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Sample records for magnetically induced transfer

  1. Magnetization Transfer Induced Biexponential Longitudinal Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Prantner, Andrew M.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Garbow, Joel R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal relaxation of brain water 1H magnetization in mammalian brain in vivo is typically analyzed on a per voxel basis using a monoexponential model, thereby assigning a single relaxation time constant to all 1H magnetization within a given voxel. This approach was tested by obtaining inversion recovery data from grey matter of rats at 64 exponentially-spaced recovery times. Using Bayesian probability for model selection, brain water data were best represented by a biexponential function characterized by fast and slow relaxation components. At 4.7 T, the amplitude fraction of the rapidly relaxing component is 3.4 ± 0.7 % with a rate constant of 44 ± 12 s-1 (mean ± SD; 174 voxels from 4 rats). The rate constant of the slow relaxing component is 0.66 ± 0.04 s-1. At 11.7 T, the corresponding values are 6.9 ± 0.9 %, 19 ± 5 s-1, and 0.48 ± 0.02 s-1 (151 voxels from 4 rats). Several putative mechanisms for biexponential relaxation behavior were evaluated, and magnetization transfer between bulk water protons and non-aqueous protons was determined to be the source of biexponential longitudinal relaxation. MR methods requiring accurate quantification of longitudinal relaxation may need to take this effect explicitly into account. PMID:18759367

  2. Fluctuation-Induced Interactions in external magnetic fields: Casimir force and Radiative Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul

    Thermally induced electromagnetic fields give rise to the Casimir force and the near field heat transfer between two bodies separated by a gap. These phenomena are described by Rytova's theory of fluctuating electromagnetic fields and both the Casimir force and the near field heat transfer depend on the local dielectric function of the bodies. In this work we present a theoretical calculation on the modulation of fluctuation-induced interactions in the presence of an external magnetic field. The system consists of two parallel plates separated by a gap d. Each plate is isotropic and has a local dielectric function. Applying an external magnetic field parallel to the plates, in the so called Voigt configuration, the plates become anisotropic. In particular, we consider plates of InSb. For the Casimir force the two plates are kept at the same temperature and the external field reduces the magnitude of the force. Similarly if the two plates are kept at different temperature the near field radiative heat transfer is modulated by the magnitude of the external magnetic field. The results are extended to semiconducting quantum wells. In both cases, the excitation of magnetoplasmons provides an explanation for the observed effect.

  3. Adiabatic spin-transfer-torque-induced domain wall creep in a magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttagupta, S.; Fukami, S.; Zhang, C.; Sato, H.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of elastic interfaces is a general field of interest in statistical physics, where magnetic domain wall has served as a prototypical example. Domain wall `creep’ under the action of sub-threshold driving forces with thermal activation is known to be described by a scaling law with a certain universality class, which represents the mechanism of the interaction of domain walls with the applied forces over the disorder of the system. Here we show different universality classes depending on the driving forces, magnetic field or spin-polarized current, in a metallic system, which have hitherto been seen only in a magnetic semiconductor. We reveal that an adiabatic spin-transfer torque plays a major role in determining the universality class of current-induced creep, which does not depend on the intricacies of material disorder. Our results shed light on the physics of the creep motion of domain walls and other elastic systems.

  4. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jia

    2014-10-07

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. We reproduce the experimental results of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films by micromagnetic simulation. Due to the spin-orbit interaction, the magnetization can be switched by changing the direction of the current with the assistant of magnetic field. By increasing the current amplitude, wider range of switching events can be achieved. Time evolution of magnetization has provided us a clear view of the process, and explained the role of minimum external field. Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque modifies the magnetization when current is present. The magnitude of the minimum external field is determined by the strength of the Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. The investigations may provide potential applications in magnetic memories.

  5. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia

    2014-10-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. We reproduce the experimental results of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films by micromagnetic simulation. Due to the spin-orbit interaction, the magnetization can be switched by changing the direction of the current with the assistant of magnetic field. By increasing the current amplitude, wider range of switching events can be achieved. Time evolution of magnetization has provided us a clear view of the process, and explained the role of minimum external field. Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque modifies the magnetization when current is present. The magnitude of the minimum external field is determined by the strength of the Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. The investigations may provide potential applications in magnetic memories.

  6. Magnetic domain-wall motion twisted by nanoscale probe-induced spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, L. S.; Wang, C. S.; Zhang, H. Z.; Shu, L.; Bai, J.; Chai, Y. S.; Zhao, X.; Nie, J. C.; Cao, C. B.; Gu, C. Z.; Xiong, C. M.; Sun, Y.; Shi, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Xia, K.; Nan, C. W.; Zhang, J. X.

    2014-12-01

    A method for deterministic control of magnetism using an electrical stimulus is highly desired for the new generation of magnetoelectronic devices. Much effort has been focused on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion manipulated by a successive injection of spin-polarized current into a magnetic nanostructure. However, an integrant high-threshold current density of 1011˜1012A /m2 inhibits the integration with low-energy-cost technology. Here, we report an approach to manipulate a single magnetic domain wall with a perpendicular anisotropy in a manganite/dielectric/metal capacitor using a probe-induced spin displacement. A spin-transfer torque (STT) occurs in the strongly correlated manganite film during the spin injection into the capacitor from the nanoscale magnetized tip with an ultralow voltage of 0.1 V, where a lower bound of the estimated threshold spin-polarized current density is ˜108A /m2 at the tip/manganite interface. The dynamic of DW motions are analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert method. This probe-voltage-controlled DW motion, at an ambient condition, demonstrates a critical framework for the fundamental understanding of the manipulation of the nanomagnet systems with low-energy consumption.

  7. Simulation of electric-field and spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization switching in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-05-01

    Macrospin simulations are performed to model the magnetization switching driven by the combined action of electric-field and spin-polarized electric current (spin-transfer torque; STT) in MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results indicate that at low current case, the free layer magnetization shows a fast toggle-like switching, the final parallel or antiparallel magnetization state is determined by the electric-field effect, and the STT just helps or resists it to reach the final state depending on the current direction. However, with the increase of current strength, the contribution of STT effect gradually increases, which eventually achieves a deterministic magnetization switching state. Simulations further demonstrate that by appropriately tuning the parameters of applied electric-field and current the power consumption can be easily reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  8. Simulation of electric-field and spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization switching in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiangli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-05-07

    Macrospin simulations are performed to model the magnetization switching driven by the combined action of electric-field and spin-polarized electric current (spin-transfer torque; STT) in MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results indicate that at low current case, the free layer magnetization shows a fast toggle-like switching, the final parallel or antiparallel magnetization state is determined by the electric-field effect, and the STT just helps or resists it to reach the final state depending on the current direction. However, with the increase of current strength, the contribution of STT effect gradually increases, which eventually achieves a deterministic magnetization switching state. Simulations further demonstrate that by appropriately tuning the parameters of applied electric-field and current the power consumption can be easily reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  9. Magnetic Field-Induced Giant Enhancement of Electron-Phonon Energy Transfer in Strongly Disordered Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtyk, A. V.; Feigel'man, M. V.; Kravtsov, V. E.

    2013-10-01

    Relaxation of soft modes (e.g., charge density in gated semiconductor heterostructures, spin density in the presence of magnetic field) slowed down by disorder may lead to giant enhancement of energy transfer (cooling power) between overheated electrons and phonons at low bath temperature. We show that in strongly disordered systems with time-reversal symmetry broken by external or intrinsic exchange magnetic field the cooling power can be greatly enhanced. The enhancement factor as large as 102 at magnetic field B˜10T in 2D InSb films is predicted. A similar enhancement is found for the ultrasound attenuation.

  10. Current-induced switching of magnetic tunnel junctions: Effects of field-like spin-transfer torque, pinned-layer magnetization orientation, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. K.; Jhon, M. H.; Ng, N.; Gan, C. K.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    2014-01-13

    We study current-induced switching in magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of a field-like spin-transfer torque and titled pinned-layer magnetization in the high current limit at finite temperature. We consider both the Slonczewski and field-like torques with coefficients a{sub J} and b{sub J}, respectively. At finite temperatures, σ=b{sub J}/a{sub J}=±1 leads to a smaller mean switching time compared that with σ=0. The reduction of switching time in the presence of the field-like term is due to the alignment effect (for σ>0) and the initial torque effect.

  11. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grisolia, M. N.; Varignon, J.; Barthelemy, A.; Bibes, M.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Varela, M.; Santamaria, J.; Arora, A.; Valencia, S.; Abrudan, R.; et al

    2016-01-25

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions at and between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignmentmore » picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal–oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Furthermore, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence.« less

  12. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisolia, M. N.; Varignon, J.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Arora, A.; Valencia, S.; Varela, M.; Abrudan, R.; Weschke, E.; Schierle, E.; Rault, J. E.; Rueff, J.-P.; Barthélémy, A.; Santamaria, J.; Bibes, M.

    2016-05-01

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions at and between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence.

  13. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Grisolia, M.N.; Arora, A.; Valencia, S.; Varela, M.; Abrudan, R.; Weschke, E.; Schierle, E.; Rault, J.E.; Rueff, J.-P.; Barthélémy, A.; Santamaria, J.; Bibes, M.

    2015-01-01

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. PMID:27158255

  14. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grisolia, M. N.; Varignon, J.; Barthelemy, A.; Bibes, M.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Varela, M.; Santamaria, J.; Arora, A.; Valencia, S.; Abrudan, R.; Weschke, E.; Schierle, E.; Rault, J. E.; Rueff, J. -P.

    2016-01-01

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions at and between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal–oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Furthermore, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence.

  15. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  16. First-Principles Calculations of Current-Induced Spin-Transfer Torques in Magnetic Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ling; Xu, Zhijun; Yang, Zejin

    2013-05-01

    Current-induced spin-transfer torques (STTs) have been studied in Fe, Co and Ni domain walls (DWs) by the method based on the first-principles noncollinear calculations of scattering wavefunctions expanded in the tight-binding linearized muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) basis. The results show that the out-of-plane component of nonadiabatic STT in Fe DW has localized form, which is in contrast to the typical nonlocal oscillating nonadiabatic torques obtained in Co and Ni DWs. Meanwhile, the degree of nonadiabaticity in STT is also much greater for Fe DW. Further, our results demonstrate that compared to the well-known first-order nonadiabatic STT, the torque in the third-order spatial derivative of local spin can better describe the distribution of localized nonadiabatic STT in Fe DW. The dynamics of local spin driven by this third-order torques in Fe DW have been investigated by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The calculated results show that with the same amplitude of STTs the DW velocity induced by this third-order term is about half of the wall speed for the case of the first-order nonadiabatic STT.

  17. Lateral spin transfer torque induced magnetic switching at room temperature demonstrated by x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl, M.; Erbe, A.; Grebing, J.; Wintz, S.; Raabe, J.; Fassbender, J.

    2013-10-01

    Changing and detecting the orientation of nanomagnetic structures, which can be used for durable information storage, needs to be developed towards true nanoscale dimensions for keeping up the miniaturization speed of modern nanoelectronic components. Therefore, new concepts for controlling the state of nanomagnets are currently in the focus of research in the field of nanoelectronics. Here, we demonstrate reproducible switching of a purely metallic nanopillar placed on a lead that conducts a spin-polarized current at room temperature. Spin diffusion across the metal-metal (Cu to CoFe) interface between the pillar and the lead causes spin accumulation in the pillar, which may then be used to set the magnetic orientation of the pillar. In our experiments, the detection of the magnetic state of the nanopillar is performed by direct imaging via scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM).

  18. Magnetic domain wall motion by spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie; Chanthbouala, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.; Nguyen van Dau, F.; Fert, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The discovery that a spin polarized current can exert a large torque on a ferromagnet through a transfusion of spin angular momentum, offers a new way to control a magnetization by simple current injection, without the help of an applied external field. Spin transfer can be used to induce magnetization reversals and oscillations, or to control the position of a magnetic domain wall. In this review, we focus on this last mechanism, which is today the subject of an extensive research, both because the microscopic details for its origin are still debated, but also because promising applications are at stake for non-volatile magnetic memories.

  19. Wireless power transfer magnetic couplers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Gilchrist, Aaron; Sealy, Kylee

    2016-01-19

    A magnetic coupler is disclosed for wireless power transfer systems. A ferrimagnetic component is capable of guiding a magnetic field. A wire coil is wrapped around at least a portion of the ferrimagnetic component. A screen is capable of blocking leakage magnetic fields. The screen may be positioned to cover at least one side of the ferrimagnetic component and the coil. A distance across the screen may be at least six times an air gap distance between the ferrimagnetic component and a receiving magnetic coupler.

  20. Spin-orbit coupling induced magnetic field effects in electron-transfer reactions with excited triplets: The role of triplet exciplexes and radical pairs in geminate recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, U.E.; Haas, W. )

    1991-03-07

    The magnetic field dependence of free-radical yield in the electron-transfer quenching of methylene blue triplet by p-iodoaniline has been determined between 0.00 and 3.30 T in methanol/ethylene glycol mixtures of various viscosities by using laser flash spectroscopy and a photostationary flow technique. The observed decrease of the free-radical yield with the magnetic field is interpreted by heavy-atom-induced spin-orbit coupling causing magnetic field sensitivity according to the triplet mechanism (TM) in intermediate triplet exciplexes and to the {Delta}g type radical pair mechanism (RPM) in germinate triplet radical pairs originating from dissociation of the triplet exciplexes. Analytical expressions are provided for a treatment of a combination of both mechanisms including the case of reversible formation of the triplet exciplex from the geminate radical pair. The formalism of Pedersen developed for the high field radical pair mechanism and modified by Vollenweider and Fischer to account for effects of exchange interaction is generalized to include various boundary conditions for the electron spin density matrix suggested in the literature to describe the effects of encounters and chemical reaction. With a physically consistent choice of TM and RPM parameters model calculations provide a very good quantitative fit of the observed magnetic field and viscosity dependence of the yield of free radicals.

  1. Transfer matrices for magnetized CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2006-05-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields can affect scalar cosmological perturbations whose evolution is described in the conformally Newtonian gauge and within the tight coupling approximation. The magnetized curvature perturbations present after matter-radiation equality (and prior to decoupling) are computed in terms of an appropriate transfer matrix allowing a general estimate of the Sachs-Wolfe plateau. From the observation that CMB initial conditions should be (predominantly) adiabatic, the contribution of the magnetic field intensity can be constrained.

  2. EDITORIAL: Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2011-09-01

    This cluster, consisting of five invited articles on spin-transfer torque, offers the very first review covering both magnetization reversal and domain-wall displacement induced by a spin-polarized current. Since the first theoretical proposal on spin-transfer torque—reported by Berger and Slonczewski independently—spin-transfer torque has been experimentally demonstrated in both vertical magnetoresistive nano-pillars and lateral ferromagnetic nano-wires. In the former structures, an electrical current flowing vertically in the nano-pillar exerts spin torque onto the thinner ferromagnetic layer and reverses its magnetization, i.e., current-induced magnetization switching. In the latter structures, an electrical current flowing laterally in the nano-wire exerts torque onto a domain wall and moves its position by rotating local magnetic moments within the wall, i.e., domain wall displacement. Even though both phenomena are induced by spin-transfer torque, each phenomenon has been investigated separately. In order to understand the physical meaning of spin torque in a broader context, this cluster overviews both cases from theoretical modellings to experimental demonstrations. The earlier articles in this cluster focus on current-induced magnetization switching. The magnetization dynamics during the reversal has been calculated by Kim et al using the conventional Landau--Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, adding a spin-torque term. This model can explain the dynamics in both spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junctions in a nano-pillar form. This phenomenon has been experimentally measured in these junctions consisting of conventional ferromagnets. In the following experimental part, the nano-pillar junctions with perpendicularly magnetized FePt and half-metallic Heusler alloys are discussed from the viewpoint of efficient magnetization reversal due to a high degree of spin polarization of the current induced by the intrinsic nature of these alloys. Such switching can

  3. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, S.L.

    1990-02-13

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180[degree] from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180[degree] from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils. 16 figs.

  4. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, Stefan L.

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180.degree. from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180.degree. from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils.

  5. Measurement of heat transfer coefficients by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Gore, John C

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate an experimental method for the measurement of heat transfer coefficient for a fluid system by magnetic resonance imaging. In this method, the temporal variation of thermally induced nuclear shielding is monitored and the average heat transfer coefficient is measured as a function of fluid velocity. We examine the cases of natural convection and forced convection at fluid velocity up to 0.8 m s(-1). These cases correspond to low dimensionless Biot (Bi) number where the heat transfer is limited by thermal convection. We demonstrate the NMR method for two simple geometries, a cylinder and a sphere, to experimentally determine the heat transfer coefficient (h) in two NMR imaging and spectroscopy systems through measuring three NMR parameters, the chemical shift, magnetization and spin self diffusion coefficient. PMID:18524523

  6. Current-induced spin torque resonance of a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Chiba, Takahiro; Niedermayr, Arthur; Lotze, Johannes; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Takahashi, Saburo; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the observation of current-induced spin torque resonance in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. An alternating charge current at GHz frequencies in the platinum gives rise to dc spin pumping and spin Hall magnetoresistance rectification voltages, induced by the Oersted fields of the ac current and the spin Hall effect-mediated spin transfer torque. In ultrathin yttrium iron garnet films, we observe spin transfer torque actuated magnetization dynamics which are significantly larger than those generated by the ac Oersted field. Spin transfer torques thus efficiently couple charge currents and magnetization dynamics also in magnetic insulators, enabling charge current-based interfacing of magnetic insulators with microwave devices.

  7. Fermi Level shifting, Charge Transfer and Induced Magnetic Coupling at La0.7Ca0.3MnO3/LaNiO3 Interface

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xingkun; Wang, Zhanjie; Zhang, Zhidong

    2015-01-01

    A large magnetic coupling has been observed at the La0.7Ca0.3MnO3/LaNiO3 (LCMO/LNO) interface. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study results show that Fermi level continuously shifted across the LCMO/LNO interface in the interface region. In addition, the charge transfer between Mn and Ni ions of the type Mn3+ − Ni3+ → Mn4+ − Ni2+ with the oxygen vacancies are observed in the interface region. The intrinsic interfacial charge transfer can give rise to itinerant electrons, which results in a “shoulder feature” observed at the low binding energy in the Mn 2p core level spectra. Meanwhile, the orbital reconstruction can be mapped according to the Fermi level position and the charge transfer mode. It can be considered that the ferromagnetic interaction between Ni2+ and Mn4+ gives rise to magnetic regions that pin the ferromagnetic LCMO and cause magnetic coupling at the LCMO/LNO interface. PMID:25676088

  8. Giant Spin Hall Effect and Switching Induced by Spin-Transfer Torque in a W /Co40Fe40B20/MgO Structure with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qiang; Xiao, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We obtain robust perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in a β -W /Co40Fe40B20/MgO structure without the need of any insertion layer between W and Co40Fe40B20 . This is achieved within a broad range of W thicknesses (3.0-9.0 nm), using a simple fabrication technique. We determine the spin Hall angle (0.40) and spin-diffusion length for the bulk β form of tungsten with a large spin-orbit coupling. As a result of the giant spin Hall effect in β -W and careful magnetic annealing, we significantly reduce the critical current density for the spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetic switching in Co40Fe40B20 . The elemental β -W is a superior candidate for magnetic memory and spin-logic applications.

  9. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C. Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-09-07

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  10. Wireless Energy Transfer Through Magnetic Reluctance Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillatsch, P.

    2014-11-01

    Energy harvesting from human motion for body worn or implanted devices faces the problem of the wearer being still, e.g. while asleep. Especially for medical devices this can become an issue if a patient is bed-bound for prolonged periods of time and the internal battery of a harvesting system is not recharged. This article introduces a mechanism for wireless energy transfer based on a previously presented energy harvesting device. The internal rotor of the energy harvester is made of mild steel and can be actuated through a magnetic reluctance coupling to an external motor. The internal piezoelectric transducer is consequently actuated and generates electricity. This paper successfully demonstrates energy transfer over a distance of 16 mm in air and an achieved power output of 85 μW at 25 Hz. The device functional volume is 1.85 cm3. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that increasing the driving frequency beyond 25 Hz did not yield a further increase in power output. Future research will focus on improving the reluctance coupling, e.g. by investigating the use of multiple or stronger magnets, in order to increase transmission distance.

  11. Effect of the magnetic field direction on forced convection heat transfer enhancements in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherief, Wahid; Avenas, Yvan; Ferrouillat, Sébastien; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Jossic, Laurent; Berard, Jean; Petit, Mickael

    2015-07-01

    Applying a magnetic field on a ferrofluid flow induces a large increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of two commercial ferrofluids are compared. The variations of both the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient due to the magnetic field are measured in the following conditions: square duct, laminar flow and uniform wall heat flux. The square section with two insulated walls allows for the characterization of the effect of the magnetic field direction. The experimental results show that the heat transfer is better enhanced when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. In the best case, the local heat transfer coefficient increase is about 75%. On the contrary, another experimental setup shows no enhancement of thermal conductivity when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  12. Uniform magnetization transfer in chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Parasoglou, Prodromos; Xia, Ding; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2013-04-01

    The development of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) has led to the establishment of new contrast mechanisms in magnetic resonance imaging, which serve as enablers for advanced molecular imaging strategies. Macromolecules in tissues and organs often give rise to broad and asymmetric exchange effects, called magnetization transfer (MT) effects, which can mask the CEST contrast of interest. We show here that the saturation of these macromolecular pools simultaneously at two distinct frequencies can level out the asymmetric MT effects, thus allowing one to isolate the CEST effects in vivo. For the first time, clean CEST contrast for glycosaminoglycans (gagCEST) in cartilage in the human knee joint is presented. In addition, the method allows one to clearly demarcate glycosaminoglycan measurements from cartilage and synovial fluid regions. This uniform-MT CEST methodology has wide applicability in in vivo molecular imaging (such as brain, skeletal muscle, etc).

  13. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  14. Spin transfer into an inhomogeneous magnetization distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Miltat, J.; Albuquerque, G.; Thiaville, A.; Vouille, C.

    2001-06-01

    Based on specific examples, we examine the consequence of spin-polarized current injection into confined model micromagnetic configurations, namely a high remanence state known as the S state and a low, though nonzero, remanence state called the Leaf state. Magnetization dynamics is solved in the space and time domain owing to the Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation. It is shown that, within model bounds, the S state is not propitious to fast switching under the sole influence of a polarized current, even if disregarding the current induced field, whereas Leaf state switching characteristics become extremely complex as soon as due account is made for the latter. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-07-15

    Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

  16. Dissipative structures induced by spin-transfer torques in nanopillars.

    PubMed

    León, Alejandro O; Clerc, Marcel G; Coulibaly, Saliya

    2014-02-01

    Macroscopic magnetic systems subjected to external forcing exhibit complex spatiotemporal behaviors as result of dissipative self-organization. Pattern formation from a uniform magnetization state, induced by the combination of a spin-polarized current and an external magnetic field, is studied for spin-transfer nano-oscillator devices. The system is described in the continuous limit by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The bifurcation diagram of the quintessence parallel state, as a function of the external field and current, is elucidated. We have shown analytically that this state exhibits a spatial supercritical quintic bifurcation, which generates in two spatial dimensions a family of stationary stripes, squares, and superlattice states. Analytically, we have characterized their respective stabilities and bifurcations, which are controlled by a single dimensionless parameter. This scenario is confirmed numerically. PMID:25353546

  17. Transfer of information in noise induced transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. R.; Arizmendi, C. M.

    1999-09-01

    Time correlated fluctuations interacting with a spatial asymmetry potential are sufficient conditions to give rise to transport of Brownian particles. The transfer of information coming from the nonequilibrium bath, viewed as a source of negentropy, give rise to the correlated noise. The algorithmic complexity of an object provides a means of quantifying its information contents. The Kolmogorov information entropy or algorithmic complexity is investigated in order to quantify the transfer of information that occurs in computational models showing noise induced transport. The complexity is measured in terms of the average number of bits per time unit necessary to specify the sequence generated by the system.

  18. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, Roland; Calvin, Melvin

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  19. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Calvin, M.

    1984-01-24

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transferring electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  20. Nonhelical inverse transfer of a decaying turbulent magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kahniashvili, Tina; Tevzadze, Alexander G

    2015-02-20

    In the presence of magnetic helicity, inverse transfer from small to large scales is well known in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and has applications in astrophysics, cosmology, and fusion plasmas. Using high resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetically dominated self-similarly decaying MHD turbulence, we report a similar inverse transfer even in the absence of magnetic helicity. We compute for the first time spectral energy transfer rates to show that this inverse transfer is about half as strong as with helicity, but in both cases the magnetic gain at large scales results from velocity at similar scales interacting with smaller-scale magnetic fields. This suggests that both inverse transfers are a consequence of universal mechanisms for magnetically dominated turbulence. Possible explanations include inverse cascading of the mean squared vector potential associated with local near two dimensionality and the shallower k^{2} subinertial range spectrum of kinetic energy forcing the magnetic field with a k^{4} subinertial range to attain larger-scale coherence. The inertial range shows a clear k^{-2} spectrum and is the first example of fully isotropic magnetically dominated MHD turbulence exhibiting weak turbulence scaling. PMID:25763960

  1. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  2. Silicone-induced Penile Sclerosing Lipogranuloma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Xiropotamou, Olga N; Nomikos, Michael; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing lipogranuloma is a rare benign disease, representing a peculiar granulomatous reaction of fatty tissue. The majority of cases are secondary to injection of exogenous foreign bodies, such as silicone, paraffin, mineral, or vegetable oils. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma in a 52-year-old man evaluated with a multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI of the penis by combining both conventional and functional information represents an important imaging tool in the preoperative workup of silicone-induced penile lipogranuloma. PMID:26958433

  3. The Fokker-Planck equation for the radiation transfer in a strongly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzola, S.

    1982-04-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation for the radiation transfer in a strongly magnetized plasma is obtained by means of an approximation. It is noted that this equation requires less computer time than the Monte Carlo method and that it allows the effect of the induced processes to be taken into account without difficulty.

  4. Radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, Yu I.; Vlasov, V. A.; Dolgov, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents processes of hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and release from hydrogen-saturated condensed matters in atomic, molecular and ionized states under the influence of the electron beam and X-ray radiation in the pre-threshold region. The dependence is described between the hydrogen isotope release intensity and the current density and the electron beam energy affecting sample, hydrogen concentration in the material volume and time of radiation exposure to the sample. The energy distribution of the emitted positive ions of hydrogen isotopes is investigated herein. Mechanisms of radiation-induced hydrogen transfer in condensed matters are suggested.

  5. Dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnet with spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zai-Dong; He, Peng-Bin; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    We review our recent works on dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnet with spin-transfer torque. Driven by constant spin-polarized current, the spin-transfer torque counteracts both the precession driven by the effective field and the Gilbert damping term different from the common understanding. When the spin current exceeds the critical value, the conjunctive action of Gilbert damping and spin-transfer torque leads naturally the novel screw-pitch effect characterized by the temporal oscillation of domain wall velocity and width. Driven by space- and time-dependent spin-polarized current and magnetic field, we expatiate the formation of domain wall velocity in ferromagnetic nanowire. We discuss the properties of dynamic magnetic soliton in uniaxial anisotropic ferromagnetic nanowire driven by spin-transfer torque, and analyze the modulation instability and dark soliton on the spin wave background, which shows the characteristic breather behavior of the soliton as it propagates along the ferromagnetic nanowire. With stronger breather character, we get the novel magnetic rogue wave and clarify its formation mechanism. The generation of magnetic rogue wave mainly arises from the accumulation of energy and magnons toward to its central part. We also observe that the spin-polarized current can control the exchange rate of magnons between the envelope soliton and the background, and the critical current condition is obtained analytically. At last, we have theoretically investigated the current-excited and frequency-adjusted ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic trilayers. A particular case of the perpendicular analyzer reveals that the ferromagnetic resonance curves, including the resonant location and the resonant linewidth, can be adjusted by changing the pinned magnetization direction and the direct current. Under the control of the current and external magnetic field, several magnetic states, such as quasi-parallel and quasi-antiparallel stable states, out

  6. Mathematical modeling of the magnetization transfer effect in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    The term magnetization transfer (MT) describes a group of molecular processes causing incoherent exchange of magnetic energy between water and macromolecules in biological objects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be sensitized to the MT effect using various magnetization preparation techniques. Since its introduction in early 90s, MT MRI has been used in various applications as a tool for quantitative or semi-quantitative tissue characterization and modification of tissue contrast. This review article provides an overview of biophysical mechanisms of MT in tissues, in-depth mathematical consideration of the widely used two-pool model of MT, and a summary of experimental methods used to study MT phenomena.

  7. Measurement of dynamic magnetization induced by a pulsed field: Proposal for a new rock magnetism method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes a new method for measuring transient magnetization of natural samples induced by a pulsed field with duration of 11 ms using a pulse magnetizer. An experimental system was constructed, consisting of a pair of differential sensing coils connected with a high-speed digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. The data were transferred to a computer to obtain an initial magnetization curve and a descending branch of a hysteresis loop in a rapidly changing positive field. This system was tested with synthetic samples (permalloy ribbon, aluminum plate, and nickel powder) as well as two volcanic rock samples. Results from the synthetic samples showed considerable differences from those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). These differences were principally due to the time-dependent magnetic properties or to electromagnetic effects, such as magnetic viscosity, eddy current loss, or magnetic relaxation. Results from the natural samples showed that the transient magnetization-field curves were largely comparable to the corresponding portions of the hysteresis loops. However, the relative magnetization (scaled to the saturation magnetization) at the end of a pulse was greater than that measured by a VSM. This discrepancy, together with the occurrence of rapid exponential decay after a pulse, indicates magnetic relaxations that could be interpreted in terms of domain wall displacement. These results suggest that with further developments, the proposed technique can become a useful tool for characterizing magnetic particles contained in a variety of natural materials.

  8. Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Iguchi, R; Sato, K; Vehstedt, E K; Uchida, K; Bauer, G E W; Saitoh, E

    2016-01-01

    Applying magnetic fields has been the method of choice to magnetize non-magnetic materials, but they are difficult to focus. The magneto-electric effect and voltage-induced magnetization generate magnetization by applied electric fields, but only in special compounds or heterostructures. Here we demonstrate that a simple metal such as gold can be magnetized by a temperature gradient or magnetic resonance when in contact with a magnetic insulator by observing an anomalous Hall-like effect, which directly proves the breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Such Hall measurements give experimental access to the spectral spin Hall conductance of the host metal, which is closely related to other spin caloritronics phenomena such as the spin Nernst effect and serves as a reference for theoretical calculation. PMID:27457185

  9. Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Iguchi, R.; Sato, K.; Vehstedt, E. K.; Uchida, K.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Applying magnetic fields has been the method of choice to magnetize non-magnetic materials, but they are difficult to focus. The magneto-electric effect and voltage-induced magnetization generate magnetization by applied electric fields, but only in special compounds or heterostructures. Here we demonstrate that a simple metal such as gold can be magnetized by a temperature gradient or magnetic resonance when in contact with a magnetic insulator by observing an anomalous Hall-like effect, which directly proves the breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Such Hall measurements give experimental access to the spectral spin Hall conductance of the host metal, which is closely related to other spin caloritronics phenomena such as the spin Nernst effect and serves as a reference for theoretical calculation. PMID:27457185

  10. Magnetization reversal induced by in-plane current in Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Yamanouchi, M. Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Fukami, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate in-plane current-induced magnetization reversal under an in-plane magnetic field in Hall bar shaped devices composed of Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis. The observed relationship between the directions of current and magnetization switching and Ta thickness dependence of magnetization switching current are accordance with those for magnetization reversal by spin transfer torque originated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer.

  11. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    PubMed

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description. PMID:26243659

  12. Photo-induced Magnetism and Spintronics in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jung Woo

    2009-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed growing attention on manipulating spins in organic species. One of the interesting phenomena in organic-based magnets is controlling magnetic properties by optical stimulus, a property not exhibited in metallurgical magnets. Three classes of known phenomena and mechanism will be discussed: i) manipulation of number of spins by optically induced charge transfer in cyano-bimetallic complexes [1], ii) optical control of exchange coupling in Mn(TCNE)2 compound [2], iii) light-induced change of magnetic anisotropy in the magnetic semiconductor V(TCNE)x [3]. The second part of this talk will be devoted to ongoing research on transferring spin polarized carriers through organic semiconductors. Recently, there have been lively activities as well as controversies on the application of organic semiconductors for transporting spin information. However, the understanding of spin injection and transport in organic semiconductors is still limited. We will address detailed mechanisms for spin injection and transport in organic semiconductor film of our rubrene (C42H28)-based spin valve and potential applications of organic-based spintronics. [4pt] [1] O. Sato, T. Iyoda, A. Fujishima, and K. Hashimoto, Science 272, 704 (1996).[0pt] [2] D. A. Pejakovic', C. Kitamura, J. S. Miller, and A. J. Epstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 057202 (2002).[0pt] [3] J. W. Yoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 247205 (2006); 99, 157205 (2007).

  13. Torsion-induced effects in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    A magnetic helix wire is one of the simplest magnetic systems which manifests properties of both curvature and torsion. Possible equilibrium magnetization states in the helix wire with different anisotropy directions are studied theoretically. There exist two equilibrium states in the helix wire with easy-tangential anisotropy: a quasitangential magnetization distribution in the case of relatively small curvatures and torsions, and an onion state in the opposite case. The curvature and torsion also essentially influence the spin-wave dynamics in the helix wire, acting as an effective magnetic field. Originated from a geometry-induced effective Dzyaloshinskii interaction, this magnetic field leads to a coupling between the helix chirality and the magnetochirality and breaks mirror symmetry in the spin-wave spectrum: the modification of magnon dispersion relation is linear with respect to the torsion and quadratic with respect to the curvature. All analytical predictions on magnetization statics and dynamics are well confirmed by direct spin-lattice simulations.

  14. Serial Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Acute Optic Neuritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, S. J.; Toosy, A. T.; Jones, S. J.; Altmann, D. R.; Miszkiel, K. A.; MacManus, D. G.; Barker, G. J.; Plant, G. T.; Thompson, A. J.; Miller, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    In serial studies of multiple sclerosis lesions, reductions in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) are thought to be due to demyelination and axonal loss, with later rises due to remyelination. This study followed serial changes in MTR in acute optic neuritis in combination with clinical and electrophysiological measurements to determine if the MTR…

  15. Stable magnetic droplet solitons in spin-transfer nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, Ferran; Backes, Dirk; Kent, Andrew D.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have localized excitations that correspond to reversed, dynamically precessing magnetic moments, which are known as magnetic droplet solitons. Fundamentally, these excitations are associated with an attractive interaction between elementary spin-excitations and have been predicted to occur in perpendicularly magnetized materials in the absence of damping. Although damping suppresses these excitations, it can be compensated by spin-transfer torques when an electrical current flows in nanocontacts to ferromagnetic thin films. Theory predicts the appearance of magnetic droplet solitons in nanocontacts at a threshold current and, recently, experimental signatures of droplet nucleation have been reported. However, to date, these solitons have been observed to be nearly reversible excitations, with only partially reversed magnetization. Here, we show that magnetic droplet solitons exhibit a strong hysteretic response in field and current, proving the existence of bistable states: droplet and non-droplet states. In the droplet soliton state we find that the magnetization in the contact is almost fully reversed. These observations, in addition to their fundamental interest, are important to understanding and controlling droplet motion, nucleation and annihilation.

  16. Multiple-receptor wireless power transfer for magnetic sensors charging on Mars via magnetic resonant coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunhua; Chau, K. T.; Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Chun; Lin, Fei; Ching, T. W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a new idea for magnetic sensors charging on Mars, which aims to effectively transmit energy from Mars Rover to distributed magnetic sensors. The key is to utilize wireless power transfer (WPT) to enable multiple receptors extracting energy from the source via magnetic resonant coupling. Namely, the energy transmitter is located on the Mars Rover, whereas the energy receptor is installed in the magnetic sensor. In order to effectively transfer the power, a resonator is installed between the transmitter and the receptors. Based on the proposed idea, the system topology, operation principle, and simulation results are developed. By performing finite element magnetic field analysis, the output power and efficiency of the proposed WPT system are evaluated. It confirms that the Mars Rover carrying with the energy transmitter is capable of loitering around the resonator, while the magnetic sensors on the receptors can be simultaneously charged according to energy-on-demand.

  17. Thermal spin-transfer torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Heiliger, Christian Franz, C.; Czerner, Michael

    2014-05-07

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) is an effect to switch the magnetic free layer in a magnetic tunnel junction by a temperature gradient only. We present ab initio calculations of the TSTT. In particular, we discuss the influence of magnetic layer composition by considering Fe{sub x}Co{sub 1–x} alloys. Further, we compare the TSTT to the bias voltage driven STT and discuss the requirements for a possible thermal switching. For example, only for very thin barriers of 3 monolayers MgO, a thermal switching is imaginable. However, even for such a thin barrier, the TSTT is still too small for switching at the moment and further optimization is needed. In particular, the TSTT strongly depends on the composition of the ferromagnetic layer. In our current study, it turns out that at the chosen thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, pure Fe gives the highest thermal spin-transfer torque.

  18. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. B.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, T. N.; Chen, L. Q.; Ma, X. Q.

    2014-09-22

    Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane magnetization reversal in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase-field microelasticity theory. It is found that the critical current density for in-plane magnetization reversal decreases dramatically with an increasing substrate strain, since the effective elastic field can drag the magnetization to one of the four in-plane diagonal directions. A potential strain-assisted multilevel bit spin transfer magnetization switching device using substrate misfit strain is also proposed.

  19. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  20. Nanoscale heat transfer in the head-disk interface for heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyu; Xiong, Shaomin; Canchi, Sripathi; Schreck, Erhard; Bogy, David

    2016-02-01

    Laser heating has been introduced in heat-assisted magnetic recording in order to reduce the magnetic coercivity and enable data writing. However, the heat flow inside a couple of nanometers head-disk gap is still not well understood. An experimental stage was built for studying heat transfer in the head-disk interface (HDI) and the heat-induced instability of the HDI. A laser heating system is included to produce a heated spot on the disk at the position of the slider. A floating air bearing slider is implemented in the stage for sensing the temperature change of the slider due to the heat transfer from the disk by the use of an embedded contact sensor, and the gap between the two surfaces is controlled by the use of a thermal fly-height control actuator. By using this system, we explore the dependency of the heat transfer on the gap spacing as well as the disk temperature.

  1. Magnetization transfer using inversion recovery during off-resonance irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mangia, Silvia; De Martino, Federico; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of magnetization transfer (MT) parameters in vivo can be compromised by an inability to drive the magnetization to a steady state using allowable levels of radiofrequency (RF) irradiation, due to safety concerns (tissue heating and specific absorption rate (SAR)). Rather than increasing the RF duration or amplitude, here we propose to circumvent the SAR limitation by sampling the formation of the steady state in separate measurements made with the magnetization initially along the −z and +z axis of the laboratory frame, i.e. with or without an on-resonance inversion pulse prior to the off-resonance irradiation. Results from human brain imaging demonstrate that this choice provides a tremendous benefit in the fitting procedure used to estimate MT parameters. The resulting parametric maps are characterized by notably increased tissue specificity as compared to those obtained with the standard MT acquisition in which magnetization is initially along the +z axis only. PMID:21601405

  2. Magnetization transfer using inversion recovery during off-resonance irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Silvia; De Martino, Federico; Liimatainen, Timo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of magnetization transfer (MT) parameters in vivo can be compromised by an inability to drive the magnetization to a steady state using allowable levels of radiofrequency (RF) irradiation, due to safety concerns (tissue heating and specific absorption rate (SAR)). Rather than increasing the RF duration or amplitude, here we propose to circumvent the SAR limitation by sampling the formation of the steady state in separate measurements made with the magnetization initially along the -z and +z axis of the laboratory frame, i.e. with or without an on-resonance inversion pulse prior to the off-resonance irradiation. Results from human brain imaging demonstrate that this choice provides a tremendous benefit in the fitting procedure used to estimate MT parameters. The resulting parametric maps are characterized by notably increased tissue specificity as compared to those obtained with the standard MT acquisition in which magnetization is initially along the +z axis only. PMID:21601405

  3. Nonadiabatic spin transfer torque in high anisotropy magnetic nanowires with narrow domain walls.

    PubMed

    Boulle, O; Kimling, J; Warnicke, P; Kläui, M; Rüdiger, U; Malinowski, G; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B; Ulysse, C; Faini, G

    2008-11-21

    Current induced domain wall (DW) depinning of a narrow DW in out-of-plane magnetized (Pt/Co)_{3}/Pt multilayer elements is studied by magnetotransport. We find that for conventional measurements Joule heating effects conceal the real spin torque efficiency and so we use a measurement scheme at a constant sample temperature to unambiguously extract the spin torque contribution. From the variation of the depinning magnetic field with the current pulse amplitude we directly deduce the large nonadiabaticity factor in this material and we find that its amplitude is consistent with a momentum transfer mechanism. PMID:19113434

  4. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Kyle J.; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection (IMA) is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field, and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one would expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper, we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity, and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.

  5. Magnetic fluctuation induced transport in MST (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.R.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Ji, H. )

    1995-01-01

    We made local measurements of the magnetic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy in the outer region ([ital r]/[ital a][gt]0.75) of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. These measurements allow comparison with the Rochester--Rosenbluth stochastic diffusion coefficients. An electrostatic electron energy analyzer and fast pyrobolometer were employed in combination with magnetic pickup coils to directly measure the correlated products [l angle][ital [tilde J

  6. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.

    1993-11-01

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range r/a > 0.75). The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm{sup 2}) in the ``core`` (r/a < 0.85) and small (< 10--30 kW/cm{sup 2}) in the edge.

  7. Magnetic error analysis of recycler pbar injection transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Detailed study of Fermilab Recycler Ring anti-proton injection line became feasible with its BPM system upgrade, though the beamline has been in existence and operational since year 2000. Previous attempts were not fruitful due to limitations in the BPM system. Among the objectives are the assessment of beamline optics and the presence of error fields. In particular the field region of the permanent Lambertson magnets at both ends of R22 transfer line will be scrutinized.

  8. Laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David A.; Lin, Yuting; Luk, Alex; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-08-01

    Due to the strong scattering nature of biological tissue, optical imaging beyond the diffusion limit suffers from low spatial resolution. In this letter, we present an imaging technique, laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging (PMI), which uses laser illumination to induce temperature increase in a medium and magnetic resonance imaging to map the spatially varying temperature, which is proportional to absorbed energy. This technique can provide high-resolution images of optical absorption and can potentially be used for small animal as well as breast cancer and lymph node imaging. First, we describe the theory of PMI, including the modeling of light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We also present experimental data with corresponding predictions from theoretical models, which show excellent agreement.

  9. Magnetic Metamaterial Superlens for Increased Range Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Da Huang; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2014-01-01

    The ability to wirelessly power electrical devices is becoming of greater urgency as a component of energy conservation and sustainability efforts. Due to health and safety concerns, most wireless power transfer (WPT) schemes utilize very low frequency, quasi-static, magnetic fields; power transfer occurs via magneto-inductive (MI) coupling between conducting loops serving as transmitter and receiver. At the “long range” regime – referring to distances larger than the diameter of the largest loop – WPT efficiency in free space falls off as (1/d)6; power loss quickly approaches 100% and limits practical implementations of WPT to relatively tight distances between power source and device. A “superlens”, however, can concentrate the magnetic near fields of a source. Here, we demonstrate the impact of a magnetic metamaterial (MM) superlens on long-range near-field WPT, quantitatively confirming in simulation and measurement at 13–16 MHz the conditions under which the superlens can enhance power transfer efficiency compared to the lens-less free-space system. PMID:24407490

  10. Magnetic metamaterial superlens for increased range wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Huang, Da; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S; Smith, David R; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2014-01-01

    The ability to wirelessly power electrical devices is becoming of greater urgency as a component of energy conservation and sustainability efforts. Due to health and safety concerns, most wireless power transfer (WPT) schemes utilize very low frequency, quasi-static, magnetic fields; power transfer occurs via magneto-inductive (MI) coupling between conducting loops serving as transmitter and receiver. At the "long range" regime - referring to distances larger than the diameter of the largest loop - WPT efficiency in free space falls off as (1/d)(6); power loss quickly approaches 100% and limits practical implementations of WPT to relatively tight distances between power source and device. A "superlens", however, can concentrate the magnetic near fields of a source. Here, we demonstrate the impact of a magnetic metamaterial (MM) superlens on long-range near-field WPT, quantitatively confirming in simulation and measurement at 13-16 MHz the conditions under which the superlens can enhance power transfer efficiency compared to the lens-less free-space system. PMID:24407490

  11. Modeled ground magnetic signatures of flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, Mark A.; Clauer, C. Robert

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic field on the ground due to a small (not greater than 200 km scale size) localized field-aligned current (FAC) system interacting with the ionosphere is calculated in terms of an integral over the ionospheric distribution of FAC. Two different candidate current systems for flux transfer events (FTEs) are considered: (1) a system which has current flowing down the center of a cylindrical flux tube with a return current uniformly distributed along the outside edge; and (2) a system which has upward current on one half of the perimeter of a cylindrical flux tube with downward current on the opposite half. The peak magnetic field on the ground is found to differ by a factor of 2 between the two systems, and the magnetic perturbations are in different directions depending on the observer's position.

  12. Field-Induced Magnetic Phenomena in Molecule-Based Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmety, Carmen R.

    2001-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between the crystal structure and magnetic ordering is crucial for the design of three-dimensional molecule-based magnets with high ordering temperatures. In this talk, we introduce a novel series of molecule-based magnets consisting of transition metal ions (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni or Cu) coordinated with the organic ligand dicyanamide [N(CN)_2]^-.(J.L. Manson et al. al.), Chem. Mater. 10, 2552 (1998); S.R. Batten et al. al., Chem. Commun. (Cambridge) 1998, 439; M. Kurmoo et al. al., New J. Chem. 22, 1515 (1998). The crystal structures for all compounds are isomorphous in the paramagnetic regime as well as in the ordered state. However, the compounds with transition metal ions having six or less electrons in the 3d orbitals order as canted antiferromagnets (AFM) while the ones with seven or more electrons order as ferromagnets (FM). The spin orientation is nearly in perpendicular directions for the AFM versus FM systems.(C.R. Kmety et al. al.), Phys. Rev. B 60, 60 (1999).^,(C.R. Kmety et al. al.), Phys. Rev. B 62, 5576 (2000). An external magnetic field induces a spin rotation transition in the Mn compound and an energy-level crossing for the Fe compound.(C.R. Kmety and A.J. Epstein, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 2000 Annual Research Review.) The possible origins of the variability of the magnetic structure for the first row transition metal ions compounds will be discussed.

  13. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  14. Temperature memory of the induced magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcfinski, V. S.; Tunyi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Methods of higher harmonics applied to study the effects associated with the induced magnetic anisotropy (IMA) of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials are considered. Physical processes causing the anisotropy and small value of these effects are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the IMA can remember the pressure at which it was formed.

  15. Evaluation of the induced electric field and compliance procedure for a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2013-11-01

    In this study, an induced electric field in a human body is evaluated for the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system for charging an electrical vehicle. The magnetic field from the wireless power transfer system is modelled computationally, and its effectiveness is confirmed by comparison with the field measured in a previous study. The induced electric field in a human standing around the vehicle is smaller than the allowable limit prescribed in international guidelines, although the magnetic field strength in the human body is locally higher than the allowable external field strength. Correlation between the external magnetic field and the induced electric field is confirmed to be reasonable at least in the standing posture, which is the case discussed in the international standard. Based on this finding, we discussed and confirmed the applicability of a three-point magnetic field measurement at heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m for safety compliance.

  16. Spin transfer torque generated magnetic droplet solitons (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Mohseni, S. M.; Sani, S. R.; Iacocca, E.; Dumas, R. K.; Pogoryelov, Ye.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Muduli, P. K.; Eklund, A.; Hoefer, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2014-05-07

    We present recent experimental and numerical advancements in the understanding of spin transfer torque generated magnetic droplet solitons. The experimental work focuses on nano-contact spin torque oscillators (NC-STOs) based on orthogonal (pseudo) spin valves where the Co fixed layer has an easy-plane anisotropy, and the [Co/Ni] free layer has a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The NC-STO resistance and microwave signal generation are measured simultaneously as a function of drive current and applied perpendicular magnetic field. Both exhibit dramatic transitions at a certain current dependent critical field value, where the microwave frequency drops 10 GHz, modulation sidebands appear, and the resistance exhibits a jump, while the magnetoresistance changes sign. We interpret these observations as the nucleation of a magnetic droplet soliton with a large fraction of its magnetization processing with an angle greater than 90°, i.e., around a direction opposite that of the applied field. This interpretation is corroborated by numerical simulations. When the field is further increased, we find that the droplet eventually collapses under the pressure from the Zeeman energy.

  17. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  18. Magnetic field and radiative transfer modelling of a quiescent prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Schwartz, P.; Dudík, J.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Jurčák, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the multi-instrument observations of the June 22, 2010 prominence to study its structure in detail, including the prominence-corona transition region and the dark bubble located below the prominence body. Methods: We combined results of the 3D magnetic field modelling with 2D prominence fine structure radiative transfer models to fully exploit the available observations. Results: The 3D linear force-free field model with the unsheared bipole reproduces the morphology of the analysed prominence reasonably well, thus providing useful information about its magnetic field configuration and the location of the magnetic dips. The 2D models of the prominence fine structures provide a good representation of the local plasma configuration in the region dominated by the quasi-vertical threads. However, the low observed Lyman-α central intensities and the morphology of the analysed prominence suggest that its upper central part is not directly illuminated from the solar surface. Conclusions: This multi-disciplinary prominence study allows us to argue that a large part of the prominence-corona transition region plasma can be located inside the magnetic dips in small-scale features that surround the cool prominence material located in the dip centre. We also argue that the dark prominence bubbles can be formed because of perturbations of the prominence magnetic field by parasitic bipoles, causing them to be devoid of the magnetic dips. Magnetic dips, however, form thin layers that surround these bubbles, which might explain the occurrence of the cool prominence material in the lines of sight intersecting the prominence bubbles. Movie and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Convection Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantin, Mazuruk

    2000-01-01

    Axisymmetric traveling magnetic fields (TMF) can be beneficial for crystal growth applications. such as the vertical Bridgman, float zone or traveling heater methods. TMF induces a basic flow in the form of a single roll. This type of flow can enhance mass and heat transfer to the growing crystal. More importantly, the TMF Lorentz body force induced in the system can counterbalance the buoyancy forces, so the resulting convection can be much smaller and even the direction of it can be changed. In this presentation, we display basic features of this novel technique. In particular, numerical calculations of the Lorentz force for arbitrary frequencies will be presented along with induced steady-state fluid flow profiles. Also, numerical modeling of the TMF counter-balancing natural convection in vertical Bridgman systems will be demonstrated.

  20. Signature of magnetization dynamics in spin-transfer-driven nanopillars with tilted easy axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Lin, Weiwei; Mangin, Stéphane; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen

    2013-01-01

    Special spin-transfer-driven magnetic behaviors can take place in a spin valve nanopillar with perpendicular anisotropy due to reduced symmetry of easy axis. Micromagnetic simulation demonstrates a dip in the average magnetization curve, which corresponds to the experimentally observed undulation of dc resistance. The dip is a signature of spin-transfer-driven reversable magnetic process with slightly tilted easy axis in the free layer. This featured magnetization dynamics includes non-uniform magnetization precession and multi-mode propagating spin waves, which are attributed to the competition among tilted magnetic anisotropy, magnetic field, and spin transfer torque.

  1. Near-infrared-induced electron transfer of an uranyl macrocyclic complex without energy transfer to dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Ho, I-Ting; Zhang, Zhan; Ishida, Masatoshi; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lynch, Vincent M; Kadish, Karl M; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    Photoexcitation of dichloromethane solutions of an uranyl macrocyclic complex with cyclo[1]furan[1]pyridine[4]-pyrrole () at the near-infrared (NIR) band (1177 nm) in the presence of electron donors and acceptors resulted in NIR-induced electron transfer without producing singlet oxygen via energy transfer. PMID:25791126

  2. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  3. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.R. )

    1994-02-14

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range [ital r]/[ital a][gt]0.75).The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magentic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm[sup 2]) in the core'' ([ital r]/[ital a][lt]0.85) and small ([lt]10--30 kW/cm[sup 2]) in the edge.

  4. Magnetic ordering in fullerene charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tohru; Yamabe, Tokio; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi

    1997-07-01

    We have determined the ground states of the charge-transfer (CT) complexes in which the energy levels of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of donors and the lowest unoccupied MO (LUMO) of acceptors are closely located, and examined some fullerene complexes consisting of C60, C70, tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE), and 1,1',3,3'-tetramethyl-Δ2,2'-bi(imidazolidine) (TMBI). The observed magnetic properties of TDAE-C60, TMBI-C60, and TDAE-C70 can be accounted for by employing realistic parameters. The effective Hamiltonian including up to the fourth-order perturbation has also been derived in the fourfold degenerate model space. The effective Hamiltonian can plausibly reproduce the magnetic phase diagram obtained by the variational treatment of TDAE-C60. It has been shown that the third and the fourth processes contribute to the stabilization of the antiferromagnetic state.

  5. Diffusive and thermodiffusive transfer of magnetic nanoparticles in porous media.

    PubMed

    Sints, Viesturs; Blums, Elmars; Maiorov, Michail; Kronkalns, Gunars

    2015-05-01

    Experimental results on mass transfer within a thin porous layer saturated with ferrofluid are outlined in this paper. From the analysis of particle concentration distribution across the layer it is shown that both the mass diffusion and the Soret coefficients of nanoparticles are remarkably less than those measured in free fluid. The particle transport coefficient changes due to an external uniform magnetic field qualitatively well agree with the predictions of existing theoretical research. The magnetic field that is oriented transversely to the porous layer causes an increase in the diffusion coefficient and a decrease in the Soret coefficient whilst the longitudinal field causes a reduction of the mass diffusion and an intensification of the particle thermodiffusion. PMID:25957178

  6. Magnetically induced pumping and memory storage in quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cini, Michele; Perfetto, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    Nanoscopic rings pierced by external magnetic fields and asymmetrically connected to wires behave in sharp contrast with classical expectations. By studying the real-time evolution of tight-binding models in different geometries, we show that the creation of a magnetic dipole by a bias-induced current is a process that can be reversed: connected rings excited by an internal ac flux produce ballistic currents in the external wires. In particular we point out that by employing suitable flux protocols, single-parameter nonadiabatic pumping can be achieved, and an arbitrary amount of charge can be transferred from one side to the other. We also propose a setup that could serve a memory device, in which both the operations of writing and erasing can be efficiently performed.

  7. Mirror-image-induced magnetic modes.

    PubMed

    Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Shi, Lei; Tuzer, Umut; Fenollosa, Roberto; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Quidant, Romain; Meseguer, Francisco

    2013-01-22

    Reflection in a mirror changes the handedness of the real world, and right-handed objects turn left-handed and vice versa (M. Gardner, The Ambidextrous Universe, Penguin Books, 1964). Also, we learn from electromagnetism textbooks that a flat metallic mirror transforms an electric charge into a virtual opposite charge. Consequently, the mirror image of a magnet is another parallel virtual magnet as the mirror image changes both the charge sign and the curl handedness. Here we report the dramatic modification in the optical response of a silicon nanocavity induced by the interaction with its image through a flat metallic mirror. The system of real and virtual dipoles can be interpreted as an effective magnetic dipole responsible for a strong enhancement of the cavity scattering cross section. PMID:23194368

  8. Mixing Dynamics Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microstructural and compositional homogeneity in metals and alloys can only be achieved if the initial melt is homogeneous prior to the onset of solidification processing. Naturally induced convection may initially facilitate this requirement but upon the onset of solidification significant compositional variations generally arise leading to undesired segregation. Application of alternating magnetic fields to promote a uniform bulk liquid concentration during solidification processing has been suggested. To investigate such possibilities an initial study of using traveling magnetic fields (TMF) to promote melt homogenization is reported in this work. Theoretically, the effect of TMF-induced convection on mixing phenomena is studied in the laminar regime of flow. Experimentally, with and without applied fields, both 1) mixing dynamics by optically monitoring the spreading of an initially localized dye in transparent fluids and, 2) compositional variations in metal alloys have been investigated.

  9. Mixing Dynamics Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Microstructural and compositional homogeneity in metals and alloys can only be achieved if the initial melt is homogeneous prior to the onset of solidification processing. Naturally induced convection may initially facilitate this requirement but upon the onset of solidification significant compositional variations generally arise leading to undesired segregation. Application of alternating magnetic fields to promote a uniform bulk liquid concentration during solidification processing has been suggested. To investigate such possibilities an initial study of using traveling magnetic fields (TMF) to promote melt homogenization is reported in this work. Theoretically, the effect of TMF-induced convection on mixing phenomena is studied in the laminar regime of flow. Experimentally, with and without applied fields, both: mixing dynamics by optically monitoring the spreading of an initially localized dye in transparent fluids and, compositional variations in metal alloys have been investigated.

  10. Magnetic Dynamics of Single-Domain Planar Spin-Transfer Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaliy, Ya. B.

    2008-03-01

    We study spin-transfer devices with dynamic magnets characterized by large easy-plane anisotropy. This situation is standard for planar devices where it arises due to the shape anisotropy. Dominating easy-plane anisotropy keeps the motion of the magnetic moment close to the easy plane, with small out-of-plane deviations. As a result, it is possible to approximately describe magnetization vector by the in-plane angle and derive an effective one dimensional equation for that angle in the absence [1] and in the presence [2] of spin-transfer torques. Effective description maps a spin-transfer device problem onto a problem of an ``effective particle'' moving in external potential with variable friction coefficient. The advantage of such a description is that the motion of the effective particle can be qualitatively understood by applying the usual energy conservation and dissipation arguments. We show how the effective description produces analytic results for current induced precession states [3] and predicts unconventional ``stabilization by repulsion'' of static states [2]. // [1] C. J. Garcia-Cervera, Weinan E, J. Appl. Phys. 90, 370 (2001). [2] Ya. B. Bazaliy, Phys. Rev. B 76, 140402(R) (2007). [3] Ya. B. Bazaliy, arXiv:0705.0508, to be published in Appl. Phys. Lett. (2007).

  11. 49 CFR 225.37 - Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.37 Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission. (a) A railroad has the option of submitting the following reports, updates, and amendments by way of magnetic media...

  12. Local light-induced magnetization using nanodots and chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Dor, Oren Ben; Morali, Noam; Yochelis, Shira; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Paltiel, Yossi

    2014-11-12

    With the increasing demand for miniaturization, nanostructures are likely to become the primary components of future integrated circuits. Different approaches are being pursued toward achieving efficient electronics, among which are spin electronics devices (spintronics). In principle, the application of spintronics should result in reducing the power consumption of electronic devices. Recently a new, promising, effective approach for spintronics has emerged, using spin selectivity in electron transport through chiral molecules. In this work, using chiral molecules and nanocrystals, we achieve local spin-based magnetization generated optically at ambient temperatures. Through the chiral layer, a spin torque can be transferred without permanent charge transfer from the nanocrystals to a thin ferromagnetic layer, creating local perpendicular magnetization. We used Hall sensor configuration and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the induced local magnetization. At low temperatures, anomalous spin Hall effects were measured using a thin Ni layer. The results may lead to optically controlled spintronics logic devices that will enable low power consumption, high density, and cheap fabrication. PMID:25313442

  13. Observation of anisotropic energy transfer in magnetically coupled magnetic vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, N.; Sugimoto, S.; Kumar, D.; Barman, S.; Barman, A.; Kondou, K.; Otani, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We have experimentally investigated the energy transfer and storage in the magnetostatically coupled vortices in a pair of disks. By measuring the frequency dependence of the rectified dc voltage, we observed a specific gyrating motion due to anomalous energy storage at the off-resonant frequency for anti-parallel polarities. Micromagnetic simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation qualitatively reproduce the experimental results and reveal that the behavior arises from the anisotropic energy transfer, i.e., the modulation of effective damping constant of the pair disks, originating from the phase difference between coupled vortex cores. These findings can be of use in magnetic vortex based logic operations.

  14. Improved power transfer to wearable systems through stretchable magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Bedair, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    The use of wireless power transfer is common in stretchable electronics since physical wiring can be easily destroyed as the system is stretched. This work presents the first demonstration of improved inductive power coupling to a stretchable system through the addition of a thin layer of ferroelastomeric material. A ferroelastomer, an elastomeric polymer loaded with magnetic particulates, has a permeability greater than one while retaining the ability to survive significant mechanical strains. A recently developed ferroelastomer composite based on sendust platelets within a soft silicone elastomer was incorporated into liquid metal stretchable inductors based on the liquid metal galinstan in fluidic channels. For a single-turn inductor, the maximum power transfer efficiency rises from 71 % with no backplane, to 81 % for a rigid ferrite backplane on the transmitter side alone, to 86 % with a ferroelastomer backplane on the receiver side as well. The coupling between a commercial wireless power transmitter coil with ferrite backplane to a five-turn liquid metal inductor was also investigated, finding an improvement in power transfer efficiency from 81 % with only a rigid backplane to 90 % with the addition of the ferroelastomer backplane. Both the single and multi-turn inductors were demonstrated surviving up to 50 % uniaxial applied strain.

  15. Streaming potential and heat transfer of nanofluids in microchannels in the presence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangpu; Jian, Yongjun; Li, Fengqin

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the heat transfer characteristics of thermally developed nanofluid flow through a parallel plate microchannel under the combined influences of externally applied axial pressure gradient and transverse magnetic fields. The analytical solutions for electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) flow in microchannels are obtained under the Debye-Hückel linearization. The classical boundary condition of uniform wall heat flux is considered in the analysis, and the effect of viscous dissipation as well as Joule heating is also taken into account. In addition, in virtue of the velocity field and temperature field, the Nusselt number variations are induced. The results for pertinent dimensionless parameters are presented graphically and discussed in briefly.

  16. Mass transfer and magnetic braking in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-02-01

    Sco X-1 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that has one of the most precisely determined set of binary parameters such as the mass accretion rate, companions mass ratio and the orbital period. For this system, as well as for a large fraction of other well-studied LMXBs, the observationally-inferred mass accretion rate is known to strongly exceed the theoretically expected mass transfer (MT) rate. We suggest that this discrepancy can be solved by applying a modified magnetic braking prescription, which accounts for increased wind mass-loss in evolved stars compared to main sequence stars. Using our MT framework based on MESA, we explore a large range of binaries at the onset of the MT. We identify the subset of binaries for which the MT tracks cross the Sco X-1 values for the mass ratio and the orbital period. We confirm that no solution can be found for which the standard magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates, while wind-boosted magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates for many progenitor binaries that evolve to the observed orbital period and mass ratio.

  17. Heavy ion induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L. D.; Apavatjrut, P.; Phanchaisri, B.; Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I. G.

    2004-10-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment of biological materials for genetic modification purposes has experienced rapid growth in the last decade, particularly for the direct DNA transfer into living organisms including both plants and bacteria. Attempts have been made to understand the mechanisms involved in ion-bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into biological cells. Here we summarize the present status of the application of low-energy ions for genetic modification of living sample materials.

  18. Importance of polarization transfer in reaction products for interpreting and analyzing CIDNP at low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic field dependence of Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) was studied for the amino acids N-acetyl histidine, N-acetyl tryptophan and N-acetyl tyrosine. It is demonstrated that at low field CIDNP is strongly affected by polarization redistribution in the diamagnetic molecules. Such a polarization transfer is of coherent nature and is due to spin coherences formed together with non-equilibrium population of the spin states. These coherences clearly manifest themselves in an oscillatory time dependence of polarization. Polarization transfer effects are most pronounced at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs), which also result in sharp features in the CIDNP field dependence. Thus, polarization transfer is an important factor, which has to be taken into account in order to interpret low-field CIDNP data on both qualitative and quantitative level. Possible applications of polarization transfer phenomena are also discussed in the paper. In particular, the role of LACs in spin order transfer is highlighted: LACs provide a new tool for precise manipulation of spin hyperpolarization and NMR enhancement of selected target spins.

  19. Importance of polarization transfer in reaction products for interpreting and analyzing CIDNP at low magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic field dependence of Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) was studied for the amino acids N-acetyl histidine, N-acetyl tryptophan and N-acetyl tyrosine. It is demonstrated that at low field CIDNP is strongly affected by polarization redistribution in the diamagnetic molecules. Such a polarization transfer is of coherent nature and is due to spin coherences formed together with non-equilibrium population of the spin states. These coherences clearly manifest themselves in an oscillatory time dependence of polarization. Polarization transfer effects are most pronounced at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs), which also result in sharp features in the CIDNP field dependence. Thus, polarization transfer is an important factor, which has to be taken into account in order to interpret low-field CIDNP data on both qualitative and quantitative level. Possible applications of polarization transfer phenomena are also discussed in the paper. In particular, the role of LACs in spin order transfer is highlighted: LACs provide a new tool for precise manipulation of spin hyperpolarization and NMR enhancement of selected target spins. PMID:25797825

  20. Laser-induced backward transfer of nanoimprinted polymer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinaeugle, Matthias; Heath, Daniel J.; Mills, Benjamin; Grant-Jacob, James A.; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Eason, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced backward transfer of transparent photopolymers is demonstrated in the solid state, assisted by a digital micromirror spatial light modulator for producing shaped deposits. Through use of an absorbing silicon carrier substrate, we have been able to successfully transfer solid-phase material, with lateral dimensions as small as ~6 µm. In addition, a carrier of silicon incorporating a photonic waveguide relief structure enables the transfer of imprinted deposits that have been accomplished with surface features exactly complementing those present on the substrate, with an observed minimum feature size of 140 nm.

  1. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtian; Cushing, Scott K.; Meng, Fanke; Senty, Tess R.; Bristow, Alan D.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-09-01

    In Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), energy non-radiatively transfers from a blue-shifted emitter to a red-shifted absorber by dipole-dipole coupling. This study shows that plasmonics enables the opposite transfer direction, transferring the plasmonic energy towards the short-wavelength direction to induce charge separation in a semiconductor. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET) differs from FRET because of the lack of a Stoke's shift, non-local absorption effects and a strong dependence on the plasmon's dephasing rate and dipole moment. PIRET non-radiatively transfers energy through an insulating spacer layer, which prevents interfacial charge recombination losses and dephasing of the plasmon from hot-electron transfer. The distance dependence of dipole-dipole coupling is mapped out for a range of detuning across the plasmon resonance. PIRET can efficiently harvest visible and near-infrared sunlight with energy below the semiconductor band edge to help overcome the constraints of band-edge energetics for single semiconductors in photoelectrochemical cells, photocatalysts and photovoltaics.

  2. Mathematical Model of the Processes of Heat and Mass Transfer and Diffusion of the Magnetic Field in an Induction Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perminov, A. V.; Nikulin, I. L.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mathematical model describing the motion of a metal melt in a variable inhomogeneous magnetic field of a short solenoid. In formulating the problem, we made estimates and showed the possibility of splitting the complete magnetohydrodynamical problem into two subproblems: a magnetic field diffusion problem where the distributions of the external and induced magnetic fields and currents are determined, and a heat and mass transfer problem with known distributions of volume sources of heat and forces. The dimensionless form of the heat and mass transfer equation was obtained with the use of averaging and multiscale methods, which permitted writing and solving separately the equations for averaged flows and temperature fields and their oscillations. For the heat and mass transfer problem, the boundary conditions for a real technological facility are discussed. The dimensionless form of the magnetic field diffusion equation is presented, and the experimental computational procedure and results of the numerical simulation of the magnetic field structure in the melt for various magnetic Reynolds numbers are described. The extreme dependence of heat release on the magnetic Reynolds number has been interpreted.

  3. Downstream properties of magnetic flux transfer events. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the downstream evolution of the field line tubes known as 'flux transfer events' (FTEs), whose magnetic field and plasma properties are distinct from those of the nearby unmerged magnetosheath and magnetosphere field lines. After the FTE has moved 200 earth radii down the tail, its drained portion reaches 25 earth radii radially outward from the tail boundary. It is suggested that most multiple crossings of the tail boundary observed by spacecraft are encounters with tailward-moving FTEs, thereby explaining both the behavior of boundary normals during multiple crossings and how the sign of the IMF causes the observed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the thickness of the magnetotail boundary layer.

  4. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging as a Biomarker for Effects of Systemic Inflammation on the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Cooper, Ella; Dowell, Nicholas G.; Keramida, Georgia; Voon, Valerie; Critchley, Hugo D.; Cercignani, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation impairs brain function and is increasingly implicated in the etiology of common mental illnesses, particularly depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Immunotherapies selectively targeting proinflammatory cytokines demonstrate efficacy in a subset of patients with depression. However, efforts to identify patients most vulnerable to the central effects of inflammation are hindered by insensitivity of conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging. Methods We used quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging, a magnetic resonance imaging technique that enables quantification of changes in brain macromolecular density, together with experimentally induced inflammation to investigate effects of systemic inflammatory challenge on human brain microstructure. Imaging with qMT was performed in 20 healthy participants after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. An additional 20 participants underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography following the same inflammatory challenge. Results The qMT data demonstrated that inflammation induced a rapid change in brain microstructure, reflected in increased magnetization exchange from free (water) to macromolecular-bound protons, within a discrete region of insular cortex implicated in representing internal physiologic states including inflammation. The functional significance of this change in insular microstructure was demonstrated by correlation with inflammation-induced fatigue and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging, which revealed increased resting glucose metabolism within this region following the same inflammatory challenge. Conclusions Together these observations highlight a novel structural biomarker of the central physiologic and behavioral effects of mild systemic inflammation. The widespread clinical availability of magnetic resonance imaging supports the viability of qMT imaging as a clinical biomarker in trials of immunotherapeutics

  5. Momentum transfer to rotating magnetized plasma from gun plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, Imran; Hassam, A. B.; Ellis, R. F.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.

    2006-11-15

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the penetration and momentum coupling of a gun-injected plasma slug into a rotating magnetized plasma. An experiment along these lines is envisioned for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)] using a coaxial plasma accelerator gun developed by HyperV Technologies Corp. [F. D. Witherspoon et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, LP1 87 (2005)]. The plasma gun would be located in the axial midplane and fired off-axis into the rotating MCX plasma annulus. The numerical simulation is set up so that the initial momentum in the injected plasma slug is of the order of the initial momentum of the target plasma. Several numerical firings are done into the cylindrical rotating plasma. Axial symmetry is assumed. The slug is seen to penetrate readily and deform into a mushroom, characteristic of interchange deformations. It is found that up to 25% of the momentum in the slug can be transferred to the background plasma in one pass across a cylindrical chord. For the same initial momentum, a high-speed low density slug gives more momentum transfer than a low-speed high density slug. Details of the numerical simulations and a scaling study are presented.

  6. Momentum transfer to rotating magnetized plasma from gun plasma injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, Imran; Hassam, A. B.; Ellis, R. F.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.

    2006-11-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the penetration and momentum coupling of a gun-injected plasma slug into a rotating magnetized plasma. An experiment along these lines is envisioned for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)] using a coaxial plasma accelerator gun developed by HyperV Technologies Corp. [F. D. Witherspoon et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, LP1-87 (2005)]. The plasma gun would be located in the axial midplane and fired off-axis into the rotating MCX plasma annulus. The numerical simulation is set up so that the initial momentum in the injected plasma slug is of the order of the initial momentum of the target plasma. Several numerical firings are done into the cylindrical rotating plasma. Axial symmetry is assumed. The slug is seen to penetrate readily and deform into a mushroom, characteristic of interchange deformations. It is found that up to 25% of the momentum in the slug can be transferred to the background plasma in one pass across a cylindrical chord. For the same initial momentum, a high-speed low density slug gives more momentum transfer than a low-speed high density slug. Details of the numerical simulations and a scaling study are presented.

  7. Momentum transfer to rotating magnetized plasma from gun plasma injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassam, A. B.; Shamim, Imran; Ellis, R. F.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.

    2006-10-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the penetration and momentum coupling of a gun-injected plasma slug into a rotating magnetized plasma. An experiment along these lines is envisioned for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) using a coaxial plasma accelerator gun developed by HyperV Technologies Corp. The plasma gun would be located in the axial mid-plane and fired off-axis into the rotating MCX plasma annulus. The numerical simulation is set up so that the initial momentum in the injected plasma slug is of order the initial momentum of the target plasma. Several numerical firings are done into cylindrical rotating plasma. Axial symmetry is assumed. The slug is seen to penetrate readily and deform into a mushroom, characteristic of interchange deformations. It is found that upto 25% of the momentum in the slug can be transferred to the background plasma in one pass across a cylindrical chord. For the same initial momentum, a high-speed low density slug gives more momentum transfer than a low-speed high density slug. Details of the numerical simulations and a scaling study are presented.

  8. Orientation dependence of magnetization transfer parameters in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Pampel, André; Müller, Dirk K; Anwander, Alfred; Marschner, Henrik; Möller, Harald E

    2015-07-01

    Quantification of magnetization-transfer (MT) experiments is typically based on a model comprising a liquid pool "a" of free water and a semisolid pool "b" of motionally restricted macromolecules or membrane compounds. By a comprehensive fitting approach, high quality MT parameter maps of the human brain are obtained. In particular, a distinct correlation between the diffusion-tensor orientation with respect to the B0-magnetic field and the apparent transverse relaxation time, T2(b), of the semisolid pool (i.e., the width of its absorption line) is observed. This orientation dependence is quantitatively explained by a refined dipolar lineshape for pool b that explicitly considers the specific geometrical arrangement of lipid bilayers wrapped around a cylindrical axon. The model inherently reduces the myelin membrane to its lipid constituents, which is motivated by previous studies on efficient interaction sites (e.g., cholesterol or galactocerebrosides) in the myelin membrane and on the origin of ultrashort T2 signals in cerebral white matter. The agreement between MT orientation effects and corresponding forward simulations using empirical diffusion imaging results as input as well as results from fits employing the novel lineshape support previous suggestions that the fiber orientation distribution in a voxel can be modeled as a scaled Bingham distribution. PMID:25862261

  9. Investigating the role of superdiffusive currents in laser induced demagnetization of ferromagnets with nanoscale magnetic domains

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, N.; Malinowski, G.; Mauchain, J.; Hehn, M.; Vodungbo, B.; Lüning, J.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Thiaville, A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the loss of magnetic order and the microscopic mechanisms involved in laser induced magnetization dynamics is one of the most challenging topics in today's magnetism research. While scattering between spins, phonons, magnons and electrons have been proposed as sources for dissipation of spin angular momentum, ultrafast spin dependent transport of hot electrons has been pointed out as a potential candidate to explain ultrafast demagnetization without resorting to any spin dissipation channel. Here we use time resolved magneto-optical Kerr measurements to extract the influence of spin dependent transport on the demagnetization dynamics taking place in magnetic samples with alternating domains with opposite magnetization directions. We unambiguously show that whatever the sample magnetic configuration, the demagnetization takes place during the same time, demonstrating that hot electrons spin dependent transfer between neighboring domains does not alter the ultrafast magnetization dynamics in our systems with perpendicular anisotropy and 140 nm domain sizes. PMID:24722395

  10. Electrically induced structure formation and pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Erik; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Russell, Thomas P.; Steiner, Ullrich

    2000-02-01

    The wavelength of light represents a fundamental technological barrier to the production of increasingly smaller features on integrated circuits. New technologies that allow the replication of patterns on scales less than 100nm need to be developed if increases in computing power are to continue at the present rate. Here we report a simple electrostatic technique that creates and replicates lateral structures in polymer films on a submicrometre length scale. Our method is based on the fact that dielectric media experience a force in an electric field gradient. Strong field gradients can produce forces that overcome the surface tension in thin liquid films, inducing an instability that features a characteristic hexagonal order. In our experiments, pattern formation takes place in polymer films at elevated temperatures, and is fixed by cooling the sample to room temperature. The application of a laterally varying electric field causes the instability to be focused in the direction of the highest electric field. This results in the replication of a topographically structured electrode. We report patterns with lateral dimensions of 140nm, but the extension of the technique to pattern replication on scales smaller than 100nm seems feasible.

  11. Induced remanent magnetization of social insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajnberg, E.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; El-Jaick, L. J.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2001-05-01

    The induced remanent magnetization (IRM) of honeybees Apis mellifera and ants as Pachycondyla marginata, a migratory species, and Solenopsis sp., a fire ant, was obtained using a SQUID magnetometer from 10 to 300 K. An anomalous sharp change of the remanent magnetization is observed at 67±0.2 K for migratory ants. The IRM at room temperature indicates the presence of at least 10 times lower concentration of magnetic material in the whole fire ant as compared to the migratory ant abdomen (0.22±0.33×10 -6 emu/ant, and 2.8±1.2×10 -6 emu/abdomen, respectively). Our results in honeybee abdomen (4.6±0.9×10 -6 emu/abdomen) agree with other reported values. IRM at room temperature in ants and honeybees indicates the presence of single domain (SD) or aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles. The loss of remanence from 77 to 300 K can be related to the stable-superparamagnetic (SPM) transition of small particles (less than ca. 30 nm). From these values and considering their estimated volumes an upper limit 10 10 SPM and 10 9 SD or aggregate particles are obtained in these insects.

  12. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  13. Electromagnetically induced grating in a crystal of molecular magnets system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jibing; Liu, Na; Shan, Chuanjia; Liu, Tangkun; Li, Hong; Zheng, Anshou; Xie, Xiao-Tao

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the response of the molecular system to the magnetic field modulation. Molecular magnets are subjected to a strong standing ac magnetic field and a weak probe magnetic field. The transmission and absorption of the weak probe magnetic field can be changed due to quantum coherence and the spatially modulating of the standing field. And a electromagnetically induced grating is formed in the crystal of molecular magnets via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The diffraction efficiency of the grating can be adjusted efficiently by tuning the intensity of the standing wave field and the single photon detuning.

  14. Ultrafast thermally induced magnetic switching in synthetic ferrimagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Richard F. L. Ostler, Thomas A.; Chantrell, Roy W.; Radu, Ilie; Rasing, Theo

    2014-02-24

    Synthetic ferrimagnets are composite magnetic structures formed from two or more anti-ferromagnetically coupled magnetic sublattices with different magnetic moments. Here, we report on atomistic spin simulations of the laser-induced magnetization dynamics on such synthetic ferrimagnets and demonstrate that the application of ultrashort laser pulses leads to sub-picosecond magnetization dynamics and all-optical switching in a similar manner as in ferrimagnetic alloys. Moreover, we present the essential material properties for successful laser-induced switching, demonstrating the feasibility of using a synthetic ferrimagnet as a high density magnetic storage element without the need of a write field.

  15. Microscopic observation of behavior of magnetic particle clusters during torque transfer between magnetic poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagato, Keisuke; Oshima, Takuya; Kuwayama, Akinori; Okada, Hiroshi; Matsushima, Takashi; Takagi, Shu; Nakao, Masayuki; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of magnetic particles during the formation, fracture, and sliding of clusters was investigated. A setup, in which particles can be visualized and the torque between poles is measured simultaneously, was designed and built. In the case of flat poles, clusters were inclined in both the fracture and sliding mode areas. In the case of textured poles, the torque increased and varied with the cycle corresponding to the pitch of the texture. These clusters inclined by an angle less than that in the case of flat poles. The magnetic field distribution calculated by a finite element method supported this result, in which the field was concentrated at the concaves and their edges. These results will lead to the design of more efficient torque transfer devices using magnetorheological fluids.

  16. Vortex-induced tearing mode instability as a source of flux transfer events

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Z.Y.; Hou, P.T. ); Liu, Z.X. )

    1990-11-01

    A two-dimensional MHD simulation is performed to investigate the evolution and the asymptotic quasi-static state (AQSS) of the vortex-induced tearing mode instability (VITM) at the magnetospheric boundary. The original VITM model is extended by including B{sub y}, a magnetic field component along the invariant direction, and varying N, the number density, which makes the model applicable to a wide region on the dayside magnetopause. The AWSS is found to be characterized by a large-scale magnetic island together with a colocated vortex tube. The structure of the magnetic island is studied and compared with observations. The possible role of the VITM in the formation of flux transfer events is discussed.

  17. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  18. Voltage-driven spin-transfer torque in a magnetic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, P. Davidović, D.

    2015-10-26

    We discuss a spin-transfer torque device, where the role of the soft ferromagnetic layer is played by a magnetic particle or a magnetic molecule, in weak tunnel contact with two spin polarized leads. We investigate if the magnetization of the particle can be manipulated electronically, in the regime where the critical current for magnetization switching is negligibly weak, which could be due to the reduced particle dimensions. Using master equation simulations to evaluate the effects of spin-orbit anisotropy energy fluctuations on spin-transfer, we obtain reliable reading and writing of the magnetization state of such magnetic particle, and find that the device relies on a critical voltage rather than a critical current. The critical voltage is governed by the spin-orbit energy shifts of discrete levels in the particle. This finding opens a possibility to significantly reduce the power dissipation involved in spin-transfer torque switching, by using very small magnetic particles or molecules.

  19. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat transfer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, P.J.; LaGraff, L.E. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder was conducted. The objective of the study was to create a quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow. In this simulation, a larger cylinder, representing the leading-edge region of a rotor blade, was immersed in the wake of a smaller cylinder, representing the trailing-edge region of a stator vane. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat transfer results were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds number at two Mach number: one incompressible and one transonic. The tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, and gas-to-wall temperature ratios characteristic of turbine engine conditions in an isentropic compression-heated transient wind tunnel (LICH tube). The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness was documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. It was found that the time-averaged heat transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number (Nu/[radical]RE), reached a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross-correlation of the heat transfer signals in the stagnation region revealed the importance of large vortical structures shed from upstream wake generator. These structures caused large positive and negative excursions about the mean heat transfer rate in the stagnation region.

  20. Laser-Induced Magnetic Dipole Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Christian; Bücker, Dennis; Domingo Köhler, Silvia; Jeschke, Gunnar; Drescher, Malte

    2016-06-16

    Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of nanometer scale distance distributions have proven highly effective in structural studies. They exploit the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling between spin labels site-specifically attached to macromolecules. The most commonly applied technique is double electron-electron resonance (DEER, also called pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR)). Here we present the new technique of laser-induced magnetic dipole (LaserIMD) spectroscopy based on optical switching of the dipole-dipole coupling. In a proof of concept experiment on a model peptide, we find, already at a low quantum yield of triplet excitation, the same sensitivity for measuring the distance between a porphyrin and a nitroxide label as in a DEER measurement between two nitroxide labels. On the heme protein cytochrome C, we demonstrate that LaserIMD allows for distance measurements between a heme prosthetic group and a nitroxide label, although the heme triplet state is not directly observable by an electron spin echo. PMID:27163749

  1. Optomechanically induced stochastic resonance and chaos transfer between optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monifi, Faraz; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Liu, Yu-Xi; Bo, Fang; Nori, Franco; Yang, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been reported in many physical systems and has affected almost every field of science. Chaos involves hypersensitivity to the initial conditions of a system and introduces unpredictability into its output. Thus, it is often unwanted. Interestingly, the very same features make chaos a powerful tool to suppress decoherence, achieve secure communication and replace background noise in stochastic resonance—a counterintuitive concept that a system's ability to transfer information can be coherently amplified by adding noise. Here, we report the first demonstration of chaos-induced stochastic resonance in an optomechanical system, as well as the optomechanically mediated chaos transfer between two optical fields such that they follow the same route to chaos. These results will contribute to the understanding of nonlinear phenomena and chaos in optomechanical systems, and may find applications in the chaotic transfer of information and for improving the detection of otherwise undetectable signals in optomechanical systems.

  2. The dynamic transfer function for a cavitating inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.; Acosta, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the dynamic performance of pumps is essential for the prediction of transient behavior and instabilities in hydraulic systems; the necessary information is in the form of a transfer function which relates the instantaneous or fluctuating pressure and mass flow rate at inlet to the same quantities in the discharge from the pump. The presence of cavitation within the pump can have a major effect on this transfer function since dynamical changes in the volume of cavitation contribute to the difference in the instantaneous inlet and discharge mass flow rates. The present paper utilizes results from free streamline cascade theory to evaluate the elements in the transfer function for a cavitating inducer and shows that the numerical results are consistent with the characteristics observed in some dynamic tests on rocket engine turbopumps.

  3. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field Hsat for arbitrary spin S . We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field Hsat≤H ≤HsatI. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H =Hsat, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ ∝1 /√{H -Hsat }. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit.

  4. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field H_{sat} for arbitrary spin S. We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field H_{sat}≤H≤H_{sat}^{I}. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H=H_{sat}, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ∝1/sqrt[H-H_{sat}]. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit. PMID:27203342

  5. MR of intracranial tumors: Combined use of gadolinium and magnetization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki, T.; Niemi, P.; Valtonen, S.

    1994-10-01

    To study the potential combined application of gadolinium and magnetization transfer in the MR imaging of intracranial tumors. Twenty-two patients were imaged at low field strength (0.1 T). Corresponding gradient-echo partial saturation images without and with magnetization transfer pulse were produced. Images with intermediate repetition times were obtained in 18 cases; five different sequences were produced in 4 cases. Gadopentetate dimeglumine was used at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Magnetization transfer effect increased the contrast between enhancing lesion and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain; the contrast between enhancing lesion and edema was not significantly changed. On intermediate-repetition-time magnetization transfer images the contrast between enhancing tumor and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain were superior to short-repetition-time magnetization transfer images, but the differentiation between enhancing tumor and edema was poorer. Magnetization transfer can be used to improve contrast in Gd-enhanced MR imaging. Combining magnetization transfer with an intermediate-repetition-time image provides the possibility for displaying both enhancing and nonehancing lesions on a single MR image. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Laser-Induced Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Magnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ka; Bauer, Gerrit E W

    2015-11-01

    We present a theory for the coherent magnetization dynamics induced by a focused ultrafast laser beam in magnetic films, taking into account nonthermal (inverse Faraday effect) and thermal (heating) actuation. The dynamic conversion between spin waves and phonons is induced by the magnetoelastic coupling that allows efficient propagation of angular momentum. The anisotropy of the magnetoelastic coupling renders characteristic angle dependences of the magnetization propagation that are strikingly different for thermal and nonthermal actuation. PMID:26588408

  7. An eddy current-induced magnetic plucking for piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Nam Ho; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-04-01

    Frequency up-conversion is a very efficient method of energy harvesting in order to overcome low, non-periodic, or altered ambient vibration. In order to perform frequency up-conversion and transference of mechanical energy without contact, an eddy current-induced magnetic drag force is used. In this paper, we present a novel configuration of eddy current-induced magnetic plucking for piezoelectric energy harvesting. Our method consists of two permanent magnets, a piezoelectric beam, and a copper disk piece. We design our harvesting method to achieve loading, sudden release, and free vibration using the actuation of the piezoelectric beam through the magnetic mutual coupling between the magnet and copper disk piece. We present the principle of magnetic drag force-generation, characterize the energy harvesting performance of our harvesting method, and demonstrate our harvesting method’s capability of frequency up-conversion and transference of mechanical energy without contact under low, non-periodic, or altered ambient vibration. To that end, we describe the calculation of magnetic drag force with various geometric dimensions and material properties, model of the piezoelectric cantilever beam, comparison between estimation response and measured experiment response, and the measured voltage and power responses.

  8. Wireless power transfer based on magnetic quadrupole coupling in dielectric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mingzhao; Iorsh, Ivan; Kapitanova, Polina; Nenasheva, Elizaveta; Belov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate a magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system based on high refractive index dielectric resonators. We propose to operate at magnetic quadrupole mode of the resonators to enlarge the efficiency due to minimization of ohmic and radiation losses. Numerical estimation predicts the 80% efficiency of the wireless power transfer (WPT) system operating at quadrupole mode at 300 MHz. Moreover, the system operating at magnetic quadrupole mode is capable of transferring power with 70% efficiency when the receiver rotates 90°. We verify the simulated results by experimental investigation of the WPT system based on microwave ceramic resonators (ɛ = 80 and tanδ = 10-4).

  9. Perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction switched by spin-Hall-assisted spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Deng, Erya; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the magnetization switching induced by spin-Hall-assisted spin-transfer torque (STT) in a three-terminal device consisting of a perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) and an β-W strip. Magnetization dynamics in free layer of MTJ is simulated by solving numerically a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The influences of spin-Hall write current (density, duration and direction) on the STT switching are evaluated. We find that the switching speed of a STT-MTJ can be significantly improved (reduced to <1 ns) by using a sufficiently large spin-Hall write current density (~25 MA cm-2) with an appropriate duration (~0.5 ns). Finally we develop an electrical model of three-terminal MTJ/β-W device with Verilog-A language and perform transient simulation of switching a 4 T/1MTJ/1β-W memory cell with Spectre simulator. Simulation results demonstrate that spin-Hall-assisted STT-MTJ has advantages over conventional STT-MTJ in write speed and energy.

  10. On the unique reconstruction of induced spherical magnetizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhards, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recovering spherical magnetizations m from magnetic field data in the exterior is a highly non-unique problem. A spherical Hardy-Hodge decomposition supplies information on what contributions of the magnetization m are recoverable but it does not supply geophysically suitable constraints on m that would guarantee uniqueness for the entire magnetization. In this paper, we focus on the case of induced spherical magnetizations and show that uniqueness is guaranteed if one assumes that the magnetization is compactly supported on the sphere. The results are based on ideas presented in (Baratchart et al 2013 Inverse Problems 29 015004) for the planar setting.

  11. First-principles investigation of transient spin transfer torque in magnetic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhizhou; Wang, Jian

    By employing the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method, the transient current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) of the magnetic layered system is investigated based on the density functional theory (DFT). The computational cost of the transient STT is huge due to the dense mesh of k-sampling for the layered system. In order to speed up the calculation, the Hamiltonian of leads is replaced by the complex absorbing potential (CAP) so that the Green's function can be cast into the wide-band form. After employing the Padé spectrum decomposition, the energy integrals in the formalism of transient electric current and STT, including that of the Fermi distribution function, can be analytically calculated by the theorem of residue, which dramatically reduces the computational complexity of the transient STT. As an application, the NEGF-DFT-CAP formalism with the Padé approximation is implemented to study the transient electric current and current-induced STT of Co/Cu/Co trilayers under an upward pulse of bias with different rotating angles of magnetization direction between two leads. The oscillation behavior is obtained for the transient STT when it approaches the steady state.

  12. Wireless power transfer based on magnetic metamaterials consisting of assembled ultra-subwavelength meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Li, Y. H.; Gao, N.; Yang, F.; Chen, Y. Q.; Fang, K.; Zhang, Y. W.; Chen, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this letter, a potential way to transfer power wirelessly based on magnetic metamaterials (MMs) assembled by ultra-subwavelength meta-atoms is proposed. Frequency-domain simulation and experiments are performed for accurately obtaining effective permeability of magnetic metamaterials. The results demonstrate that MMs possess great power for enhancing the wireless power transfer efficiency between two non-resonant coils. Further investigations on the magnetic-field distribution demonstrate that a large-area flattened magnetic field in near range can be effectively realized, exhibiting great flexibility in assembling.

  13. Current-induced rotational torques in the skyrmion lattice phase of chiral magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Everschor, Karin; Garst, Markus; Rosch, Achim; Duine, R. A.

    2011-08-01

    In chiral magnets without inversion symmetry, the magnetic structure can form a lattice of magnetic whirl lines, a two-dimensional skyrmion lattice, stabilized by spin-orbit interactions in a small range of temperatures and magnetic fields. The twist of the magnetization within this phase gives rise to an efficient coupling of macroscopic magnetic domains to spin currents. We analyze the resulting spin-transfer effects, and, in particular, focus on the current-induced rotation of the magnetic texture by an angle. Such a rotation can arise from macroscopic temperature gradients in the system as has recently been shown experimentally and theoretically. Here we investigate an alternative mechanism, where small distortions of the skyrmion lattice and the transfer of angular momentum to the underlying atomic lattice play the key role. We employ the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and adapt the Thiele method to derive an effective equation of motion for the rotational degree of freedom. We discuss the dependence of the rotation angle on the orientation of the applied magnetic field and the distance to the phase transition.

  14. Nonlinear magnetization dynamics of antiferromagnetic spin resonance induced by intense terahertz magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Y.; Hirori, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kageyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a HoFeO3 crystal induced by a strong terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with a split ring resonator and measured with magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The terahertz magnetic field induces a large change (˜40%) in the spontaneous magnetization. The frequency of the antiferromagnetic resonance decreases in proportion to the square of the magnetization change. A modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a phenomenological nonlinear damping term quantitatively reproduced the nonlinear dynamics.

  15. Floating and flying ferrofluid bridges induced by external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongchao; Zhou, Yixin; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-01

    A ferrofluid is a mixture that exhibits both magnetism and fluidity. This merit enables the ferrofluid to be used in a wide variety of areas. Here we show that a floating ferrofluid bridge can be induced between two separated boards under a balanced external magnetic field generated by two magnets, while a flying ferrofluid bridge can be induced under an unbalanced external magnetic field generated by only one magnet. The mechanisms of the ferrofluid bridges were discussed and the corresponding mathematical equations were also established to describe the interacting magnetic force between the ferro particles inside the ferrofluid. This work answered a basic question that, except for the well-known floating water bridges that are related to electricity, one can also build up a liquid bridge that is related to magnetism.

  16. Experimental demonstration of the equivalence of inductive and strongly coupled magnetic resonance wireless power transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, David S.; Chabalko, Matthew J.; Hillenius, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we show experimentally that wireless power transfer (WPT) using strongly coupled magnetic resonance (SCMR) and traditional induction are equivalent. We demonstrate that for a given coil separation, and to within 4%, strongly coupled magnetic resonance and traditional induction produce the same theoretical efficiency of wireless power transfer versus distance. Moreover, we show that the difference between traditional induction and strongly coupled magnetic resonance is in the implementation of the impedance matching network where strongly coupled magnetic resonance uses the mini-loop impedance match. The mini-loop impedance mach provides a low-loss, high-ratio impedance transformation that makes it desirable for longer distance wireless power transfer, where large impedance transformations are needed to maximize power transfer.

  17. Magnetic Separation-Assistant Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition for Highly Sensitive Probing of Nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ran; Liu, Qian; Hong, Zhangyong; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-12-15

    For the widely used "off-on" fluorescence (or phosphorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET or PRET) system, the separation of donors and acceptors species was vital for enhancing the sensitivity. To date, separation of free donors from FRET/PRET inhibition systems was somewhat not convenient, whereas separation of the target-induced far-between acceptors has hardly been reported yet. We presented here a novel magnetic separation-assistant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (MS-FRET) inhibition strategy for highly sensitive detection of nucleolin using Cy5.5-AS1411 as the donor and Fe3O4-polypyrrole core-shell (Fe3O4@PPY) nanoparticles as the NIR quenching acceptor. Due to hydrophobic interaction and π-π stacking of AS1411 and PPY, Cy5.5-AS1411 was bound onto the surface of Fe3O4@PPY, resulting in 90% of fluorescence quenching of Cy5.5-AS1411. Owing to the much stronger specific interaction of AS1411 and nucleolin, the presence of nucleolin could take Cy5.5-AS1411 apart from Fe3O4@PPY and restore the fluorescence of Cy5.5-AS1411. The superparamagnetism of Fe3O4@PPY enabled all separations and fluorescence measurements complete in the same quartz cell, and thus allowed the convenient but accurate comparison of the sensitivity and fluorescence recovery in the cases of separation or nonseparation. Compared to nonseparation FRET inhibition, the separation of free Cy5.5-AS1411 from Cy5.5-AS1411-Fe3O4@PPY solution (the first magnetic separation, MS-1) had as high as 25-fold enhancement of the sensitivity, whereas further separation of the nucleolin-inducing far-between Fe3O4@PPY from the FRET inhibition solution (the second magnetic separation, MS-2) could further enhance the sensitivity to 35-fold. Finally, the MS-FRET inhibition assay displayed the linear range of 0.625-27.5 μg L(-1) (8.1-359 pM) and detection limit of 0.04 μg L(-1) (0.05 pM) of nucleolin. The fluorescence intensity recovery (the percentage ratio of the final restoring fluorescence intensity

  18. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste

    PubMed Central

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods1-3 for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet3 and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)4 have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)5-9, has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  19. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste.

    PubMed

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods(1-3) for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet(3) and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)(4) have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)(5-9), has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  20. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  1. Production of biomolecule microarrays through laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Pradas, Juan Marcos; Serra, Pere; Colina, Monica; Morenza, Jose-Luis

    2004-10-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are a kind of biosensors that consist in patterns of different biological molecules immobilized on a solid substrate and capable to bind specifically to their complementary targets. In particular, DNA and protein microarrays have been revealed to be very efficient devices for genen and protein identification, what has converted them in powerful tools for many applications, like clinical diagnose, drug discovery analysis, genomics and proteomics. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of a liquid solution containing biomolecules without damaging them. In this work laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been used for spotting a biomolecule in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength) has been used to transfer droplets of a biomolecule containing solution onto a solid slide. Optical microscopy of the transferred material has been carried out to investigate the morphological characteristics of the droplets obtained under different irradiation conditions. Afterwards, a DNA microarray has been spotted. The viability of the transference has been tested by checking the biological activity of the biomolecule in front of its specific complementary target. This has revealed that, indeed, the LIFT technique is adequate for the production of DNA microarrays.

  2. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  3. Photo-induced Spin Angular Momentum Transfer into Antiferromagnetic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fan; Fan, Yichun; Ma, Xin; Zhu, J.; Li, Q.; Ma, T. P.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, Z. H.; Zhao, H. B.; Luepke, Gunter; College of William and Mary Team; Department of Physics, Fudan University Team; Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University Team

    2014-03-01

    Spin angular momentum transfer into antiferromagnetic(AFM) insulator is observed in single crystalline Fe/CoO/MgO(001) heterostructure by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE). The transfer process is mediated by the Heisenberg exchange coupling between Fe and CoO spins. Below the Neel temperature(TN) of CoO, the fact that effective Gilbert damping parameter α is independent of external magnetic field and it is enhanced with respect to the intrinsic damping in Fe/MgO, indicates that the damping process involves both the intrinsic spin relaxation and the transfer of Fe spin angular momentum to CoO spins via FM-AFM exchange coupling and then into the lattice by spin-orbit coupling. The work at the College of William and Mary was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. The work at Department of Physics, Fudan, was supported by NSFC. The work at Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan was supported by NSFC and NCET.

  4. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G.; Ernst, D. R.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  5. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  6. Fuel-free locomotion of Janus motors: magnetically induced thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Baraban, Larysa; Streubel, Robert; Makarov, Denys; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy; Schmidt, Oliver G; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-02-26

    We present fuel-free locomotion of magnetic spherical Janus motors driven by magnetically induced thermophoresis--a self-diffusive propulsion of an object in any liquid media due to a local temperature gradient. Within this approach an ac magnetic field is applied to induce thermophoretic motion of the objects via heating a magnetic cap of the particles, while an additional dc magnetic field is used to orient Janus motors and guide their motion on a long time scale. Full control over the motion is achieved due to specific properties of ultrathin 100-nm-thick Permalloy (Py, Fe₁₉Ni₈₁ alloys) magnetic films resulting in a topologically stable magnetic vortex state in the cap structure of Janus motors. Realized here magnetically induced thermophoretic locomotion does not require catalytic chemical reactions that imply toxic reagents. In this respect, we addressed and successfully solved one of the main shortcomings in the field of artificial motors, namely being fully controlled and remain biocompatible. Therefore, our approach is attractive for biotechnological in vitro assays and even in vivo operations, since the functioning of Janus motors offers low toxicity; it is not dependent on the presence of the fuel molecules in solution. Furthermore, the suggested magnetic ac excitation is superior compared to the previously proposed optically induced heating using lasers as it does not require transparent packaging. PMID:23268780

  7. Observation of Magnetically Induced Trap Loss of Ultracold Thulium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalganova, E. S.; Vishnyakova, G. A.; Golovizin, A. A.; Tregubov, D. O.; Sukachev, D. D.; Akimov, A. V.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Sorokin, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    We report the observation of influence of homogeneous magnetic field on an optical lattice losses of ultracold thulium atoms. The atomic cloud temperature was T = 15 mK. The dependence of trap population on a value of magnetic field has a broad resonance in the low-field region with a center at B = 0.4 G. We also have measured a decrease of optical lattice lifetime in a presence of resonance magnetic field. The observed magnetically-induced trap losses are assumed to be Feshbach resonance which is a dependence of an atomic scattering length on magnetic field.

  8. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  9. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-01

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  10. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-28

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  11. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  12. Evaluation of the induced electric field and compliance procedure for a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2013-11-01

    In this study, an induced electric field in a human body is evaluated for the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system for charging an electrical vehicle. The magnetic field from the wireless power transfer system is modelled computationally, and its effectiveness is confirmed by comparison with the field measured in a previous study. The induced electric field in a human standing around the vehicle is smaller than the allowable limit prescribed in international guidelines, although the magnetic field strength in the human body is locally higher than the allowable external field strength. Correlation between the external magnetic field and the induced electric field is confirmed to be reasonable at least in the standing posture, which is the case discussed in the international standard. Based on this finding, we discussed and confirmed the applicability of a three-point magnetic field measurement at heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m for safety compliance. PMID:24107570

  13. Shock induced magnetic effects in fine particle iron dispersions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic effects associated with shock induced transformation of fcc antiferromagnetic iron precipitates in polycrystalline copper disks at levels up to 5 GPa in weak magnetic fields (H not greater than 0.5 Oe) were investigated. The demagnetization and anisotropy associated with second order transition, the effects of plastic deformation in imparting magnetic anisotropy and magnetic hardening, and the influence of post shock thermal transients on magnetization associated with recovery, recrystallization and grain growth were studied. It was found that on the microsecond time scale of the shock induced first order transformation, the field sense is recorded in the transformed iron particles. For a given particle size the degree of transformation of fcc iron depends on the level of the shock. For a given shock level the resultant magnetic properties depend on the particle size distribution, with maximum effects noted in specimens with 400 to 600 A particles.

  14. Magnetic flux transfer in the 5 April 2010 Galaxy 15 substorm: an unprecedented observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M.; Russell, C. T.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-03-01

    At approximately 08:25 UT on 5 April 2010, a CME-driven shock compressed Earth's magnetosphere and applied about 15 nT of southward IMF for nearly an hour. A substorm growth phase and localized dipolarization at 08:47 UT were followed by large dipolarizations at 09:03 UT and 09:08 UT, observed by GOES West (11) in the midnight sector, and by three THEMIS spacecraft near X=-11, Y=-2 RE. A large electric field at the THEMIS spacecraft indicates so much flux transfer to the inner magnetosphere that "overdipolarization" took place at GOES 11. This transfer is consistent with the ground and space magnetic signature of the substorm current wedge. Significant particle injections were also observed. The ensemble of extreme geophysical conditions, never previously observed, is consistent with the Near-Earth Neutral Line interpretation of substorms, and subjected the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite to space weather conditions which appear to have induced a major operational anomaly.

  15. Identifying the magnetoconductance responses by the induced charge transfer complex states in pentacene-based diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Shun; Lee, Tsung-Hsun; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Huang, J. C. A.; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the magnetoconductance (MC) responses in photocurrent, unipolar injection, and bipolar injection regimes in pentacene-based diodes. Both photocurrent and bipolar injection contributed MC responses show large difference in MC line shape, which are attributed to triplet-polaron interaction modulated by the magnetic field dependent singlet fission and the intersystem crossing of the polaron pair, respectively. By blending 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane into pentacene, all the MC responses are suppressed but the MC response at unipolar injection regime is enhanced, which is attributed to the induced charge transfer complex states (CT complex states). This work identify the MC responses between single carrier contributed MC and exciton related MC by the induced CT complex states.

  16. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  17. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  18. Magnetic field control of near-field radiative heat transfer and the realization of highly tunable hyperbolic thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada-Villa, E.; Fernández-Hurtado, V.; García-Vidal, F. J.; García-Martín, A.; Cuevas, J. C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical study of the magnetic field dependence of the near-field radiative heat transfer (NFRHT) between two parallel plates. We show that when the plates are made of doped semiconductors, the near-field thermal radiation can be severely affected by the application of a static magnetic field. We find that irrespective of its direction, the presence of a magnetic field reduces the radiative heat conductance, and dramatic reductions up to 700% can be found with fields of about 6 T at room temperature. We show that this striking behavior is due to the fact that the magnetic field radically changes the nature of the NFRHT. The field not only affects the electromagnetic surface waves (both plasmons and phonon polaritons) that normally dominate the near-field radiation in doped semiconductors, but it also induces hyperbolic modes that progressively dominate the heat transfer as the field increases. In particular, we show that when the field is perpendicular to the plates, the semiconductors become ideal hyperbolic near-field emitters. More importantly, by changing the magnetic field, the system can be continuously tuned from a situation where the surface waves dominate the heat transfer to a situation where hyperbolic modes completely govern the near-field thermal radiation. We show that this high tunability can be achieved with accessible magnetic fields and very common materials like n -doped InSb or Si. Our study paves the way for an active control of NFRHT and it opens the possibility to study unique hyperbolic thermal emitters without the need to resort to complicated metamaterials.

  19. Spin-transfer torque and specific features of magnetic-state switching in vacuum tunnel nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, G. D. Popkov, A. F.; Dyuzhev, N. A.

    2015-12-15

    The specific features of spin-transfer torque in vacuum tunnel structures with magnetic electrodes are investigated using the quasi-classical Sommerfeld model of electron conductivity, which takes into account the exchange splitting of the spin energy subbands of free electrons. Using the calculated voltage dependences of the transferred torques for a tunnel structure with cobalt electrodes and noncollinear magnetic moments in the electrodes, diagrams of stable spin states on the current–field parameter plane in the in-plane geometry of the initial magnetization are obtained.

  20. Effect of an alternating nonuniform magnetic field on ferrofluid flow and heat transfer in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Ashjaee, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Forced convective heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in the presence of an alternating non-uniform magnetic field is investigated numerically. The geometry is a two-dimensional channel which is subjected to a uniform heat flux at the top and bottom surfaces. Nonuniform magnetic field produced by eight line source dipoles is imposed on several parts of the channel. Also, a rectangular wave function is applied to the dipoles in order to turn them on and off alternatingly. The effects of the alternating magnetic field strength and frequency on the convective heat transfer are investigated for four different Reynolds numbers (Re=100, 600, 1200 and 2000) in the laminar flow regime. Comparing the results with zero magnetic field case, show that the heat transfer enhancement increases with the Reynolds number and reaches a maximum of 13.9% at Re=2000 and f=20 Hz. Moreover, at a constant Reynolds number, it increases with the magnetic field intensity while an optimum value exists for the frequency. Also, the optimum frequency increases with the Reynolds number. On the other hand, the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. A maximum pressure drop increase of 6% is observed at Re=2000 and f=5 Hz which shows that the pressure drop increase is not as significant as the heat transfer enhancement.

  1. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  2. Spin-transfer torque on a single magnetic adatom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Fernando; José Palacios, Juan; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquín

    2010-03-01

    We theoretically show how the spin orientation of a single magnetic adatom can be controlled by spin polarized electrons in a scanning tunnelling microscope configuration. The underlying physical mechanism is spin assisted inelastic tunnelling. Experiments with Mn adatoms deposited on a Cu2N surface have been reported for non-polarized currents [1-2]. We show that by changing the direction of the applied current, the orientation of the magnetic adatom can be completely reversed on a time scale that ranges from a few nanoseconds to microseconds, depending on bias and temperature. The changes in the adatom magnetization direction are, in turn, reflected in the tunnelling conductance. Therefore, this effect opens the possibility of writing/reading a single spin without the need of a local magnetic field.[4pt] [1] C.F. Hirjibehedin, C. P. Lutz, A. J. Heinrich, Science 312, 1021 (2006).[0pt] [2] C. Hirjibehedin et al., Science 317, 1199 (2007).

  3. Laser induced vibrational energy transfer in iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langsam, Yedidyah; Ronn, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    The internal kinetics of Fe(CO)5 as well as the kinetics between Fe(CO)5 and other nonreactive species were studied using the technique of laser induced fluorescence. The energy transfer behavior of this large polyatomic is discussed in terms of existing V-V and V-T/R theories and collisional energy transfer. Iron pentacarbonyl's vibrational energy structure is treated by means of a simple three and four level energy transfer scheme. Subsequent to excitation of the 10 μ region by a CO2 laser, infrared fluorescence has been detected from the ˜16, ˜5, and ˜4 μ regions of Fe(CO)5. A single exponential decay rate of 13.6 ms-1 Torr-1 is observed from the ˜5 μ region, in good agreement with other decay rates established for smaller polyatomics possessing similar vibrational level structure. Under conditions of low fluence (˜30 mJ/cm2), this region is activated at a rate of 474 ms-1 Torr-1 suggesting a rapid near resonant collisional energy transfer. Under conditions of high fluence (˜5 J/cm2), the activation of the ˜5 μ region proceeds at a rate of 1250 ms-1 Torr-1 suggesting a different pathway for the determining step of the excitation process. The rare gas deactivation rates as well as those with Ni(CO)4, CO(CO)3No, and CO (as well as the reverse rate) and the crossover rate from excited Fe(CO)5 to CO in high rare gas dilution have also been determined.

  4. Topology and signatures of a model for flux transfer events based on vortex-induced reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.X.; Zhu, Z.W.; Li, F. ); Pu, Z.Y. )

    1992-12-01

    A model of the disturbed magnetic field and disturbed velocity of flux transfer events (FTEs) is deduced on the basis of the vortex-induced reconnection theory. The topology and signatures of FTEs are calculated and discussed. The authors propose that the observed forms of FTE signatures depend on the motional direction of the FTE tube, the positions of the spacecraft relative to the passing FTE tube, and which part of the FTE tube (the magnetosphere part, the magnetopause part, or the magnetosheath part) the spacecraft is passing through. It is found that when a FTE tube moves from south to north along a straight line in the northern hemisphere, positive FTEs appear for most passages; however, reverse FTEs are also observed occasionally while the signatures of B[sub Z] (B[sub L]) appear as a single peak, and the irregular FTEs always correspond to oblique line motions of the FTE tube. The velocity signatures are similar to those of the magnetic field, but in the northern hemisphere their directions are all just opposite to the magnetic field. The calculated results for the magnetic field are compared with 61 observed FTEs. The observed signatures (B[sub N] and B[sub L]) of 52 FTEs are consistent with the calculations. The results indicate that a majority of observed FTEs correspond to passages of spacecraft through the edges of FTE tubes.

  5. Remanent and induced contributions of the Earth's magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervelidou, Foteini; Lesur, Vincent; Thébault, Erwan; Dyment, Jérôme; Holschneider, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Inverting the magnetic field of crustal origin for the magnetization distribution that generates it suffers from non-uniqueness. The reason for this is the so-called annihilators, i.e. structures that produce no visible magnetic field outside the sources. Gubbins et al., 2011 uses the complex vector Spherical Harmonics notation in order to separate the Vertical Integrated Magnetization (VIM) distribution into the parts that do and do not contribute to the magnetic field measured in source free regions. We use their formalism and convert a crustal SH model based on the WDMAM into a model for the equivalent magnetization. However, we extend their formalism and assume that the magnetization is confined within a layer of finite thickness. A different thickness is considered for the oceanic crust than for the continental one. It is well known that the large scales of the crustal field are entirely masked by the Earth's main field. Therefore, we complement the WDMAM based magnetization map (SH degrees 16 to 800) with the magnetization map for the large wavelengths (SH degrees 1-15) that was recently derived by Vervelidou and Thébault (2015) from a series of regional statistical analyses of the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. Finally we propose a tentative separation of this magnetization map into induced and remanent contributions on a regional scale. We do so based on the direction of the core magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these results in terms of the tectonic history of the Earth.

  6. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  7. Ag induced enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shern, C. S.; Su, C. W.; Wu, Y. E.; Chen, S. H.

    2001-12-01

    Some interesting magnetic properties were observed after Ag ultrathin films were deposited on Co/Pt(1 1 1). The spin reversal of Co can be prevented when Ag atoms cap Co on Pt(1 1 1). The out-of-plane magnetization has a significant enhancement after annealing at high temperature. The Curie temperature increases from 625 to 710 K as 1 ML of Ag is deposited on 1 ML Co/Pt(1 1 1). The change of surface anisotropy and the formation of a Co-Pt alloy are possible mechanisms for the magnetization enhancement.

  8. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  9. Magnetic dipolar interaction induced cobalt nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maogang; Dai, Qilin; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-02-19

    The dipolar interaction of magnetic nanoparticles is of intense interest to engineer material self-assembly for anisotropic functional nanostructures. Here we report the solution synthesis of cobalt nanowires, where the one-dimensional nanowire formation is ultimately dependent on the magnetic dipolar interaction to realize in situ assembly of cobalt nanoparticles. The morphology transition of cobalt nanostructures is well controlled via the ligand-free synthesis and thermal decomposition of zero-valent cobalt precursor. This study provides a self-assembly approach to the development of anisotropic cobalt nanostructures and a better understanding of nucleation parameters, which are demonstrated to correlate strongly with the size and morphology of final cobalt nanowires. This approach may be extended to other magnetic materials for the control of their nanostructure and magnetic performance. PMID:26783195

  10. Magnetic Field Induced Changes Of Domain Structure Grating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziewski, A.; Stankiewicz, A.

    1987-10-01

    A stripe domain grating (SDG) has been theoretically analysed to combine some magnetic field changeable grating parameters with a magnetic sample material parameters. The alterable grating properties were discussed for different types of fiber-optic switch device. The quality and prefered directions of SDG have been quantitatively investigated using unconventional set-up based on the light diffraction effect. The gratings have been induced by the magnetic field with different orientations and values. SDG quality was significantly improved applying nontypically oriented magnetic field. We focused our attention on SDG static properties.

  11. Calorimetric Study of Magnetic Field-Induced Phase Transitions in - Fulvalenium) -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortune, Nathanael Alexander

    The particular class of organic conductors known as the Bechgaard salts exhibit a variety of highly anisotropic magnetic, thermal, and electrical phenomena. At low temperatures (below 10 kelvin), the application of a strong magnetic field establishes an effectively lower-dimensional anisotropic Fermi surface, as manifested in a variety of quasi one dimensional and quasi two dimensional thermodynamic and transport properties. Most dramatically, an increasing magnetic field--after suppression of superconductivity, induces a second order phase transition from a metallic to a spin density wave semimetal, followed by a series of first order phase transitions between density wave semimetallic states. This thesis concerns the thermodynamic nature of the low temperature magnetic field induced phase transitions in the Bechgaard charge-transfer salt (TMTSF)2-Cl(O)4. Presented here are the first measurements of the specific heat in magnetic fields up to 30 tesla, as well as the design and construction of a small sample calorimeter capable of operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the challenging environment of the high field resistive Bitter magnets. From transport measurements, the existence of a magnetic field induced reentrance into the metallic state has previously been inferred. In this thesis, the unambiguous bulk thermodynamic character of the reentrance is calorimetrically demonstrated. The behavior of the electronic specific heat at the reentrant transition is shown to be consistent with magnetic field enhanced localization. Additionally, quantum oscillations in the high field semimetallic state and the presence of additional structure above the reentrant field are observed. Although these oscillations have also been observed in magnetoresistance and magnetization, the magnitude of the oscillations in the specific heat calls into question all known models for the physical origin of these oscillations.

  12. Polyclonal Th1 cells transfer oil-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Svelander, L; Müssener, A; Erlandsson-Harris, H; Kleinau, S

    1997-01-01

    T-cells play a critical role in oil-induced arthritis (OIA) in DA rats. The present study focuses on the involvement of CD4/CD8 T cells in OIA by using adoptive transfer. Mitogen-activated T cells from DA rats previously injected with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) were depleted of CD4+ T cells or CD8+ T cells before transfer to irradiated naive receipients. The results indicate that CD4+ T cells are essential for the induction of passively induced OIA. However, in vitro blocking experiments with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the CD4 molecule of the T cells before transfer did not affect the passive OIA. Neither was passive OIA inhibited by treating the CD4+ T cells with mAb to intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in order to block cell-cell interactions or migration. The arthritogenic CD4+ T cells were sensitive, however, to in vitro treatment with mAb to the interleukin-2 receptor, which inhibited the disease or delayed the onset of passive OIA in recipients. The arthritogenic CD4+ T cells were also analysed for expression of specific T-cell receptor (TCR) variable (V) beta chains, critical for recognition of autoantigen, by utilizing V beta gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results show a heterogeneous expression of V beta segments of the TCR, indicating a polyclonal origin of the pathogenic cells. Moreover, an investigation of the T helper (Th)1/Th2 status of the CD4+ T cells, defined by cytokine expression, was made at the mRNA level by using in situ hybridization. High numbers of interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA expressing cells and also interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-expressing cells could be identified. We conclude from this study that non-immunogenic IFA triggers polyclonal, IL-2-dependent Th1 cells which induce arthritis. The contribution of the CD4 or ICAM-1 molecules for arthritis induction seem to be of minor importance. PMID:9227326

  13. Ferrofluid heat transfer treatment in the presence of variable magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the Control Volume-based Finite Element Method (CVFEM) is applied to simulate Fe3O4 -water nanofluid mixed convection heat transfer in a lid-driven semi annulus in the presence of a non-uniform magnetic field. The calculations were performed for different governing parameters, namely, Richardson number, viscosity parameter, nanoparticle volume fraction, magnetic number and Hartmann number. Results show that the Nusselt number has a direct relationship with Richardson number and nanoparticle volume fraction, while it has a reverse relationship with Hartmann number and magnetic number. Also, it can be found that the Nusselt number increases by considering magnetic-field-dependent viscosity.

  14. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. PMID:26708022

  15. Convective Flow Induced by Localized Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric traveling magnetic field induces a meridional base flow in a cylindrical zone of an electrically conducting liquid. This remotely induced flow can be conveniently controlled, in magnitude and direction, and can have benefits for crystal growth applications. In particular, it can be used to offset natural convection. For long vertical cylinders, non-uniform and localized in the propagating direction, magnetic fields are required for this purpose. Here we investigate a particular form of this field, namely that induced by a set of a few electric current coils. An order of magnitude reduction of buoyancy convection is theoretically demonstrated for a vertical Bridgman crystal growth configuration.

  16. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction by combining spin-transfer torque and electric field-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-26

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, in which two successive voltage pulses are applied to utilize both spin-transfer torque and electric field effect. Under this switching scheme, a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is shown to switch faster than by spin-transfer torque alone and more reliably than that by electric fields alone.

  17. Respective influence of in-plane and out-of-plane spin-transfer torques in magnetization switching of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Dieny, B.

    2015-09-01

    The relative contributions of in-plane (damping-like) and out-of-plane (field-like) spin-transfer torques (STT) in the magnetization switching of out-of-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junctions (pMTJ) has been theoretically analyzed using the transformed Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with the STT terms. It is demonstrated that in a pMTJ structure obeying macrospin dynamics, the out-of-plane torque influences the precession frequency, but it does not contribute significantly to the STT switching process (in particular to the switching time and switching current density), which is mostly determined by the in-plane STT contribution. This conclusion is confirmed by finite temperature and finite writing pulse macrospin simulations of the current field switching diagrams. It contrasts with the case of STT switching in in-plane magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) in which the field-like term also influences the switching critical current. This theoretical analysis was successfully applied to the interpretation of voltage field STT switching diagrams experimentally measured on pMTJ pillars 36 nm in diameter, which exhibit macrospin behavior. The physical nonequivalence of Landau and Gilbert dissipation terms in the presence of STT-induced dynamics is also discussed.

  18. Phonon induced magnetism in ionic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Oscar D.; Antolin, Nikolas; Jin, Hyungyu; Heremans, Joseph P.; Windl, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric phenomena in magnetic materials create exciting possibilities in future spin caloritronic devices by manipulating spin information using heat. An accurate understanding of the spin-lattice interactions, i.e. the coupling between magnetic excitations (magnons) and lattice vibrations (phonons), holds the key to unraveling their underlying physics. We report ab initio frozen-phonon calculations of CsI that result in non-zero magnetization when the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electronic density of states is lifted for certain phonon displacement patterns. For those, the magnetization as a function of atomic displacement shows a sharp resonance due to the electronic states on the displaced Cs atoms, while the electrons on indium form a continuous background magnetization. We relate this resonance to the generation of a two-level system in the spin-polarized Cs partial density of states as a function of displacement, which we propose to be described by a simple resonant-susceptibility model. Current work extends these investigations to semiconductors such as InSb. ODR and WW are supported by the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF MRSEC at OSU (Grant DMR-0820414).HJ and JPH are supported by AFOSR MURI Cryogenic Peltier Cooling, Contract #FA9550-10-1-0533.

  19. Chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.

    2013-09-15

    Characteristic equations in magnetized plasma with chirality are derived in simple formulations and the dispersion relations for propagation parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field are studied in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations of each eigenwave, the author explores chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma and investigates the effects of parameters (i.e., chirality degree, external magnetic field, etc.) on the negative refraction. The results show that the chirality is the necessary and only one factor which leads to negative refraction without manipulating electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. Both increasing the degree of chirality and reducing the external magnetic field can result in greater range negative refraction. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  20. Electrodes for microfluidic devices produced by laser induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germain, Chris; Charron, Luc; Lilge, Lothar; Tsui, Ying Y.

    2007-07-01

    The laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) process was used to create conductive lines and pads for rapid prototyping and repairing microdevices. Single 0.1-10 μJ pulses from a 120 fs 800 nm titanium:sapphire laser were used to transfer films consisting of 40-80 nm thick gold to create the lines. Experiments were conducted in air ambient. The laser was focused using 4× and 10× microscope objectives and produced 5-20 μm diameter metal spots which were overlapped to produce conductive lines. Electrodes with widths between 10 and 50 μm have been produced and their resistances have been measured. The resistivities of these LIFT produced Au electrodes were found to be approximately (1-4) × 10 -6 Ω m. It has also been shown that the conductivity of the lines can be further improved by electrical curing. The LIFT process was used to repair heaters for microfluidic applications and preliminarily create electrodes for control of electro-osmotic flow in microfluidic devices.

  1. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic–inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material. PMID:26916536

  2. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  3. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers.

    PubMed

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material. PMID:26916536

  4. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  5. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  6. Biosynthesis of magnetic nanostructures in a foreign organism by transfer of bacterial magnetosome gene clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinko, Isabel; Lohße, Anna; Borg, Sarah; Raschdorf, Oliver; Jogler, Christian; Tu, Qiang; Pósfai, Mihály; Tompa, Éva; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Brachmann, Andreas; Wanner, Gerhard; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming; Schüler, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    The synthetic production of monodisperse single magnetic domain nanoparticles at ambient temperature is challenging. In nature, magnetosomes--membrane-bound magnetic nanocrystals with unprecedented magnetic properties--can be biomineralized by magnetotactic bacteria. However, these microbes are difficult to handle. Expression of the underlying biosynthetic pathway from these fastidious microorganisms within other organisms could therefore greatly expand their nanotechnological and biomedical applications. So far, this has been hindered by the structural and genetic complexity of the magnetosome organelle and insufficient knowledge of the biosynthetic functions involved. Here, we show that the ability to biomineralize highly ordered magnetic nanostructures can be transferred to a foreign recipient. Expression of a minimal set of genes from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense resulted in magnetosome biosynthesis within the photosynthetic model organism Rhodospirillum rubrum. Our findings will enable the sustainable production of tailored magnetic nanostructures in biotechnologically relevant hosts and represent a step towards the endogenous magnetization of various organisms by synthetic biology.

  7. Integrated information storage and transfer with a coherent magnetic device

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ning; Banchi, Leonardo; Bayat, Abolfazl; Dong, Guangjiong; Bose, Sougato

    2015-01-01

    Quantum systems are inherently dissipation-less, making them excellent candidates even for classical information processing. We propose to use an array of large-spin quantum magnets for realizing a device which has two modes of operation: memory and data-bus. While the weakly interacting low-energy levels are used as memory to store classical information (bits), the high-energy levels strongly interact with neighboring magnets and mediate the spatial movement of information through quantum dynamics. Despite the fact that memory and data-bus require different features, which are usually prerogative of different physical systems – well isolation for the memory cells, and strong interactions for the transmission – our proposal avoids the notorious complexity of hybrid structures. The proposed mechanism can be realized with different setups. We specifically show that molecular magnets, as the most promising technology, can implement hundreds of operations within their coherence time, while adatoms on surfaces probed by a scanning tunneling microscope is a future possibility. PMID:26347152

  8. Integrated information storage and transfer with a coherent magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ning; Banchi, Leonardo; Bayat, Abolfazl; Dong, Guangjiong; Bose, Sougato

    2015-01-01

    Quantum systems are inherently dissipation-less, making them excellent candidates even for classical information processing. We propose to use an array of large-spin quantum magnets for realizing a device which has two modes of operation: memory and data-bus. While the weakly interacting low-energy levels are used as memory to store classical information (bits), the high-energy levels strongly interact with neighboring magnets and mediate the spatial movement of information through quantum dynamics. Despite the fact that memory and data-bus require different features, which are usually prerogative of different physical systems--well isolation for the memory cells, and strong interactions for the transmission--our proposal avoids the notorious complexity of hybrid structures. The proposed mechanism can be realized with different setups. We specifically show that molecular magnets, as the most promising technology, can implement hundreds of operations within their coherence time, while adatoms on surfaces probed by a scanning tunneling microscope is a future possibility. PMID:26347152

  9. Development of an Energy Efficient Cryogenic Transfer Line with Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Susta, Joseph T.; Hull, John R.; Demko, Jonathan A.; Britcher, Colin P.; Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Werfel, Frank; Bonnema, Edward C.

    2006-04-01

    In a conventional vacuum-jacketed cryogen transfer line, the major heat transfer is dominated by two modes: i) radiation between the warm outer pipe and the cold inner pipe and ii) thermal conduction through support members and penetrations. Magnetic levitation makes it possible to eliminate the conduction portion by use of non-contact support, consisting of high temperature superconductor (HTS) and permanent magnet (PM). Several transfer line prototypes (including a 6-meter prototype) have been designed and constructed to optimized the levitation and thermal performance. This paper reviews the key design/fabrication issues, such as levitation configuration, levitation force measurement, warm-support design using smart materials, fabrication process, and technical milestones throughout a 3-year period. This novel transfer line offers the potential of significant savings of cryogens and hence reduces the cost of crygon use.

  10. Analytical Method of Correction of B 1 Errors in Mapping of Magnetization Transfer Ratio in Highfield Magnetic Resonance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnykh, V. L.; Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) is a widely used parameter for quantitative estimation of tissues in magnetic resonance tomography (MRT). At the same time, MTR is rather sensitive to errors caused by the nonideal characteristics of magnetic resonance tomographs. In particular, MTR depends strongly on the local inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency field B 1 that limits the MTR application for high magnetic field strengths. In the present research, a simple analytical model of the MTR dependence on B 1 is derived. Based on this model, a correction algorithm is developed using a set of parameters independent of tissue. This algorithm is tested for MTR mapping of the human brain in the field with induction of 3 T. The MTR correction demonstrates high accuracy for a wide range of B 1 inhomogeneities. Combination of the analytical algorithm with fast B 1 mapping enables high-precision MTR brain mapping for neuroimaging applications and analysis of histograms on high-field scanners.

  11. Integration of laser die transfer and magnetic self-assembly for ultra-thin chip placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda Kuran, Emine; Berg, Yuval; Tichem, Marcel; Kotler, Zvi

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the integration of a novel self-assembly method with laser die transfer for ultra-thin chip (UTC) placement. The laser die transfer technique provides high speed chip presentation into the assembly positions on the substrate, where the magnetic self-assembly traps and aligns the chips. Combination of these two technologies allows handling of UTCs without a direct mechanical contact throughout the assembly flow and provides high precision chip placement.

  12. Effect of different magnetic field distributions on laminar ferroconvection heat transfer in horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza; Saffar-avval, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The forced convection heat transfer of ferrofluid steady state laminar flow through a circular axisymmetric horizontal pipe under different magnetic field is the focus of this study. The pipe is under constant heat flux while different linear axial magnetic fields were applied on the ferrofluid with equal magnetic energy. In this scenario, viscosity of ferrofluid is temperature dependent, to capture ferrofluid real behavior a nonlinear Langevin equation was considered for equilibrium magnetization. For this purpose, the set of nonlinear governing PDEs was solved using proper CFD techniques: the finite volume method and SIMPLE algorithm were used to discretize and numerically solve the governing equation in order to obtain thermohydrodynamic flow characteristics. The numerical results show a promising enhancement of up to 135.7% in heat transfer as a consequence of the application of magnetic field. The magnetic field also increases pressure loss of up to 77% along the pipe; but effectiveness (favorable to unfavorable effect ratio) of the magnetic field as a performance index economically justifies its application such that higher magnetic field intensity causes higher effectiveness of up to 1.364.

  13. The permanent and induced magnetic dipole moment of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Lichtenstein, B. R.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field observations with the Apollo 15 subsatellite have been used to deduce the components of both the permanent and induced lunar dipole moments in the orbital plane. The present permanent lunar magnetic dipole moment in the orbital plane is less than 1.3 times ten to the eighteenth power gauss-cu cm. Any uniformly magnetized near surface layer is therefore constrained to have a thickness-magnetization product less than 2.5 emu-cm per g. The induced moment opposes the external field, implying the existence of a substantial lunar ionosphere with a permeability between 0.63 and 0.85. Combining this with recent measures of the ratio of the relative field strength at the ALSEP and Explorer 35 magnetometers indicates that the global lunar permeability relative to the plasma in the geomagnetic tail lobes is between 1.008 and 1.03.

  14. Magnetic island induced bootstrap current on island dynamics in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Spong, D.A.

    2006-02-15

    When a magnetic island is embedded in toroidally symmetric tokamaks, the toroidal symmetry in |B| is broken [K. C. Shaing, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 245003 (2001)]. Here, B is the magnetic field. This broken symmetry induces an additional bootstrap current density in the vicinity of the island. It is illustrated that this island induced bootstrap current density modifies the island evolution equation and imposes a lower limit on the absolute value of the tearing mode stability parameter {delta}{sup '} for the island to be unstable. This lower limit depends on the local poloidal plasma beta {beta}{sub p}, the ratio of the plasma pressure to the poloidal magnetic field pressure. If {beta}{sub p} is high enough, the magnetic island is stable. This mechanism provides an alternative route to stabilize the island.

  15. Magnetic Island Induced Bootstrap Current on Island Dynamics in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A; Shaing, K. C.

    2006-02-01

    When a magnetic island is embedded in toroidally symmetric tokamaks, the toroidal symmetry in |B| is broken [K. C. Shaing, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 245003 (2001)] . Here, B is the magnetic field. This broken symmetry induces an additional bootstrap current density in the vicinity of the island. It is illustrated that this island induced bootstrap current density modifies the island evolution equation and imposes a lower limit on the absolute value of the tearing mode stability parameter |{Delta}{prime}| for the island to be unstable. This lower limit depends on the local poloidal plasma beta {beta}{sub p}, the ratio of the plasma pressure to the poloidal magnetic field pressure. If {beta}{sub p} is high enough, the magnetic island is stable. This mechanism provides an alternative route to stabilize the island.

  16. Electron transfer in mixed-valence tetranuclear iron clusters. Orbital effects and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás-Almenar, J. J.; Coronado, E.; Georges, R.; Gomez-García, C. J.

    1993-11-01

    The energy levels and magnetic properties of mixed-valence iron clusters with cubane structure are studied from a model that takes into account the different electron transfer paths between the e g-type metal orbitals via the p orbitals of the bridging atoms. The interplay between double exchange and superexchange on the magnetic properties are discussed, including distortion effects of the cubane structure from T d to D 2d symmetries.

  17. Magnetotransport and current-induced spin transfer torque in a ferromagnetically contacted graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benhu; Chen, Xiongwen; Wang, Haiyan; Ding, Kai-He; Zhou, Guanghui

    2010-11-10

    We theoretically investigate the spin-dependent transport through a graphene sheet between two ferromagnetic (FM) leads with arbitrary polarization directions at low temperatures, where a magnetic insulator is deposited on the graphene to induce an exchange splitting between spin-up and spin-down carriers. By using standard nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) techniques, it is demonstrated that the density of states (DOS) decreases for spin-up and increases for spin-down when the polarization strength of the two leads in parallel alignment increases. For the electron energy around the exchange splitting, the DOS for both spin-up and spin-down channels is independent of the polarization. In contrast, the conductance increases for spin-up but decreases for spin-down with an increase of the polarization. Interestingly, the magnitude of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) can be dramatically suppressed with the increase of the exchange splitting in graphene. Furthermore, the current-induced spin transfer torque (STT) dependence on the relative angle θ between the magnetic moments of the two leads shows a sine-like behavior and is enhanced with an increase of the polarization and/or the bias voltage. We attribute these spin-resolved effects to the breaking of the insulator-type properties of graphene with an exchange splitting between spin-up and spin-down carriers. PMID:21403343

  18. Structuralization of Magnetic Nanoparticles Induced by Laser Heating in Magnetic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Tomčo, L.; Koneracká, M.; Štelina, J.; Musil, C.

    2010-01-01

    The structuralization of magnetic particles in magnetic fluids due to the thermodiffusion induced by laser light illumination was experimentally observed in two types of magnetic fluids: one based on a mineral oil with magnetite particles covered by a monolayer of oleic acid as a surfactant and the other a kerosene-based magnetic fluid sterically stabilized by a double layer consisting of oleic acid and dodecylbenzenesulphonic acid (DBS). Forced Rayleigh scattering (FRS) showed different behaviors of magnetic particle structuralization in the observed magnetic fluids. While for the case of mineral oil-based magnetic fluids, there was observed a positive thermodiffusion ( S > 0), an indication of negative thermodiffusion ( S < 0) was observed in magnetic fluids based on kerosene. This was also confirmed by the time-dependent decay of a grating of magnetic particles. Numerical simulation of aggregation for the case of negative thermodiffusion was confirmed by the observed aggregation after laser illumination in kerosene-based magnetic fluids and enabled an estimated value of the negative Soret constant in the magnetic fluid studied ( S ≈ -10-2 K -1).

  19. Ensemble simulations of the ocean induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, Christopher; Saynisch, Jan; Hagedoorn, Jan M.; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The recent advent of new high-resolution datasets of electromagnetic induction allows novel combinations of observations and models. The ocean induced magnetic field provides the potential to indirectly observe the ocean general circulation and may be utilized by data assimilation techniques. The modelling of the ocean induced magnetic field is affected by various uncertainties that originate from errors in the input data and from the applied model itself. The amount of aggregated uncertainties and their effect on the modelling of electromagnetic induction in the ocean is unknown. However, the knowledge of model uncertainties is essential for many research questions. To investigate the uncertainty in the modelling of motional induction, ensemble simulations with an ocean general circulation model and an electromagnetic induction model are performed on the basis of different error scenarios. This approach allows to estimate both the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the uncertainty. The largest uncertainty in the motionally induced magnetic field occurs in the area of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Local maxima reach values of up to 0.7 nano Tesla (nT). The estimated global annual mean uncertainty in the motionally induced magnetic field ranges from 0.1 to 0.4 nT. The relative amount of uncertainty reaches up to 30 % of the induced magnetic signal strength with largest values in regions in the northern hemisphere. The major source of uncertainty is found to be introduced by the wind stress from the atmospheric forcing of the ocean model. In addition, the temporal evolution of the uncertainty in the motionally induced magnetic field shows distinct seasonal variations. Specific regions are identified which are robust with respect to the introduced uncertainties.

  20. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  1. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q Y; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×10(9) A/m(2) under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  2. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only.

  3. Mechanically induced magnetic diffusion in cylindrical magnetoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the radial dependence of magnetic diffusion in cylindrical magnetoelastic materials that results from the simultaneous application of a constant surface magnetic field and a dynamic mechanical input. Mechanically induced magnetic diffusion is particularly pronounced in materials that exhibit a strong magnetoelastic coupling, such as magnetostrictive materials and ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. Analytical time- and frequency-domain solutions of the PDE governing the radial diffusion of magnetic field are derived. The solutions are non-dimensionalized by deriving a skin depth and cut-off frequency for mechanically induced diffusion, which are about 2.08 and 4.34 times those for field-induced diffusion, respectively. It is shown that the effects of mechanically induced diffusion can be incorporated in linear constitutive models through the use of a complex-valued, frequency-dependent magnetoelastic coupling coefficient and Young's modulus. The solutions show that for forcing frequencies f up to about the cut-off frequency, the magnitude of the steady-state, dynamic field increases in proportion to f. As forcing frequency increases above that range, the magnitude overshoots its high frequency limit, peaks, then decreases to its high frequency limit, at which point the dynamic magnetic flux becomes zero and continued increases in forcing frequency have no effect. Together, the derived frequency responses, skin depth, and cut-off frequency can be used to design magnetoelastic systems and determine if lamination of the magnetoelastic material is necessary

  4. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    We report magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet on-demand manipulation by coating a liquid metal with ferromagnetic materials. The gallium-based liquid metal alloy has a challenging drawback that it is instantly oxidized in ambient air, resulting in surface wetting on most surfaces. When the oxidized surface of the droplet is coated with ferromagnetic materials, it is non-wettable and can be controlled by applying an external magnetic field. We coated the surface of a liquid metal droplet with either an electroplated CoNiMnP layer or an iron (Fe) particle by simply rolling the liquid metal droplet on an Fe particle bed. For a paper towel, the minimum required magnetic flux density to initiate movement of the ~8 μL Fe-particle-coated liquid metal droplet was 50 gauss. Magnetic-field-induced liquid metal droplet manipulation was investigated under both horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. Compared to the CoNiMnP-electroplated liquid metal droplet, the Fe-particle-coated droplet could be well controlled because Fe particles were uniformly coated on the surface of the droplet. With a maximum applied magnetic flux density of ~1,600 gauss, the CoNiMnP layer on the liquid metal broke down, resulting in fragmentation of three smaller droplets, and the Fe particle was detached from the liquid metal surface and was re-coated after the magnetic field had been removed.

  5. Computations of wind-driven ocean-induced magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachl, Libor; Einspigel, David; Martinec, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of computations of the secondary magnetic field induced by ocean motions. Ocean velocities are computed using the baroclinic ocean model LSOMG. The velocities are then used to determine the Lorentz force which is plugged into the magnetic induction code TLAM as a principal forcing. The TLAM is a 2D magnetic induction code based on the thin-shell approximation (Vivier et al., 2004; Tyler et al., 1997). In this approximation, the equation of magnetic induction simplifies significantly, time derivatives of main and induced magnetic fields are neglected as well as the self-induction term. The price for simplification of governing equations is the limited applicability of the resulting system. It is only suitable for slowly evolving processes. In order to meet the condition, we restrict ourselves to the wind (buoyancy) driven ocean circulation, although the LSOMG model is able to model both tidally- and wind-driven circulations. We assess the accuracy of thin-shell approximation in our setup by comparing the results with the Swarm satellite magnetic data. References Tyler, R. H., Mysak, L. A., and Oberhuber, J. M, 1997. Electromagnetic fields generated by a three dimensional global ocean circulation. J. Geophys. Res., 102, 5531-5551. Vivier, F., Meier-Reimer, E., and Tyler, R. H., 2004. Simulations of magnetic fields generated by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at satellite altitude: Can geomagnetic measurements be used to monitor the flow? Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L10306, doi:10.1029/2004GL019804.

  6. Influence of external magnetic field on laser-induced gold nanoparticles fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, A. A.; Rakov, I. I.; Simakin, A. V.; Kuzmin, P. G.; Shafeev, G. A.; Mikhailova, G. N.; Antonova, L. Kh.; Troitskii, A. V.; Kuzmin, G. P.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-assisted fragmentation is an efficient method of the nanoparticles size and morphology control. However, its exact mechanisms are still under consideration. One of the remaining problems is the plasma formation, inevitably occurring upon the high intensity laser irradiation. In this Letter, the role of the laser-induced plasma is studied via introduction of high-intensity external magnetic field (up to 7.5 T). Its presence is found to cause the plasma emission to start earlier regarding to a laser pulse, also increasing the plume luminosity. Under these conditions, the acceleration of nanoparticles fragmentation down to a few nanometers is observed. Laser-induced plasma interaction with magnetic field and consequent energy transfer from plasma to nanoparticles are discussed.

  7. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  8. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T.; Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  9. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  10. Disorder-induced microscopic magnetic memory

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, M.S.; Buechler, C.R.; Sorenson, L.B.; Turner, J.J.; Kevan, S.D.; Jagla, E.A.; Deutsch, J.M.; Mai, T.; Narayan, O.; Davies, J.E.; Liu, K.; Hunter-Dunn, J.; Chesnel, K.M.; Kortright, J.B.; Hellwig, O.; Fullerton, E.E.

    2005-01-06

    Using coherent x-ray speckle metrology, we have measured the influence of disorder on major loop return point memory (RPM) and complementary point memory (CPM) for a series of perpendicular anisotropy Co/Pt multilayer films. In the low disorder limit, the domains structures show no memory with field cycling - no PRM and no CPM. With increasing disorder, we observe the onset and the saturation of both the RPM and the CPM. These results provide the first direct ensemble-sensitive experimental study of the effects of varying disorder on microscopic magnetic memory and are compared against the predictions of existing theories.

  11. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  12. Magnetically-induced electric polarization in an organo-metallic magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Zapf, W S; Fabris, F W; Balakirev, F F; Francoual, S M; Kenzelmann, M; Chen, Y

    2009-01-01

    The coupling between magnetic order and ferroelectricity has been under intense investigation in a wide range of transition metal oxides. The strongest coupling is obtained in so-called magnetically induced multiferroics where ferroelectricity arises directly from magnetic order that breaks inversion symmetry. However, it has been difficult to find non-oxide based materials in which these effects occur. Here we present a study of copper dimethyl sulfoxide dichloride (CDC), an organometallic quantum magnet containing S =1/1 Cu spins, in which a switchable electric polarization arises from field-tuned magnetic order. Fast magnetic field pulses allow us to perform sensitive measurements of the electric polarization and demonstrate that the electric state is present only if the magnetic order is non-collinear. Furthermore, we show that the electric polarization can be switched in a stunning hysteretic fashion. Because the magnetic order in CDC is mediated by large organic molecules, our study shows that magnetoelectric interactions can exist in this important class of materials, opening the road to designing magnetoelectrics and multiferroics using large molecules as building blocks. Further, we demonstrate that CDC undergoes a magnetoelectric quantum phase transition -the first of its kind, where both ferroelectric and magnetic order emerge simultaneously as a function of magnetic field at very low temperatures.

  13. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  14. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure.

  15. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S P; Wong, A T; Glavic, A; Herklotz, A; Urban, C; Valmianski, I; Biegalski, M D; Christen, H M; Ward, T Z; Lauter, V

    2016-01-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure. PMID:26940159

  16. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-01-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure. PMID:26940159

  17. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-04

    We realize that a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized and by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate.more » These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. In our study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure.« less

  18. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  19. Lunar magnetic field - Permanent and induced dipole moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo 15 subsatellite magnetic field observations have been used to measure both the permanent and the induced lunar dipole moments. Although only an upper limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 18th gauss-cubic centimeters has been determined for the permanent dipole moment in the orbital plane, there is a significant induced dipole moment which opposes the applied field, indicating the existence of a weak lunar ionosphere.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles as bimodal tools in magnetically induced labelling and magnetic heating of tumour cells: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettering, M.; Winter, J.; Zeisberger, M.; Bremer-Streck, S.; Oehring, H.; Bergemann, C.; Alexiou, C.; Hergt, R.; Halbhuber, K. J.; Kaiser, W. A.; Hilger, I.

    2007-05-01

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles continue to be an active area of cancer research. The present study uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) as bimodal tools and combines magnetically induced cell labelling and magnetic heating. The main focus was to assess if a selective and higher MNP accumulation within tumour cells due to magnetic labelling (max. 56 and 83 mT) and consequently a larger heating effect occurs after exposure to an alternating magnetic field (magnetic heating: frequency 400 kHz, amplitude 24.6 kA m-1) in order to eliminate labelled tumour cells effectively. The results demonstrate that the magnetically based cellular MNP uptake by human adenocarcinoma cells is due to suitable magnetic field gradients in vitro which intensify the temperature increase generated during magnetic heating. A significantly (P<=0.05) enhanced MNP cell uptake due to 83 mT labelling compared to controls or to 56 mT labelling was observed. Our experiments required the following conditions, namely a cell concentration of 2.5 × 107 cells ml-1, a minimum MNP concentration of 0.32 mg Fe ml-1 culture medium, and an incubation time of 24 h, to reach this effect as well as for the significantly enlarged heating effects to occur.

  1. Magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coatings from one-pot synthesized hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hongxia; Xue, Yuhua; Wang, Xungai; Lin, Tong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the production of superhydrophobic coatings on various substrates (e.g., glass slide, silicon wafer, aluminum foil, plastic film, nanofiber mat, textile fabrics) using hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles and a magnet-assembly technique. Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with a thin layer of fluoroalkyl silica on the surface were synthesized by one-step coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) under an alkaline condition in the presence of a fluorinated alkyl silane. Under a magnetic field, the magnetic nanoparticles can be easily deposited on any solid substrate to form a thin superhydrophobic coating with water contact angle as high as 172 degrees , and the surface superhydrophobicity showed very little dependence on the substrate type. The particulate coating showed reasonable durability because of strong aggregation effect of nanoparticles, but the coating layer can be removed (e.g., by ultrasonication) to restore the original surface feature of the substrates. By comparison, the thin particle layer deposited under no magnetic field showed much lower hydrophobicity. The main reason for magnet-induced superhydrophobic surfaces is the formation of nano- and microstructured surface features. Such a magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coating may have wide applications in electronic, biomedical, and defense-related areas. PMID:20397642

  2. Gyro-induced acceleration of magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Borgogno, D.

    2013-09-15

    The linear and nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection in collisionless high-temperature plasmas with a strong guide field is analyzed on the basis of a two-dimensional gyrofluid model. The linear growth rate of the reconnecting instability is compared to analytical calculations over the whole spectrum of linearly unstable wave numbers. In the strongly unstable regime (large Δ′), the nonlinear evolution of the reconnecting instability is found to undergo two distinctive acceleration phases separated by a stall phase in which the instantaneous growth rate decreases. The first acceleration phase is caused by the formation of strong electric fields close to the X-point due to ion gyration, while the second acceleration phase is driven by the development of an open Petschek-like configuration due to both ion and electron temperature effects. Furthermore, the maximum instantaneous growth rate is found to increase dramatically over its linear value for decreasing diffusion layers. This is a consequence of the fact that the peak instantaneous growth rate becomes weakly dependent on the microscopic plasma parameters if the diffusion region thickness is sufficiently smaller than the equilibrium magnetic field scale length. When this condition is satisfied, the peak reconnection rate asymptotes to a constant value.

  3. Electric-field control of magnetism via strain transfer across ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interfaces.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-12-23

    By taking advantage of the coupling between magnetism and ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic (FM)/ferroelectric (FE) multiferroic interfaces play a pivotal role in manipulating magnetism by electric fields. Integrating the multiferroic heterostructures into spintronic devices significantly reduces energy dissipation from Joule heating because only an electric field is required to switch the magnetic element. New concepts of storage and processing of information thus can be envisioned when the electric-field control of magnetism is a viable alternative to the traditional current based means of controlling magnetism. This article reviews some salient aspects of the electric-field effects on magnetism, providing a short overview of the mechanisms of magneto-electric (ME) coupling at the FM/FE interfaces. A particular emphasis is placed on the ME effect via interfacial magneto-elastic coupling arising from strain transfer from the FE to FM layer. Recent results that demonstrate the electric-field control of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic order, magnetic domain wall motion, and etc are described. Obstacles that need to be overcome are also discussed for making this a reality for future device applications. PMID:26613163

  4. Electric-field control of magnetism via strain transfer across ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-12-01

    By taking advantage of the coupling between magnetism and ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic (FM)/ferroelectric (FE) multiferroic interfaces play a pivotal role in manipulating magnetism by electric fields. Integrating the multiferroic heterostructures into spintronic devices significantly reduces energy dissipation from Joule heating because only an electric field is required to switch the magnetic element. New concepts of storage and processing of information thus can be envisioned when the electric-field control of magnetism is a viable alternative to the traditional current based means of controlling magnetism. This article reviews some salient aspects of the electric-field effects on magnetism, providing a short overview of the mechanisms of magneto-electric (ME) coupling at the FM/FE interfaces. A particular emphasis is placed on the ME effect via interfacial magneto-elastic coupling arising from strain transfer from the FE to FM layer. Recent results that demonstrate the electric-field control of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic order, magnetic domain wall motion, and etc are described. Obstacles that need to be overcome are also discussed for making this a reality for future device applications.

  5. Light-induced excited spin state trapping and charge transfer in trigonal bipyramidal cyanide-bridged complexes.

    PubMed

    Funck, Kristen E; Prosvirin, Andrey V; Mathonière, Corine; Clérac, Rodolphe; Dunbar, Kim R

    2011-04-01

    Three members of the family of trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) complexes of general formula [M(tmphen)(2)](3)[M'(CN)(6)](2) (tmphen = 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) or [M(3)M'(2)], which are known to exhibit thermally induced spin crossover and charge transfer, have been investigated for optical and photomagnetic properties. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) effect found in classical spin crossover compounds, such as [Fe(phen)(2)(NCS)(2)], was explored for the [Fe(3)Fe(2)] and [Fe(3)Co(2)] compounds. Similarly, inspired by the light-induced charge-transfer properties of K(0.2)Co(1.4)[Fe(CN)(6)]·6.9H(2)O and related Prussian blue materials, the possibility of photo-induced magnetic changes was investigated for the [Co(3)Fe(2)] TBP complex. Optical reflectivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to evaluate the photoactivity of these compounds. A comparison of these data before and after light irradiation demonstrates that (i) the spin crossover of the Fe(II) centers in the [Fe(3)Fe(2)] and [Fe(3)Co(2)] analogues and the (ii) charge transfer events in the [Co(3)Fe(2)] complex occur with temperature and irradiation. In addition, photomagnetic behavior is exhibited by all three compounds. The photo-conversion efficiency has been estimated at 20% of photo-induced high spin Fe(II) centers in [Fe(3)Co(2)], 30% of paramagnetic Co(II)-Fe(III) pairs in [Co(3)Fe(2)], and less than 2% of photo-induced high spin Fe(II) centers in [Fe(3)Fe(2)]. PMID:21391549

  6. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  7. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. PMID:26822395

  8. Effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    A two-fluid, two-dimensional model of the plasma expansion in a divergent magnetic nozzle is used to investigate the effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on the acceleration and divergence of the plasma jet self-consistently. The induced field is diamagnetic and opposes the applied one, increasing the divergence of the magnetic nozzle and weakening its strength. This has a direct impact on the propulsive performance of the device, the demagnetization and detachment of the plasma, and can lead to the appearance of zero-field points and separatrix surfaces downstream. In contrast, the azimuthal induced field, albeit non-zero, is small in all cases of practical interest.

  9. Efficiency analysis of magnetic resonance wireless power transfer with three-dimensional transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. F.; Huang, X. L.; Wang, W.

    2015-05-01

    Generally, the transfer power of wireless power transfer (WPT) system reduces significantly with the increase of distance and angle between transmitting and receiving coils in traditional WPT system. Experiments with two transmitters in the magnetic resonance coupling WPT system have been shown that it can enlarge transfer power and create a stable region in power transfer efficiency in a certain space. However, two transmitters have a limited transfer power comparing to the three-dimensional WPT. In this paper, a model of WPT system with three-dimensional transmitters (3DT-WPT), which are perpendicular to each other and so cover three dimensional spaces, is proposed to overcome the drawbacks mentioned above and the 3DT-WPT system via magnetic resonance coupling is designed to verify the proposed model. The diversity of the characteristics of the transfer power is observed through changing the distance and normal angle between transmitting and receiving coils. Analysis and experiment results show that the proposed method has better performance than the two transmitters.

  10. Voltage dependence properties of ballistic spin currents and spin transfer torques in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chshiev, Mairbek

    2009-03-01

    Interest in spintronics [1] has been strongly accentuated by the discovery of current induced magnetization switching caused by spin transfer torque (STT) [2]. Among the most favorable candidate systems for the realization of STT-based spintronic devices are epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) [3]. Here we present a systematic study of voltage-induced STT in MTJs and provide an insight into the nature of its voltage behavior by investigating the properties of ballistic spin currents [4,5]. We demonstrate that the band filling has a dramatic impact on voltage dependence properties of both STT components, tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as well as on equilibrium interlayer exchange coupling [5]. Both in-plane (Slonczewski) and perpendicular-to-the-plane (field-like) STT components demonstrate a wide range of nontrivial behavior as a function of applied voltage [4,5]. The explanation is given in terms of the spin and charge current dependence on the interplay between evanescent states in the insulator and the Fermi surfaces of the ferromagnetic electrodes comprising the MTJ [5]. In particular we show that in ballistic regime the field-like torque is an even parity function of applied voltage while the parallel torque may exhibit a wide range of behavior [4,5]. Recent experiments [6] are in agreement with these predictions. Calculations are based on the non-equilibrium Green functions technique.[4pt] [1] A. Fert et al, Mat. Sci. Eng. B, 84, 1 (2001); S. A. Wolf, Science, 294, 1488 (2001)[0pt] [2] J. C. Slonczewski, J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 159, L1 (1996); L. Berger, Phys. Rev. B 54, 9353 (1996[0pt] [3] W. H. Butler et al, Phys. Rev. B, 63, 054416 (2001); J. Mathon and A. Umerski, Phys. Rev. B, 63, 220403(R) (2001)[0pt] [4] I. Theodonis et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 237205 (2006)[0pt] [5] M. Chshiev et al. IEEE Trans. Mag. 44 (11) (2008); A. Kalitsov et al., submitted[0pt] [6] H. Kubota et al, Nature Physics 4, 37 (2008); J. C. Sankey et al, ibid. 4, 67 (2008); A. Deac et

  11. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  12. Highly sensitive detection and stochastic analysis of magnetization agitation induced in a single layered magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Motoi, Keiichi; Miyajima, Hideki

    2016-03-01

    This study shows that broadband magnetic noise in a ferromagnetic wire can be detected over a wide frequency range between 500 MHz and 8 GHz using a lock-in detection technique. The magnetic noise spectrum from a 20 nm-thick single-layered Fe19Ni81 wire biased with a dc current is measured as functions of an external field and dc current. This noise is caused by thermal agitation in magnetization due to ambient temperature and Joule heating. The noise behaviors are well reproduced by a stochastic model. Thus, this paper presents a stochastic analysis of magnetic noise behaviors induced by thermal agitation using a highly sensitive technique for detecting the magnetic noise in a single layered ferromagnetic wire.

  13. Binding of biological effectors on magnetic nanoparticles measured by a magnetically induced transient birefringence experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, C.; Gazeau, F.; Roger, J.; Pons, J. N.; Salis, M. F.; Perzynski, R.; Bacri, J. C.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the relaxation of the magnetically induced birefringence in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in order to detect the binding reaction of polyclonal antibodies on the particle surface. The birefringence relaxation is driven by the rotational diffusion of the complex formed by the magnetic nanoparticles bound to the antibody and thus is directly related to the hydrodynamic size of this complex. Birefringence relaxations are well described by stretched exponential laws revealing a polydisperse distribution of hydrodynamic diameters. Comparing the size distribution of samples with different initial ratios of immunoglobuline added per magnetic nanoparticles, we evidence the graft of an antibody on particle and eventually the onset of particles agregation. Measurements on samples separated in size by gel filtration demonstrate the robustness of our experiment for the determination of size distribution and its modification due to the adsorption of a macromolecule. The immunoglobuline binding assay is performed comparatively for ionic magnetic nanoparticles with different coatings.

  14. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  15. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  16. Bistable Magnetism and Potential for Voltage-Induced Spin Crossover in Dilute Magnetic Ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Weston, L; Cui, X Y; Ringer, S P; Stampfl, C

    2015-06-19

    A first-principles investigation into the magnetic ferroelectric PbTi(1-x)Co(x)O(3) has revealed a bi-stable magnetic system with strong spin-lattice coupling. The local distortions induced by the low-spin to high-spin crossover are ferroelectric in nature, and are characterized by the displacement of the dopant ion with respect to the surrounding O(6) octahedral cage. We demonstrate how this spin-lattice effect could mediate magnetoelectric coupling and possible electric field induced spin-crossover, indicating a promising route to voltage manipulation of isolated spins in a solid-state system. PMID:26197012

  17. Magnetic-Polaron-Induced Enhancement of Surface Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qi; Liao, Fan; Ruotolo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The studies of the effects of magnetic field on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been so far limited to the case of ferromagnetic/noble-metal, core/shell nano-particles, where the influence was always found to be negative. In this work, we investigate the influence of magnetic field on a diluted magnetic semiconductor/metal SERS system. Guided by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, a high efficient SERS substrate was obtained by diluting Mn into Au-capped ZnO, which results in an increase of the dielectric constant and, therefore, an enhancement of Raman signals. More remarkably, an increase of intensities as well as a reduction of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of Raman signals have been observed as a function of the external magnetic strength. We ascribe these positive influences to magnetic-field induced nucleation of bound magnetic polarons in the Mn doped ZnO. The combination of diluted magnetic semiconductors and SERS may open a new avenue for future magneto-optical applications. PMID:26754049

  18. Spin jam induced by quantum fluctuations in a frustrated magnet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana; Dissanayake, Sachith; Ueda, Hiroaki; Klich, Israel; Iida, Kazuki; Pajerowski, Daniel; Butch, Nicholas P; Huang, Q; Copley, John R D; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2015-09-15

    Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for existence of a glassy state, which we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr(3+) (s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-2D triangular system of bipyramids. Our experimental data show that as the nonmagnetic Ga(3+) impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: an exotic glassy state, which we call a spin jam, for the high magnetic concentration region (p > 0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration (p < 0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states of dense frustrated magnets can be understood. PMID:26324917

  19. Magnetic-Polaron-Induced Enhancement of Surface Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Liao, Fan; Ruotolo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The studies of the effects of magnetic field on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been so far limited to the case of ferromagnetic/noble-metal, core/shell nano-particles, where the influence was always found to be negative. In this work, we investigate the influence of magnetic field on a diluted magnetic semiconductor/metal SERS system. Guided by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, a high efficient SERS substrate was obtained by diluting Mn into Au-capped ZnO, which results in an increase of the dielectric constant and, therefore, an enhancement of Raman signals. More remarkably, an increase of intensities as well as a reduction of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of Raman signals have been observed as a function of the external magnetic strength. We ascribe these positive influences to magnetic-field induced nucleation of bound magnetic polarons in the Mn doped ZnO. The combination of diluted magnetic semiconductors and SERS may open a new avenue for future magneto-optical applications. PMID:26754049

  20. Spin jam induced by quantum fluctuations in a frustrated magnet

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana; Dissanayake, Sachith; Ueda, Hiroaki; Klich, Israel; Iida, Kazuki; Pajerowski, Daniel; Butch, Nicholas P.; Huang, Q.; Copley, John R. D.; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for existence of a glassy state, which we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-2D triangular system of bipyramids. Our experimental data show that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: an exotic glassy state, which we call a spin jam, for the high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states of dense frustrated magnets can be understood. PMID:26324917

  1. THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION THROUGH A COMPRESSED RANDOM MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Hughes, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the radiative transfer of synchrotron radiation in the presence of a magnetic field configuration resulting from the compression of a highly disordered magnetic field. It is shown that, provided Faraday rotation and circular polarization can be neglected, the radiative transfer equations for synchrotron radiation separate for this configuration, and the intensities and polarization values for sources that are uniform on large scales can be found straightforwardly in the case where opacity is significant. Although the emission and absorption coefficients must, in general, be obtained numerically, the process is much simpler than a full numerical solution to the transfer equations. Some illustrative results are given and an interesting effect, whereby the polarization increases while the magnetic field distribution becomes less strongly confined to the plane of compression, is discussed. The results are of importance for the interpretation of polarization near the edges of lobes in radio galaxies and of bright features in the parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei, where such magnetic field configurations are believed to exist.

  2. Magnetization transfer proportion: a simplified measure of dose response for polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Heather M.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Gore, John C.

    2008-12-01

    The response to radiation of polymer gel dosimeters has most often been described by measuring the nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate as a function of dose. This approach is highly dependent upon the choice of experimental parameters, such as the echo spacing time for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill-type pulse sequences, and is difficult to optimize in imaging applications where a range of doses are applied to a single gel, as is typical for practical uses of polymer gel dosimetry. Moreover, errors in computing dose can arise when there are substantial variations in the radiofrequency (B1) field or resonant frequency, as may occur for large samples. Here we consider the advantages of using magnetization transfer imaging as an alternative approach and propose the use of a simplified quantity, the magnetization transfer proportion (MTP), to assess doses. This measure can be estimated through two simple acquisitions and is more robust in the presence of some sources of system imperfections. It also has a dependence upon experimental parameters that is independent of dose, allowing simultaneous optimization at all dose levels. The MTP is shown to be less susceptible to B1 errors than are CPMG measurements of R2. The dose response can be optimized through appropriate choices of the power and offset frequency of the pulses used in magnetization transfer imaging.

  3. Spin-transfer-torque-assisted magnetization reversal in spin-valve strips using the spin-pumping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Mao; Nozaki, Yukio

    2016-06-01

    The modulation of a switching field by a spin-transfer torque generated by the spin-pumping effect is demonstrated in spin-valve strips. A spin current pumped into a spin valve prefers an antiparallel configuration of magnetization, so that the hysteresis loop of a soft magnetic layer is shifted by applying an alternating-current magnetic field with a frequency that matched the resonant condition of a hard magnetic layer. Furthermore, we confirmed that an alternating spin current generated by the spin pumping in the hard magnetic layer produces an orthogonal magnetic torque that can reduce the coercive field of the soft magnetic layer.

  4. Electric and magnetic surface polariton mediated near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials made of silicon carbide particles.

    PubMed

    Francoeur, Mathieu; Basu, Soumyadipta; Petersen, Spencer J

    2011-09-26

    Near-field radiative heat transfer between isotropic, dielectric-based metamaterials is analyzed. A potassium bromide host medium comprised of silicon carbide (SiC) spheres with a volume filling fraction of 0.4 is considered for the metamaterial. The relative electric permittivity and relative magnetic permeability of the metamaterial are modeled via the Clausius-Mossotti relations linking the macroscopic response of the medium with the polarizabilities of the spheres. We show for the first time that electric and magnetic surface polariton (SP) mediated near-field radiative heat transfer occurs between dielectric-based structures. Magnetic SPs, existing in TE polarization, are physically due to strong magnetic dipole resonances of the spheres. We find that spherical inclusions with radii of 1 μm (or greater) are needed in order to induce SPs in TE polarization. On the other hand, electric SPs existing in TM polarization are generated by surface modes of the spheres, and are thus almost insensitive to the size of the inclusions. We estimate that the total heat flux around SP resonance for the metamaterial comprised of SiC spheres with radii of 1 μm is about 35% greater than the flux predicted between two bulks of SiC, where only surface phonon-polaritons in TM polarization are excited. The results presented in this work show that the near-field thermal spectrum can be engineered via dielectric-based metamaterials, which is crucial in many emerging technologies, such as in nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic power generation. PMID:21996819

  5. Magnetically Suspended Linear Pulse Motor for Semiconductor Wafer Transfer in Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriyama, Shin-Ichi; Hiraki, Naoji; Watanabe, Katsuhide; Kanemitsu, Yoichi

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a magnetically suspended linear pulse motor for a semiconductor wafer transfer robot in a vacuum chamber. The motor can drive a wafer transfer arm horizontally without mechanical contact. In the construction of the magnetic suspension system, four pairs of linear magnetic bearings for the lift control are used for the guidance control as well. This approach allows us to make the whole motor compact in size and light in weight. The tested motor consists of a double-sided stator and a transfer arm with a width of 50 mm and a total length of 700 mm. The arm, like a ladder in shape, is designed as the floating element with a tooth width of 4 mm (a tooth pitch of 8 mm). The mover mass is limited to about 1.6 kg by adopting such an arm structure, and the ratio of thrust to mover mass reaches to 3.2 N/kg under a broad air gap (1 mm) between the stator teeth and the mover teeth. The performance testing was carried out with a transfer distance less than 450 mm and a transfer speed less than 560 mm/s. The attitude of the arm was well controlled by the linear magnetic bearings with a combined use, and consequently the repeatability on the positioning of the arm reached to about 2 micron. In addition, the positioning accuracy was improved up to about 30 micron through a compensation of the 128-step wave current which was used for the micro-step drive with a step increment of 62.5 micron.

  6. How fast is optically induced electron transfer in organic mixed valence systems?

    PubMed

    Lambert, C; Moos, M; Schmiedel, A; Holzapfel, M; Schäfer, J; Kess, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-28

    The rate of thermally induced electron transfer in organic mixed valence compounds has thoroughly been investigated by e.g. temperature dependent ESR spectroscopy. However, almost nothing is known about the dynamics of optically induced electron transfer processes in such systems. Therefore, we investigated these processes in mixed valence compounds based on triphenylamine redox centres bridged by conjugated spacers by NIR transient absorption spectroscopy with fs-time resolution. These experiments revealed an internal conversion (IC) process to be on the order of 50-200 fs which is equivalent to the back electron transfer after optical excitation into the intervalence charge transfer band. This IC is followed by ultrafast cooling to the ground state within 1 ps. Thus, in the systems investigated optically induced electron transfer is about 3-4 orders of magnitude faster than thermally induced ET. PMID:27376572

  7. Modelling of Ocean Induced Magnetic Signals in Swarm Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einspigel, D.; Velimsky, J.; Martinec, Z.; Sachl, L.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the motion of sea water in the Earth's main magnetic field induces the secondary magnetic field which can be measured by satellite, land-based or sea surface magnetic measurements, despite being rather weak, reaching intensities of up to a few nT. We focus on the extraction of ocean induced signals from Swarm satellite data and their interpretation by a comparison with synthetic signals. Results of our modeling and data processing efforts will be presented. We use two ocean circulation models: 1) DEBOT, a barotropic model of ocean tide flow and 2) LSOMG, a baroclinic model of global ocean circulation; and two different approaches for modelling the secondary magnetic field: 1) a single-layer approximation model and 2) a three-dimensional time-domain electromagnetic induction model. Swarm data are analyzed along night-time tracks of the satellites. Only a small amount of the data can be used for the analysis of ocean-induced signals because of permanently present strong signals from the magnetosphere and disruptive effects of polar electrojets. Nevertheless, the extracted signals from selected Swarm data tracks show a relatively good coincidence with predicted signals.

  8. Persistent Optically Induced Magnetism in Oxygen-Deficient Strontium Titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Crooker, S. A.; Bombeck, M.; Ambwani, P.; Leighton, C.

    2014-03-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. While its electronic, optical, and lattice properties have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research owing to the discovery of magnetism and superconductivity at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other oxides. The formation and distribution of oxygen vacancies may play an essential but as-yet-incompletely understood role. Here we observe an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The optically induced magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable via the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects, which only occur in oxygen-deficient samples, reveal a detailed interplay between defects, magnetism, and light in oxide materials. W. D. Rice et al. submitted. See article on arXiv.

  9. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave

    PubMed Central

    Mochol, Małgorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  10. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave.

    PubMed

    Mochol, Małgorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  11. rf-induced Sisyphus cooling in a magnetic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Janis, J.; Banks, M.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    We show an rf-induced Sisyphus cooling process for magnetic traps that may easily be applied to many of the current Bose-Einstein condensation experiments. Through Monte Carlo simulations of magnetically trapped {sup 87}Rb we have shown a cooling rate of {approx}15 {mu}K/s. We have also shown a greater efficiency than evaporative cooling from 250{yields}{approx}7 {mu}K with an efficiency {alpha}=d ln T/d ln N>3 over the majority of this range.

  12. Magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency analogy of dielectric metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fuli He, Xuan; Zhao, Qian; Lan, Chuwen; Zhou, Ji; Zhang, Weihong Qiu, Kepeng

    2014-03-31

    In this manuscript, we experimentally demonstrate magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogy effect inside dielectric metamaterial. In contrast to previous studies employed different metallic topological microstructures to introduce dissipation loss change, barium strontium titanate, and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) are chosen as the bright and dark EIT resonators, respectively, due to their different intrinsic dielectric loss. Under incident magnetic field excitation, dielectric metamaterial exhibits an EIT-type transparency window around 8.9 GHz, which is accompanied by abrupt change of transmission phase. Numerical calculations show good agreement with experiment spectra and reveal remarkably increased group index, indicating potential application in slow light.

  13. Optically induced magnetic polarons in EuTe

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, A. B.; Galgano, G. D.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.

    2013-12-04

    Direct measurements of the photoinduced magnetization in EuTe, using a two color pump-and-probe technique, are presented. The photoinduced effect was pumped using photons of above-the-bandgap energy, and detected by the Faraday rotation of a probe beam of energy below-the-bandgap. The photoinduced Faraday rotation changes sign, as expected from our model for the optically induced magnetic polaron. The EuTe spin-flop transition at low fields is also detected as a sharp step in the photoinduced Faraday rotation, and its observation provides additional supports for the photoinduced polaron model.

  14. Field induced spin chirality and chirality switching in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskaya, Elena V.

    2015-05-01

    The physical origin of the field-induced spin chirality experimentally observed in rare earth multilayers is determined. It is shown that the effect is possible due to the interplay between solid-state exchange interactions (the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida and the Dsyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions), the external magnetic field and a special confinement of magnetic constituents. The presented model describes a certain temperature dependence of the chirality factor in agreement with experimental data and opens a new way to design nanostructured objects with predicted handedness.

  15. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  16. Magnetically induced rotor vibration in dual-stator permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bang; Wang, Shiyu; Wang, Yaoyao; Zhao, Zhifu; Xiu, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Magnetically induced vibration is a major concern in permanent magnet (PM) motors, which is especially true for dual-stator motors. This work develops a two-dimensional model of the rotor by using energy method, and employs this model to examine the rigid- and elastic-body vibrations induced by the inner stator tooth passage force and that by the outer. The analytical results imply that there exist three typical vibration modes. Their presence or absence depends on the combination of magnet/slot, force's frequency and amplitude, the relative position between two stators, and other structural parameters. The combination and relative position affect these modes via altering the force phase. The predicted results are verified by magnetic force wave analysis by finite element method (FEM) and comparison with the existing results. Potential directions are also given with the anticipation of bringing forth more interesting and useful findings. As an engineering application, the magnetically induced vibration can be first reduced via the combination and then a suitable relative position.

  17. Using Magnetic Nanoparticles for Gene Transfer to Neural Stem Cells: Stem Cell Propagation Method Influences Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension “neurospheres” or 2-D adherent “monolayers”. MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields (“magnetofection technology”) mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population. PMID:25918990

  18. Characterization of pattern transfer in the fabrication of magnetic nanostructure arrays by block copolymer lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Parker, J. S.; Hillmyer, M. A.; Leighton, C.

    2007-06-01

    The authors report the fabrication of large-area antidot arrays using cylinder-forming polystyrene-polyisoprene-polylactide triblock terpolymer templates. 30nm antidots were generated after removal of the minority polymer component by aqueous degradation, oxygen reactive ion etching, and subsequent Ar ion beam milling to transfer the pattern to an underlying Ni80Fe20 film. Emphasis was placed on characterization of the pattern transfer, which was tracked using a combination of atomic force microscopy, magnetometry, and magnetotransport. It is demonstrated that variable temperature magnetometry and transport measurements are excellent probes of the progress of the ion milling into underlying magnetic layers.

  19. Heat Transfer of Thermocapillary Convection in a Two-Layered Fluid System Under the Influence of Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Ludovisis, D.; Cha, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat transfer of a two-layer fluid system has been of great importance in a variety of industrial applications. For example, the phenomena of immiscible fluids can be found in materials processing and heat exchangers. Typically in solidification from a melt, the convective motion is the dominant factor that affects the uniformity of material properties. In the layered flow, thermocapillary forces can come into an important play, which was first emphasized by a previous investigator in 1958. Under extraterrestrial environments without gravity, thermocapillary effects can be a more dominant factor, which alters material properties in processing. Control and optimization of heat transfer in an immiscible fluid system need complete understanding of the flow phenomena that can be induced by surface tension at a fluid interface. The present work is focused on understanding of the magnetic field effects on thermocapillary convection, in order to optimize material processing. That is, it involves the study of the complicated phenomena to alter the flow motion in crystal growth. In this effort, the Marangoni convection in a cavity with differentially heated sidewalls is investigated with and without the influence of a magnetic field. As a first step, numerical analyses are performed, by thoroughly investigating influences of all pertinent physical parameters. Experiments are then conducted, with preliminary results, for comparison with the numerical analyses.

  20. Spin-transfer-torque efficiency enhanced by edge-damage of perpendicular magnetic random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kyungmi; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-08-07

    We numerically investigate the effect of magnetic and electrical damages at the edge of a perpendicular magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cell on the spin-transfer-torque (STT) efficiency that is defined by the ratio of thermal stability factor to switching current. We find that the switching mode of an edge-damaged cell is different from that of an undamaged cell, which results in a sizable reduction in the switching current. Together with a marginal reduction of the thermal stability factor of an edge-damaged cell, this feature makes the STT efficiency large. Our results suggest that a precise edge control is viable for the optimization of STT-MRAM.

  1. Transfer matrix method-based approach to study the bi-gyrotropic magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, Mehdi; Hajesmaeili, Hamidreza Nezhad; Zandi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Optical and magneto-optical (MO) responses in magnetic multilayer systems are calculated by transfer matrix method (TMM). In a bi-gyrotropic medium, electric permittivity (ε) and magnetic permeability (μ) coefficients are in the form of non-diagonal tensors, synchronously, which their non-diagonal elements refer to the existence of anisotropy in such medium. In the present study, in addition to present a TMM based-approach for bi-gyrotropic medium, numerical simulations for studying the amount of optical and MO parameters of the bi-gyrotropic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) material, in both transmission and reflection configurations, have been done.

  2. Radiofrequency heating and magnetically induced displacement of dental magnetic attachments during 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, K; Hasegawa, M; Abe, Y; Tabuchi, T; Namiki, T; Ishigami, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of injury from dental magnetic attachments due to their radiofrequency (RF) heating and magnetically induced displacement during 3.0 T MRI. Methods To examine the magnetic attachments, we adopted the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-02a and F2052-06 standards in two MRI systems (Achieva 3.0 T Nova Dual; Philips, Tokyo, Japan, and Signa HDxt 3.0 T; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). The temperature change was measured in a cylindrical keeper (GIGAUSS D600; GC, Tokyo, Japan) with coping of the casting alloy and a keeper with a dental implant at the maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) for 20 min. To measure the magnetically induced displacement force, three sizes of keepers (GIGAUSS D400, D600 and D1000) were used in deflection angle tests conducted at the point of the maximum magnetic field strength. Results Temperature elevations of both coping and implant were higher in the Signa system than in the Achieva system. The highest temperature changes in the keeper with implant and keeper with coping were 0.6 °C and 0.8 °C in the Signa system, respectively. The temperature increase did not exceed 1.0 °C at any location. The deflection angle (α) was not measurable because it exceeded 90°. GIGAUSS D400 required an extra 3.0 g load to constrain the deflection angle to less than 45°; GIGAUSS D600 and D1000 required 5.0 and 9.0 g loads, respectively. Conclusions Dental magnetic attachments pose no risk due to RF heating and magnetically induced displacement at 3.0 T MRI. However, it is necessary to confirm that these keepers are securely attached to the prosthesis before imaging. PMID:22499128

  3. Laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in the presence of a nanoscale magnetic domain network.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Sardinha, Anna Barszczak; Lozano, Magali; Sebban, Stéphane; Ducousso, Mathieu; Boutu, Willem; Li, Kaigong; Tudu, Bharati; Tortarolo, Marina; Hawaldar, Ranjit; Delaunay, Renaud; López-Flores, Victor; Arabski, Jacek; Boeglin, Christine; Merdji, Hamed; Zeitoun, Philippe; Lüning, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond magnetization phenomena have been challenging our understanding for over a decade. Most experiments have relied on infrared femtosecond lasers, limiting the spatial resolution to a few micrometres. With the advent of femtosecond X-ray sources, nanometric resolution can now be reached, which matches key length scales in femtomagnetism such as the travelling length of excited 'hot' electrons on a femtosecond timescale. Here we study laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in [Co/Pd](30) multilayer films, which, for the first time, achieves a spatial resolution better than 100 nm by using femtosecond soft X-ray pulses. This allows us to follow the femtosecond demagnetization process in a magnetic system consisting of alternating nanometric domains of opposite magnetization. No modification of the magnetic structure is observed, but, in comparison with uniformly magnetized systems of similar composition, we find a significantly faster demagnetization time. We argue that this may be caused by direct transfer of spin angular momentum between neighbouring domains. PMID:22893123

  4. Optimal electron, phonon, and magnetic characteristics for low energy thermally induced magnetization switching

    SciTech Connect

    Atxitia, U.; Ostler, T. A.; Chantrell, R. W.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2015-11-09

    Using large-scale computer simulations, we thoroughly study the minimum energy required to thermally induced magnetization switching (TIMS) after the application of a femtosecond heat pulse in transition metal-rare earth ferrimagnetic alloys. We find that for an energy efficient TIMS, a low ferrimagnetic net magnetization with a strong temperature dependence is the relevant factor for the magnetic system. For the lattice and electron systems, the key physics for efficient TIMS is a large electron-phonon relaxation time. Importantly, we show that as the cooling time of the heated electrons is increased, the minimum power required to produce TIMS can be reduced by an order of magnitude. Our results show the way to low power TIMS by appropriate engineering of magnetic heterostructures.

  5. Optimal electron, phonon, and magnetic characteristics for low energy thermally induced magnetization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atxitia, U.; Ostler, T. A.; Chantrell, R. W.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2015-11-01

    Using large-scale computer simulations, we thoroughly study the minimum energy required to thermally induced magnetization switching (TIMS) after the application of a femtosecond heat pulse in transition metal-rare earth ferrimagnetic alloys. We find that for an energy efficient TIMS, a low ferrimagnetic net magnetization with a strong temperature dependence is the relevant factor for the magnetic system. For the lattice and electron systems, the key physics for efficient TIMS is a large electron-phonon relaxation time. Importantly, we show that as the cooling time of the heated electrons is increased, the minimum power required to produce TIMS can be reduced by an order of magnitude. Our results show the way to low power TIMS by appropriate engineering of magnetic heterostructures.

  6. Effect of variable magnetic field on nanofluid flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Mohammadkazem; Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Shariatmadar, Hamed

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, Control Volume based Finite Element Method is applied to simulate nanofluid flow and heat transfer in presence of variable magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations are coupled with the energy equation due to the heat transfer by means of the Boussinessq approximation. Then, the 2D non-dimensional full MHD equations in terms of stream function, temperature, magnetic field and vorticity are solved by using CVFEM. The calculations were performed for different governing parameters namely; the Rayleigh number, nanoparticle volume fraction and Hartmann number arising from MHD. Results show that Nusselt number has direct relationship with Rayleigh number, nanoparticle volume fraction while it has reverse relationship with Hartmann number. Also it can be found that enhancement in heat.

  7. Mixed-valence trinuclear manganese clusters: Influence of the electronic transfer on the magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, C. J.; Coronado, E.; Pourroy, G.

    1990-05-01

    The magnetic behavior of mixed-valence trinuclear clusters d4-d4-d5 is discussed on the basis of a model which takes into account valence delocalization and Heisenberg exchange. This model considers the competing effect between the electronic transfer and the localization of the extra electron due to an asymmetry of the triangular entity. The magnetic properties of the mixed-valence oxo-centered Mn(II)-Mn(III)-Mn(III) complexes formulated as Mn3O(O2CR)6L3 (R=Me, L=pyridine) are discussed on the basis of the developed model, supporting a significant intramolecular electron transfer. A comparison of these results to those previously reported by assuming a valence-trapped model is given.

  8. Bit error rate investigation of spin-transfer-switched magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming

    2012-10-01

    A method is developed to enable a fast bit error rate (BER) characterization of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) cells without integrating with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuit. By utilizing the reflected signal from the devices under test, the measurement setup allows a fast measurement of bit error rates at >106, writing events per second. It is further shown that this method provides a time domain capability to examine the MTJ resistance states during a switching event, which can assist write error analysis in great detail. BER of a set of spin-transfer-torque MTJ cells has been evaluated by using this method, and bit error free operation (down to 10-8) for optimized in-plane MTJ cells has been demonstrated.

  9. MHD Couette two-fluid flow and heat transfer in presence of uniform inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikodijevic, D.; Milenkovic, D.; Stamenkovic, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The MHD Couette flow of two immiscible fluids in a parallel plate channel in the presence of an applied electric and inclined magnetic field is investigated in the paper. One of the fluids is assumed to be electrically conducting, while the other fluid and the channel plates are assumed to be electrically insulating. Separate solutions with appropriate boundary conditions for each fluid are obtained and these solutions are matched at the interface using suitable matching conditions. The partial differential equations governing the flow and heat transfer are transformed to ordinary differential equations and closed-form solutions are obtained in both fluid regions of the channel. The results for various values of the Hartmann number, the angle of magnetic field inclination, the loading parameter and the ratio of the heights of the fluids are presented graphically to show their effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics.

  10. Spectral Energy Transfer and Dissipation of Magnetic Energy from Fluid to Kinetic Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, K.; Li, H.

    2007-01-19

    We investigate the magnetic energy transfer from the fluid to kinetic scales and dissipation processes using three-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The nonlinear evolution of a sheet pinch is studied where we show that it exhibits both fluid scale global relaxation and kinetic scale collisionless reconnection at multiple resonant surfaces. The interactions among collisionless tearing modes destroy the original flux surfaces and produce stochastic fields, along with generating sheets and filaments of intensified currents. In addition, the magnetic energy is transferred from the original shear length scale both to the large scales due to the global relaxation and to the smaller, kinetic scales for dissipation. The dissipation is dominated by the thermal or pressure effect in the generalized Ohm's law, and electrons are preferentially accelerated.

  11. Spectral energy transfer and dissipation of magnetic energy from fluid to kinetic scales.

    PubMed

    Bowers, K; Li, H

    2007-01-19

    We investigate the magnetic energy transfer from the fluid to kinetic scales and dissipation processes using three-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The nonlinear evolution of a sheet pinch is studied where we show that it exhibits both fluid scale global relaxation and kinetic scale collisionless reconnection at multiple resonant surfaces. The interactions among collisionless tearing modes destroy the original flux surfaces and produce stochastic fields, along with generating sheets and filaments of intensified currents. In addition, the magnetic energy is transferred from the original shear length scale both to the large scales due to the global relaxation and to the smaller, kinetic scales for dissipation. The dissipation is dominated by the thermal or pressure effect in the generalized Ohm's law, and electrons are preferentially accelerated. PMID:17358690

  12. Directionality effects in the transfer of X-rays from a magnetized atmosphere: Beam pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Bonazzola, S.

    1981-01-01

    A formalism is presented for radiation transfer in two normal polarization modes in finite and semiinfinite plane parallel uniform atmospheres with a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface and arbitrary propagation angles. This method is based on the coupled integral equations of transfer, including emission, absorption, and scattering. Calculations are performed for atmosphere parameters typical of X-ray pulsars. The directionality of the escaping radiation is investigated for several cases, varying the input distributions. Theoretical pencil beam profiles and X-ray pulse shapes are obtained assuming the radiation is emitted from the polar caps of spinning neutron stars. Implications for realistic models of accreting magnetized X-ray sources are briefly discussed.

  13. Diffusive transfer of polarized 3He gas through depolarizing magnetic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, J. D.; Epstein, C. S.; Milner, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Transfer of polarized 3He gas across spatially varying magnetic fields will facilitate a new source of polarized 3He ions for particle accelerators. In this context, depolarization of atoms as they pass through regions of significant transverse field gradients is a major concern. To understand these depolarization effects, we have built a system consisting of a Helmholtz coil pair and a solenoid, both with central magnetic fields of order 30 gauss. The atoms are polarized via metastability exchange optical pumping in the Helmholtz coil and are in diffusive contact via a glass tube with a second test cell in the solenoid. We have carried out measurements of the spin relaxation during transfer of polarization in 3He at 1 torr by diffusion. We explore the use of measurements of the loss of polarization taken in one cell to infer the polarization in the other cell.

  14. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  15. Lifshitz effects on vector condensate induced by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Liu, Mo-Lin; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhuo-Qun

    2014-05-01

    By numerical and analytical methods, we study in detail the effects of the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z on the vector condensate induced by an applied magnetic field in the probe limit. Concretely, in the presence of the magnetic field, we obtain the Landau level independent of z, and we also find the critical value by coupling a Maxwell complex vector field and an SU(2) field into a (3+1)-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, respectively. The research results show that for the two models with the lowest Landau level, the increasing z improves the response of the critical temperature to the applied magnetic field even without the charge density, and the analytical results uphold the numerical results. In addition, we find that, even in the Lifshitz black hole, the Maxwell complex vector model is still a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model. Furthermore, we construct the square vortex lattice and discuss the implications of these results.

  16. Pressure-Induced Order in the Gapped Quantum Magnet DTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannig, Alexandra; Moeller, Johannes; Zheludev, Andrey; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Dela Cruz, Clarina; Guguchia, Zurab; Khasanov, Rustem; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    We present muon-spin relaxation, neutron diffraction and magnetic susceptibility data under applied hydrostatic pressure on the organometallic S = 1 quantum magnet NiCl2 . 4 [ SC(NH2)2 ] . The material consists of weakly coupled antiferromagnetic chains and has a spin gap resulting from a large single-ion anisotropy. Our muon spin rotation experiments provide local field dependencies on temperature as well as pressure and allow for the mapping of a detailed phase diagram up to 22kbar. Thus, we demonstrate that the compound may be driven through two subsequent pressure-induced transitions into apparently distinct magnetically ordered phases. Neutron diffraction and susceptibility measurements support those results and show the potential of low-pressure transitions to be investigated by various techniques.

  17. X-ray induced demagnetization of single-molecule magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiser, Jan; Westerström, Rasmus; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald; Yang, Shangfeng; Popov, Alexey; Dunsch, Lothar; Greber, Thomas

    2014-07-21

    Low-temperature x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on the endohedral single-molecule magnet DySc{sub 2}N@C{sub 80} at the Dy M{sub 4,5} edges reveal a shrinking of the opening of the observed hysteresis with increasing x-ray flux. Time-dependent measurements show that the exposure of the molecules to x-rays resonant with the Dy M{sub 5} edge accelerates the relaxation of magnetization more than off-resonant x-rays. The results cannot be explained by a homogeneous temperature rise due to x-ray absorption. Moreover, the observed large demagnetization cross sections indicate that the resonant absorption of one x-ray photon induces the demagnetization of many molecules.

  18. Noise-induced bifurcations in magnetization dynamics of uniaxial nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, C. Perna, S.; Quercia, A.; Bertotti, G.; D'Aquino, M.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    2015-05-07

    Stochastic magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized nanomagnets is considered. The system is assumed to have rotational symmetry as the anisotropy axis, the applied field, and the spin polarization are all aligned along an axis of symmetry. By appropriate integration of the Fokker-Planck equation associated to the problem, the stochastic differential equation governing the evolution of the angle between the magnetization orientation and the symmetry axis is derived. The drift terms present in this equation contain a noise-induced drift term, which, in combination with drift terms of deterministic origin, can be written as the derivative of an effective potential. Superparamagnetic-like transitions are studied in connections with the bifurcations of the effective potential as temperature and excitation conditions are varied.

  19. Magnet power supply control of the NSLS VUV and x-ray storage rings transfer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Singh, O.; Smith, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer lines for NSLS VUV and x-ray storage rings have been split. New power supplies have been incorporated with existing ones. The existing microprocessor system has been upgraded in order to control the additional functions. This system expands the input/output port of the microprocessor to an addressable serial/parallel link to each magnet power supply. The implementation of this system will be discussed.

  20. A voxel based comparative analysis using magnetization transfer imaging and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Mangalore; Saini, Jitender; Pasha, Shaik Afsar; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims: In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) tissue damage occurs in specific cortical and subcortical regions. Voxel based analysis using T1-weighted images depict quantitative gray matter (GM) atrophy changes. Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging depicts qualitative changes in the brain parenchyma. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether MT imaging could indicate abnormalities in PSP. Settings and Design: A total of 10 patients with PSP (9 men and 1 woman) and 8 controls (5 men and 3 women) were studied with T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3DMT imaging. Voxel based analysis of T1-weighted MRI was performed to investigate brain atrophy while MT was used to study qualitative abnormalities in the brain tissue. We used SPM8 to investigate group differences (with two sample t-test) using the GM and white matter (WM) segmented data. Results: T1-weighted imaging and MT are equally sensitive to detect changes in GM and WM in PSP. Magnetization transfer ratio images and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo revealed extensive bilateral volume and qualitative changes in the orbitofrontal, prefrontal cortex and limbic lobe and sub cortical GM. The prefrontal structures involved were the rectal gyrus, medial, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). The anterior cingulate, cingulate gyrus and lingual gyrus of limbic lobe and subcortical structures such as caudate, thalamus, insula and claustrum were also involved. Cerebellar involvement mainly of anterior lobe was also noted. Conclusions: The findings suggest that voxel based MT imaging permits a whole brain unbiased investigation of central nervous system structural integrity in PSP. PMID:25024571

  1. Magnetic field induced spin-wave energy focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Noel; Lopez-Diaz, Luis

    2015-07-01

    Local temperature variations induced by spin-wave propagation are studied using a model that couples nonuniform magnetization dynamics and heat flow. We show that the remote heating at the sample edge reported recently [T. An et al., Nat. Mater. 12, 549 (2013)], 10.1038/nmat3628 is due to the geometry-induced gradual reduction of the effective field. We demonstrate that the same effect can be achieved by a reduction in the external field instead of a constriction at the edge and, furthermore, that both the location and the amount of energy to be delivered to the lattice can be controlled accurately this way.

  2. Charge transfer induced activity of graphene for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Anli; Xia, Weijun; Zhang, Lipeng; Dou, Shuo; Xia, Zhenhai; Wang, Shuangyin

    2016-05-01

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), with its strong electron-accepting ability, was used to dope graphene as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The charge transfer process was observed from graphene to TCNE by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman characterizations. Our density functional theory calculations found that the charge transfer behavior led to an enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR.

  3. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  4. The effect of the magnetic field on heat transfer in a slotted channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, I.; Kirillov, I.; Sidorenkov, S.

    1994-12-31

    The results of numerical and experimental studies of the liquid metal heat transfer in the slotted channel with transverse magnetic field are presented. Theoretical predictions were prepared by both Efremov Institute and Argonne National Laboratory. The heat transfer test was conducted at ALEX facility jointly between ANL and Efremov Institute. The test section consisted of the two slotted geometry (b/a=10) parts - with and without {open_quotes}anchor links{close_quotes}. The Hartmann numbers (M) up to 1050 and Interaction parameters (N) up to 2000, based on the half-width of the short wall (7 mm) were achieved. The heat flux to the top wall was up to 9 x 10{sup 4} W/m{sup 2}. The test results showed the improvement of heat transfer in the straight channel at low and moderate N. The Nusselt number at small N (around 120) was up to 3 times higher than in the turbulent flow at the same Peclet number. Qualitative correlations between the heat transfer results and velocity fluctuation data show that the generation of large velocity fluctuation in the side layer of the heated wall is the main reason for the heat transfer improvement, high average velocity in the side layer is of the less effect on the heat transfer. At high N the velocity fluctuations are suppressed and consequently the Nusselt number at high N is smaller than at the corresponding turbulent flow.

  5. Current induced vortex wall dynamics in helical magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roostaei, Bahman

    2015-03-01

    Nontrivial topology of interfaces separating phases with opposite chirality in helical magnetic metals result in new effects as they interact with spin polarized current. These interfaces or vortex walls consist of a one dimensional array of vortex lines. We predict that adiabatic transfer of angular momentum between vortex array and spin polarized current will result in topological Hall effect in multi-domain samples. Also we predict that the motion of the vortex array will result in a new damping mechanism for magnetic moments based on Lenz's law. We study the dynamics of these walls interacting with electric current and use fundamental electromagnetic laws to quantify those predictions. On the other hand discrete nature of vortex walls affects their pinning and results in low depinning current density. We predict the value of this current using collective pinning theory.

  6. Förster-Induced Energy Transfer in Functionalized Graphene.

    PubMed

    Malic, Ermin; Appel, Heiko; Hofmann, Oliver T; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanostructures are ideal substrates for functionalization with molecules since they consist of a single atomic layer giving rise to an extraordinary sensitivity to changes in their surrounding. The functionalization opens a new research field of hybrid nanostructures with tailored properties. Here, we present a microscopic view on the substrate-molecule interaction in the exemplary hybrid material consisting of graphene functionalized with perylene molecules. First experiments on similar systems have been recently realized illustrating an extremely efficient transfer of excitation energy from adsorbed molecules to the carbon substrate, a process with a large application potential for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices and biomedical imaging and sensing. So far, there has been no microscopically founded explanation for the observed energy transfer. Based on first-principle calculations, we have explicitly investigated the different transfer mechanisms revealing the crucial importance of Förster coupling. Due to the efficient Coulomb interaction in graphene, we obtain strong Förster rates in the range of 1/fs. We investigate its dependence on the substrate-molecule distance R and describe the impact of the momentum transfer q for an efficient energy transfer. Furthermore, we find that the Dexter transfer mechanism is negligibly small due to the vanishing overlap between the involved strongly localized orbital functions. The gained insights are applicable to a variety of carbon-based hybrid nanostructures. PMID:24808936

  7. Percolation induced heat transfer in deep unsaturated zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; LeCain, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    Subsurface temperature data from a borehole located in a desert wash were measured and used to delineate the conductive and advective heat transfer regimes, and to estimate the percolation quantity associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation. In an arid environment, conductive heat transfer dominates the variation of shallow subsurface temperature most of the time, except during sporadic precipitation periods. The subsurface time-varying temperature due to conductive heat transfer is highly correlated with the surface atmospheric temperature variation, whereas temperature variation due to advective heat transfer is strongly correlated with precipitation events. The advective heat transfer associated with precipitation and infiltration is the focus of this paper. Disruptions of the subsurface conductive temperature regime, associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation, were detected and used to quantify the percolation quantity. Modeling synthesis using a one-dimensional coupled heat and unsaturated flow model indicated that a percolation per unit area of 0.7 to 1.3 m height of water in two weeks during February 1998 was responsible for the observed temperature deviations down to a depth of 35.2 m. The reported study demonstrated quantitatively, for the first time, that the near surface temperature variation due to advective heat transfer can be significant at a depth greater than 10 m in unsaturated soils and can be used to infer the percolation amount in thick unsaturated soils.

  8. Förster-Induced Energy Transfer in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures are ideal substrates for functionalization with molecules since they consist of a single atomic layer giving rise to an extraordinary sensitivity to changes in their surrounding. The functionalization opens a new research field of hybrid nanostructures with tailored properties. Here, we present a microscopic view on the substrate–molecule interaction in the exemplary hybrid material consisting of graphene functionalized with perylene molecules. First experiments on similar systems have been recently realized illustrating an extremely efficient transfer of excitation energy from adsorbed molecules to the carbon substrate, a process with a large application potential for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices and biomedical imaging and sensing. So far, there has been no microscopically founded explanation for the observed energy transfer. Based on first-principle calculations, we have explicitly investigated the different transfer mechanisms revealing the crucial importance of Förster coupling. Due to the efficient Coulomb interaction in graphene, we obtain strong Förster rates in the range of 1/fs. We investigate its dependence on the substrate–molecule distance R and describe the impact of the momentum transfer q for an efficient energy transfer. Furthermore, we find that the Dexter transfer mechanism is negligibly small due to the vanishing overlap between the involved strongly localized orbital functions. The gained insights are applicable to a variety of carbon-based hybrid nanostructures. PMID:24808936

  9. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  10. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, T. Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  11. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state.

    PubMed

    Gibert, M; Viret, M; Zubko, P; Jaouen, N; Tonnerre, J-M; Torres-Pardo, A; Catalano, S; Gloter, A; Stéphan, O; Triscone, J-M

    2016-01-01

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices. PMID:27079668

  12. Impurities in magnetic-field-induced Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Wen; Maslov, Dmitrii L.; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2001-03-01

    It has been shown recently(C. Biagini, D. L. Maslov, M. Yu. Reizer and L. I. Glazman, `` Magnetic-field-induced Luttinger liquid''), cond-mat/0006407. that a strong magnetic field applied to a bulk metal may induce a Luttinger liquid phase. This is a consequence of the reduced effective dimensionality of charge carriers from 3D to 1D, an effect which is most pronounced in the ultra-quantum limit, when only the lowest Landau level remains populated. We study the effect of impurities in this system. For the case of a point impurity, the calculation of the scattering cross section at a single impurity can be mapped exactly to a 1D problem of tunneling conductance through a barrier for interacting electrons, solved by Yue et al.(D. Yue, L. I. Glazman and K. A. Matveev, Phys. Rev. B 49) (1994) 1966.. Using this mapping, we find that the longitudinal (ɛ=+1) and transverse (ɛ=-1) Drude conductivities exhibit the scaling laws σ_ɛ∝ T^ɛα, where α=2e^2|lnκl_B|/π v_F, and vF and κ are the B-dependent Fermi velocity and screening wavevector, respectively; lB is the magnetic length. The physical reason for such a behavior of the conductivity is the almost 1D form of the Friedel oscillation around a single point impurity in the strong magnetic field.

  13. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dswley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla = 10/sup 4/ Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. (JMT)

  14. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, M.; Viret, M.; Zubko, P.; Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Torres-Pardo, A.; Catalano, S.; Gloter, A.; Stéphan, O.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices. PMID:27079668

  15. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, M.; Viret, M.; Zubko, P.; Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Torres-Pardo, A.; Catalano, S.; Gloter, A.; Stéphan, O.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices.

  16. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  17. Low frequency dynamics of Magnetic Droplet Solitons in Spin Transfer Nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macia, Ferran; Lendínez, Sergi; Hernàndez, Joan Manel; Backes, Dirk; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-03-01

    Localized excitations that correspond to reversed dynamically precessing magnetic moments, known as magnetic droplet solitons, were predicted to occur in uniaxial magnets in the absence of damping. However, damping is present in all magnetic materials and suppresses these excitations. It is possible now to compensate damping in ferromagnetic thin films by spin transfer torques through electrical current flow in nanometer scale contacts. Recent experiments have shown the existence of these magnetics objects and proved their stability. We explored conditions that allow formation, stabilization, and annihilation of the droplet excitations. We report spectral measurements, on the GHz range, as a function of current and applied field that challenge existing theories. Additionally, we will report low frequency (~ 300 MHz) excitations associated to the magnetic droplet dynamics. We will show that the droplet hysteretic behavior in current and field, which is related to its stability, is also present in the high and low frequencies spectra. Finally, we will present our recent simulations and compare them with the results and the existing theory.

  18. Nonideal rotations in nuclear magnetic resonance: Estimation of coherence transfer leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Jerschow, Alexej

    2000-07-15

    When spherical tensors are rotated by certain angles, coherence transfer selection rules may apply. For example, a {pi} rotation cleanly inverts the coherence order. A {pi}/2 rotation of a T{sub 0}{sup 1} tensor creates only T{sub {+-}}{sub 1}{sup 1} tensors. In this work estimations are given for the coherence transfer leakage under the action of rotations with small errors in the rotation angle or axis. Although the theory is stated with particular applications to NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in mind it is equally applicable wherever nonideal rotations of spherical tensors are considered (e.g., quantum computing and relaxation theory). In NMR it is useful for the estimation of coherence transfer leakage, especially in pulse sequences with many n{pi} pulses. The results are also applicable to spinors and half-integer representations of the rotation group. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Laser induced forward transfer of SnO2 for sensing applications using different precursors systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattle, Thomas; Hintennach, Andreas; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents the transfer of SnO2 by laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) for gas sensor applications. Different donor substrates of SnO2 with and without triazene polymer (TP) as a dynamic release layer were prepared. Transferring these films under different conditions were evaluated by optical microscopy and functionality. Transfers of sputtered SnO2 films do not lead to satisfactory results and transfers of SnO2 nanoparticles are difficult. Transfers of SnO2 nanoparticles can only be achieved when applying a second laser pulse to the already transferred material, which improves the adhesion resulting in a complete pixel. A new approach of decomposing the transfer material during LIFT transfer was developed. Donor films based on UV absorbing metal complex precursors namely, SnCl2(acac)2 were prepared and transferred using the LIFT technique. Transfer conditions were optimized for the different systems, which were deposited onto sensor-like microstructures. The conductivity of the transferred material at temperatures of about 400 ∘C are in a range usable for SnO2 gas sensors. First sensing tests were carried out and the transferred material proved to change conductivity when exposed to ethanol, acetone, and methane.

  20. Optimization of magnetic refrigerators by tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Bennett, Lawrence; Della Torre, Edward

    A new reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) experimental device has been designed, built and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Gadolinium turnings were used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a higher temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this work show that there is an optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in an AMR system. It is expected that such optimization and the results provided herein will permit the future design and development of more efficient room-temperature magnetic refrigeration systems.

  1. A Model of Charge-Transfer Excitons: Diffusion, Spin Dynamics, and Magnetic Field Effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chee Kong; Shi, Liang; Willard, Adam P

    2016-06-16

    In this Letter, we explore how the microscopic dynamics of charge-transfer (CT) excitons are influenced by the presence of an external magnetic field in disordered molecular semiconductors. This influence is driven by the dynamic interplay between the spin and spatial degrees of freedom of the electron-hole pair. To account for this interplay, we have developed a numerical framework that combines a traditional model of quantum spin dynamics with a stochastic coarse-grained model of charge transport. This combination provides a general and efficient methodology for simulating the effects of magnetic field on CT state dynamics, therefore providing a basis for revealing the microscopic origin of experimentally observed magnetic field effects. We demonstrate that simulations carried out on our model are capable of reproducing experimental results as well as generating theoretical predictions related to the efficiency of organic electronic materials. PMID:27237448

  2. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  3. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  4. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields.

  5. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  6. Magnetization dynamics driven by angle-dependent spin-orbit spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seo-Won; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Spin-orbit torque allows efficient control of the magnetization by using the in-plane current. Recent experiments found a strong angular dependence of spin-orbit torque. We theoretically investigate magnetization switching and domain wall motion induced by an angle-dependent spinorbit torque in perpendicularly magnetized layers. We obtain analytic expressions for the switching current and the domain wall velocity, which are in agreement with numerical results. Based on the expressions, we find that a spin-orbit torque that increases with increasing polar angle of the magnetization is beneficial for both switching and domain wall motion. Our result will serve as a guideline to design and interpret switching and domain wall experiments based on the spin-orbit torque.

  7. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-01

    A spintronic device, called the "strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM)," is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  8. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Asif Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-30

    A spintronic device, called the “strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM),” is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  9. UV-Induced Proton Transfer between DNA Strands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Beckstead, Ashley A; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-10

    UV radiation creates excited states in DNA that lead to mutagenic photoproducts. Photoexcitation of single-stranded DNA can transfer an electron between stacked bases, but the fate of excited states in the double helix has been intensely debated. Here, photoinduced interstrand proton transfer (PT) triggered by intrastrand electron transfer (ET) is detected for the first time by time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations. Long-lived excited states are shown to be oppositely charged base pair radical ions. In two of the duplexes, the base pair radical anions are present as tautomers formed by interstrand PT. Charge recombination occurs on the picosecond time scale preventing the accumulation of damaging radicals or mutagenic tautomers. PMID:26005794

  10. Three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip with an optically induced fictitious magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui

    2010-05-15

    A robust type of three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip combining optically induced fictitious magnetic field with microcurrent-carrying wires is proposed. Compared to the regular optical lattice, the individual trap in this three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice can be easily addressed and manipulated.

  11. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dawley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla - 10(4) Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. These experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, suggest that augmentation of the signal amplitude in the T-wave segment of the ECG may result from a superimposed electrical potential generated by aortic blood flow in the presence of a stationary magnetic field.

  12. Electric-field-induced Spontaneous Magnetization and Phase Transitions in Zigzag Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lang; Gu, Gangxu; Xiang, Gang; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an alternative scheme for realizing spin polarizations in semiconductor nanostructures by an all-electric way. The electronic and magnetic properties of the model system, zigzag pristine boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), are investigated under a transverse electric field (E) through spin-polarized density functional theory calculations. As E increases, the band gap of BNNTs is reduced due to charge redistribution induced by the asymmetry of electrostatic potential energy, and BNNTs experience rich phase transitions, such as semiconductor-metal transition and nonmagnetic (NM) metal-ferromagnetic (FM) metal transitions. Electric-field-induced magnetization occurs when a sufficiently high density of states at the Fermi level in the vicinity of metal-insulator transition is reached due to the redistribution of electronic bands and charge transferring across the BNNTs. Further analysis show that the spontaneous magnetization is derived from the localized nature of the 2p states of B and N, and the ferromagnetic coupling is stabilized by Zener’s double-exchange mechanism. Our results may provide a viable way to realize spintronic devices for applications. PMID:26206393

  13. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  14. Spin-electromagnetic hydrodynamics and magnetization induced by spin-magnetic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, T.

    2013-03-01

    The hydrodynamic model including the spin degree of freedom and the electromagnetic field is discussed. In this derivation, we apply electromagnetism for a macroscopic medium proposed by Minkowski. For the equation of motion of spin, we assume that the hydrodynamic representation of the Pauli equation is reproduced when the many-body effect is neglected. Then the spin-magnetic interaction in the Pauli equation is converted to a part of the magnetization. The fluid and spin stress tensors induced by the many-body effect are obtained by employing the algebraic positivity of the entropy production in the framework of the linear irreversible thermodynamics, including the mixing effect of the irreversible currents. We further construct the constitutive equation of the polarization and the magnetization. Our polarization equation is more reasonable compared to another result obtained using electromagnetism for a macroscopic medium proposed by de Groot-Mazur.

  15. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease. PMID:12929156

  16. Strain Manipulated Magnetic Properties in ZnO and GaN Induced by Cation Vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yanqin; Jiang, Jiaping; Wu, Yuxi; Tang, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The effects of isotropic strains on the magnetic properties in ZnO and GaN induced by cation vacancies are comparatively investigated by density functional theory calculations. The magnetic moments and the couplings between vacancies in different charged states are calculated as a function of strains. The modulation of strain on the magnetic properties relies on the materials and the charge states of cation vacancies in them. As the occurrence of charge transfer in ZnO:V Zn under compression, the coupling between V_{{Zn}}0 is antiferromagnetic (AFM) and it could be stabilized by strains. Tensions can strengthen the ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between V_{{Zn}}0 but weaken that of V_{{Ga}}^{ - } . The neutral V Ga are always AFM coupling under strains from -6 to +6% and could be stabilized by compressions. The interactions between V_{{Ga}}^{ - } are always FM with ignorable variations under strains; however, the FM couplings between V_{{Ga}}^{2 - } could be strengthened by compressions. These varying trends of magnetic coupling under strains are interpreted by the band coupling models. Therefore, strain-engineering provides a route to manipulate and design high Curie temperature ferromagnetism derived and mediated by intrinsic defect for spintronic applications.

  17. Strain Manipulated Magnetic Properties in ZnO and GaN Induced by Cation Vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Yanqin; Jiang, Jiaping; Wu, Yuxi; Tang, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The effects of isotropic strains on the magnetic properties in ZnO and GaN induced by cation vacancies are comparatively investigated by density functional theory calculations. The magnetic moments and the couplings between vacancies in different charged states are calculated as a function of strains. The modulation of strain on the magnetic properties relies on the materials and the charge states of cation vacancies in them. As the occurrence of charge transfer in ZnO: V Zn under compression, the coupling between V_{{Zn}}0 is antiferromagnetic (AFM) and it could be stabilized by strains. Tensions can strengthen the ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between V_{{Zn}}0 but weaken that of V_{{Ga}}^{ - } . The neutral V Ga are always AFM coupling under strains from -6 to +6% and could be stabilized by compressions. The interactions between V_{{Ga}}^{ - } are always FM with ignorable variations under strains; however, the FM couplings between V_{{Ga}}^{2 - } could be strengthened by compressions. These varying trends of magnetic coupling under strains are interpreted by the band coupling models. Therefore, strain-engineering provides a route to manipulate and design high Curie temperature ferromagnetism derived and mediated by intrinsic defect for spintronic applications.

  18. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1995-11-04

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday`s law. We previously determined that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here we calculate the electron density including both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. We calculate the potential required to establish a constant electron density, and compare with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest.

  19. Magnetic plasmon induced transparency in three-dimensional metamolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pin Chieh; Chen, Wei Ting; Yang, Kuang-Yu; Hsiao, Chih Ting; Sun, Greg; Liu, Ai Qun; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Tsai, Din Ping

    2012-11-01

    In a laser-driven atomic quantum system, a continuous state couples to a discrete state resulting in quantum interference that provides a transmission peak within a broad absorption profile the so-called electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). In the field of plasmonic metamaterials, the sub-wavelength metallic structures play a role similar to atoms in nature. The interference of their near-field coupling at plasmonic resonance leads to a plasmon induced transparency (PIT) that is analogous to the EIT of atomic systems. A sensitive control of the PIT is crucial to a range of potential applications such as slowing light and biosensor. So far, the PIT phenomena often arise from the electric resonance, such as an electric dipole state coupled to an electric quadrupole state. Here we report the first three-dimensional photonic metamaterial consisting of an array of erected U-shape plasmonic gold nanostructures that exhibits PIT phenomenon with magnetic dipolar interaction between magnetic metamolecules. We further demonstrate using a numerical simulation that the coupling between the different excited pathways at an intermediate resonant wavelength allows for a π phase shift resulting in a destructive interference. A classical RLC circuit was also proposed to explain the coupling effects between the bright and dark modes of EIT-like electromagnetic spectra. This work paves a promising approach to achieve magnetic plasmon devices.

  20. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  1. Magnetically Responsive Biodegradable Nanoparticles Enhance Adenoviral Gene Transfer in Cultured Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chorny, Michael; Fishbein, Ilia; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviral (Ad) vectors have shown promise as a tool for gene delivery-based therapeutic applications. Their clinical use is however limited by therapeutically suboptimal transduction levels in cell types expressing low levels of Coxsackie-Ad receptor (CAR), the primary receptor responsible for the cell entry of the virus, and by systemic adverse reactions. Targeted delivery achievable with Ad complexed with biodegradable magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNP) may therefore be instrumental for improving both the safety and efficiency of these vectors. Our hypothesis was that magnetically driven delivery of Ad affinity-bound to biodegradable MNP can substantially increase transgene expression in CAR deficient vascular cells in culture. Fluorescently labeled MNP were formulated from polylactide with inclusion of iron oxide and surface-modified with the D1 domain of CAR as an affinity linker. MNP cellular uptake and GFP reporter transgene expression were assayed fluorimetrically in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells using λex/λem of 540 nm/575 nm and 485 nm/535 nm, respectively. Stable vector-specific association of Ad with MNP resulted in formation of MNP–Ad complexes displaying rapid cell binding kinetics following a brief exposure to a high gradient magnetic field with resultant gene transfer levels significantly increased compared to free vector or nonmagnetic control treatment. Multiple regression analysis suggested a mechanism of MNP–Ad mediated transduction distinct from that of free Ad, and confirmed the major contribution of the complexes to the gene transfer under magnetic conditions. The magnetically enhanced transduction was achieved without compromising the cell viability or growth kinetics. The enhancement of adenoviral gene delivery by affinity complexation with biodegradable MNP represents a promising approach with a potential to extend the applicability of the viral gene therapeutic strategies. PMID:19496618

  2. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Petrov, Pavel A.; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a 31P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7 Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2 Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity.

  3. Turbulence-induced disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Banerjee, R.; Pudritz, R. E.; Klessen, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    We present collapse simulations of strongly magnetized, turbulent molecular cloud cores with masses ranging from 2.6 to 1000 M⊙ in order to study the influence of the initial conditions on the turbulence-induced disc formation mechanism proposed recently by Seifried et al. We find that Keplerian discs are formed in all cases independently of the core mass, the strength of turbulence or the presence of global rotation. The discs appear within a few kyr after the formation of the protostar, are 50-150 au in size, and have masses between 0.05 and a few 0.1 M⊙. During the formation of the discs the mass-to-flux ratio stays well below the critical value of 10 for Keplerian disc formation. Hence, flux-loss alone cannot explain the formation of Keplerian discs. The formation of rotationally supported discs at such early phases is rather due to the disordered magnetic field structure and due to turbulent motions in the surroundings of the discs, two effects lowering the classical magnetic braking efficiency. Binary systems occurring in the discs are mainly formed via the disc capturing mechanism rather than via disc fragmentation, which is largely suppressed by the presence of magnetic fields.

  4. Can slow roll inflation induce relevant helical magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrer, Ruth; Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We study the generation of helical magnetic fields during single field inflation induced by an axial coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. During slow roll inflation, we find that such a coupling always leads to a blue spectrum with B2(k)proptok, as long as the theory is treated perturbatively. The magnetic energy density at the end of inflation is found to be typically too small to backreact on the background dynamics of the inflaton. We also show that a short deviation from slow roll does not result in strong modifications to the shape of the spectrum. We calculate the evolution of the correlation length and the field amplitude during the inverse cascade and viscous damping of the helical magnetic field in the radiation era after inflation. We conclude that except for low scale inflation with very strong coupling, the magnetic fields generated by such an axial coupling in single field slow roll inflation with perturbative coupling to the inflaton are too weak to provide the seeds for the observed fields in galaxies and clusters.

  5. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, S.; Sidis, Y.; Lamago, D.; Heid, R.; Mignot, J.-M.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Ivanov, A.; Steffens, P.; Keller, T.; Wang, L.; Goering, E.; Weber, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron–phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron–phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe–Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin–phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  6. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi.

    PubMed

    Krannich, S; Sidis, Y; Lamago, D; Heid, R; Mignot, J-M; Löhneysen, H v; Ivanov, A; Steffens, P; Keller, T; Wang, L; Goering, E; Weber, F

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron-phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron-phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe-Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin-phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  7. Tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions in magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Siddique, Abid; Bennett, Lawrence H.; Della Torre, Edward

    2016-07-01

    A new experimental test bed has been designed, built, and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Bulk gadolinium was used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a high temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this research show that there is a optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in any AMR system. By optimizing these parameters in our AMR apparatus the temperature span between the hot and cold ends increased by 24%. The optimized values are system dependent and need to be determined and measured for any AMR system by following the procedures that are introduced in this research. It is expected that such optimization will permit the design of a more efficient magnetic refrigeration system.

  8. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  9. Fluoroquinolone-induced gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity. Bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones can cause DNA damage and induce a bacterial SOS response to stimulate repair of damaged DNA. Certain prophages (integrated in bacterial chromosomes) ...

  10. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J.; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2–4 h after stimulation), which is Ca2+-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca2+-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  11. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2-4 h after stimulation), which is Ca(2+)-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca(2+)-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  12. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  13. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  14. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  15. Magnetically Induced Plasma Rotation and the Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witalis, E. A.

    1983-09-01

    Fusion for Fission fuel breeding and other incentives for unconventional magnetic fusion research are introductorily mentioned. The design, operation and peculiar characteristics of dense plasma foci are briefly described with attention to their remarkable ion acceleration and plasma heating capabilities. Attempts for interpretations are reviewed, and a brief account is given for an explanation based on the concept of magnetically induced plasma rotation, recently derived in detail in this journal. Basically an ion acceleration mechanism of betraton character it describes in combination with a dynamic, generalized Bennett relation focus plasma characteristics like the polarity dependence, the current channel disruption, the axial ion beam formation and the prerequisites for the ensuing turbulent plasma dissipative stage. Fundamental differences with respect to mainline fusion research are emphasized, and some conjectures and proposals are presented as to the further development of plasma focus nuclear fusion or fission energy production.

  16. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Flaig, M.; Plewa, T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V.

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  17. MESSENGER observations of induced magnetic fields in Mercury's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Hauck, Steven A.; Heyner, Daniel; Phillips, Roger J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital data from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow investigation of magnetic fields induced at the top of Mercury's core by time-varying magnetospheric fields. We used 15 Mercury years of observations of the magnetopause position as well as the magnetic field inside the magnetosphere to establish the presence and magnitude of an annual induction signal. Our results indicate an annual change in the internal axial dipole term, g10, of 7.5 to 9.5 nT. For negligible mantle conductivity, the average annual induction signal provides an estimate of Mercury's core radius to within ±90 km, independent of geodetic results. Larger induction signals during extreme events are expected but are challenging to identify because of reconnection-driven erosion. Our results indicate that the magnetopause reaches the dayside planetary surface 1.5-4% of the time.

  18. Effect of readout magnetic-field direction on trilayer magnetically induced super resolution media (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamanoi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Sugimoto, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Shono, K.

    1997-04-01

    Among the proposed magnetically induced super resolution media, double-mask rear aperture detection (RAD) has the greatest potential for use in high-density land/groove recording.1 We proposed a trilayer double-mask RAD media that does not require a large initializing magnetic field.2 In this paper, we report the land/groove recording on the trilayer media for a 0.4 μm mark length and 0.7 μm track pitch. We found that crosstalk drastically changed depending on the direction of the readout magnetic field, and that the crosswrite is related to crosstalk. When applying the readout magnetic field in the erasing direction, the value of crosstalk was about -25 dB and a large crosswrite effect was observed. Conversely, the crosstalk was below -45 dB and no crosswrite effect was observed when applying the magnetic field in the writing direction. CNRs had almost the same value of 48 dB for both the above cases. To investigate the mask formation while applying the readout field in the writing direction, we precisely observed the wave form of the isolated marks. The carrier level rose twice with increasing readout field. However, the position of the leading edge mainly changed when increasing the field. We think that the low crosstalk is attributable to the enhancement of the front mask area. The trilayer media enables an areal density of 3 Gbit/in.2

  19. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co2+ promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  20. Heat transfer characteristics of Fe3O4 ferrofluid flowing in a mini channel under constant and alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemian, M.; Najafian Ashrafi, Z.; Goharkhah, M.; Ashjaee, M.

    2015-05-01

    Laminar forced convection heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 ferrofluid in a mini channel in the presence of constant and alternating magnetic fields is studied numerically. The hot ferrofluid flows into the 20 mm (l)×2 mm (h) mini channel with isothermal top and bottom cold surfaces and is subjected to a transverse non-uniform magnetic field produced by current carrying wires. Two-phase mixture model is implemented and the governing equations are solved using the finite volume approach. Primarily, the effects of the constant magnetic field location and intensity on the convective heat transfer are investigated. Simulation results show that the heat transfer is enhanced due to the disruption of the thermal boundary layer. However, this effect is more pronounced when the magnetic field source is placed in the fully developed region. In the next section, an alternating magnetic field with frequencies ranging from 0 to 10 Hz is imposed to the ferrofluid at different Reynolds numbers of Re=10, 25 and 50. A 16.48% heat transfer enhancement is obtained with a constant magnetic field at Re=25 and magnetic field intensity, Mn=1.07×108. This value is increased up to 27.72% by applying an alternating magnetic field with the same intensity at f=4 Hz. Results also indicate that the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is more significant at lower Reynolds numbers. The optimum frequency for heat transfer enhancement has been obtained for all the cases which shows that it has an increasing trend with the Reynolds number.

  1. Magnetic field induced minigap in double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Harff, N.E. |

    1994-07-01

    We report discovery of a partial energy gap, or minigap, in strongly coupled double quantum wells (QWs), due to an anticrossing of the two QW dispersion curves. The anticrossing and minigap are induced by an in-plane magnetic field B{sub {parallel}}, and give rise to large distortions in the Fermi surface and density of states, including a Van Hove singularity. Sweeping B{sub {parallel}} moves the minigap through the Fermi level, with the upper and lower gap edges producing a sharp maximum and minimum in the low-temperature in-plane conductance, in agreement with theoretical calculations. The gap energy may be directly determined from the data.

  2. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  3. Ultracold Fermions in a Cavity-Induced Artificial Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Kollath, Corinna; Sheikhan, Ameneh; Wolff, Stefan; Brennecke, Ferdinand

    2016-02-12

    We propose how a fermionic quantum gas confined to an optical lattice and coupled to an optical cavity can self-organize into a state where the spontaneously emerging cavity field amplitude induces an artificial magnetic field. The fermions form either a chiral insulator or a chiral liquid carrying chiral currents. The feedback mechanism via the dynamical cavity field enables robust and fast switching in time of the chiral phases, and the cavity output can be employed for a direct nondestructive measurement of the chiral current. PMID:26918972

  4. Transmission Through Gate-Induced Magnetic Islands on Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán Arellano, R. M.; Usaj, Gonzalo

    2015-04-01

    We study the spin-dependent transmission through a potential barrier in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon. In particular, we consider the effect of the magnetic order of the ribbon induced by the modulation of the local density introduced by the barrier. We model the system using an Anderson-Hubbard model that we treat in the mean field approximation. We solve this problem self-consistently and calculate the transmission coefficient using the recursive Green function method. We find that Fano-like interference dips appear on one of the spin channels as the result of the presence of spin polarized edge states in the barrier.

  5. Ultracold Fermions in a Cavity-Induced Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollath, Corinna; Sheikhan, Ameneh; Wolff, Stefan; Brennecke, Ferdinand

    2016-02-01

    We propose how a fermionic quantum gas confined to an optical lattice and coupled to an optical cavity can self-organize into a state where the spontaneously emerging cavity field amplitude induces an artificial magnetic field. The fermions form either a chiral insulator or a chiral liquid carrying chiral currents. The feedback mechanism via the dynamical cavity field enables robust and fast switching in time of the chiral phases, and the cavity output can be employed for a direct nondestructive measurement of the chiral current.

  6. Pressure-induced magnetic instability in Pd-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomi, Gendo; Iwai, Sadanori; Ohashi, Masashi; Nakano, Tomohito

    2012-12-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ(T) of dilute Pd-Ni alloys has been measured at high pressure up to 3 GPa. It is found that the ρ(T) of the ferromagnetic Pd-Ni alloy shows an anomalous temperature dependence near the critical pressure Pc, where the ferromagnetism disappears. The results are analysed in the framework of quantum critical behaviour induced by pressure. The effect of magnetic field on the ρ(T) is also examined. Different behaviour of magnetoresistance against pressure was found depending on the alloy concentration and discussed in connection with an instability of ferromagnetism.

  7. Sensitivity Enhancement by Exchange Mediated MagnetizationTransfer of the Xenon Biosensor Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Lowery, Thomas J.; Han, Song-I.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-08-31

    Hyperpolarized xenon associated with ligand derivitized cryptophane-A cages has been developed as a NMR based biosensor. To optimize the detection sensitivity we describe use of xenon exchange between the caged and bulk dissolved xenon as an effective signal amplifier. This approach, somewhat analogous to 'remote detection' described recently, uses the chemical exchange to repeatedly transfer spectroscopic information from caged to bulk xenon, effectively integrating the caged signal. After an optimized integration period, the signal is read out by observation of the bulk magnetization. The spectrum of the caged xenon is reconstructed through use of a variable evolution period before transfer and Fourier analysis of the bulk signal as a function of the evolution time.

  8. Correcting reaction rates measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-04-01

    Off-resonance or spillover irradiation and incomplete saturation can introduce significant errors in the estimates of chemical rate constants measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Existing methods of correction are effective only over a limited parameter range. Here, a general approach of numerically solving the Bloch-McConnell equations to calculate exchange rates, relaxation times and concentrations for the saturation-transfer experiment is investigated, but found to require more measurements and higher signal-to-noise ratios than in vivo studies can practically afford. As an alternative, correction formulae for the reaction rate are provided which account for the expected parameter ranges and limited measurements available in vivo. The correction term is a quadratic function of experimental measurements. In computer simulations, the new formulae showed negligible bias and reduced the maximum error in the rate constants by about 3-fold compared to traditional formulae, and the error scatter by about 4-fold, over a wide range of parameters for conventional saturation transfer employing progressive saturation, and for the four-angle saturation-transfer method applied to the creatine kinase (CK) reaction in the human heart at 1.5 T. In normal in vivo spectra affected by spillover, the correction increases the mean calculated forward CK reaction rate by 6-16% over traditional and prior correction formulae.

  9. Tunable negligible-loss energy transfer between dipolar-coupled magnetic disks by stimulated vortex gyration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyunsung; Lee, Ki-Suk; Jeong, Dae-Eun; Choi, Youn-Seok; Yu, Young-Sang; Han, Dong-Soo; Vogel, Andreas; Bocklage, Lars; Meier, Guido; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of coupled harmonic oscillators exist in nature. Coupling between different oscillators allows for the possibility of mutual energy transfer between them and the information-signal propagation. Low-energy input signals and their transport with negligible energy loss are the key technological factors in the design of information-signal processing devices. Here, utilizing the concept of coupled oscillators, we experimentally demonstrated a robust new mechanism for energy transfer between spatially separated dipolar-coupled magnetic disks - stimulated vortex gyration. Direct experimental evidence was obtained by a state-of-the-art experimental time-resolved soft X-ray microscopy probe. The rate of energy transfer from one disk to the other was deduced from the two normal modes' frequency splitting caused by dipolar interaction. This mechanism provides the advantages of tunable energy transfer rates, low-power input signals and negligible energy loss in the case of negligible intrinsic damping. Coupled vortex-state disks might be implemented in applications for information-signal processing. PMID:22355578

  10. Relayed 13C magnetization transfer: Detection of malate dehydrogenase reaction in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jehoon; Shen, Jun

    2007-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase catalyzes rapid interconversion between dilute metabolites oxaloacetate and malate. Both oxaloacetate and malate are below the detection threshold of in vivo MRS. Oxaloacetate is also in rapid exchange with aspartate catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase, the latter metabolite is observable in vivo using 13C MRS. We hypothesized that the rapid turnover of oxaloacetate can effectively relay perturbation of magnetization between malate and aspartate. Here, we report indirect observation of the malate dehydrogenase reaction by saturating malate C2 resonance at 71.2 ppm and detecting a reduced aspartate C2 signal at 53.2 ppm due to relayed magnetization transfer via oxaloacetate C2 at 201.3 ppm. Using this strategy the rate of the cerebral malate dehydrogenase reaction was determined to be 9 ± 2 μmol/g wet weight/min (means ± SD, n = 5) at 11.7 Tesla in anesthetized adult rats infused with [1,6- 13C 2]glucose.

  11. Simulations on shifting medium and its application in wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenwen; Zhang, Yingyi; Yao, Chen; Tang, Houjun

    2016-05-01

    Shifting medium is a kind of an anisotropic but homogeneous metamaterial designed by transformation optics. An object or free space enclosed by the shifting medium could be moved to a certain distance away from the original position. In this paper, we propose a cone-shaped shifting medium shell to move an internal coil to the given position. In this way, the two coils in a wireless power transfer system could be equivalently moved closer; thus, their magnetic coupling is enhanced. The theoretical models and numerical simulations are presented and analyzed to validate the effects of the shifting medium shell. Both ohmic loss and magnetic loss are also considered for practical concerns. Finally, we discuss the simplification of such a shifting medium to facilitate its fabrication.

  12. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  13. Improved segmentation of deep brain grey matter structures using magnetization transfer (MT) parameter maps

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Gunther; Draganski, Bogdan; Frackowiak, Richard; Ashburner, John; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2009-01-01

    Basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei are involved in the pathophysiology of various neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Currently available structural T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance images do not provide sufficient contrast for reliable automated segmentation of various subcortical grey matter structures. We use a novel, semi-quantitative magnetization transfer (MT) imaging protocol that overcomes limitations in T1w images, which are mainly due to their sensitivity to the high iron content in subcortical grey matter. We demonstrate improved automated segmentation of putamen, pallidum, pulvinar and substantia nigra using MT images. A comparison with segmentation of high-quality T1w images was performed in 49 healthy subjects. Our results show that MT maps are highly suitable for automated segmentation, and so for multi-subject morphometric studies with a focus on subcortical structures. PMID:19344771

  14. Multiferroicity in an organic charge-transfer salt that is suggestive of electric-dipole-driven magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Lunkenheimer, P.; Muller, J.; Krohns, S.; Schrettle, F.; Loidl, A.; Hartmann, B.; Rommel, R.; de Souza, M.; Hotta, C.; Schlueter, J. A.; Lang, M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiferroics, showing simultaneous ordering of electrical and magnetic degrees of freedom, are remarkable materials as seen from both the academic and technological points of view. A prominent mechanism of multiferroicity is the spin-driven ferroelectricity, often found in frustrated antiferromagnets with helical spin order. There, as for conventional ferroelectrics, the electrical dipoles arise from an off-centre displacement of ions. However, recently a different mechanism, namely purely electronic ferroelectricity, where charge order breaks inversion symmetry, has attracted considerable interest. Here we provide evidence for ferroelectricity, accompanied by antiferromagnetic spin order, in a two-dimensional organic charge-transfer salt, thus representing a new class of multiferroics. We propose a charge-order-driven mechanism leading to electronic ferroelectricity in this material. Quite unexpectedly for electronic ferroelectrics, dipolar and spin order arise nearly simultaneously. This can be ascribed to the loss of spin frustration induced by the ferroelectric ordering. Hence, here the spin order is driven by the ferroelectricity, in marked contrast to the spin-driven ferroelectricity in helical magnets.

  15. Polarization Factors and Spin-Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunneling Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonczewski, John

    2004-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions having small RA enhance the prospect of 2-terminal memory elements using spin transfer for writing and TMR for reading. Using Bardeen theory, I find a sufficient condition for the existence of the tunnel-effective polarization factors which I-V experiments support. The mere presence of an ideal crystalline slab within the barrier suffices, regardless of electron structure and atomic disorder within the magnets and interface regions. I find the moment-coplanar torque density L_R=(h/4π e)P_LJ_0sin θ acting on a right magnet with applied voltage V. Here, P_L(V) and P_R(V) are the polarization factors of the left and right magnets, and J_0(V) is the mean current density in the conventional expression J=J_0(1+P_LP_Rs θ ). This connection between LR and J may aid laboratory exploration of junction technology for current-driven switching by study of J(V,θ ) prior to the difficult fabrication of pillars having submicron dimensions.

  16. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  17. Comptonization in ultra-strong magnetic fields: numerical solution to the radiative transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-02-01

    Context. We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B ≳ Bc ≈ 4.4 × 1013 G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims: The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods: We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results: We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions: We derived the specific intensity of the ordinary photons, under the

  18. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  19. Calcium induced ATP synthesis: Isotope effect, magnetic parameters and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Kuznetsov, D. A.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Shchegoleva, L. N.; Arkhangelsky, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    ATP synthesis by creatine kinase with calcium ions is accompanied by 43Ca/ 40Ca isotope effect: the enzyme with 43Ca 2+ was found to be 2.0 ± 0.3 times more active than enzymes, in which Ca 2+ ions have nonmagnetic nuclei 40Ca. The effect demonstrates that primary reaction in ATP synthesis is electron transfer between reaction partners, Сa( HO)n2+ ( n ⩽ 3) and Ca 2+(ADP) 3-. It generates ion-radical pair, in which spin conversion results in the isotope effect. Magnetic parameters (g-factors and HFC constants a( 43Ca) and a( 31P)) confirm that namely terminal oxygen atom of the ADP ligand in the complex Ca 2+(ADP) 3- donates electron to the Ca( HO)n2+ ion.

  20. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields.

    PubMed

    Bello, M; Creffield, C E; Platero, G

    2016-01-01

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain's end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points - the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites-making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving. PMID:26932406

  1. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, M.; Creffield, C. E.; Platero, G.

    2016-03-01

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain’s end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points - the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites-making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving.

  2. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields

    PubMed Central

    Bello, M.; Creffield, C. E.; Platero, G.

    2016-01-01

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain’s end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points – the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites–making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving. PMID:26932406

  3. Adoptive Transfer of Dying Cells Causes Bystander-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwulst, Steven J.; Davis, Christopher G.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein has the remarkable ability to prevent cell death from several noxious stimuli. Intriguingly, Bcl-2 overexpression in one cell type has been reported to protect against cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cell types. The mechanism of this “trans” protection has been speculated to be secondary to the release of a cytoprotective factor by Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. We employed a series of adoptive transfer experiments in which lymphocytes that overexpress Bcl-2 were administered to either wild type mice or mice lacking mature T and B cells (Rag-1-/-) to detect the presence or absence of the putative protective factor. We were unable to demonstrate “trans” protection. However, adoptive transfer of apoptotic or necrotic cells exacerbated the degree of apoptotic death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells (p≤0.05). Therefore, this data suggests that dying cells emit signals triggering cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells, i.e. a “trans” destructive effect. PMID:17194455

  4. Adoptive transfer of dying cells causes bystander-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Schwulst, Steven J; Davis, Christopher G; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2007-02-16

    The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein has the remarkable ability to prevent cell death from several noxious stimuli. Intriguingly, Bcl-2 overexpression in one cell type has been reported to protect against cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cell types. The mechanism of this "trans" protection has been speculated to be secondary to the release of a cytoprotective factor by Bcl-2 overexpressing cells. We employed a series of adoptive transfer experiments in which lymphocytes that overexpress Bcl-2 were administered to either wild type mice or mice lacking mature T and B cells (Rag-1-/-) to detect the presence or absence of the putative protective factor. We were unable to demonstrate "trans" protection. However, adoptive transfer of apoptotic or necrotic cells exacerbated the degree of apoptotic death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells (p < or= 0.05). Therefore, this data suggests that dying cells emit signals triggering cell death in neighboring non-Bcl-2 overexpressing cells, i.e., a "trans" destructive effect. PMID:17194455

  5. Effect of magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of a magnetic nanofluid in a miniature heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjaee, Mehdi; Goharkhah, Mohammad; Khadem, Leila Azizi; Ahmadi, Reza

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in a miniature heat sink is studied experimentally. The heat sink with the dimensions of 40 mm (L) × 40 mm (W) × 10 mm (H) consists of an array of five circular channels with diameter and length of 4 and 40 mm, respectively. It is heated from the bottom surface with a constant heat flux while the other surfaces are insulated. The heat sink is also influenced by an external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet. The local convective coefficients are measured at various flow rates (200 < Re < 900), magnetic field intensities (B < 1,400 G), and particle volume fractions (φ = 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 %). Results show that using ferrofluid results in a maximum of 14 % improvement in heat transfer compared to the pure water, in the absence of magnetic field. This value grows up to 38 % when a magnetic field with the strength of 1,200 G is applied to the ferrofluid. On the other hand, it is observed that the significant heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. The optimum operating condition is obtained based on the maximum heat transfer enhancement per pressure loss.

  6. Magnetically sensitive light-induced reactions in cryptochrome are consistent with its proposed role as a magnetoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Robinson, Alexander J; Henbest, Kevin B; Hogben, Hannah J; Biskup, Till; Ahmad, Margaret; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2012-03-27

    Among the biological phenomena that fall within the emerging field of "quantum biology" is the suggestion that magnetically sensitive chemical reactions are responsible for the magnetic compass of migratory birds. It has been proposed that transient radical pairs are formed by photo-induced electron transfer reactions in cryptochrome proteins and that their coherent spin dynamics are influenced by the geomagnetic field leading to changes in the quantum yield of the signaling state of the protein. Despite a variety of supporting evidence, it is still not clear whether cryptochromes have the properties required to respond to magnetic interactions orders of magnitude weaker than the thermal energy, k(B)T. Here we demonstrate that the kinetics and quantum yields of photo-induced flavin-tryptophan radical pairs in cryptochrome are indeed magnetically sensitive. The mechanistic origin of the magnetic field effect is clarified, its dependence on the strength of the magnetic field measured, and the rates of relevant spin-dependent, spin-independent, and spin-decoherence processes determined. We argue that cryptochrome is fit for purpose as a chemical magnetoreceptor. PMID:22421133

  7. Magnetically sensitive light-induced reactions in cryptochrome are consistent with its proposed role as a magnetoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kiminori; Robinson, Alexander J.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hogben, Hannah J.; Biskup, Till; Ahmad, Margaret; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Among the biological phenomena that fall within the emerging field of “quantum biology” is the suggestion that magnetically sensitive chemical reactions are responsible for the magnetic compass of migratory birds. It has been proposed that transient radical pairs are formed by photo-induced electron transfer reactions in cryptochrome proteins and that their coherent spin dynamics are influenced by the geomagnetic field leading to changes in the quantum yield of the signaling state of the protein. Despite a variety of supporting evidence, it is still not clear whether cryptochromes have the properties required to respond to magnetic interactions orders of magnitude weaker than the thermal energy, kBT. Here we demonstrate that the kinetics and quantum yields of photo-induced flavin—tryptophan radical pairs in cryptochrome are indeed magnetically sensitive. The mechanistic origin of the magnetic field effect is clarified, its dependence on the strength of the magnetic field measured, and the rates of relevant spin-dependent, spin-independent, and spin-decoherence processes determined. We argue that cryptochrome is fit for purpose as a chemical magnetoreceptor. PMID:22421133

  8. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  9. Ambipolar magnetic fluctuation-induced heat transport in toroidal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.; Almagri, A.F.; Cekic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.; Ware, A.S.

    1996-05-01

    The total magnetic fluctuation-induced electron thermal flux has been determined in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch [Fusion Technol. {bold 19}, 131 (1991)] from the measured correlation of the heat flux along perturbed fields with the radial component of the perturbed field. In the edge region the total flux is convective and intrinsically ambipolar constrained, as evidenced by the magnitude of the thermal diffusivity, which is well approximated by the product of ion thermal velocity and the magnetic diffusivity. A self-consistent theory is formulated and shown to reproduce the experimental results, provided nonlinear charge aggregation in streaming electrons is accounted for in the theory. For general toroidal configurations, it is shown that ambipolar constrained transport applies when remote magnetic fluctuations (i.e., global modes resonant at distant rational surfaces) dominate the flux. Near locations where the dominant modes are resonant, the transport is nonambipolar. This agrees with the radial variation of diffusivity in MST. Expectations for the tokamak are also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wen Qing

    2015-04-13

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 4+}, and O{sup 2−} ions in double perovskites R{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P2{sub 1} symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  11. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an "all-or-none" manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  12. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  13. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma. PMID:22792275

  14. Population transfer in a Lambda system induced by detunings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, P. G.; Paladino, E.; D'Arrigo, A.; Falci, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we propose a protocol to achieve coherent population transfer between two states in a three-level atom by using two ac fields. It is based on the physics of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), but it is implemented with the constraint of a reduced control, namely, one of the fields cannot be switched off. A combination of frequency chirps is used with resonant fields, allowing us to achieve approximate destructive interference, despite the fact that an exact dark state does not exist. This chirped STIRAP protocol is tailored for applications to artificial atoms, where architectures with several elementary units can be strongly coupled but where the possibility of switching on and off such couplings is often very limited. Demonstration of this protocol would be a benchmark for the implementation of a class of multilevel advanced control procedures for quantum computation and microwave quantum photonics in artificial atoms.

  15. Neutron transfer reactions induced by Li8 on Be9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, V.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Camargo, O.; Barioni, A.; Assunção, M.; Kolata, J. J.; Amro, H.; Becchetti, F. D.; Jiang, Hao; Aguilera, E. F.; Lizcano, D.; Martines-Quiroz, E.; Garcia, H.

    2007-05-01

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of Li8 on Be9 and the neutron transfer reactions Be9(Li8,Li7)Be10 and Be9(Li8,Li9)Be8 were measured with a 27 MeV Li8 radioactive nuclear beam. Spectr- oscopic factors for Li8 ⊗n= Li9 and Li7 ⊗n= Li8 bound systems were obtained from the comparison between the experimental differential cross section and finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation calculations with the code FRESCO. The spectroscopic factors obtained were compared to shell model calculations and to other experimental values from (d,p) reactions. Using the present values for the spectroscopic factor, cross sections for the direct neutron-capture reactions Li7(n,γ)Li8 and Li8(n,γ)Li9 were calculated in the framework of a potential model.

  16. Strain-induced magnetism in MoS{sub 2} monolayer with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Peng; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng Zhang, Zhidong

    2014-02-07

    The strain-induced magnetism is observed in single-layer MoS{sub 2} with atomic single vacancies from density functional calculations. Calculated magnetic moment is no less than 2 μ{sub B} per vacancy defect. The strain-induced band gap closure is concurrent with the occurrence of the magnetism. Possible physical mechanism of the emergence of strain-induced magnetism is illustrated. We also demonstrate the possibility to test the predicted magnetism in experiment. Our study may provide an opportunity for the design of new type of memory-switching or logic devices by using earth-rich nonmagnetic materials MoS{sub 2}.

  17. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  18. Spin-transfer torque magnetic memory as a stochastic memristive synapse for neuromorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Adrien F; Larroque, Jerome; Locatelli, Nicolas; Ben Romdhane, Nesrine; Bichler, Olivier; Gamrat, Christian; Zhao, Wei Sheng; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Galdin-Retailleau, Sylvie; Querlioz, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Spin-transfer torque magnetic memory (STT-MRAM) is currently under intense academic and industrial development, since it features non-volatility, high write and read speed and high endurance. In this work, we show that when used in a non-conventional regime, it can additionally act as a stochastic memristive device, appropriate to implement a "synaptic" function. We introduce basic concepts relating to spin-transfer torque magnetic tunnel junction (STT-MTJ, the STT-MRAM cell) behavior and its possible use to implement learning-capable synapses. Three programming regimes (low, intermediate and high current) are identified and compared. System-level simulations on a task of vehicle counting highlight the potential of the technology for learning systems. Monte Carlo simulations show its robustness to device variations. The simulations also allow comparing system operation when the different programming regimes of STT-MTJs are used. In comparison to the high and low current regimes, the intermediate current regime allows minimization of energy consumption, while retaining a high robustness to device variations. These results open the way for unexplored applications of STT-MTJs in robust, low power, cognitive-type systems. PMID:25879967

  19. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  20. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  1. Permanently reconfigured metamaterials due to terahertz induced mass transfer of gold.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, Andrew C; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Lorenzen, Dennis Lund; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2015-05-01

    We present a new technique for permanent metamaterial reconfiguration via optically induced mass transfer of gold. This mass transfer, which can be explained by field-emission induced electromigration, causes a geometric change in the metamaterial sample. Since a metamaterial's electromagnetic response is dictated by its geometry, this structural change massively alters the metamaterial's behavior. We show this by optically forming a conducting pathway between two closely spaced dipole antennas, thereby changing the resonance frequency by a factor of two. After discussing the physics of the process, we conclude by presenting an optical fuse that can be used as a sacrificial element to protect sensitive components, demonstrating the applicability of optically induced mass transfer for device design. PMID:25969252

  2. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces phage-mediated gene transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Allen, Heather K.; Brunelle, Brian W.; Lee, In Soo; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Stanton, Thaddeus B.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the US during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness genes in the

  3. Induced magnetism in exfoliated graphene via proximity effect with yttrium iron garnet thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, Mario; Li, Yang; di Bernardo, Angelo; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Robinson, Jason

    The recent discovery of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in magnetically doped topological insulators cooled below in the milikelvin regime represents breakthrough in the field of spintronics. Theoretically, the QAHE should occur in graphene proximity coupled to a ferromagnetic insulato but with the promise of much higher operating temperatures for practical applications. Hints of proximity-induced magnetism in graphene coupled to yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films have been reported although the QAHE remains unobserved; the lack of a fully developed plateau in graphene/YIG devices can be attributed to poor interfacial coupling and therefore a dramatically reduced magnetic proximity effect. Here we report the deposition and characterisation of epitaxial thin-films of YIG on lattice-matched gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Pristine exfoliated graphene flakes transferred mechanically onto the YIG are reported alongside results that correlate the effects of YIG morphology on the electronic and crystal properties of graphene by electrical (low temperature magnetoresistance measurements in Hall-bar-like configuration) and optical (Raman) means.

  4. Strain-Induced Isostructural and Magnetic Phase Transitions in Monolayer MoN2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Wang, Shan-Shan; Lu, Yunhao; Jiang, Jianzhong; Yang, Shengyuan A

    2016-07-13

    The change of bonding status, typically occurring only in chemical processes, could dramatically alter the material properties. Here, we show that a tunable breaking and forming of a diatomic bond can be achieved through physical means, i.e., by a moderate biaxial strain, in the newly discovered MoN2 two-dimensional (2D) material. On the basis of first-principles calculations, we predict that as the lattice parameter is increased under strain, there exists an isostructural phase transition at which the N-N distance has a sudden drop, corresponding to the transition from a N-N nonbonding state to a N-N single bond state. Remarkably, the bonding change also induces a magnetic phase transition, during which the magnetic moments transfer from the N(2p) sublattice to the Mo(4d) sublattice; meanwhile, the type of magnetic coupling is changed from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. We provide a physical picture for understanding these striking effects. The discovery is not only of great scientific interest in exploring unusual phase transitions in low-dimensional systems, but it also reveals the great potential of the 2D MoN2 material in the nanoscale mechanical, electronic, and spintronic applications. PMID:27310459

  5. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat-transfer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magari, P. J.; Lagraff, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder are presented. A quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow is created. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat-transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers at two Mach numbers: one incompressible and one transonic. The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness is documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. The time-averaged heat-transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number, is found to reach a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross correlation of the heat-transfer signals in the stagnation region reveal the importance of large vortical structures shed from the upstream wake generator.

  6. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat-transfer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, P.J.; Lagraff, L.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder are presented. A quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow is created. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat-transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers at two Mach numbers: one incompressible and one transonic. The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness is documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. The time-averaged heat-transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number, is found to reach a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross correlation of the heat-transfer signals in the stagnation region reveal the importance of large vortical structures shed from the upstream wake generator. 30 refs.

  7. Current-induced Orbital and Spin Magnetizations in Crystals with Helical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Taiki; Yokoyama, Takehito; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically show that in a crystal with a helical lattice structure, orbital and spin magnetizations along a helical axis are induced by an electric current along the helical axis. We propose a simple tight-binding model for calculations, and the results can be generalized to any helical crystals. The induced magnetizations are opposite for right-handed and left-handed helices. The current-induced spin magnetization along the helical axis comes from a radial spin texture on the Fermi surface. This is in sharp contrast to Rashba systems where the induced spin magnetization is perpendicular to the applied current. PMID:26156643

  8. Thick film laser induced forward transfer for deposition of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kattamis, Nicholas T.; Purnick, Priscilla E.; Weiss, Ron; Arnold, Craig B.

    2007-10-22

    Laser forward transfer processes incorporating thin absorbing films can be used to deposit robust organic and inorganic materials but the deposition of more delicate materials has remained elusive due to contamination and stress induced during the transfer process. Here, we present the approach to high resolution patterning of sensitive materials by incorporating a thick film polymer absorbing layer that is able to dissipate shock energy through mechanical deformation. Multiple mechanisms for transfer as a function of incident laser energy are observed and we show viable and contamination-free deposition of living mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  9. Thick film laser induced forward transfer for deposition of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattamis, Nicholas T.; Purnick, Priscilla E.; Weiss, Ron; Arnold, Craig B.

    2007-10-01

    Laser forward transfer processes incorporating thin absorbing films can be used to deposit robust organic and inorganic materials but the deposition of more delicate materials has remained elusive due to contamination and stress induced during the transfer process. Here, we present the approach to high resolution patterning of sensitive materials by incorporating a thick film polymer absorbing layer that is able to dissipate shock energy through mechanical deformation. Multiple mechanisms for transfer as a function of incident laser energy are observed and we show viable and contamination-free deposition of living mammalian embryonic stem cells.

  10. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10-20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  11. Characteristics analysis of a high speed permanent magnet synchronous generator using the transfer relations theorem and equivalent circuit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Ji-Hoon; Cho, Han-Wook; Hong, Jung-Pyo

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents analytical methods to predict the magnetic field distribution, electrical parameters, and output characteristics of a high speed synchronous generator equipped with surface-mounted permanent magnet. In order to analyze the magnetic field distribution and to estimate the electrical parameters, electromagnetic transfer relation (TR) theorem is employed. Moreover, output characteristics for variable resistive load and the operating speed are also obtained by solving the permanent magnet machine's equivalent circuit equation. The analytical results are validated extensively by nonlinear finite element analysis and experimental results.

  12. Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a High-Temperature Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-07-10

    The first direct measurement of magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle flux in the core of a high-temperature plasma is reported. Transport occurs due to magnetic field fluctuations associated with global tearing instabilities. The electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density and radial magnetic fluctuations, accounts for density profile relaxation during a magnetic reconnection event. The measured particle transport is much larger than that expected for ambipolar particle diffusion in a stochastic magnetic field.

  13. Substrate induced modulation of electronic, magnetic and chemical properties of MoSe{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Wasey, A. H. M. Abdul; Chakrabarty, Soubhik; Das, G. P.

    2014-04-15

    Monolayer of MoSe{sub 2}, having a typical direct band gap of ∼1.5 eV, is a promising material for optoelectronic and solar cell applications. When this 2D semiconductor is supported on transition metal substrates, such as Ni(111) and Cu(111), its electronic structure gets modulated. First principles density functional investigation shows the appearance of de-localized mid-gap states in the density of states. The work function of the semiconductor overlayer gets modified considerably, indicating n-type doping caused by the metal contacts. The charge transfer across the metal-semiconductor junction also significantly enhances the chemical reactivity of the MoSe{sub 2} overlayer, as observed by Hydrogen absorption. Furthermore, for Ni contact, there is a signature of induced magnetism in MoSe{sub 2} monolayer.

  14. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Petrov, Pavel A; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a (31)P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity. PMID

  15. Exact transfer functions for the PEP storage ring magnets and some general characteristics and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    The exact, ion-optical transfer functions for the dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the PEP standard PODC cell are calculated for any single particle with initial coordinates (r, p, s). Modifications resulting from radiative energy loss are also calculated and discussed. These functions allow one to characterize individual magnets or classes of magnets by their aberrations and thereby simplify their study and correction. In contrast to high-energy spectrometers where aberrations are often analyzed away, those in storage rings drive series of high order resonances, even for perfect magnets (2), that can produce stop bands and other effects which can seriously limit performance. Thus, one would like to eliminate them altogether or failing this to develop local and global correction schemes. Even then, one should expect higher order effects to influence injection, extraction or single-pass systems either because of orbit distortions or overly large phase spece distortions such as may occur in low-beta insertions or any final-focus optics. The term exact means that the results here are based on solving the relativistic Lorentz force equation with accurate representations of measured magnetostatic fields. Such fields satisfy Maxwell's equations and are the actual fields seen by a particle as it propagates around a real storage ring. This is discussed in detail and illustrated with examples that show that this is possible, practical and may even be useful.

  16. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  17. Transfer and contact-induced variation in child Basque

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Young Basque-speaking children produce Differential Object Marking (DOM) and pre-verbal complementizers in their speech, variants argued to stem from contact with Spanish (Austin, 2006; Rodríguez-Ordóñez, 2013). In this paper, I claim that despite their contact-induced origin, these forms reflect distinct developmental tendencies on the part of the child acquiring Basque. Children's use of pre-verbal complementizers in Basque seems to be a relief strategy that bilingual children employ until they have acquired the post-verbal complementizers in Basque, which are low-frequency morphemes. In contrast, the use of DOM is present in the adult input, although children use this construction to a greater extent than adults do. Finally, I discuss the implications of these findings for the part that child learners play in advancing language change. PMID:25653632

  18. In Vivo Magnetization Transfer and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detects Thrombus Composition in a Mouse Model of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Prakash; Modarai, Bijan; Smith, Alberto; Botnar, René M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis remains a major health problem necessitating accurate diagnosis. Thrombolysis is associated with significant morbidity and is effective only for the treatment of unorganized thrombus. We tested the feasibility of in vivo magnetization transfer (MT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to detect thrombus organization in a murine model of deep vein thrombosis. Methods and Results Deep vein thrombosis was induced in the inferior vena cava of male BALB/C mice. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction using MT, diffusion-weighted, inversion-recovery, and T1-mapping protocols. Delayed enhancement and T1 mapping were repeated 2 hours after injection of a fibrin contrast agent. Finally, excised thrombi were used for histology. We found that MT and diffusion-weighted imaging can detect histological changes associated with thrombus aging. MT rate (MTR) maps and percentage of MT rate (%MTR) allowed visualization and quantification of the thrombus protein content, respectively. The %MTR increased with thrombus organization and was significantly higher at days 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction (days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28: %MTR=2483±451, 2079±1210, 7029±2490, 10 295±4356, 32 994±25 449; Panova<0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the %MTR and the histological protein content of the thrombus (r=0.70; P<0.05). The apparent diffusion coefficient was lower in erythrocyte-rich and collagen-rich thrombus (0.72±0.10 and 0.69±0.05 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Thrombus at days 7 and 14 had the highest apparent diffusion coefficient values (0.95±0.09 and 1.10±0.18 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Conclusions MT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences are promising for the staging of thrombus composition and could be useful in guiding medical intervention. PMID:23564561

  19. Absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of fungi (Trichoderma conidia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Antal, Zs.; Kresz, N.; Bor, Zs.; Chrisey, D.

    2004-09-01

    We present an investigation on absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer (AFA-LIFT) of fungus (Trichoderma) conidia. A KrF excimer laser beam [λ =248nm,FWHM=30ns (FWHM, full width at half maximum)] was directed through a quartz plate and focused onto its silver coated surface where conidia of the Trichoderma strain were uniformly spread. The laser fluence was varied in the range of 0-2600mJ/cm2 and each laser pulse transferred a pixel of target material. The average irradiated area was 8×10-2mm2. After the transfer procedure, the yeast extract medium covered glass slide and the transferred conidia patterns were incubated for 20 h and then observed using an optical microscope. The transferred conidia pixels were germinated and the areas of the culture medium surfaces covered by the pixels were evaluated as a function of laser fluence. As the laser fluence was increased from 0 to 355mJ/cm2 the transferred and germinated pixel area increased from 0 to 0.25mm2. Further increase in fluence resulted in a drastic decrease down to an approximately constant value of 0.06mm2. The yield of successful transfer by AFA-LIFT and germination was as much as 75% at 355mJ/cm2. The results prove that AFA-LIFT can successfully be applied for the controlled transfer of biological objects.

  20. Quantitative T(1rho) and magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging of acute cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Heidi I; Kettunen, Mikko I; Gröhn, Olli H J; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2002-05-01

    It has been previously shown that T1 in the rotating frame (T(1rho)) is a very sensitive and early marker of cerebral ischemia and that, interestingly, it can provide prognostic information about the degree of subsequent neuronal damage. In the present study the authors have quantified T(1rho) together with the rate and other variables of magnetization transfer (MT) associated with spin interactions between the bulk and semisolid macromolecular pools by means of Z spectroscopy, to examine the possible overlap of mechanisms affecting these magnetic resonance imaging contrasts. Substantial prolongation of cerebral T(1rho) was observed minutes after induction of ischemia, this change progressing in a time-dependent manner. Difference Z spectra (contralateral nonischemic minus ischemic brain tissue) showed a significant positive reminder in the time points from 0.5 to 3 hours after induction of ischemia, the polarity of this change reversing by 24 hours. Detailed analysis of the MT variables showed that the initial Z spectral changes were due to concerted increase in the maximal MT (+3%) and amount of MT (+4%). Interestingly, the MT rates derived either from the entire frequency range of Z spectra or the time constant for the first-order forward exchange (k(sat)) were unchanged at this time, these variables reducing only one day after induction of ischemia. The authors conclude that T(1rho) changes in the acute phase of ischemia coincide with both elevated maximal MT and amount of MT. These changes occur independent of the overall MT rate and in the absence of net water gain to the tissue, whereas in the consolidating infarction the decrease in the rate and amount of MT, as well as the extensive prolongation of T(1rho), are associated with water accumulation. PMID:11973427

  1. Laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of β-mercaptoethanol mediated photo induced proton coupled electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, S; Satish Rao, B S; Satyamoorthy, K; Mahato, K K

    2015-01-01

    Photo induced proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is an important process that many organisms use for progression of catalytic reactions leading to energy conversion. In the present study, the influence of SDS and BME on the redox properties of tyrosine and tryptophan for five different globular proteins, BSA, HSA, RNase-A, trypsin and lysozyme were studied using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were subjected to denaturation under SDS, SDS plus heat and SDS plus β-mercaptoethanol (BME) plus heat and the corresponding fluorescence were recorded. The influence of BME on the autofluorescence properties of the proteins were evaluated upon tris-2-corboxy-ethyl phosphine (TCEP) denaturation. The BSA and HSA when exposed to SDS alone, exhibited hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties. However, these proteins when treated with SDS plus BME plus heat, an unusual red shift in the emission was observed, may be due to proton transfer from hydroxyl group of the excited tyrosine residues to the local microenvironments. The observation was further confirmed with similar proton transfer in absence of tryptophan in RNase-A showing involvement of tyrosine in the process. A drastic quenching of fluorescence in all of the proteins under study were also observed, may be due to photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from BME to the intrinsic fluorophores resulting in radical ions formation, evaluated upon DCFDA measurements. PMID:25985124

  2. Defects induced magnetization in B-doped ZnFeO dilute magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Murtaza; Sabieh Anwar, M.; Mahmood, Asif; Atiq, Shahid; Ramay, Shahid M.; Siddiqi, Saadat A.

    2015-05-01

    Zn0.95-xFe0.05BxO (x=0, 0.05) nano-particles have been synthesized using a modified chemically derived citrate gel method. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates the wurtzite type hexagonal structure belonging to P63mc space group without the presence of any secondary phase in both compositions. The Diffraction analysis shows that Fe2+ and B3+ ions have replaced some of the Zn2+ ions while some occupy un-detectable interstitial and inter-granular positions inside the structure. Scanning electron micrographs obtained using scanning electron microscopy show typical smaller size of particles in B-doped composition. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity analysis shows the semiconducting characteristics of the compositions and that doping of Fe and B up to 10 at% does not change the electrical behavior of the host material. Magnetic measurements display room temperature ferromagnetism in both compositions with enhanced magnetization in B-doped composition associated with defect induced magnetic mechanism belonging to intrinsically augmented interstitial and inter-granular effects.

  3. Spin nutation induced by atomic motion in a magnetic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Shiraishi, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.

    2010-12-15

    An atom moving in a spatially periodic field experiences a temporally periodic perturbation and undergoes a resonance transition between atomic internal states when the transition frequency is equal to the atomic velocity divided by the field period. We demonstrated that spin nutation was induced by this resonant transition in a polarized rubidium (Rb) atomic beam passing through a magnetic lattice. The lattice was produced by current flowing through an array of parallel wires crossing the beam. This array structure, reminiscent of a multiwire chamber for particle detection, allowed the Rb beam to pass through the lattice at a variety of incident angles. The dephasing of spin nutation was reduced by varying the incident angle.

  4. Thermally induced magnetization switching in Gd/Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ostler, T. A.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model of Gd/Fe multilayers is constructed using the atomistic spin dynamics formalism. By varying the thicknesses and number of layers we have shown that a strong dependence of the energy required for thermally induced magnetization switching (TIMS) is present; with a larger number of interfaces, lower energy is required. The results of the layer resolved dynamics show that the reversal process of the multilayered structures, similar to that of a GdFeCo alloy, is driven by the antiferromagnetic interaction between the transition-metal and rare-earth components. Finally, while the presence of the interface drives the reversal process, we show here that the switching process does not initiate at the surface but from the layers furthest from it, a departure from the alloy behavior which expands the classes of material types exhibiting TIMS.

  5. Magnetic-Field Induced Diffraction Patterns from Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem; Lawes, Gavin; Naik, Ratna

    2011-04-01

    Ferrofluids are stable colloidal suspensions of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a carrier liquid. We report studies of magneto-optic properties of two ferrofluid systems consisting of tetramethyl-ammonium-hydroxide (TMAH)-coated and of dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles of nominal sizes of 6 nm and 12 nm respectively suspended in water. Both samples showed superparamagnetic behavior. The static and time-dependent DC-magnetic-field-induced light scattering patterns produced by two orthogonal He-Ne laser beams passing through the ferrofluid samples revealed significant different optical signatures for the two surfactants. Notably, in contrast to the linear diffraction pattern produced by TMAH-coated nanoparticles, a circular diffraction pattern is reported -- for the first time -- in the dextran-coated ferrofluid.

  6. Thermally induced magnetization switching in Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001): selectable magnetic configurations by temperature and field control

    PubMed Central

    Spezzani, Carlo; Vidal, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Eddrief, Mahmoud; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Etgens, Victor H.; Popescu, Horia; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetization control by external magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents. Developing temperature-driven magnetization control has potential for achieving enhanced device functionalities. Recently, there has been much interest in thermally induced magnetisation switching (TIMS), where the temperature control of intrinsic material properties drives a deterministic switching without applying external fields. TIMS, mainly investigated in rare-earth–transition-metal ferrimagnets, has also been observed in epitaxial Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001), where it stems from a completely different physical mechanism. In Fe/MnAs temperature actually modifies the surface dipolar fields associated with the MnAs magnetic microstructure. This in turn determines the effective magnetic field acting on the Fe overlayer. In this way one can reverse the Fe magnetization direction by performing thermal cycles at ambient temperatures. Here we use element selective magnetization measurements to demonstrate that various magnetic configurations of the Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001) system are stabilized predictably by acting on the thermal cycle parameters and on the presence of a bias field. We show in particular that the maximum temperature reached during the cycle affects the final magnetic configuration. Our findings show that applications are possible for fast magnetization switching, where local temperature changes are induced by laser excitations. PMID:25631753

  7. Thermally induced magnetization switching in Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001): selectable magnetic configurations by temperature and field control.

    PubMed

    Spezzani, Carlo; Vidal, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Eddrief, Mahmoud; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Etgens, Victor H; Popescu, Horia; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetization control by external magnetic fields or spin-polarized currents. Developing temperature-driven magnetization control has potential for achieving enhanced device functionalities. Recently, there has been much interest in thermally induced magnetisation switching (TIMS), where the temperature control of intrinsic material properties drives a deterministic switching without applying external fields. TIMS, mainly investigated in rare-earth-transition-metal ferrimagnets, has also been observed in epitaxial Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001), where it stems from a completely different physical mechanism. In Fe/MnAs temperature actually modifies the surface dipolar fields associated with the MnAs magnetic microstructure. This in turn determines the effective magnetic field acting on the Fe overlayer. In this way one can reverse the Fe magnetization direction by performing thermal cycles at ambient temperatures. Here we use element selective magnetization measurements to demonstrate that various magnetic configurations of the Fe/MnAs/GaAs(001) system are stabilized predictably by acting on the thermal cycle parameters and on the presence of a bias field. We show in particular that the maximum temperature reached during the cycle affects the final magnetic configuration. Our findings show that applications are possible for fast magnetization switching, where local temperature changes are induced by laser excitations. PMID:25631753

  8. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D. E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic torquer induced disturbing signals within GRACE accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterseim, Nadja; Flury, Jakob; Schlicht, Anja

    2012-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) gravity field satellite mission was launched in 2002. Although many investigations have been carried out, not all disturbances and perturbations upon satellite instruments and sensors are resolved yet. In this work the issue of acceleration disturbances onboard of GRACE due to magnetic torquers is investigated and discussed. Each of the GRACE satellites is equipped with a three-axes capacitive accelerometer to measure non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft. We used 10 Hz Level 1a raw accelerometer data in order to determine the impact of electric current changes on the accelerometer. After reducing signals which are induced by highly dominating processes in the low frequency range, such as thermospheric drag and solar radiation pressure, which can easily be done by applying a high-pass filter, disturbing signals from onboard instruments such as thruster firing events or heater switch events need to be removed from the previously filtered data. Afterwards the spikes which are induced by the torquers can be very well observed. Spikes vary in amplitude with respect to an increasing or decreasing current used for magnetic torquers, and can be as large as 20 nm/s2. Furthermore, we were able to set up a model for the spikes of each scenario with which we were able to compute model spike time series. With these time series the spikes can successfully be removed from the 10 Hz raw accelerometer data. Spectral analysis of the time series reveal that an influence onto gravity field determination due to these effects is very unlikely, but can theoretically not be excluded.

  10. Transfer of the magnetic axis of an undulator to mechanical fiducial marks of a laser tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketenoğlu, Bora; Englisch, Uwe; Li, Yuhui; Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Benecke, Wolf; Noak, Martin; Prenting, Johannes; Schloesser, Markus; Pflueger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    The exact geometric location of the magnetic centers of sensors or sensor systems using Hall probes or pick-up coils is usually not known with high precision. In order to transfer the high spatial accuracy of magnetic measurements to external mechanic fiducials a device called "Magnetic Landmark" was developed and is described in this report. Its purpose is to establish the exact relation between "magnetic" coordinates used on magnetic measurement systems and "mechanic" coordinates used for alignment. The landmark consists of a permanent magnet configuration, which generates a field distribution with well-defined zero crossings in two orthogonal directions, which can be exactly localized with micrometer precision using magnetic measurement systems. For the "mechanic" measurements several redundant monuments for laser fiducials can be used. Using flip tests for the magnetic as well as mechanic measurements the center positions are determined in magnetic and mechanic coordinates. Using them the relation between the magnetic and surveying coordinates can be established with high accuracy. This report concentrates on the description of the landmark. A thorough analysis on achievable accuracy is presented. The method was developed for the alignment of the 91 undulator segments needed for the European XFEL but can be applied to other magnet systems as well.

  11. ATP synthesis and degradation rates in the perfused rat heart. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance double saturation transfer measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, R G; Balschi, J A; Leigh, J S; Ingwall, J S

    1988-01-01

    A limitation of magnetization transfer techniques for studying enzyme kinetics in vivo has been the difficulty of treating systems with more than two exchanging species. This problem was addressed in the original papers describing saturation transfer. Since then, a number of approaches have been devised to study these complex situations. Here, we present a method based on the transient saturation transfer experiment in which spin-lattice relaxation time constants and reaction rates are obtained from the same magnetization transfer data. This technique is particularly suitable for biological samples. We apply the method to evaluate flux balance in the three-site linear exchange network composed of ATP, creatine phosphate, and inorganic phosphate in the isolated, perfused rat heart and show that the method yields reasonable values for the reaction velocities of ATP synthesis and degradation. PMID:3242635

  12. Time-domain analysis of spin-torque induced switching paths in nanoscale CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heindl, R.; Rippard, W. H.; Russek, S. E.; Pufall, M. R.

    2014-12-28

    We performed thousands of single-shot, real-time measurements of spin-transfer-torque induced switching in nanoscale CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions having in-plane magnetizations. Our investigation discovered a variety of switching paths occurring in consecutive, nominally identical switching trials of a single device. By mapping the voltage as a function of time to an effective magnetization angle, we determined that reversal of a single device occurs via a variety of thermally activated paths. Our results show a complex switching behavior that has not been captured by previous observations and cannot be fully explained within the simple macrospin model.

  13. Mixed Convective Flow of an Elastico-Viscous Fluid Past a Vertical Plate in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction with an Induced Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Utpal Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the steady, two-dimensional, hydromagnetic, mixed convection heat and mass transfer of a conducting, optically thin, incompressible, elastico-viscous fluid (characterized by the Walters' B' model) past a permeable, stationary, vertical, infinite plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction with account for an induced magnetic field. The governing equations of the flow are solved by the series method, and expressions for the velocity field, induced magnetic field, temperature field, and the skin friction are obtained.

  14. Optimization study of the femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer process with thin aluminum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudipta; Sabbah, A. J.; Yarbrough, J. M.; Allen, C. G.; Winters, Beau; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-07-01

    The parameters for an effective laser-induced forward-transfer (LIFT) process of aluminum thin films using a femtosecond laser are studied. Deposited feature size as a function of laser fluence, donor film thickness, quality of focus, and the pulse duration are varied, providing a metric of the most desirable conditions for femtosecond LIFT with thin aluminum films.

  15. Solvent-induced reversible solid-state colour change of an intramolecular charge-transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Maier, Josef M; Hwang, Jungwun; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Mullis, Brian T; Strickland, Sharon M S; Shimizu, Ken D

    2015-10-11

    A dynamic intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) complex was designed that displayed reversible colour changes in the solid-state when treated with different organic solvents. The origins of the dichromatism were shown to be due to solvent-inclusion, which induced changes in the relative orientations of the donor pyrene and acceptor naphthalenediimide units. PMID:26299357

  16. Electron transfer in tetranuclear mixed-valence iron clusters. Role of the topology on the magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borras-Almenar, J. J.; Coronado, E.; Georges, R.; Gomez-Garcia, C. J.

    1992-10-01

    The energy levels and magnetic properties of mixed-valence d 5d 5d 5d 6 clusters are studied from a model that takes into account the electron transfers between orbitally nondegenerate orbitals of the metal ions, and superexchange interactions. The influence of the electron transfer on the spin state energies and magnetic properties is examined as a function of the geometry of the tetranuclear cluster, including the limiting cases with T d and D 4h symmetries. For geometries close to the tetrahedral, effects of antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions are also discussed.

  17. Surface heat transfer and flow properties of vortex arrays induced artificially and from centrifugal instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, C. S.; Ligrani, P. M.; Tuzzolo, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents and compares fluid-flow and heat transfer properties from artificially induced vortices in a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer and naturally occurring vortices due to centrifugal instabilities in a curved-channel laminar flow. Pairs and arrays of vortices are artificially induced by placing half-delta wings on the plate surface. With both arrays and pairs of vortices, streamwise velocities and total pressures are high, and surface heat transfer is locally augmented in vortex downwash regions. In contrast to vortices in the arrays vortices in the pairs tend to move in the streamwise direction with significant divergence (when the common flow between pair is toward the wall) or convergence (when the common flow between pair is away from the wall). The vortices in the arrays cause maximum peak-to-peak heat transfer variations of up to 12 percent of local spanwise-averaged values for initial vortex spacings between 1 to 2.5 generator heights.

  18. Calculation of magnetically induced currents in hydrocarbon nanorings.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Stefan; Sundholm, Dage; Jusélius, Jonas; Klopper, Wim; Fliegl, Heike

    2008-12-25

    Magnetically induced current densities, nuclear magnetic shieldings, and electric polarizabilities of planar ring-shaped hydrocarbons have been studied at the density-functional theory level using the Becke-Perdew (BP86) functional. The current densities were calculated using the Gauge-Including Magnetically Induced Current (GIMIC) method employing gauge-including atomic orbitals. The GIMIC calculations yield rules to estimate the global and local ring-current strengths as well as the current pathways for the hydrocarbon nanorings. For the overall antiaromatic molecules, aromatic groups such as benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene moieties localize the ring current making the global ring currents vanish. The ability of the edge groups to localize the currents is related to the aromatic character of the molecule as a whole. The local ring current prefers to follow the edges of the group. Phenalenyl corner moieties are found to introduce strong global ring currents, whereas with fused benzene and pyrene corner groups the global ring current vanishes. Fused benzene rings in the corner or along the edge of overall antiaromatic molecules sustain local ring currents of about the same size as for a free benzene molecule. For the overall aromatic molecules, the global ring current is split along the bonds of the edge moieties, but the detailed division fulfilling Kirchhoff's current law is not easily predictable and must be calculated for each individual bond. At the phenalenyl corner moieties, the global ring current follows the innermost route isolating the rest of the group from the main delocalization pathway. A hydrocarbon nanoring sustaining strong ring currents should be large and formally aromatic with many and large aromatic moieties along the edges. A clear correlation between the strength of the global ring currents and the size of the electric polarizabilities is obtained. The calculated 1H NMR shieldings of a proton in immediate contact to the global

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic free convection between vertical parallel porous plates in the presence of induced magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sarveshanand; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the steady two-dimensional hydromagnetic free convective flow of an incompressible viscous and electrically conducting fluid between two parallel vertical porous plates has been considered. The effect of induced magnetic field arising due to the motion of an electrically conducting fluid is taken into account. The governing equations of the motion are a set of simultaneous ordinary differential equations and their analytical solutions in dimensionless form have been obtained for the velocity field, the induced magnetic field and the temperature field. The expression for the induced current density has been also obtained. The effects of various non-dimensional parameters on the velocity profile, the induced magnetic field profile, the temperature profile and the induced current density profile have been shown in the graphs. It is found that the effect of suction parameter is to decrease the velocity field and induced current density while it has increasing effect on the induced magnetic field. PMID:26180753

  20. Magnetic resonant wireless power transfer for propulsion of implantable micro-robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Kim, M.; Yoo, J.; Park, H.-H.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, various types of mobile micro-robots have been proposed for medical and industrial applications. Especially in medical applications, a motor system for propulsion cannot easily be used in a micro-robot due to their small size. Therefore, micro-robots are usually actuated by controlling the magnitude and direction of an external magnetic field. However, for micro-robots, these methods in general are only applicable for moving and drilling operations, but not for the undertaking of various missions. In this paper, we propose a new micro-robot concept, which uses wireless power transfer to deliver the propulsion force and electric power simultaneously. The mechanism of Lorentz force generation and the coil design methodologies are explained, and validation of the proposed propulsion system for a micro-robot is discussed thorough a simulation and with actual measurements with up-scaled test vehicles.

  1. Experimental Studies on Flexible Forming of Sheet Metals Assisted by Magnetic Force Transfer Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Fu Jian; Wang, Mo Nan; Xu, Peng; Jin, Cheng Chuang

    2016-06-01

    To improve the thickness uniformity and increase the forming limit of sheets to enhance their overall quality, a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) was injected into the punch cavity to act as the force transfer medium and fulfill the function of flexible pressing during the sheet bulging process. The rheological properties of the MRF were changed under the influence of a magnetic field produced by loading different currents, which allowed variation of stress states and deformation modes in the 0.75-mm-thick 304 stainless steel sheets. With increasing current (up to 3.5 A), the sheet-forming limit increased by 16.13% at most, and the fracture morphology experienced a certain change. Additionally, both the bulge height and the wall thickness distribution had obvious changes with a punch stroke of 10 mm. According to the experimental analysis, the MRF can be used successfully as a pressure-carrying medium in the sheet forming process.

  2. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  3. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  4. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing (TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  5. Current-induced magnetization excitation in a pseudo-spin-valve with in-plane anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Tan, Seng Ghee

    2008-05-01

    We study the magnetization dynamics of a pseudo-spin-valve structure with in-plane anisotropy, which is induced by the passage of a perpendicular-to-plane spin-polarized current. The magnetization dynamics is described by a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which incorporates two spin torque terms. The simulation results reveal two magnetization excitation modes: (a) complete magnetization reversal and (b) persistent spin precession. The existence of these dual modes may be explained in terms of the competition between the four terms of the modified LLG equation. Our results give indications to the optimal operating conditions for current-induced magnetization dynamics for possible device applications.

  6. Measurement of evoked electroencephalography induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iramina, Keiji; Maeno, Takashi; Nonaka, Yukio; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-05-01

    This study focused on the measurement of evoked potentials induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for observing the neuronal connectivity in the brain. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) measurement system to eliminate the electromagnetic interaction emitted from TMS. EEG activities 5 ms after TMS stimulation were measured. Using this artifact free amplifier, we investigated the intensity dependence of brain activation induced by TMS. When the stimulus intensity was changed at three levels, TMS-evoked EEG responses were measured. Several components of the evoked potential appeared at 9 ms, 20 ms, and 50 ms after stimulation. A large response appeared at about 9 ms after cerebellar TMS. There was a significant dependence of these responses on the stimulus intensity. During right-hand side motor area stimulation, there was no clear peak of the wave forms within 10 ms latency. Occipital stimulation caused more evoked responses to spread to the center of the brain than at other areas of stimulation. The evoked signal by TMS was possibly conducted posteriorly to anteriorly along the pathways of the neuronal fiber exiting the cerebellum into the cerebral cortex.

  7. Ab initio calculations on magnetism induced by composite defects in magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yao-Fang; Feng, Min; Shao, Bin; Lu, Yuan; Zuo, Xu; Liu, Hong

    2014-05-07

    The local magnetic state induced by the composite defects, composed of an oxygen vacancy and a nitrogen substituting oxygen, in magnesium oxide has been studied by using ab initio calculation based on density functional theory. The calculated results show that local magnetic moment can be induced by the composite defects around the oxygen vacancy, when the exchange split of the oxygen vacancy is enhanced either by the hybridization between the N-p and nearest neighbor O-p orbitals or by applying on-site Coulomb repulsion (U) and exchange interaction (J). We show that the magnetic state induced by the composite defect is energetically more stable than the non-magnetic state. In addition, we show that the U and J applied on the p-orbitals of N and O atoms may significantly impact the calculated magnetic state of the composite defect, resulting in magnetic state for a configuration that is non-magnetic by generalized gradient approximation.

  8. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-09

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  9. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  10. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  11. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  12. Correlation between charge transfer and exchange coupling in carbon-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Nguyen, Huy Sinh; Pham, Thi Tuan Anh; Do, Viet Thang; Dam, Hieu Chi

    2015-10-15

    Several forms of carbon-based magnetic materials, i.e. single radicals, radical dimers, and alternating stacks of radicals and diamagnetic molecules, have been investigated using density-functional theory with dispersion correction and full geometry optimization. Our calculated results demonstrate that the C{sub 31}H{sub 15} (R{sub 4}) radical has a spin of ½. However, in its [R{sub 4}]{sub 2} dimer structure, the net spin becomes zero due to antiferromagnetic spin-exchange between radicals. To avoid antiferromagnetic spin-exchange of identical face-to-face radicals, eight alternating stacks, R{sub 4}/D{sub 2m}/R{sub 4} (with m = 3-10), were designed. Our calculated results show that charge transfer (Δn) between R{sub 4} radicals and the diamagnetic molecule D{sub 2m} occurs with a mechanism of spin exchange (J) in stacks. The more electrons that transfer from R{sub 4} to D{sub 2m}, the stronger the ferromagnetic spin-exchange in stacks. In addition, our calculated results show that Δn can be tailored by adjusting the electron affinity (E{sub a}) of D{sub 2m}. The correlation between Δn, E{sub a}, m, and J is discussed. These results give some hints for the design of new ferromagnetic carbon-based materials.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer Characteristics in Microwave Heating of Magnetic Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Park, Chong-Lyuck; Kim, Byoung-Gon; Onyedika, Gerald

    2012-03-01

    A numerical simulation of heat transfer during the microwave heating process of magnetite, which is a two-dimensional (2-D) magnetic dielectric, subjected to heat conduction, convection, and radiation was performed. The heat transfer process was modeled using an explicit finite-difference approach, and the temperature profiles for different heating parameters were generated through developing a code in Mathematica 7.0 (Wolfram Research, Inc., Champaign, IL). The temperature in the sample increases rapidly in 1 minute and nonuniform temperature distribution inside the object is observed. An obvious temperature hot spot is formed in the corner of the predicted temperature profile initially, which shifts to the center of the object as heating power increases. Microwave heating at 915 MHz exhibits better heating uniformity than 2450 MHz mainly because of the larger microwave penetration depth. It is also observed that the heating homogeneity in the object can be improved by reducing the dimension of object. The effects of heating time, microwave power, microwave frequency, and object dimension need to be considered to obtain high heating performance and avoid/minimize thermal runaway resulting from temperature nonuniformity in large-scale microwave heating.

  14. Bond-order potential for magnetic body-centered-cubic iron and its transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Shen; Mrovec, M.; Vitek, V.

    2016-06-01

    We derived and thoroughly tested a bond-order potential (BOP) for body-centered-cubic (bcc) magnetic iron that can be employed in atomistic calculations of a broad variety of crystal defects that control structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of this technologically important metal. The constructed BOP reflects correctly the mixed nearly free electron and covalent bonding arising from the partially filled d band as well as the ferromagnetism that is actually responsible for the stability of the bcc structure of iron at low temperatures. The covalent part of the cohesive energy is determined within the tight-binding bond model with the Green's function of the Schrödinger equation determined using the method of continued fractions terminated at a sufficient level of the moments of the density of states. This makes the BOP an O (N ) method usable for very large numbers of particles. Only d d bonds are included explicitly, but the effect of s electrons on the covalent energy is included via their screening of the corresponding d d bonds. The magnetic part of the cohesive energy is included using the Stoner model of itinerant magnetism. The repulsive part of the cohesive energy is represented, as in any tight-binding scheme, by an empirical formula. Its functional form is physically justified by studies of the repulsion in face-centered-cubic (fcc) solid argon under very high pressure where the repulsion originates from overlapping s and p closed-shell electrons just as it does from closed-shell s electrons in transition metals squeezed into the ion core under the influence of the large covalent d bonding. Testing of the transferability of the developed BOP to environments significantly different from those of the ideal bcc lattice was carried out by studying crystal structures and magnetic states alternative to the ferromagnetic bcc lattice, vacancies, divacancies, self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), paths continuously transforming the bcc structure to

  15. Spin-transfer torque based damping control of parametrically excited spin waves in a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, V.; Bozhko, D. A.; Brächer, T.; Pirro, P.; Vasyuchka, V. I.; Serga, A. A.; Jungfleisch, M. B.; Agrawal, M.; Kobljanskyj, Yu. V.; Melkov, G. A.; Dubs, C.; Hillebrands, B.; Chumak, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The damping of spin waves parametrically excited in the magnetic insulator Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) is controlled by a dc current passed through an adjacent normal-metal film. The experiment is performed on a macroscopically sized YIG(100 nm)/Pt(10 nm) bilayer of 4 × 2 mm2 lateral dimensions. The spin-wave relaxation frequency is determined via the threshold of the parametric instability measured by Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. The application of a dc current to the Pt film leads to the formation of a spin-polarized electron current normal to the film plane due to the spin Hall effect. This spin current exerts a spin transfer torque in the YIG film and, thus, changes the spin-wave damping. Depending on the polarity of the applied dc current with respect to the magnetization direction, the damping can be increased or decreased. The magnitude of its variation is proportional to the applied current. A variation in the relaxation frequency of ± 7.5 % is achieved for an applied dc current density of 5 × 1010 A/m2.

  16. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  17. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  18. Asymmetric angular dependence of spin-transfer torques in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ling; Xu, Zhi-Jun; Zuo, Xian-Jun; Yang, Ze-Jin; Gao, Qing-He; Linghu, Rong-Feng; Guo, Yun-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Using a first-principles noncollinear wave-function-matching method, we studied the spin-transfer torques (STTs) in CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe(001) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), where three different types of B-doped MgO in the spacer are considered, including B atoms replacing Mg atoms (Mg3BO4), B atoms replacing O atoms (Mg4BO3), and B atoms occupying interstitial positions (Mg4BO4) in MgO. A strong asymmetric angular dependence of STT can be obtained both in ballistic CoFe/Mg3BO4 and CoFe/Mg4BO4 based MTJs, whereas a nearly symmetric STT curve is observed in the junctions based on CoFe/Mg4BO3. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the angular dependence of STT can be suppressed significantly by the disorder of B distribution. Such skewness of STTs in the CoFe/Mg-B-O/CoFe MTJs could be attributed to the interfacial resonance states induced by the B diffusion into MgO spacer.

  19. Probing the spin polarization of current by soft x-ray imaging of current-induced magnetic vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Shinya; Fischer, Peter; Im, Mi-Young; Yamada, Keisuke; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Kohno, Hiroshi; Ono, Teruo

    2008-12-09

    Time-resolved soft X-ray transmission microscopy is applied to image the current-induced resonant dynamics of the magnetic vortex core realized in a micron-sized Permalloy disk. The high spatial resolution better than 25 nm enables us to observe the resonant motion of the vortex core. The result also provides the spin polarization of the current to be 0.67 {+-} 0.16 for Permalloy by fitting the experimental results with an analytical model in the framework of the spin-transfer torque.

  20. A multitheragnostic nanobubble system to induce blood-brain barrier disruption with magnetically guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Yang; Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hung; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Chi, Huei-Shang; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-27

    A novel magnetically guidable nanobubble is designed for disrupting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by combining magnetic guidance with focused ultrasound in vivo. The magnetic-nanobubble platform also demonstrates the potential to serve as a unique theranostic tool via performing focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced BBB disruption and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound dual-modality contrast-agent imaging to improve the drug delivery of therapeutic substances or gene therapy into the central nervous system. PMID:25472627

  1. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  2. Intercellular transfer of small RNAs from astrocytes to lung tumor cells induces resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Menachem, Assaf; Makovski, Victoria; Bodner, Or; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Stein, Reuven; Shomron, Noam; Kloog, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are resistant to chemotherapy and carry a poor prognosis. Studies have shown that tumor cells are surrounded by activated astrocytes, whose cytoprotective properties they exploit for protection from chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. The mechanism of such astrocytic protection is poorly understood. A non-mutational mechanism of resistance to chemotherapy that is receiving increased attention is the regulation of gene translation mediated by small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), and particularly microRNAs (miRNAs). With the aim of examining the role of astrocytic sRNAs in promoting resistance of human lung tumor PC14 cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, here we used a miRNA microarray to compare sRNA profiles of human lung tumor cells cultured with and without astrocytes. We found that sRNAs are transferred from astrocytes to PC14 cells in a contact-dependent manner. Transfer was rapid, reaching a plateau after only 6 hours in culture. The sRNA transfer was inhibited by the broad-spectrum gap-junction antagonist carbenoxolone, indicating that transfer occurs via gap junctions. Among the transferred sRNAs were several that are implicated in survival pathways. Enforced expression of these sRNAs in PC14 cells increased their resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These novel findings might be of clinical relevance for the treatment of patients with brain metastases. PMID:26871466

  3. Observatory geoelectric fields induced in a two-layer lithosphere during magnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Swidinsky, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of an algorithm for estimating geoelectric fields induced in the lithosphere beneath an observatory during a magnetic storm. To accommodate induction in three-dimensional lithospheric electrical conductivity, we analyze a simple nine-parameter model: two horizontal layers, each with uniform electrical conductivity properties given by independent distortion tensors. With Laplace transformation of the induction equations into the complex frequency domain, we obtain a transfer function describing induction of observatory geoelectric fields having frequency-dependent polarization. Upon inverse transformation back to the time domain, the convolution of the corresponding impulse-response function with a geomagnetic time series yields an estimated geoelectric time series. We obtain an optimized set of conductivity parameters using 1-s resolution geomagnetic and geoelectric field data collected at the Kakioka, Japan, observatory for five different intense magnetic storms, including the October 2003 Halloween storm; our estimated geoelectric field accounts for 93% of that measured during the Halloween storm. This work demonstrates the need for detailed modeling of the Earth’s lithospheric conductivity structure and the utility of co-located geomagnetic and geoelectric monitoring.

  4. Time causal operational estimation of electric fields induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Swidinsky, Andrei

    2014-04-01

    In support of projects for monitoring geomagnetic hazards for electric power grids, we develop a simple mathematical formalism, consistent with the time causality of deterministic physics, for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms. For an idealized model of the lithosphere, an infinite half-space having uniform electrical conductivity properties described by a galvanic tensor, we work in the Laplace-transformed frequency domain to obtain a transfer function which, when convolved with measured magnetic field time series, gives an estimated electric field time series. Using data collected at the Kakioka, Japan observatory, we optimize lithospheric conductivity parameters by minimizing the discrepancy between model-estimated electric field variation and that actually measured. With our simple model, we can estimate 87% of the variance in storm time Kakioka electric field data; a more complicated model of lithospheric conductivity would be required to estimate the remaining 13% of the variance. We discuss how our estimation formalism might be implemented for geographically coordinated real-time monitoring of geoelectric fields.

  5. Finite element modeling study of the suppression effect of external high magnetic field on the heat transfer of tungsten melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, S.; Jia, Y.; Gao, S.; Yuan, Y.; Li, C.; Lian, Y.; Liu, X.; Liu, W.

    2016-02-01

    Finite element modeling analysis has been employed to simulate the melt layer motion of tungsten and tungsten-based materials under high magnetic field. High heat flux of 2 GW m-2 was loaded for 3 ms at 1000 K and provided a molten bath. Meanwhile, high magnetic field from 0 to 8 T was loaded during the simulation. Both positive and negative surface tension temperature coefficient was tested. The result shows that the convention forced by the surface tension is suppressed by the magnetic field. The high magnetic field performs as a resistance of the heat transfer, leading to a reduced molten bath. The magnetic field mitigates the melting behaviur of the tungsten materials.

  6. Simulation of electromagnetically and magnetically induced transparency in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, M. S.; Wurtele, J. S.; Shvets, G.

    2003-07-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), a phenomenon well known in atomic systems, has a natural analogy in a classical magnetized plasma. The magnetized plasma has a resonance for right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves at the electron cyclotron frequency Ω0, so that a probe wave with frequency ω1=Ω0 cannot propagate through the plasma. The plasma can be made transparent to such a probe by the presence of a pump wave. The pump may be an electromagnetic wave or magnetostatic wiggler. Simulations and theory show that the physical reason for the transparency is that the beating of the probe wave with the pump wave sets up a plasma oscillation, and the upper sideband of the pump wave cancels the resonant plasma current due to the probe. The theory of plasma EIT derived here extends that found in the earlier work to include the effects of the lower sideband of the pump and renormalization of the plasma frequency and an analysis of the transient response. A detailed comparison of theory to one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations is presented and estimates for the performance ion accelerator using the EIT interaction are given. The dispersion relation and estimates for the phase velocity and amplitude of the plasma wave are in good agreement with particle-in-cell simulations.

  7. Au25 Clusters as Electron-Transfer Catalysts Induced the Intramolecular Cascade Reaction of 2-nitrobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Wang, Shuxin; Fu, Fangyu; Xiang, Ji; Zhu, Manzhou; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Design of atomically precise metal nanocluster catalysts is of great importance in understanding the essence of the catalytic reactions at the atomic level. Here, for the first time, Au25z nanoslusters were employed as electron transfer catalysts to induce an intramolecular cascade reaction at ambient conditions and gave rise to high conversion (87%) and selectivity (96%). Electron spin-resonance spectra indeed confirmed the consecutive electron transfer process and the formation of N radical. UV-vis absorption spectra also verified Au25z was intact after the catalytic circle. Our research may open up wide opportunities for extensive organic reactions catalyzed by Au25z. PMID:24225495

  8. Excitation of the ligand-to-metal charge transfer band induces electron tunnelling in azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, Chiara; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2014-03-03

    Optical excitation of azurin blue copper protein immobilized on indium-tin oxide, in resonance with its ligand-to-metal charge transfer absorption band, resulted in a light-induced current tunnelling within the protein milieu. The related electron transport rate is estimated to be about 10{sup 5} s{sup −1}. A model based on resonant tunnelling through an azurin excited molecular state is proposed. The capability of controlling electron transfer processes through light pulses opens interesting perspectives for implementation of azurin in bio-nano-opto-electronic devices.

  9. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed. PMID:26832524

  10. A study of the mechanism of metal deposition by the laser-induced forward transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Jette, A. N.; Thompson, P.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique for transferring metal features from a film to a substrate is examined by using the one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation with a moving solid-melt boundary to model the heating, melting, and vaporization of the metal film by the laser. For typical LIFT conditions the calculations show that the back of the film (i.e., the part exposed to the laser) will reach the boiling point before the film melts through, which supports the qualitative picture that the LIFT process involves vapor-driven propulsion of metal from the film onto the target.

  11. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  12. 1Application of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Magnetic Twisting Cytometry to Quantitate Mechano-Chemical Signaling Activities in a Living Cell

    PubMed Central

    Na, Sungsoo; Wang, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and then convert them into biochemical signaling. Recently we showed that mechanical stress is transduced from the cell surface to remote cytoplasmic sites within 0.3 s, which is at least 40 to 50 times faster than soluble factor-induced signal transduction, and the sites of mechanotransduction colocalize with sites where mechanical stress causes microtubule displacement. These results suggest that mechanotransduction employs mechanisms different from those of soluble factor-induced signal transduction. Here we describe a protocol that utilizes fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and a magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) device to capture rapid mechano-chemical signaling activities in living cells. PMID:18728305

  13. Structuralization induced by the photothermal effect in magnetic fluid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timko, M.; Kopčanský, P.; Repašan, M.; Koneracká, M.; Hnatič, M.; Džarová, A.; Štelina, J.; Musil, C.; Ayrjan, E.

    2008-05-01

    The structuralization of magnetic particles after illumination was experimentally observed in two types of a magnetic fluid based on mineral oil with the magnetite particles covered by monolayer surfactant and kerosene-based magnetic fluid sterically stabilized by a double layer consisting of oleic acid and dodecylbenzensulphonic acid (DBS). This contribution presents a detailed theoretical description of the thermodiffusion process in magnetic fluids, simulation of the structuralization in magnetic fluid with a negative Soret constant, and confirmaton of the negative value of this constant for a kerosene-based magnetic fluid.

  14. Laser-Induced Forward Transfer Using Triazene Polymer Dynamic Releaser Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, James Shaw; Lippert, Thomas; Nagel, Matthias; Nüesch, Frank; Wokaun, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This article presents a short review of the use of triazene polymer as a dynamic release layer (DRL) for laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), before looking at the latest research in more detail. The field of triazene polymer ablation only started around 20 years ago and has grown rapidly into a number of different application areas. Most promisingly, triazene ablation has been refined as a method for propulsion, bringing the benefits of LIFT to the deposition of sensitive transfer materials. The key to understanding LIFT with a triazene DRL is to understand the more fundamental nature of triazene polymer ablation in both frontside and backside orientations. This article focuses on the most recent experimental results on LIFT with a triazene DRL: the effect of picosecond pulse lengths compared with nanosecond pulse lengths; the effect of reduced air pressure; and the improvements in transfer in terms of range of transfer materials, and transfer across a gap. The results all help improve fundamental understanding of triazene-based LIFT, and the transfer of functioning OLEDs demonstrates the capability of the technique.

  15. Study of the laser-induced forward transfer of liquids for laser bioprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing patterns of diverse materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. In conventional LIFT a small fraction of a solid thin film is vaporized by means of a laser pulse focused on the film through its transparent holder, and the resulting material recondenses on the receptor substrate. It has been recently shown that LIFT can also be used to transfer materials from liquid films. This widened its field of application to biosensors manufacturing, where small amounts of biomolecules-containing solutions have to be deposited with high precision on the sensing elements. However, there is still little knowledge on the physical processes and parameters determining the characteristics of the transfers. In this work, different parameters and their effects upon the transferred material were studied. It was found that the deposited material corresponds to liquid droplets which volume depends linearly on the laser pulse energy, and that a minimum threshold energy has to be overcome for transfer to occur. The liquid film thickness was varied and droplets as small as 10 μm in diameter were obtained. Finally, the effects of the variation of the film to substrate distance were also studied and it was found that there exists a wide range of distances where the morphology of the transferred droplets is independent of this parameter, what provides LIFT with a high degree of flexibility.

  16. Effect of Adoptive Transfer or Depletion of Regulatory T Cells on Triptolide-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinzhi; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) in triptolide (TP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 h after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levels of transcription factor Forkhead box P3 and retinoid orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt), interleukin-10 (IL-10), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated. Results: During TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while T helper 17 cells cell-transcription factor RORγt, SOCS and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1, and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3, and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. Conclusion: These results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27148057

  17. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  18. A potential diagnostic application of magnetization transfer contrast: an in vitro NMR study of excised human thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callicott, C.; Goode, A. W.

    1998-03-01

    A series of freshly excised thyroid tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histo-pathology examination. Whilst simple values for normal tissue and goitre are not significantly different, the degree of intra-subject and variability is shown to be an indicator of benign thyroid disease. Using data collected from an inversion-recovery sequence performed with and without magnetization transfer, a magnetization transfer rate constant was calculated for each tissue sample. These data suggest that this parameter may provide in vivo discrimination between follicular cancer and follicular adenoma.

  19. Magnetization-induced enhancement of photoluminescence in core-shell CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} composite

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yanmin E-mail: wuzheng@zjnu.cn; Zhou, Zhihua; Wei, Yongbin; Wu, Zheng E-mail: wuzheng@zjnu.cn; Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Yihe; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-12-07

    After the core-shell CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} composite synthesized through a facile sol-gel method was magnetized under an external magnetic field of 0.25 T for 4 h, an enhancement of ∼56% in photoluminescence intensity was observed. The remanent magnetization of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core increases the intensity of the excited charge transfer transition of VO{sub 4}{sup 3−} group in YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} shell, which may enhance the probability related to the Eu{sup 3+} radiative transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 2}, yielding to a high photoluminescence. The obvious remanent-magnetization-induced enhancement in photoluminescence is helpful in developing excellent magnetic/luminescent material for the practical display devices.

  20. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  1. Competing magnetic phases and field-induced dynamics in DyRuAsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Michael A.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; May, Andrew F.; Sales, Brian C.

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of neutron diffraction, dc magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity for DyRuAsO in an applied magnetic field are presented at temperatures near and below those at which the structural distortion (TS=25 K) and subsequent magnetic ordering (TN=10.5 K) take place. Powder neutron diffraction is used to determine the antiferromagnetic order of Dy moments of magnitude 7.6(1)μB in the absence of a magnetic field, and demonstrate the reorientation of the moments into a ferromagnetic configuration upon application of a magnetic field. Dy magnetism is identified as the driving force for the structural distortion. The magnetic structure of analogous TbRuAsO is also reported. Competition between the two magnetically ordered states in DyRuAsO is found to produce unusual physical properties in applied magnetic fields at low temperature. An additional phase transition near T*=3 K is observed in heat capacity and other properties in fields ≳3 T. Magnetic fields of this magnitude also induce spin-glass-like behavior including thermal and magnetic hysteresis, divergence of zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetization, frequency dependent anomalies in ac magnetic susceptibility, and slow relaxation of the magnetization. This is remarkable since DyRuAsO is a stoichiometric material with no disorder detected by neutron diffraction, and suggests analogies with spin-ice compounds and related materials with strong geometric frustration.

  2. Light induced magnetic properties of spiropyrane tris(oxalato)chromate (III) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Morgunov, R.B.; Mushenok, F.B.; Aldoshin, S.M.; Yur'eva, E.A.; Shilov, G.V.; Tanimoto, Y.

    2009-06-15

    The effect of UV light on Weiss temperature and ESR spectra in 1-isopropyl-3, 3, 5', 6'-tetramethylspiro[indolin-2,2'-[2H]pyrano[3,2-b]pyridinium] tris(oxalato)chromate (III) (Sp{sub 3}Cr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}) has been found. Additional line has been observed in the ESR spectra of irradiated samples in 'strong' magnetic fields of {approx}15 kOe. The analysis of angular dependences of the ESR spectra allowed a contribution of Cr{sup 3+} ions to magnetic properties of Sp{sub 3}Cr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3} to be determined. The zero-field splitting parameters D=0.619 cm{sup -1}, E=0.024 cm{sup -1} were derived from the experimental data. The parameters were typical for Cr{sup 3+} in the chromium oxalate. Weiss temperature changed sign from 25 to -25 K under UV irradiation. The value of Weiss temperature and its changing cannot be explained by exchange interaction, dipole-dipole interaction or the effect of crystal field. The existence of Weiss temperature is explained by the changes in amount and spin of paramagnetic particles. The change is due to thermoactivated redistribution of electrons between chromium ions and spiropyrane molecules. Light-induced transfer of electrons is also explaining the change in sign of Weiss temperature under UV irradiation. - Graphical abstract: Fragment of crystal structure of (Sp{sub 3}Cr(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}). Temperature dependences of reciprocal molar magnetic moment of the sample at T=2 K: (1) before irradiation, and (2) after UV irradiation.

  3. Micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave normal modes and the spin-transfer-torque driven magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cross

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Tanmoy Roy, Urmimala; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Tsoi, Maxim

    2014-05-07

    We studied spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching of a cross-shaped magnetic tunnel junction in a recent report [Roy et al., J. Appl. Phys. 113, 223904 (2013)]. In that structure, the free layer is designed to have four stable energy states using the shape anisotropy of a cross. STT switching showed different regions with increasing current density. Here, we employ the micromagnetic spectral mapping technique in an attempt to understand how the asymmetry of cross dimensions and spin polarization direction of the injected current affect the magnetization dynamics. We compute spatially averaged frequency-domain spectrum of the time-domain magnetization dynamics in the presence of the current-induced STT term. At low currents, the asymmetry of polarization direction and that of the arms are observed to cause a splitting of the excited frequency modes. Higher harmonics are also observed, presumably due to spin-wave wells caused by the regions of spatially non-uniform effective magnetic field. The results could be used towards designing a multi-bit-per-cell STT-based random access memory with an improved storage density.

  4. Investigation of Heat Transfer in Mini Channels using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøgild, M. R.; Poulsen, J. L.; Rath, E. Z.; Sørensen, H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an experimental investigation of the heat transfer in mini channels with a hydraulic diameter of 889 μm is conducted. The method used is planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF), which uses the principle of laser excitation of rhodamine B in water. The goal of this study is to validate the applicability of PLIF to determine the convective heat transfer coefficient in mini channels against conventional correlations of the convective heat transfer coefficient. The applicability of the conventional theory in micro and mini channels has been discussed by several researchers, but to the authors knowledge the applicability of PLIF to validate this has not yet been investigated thoroughly. The experiment shows good agreement to the conventional correlation, and the resolution of the temperature gradient at the wall is found sufficiently accurate in certain areas. However, PLIF is not found satisfactory over the whole domain, and the limitations and errors are analysed.

  5. Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Homogenous 2-Hydroxypyridine Dimer Electron Induced Proton Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlk, Alexandra; Stokes, Sarah; Wang, Yi; Hicks, Zachary; Zhang, Xinxing; Blando, Nicolas; Frock, Andrew; Marquez, Sara; Bowen, Kit; Bowen Lab JHU Team

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopic (PES) and density functional theory (DFT) studies on the dimer anion of (2-hydroxypyridine)2-are reported. The experimentally measured vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 1.21eV compares well with the theoretically predicted values. The 2-hydroxypyridine anionic dimer system was investigated because of its resemblance to the nitrogenous heterocyclic pyrimidine nucleobases. Experimental and theoretical results show electron induced proton transfer (EIPT) in both the lactim and lactam homogeneous dimers. Upon electron attachment, the anion can serve as the intermediate between the two neutral dimers. A possible double proton transfer process can occur from the neutral (2-hydroxypyridine)2 to (2-pyridone)2 through the dimer anion. This potentially suggests an electron catalyzed double proton transfer mechanism of tautomerization. Research supported by the NSF Grant No. CHE-1360692.

  6. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, V; Pranculis, V; Melianas, A; Inganäs, O; Gulbinas, V; Abramavicius, D

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  7. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  8. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Li, Yong; Song, Z.; Sun, C.-P.

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus, which is a gapped system induced by the impurity. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations for finite system show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  9. Ultrasonic propagation: a technique to reveal field induced structures in magnetic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Kinnari; Patel, Jaykumar; Upadhyay, R V

    2015-07-01

    The paper reports the study of magnetic field induced structures in magnetic nanofluid investigated through ultrasonic wave propagation. Modified Tarapov's theory is used to study variation in velocity anisotropy with magnetic field. The types of field induced structures depend upon the chemical structure of the carrier in which magnetic nanoparticles are dispersed. Our study indicates formation of fractals and chain respectively, in transformer oil and kerosene based fluid. This difference is explained on the basis of particle-particle interaction and particle-medium interaction. PMID:25791205

  10. [Viral transfer of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Wędrowska, Ewelina; Wandtke, Tomasz; Dyczek, Andrzej; Woźniak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces carcinoma cell death through the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Preclinical trials of gene therapy have been conducted using viral transfer of the TRAIL transgene into prostate, bladder, breast, kidney, liver, non-small cell lung cancer and also glioblastoma cells. Experiments in vitro demonstrated the extensive apoptosis of target cells as well as frequent disease regression or remission. TRAIL transfer did not show any side effects, opposite to chemotherapy. Encouraging results of TRAIL-related gene therapy were observed in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (AdV) encoding TRAIL are the most promising tool in anti-tumor therapy. They have undergone numerous modifications by increasing transfection efficiency and transgene expression in target cells. However, only one clinical phase I trial has been performed. AdV encoding the TRAIL transgene caused local inflammation and apoptosis in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27259213

  11. 3-D joint inversion of the magnetotelluric phase tensor and vertical magnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver; Egbert, Gary D.

    2015-11-01

    With advancing computational resources, 3-D inversion techniques have become feasible in recent years and are now a more widely used tool for magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. Galvanic distortion caused by small-scale near-surface inhomogeneities remains an obstacle for 3-D MT inversion which so far has experienced little attention. If not considered properly, the effect on 3-D inversion can be immense and result in erroneous subsurface models and interpretations. To tackle the problem we implemented inversion of the distortion-free phase tensor into the ModEM inversion package. The dimensionless phase tensor components describe only variations of the conductivity structure. When inverting these data, particular care has to be taken of the conductivity structure in the a priori model, which provides the reference frame when transferring the information from phase tensors into absolute conductivity values. Our results obtained with synthetic data show that phase tensor inversion can recover the regional conductivity structure in presence of galvanic distortion if the a priori model provides a reasonable assumption for the regional resistivity average. Joint inversion of phase tensor data and vertical magnetic transfer functions improves recovery of the absolute resistivity structure and is less dependent on the prior model. We also used phase tensor inversion for a data set of more than 250 MT sites from the central San Andreas fault, California, where a number of sites showed significant galvanic distortion. We find the regional structure of the phase tensor inversion results compatible with previously obtained models from impedance inversion. In the vicinity of distorted sites, phase tensor inversion models exhibit more homogeneous/smoother conductivity structures.

  12. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle

    PubMed Central

    Savage, David B.; Williams, Guy B.; Porter, David; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the 31P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. PMID:26744504

  13. Electric tuning of magnetization dynamics and electric field-induced negative magnetic permeability in nanoscale composite multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Berakdar, Jamal; Xue, Desheng

    2015-06-01

    Steering magnetism by electric fields upon interfacing ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) materials to achieve an emergent multiferroic response bears a great potential for nano-scale devices with novel functionalities. FM/FE heterostructures allow, for instance, the electrical manipulation of magnetic anisotropy via interfacial magnetoelectric (ME) couplings. A charge-mediated ME effect is believed to be generally weak and active in only a few angstroms. Here we present an experimental evidence uncovering a new magnon-driven, strong ME effect acting on the nanometer range. For Co92Zr8 (20 nm) film deposited on ferroelectric PMN-PT we show via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) that this type of linear ME allows for electrical control of simultaneously the magnetization precession and its damping, both of which are key elements for magnetic switching and spintronics. The experiments unravel further an electric-field-induced negative magnetic permeability effect.

  14. Electric tuning of magnetization dynamics and electric field-induced negative magnetic permeability in nanoscale composite multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Berakdar, Jamal; Xue, Desheng

    2015-01-01

    Steering magnetism by electric fields upon interfacing ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) materials to achieve an emergent multiferroic response bears a great potential for nano-scale devices with novel functionalities. FM/FE heterostructures allow, for instance, the electrical manipulation of magnetic anisotropy via interfacial magnetoelectric (ME) couplings. A charge-mediated ME effect is believed to be generally weak and active in only a few angstroms. Here we present an experimental evidence uncovering a new magnon-driven, strong ME effect acting on the nanometer range. For Co92Zr8 (20 nm) film deposited on ferroelectric PMN-PT we show via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) that this type of linear ME allows for electrical control of simultaneously the magnetization precession and its damping, both of which are key elements for magnetic switching and spintronics. The experiments unravel further an electric-field-induced negative magnetic permeability effect. PMID:26058060

  15. Electric tuning of magnetization dynamics and electric field-induced negative magnetic permeability in nanoscale composite multiferroics

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Berakdar, Jamal; Xue, Desheng

    2015-01-01

    Steering magnetism by electric fields upon interfacing ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) materials to achieve an emergent multiferroic response bears a great potential for nano-scale devices with novel functionalities. FM/FE heterostructures allow, for instance, the electrical manipulation of magnetic anisotropy via interfacial magnetoelectric (ME) couplings. A charge-mediated ME effect is believed to be generally weak and active in only a few angstroms. Here we present an experimental evidence uncovering a new magnon-driven, strong ME effect acting on the nanometer range. For Co92Zr8 (20 nm) film deposited on ferroelectric PMN-PT we show via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) that this type of linear ME allows for electrical control of simultaneously the magnetization precession and its damping, both of which are key elements for magnetic switching and spintronics. The experiments unravel further an electric-field-induced negative magnetic permeability effect. PMID:26058060

  16. Effect of shear and magnetic field on the heat-transfer efficiency of convection in rotating spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. K.; Gastine, T.; Christensen, U. R.; Duarte, L. D. V.; Reiners, A.

    2016-02-01

    We study rotating thermal convection in spherical shells as prototype for flow in the cores of terrestrial planets, gas planets or in stars. We base our analysis on a set of about 450 direct numerical simulations of the (magneto)hydrodynamic equations under the Boussinesq approximation. The Ekman number ranges from 10-3 to 10-5. The supercriticality of the convection reaches about 1000 in some models. Four sets of simulations are considered: non-magnetic simulations and dynamo simulations with either free-slip or no-slip flow boundary conditions. The non-magnetic setup with free-slip boundaries generates the strongest zonal flows. Both non-magnetic simulations with no-slip flow boundary conditions and self-consistent dynamos with free-slip boundaries have drastically reduced zonal-flows. Suppression of shear leads to a substantial gain in heat-transfer efficiency, increasing by a factor of 3 in some cases. Such efficiency enhancement occurs as long as the convection is significantly influenced by rotation. At higher convective driving the heat-transfer efficiency tends towards that of the classical non-rotating Rayleigh-Bénard system. Analysis of the latitudinal distribution of heat flow at the outer boundary reveals that the shear is most effective at suppressing heat-transfer in the equatorial regions. Simulations with convection zones of different thickness show that the zonal flows become less energetic in thicker shells, and, therefore, their effect on heat-transfer efficiency decreases. Furthermore, we explore the influence of the magnetic field on the non-zonal flow components of the convection. For this we compare the heat-transfer efficiency of no-slip non-magnetic cases with that of the no-slip dynamo simulations. We find that at E = 10-5 magnetic field significantly affects the convection and a maximum gain of about 30 per cent (as compared to the non-magnetic case) in heat-transfer efficiency is obtained for an Elsasser number of about 3. Our analysis

  17. Conjugative DNA transfer induces the bacterial SOS response and promotes antibiotic resistance development through integron activation.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bikard, David; Mazel, Didier

    2010-10-01

    Conjugation is one mechanism for intra- and inter-species horizontal gene transfer among bacteria. Conjugative elements have been instrumental in many bacterial species to face the threat of antibiotics, by allowing them to evolve and adapt to these hostile conditions. Conjugative plasmids are transferred to plasmidless recipient cells as single-stranded DNA. We used lacZ and gfp fusions to address whether conjugation induces the SOS response and the integron integrase. The SOS response controls a series of genes responsible for DNA damage repair, which can lead to recombination and mutagenesis. In this manuscript, we show that conjugative transfer of ssDNA induces the bacterial SOS stress response, unless an anti-SOS factor is present to alleviate this response. We also show that integron integrases are up-regulated during this process, resulting in increased cassette rearrangements. Moreover, the data we obtained using broad and narrow host range plasmids strongly suggests that plasmid transfer, even abortive, can trigger chromosomal gene rearrangements and transcriptional switches in the recipient cell. Our results highlight the importance of environments concentrating disparate bacterial communities as reactors for extensive genetic adaptation of bacteria. PMID:20975940

  18. Quantum state transfer in XXZ spin chains: A measurement induced transport method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyandeh, Sima; Shahbazi, Farhad

    2015-05-01

    We study the information transferring ability of a spin-1/2 XXZ Hamiltonian for two different proposals of state transfer, namely, the well-studied attaching scenario and the recently proposed measurement induced transport. The latter one has been inspired by recent achievements in optical lattice experiments for local addressability of individual atoms and their time evolution when only local rotations and measurements are available and local control of the Hamiltonian is very limited. We show that while the both scenarios performs with almost similar quality in the case of non-interacting free fermionic XX phase, the difference become more pronounced around the isotropic Heisenberg point. Our study shows that the presence of spin-flip symmetry plays a key point in the quality of state transfer and each scenario which benefits from this symmetry transfers the quantum states with higher fidelity. In fact, for even chains this symmetry exists only for the measurement induced dynamics which then gives higher transport quality and for odd chains the spin-flip symmetry is only valid for the attaching scenarios which become more superior. We also study the effect of thermal fluctuations and environmental interactions on both scenarios.

  19. Time-resolved digital holographic microscopy of laser-induced forward transfer process

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H.; Venugopalan, V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a method for time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to obtain time-resolved 3-D deformation measurements of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) processes. We demonstrate nanometer axial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution of our method which is suitable for measuring dynamic morphological changes in LIFT target materials. Such measurements provide insight into the early dynamics of the LIFT process and a means to examine the effect of laser and material parameters on LIFT process dynamics. PMID:24748724

  20. Time-resolved digital holographic microscopy of laser-induced forward transfer process.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Venugopalan, V

    2014-03-01

    We develop a method for time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to obtain time-resolved 3-D deformation measurements of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) processes. We demonstrate nanometer axial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution of our method which is suitable for measuring dynamic morphological changes in LIFT target materials. Such measurements provide insight into the early dynamics of the LIFT process and a means to examine the effect of laser and material parameters on LIFT process dynamics. PMID:24748724

  1. Utilising tetraphenylethene as a dual activator for intramolecular charge transfer and aggregation induced emission.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Feng; Aldred, Matthew P; Gong, Wen-Liang; Li, Chong; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2012-08-11

    We report a simple design and synthesis of a donor-acceptor tetraphenylethene-naphthalimide (TPE-NI) dyad, in which TPE acts both as an electron-donor for intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and activator for aggregation induced emission (AIE). Strong solvent-dependent photoluminescence covering almost the whole visible spectrum and AIE in its nanoparticle state compared to its solution state are demonstrated. PMID:22745935

  2. Shadowgraphic studies of triazene assisted laser-induced forward transfer of ceramic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, K. S.; May-Smith, T. C.; Banks, D. P.; Grivas, C.; Eason, R. W.; Fardel, R.; Nagel, M.; Lippert, T.

    2009-06-01

    The laser-induced forward transfer process of solid ceramic donor materials (gadolinium gallium oxide and ytterbium doped yttrium aluminium oxide) was studied using triazene polymer as a sacrificial layer by means of a time-resolved nanosecond-shadowgraphy technique. The dependence of the ablation dynamics and quality of the ejected donor material on the laser fluence and thickness of the sacrificial and donor layers were investigated and discussed.

  3. Effects of hole doping by neutron irradiation of magnetic field induced electronic phase transitions in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Yaguchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated effects of hole doping by fast-neutron irradiation on the magnetic-field induced phase transitions in graphite using specimens irradiated with fast neutrons. Resistance measurements have been done in magnetic fields of up to above 50 T and at temperatures down to about 1.5 K. The neutron irradiation creates lattice defects acting as acceptors, affecting the imbalance of the electron and hole densities and the Fermi level. We have found that the reentrant field from the field induced state back to the normal state shifts towards a lower field with hole doping, suggestive of the participation of electron subbands in the magnetic-field induced state.

  4. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  5. Optimization of wireless power transfer via magnetic resonance in different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonah, Olutola

    A wide range of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for the monitoring the health of concrete structure has been studied for several years. The recent rapid evolution of wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies has resulted in the development of sensing elements that can be embedded in concrete, to monitor the health of infrastructure, collect and report valuable related data. The monitoring system can potentially decrease the high installation time and reduce maintenance cost associated with wired monitoring systems. The monitoring sensors need to operate for a long period of time, but sensors batteries have a finite life span. Hence, novel wireless powering methods must be devised. The optimization of wireless power transfer via Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to sensors embedded in concrete is studied here. First, we analytically derive the optimal geometric parameters for transmission of power in the air. This specifically leads to the identification of the local and global optimization parameters and conditions, it was validated through electromagnetic simulations. Second, the optimum conditions were employed in the model for propagation of energy through plain and reinforced concrete at different humidity conditions, and frequencies with extended Debye's model. This analysis leads to the conclusion that SCMR can be used to efficiently power sensors in plain and reinforced concrete at different humidity levels and depth, also validated through electromagnetic simulations. The optimization of wireless power transmission via SMCR to Wearable and Implantable Medical Device (WIMD) are also explored. The optimum conditions from the analytics were used in the model for propagation of energy through different human tissues. This analysis shows that SCMR can be used to efficiently transfer power to sensors in human tissue without overheating through electromagnetic simulations, as excessive power might result in overheating of the tissue. Standard SCMR

  6. Direct observation of a propagating spin wave induced by spin-transfer torque.

    PubMed

    Madami, M; Bonetti, S; Consolo, G; Tacchi, S; Carlotti, G; Gubbiotti, G; Mancoff, F B; Yar, M A; Akerman, J

    2011-10-01

    Spin torque oscillators with nanoscale electrical contacts are able to produce coherent spin waves in extended magnetic films, and offer an attractive combination of electrical and magnetic field control, broadband operation, fast spin-wave frequency modulation, and the possibility of synchronizing multiple spin-wave injection sites. However, many potential applications rely on propagating (as opposed to localized) spin waves, and direct evidence for propagation has been lacking. Here, we directly observe a propagating spin wave launched from a spin torque oscillator with a nanoscale electrical contact into an extended Permalloy (nickel iron) film through the spin transfer torque effect. The data, obtained by wave-vector-resolved micro-focused Brillouin light scattering, show that spin waves with tunable frequencies can propagate for several micrometres. Micromagnetic simulations provide the theoretical support to quantitatively reproduce the results. PMID:21873993

  7. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis. PMID:21950944

  8. Laser-induced forward transfer of high-viscosity silver pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Martin, D.; Brasz, C. F.; Chen, Y.; Morales, M.; Arnold, C. B.; Molpeceres, C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a study of the morphology of individual dots of silver paste deposited by laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is performed using a ns-pulsed laser at 532 nm. The LIFT process is characterized by scanning confocal microscopy on the deposited material and in-situ time-resolved imaging during the transfer in order to illuminate the flow dynamics in relation to the pulse energy and paste thickness. The influence of process parameters on the structure of transferred dots is explained both phenomenologically and analytically. Depending on the experimental conditions, different transfer regimes were observed. These regimes have similarities to those reported for LIFT of Newtonian fluids and nanopastes, but the multiphase and non-Newtonian rheology and thicker films used lead to noticeable differences, such as the formation of a continuous and stable pillar connecting donor and acceptor substrates when the paste film is thick enough and the energy is optimum. This process regime allows transfer of dots with high aspect ratios, which is desirable for the printing of contacts on solar cells.

  9. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  10. Spin-orbit-coupling induced torque in ballistic domain walls: Equivalence of charge-pumping and nonequilibrium magnetization formalisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Kelly, Paul J.

    2016-06-01

    To study the effect of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on spin-transfer torque in magnetic materials, we have implemented two theoretical formalisms that can accommodate SOC. Using the "charge-pumping" formalism, we find two contributions to the out-of-plane spin-transfer torque parameter β in ballistic Ni domain walls (DWs). For short DWs, the nonadiabatic reflection of conduction electrons caused by the rapid spatial variation of the exchange potential results in an out-of-plane torque that increases rapidly with decreasing DW length. For long DWs, the Fermi level conduction channel anisotropy that gives rise to an intrinsic DW resistance in the presence of SOC leads to a linear dependence of β on the DW length. To understand this counterintuitive divergence of β in the long DW limit, we use the "nonequilibrium magnetization" formalism to examine the spatially resolved spin-transfer torque. The SOC-induced out-of-plane torque in ballistic DWs is found to be quantitatively consistent with the values obtained using the charge-pumping calculations, indicating the equivalence of the two theoretical methods.

  11. Femtosecond-laser-induced modifications in Co/Pt multilayers studied with tabletop resonant magnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, C.; Adam, R.; Rudolf, D.; Frömter, R.; Grychtol, P.; Winkler, G.; Kobs, A.; Oepen, H. P.; Kapteyn, H. C.; Murnane, M. M.; Schneider, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the magnetic domain structure of Co/Pt multilayer films on length scales below one hundred nanometers using resonant magnetic scattering and magnetic force microscopy. The extreme ultraviolet light for the scattering experiment is created by a laser-based high-order harmonic generation source. After illumination with intense ultrashort infrared laser pulses, we observe pronounced changes in the magnetic structure and morphology. This study points out the importance of a detailed analysis of the different laser-induced modifications of a magnetic thin film that influence the scattering patterns.

  12. External magnetic field-induced selective biodistribution of magnetoliposomes in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Jimeno, Sonia; Escribano, Elvira; Queralt, Josep; Estelrich, Joan

    2012-08-01

    This study looked at the effect of an external magnet on the biodistribution of magnetoliposomes intravenously administrated in mice (8 mg iron/kg) with and without induced acute inflammation. Our results showed that due to enhanced vascular permeability, magnetoliposomes accumulated at the site of inflammation in the absence of an external magnetic field, but the amount of iron present increased under the effect of a magnet located at the inflammation zone. This increase was dependent on the time (20 or 60 min) of exposure of the external magnetic field. It was also observed that the presence of the magnet was associated with lower amounts of iron in the liver, spleen, and plasma than was found in mice in which a magnet had not been applied. The results of this study confirm that it is possible to target drugs encapsulated in magnetic particles by means of an external magnet.

  13. Imaging magnetic scalar potentials by laser-induced fluorescence from bright and dark atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fescenko, I.; Weis, A.

    2014-06-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for mapping two-dimensional distributions of magnetic field strengths (magnetic scalar potential lines) using charge-coupled device (CCD) recordings of the fluorescence patterns emitted by spin-polarized Cs vapour in a buffer gas exposed to inhomogeneous magnetic fields. The method relies on the position-selective destruction of spin polarization by magnetic resonances induced by multi-component oscillating magnetic fields, such that magnetic potential lines can be directly detected by the CCD camera. We also present a generic algebraic model allowing for the calculation of the fluorescence patterns and find excellent agreement with the experimental observations for three distinct inhomogeneous field topologies. The spatial resolution obtained with these proof-of-principle experiments is of the order of 1 mm. A substantial increase of spatial and magnetic field resolution is expected by deploying the method in a magnetically shielded environment.

  14. External magnetic field-induced selective biodistribution of magnetoliposomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the effect of an external magnet on the biodistribution of magnetoliposomes intravenously administrated in mice (8 mg iron/kg) with and without induced acute inflammation. Our results showed that due to enhanced vascular permeability, magnetoliposomes accumulated at the site of inflammation in the absence of an external magnetic field, but the amount of iron present increased under the effect of a magnet located at the inflammation zone. This increase was dependent on the time (20 or 60 min) of exposure of the external magnetic field. It was also observed that the presence of the magnet was associated with lower amounts of iron in the liver, spleen, and plasma than was found in mice in which a magnet had not been applied. The results of this study confirm that it is possible to target drugs encapsulated in magnetic particles by means of an external magnet. PMID:22883385

  15. Study of stream wise transverse magnetic fluid flow with heat transfer around an obstacle embedded in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, S.; Dehghan, M.; Ellahi, R.; Riaz, M.; Jamal-Abad, M. T.

    2015-03-01

    A mathematical model for two-dimensional fluid flow under the influence of stream wise transverse magnetic fields in laminar regime is simulated in this study. Heat transfer past a square diamond shaped porous obstacle is also taken into account. The attention is focused to investigate the effects of intensity and direction of magnetic field, Darcy and Reynolds numbers on the mechanism of convective heat transfer and flow structures. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model along with the Maxwell equations is used. The nonlinear coupled equations using a finite volume approach (FVA) are solved numerically. The calculations are performed for different governing parameters such as Reynolds number, Nusselt number, Stuart number and Prandtl Number. The physical interpretation of velocity and isothermal contours is assigned through graphs. It is shown that the effects of a transverse magnetic field on flow behavior and heat transfer mechanism are more than that of the stream wise magnetic field. The configuration of streamlines and vorticity contours phenomena are also presented for porous diamond obstacle. Comparison of the numerical solutions with existing literature is also made.

  16. Magnetic topology change induced by reconnection events in RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momo, Barbara; Martines, Emilio; Innocente, Paolo; Lorenzini, Rita; Rea, Cristina; Zanca, Paolo; Zuin, Matteo

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a phenomena observed in various plasmas across the Universe, where a conversion of magnetic to kinetic energy of plasma particles is consequent to a change in the global magnetic topology. In laboratory plasmas magnetic reconnections are associated to relaxation processes, like sawtooth crashes in Tokamak dynamics and the so-called dynamo effect in Reversed Filed Pinches (RFPs). In this work we propose the study of magnetic crashes in RFP dynamics, where the recursive transition from a more ordered helical state to a chaotic one is associated with rapid magnetic reconnection events. More into details, we propose to analyse RFX-mod discharges reconstructing the magnetic topology in the whole plasma volume at fixed time snapshots. Times are chosen in a window around the crashes, and the magnetic topology is reconstructed by using the solutions of a Newcomb-type equation, solved consistently with experimental boundary conditions. New boundary conditions are given by internal magnetic measurements coming from the ISIS probe system, in order to detect high frequency dynamics. Poincaré plots are used as a tool for the visualization of magnetic topology changes.

  17. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  18. Hole-transfer induced energy transfer in perylene diimide dyads with a donor-spacer-acceptor motif.

    PubMed

    Kölle, Patrick; Pugliesi, Igor; Langhals, Heinz; Wilcken, Roland; Esterbauer, Andreas J; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Riedle, Eberhard

    2015-10-14

    We investigate the photoinduced dynamics of perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif with polyyne spacers of varying length by pump-probe spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence, chemical variation and quantum chemistry. While the dyads with pyridine based polyyne spacers undergo energy transfer with near-unity quantum efficiency, in the dyads with phenyl based polyyne spacers the energy transfer efficiency drops below 50%. This suggests the presence of a competing electron transfer process from the spacer to the energy donor as the excitation sink. Transient absorption spectra, however, reveal that the spacer actually mediates the energy transfer dynamics. The ground state bleach features of the polyyne spacers appear due to the electron transfer decay with the same time constant present in the rise of the ground state bleach and stimulated emission of the perylene energy acceptor. Although the electron transfer process initially quenches the fluorescence of the donor it does not inhibit energy transfer to the perylene energy acceptor. The transient signatures reveal that electron and energy transfer processes are sequential and indicate that the donor-spacer electron transfer state itself is responsible for the energy transfer. Through the introduction of a Dexter blocker unit into the spacer we can clearly exclude any through bond Dexter-type energy transfer. Ab initio calculations on the donor-spacer and the donor-spacer-acceptor systems reveal the existence of a bright charge transfer state that is close in energy to the locally excited state of the acceptor. Multipole-multipole interactions between the bright charge transfer state and the acceptor state enable the energy transfer. We term this mechanism coupled hole-transfer FRET. These dyads represent a first example that shows how electron transfer can be connected to energy transfer for use in novel photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26347443

  19. WSINV3DMT: Vertical magnetic field transfer function inversion and parallel implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siripunvaraporn, Weerachai; Egbert, Gary

    2009-04-01

    We describe two extensions to the three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion program WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn, W., Egbert, G., Lenbury, Y., Uyeshima, M., 2005, Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion: data-space method. Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors 150, 3-14), including modifications to allow inversion of the vertical magnetic transfer functions (VTFs), and parallelization of the code. The parallel implementation, which is most appropriate for small clusters, uses MPI to distribute forward solutions for different frequencies, as well as some linear algebraic computations, over multiple processors. In addition to reducing run times, the parallelization reduces memory requirements by distributing storage of the sensitivity matrix. Both new features are tested on synthetic and real datasets, revealing nearly linear speedup for a small number of processors (up to 8). Experiments on synthetic examples show that the horizontal position and lateral conductivity contrasts of anomalies can be recovered by inverting VTFs alone. However, vertical positions and absolute amplitudes are not well constrained unless an accurate host resistivity is imposed a priori. On very simple synthetic models including VTFs in a joint inversion had little impact on the inverse solution computed with impedances alone. However, in experiments with real data, inverse solutions obtained from joint inversion of VTF and impedances, and from impedances alone, differed in important ways, suggesting that for structures with more realistic levels of complexity the VTFs will in general provide useful additional constraints.

  20. Magnetization transfer magic-angle-spinning z-spectroscopy of excised tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Reut; Mangoubi, Oren; Bhattacharyya, Rangeet; Degani, Hadassa; Frydman, Lucio

    2009-07-01

    NMR experiments devised to aid in analyses of tissues include magnetization transfer (MT), which can highlight the signals of biological macromolecules through cross-relaxation and/or chemical exchange processes with the bulk 1H water resonance, and high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) methods, akin to those used in solid-state NMR to introduce additional spectral resolution via the averaging of spin anisotropies. This paper explores the result of combining these methodologies, and reports on MT "z-spectroscopy" between water and cell components in excised tissues under a variety of HRMAS conditions. Main features arising from the resulting 1H "MTMAS" experiments include strong spinning sideband manifolds centered at the liquid water shift, high-resolution isotropic features coinciding with aliphatic and amide proton resonances, and a second sideband manifold arising as spinning speeds are increased. Interpretations are given for the origin of these various features, including simulations shedding further light onto the nature of MT NMR signals observed for tissue samples. Concurrently, histological examinations are reported validating the limits of HRMAS NMR procedures to the analysis of tissue samples preserved in a number of different ways.