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Sample records for magnetically ordered materials

  1. A new class of natural magnetic materials - The ordering alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that tetrataenite (approximately FeNi), found in many meteorites, and Josephinite (approximately FeNi3), found in many serpentinized peridotites and possibly in Allende, are atomically ordered alloys. Data are presented, showing magnetic hysteresis loops, coercivity-temperature behavior at cryogenic temperatures, and thermomagnetic curves, that show that these ordered magnetic materials have unique magnetic properties and do not fit the conventional rock magnetism paradigms represented by Fe3O4 serpentinites. The ordered state is characterized by induced magnetic anisotropy, reaching the extreme for the tetragonal truly uniaxial anisotropy in FeNi. It is suggested that these ordered magnetic alloys should be considered a new class of natural magnetic materials.

  2. NMR study of domain wall pinning in a magnetically ordered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakov, I. V.; Popov, P. S.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.; Dudkin, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance in the form of spin echo in combination with magnetic field pulses applied to a magnetically ordered material sample offers a convenient tool for studying characteristics of the centers of domain-wall pinning. Possibilities of this method have been demonstrated in experiments with lithium-zinc ferrite.

  3. Magnetically responsive ordered mesoporous materials: A burgeoning family of functional composite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yonghui; Cai, Yue; Sun, Zhenkun; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic mesoporous materials, as a family of novel functional nanomaterials, have attracted increasing attention due to their unique properties. Much work has been done to synthesize these materials and to explore applications in various fields, such as catalysis, separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and MR imaging. This Letter reviews the synthesis approaches, which can be grouped into three categories, i.e. sol-gel coating, post-loading, and nanocasting approaches. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of the design principles, synthesis strategies and the properties-applications relationship of the mesoporous materials.

  4. Kambersky Damping in L10 Magnetic Materials of Ordered and Disordered States with Substitutional Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Tao; Victora, Randall

    2015-03-01

    L10 phase alloys with high magnetic anisotropy play a key role in spintronic devices. The damping constant α represents the elimination of the magnetic energy and affects the efficiency of devices. However, the intrinsic Kambersky damping reported experimentally differs among investigators and the effect of defects on α is never investigated. Here, we apply Kambersky's torque correlation technique, within the tight-binding method, to L10 ordered and disordered alloys FePt, FePd,CoPt and CoPd. In the ordered phase, CoPt has the largest damping of 0.067 while FePd has the minimum value of 0.009 at room temperature. The calculated damping value of FePt and FePd agrees well with experiment. Artificially shifting Ef, as might be accomplished by doping with impurity atoms, shows that α follows the density of states (DOS) at Ef in these four L10 alloys. We introduce lattice defects through exchanging the positions of 3d and non-3d transition elements in 36 atom supercells. The damping increases with reduced degree of chemical order, owing to the enhanced spin-flip channel allowed by the broken symmetry. This prediction is confirmed by measurements in FePt. It is demonstrated that this corresponds to an enhanced DOS at the Fermi level, owing to the rounding of the DOS with loss of long-range order. This work was supported primarily by C-SPIN (one of the six SRC STAR-net Centers) and partly by the MRSEC Program under Contract No. DMR-0819885.

  5. Unmixing Multi-Component Magnetic Mixtures in Geologic Materials Using First Order Reversal Curve Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.; Li, Y.; Muraszko, J.; Channell, J. E. T.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Hodell, D. A.; Necula, C.; Panaiotu, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a magnetic unmixing method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams. PCA provides an objective and robust statistical framework for unmixing, because it represents data variability as a linear combination of a limited number of principal components that are derived purely on the basis of natural variations contained within the dataset. For PCA we have resampled FORC distributions on grids that capture diagnostic signatures of magnetic domain states. Individual FORC diagrams were then recast as linear combinations of end-member (EM) FORC diagrams, located at user-defined positions in PCA space. The EM selection is guided by constraints derived from physical modeling, and is imposed by data scatter. To test our model, we have investigated temporal variations of two EMs in bulk North Atlantic sediment cores collected from the Rockall Trough and the Iberian Continental Margin. Sediments from these sites contain a mixture of magnetosomes and granulometrically distinct detrital magnetite. We have also quantified the spatial variation of three EM components in surficial sediments along the flow path of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). These samples were separated into granulometric fractions, which also assisted in constraining EM definition. The unmixing model reveals systematic variations in EM relative abundance as a function of distance along NADW flow. Finally, we have applied PCA to the combined dataset of Rockall Trough and NADW sediments, which can be recast as a four-EM mixture, providing enhanced discrimination between components. Our method forms the foundation of a general solution to the problem of unmixing multi-component magnetic mixtures, a fundamental task of rock magnetic studies.

  6. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Engelbrecht, K.; Nielsen, K. K.; Neves Bez, H.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent magnetocaloric refrigerators (MCR) demonstrated the great potential for these materials, but a thorough study on the impact of the moderate adiabatic temperature change and strong temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is lacking. Besides, comparing active magnetic regenerators (AMR) using FOPT and SOPT materials is also of fundamental interest. We present modeling results of multi-layer AMRs using FOPT and SOPT materials based on a 1D numerical model. First the impact of isothermal entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and shape factor describing the temperature dependence of the MCE are quantified and analyzed by using artificially built magnetocaloric properties. Then, based on measured magnetocaloric properties of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13H y and Gd, an investigation on how to layer typical FOPT and SOPT materials with different temperature spans is carried out. Moreover, the sensitivity of variation in Curie temperature distribution for both groups of AMRs is investigated. Finally, a concept of mixing FOPT and SOPT materials is studied for improving the stability of layered AMRs with existing materials.

  7. Symmetry of Magnetically Ordered Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifshitz, Ron

    1998-03-01

    The notion of magnetic symmetry is reexamined in light of the recent observation of long-range magnetic order in icosahedral quasicrystals [Charrier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4637 (1997)]. The relation between the symmetry of a magnetically ordered (periodic or quasiperiodic) crystal, given in terms of a ``spin space group,'' and its neutron diffraction diagram is established. In doing so, an outline of a symmetry classification scheme for magnetically ordered quasiperiodic crystals, is provided. Predictions are given for the expected diffraction patterns of magnetically ordered icosahedral crystals, provided their symmetry is well described by icosahedral spin space groups.

  8. Magnetic ordering in the ultrapure site-diluted spin chain materials SrCu1 -xNixO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutis, G.; Thede, M.; Saint-Martin, R.; Mohan, A.; Baines, C.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Hess, C.; Revcolevschi, A.; Büchner, B.; Zheludev, A.

    2016-06-01

    The muon spin rotation technique is used to study magnetic ordering in ultrapure samples of SrCu1 -xNixO2 , an archetypical S =1 /2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain system with a small number of S =1 defects. The ordered state in the parent compound is shown to be highly homogeneous, contrary to a previous report [M. Matsuda et al., Phys. Rev. B 55, R11953 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevB.55.R11953]. Even a minute number of Ni impurities results in inhomogeneous order and a decrease of the transition temperature. At as little as 0.5 % Ni concentration, magnetic ordering is entirely suppressed. The results are compared to previous theoretical studies of weakly coupled spin chains with site defects.

  9. Magnetic order and electronic properties of Li2Mn2(MoO4)3 material for lithium-ion batteries: ESR and magnetic susceptibility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, N. M.; Prabaharan, S. R. S.; Khantimerov, S. M.; Nizamov, F. A.; Michael, M. S.; Drulis, H.; Wisniewski, P.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the application of electron spin resonance (ESR) and magnetic susceptibility methods to study the magnetic properties and valence state of transition metal ions in Li2Mn2(MoO4)3 polyanion compound previously studied for its cathode-active properties in lithium containing batteries. ESR measurements of Li2Mn2(MoO4)3 have shown the presence of Mn2+ ions in the octahedral environment of oxygen ions. It is found that the part of manganese ions occupy the anti-site positions in lithium sublattice. The absence of the ESR signal from molybdenum ions indicates that they are non-magnetic and adopt the 6+ valence state. Considerable overlapping between 3d orbitals of transition metal and 2p oxygen orbitals has been experimentally established. This leads to the indirect exchange interaction and antiferromagnetic ordering of manganese ions at 1.4 K.

  10. Comparison of the order of magnetic phase transitions in several magnetocaloric materials using the rescaled universal curve, Banerjee and mean field theory criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Burrola-Gándara, L. A. Santillan-Rodriguez, C. R.; Rivera-Gomez, F. J.; Saenz-Hernandez, R. J.; Botello-Zubiate, M. E.; Matutes-Aquino, J. A.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetocaloric materials with second order phase transition near the Curie temperature can be described by critical phenomena theory. In this theory, scaling, universality, and renormalization are key concepts from which several phase transition order criteria are derived. In this work, the rescaled universal curve, Banerjee and mean field theory criteria were used to make a comparison for several magnetocaloric materials including pure Gd, SmCo{sub 1.8}Fe{sub 0.2}, MnFeP{sub 0.46}As{sub 0.54}, and La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3}. Pure Gd, SmCo{sub 1.8}Fe{sub 0.2}, and La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} present a collapse of the rescaled magnetic entropy change curves into a universal curve, which indicates a second order phase transition; applying Banerjee criterion to H/σ vs σ{sup 2} Arrot plots and the mean field theory relation |ΔS{sub M}| ∝ (μ{sub 0}H/T{sub c}){sup 2/3} for the same materials also determines a second order phase transition. However, in the MnFeP{sub 0.46}As{sub 0.54} sample, the Banerjee criterion applied to the H/σ vs σ{sup 2} Arrot plot indicates a first order magnetic phase transition, while the mean field theory prediction for a second order phase transition, |ΔS{sub M}| ∝ (μ{sub 0}H/T{sub c}){sup 2/3}, describes a second order behavior. Also, a mixture of first and second order behavior was indicated by the rescaled universal curve criterion. The diverse results obtained for each criterion in MnFeP{sub 0.46}As{sub 0.54} are apparently related to the magnetoelastic effect and to the simultaneous presence of weak and strong magnetism in Fe (3f) and Mn (3g) alternate atomic layers, respectively. The simultaneous application of the universal curve, the Banerjee and the mean field theory criteria has allowed a better understanding about the nature of the order of the phase transitions in different magnetocaloric materials.

  11. Spin Projection of Empty Partial Density of States by Resonant X-ray Scattering (RXS): Application to Materials with Different Magnetic Ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Draeger, Guenter; Machek, Pavel

    2003-01-24

    We report the first experimental spin projections of empty partial density of states in antiferromagnetic NiO and CuO, paramagnetic MnO and in ferrimagnetic Dy3Fe5O12 by means of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS). Resolving resonantly scattered K{alpha}1,2 , K{beta}1,3 , L{alpha}1 and L1 core line spectra into their spin-up and spin-down components the spin character of the dipole- and quadrupole-excited conduction band states can quantitatively be analyzed. Since the method employs spin conservation in the RXS process and local spin references, it needs neither circularly polarized radiation nor sample magnetization for measuring the spectra. Hence, antiferro- and paramagnetic materials can be investigated as well. In the paper, the basic idea of the novel method, its experimental realization and the data treatment are reported including the spectra decomposition into the spin-up and spin-down components by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). New and unambiguous results will be presented providing the opportunity to verify experimentally the results of spin-dependent (LSDA+U) calculations. So we argue the new spectroscopy complements X-ray magnetic dichroism, which is silent for antiferro- and paramagnetic materials. In fact, the novel method gives insight into the spin polarization of conduction band states in correlated materials, independently on their magnetic ordering.

  12. Topological excitations in magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Doria, M. M.; Rodrigues, E. I. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this work we propose a new route to describe topological excitations in magnetic systems through a single real scalar field. We show here that spherically symmetric structures in two spatial dimensions, which map helical excitations in magnetic materials, admit this formulation and can be used to model skyrmion-like structures in magnetic materials.

  13. Experiments on Magnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, C. S.; Ertel, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a simple apparatus to measure the magnetization density and magnetic susceptibility of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and the diamagnetic solids and liquids. (Author/GA)

  14. Magnetic Materials in sustainable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutfleisch, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    A new energy paradigm, consisting of greater reliance on renewable energy sources and increased concern for energy efficiency in the total energy lifecycle, has accelerated research in energy-related technologies. Due to their ubiquity, magnetic materials play an important role in improving the efficiency and performance of devices in electric power generation, conversion and transportation. Magnetic materials are essential components of energy applications (i.e. motors, generators, transformers, actuators, etc.) and improvements in magnetic materials will have significant impact in this area, on par with many ``hot'' energy materials efforts. The talk focuses on the state-of-the-art hard and soft magnets and magnetocaloric materials with an emphasis on their optimization for energy applications. Specifically, the impact of hard magnets on electric motor and transportation technologies, of soft magnetic materials on electricity generation and conversion technologies, and of magnetocaloric materials for refrigeration technologies, will be discussed. The synthesis, characterization, and property evaluation of the materials, with an emphasis on structure-property relationships, will be examined in the context of their respective markets as well as their potential impact on energy efficiency. Finally, considering future bottle-necks in raw materials and in the supply chain, options for recycling of rare-earth metals will be analyzed.ootnotetextO. Gutfleisch, J.P. Liu, M. Willard, E. Bruck, C. Chen, S.G. Shankar, Magnetic Materials and Devices for the 21st Century: Stronger, Lighter, and More Energy Efficient (review), Adv. Mat. 23 (2011) 821-842.

  15. Materials with low DC magnetic susceptibility for sensitive magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwada, R.; Dennis, L.; Kendrick, R.; Khosravi, M.; Peters, M.; Smith, E.; Snow, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Materials with very low DC magnetic susceptibility have many scientific applications. To our knowledge however, relatively little research has been conducted with the goal to produce a totally nonmagnetic material. This phrase in our case means after spatially averaging over macroscopic volumes, it possesses an average zero DC magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the DC magnetic susceptibility of three different types of nonmagnetic materials at room temperature: (I) solutions of paramagnetic salts and diamagnetic liquids, (II) liquid gallium-indium alloys and (III) pressed powder mixtures of tungsten and bismuth. The lowest measured magnetic susceptibility among these candidate materials is in the order of 10-9 cgs volume susceptibility units, about two orders of magnitude smaller than distilled water. In all cases, the measured concentration dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is consistent with that expected for the weighted sum of the susceptibilities of the separate components within experimental error. These results verify the well-known Wiedemann additivity law for the magnetic susceptibility of inert mixtures of materials and thereby realize the ability to produce materials with small but tunable magnetic susceptibility. For our particular scientific application, we are also looking for materials with the largest possible number of neutrons and protons per unit volume. The gallium-indium alloys fabricated and measured in this work possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature liquid, and the tungsten-bismuth pressed powder mixtures possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature solid. This ratio is a figure of merit for a certain class of precision experiments that search for possible exotic spin-dependent forces of Nature.

  16. Ferroic nature of magnetic toroidal order.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anne S; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Electric dipoles and ferroelectricity violate spatial inversion symmetry, and magnetic dipoles and ferromagnetism break time-inversion symmetry. Breaking both symmetries favours magnetoelectric charge-spin coupling effects of enormous interest, such as multiferroics, skyrmions, polar superconductors, topological insulators or dynamic phenomena such as electromagnons. Extending the rationale, a novel type of ferroic order violating space- and time-inversion symmetry with a single order parameter should exist. This existence is fundamental and the inherent magnetoelectric coupling is technologically interesting. A uniform alignment of magnetic vortices, called ferrotoroidicity, was proposed to represent this state. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic vortex pattern identified in LiCoPO4 exhibits the indispensable hallmark of such a ferroic state, namely hysteretic poling of ferrotoroidic domains in the conjugate toroidal field, along with a distinction of toroidal from non-toroidal poling effects. This consolidates ferrotoroidicity as fourth form of ferroic order. PMID:25190207

  17. Magnetic properties of ordered NiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, P. E.; Franse, J. J. M.

    1988-04-01

    Thermal expansion, forced volume magnetostriction and high magnetic field data are presented on the ordered equiatomic NiPt compound. Values are derived for the magnetovolume parameter κC (≃3 × 10 -6kg2A-2m-4), and for the electronic and lattice Grüneisen parameters (Γ e ≊ 5.6; Γ latt ≊ 2.5) . Ordering effects on the magnetoelastic properties are studied for alloys containing 40-60 at % Ni.

  18. Centimeter-order view for magnetic domain imaging with local magnetization direction by longitudinal Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-05-01

    An observation system of centimeter-order of view of magnetic domain with local magnetization direction was developed by designing a telecentric optical system of finite design through the extension of microscope technology. The field of view realized in the developed system was 1.40 × 1.05 cm as suppressing defocus and distortion. Detection of the local magnetization direction has become possible by longitudinal Kerr observation from the orthogonal two directions. This system can be applied to the domain observation of rough surface samples and time resolved analysis for soft magnetic materials such as amorphous foil strips and soft magnetic thin films.

  19. Magnetic and charge ordering in nanosized manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T. Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Li, X. G.

    2014-09-15

    Perovskite manganites exhibit a wide range of functional properties, such as colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric effect, multiferroic property, and some interesting physical phenomena including spin, charge, and orbital ordering. Recent advances in science and technology associated with perovskite oxides have resulted in the feature sizes of microelectronic devices down-scaling into nanoscale dimensions. The nanoscale perovskite manganites display novel magnetic and electronic properties that are different from their bulk and film counterparts. Understanding the size effects of perovskite manganites at the nanoscale is of importance not only for the fundamental scientific research but also for developing next generation of electronic and magnetic nanodevices. In this paper, the current understanding and the fundamental issues related to the size effects on the magnetic properties and charge ordering in manganites are reviewed, which covers lattice structure, magnetic and electronic properties in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic based manganites. In addition to review the literatures, this article identifies the promising avenues for the future research in this area.

  20. Magnetic and charge ordering in nanosized manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Li, X. G.

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite manganites exhibit a wide range of functional properties, such as colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric effect, multiferroic property, and some interesting physical phenomena including spin, charge, and orbital ordering. Recent advances in science and technology associated with perovskite oxides have resulted in the feature sizes of microelectronic devices down-scaling into nanoscale dimensions. The nanoscale perovskite manganites display novel magnetic and electronic properties that are different from their bulk and film counterparts. Understanding the size effects of perovskite manganites at the nanoscale is of importance not only for the fundamental scientific research but also for developing next generation of electronic and magnetic nanodevices. In this paper, the current understanding and the fundamental issues related to the size effects on the magnetic properties and charge ordering in manganites are reviewed, which covers lattice structure, magnetic and electronic properties in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic based manganites. In addition to review the literatures, this article identifies the promising avenues for the future research in this area.

  1. Magnetism in Parent Iron Chalcogenides: Quantum Fluctuations Select Plaquette Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducatman, Samuel; Perkins, Natalia B.; Chubukov, Andrey

    2012-10-01

    We analyze magnetic order in Fe chalcogenide Fe1+yTe, the parent compound of the high-temperature superconductor Fe1+yTe1-xSex. Experiments show that magnetic order in this material contains components with momentum Q1=(π/2,π/2) and Q2=(π/2,-π/2) in the Fe only Brillouin zone. The actual spin order depends on the interplay between these two components. Previous works assumed that the ordered state has a single Q (either Q1 or Q2). In such a state, spins form double stripes along one of the diagonals breaking the rotational C4 symmetry. We show that quantum fluctuations actually select another order—a double Q plaquette state with equal weight of Q1 and Q2 components, which preserves C4 symmetry. We argue that the order in Fe1+yTe is determined by the competition between quantum fluctuations and magnetoelastic coupling.

  2. Multiferroicity Broken by Commensurate Magnetic Ordering in Terbium Orthomanganite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Flacau, Roxana; Du, Xin; Manuel, Pascal; Cong, Junzhuang; Sun, Young; Sun, Junliang; Yang, Sihai; Li, Guobao; Liao, Fuhui; Lin, Jianhua

    2016-04-18

    TbMnO3 is an important multiferroic material with strong coupling between magnetic and ferroelectric orderings. Incommensurate magnetic ordering is suggested to be vital for this coupling in TbMnO3 , which can be modified by doping at the site of Tb and/or Mn. Our study shows that a self-doped solid solution Tb1-x Mny MnO3 (y≤x) can be formed with Mn doped into the site of Tb of TbMnO3 . When y is small Tb1-x Mny MnO3 shows both ferroelectric and incommensurate magnetic orders at low temperature, which is similar to TbMnO3 . However, if y is large enough, a commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering appears along with the incommensurate magnetic ordering to prevent the appearance of multiferroicity in Tb1-x Mny MnO3 . That is to say, the magnetoeletric coupling can be broken by the co-existence of a commensurate antiferromagnetic ordering. This finding may be useful to the study of TbMnO3 . PMID:26833883

  3. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Catherine Ann

    2011-05-01

    Heusler intermetallics Mn2Y Ga and X2MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X2MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn2Y Ga to the logical Mn3Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co2FeSi (Appendix B).

  4. High Spin-Chern Insulators with Magnetic Order

    PubMed Central

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2013-01-01

    As a topological insulator, the quantum Hall (QH) effect is indexed by the Chern and spin-Chern numbers and . We have only in conventional QH systems. We investigate QH effects in generic monolayer honeycomb systems. We search for spin-resolved characteristic patterns by exploring Hofstadter's butterfly diagrams in the lattice theory and fan diagrams in the low-energy Dirac theory. It is shown that the spin-Chern number can takes an arbitrary high value for certain QH systems. This is a new type of topological insulators, which we may call high spin-Chern insulators. Samples may be provided by graphene on the SiC substrate with ferromagnetic order, transition-metal dichalcogenides with ferromagnetic order, transition-metal oxide with antiferromagnetic order and silicene with ferromagnetic order. Actually high spin-Chern insulators are ubiquitous in any systems with magnetic order. Nevertheless, the honeycomb system would provide us with unique materials for practical materialization. PMID:24310394

  5. High Spin-Chern Insulators with Magnetic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Motohiko

    2013-12-01

    As a topological insulator, the quantum Hall (QH) effect is indexed by the Chern and spin-Chern numbers and . We have only in conventional QH systems. We investigate QH effects in generic monolayer honeycomb systems. We search for spin-resolved characteristic patterns by exploring Hofstadter's butterfly diagrams in the lattice theory and fan diagrams in the low-energy Dirac theory. It is shown that the spin-Chern number can takes an arbitrary high value for certain QH systems. This is a new type of topological insulators, which we may call high spin-Chern insulators. Samples may be provided by graphene on the SiC substrate with ferromagnetic order, transition-metal dichalcogenides with ferromagnetic order, transition-metal oxide with antiferromagnetic order and silicene with ferromagnetic order. Actually high spin-Chern insulators are ubiquitous in any systems with magnetic order. Nevertheless, the honeycomb system would provide us with unique materials for practical materialization.

  6. Nanostructured magnetic networks: a materials comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, James L.; Butera, Alejandro; Otte, Dietmar; Barnard, John A.

    1999-03-01

    One method to achieve the enhanced coercivity necessary for the next generation of ultra high density recording media is to use a patterned substrate to nanostructure the magnetic material. By sputter-depositing a magnetic film onto the surface of a nanoporous substrate, unique magnetic properties result from the reduced dimension and topography of the film. The resultant "network" film has a coercivity nearly two orders of magnitude higher than a continuous thin film of the same thickness. This increase in coercivity has been attributed primarily to shape anisotropy due to the proportional relationship observed between the coercivity and the moment of the deposited network. To better understand the effect of the shape anisotropy, a number of different classes of magnetic materials of varying moment and magnetocrystalline anisotropy were deposited onto porous templates and compared. In general, these materials show a peak coercivity in the thickness range of 15-20 nm. In this thickness the range a linear relationship between the coercivity and moment is observed confirming the influence of shape anisotropy. A simple model assuming coherent reversal of a magnetized ellipsoid gives a ratio of 1.1 between the short and long axes. This value is significantly smaller than what it is observed by direct imaging. However, if a more realistic model of magnetization reversal is employed (such as fanning) the ratio obtained is in close agreement with the experiments.

  7. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  8. Cryogenic structural materials for superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-02-22

    This paper reviews research in the United States and Japan on structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets. Superconducting magnets are used for magnetic fusion energy devices and for accelerators that are used in particle-physics research. The cryogenic structural materials that we review are used for magnet cases and support structures. We expect increased materials requirements in the future.

  9. Iron-cobalt based soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sujit

    FeCo-based alloys with high Tc and low magnetic anisotropy are the most promising soft magnetic materials for high temperature application such as turbine and electric vehicles. Present commercially available Hiperco alloys do not meet very well the high temperature application requirements. To develop new generation of soft magnets, firstly, the relationship among magnetic properties, mechanical properties and microstructure should been studied and clarified. At high temperature, the evolution of microstructure of FeCo is very complicated, including the change of defects, ordering parameter, the amount of precipitates, and the grain size. All of these factors significantly affect the high temperature properties. In our study, a big effort was focused on the separation of these individual effects. We are now able to understand the mechanism of these effects on the magnetic and mechanical properties. Based on this understanding, new magnets have been tentatively developed by using Electrodeposition technique. This involves fiber matrix composites where the magnetic properties are borne by the magnetic matrix and the mechanical properties by the composite fibers.

  10. Testing of a First Order AC Magnetic Susceptometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ryan; Sunny, Smitha; Ho, Pei-Chun

    2011-11-01

    A first-order AC magnetic susceptometer has been constructed and tested to find the magnetic response of strongly correlated electron materials. The instrument works by using a primary coil to apply a small AC magnetic field of .104 Oe to a sample with a cylindrical coil space of length .635 cm and diameter .355 cm. A lock-in amplifier is used to monitor the induced voltage from a set of secondary coils. By coupling a temperature-controlled system with this instrument, the change in the magnetic signal with respect to temperature is measured. Monitoring the signal changes may indicate the temperature that causes the material to transition to either a ferromagnetic, anti-ferromagnetic, or superconducting state. A 122.47 mg Gd polycrystal was used to test our susceptometer. The data qualitatively agrees with the previous results of magnetization vs. temperature of Gd single crystals by Nigh et al. [1]: there is a steep increase in the pick-up signal at 300 K where Gd becomes ferromagnetic and a peak at 210 K [1]. This susceptometer will be used for our future investigation of magnetic properties of rare earth compounds and nanoparticles in the temperature range of 10 K to 300 K. [4pt] [1] H. E. Nigh, S. Legvold, and F. H. Spedding, Physical Review 132, 1092 (1963)

  11. Magnetic ordering in lanthanide-molybdenum oxide nanostructure arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Joseph; Le, Son; Schneemeyer, Lynn; Olsen, Patti; Besara, Tiglet; Siegrist, Theo; Seiler, David; Richter, Curt

    Reduced ternary molybdenum oxides, or bronzes, offer an attractive materials platform to study a wide variety of remarkable physical phenomena in a system with highly varied structural chemistry. Interesting electronic behaviors, such as superconductivity, charge density waves, and magnetism, in these materials arise from the strong hybridization of the 4d states of high-valent Mo with O p orbitals. We investigate a series of molybdenum bronze materials with Lanthanide-Mo16O44 composition that can be described as a three-dimensional array of metallic Mo8O32 nanostructures computationally predicted to contain a single charge with spin 1/2 separated by insulating MoO4 tetrahedra. This study reveals novel magnetic ordering in Lanthanide-Mo16O44 systems arising, not from the inclusion of magnetic elements, but rather from an exchange interaction between cubic Mo8O32 units. Here, we report the magnetometry and transport behaviors of a series of Lanthanide-Mo16O44 materials, emphasizing an observed low-temperature phase transition signifying the onset of antiferromagnetic ordering between the arrayed nanostructures, and relate these behaviors to their experimentally-characterized structures to reveal the intriguing physics of these correlated electronic systems.

  12. Magnetic ordering in frustrated antiferromagnets on the pyrochlore lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Gia-Wei

    Pyrochlore antiferromagnet is one of the most studied examples of strongly-interacting systems. The conflict between the lattice geometry and the local spin correlations favored by their interactions precludes the simple Neel ordering and creates an extensive degeneracy of the classical ground state. This, in turn, renders the magnet susceptible to nominally small perturbations such as quantum fluctuations, anisotropies, and dipolar interactions. Of particular interest is the classical Heisenberg spins on the pyrochlore lattice with exchange interactions restricted to the nearest neighbors. It has been demonstrated by analytical arguments and numerical simulations that the spin system remains disordered down to the lowest temperatures. In this thesis I study how magnetic ordering is induced by residual perturbations in such a system. Apart from the theoretical interest, the work presented in this thesis is mainly motivated by experimental observations of real materials. Three mechanisms of breaking the ground-state degeneracy are considered here: (1) order by distortion, (2) further-neighbor exchange interactions, and (3) the orbital degrees of freedom. In the first part, we present a theoretical model describing the lattice distortion and incommensurate magnetic order in the compound CdCr2O 4, which belongs to a class of chromium spinels exhibiting the magnetoelastic phase transitions. The magnetic frustration is relieved through the spin-driven Jahn-Teller effect involving a phonon doublet with odd parity. The distortion stabilizes a collinear magnetic order with the propagation wavevector q = 2pi(0, 0, 1). The crystal structure becomes chiral due to the lack of inversion symmetry. The handedness is transferred to the magnetic system by the relativistic spin-orbit coupling: the collinear state is twisted into a long spiral with the spins in the ac plane and q shifted to 2pi(0, delta, 1), consistent with the experiments. In the second part, we examine the effects

  13. Magnetic Cluster States in Nanostructured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Diandra Leslie-Pelecky

    2008-06-13

    The goal of this work is to fabricate model nanomaterials with different types of disorder and use atomic-scale characterization and macroscopic magnetization measurements to understand better how specific types of disorder affects macroscopic magnetic behavior. This information can be used to produce magnetic nanomaterials with specific properties for applications such as permanent magnets, soft magnetic material for motors and biomedical applications.

  14. Pressure-Induced Order in the Gapped Quantum Magnet DTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannig, Alexandra; Moeller, Johannes; Zheludev, Andrey; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Dela Cruz, Clarina; Guguchia, Zurab; Khasanov, Rustem; Morenzoni, Elvezio

    We present muon-spin relaxation, neutron diffraction and magnetic susceptibility data under applied hydrostatic pressure on the organometallic S = 1 quantum magnet NiCl2 . 4 [ SC(NH2)2 ] . The material consists of weakly coupled antiferromagnetic chains and has a spin gap resulting from a large single-ion anisotropy. Our muon spin rotation experiments provide local field dependencies on temperature as well as pressure and allow for the mapping of a detailed phase diagram up to 22kbar. Thus, we demonstrate that the compound may be driven through two subsequent pressure-induced transitions into apparently distinct magnetically ordered phases. Neutron diffraction and susceptibility measurements support those results and show the potential of low-pressure transitions to be investigated by various techniques.

  15. Magnetic Stirling cycles - A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    There is the prospect of a fundamental new application for magnetic materials as the working substance in thermodynamic cycles. Recuperative cycles which use a rare-earth ferromagnetic material near its Curie point in the field of a superconducting magnet appear feasible for applications from below 20 K to above room temperature. The elements of the cycle, advanced in an earlier paper, are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. Results are presented for J = 7/2 and g = 2. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  16. PREFACE: Soft Magnetic Materials 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfützner, H.

    1988-01-01

    The Conference "Soft Magnetic Materials 8" was held from 1 to 4 September 1987 at the Congress Centre Badgastein, Austria. It was organized by the Division of Bioelectricity and Magnetism and by the Institute of Applied and Technical Physics of the University of Technology, Vienna. The Conference was the eighth in the bi-annual series which commenced in Turin, Italy. It was attended by about 130 scientists from universities and industrial companies from 19 countries. The theme of the Conference was the recent progress in industrial applications and developments of soft magnetic alloys including magnetic measurements and field computation problems as well as fundamental aspects. In five sessions, 13 invited papers were presented in oral form. In addition, the program of poster sessions included 122 contributed papers. Regrettably, some of them were not presented when authors (especially from Eastern European countries as well as from China) were unable to be present. A clear emphasis of papers was laid on characteristics and applications of amorphous materials. As confirmed by the delegates, the spacious Congress Centre—well aerated by the near-by waterfall—provided an effective environment for informal discussions. The Conference Dinner as well as the Mountain Lodge Evening were utilized for general communications in an intensive form. However, a slight mishap of this Conference should not be concealed: Due to a thunder storm, one delegate spent a long frosty night on a rock peak of Badgasteins mountains. Still, next day he presented his excellent paper in top condition. The next Conference, SMM9, is planned to be held in El Escorial, Spain, in 1989.

  17. De Magnete et Meteorite: Cosmically Motivated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, LH; Pinkerton, FE; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Poirier, E; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2014-01-01

    Meteorites, likely the oldest source of magnetic material known to mankind, are attracting renewed interest in the science and engineering community. Worldwide focus is on tetrataenite, a uniaxial ferromagnetic compound with the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure comprised of nominally equiatomic Fe-Ni that is found naturally in meteorites subjected to extraordinarily slow cooling rates, as low as 0.3 K per million years. Here, the favorable permanent magnetic properties of bulk tetrataenite derived from the meteorite NWA 6259 are quantified. The measured magnetization approaches that of Nd-Fe-B (1.42 T) and is coupled with substantial anisotropy (1.0-1.3 MJ/m(3)) that implies the prospect for realization of technologically useful coercivity. A highly robust temperature dependence of the technical magnetic properties at an elevated temperature (20-200 degrees C) is confirmed, with a measured temperature coefficient of coercivity of -0.005%/ K, over one hundred times smaller than that of Nd-Fe-B in the same temperature range. These results quantify the extrinsic magnetic behavior of chemically ordered tetrataenite and are technologically and industrially significant in the current context of global supply chain limitations of rare-earth metals required for present-day high-performance permanent magnets that enable operation of a myriad of advanced devices and machines.

  18. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H.; Nataraj, S. K.; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A.; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E.; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics.

  19. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H; Nataraj, S K; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics. PMID:22120413

  20. Magnetic order the iron spins in NdOFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Lynn, J. W.; Li, J.; Li, G.; Chen, G. F.; Luo, J. L.; Wang, N. L.; Dai, Pengcheng; Dela Cruz, C.; Mook, H. A.

    2009-03-01

    Polarized and unpolarized powder neutron-diffraction measurements have been carried out to investigate the iron magnetic order in the parent compound of one of the highest Tc system, NdFeAsO. Antiferromagnetic order is observed below 141 K [1], which is in close proximity to the structural distortion observed in this material [2]. The magnetic structure consists of chains of parallel spins that are arranged antiparallel between chains, which is the same in-plane spin arrangement as observed in all the other iron oxypnictide materials. Nearest-neighbor spins along the c axis are antiparallel like LaFeAsO [3]. The ordered moment is 0.25 (7) μB, which is the smallest ordered moment found so far in these systems. [3pt] [1]Ying Chen, J. W. Lynn, J. Li, G. Li, G. F. Chen, J. L. Luo, N. L. Wang, Pengcheng Dai, C. dela Cruz and H. A. Mook, Phys. Rev. B 78, 064515 2008. [0pt] [2]Y. Qiu, W. Bao, Q. Huang, T. Yildirim, J. M. Simmons, M. A. Green, J.W. Lynn, Y.C. Gasparovic, J. Li, T. Wu, G. Wu, and X.H. Chen, arXiv:0806.2195 (Phys. Rev. Lett. accepted). [0pt] [3] C. dela Cruz, Q. Huang, J. W. Lynn, J. Li, W. Ratcliff II, J. L. Zarestky, H. A. Mook, G. F. Chen, J. L. Luo, N. L. Wang, and P. Dai, Nature 453, 899 (2008).

  1. From hidden order to magnetic order: Optical conductivity reveals new behavior in URu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jesse; Kanchanavatee, Noravee; Janoschek, Marc; Huang, Kevin; Butch, Nicholas; Maple, Brian; Timusk, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    As a new generation of experimental techniques is brought to bear against the heavy-Fermion compound URu2Si2, striking new details about the electronic structure changes at the mysterious hidden order (HO) transition are becoming clear. Far infrared optical conductivity measurements were performed on oriented samples of URu2Si2 doped with both Fe and Re. While Re-doping pushes the material towards ferromagnetism, Fe-doping substitutes for hydrostatic pressure and enhances the temperature of the HO transition slightly before pushing the material into antiferromagnetism. Optical conductivity measurements have revealed new information about the charge dynamics at the transition, and how these evolve with doping. Both the structure and energy of the gap are altered as the material is pushed towards magnetic ordering. Comparison is made between the gap seen in optical conductivity and the charge gaps seen in scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ARPES, as well as the gaps in the magnetic excitation spectrum seen in neutron scattering. This work supported by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada and US DOE (Grant No. DE FG02-04ER46105)

  2. Advanced Magnetic Materials and Transducers: Enabling Information Explosion and Magnetic Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shan

    2003-03-01

    Advanced magnetic materials and transducers are critical building blocks in numerous engineering devices such as bio-magnetic sensors, magnetic hard disk drives, magnetic inductors, electronic article survrence, and magnetic levitation trains. They are essential for the explosive growth in the storage capacity of hard drives at least by two orders of magnitude in the 1990s. The use of magnetic media with ever higher coercivities requires write heads to deliver more intense magnetic field, which in turn requires higher saturation magnetization of the soft magnetic material used in write heads. As an example, the talk will describe films of a new soft magnetic material based on Fe-Co-N with a saturation magnetization of 24 kG, exceeding that of any currently available soft magnetic material, with a superior permeability of over 1000 up to 1.2 GHz. They are very promising for extending the superparamagnetic limit in magnetic recording while achieving a data rate of over 2.4 Gbit/s, as well as for applications in gigahertz integrated inductors and other electromagnetic devices. Rapid development in giant magnetoresistive materials and novel spin-dependent devices has enabled read heads to detect ever-smaller bits written in hard disk drives. In search of new magnetoresistive materials, we encounter many interesting scientific questions. The talk will describe work on electron specular reflection and specular spin valves using an in-situ resistance and magnetoresistance probe. The challenges in utilizing spin valves and spin-dependent tunnel junctions for future generations of hard disk drives will also be discussed. Finally, new applications of advanced magnetic materials and transducers are emerging in magnetic nanotechnologies and magnetoelectronics. As an example, bio-magnetic sensing and DNA detection based on spin valve sensors and magnetic nanoparticle labels will be described.

  3. Magnetic stirling cycles: A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    The elements of the cycle are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  4. Structure, magnetic order and excitations in the 245 family of Fe-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Wei

    2015-01-21

    Elastic neutron scattering simultaneously probes both the crystal structure and magnetic order in a material. Inelastic neutron scattering measures phonons and magnetic excitations. Here, we review the average composition, crystal structure and magnetic order in the 245 family of Fe-based superconductors and in related insulating compounds from neutron diffraction works. A three-dimensional phase-diagram summarizes various structural, magnetic and electronic properties as a function of the sample composition. A high pressure phase diagram for the superconductor is also provided. Magnetic excitations and the theoretic Heisenberg Hamiltonian are provided for the superconductor. Issues for future works are discussed. PMID:25427222

  5. Application peculiarities of magnetic materials for protection from magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wai, P.; Dmitrenko, V.; Grabchikov, S.; Vlasik, K.; Novikov, A.; Petrenko, D.; Trukhanov, V.; Ulin, S.; Uteshev, Z.; Chernysheva, V.; Shustov, A.

    2016-02-01

    In different materials for magnetic shields, the maximum permeability is achieved for different values of the magnetic field. This determines the choice of material. So for protection from magnetic fields strength of 10 - 150 A/m it is advisable to apply the amorphous ribbon 84KXCP. For stronger fields (more than 400 A/m) it is recommended to use MFS based on Ni20Fe80. Use of these materials allows creating an effective shield working in a wide range of magnetic field strengths.

  6. Magnetic Ordering In Superconducting Nb-doped Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbae, Paul; Lawson, Benjamin; Li, Gang; Yu, Fan; Asaba, Tomoya; Tinsman, Colin; Qui, Yusheng; Hor, Yew San; Li, Lu

    Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetic order has been suggested by early studies of topological superconductor candidate, niobium doped Bi2Se3. In order to elucidate the interesting physics of this coexistence, we performed highly sensitive torque magnetometry to study the material's magnetization. We observed a bump feature in the magnetization around 8 Tesla in both the superconducting and non-superconducting samples. This is distinct from the paramagnetic torque response of the parent compound, Bi2Se3, suggesting some interesting magnetic order in Nb-doped Bi2Se3.

  7. Magnetic Moment Distribution in Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. M. C.; Zhang, X.-G.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W. A.; Butler, W. H.; Stocks, G. M.; MacLaren, J. M.

    1996-03-01

    Thin layers of magnetic material surrounded by non-magnetic layers display a reduced moment per atom relative to the bulk magnetic material. Plots of sturation magnetization versus magnetic layer thickness can be explained in terms of magnetically dead layers at interfaces. First principles calculations indicate a more complex distribution of magnetic moments. Moment distributions calculated in the local density approximation restricted to colinear spins and with unrestricted spin orientations will be presented for Cu/Ni/Cu, Cu/permalloy/Cu, and Mo/Ni/Mo structures. Work supported by Division of Materials Science, the Mathematical Information and Computational Science Division of the Office of Computational Technology Research, and by the Assistant Secretary of Defence Programs, Technology Management Group, Technology Transfer Initiative, US DOE under subcontract DEAC05-84OR21400 with Martin-Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.

  8. Phase transformations in shock compacted magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, Christopher

    Shock compaction experiments were performed on soft magnetic phases Fe 4N and Fe16N2, and hard magnetic phases Nd 2Fe14B and Sm2Fe17N3 in order to determine their thermo-mechanical stability during shock loading and explore the possibility of fabricating a textured nanocomposite magnet. Gas gun experiments performed on powders pressed in a three capsule fixture showed phase transformations occurring in Fe4N, Fe16N 2, and Nd2Fe14B, while Sm2Fe17 N3 was observed to be relatively stable. Shock compaction of FCC Fe4N resulted in a partial transformation to HCP Fe3N, consistent with previous reports of the transition occurring at a static pressure of ~3 GPa. Shock compaction of Fe16N 2 produced decomposition products α-Fe, Fe4N, and FeN due to a combination of thermal effects associated with dynamic void collapse and plastic deformation. Decomposition of Nd-Fe-B, producing α-Fe and amorphous Nd-Fe-B, was observed in several shock consolidated samples and is attributed to deformation associated with shock compaction, similar to decomposition reported in ball milled Nd-Fe-B. No decomposition was observed in shock compacted samples of Sm-Fe-N, which is consistent with literature reports showing decomposition occurring only in samples compacted at a pressure above ~15 GPa. Nd-Fe-B and Sm-Fe-N were shown to accommodate deformation primarily by grain size reduction, especially in large grained materials. Hard/Soft composite magnetic materials were formed by mixing single crystal particles of Nd-Fe-B with iron nanoparticles, and the alignment-by-magnetic-field technique was able to introduce significant texture into green compacts of this mixture. While problems with decomposition of the Nd2Fe14B phase prevented fabricating bulk magnets from the aligned green compacts, retention of the nanoscale morphology of the α-Fe particles and the high alignment of the green compacts shows promise for future development of textured nanocomposite magnets through shock compaction.

  9. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  10. Simulating functional magnetic materials on supercomputers.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Markus Ernst; Entel, Peter

    2009-07-22

    The recent passing of the petaflop per second landmark by the Roadrunner project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory marks a preliminary peak of an impressive world-wide development in the high-performance scientific computing sector. Also, purely academic state-of-the-art supercomputers such as the IBM Blue Gene/P at Forschungszentrum Jülich allow us nowadays to investigate large systems of the order of 10(3) spin polarized transition metal atoms by means of density functional theory. Three applications will be presented where large-scale ab initio calculations contribute to the understanding of key properties emerging from a close interrelation between structure and magnetism. The first two examples discuss the size dependent evolution of equilibrium structural motifs in elementary iron and binary Fe-Pt and Co-Pt transition metal nanoparticles, which are currently discussed as promising candidates for ultra-high-density magnetic data storage media. However, the preference for multiply twinned morphologies at smaller cluster sizes counteracts the formation of a single-crystalline L1(0) phase, which alone provides the required hard magnetic properties. The third application is concerned with the magnetic shape memory effect in the Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloy, which is a technologically relevant candidate for magnetomechanical actuators and sensors. In this material strains of up to 10% can be induced by external magnetic fields due to the field induced shifting of martensitic twin boundaries, requiring an extremely high mobility of the martensitic twin boundaries, but also the selection of the appropriate martensitic structure from the rich phase diagram. PMID:21828528

  11. Numerical modeling of higher order magnetic moments in UXO discrimination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, V.; Yaoguo, L.; Nabighian, M.N.; Wright, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The surface magnetic anomaly observed in unexploded ordnance (UXO) clearance is mainly dipolar, and consequently, the dipole is the only magnetic moment regularly recovered in UXO discrimination. The dipole moment contains information about the intensity of magnetization but lacks information about the shape of the target. In contrast, higher order moments, such as quadrupole and octupole, encode asymmetry properties of the magnetization distribution within the buried targets. In order to improve our understanding of magnetization distribution within UXO and non-UXO objects and to show its potential utility in UXO clearance, we present a numerical modeling study of UXO and related metallic objects. The tool for the modeling is a nonlinear integral equation describing magnetization within isolated compact objects of high susceptibility. A solution for magnetization distribution then allows us to compute the magnetic multipole moments of the object, analyze their relationships, and provide a depiction of the anomaly produced by different moments within the object. Our modeling results show the presence of significant higher order moments for more asymmetric objects, and the fields of these higher order moments are well above the noise level of magnetic gradient data. The contribution from higher order moments may provide a practical tool for improved UXO discrimination. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  12. Magnetic ordering of the polar airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Hays, P. B.

    1978-01-01

    The visible airglow experiment on the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite has gathered sufficient data over the earth's polar regions to allow one to map the geographic distribution of particle precipitation using emissions at 3371 and 5200 A. Both of these features exhibit large variations in space and time. The 3371 A emission of N2(C cubed pi), excited by low energy electrons, indicates substantial energy inputs on the dayside in the vicinity of the polar cusp. More precipitation occurs in the morning than evening for the sample reported here, while the entire night sector between magnetic latitudes 65 and 77.5 deg is subjected to particle fluxes. Regions of enhanced 5200 A emission from N(D-2) are larger in horizontal extent than those at 3371 A. This smearing effect is due to ionospheric motions induced by magnetospheric convection.

  13. Uniaxial Pressure Dependence of Magnetic Order in MnSi.

    PubMed

    Chacon, A; Bauer, A; Adams, T; Rucker, F; Brandl, G; Georgii, R; Garst, M; Pfleiderer, C

    2015-12-31

    We report comprehensive small angle neutron scattering measurements complemented by ac susceptibility data of the helical order, conical phase, and Skyrmion lattice phase (SLP) in MnSi under uniaxial pressures. For all crystallographic orientations uniaxial pressure favors the phase for which a spatial modulation of the magnetization is closest to the pressure axis. Uniaxial pressures as low as 1 kbar applied perpendicular to the magnetic field axis enhance the Skyrmion lattice phase substantially, whereas the Skyrmion lattice phase is suppressed for pressure parallel to the field. Taken together we present quantitative microscopic information on how strain couples to magnetic order in the chiral magnet MnSi. PMID:26765018

  14. Magnetic material arrangement in oriented termites: a magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, O. C.; Wajnberg, E.; de Oliveira, J. F.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2004-06-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetic resonance is used to study the magnetic material in oriented Neocapritermes opacus (N.o.) termite, the only prey of the migratory ant Pachycondyla marginata (P.m.). A broad line in the g=2 region, associated to isolated nanoparticles shows that at least 97% of the magnetic material is in the termite's body (abdomen + thorax). From the temperature dependence of the resonant field and from the spectral linewidths, we estimate the existence of magnetic nanoparticles 18.5 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and an effective magnetic anisotropy constant, Keff between 2.1 and 3.2 × 10 4 erg/cm 3. A sudden change in the double integrated spectra at about 100 K for N.o. with the long body axis oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can be attributed to the Verwey transition, and suggests an organized film-like particle system.

  15. Magnetically driven suppression of nematic order in an iron-based superconductor.

    PubMed

    Avci, S; Chmaissem, O; Allred, J M; Rosenkranz, S; Eremin, I; Chubukov, A V; Bugaris, D E; Chung, D Y; Kanatzidis, M G; Castellan, J-P; Schlueter, J A; Claus, H; Khalyavin, D D; Manuel, P; Daoud-Aladine, A; Osborn, R

    2014-01-01

    A theory of superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires an understanding of the phase diagram of the normal state. In these compounds, superconductivity emerges when stripe spin density wave (SDW) order is suppressed by doping, pressure or atomic disorder. This magnetic order is often pre-empted by nematic order, whose origin is yet to be resolved. One scenario is that nematic order is driven by orbital ordering of the iron 3d electrons that triggers stripe SDW order. Another is that magnetic interactions produce a spin-nematic phase, which then induces orbital order. Here we report the observation by neutron powder diffraction of an additional fourfold-symmetric phase in Ba1-xNaxFe2As2 close to the suppression of SDW order, which is consistent with the predictions of magnetically driven models of nematic order. PMID:24848521

  16. Magnetism in Non-Traditional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Madhu

    2013-09-17

    complimentary to the hole defects appear to be the pentagons along the curved surface of the drum. Charge oscillations found in the nano-drum are minimized in the nanoribbons. But more importantly, the hole edge atoms in the nano-drums retain significant magnetic moments; almost twice those of the corresponding ones in hydrogenated graphene nanoribbons (H-GNRs). These results suggest that the topological defects in the nano-drums may act like blocks to keep magnetic moments from ?leaking? out from the hole defects. This may have significant implications for the the use of nano-drums in magnetic storage technology where the ratio, magnetic-moment/weight, is of paramount importance in any futuristic device applications. One of the basic problems of the DFT/LSDA+U theory is the efficient evaluation of the U-term. With this in mind we proposed an alternative approach for its calculation which is based on the knowledge of the Hartree-Fock wave functions of the system under consideration. As a result, the proposed approach is closer to the basic definition of the DFT/LSDA+U scheme and its hybrid-DFT nature. According to our approach, the U value is obtained in a consistent and ab-initio way using the self-consistently calculated wave functions of the given system at the level of the HF approximation. Our method is applicable for systems which include more than one type of elements with localized d-orbitals. The method has been applied the case of the doped Zn(Co)O systems successfully. Currently, theories based on conventional superexchange or double-exchange interactions cannot explain long range magnetic order at concentrations below percolation threshold in dilute magnetic semiconductors. On the other hand, the codoping induced magnetism, which can justify magnetic interactions below percolation threshold, has eluded explanation. With this in mind, we proposed that defect-induced magnetism in codoped non-magnetic materials can be viewed within a molecular generalization of the

  17. Magnetic order in rare earth bromates below 0. 1 K

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jingchun; Corruccini, L.R. )

    1989-08-01

    Magnetic order inferred from dc susceptibility measurements is reported for Gd, Er, and Yb bromates. No order is seen in Nd bromate at temperatures above {approximately}6.5 mK. Erbium bromate orders in a fashion outwardly similar to the structurally related Er ethyl sulfate.

  18. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  19. Magnetic ordering in Ho2Fe2Si2C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, R. A.; Cadogan, J. M.; Cobas, R.; Hutchison, W. D.; Avdeev, M.; Campbell, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    We have used neutron diffraction and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, complemented by magnetisation and specific heat measurements, to examine the magnetic ordering of Ho2Fe2Si2C. We have established that Ho2Fe2Si2C orders antiferromagnetically below TN = 16(1) K with a magnetic structure involving ordering of the Ho sublattice along the b-axis with a propagation vector k =[0 0 1/2 ] . 57Fe Mössbauer spectra collected below TN show no evidence of a magnetic splitting, demonstrating the absence of long range magnetic ordering of the Fe sublattice. A small line broadening is observed in the 57Fe spectra below TN, which is due to a transferred hyperfine field—estimated to be around 0.3 T at 10 K—from the Ho sublattice.

  20. Composite, ordered material having sharp surface features

    DOEpatents

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2006-12-19

    A composite material having sharp surface features includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a sharp surface feature. The sharp surface features can be coated to make the surface super-hydrophobic.

  1. Cross coupling between electric and magnetic orders in a multiferroic metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ying; Stroppa, Alessandro; Chai, Yisheng; Yan, Liqin; Wang, Shouguo; Barone, Paolo; Picozzi, Silvia; Sun, Young

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of both electric and magnetic orders in some metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has yielded a new class of multiferroics beyond inorganic materials. However, the coupling between two orders in multiferroic MOFs has not been convincingly verified yet. Here we present clear experimental evidences of cross coupling between electric and magnetic orders in a multiferroic MOF [(CH3)2NH2]Fe(HCOO)3 with a perovskite structure. The dielelectric constant exhibit a hump just at the magnetic ordering temperature TN. Moreover, both the direct (magnetic field control of dielectric properties) and converse (electric field control of magnetization) magnetoelectric effects have been observed in the multiferroic state. This work opens up new insights on the origin of ferroelectricity in MOFs and highlights their promise as magnetoelectric multiferroics. PMID:25317819

  2. Development of electroplated magnetic materials for MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, N. V.; Sumadjo, P. T. A.; Park, D. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Soft ferromagnetic materials have thus far found the most utility in magnetic-MEMS, because the technologies necessary for depositing and micromachining them have been well developed previously by the data storage industry.

  3. High-strength magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detert, K.

    1970-01-01

    Two new precipitation-hardened magnetic alloys are suitable for operation in 800 to 1600 deg F range. One is a martensitic alloy and the other a cobalt-based alloy. They possess improved creep resistance and have application in high temperature inductors and alternators.

  4. Driving magnetic order in a manganite by ultrafast lattice excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Först, M.; Tobey, R. I.; Wall, S.; Bromberger, H.; Khanna, V.; Cavalieri, A. L.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, W. S.; Moore, R.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Krupin, O.; Trigo, M.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J. F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Hill, J. P.; Cavalleri, A.

    2011-12-01

    Femtosecond midinfrared pulses are used to directly excite the lattice of the single-layer manganite La0.5Sr1.5MnO4. Magnetic and orbital orders, as measured by femtosecond resonant soft x-ray diffraction with an x-ray free-electron laser, are reduced within a few picoseconds. This effect is interpreted as a displacive exchange quench, a prompt shift in the equilibrium value of the magnetic- and orbital-order parameters after the lattice has been distorted. Control of magnetism through ultrafast lattice excitation may be of use for high-speed optomagnetism.

  5. Magnetic ordering temperature of nanocrystalline Gd: enhancement of magnetic interactions via hydrogenation-induced "negative" pressure.

    PubMed

    Tereshina, E A; Khmelevskyi, S; Politova, G; Kaminskaya, T; Drulis, H; Tereshina, I S

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium is a nearly ideal soft-magnetic material. However, one cannot take advantage of its properties at temperatures higher than the room temperature where Gd loses the ferromagnetic ordering. By using high-purity bulk samples with grains ~200 nm in size, we present proof-of-concept measurements of an increased Curie point (TC) and spontaneous magnetization in Gd due to hydrogenation. From first-principles we explain increase of TC in pure Gd due to the addition of hydrogen. We show that the interplay of the characteristic features in the electronic structure of the conduction band at the Fermi level in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase of Gd and "negative" pressure exerted by hydrogen are responsible for the observed effect. PMID:26931775

  6. Replacing critical rare earth materials in high energy density magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, R. William

    2012-02-01

    High energy density permanent magnets are crucial to the design of internal permanent magnet motors (IPM) for hybride and electric vehicles and direct drive wind generators. Current motor designs use rare earth permanent magnets which easily meet the performance goals, however, the rising concerns over cost and foreign control of the current supply of rare earth resources has motivated a search for non-rare earth based permanent magnets alloys with performance metrics which allow the design of permanent magnet motors and generators without rare earth magnets. This talk will discuss the state of non-rare-earth permanent magnets and efforts to both improve the current materials and find new materials. These efforts combine first principles calculations and meso-scale magnetic modeling with advance characterization and synthesis techniques in order to advance the state of the art in non rare earth permanent magnets. The use of genetic algorithms in first principle structural calculations, combinatorial synthesis in the experimental search for materials, atom probe microscopy to characterize grain boundaries on the atomic level, and other state of the art techniques will be discussed. In addition the possibility of replacing critical rare earth elements with the most abundant rare earth Ce will be discussed.

  7. Cation Ordering in Li[NixMnxCo(1-2x)]O2-Layered Cathode Materials: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Pair Distribution Function, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and Electrochemical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng,D.; Cabana, J.; Breger, J.; Yoon, W.; Grey, C.

    2007-01-01

    Several members of the compositional series Li[NixMnxCo(1-2x)]O2 (0.01 = x = 1/3) were synthesized and characterized. X-ray diffraction results confirm the presence of the layered a-NaFeO2-type structure, while X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy experiments verify the presence of Ni2+, Mn4+, and Co3+. Their local environment and short-range ordering were investigated by using a combination of 6Li magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and neutron pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, associated with reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) calculations. The 6Li MAS NMR spectra of compounds with low Ni/Mn contents (x = 0.10) show several well-resolved resonances, which start to merge when the amount of Ni and Mn increases, finally forming a broad resonance at high Ni/Mn contents. Analysis of the 6Li MAS NMR 6Li[Ni0.02Mn0.02Co0.96]O2 spectrum, is consistent with the formation of Ni2+ and Mn4+ clusters within the transition-metal layers, even at these low-doping levels. The oxidation state of Ni in this high Co content sample strongly depends upon the Li/transition metal ratio of the starting materials. Neutron PDF analysis of the highest Ni/Mn content sample Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2 shows a tendency for Ni cations to be close to Mn cations in the first coordination shell; however, the Co3+ ions are randomly distributed. Analysis of the intensity of the 'LiCoO2' resonance, arising from Li surrounded by Co3+ in its first two cation coordination shells, for the whole series provides further evidence for a nonrandom distribution of the transition-metal cations. The presence of the insulator-to-metal transition seen in the electrochemical profiles of these materials upon charging correlates strongly with the concentration of the 'LiCoO2' resonance.

  8. Location of laccase in ordered mesoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoral, Álvaro; Gascón, Victoria; Blanco, Rosa M.; Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos; Díaz, Isabel

    2014-11-01

    The functionalization with amine groups was developed on the SBA-15, and its effect in the laccase immobilization was compared with that of a Periodic Mesoporous Aminosilica. A method to encapsulate the laccase in situ has now been developed. In this work, spherical aberration (Cs) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with high angle annular dark field detector and electron energy loss spectroscopy were applied to identify the exact location of the enzyme in the matrix formed by the ordered mesoporous solids.

  9. Interactions of Plutonium and Lanthanides with Ordered Mesoporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi

    Ordered mesoporous materials are porous solids with a regular, patterned structure composed of pores between 2 and 50 nm wide. Such materials have attracted much attention in the past twenty years because the chemistry of their synthesis allows control of their unique physicochemical properties, which can be tuned for a variety of applications. Generally, ordered mesoporous materials have very high specific surface areas and pore volumes, and offer unique structures that are neither crystalline nor amorphous. The large tunable interface provided by ordered mesoporous solids may be advantageous in applications involving sequestration, separation, or detection of actinides and lanthanides in solution. However, the fundamental chemical interactions of actinides and lanthanides must be understood before applications can be implemented. This dissertation focuses primarily on the fundamental interactions of plutonium with organically modified mesoporous silica, as well as several different porous carbon materials, both untreated and chemically oxidized. A method for functionalizing mesoporous silica by self assembly and molecular grafting of functional organosilane ligands was optimized for the 2D-hexagonal ordered mesoporous silica known as SBA-15 (Santa Barbara amorphous silica). Four different organically-modified silica materials were synthesized and characterized with several techniques. To confirm that covalent bonds were formed between the silane anchor of the ligand and the silica substrate, functionalized silica samples were analyzed with 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Infrared spectroscopy was used in combination with 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to verify the molecular structures of the ligands after they were synthesized and grafted to the silica. The densities of the functional silane ligands on the silica surface were estimated using thermogravimetric analysis. Batch sorption experiments were conducted with solutions of

  10. Dynamic magnetic susceptibility of systems with long-range magnetic order

    SciTech Connect

    Vannette, Matthew Dano

    2009-01-01

    The utility of the TDR as an instrument in the study of magnetically ordered materials has been expanded beyond the simple demonstration purposes. Results of static applied magnetic field dependent measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility, χ, of various ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials showing a range of transition temperatures (1-800 K) are presented. Data was collected primarily with a tunnel diode resonator (TDR) at different radio-frequencies (~10-30 MHz). In the vicinity of TC local moment ferromagnets show a very sharp, narrow peak in χ which is suppressed in amplitude and shifted to higher temperatures as the static bias field is increased. Unexpectedly, critical scaling analysis fails for these data. It is seen that these data are frequency dependent, however there is no simple method whereby measurement frequency can be changed in a controllable fashion. In contrast, itinerant ferromagnets show a broad maximum in χ well below TC which is suppressed and shifts to lower temperatures as the dc bias field is increased. The data on itinerant ferromagnets is fitted to a semi-phenomenological model that suggests the sample response is dominated by the uncompensated minority spins in the conduction band. Concluding remarks suggest possible scenarios to achieve frequency resolved data using the TDR as well as other fields in which the apparatus may be exploited.

  11. Location of laccase in ordered mesoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, Álvaro; Gascón, Victoria; Blanco, Rosa M.; Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos; Díaz, Isabel

    2014-11-01

    The functionalization with amine groups was developed on the SBA-15, and its effect in the laccase immobilization was compared with that of a Periodic Mesoporous Aminosilica. A method to encapsulate the laccase in situ has now been developed. In this work, spherical aberration (C{sub s}) corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with high angle annular dark field detector and electron energy loss spectroscopy were applied to identify the exact location of the enzyme in the matrix formed by the ordered mesoporous solids.

  12. Deflagration, fronts of tunneling, and dipolar ordering in molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, Dmitry

    2011-03-01

    Although there is no exchange interaction in crystals of molecular magnets characterized by a giant effective spin S (S = 10 for Mn 12 , and Fe 8) , magnetic field B (D) generated by magnetic moments g μ B S of magnetic molecules creates energy bias W (D) = 2 Sg μ BB (D) on a molecule that largely exceeds the tunnelling splitting Δ of matching quantum states on different sides of the anisotropy barrier. Thus the dipolar field has a profound influence on the processes of tunnelling and relaxation in molecular magnets. Both theoretical and experimental works showed a slow non-exponential relaxation of the magnetization in both initially ordered and completely disordered states since most of the spins are off tunneling resonance at any time. Recently a new mode of relaxation via tunneling has been found, the so-called fronts of tunneling, in which (within a 1 d theoretical model) dipolar field adjusts so that spins are on resonance within the broad front core. In this ``laminar'' regime fronts of tunnelling are moving fast at speeds that can exceed that of the temperature-driven magnetic deflagration, if a sufficiently strong transverse field is applied. However, a ``non-laminar'' regime has also been found in which instability causes spins to go off resonance and the front speed drops. In a combination with magnetic deflagration, the laminar regime becomes more stable and exists in the whole dipolar window 0 <= W <=W (D) on the external bias W , where the deflagration speed strongly increases. Another dipolar effect in molecular magnets is dipolar ordering below 1 K that has recently been shown to be non-uniform because of formation of magnetic domains. An object of current research is possible non-uniformity of magnetic deflagration and tunneling fronts via domain instability that could influence their speed.

  13. Microscopic Materials on a Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images show a comparison of the weak magnet OM7 from the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander before (left) and after (right) soil deposition.

    The microscope took the left image during Phoenix's Sol 15 (June 10, 2008) and the right image during Sol 21 (Jun 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Levitating a Magnet Using a Superconductive Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juergens, Frederick H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the materials and a procedure for demonstrating the levitation of a magnet above a superconducting material. The demonstration can be projected with an overhead projector for a large group of students. Kits to simplify the demonstration can be purchased from the Institute for Chemical Education of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.…

  15. Magnetic Levitational Assembly for Living Material Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Tasoglu, Savas; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Liaudanskaya, Volha; Guven, Sinan; Migliaresi, Claudio; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-15

    Functional living materials with microscale compositional topographies are prevalent in nature. However, the creation of biomaterials composed of living micro building blocks, each programmed by composition, functionality, and shape, is still a challenge. A powerful yet simple approach to create living materials using a levitation-based magnetic method is presented. PMID:25872008

  16. Search for magnetic monopoles in lunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Eberhard, P. H.; Ross, R. R.; Watt, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles in 19.8 kg. of lunar material returned by Apollo 11, 12 and 14 missions were investigated. The search was done with a detector which is capable of detecting any single monopole of any charge equal to or larger than the minimum value compatible with Dirac's theory. Two experiments were performed, each one with different lunar material. In each experiment the lunar material was divided into several measurement samples. No monopole was found. The magnetic charge of each sample was consistent with zero.

  17. Electrically tuned magnetic order and magnetoresistance in a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Guo, Minghua; Li, Kang; Zhang, Jinsong; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Wang, Lili; Chen, Xi; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Wang, Yayu

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between topological protection and broken time reversal symmetry in topological insulators may lead to highly unconventional magnetoresistance behaviour that can find unique applications in magnetic sensing and data storage. However, the magnetoresistance of topological insulators with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the transport properties of a ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film fabricated into a field effect transistor device. We observe a complex evolution of gate-tuned magnetoresistance, which is positive when the Fermi level lies close to the Dirac point but becomes negative at higher energies. This trend is opposite to that expected from the Berry phase picture, but is intimately correlated with the gate-tuned magnetic order. The underlying physics is the competition between the topology-induced weak antilocalization and magnetism-induced negative magnetoresistance. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and magnetoresistance facilitates future topological insulator based spintronic devices. PMID:25222696

  18. Magnetic behavior in an ordered Co nanorod array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Wang, Y.; Fu, Y.; Hasegawa, T.; Oshima, H.; Itoh, K.; Nishio, K.; Masuda, H.; Li, F. S.; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2008-11-01

    The magnetization reversal process of an ordered Co nanorod array is shown using the images obtained from successive in-field magnetic force microscope (MFM) measurements. The magnetization reversal model is discussed according to local and whole magnetization reversal properties measured by the polar magneto-optical Kerr effect (PMOKE) and an alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM), respectively. Additionally, the dipolar field was probed using in-field MFM measurements. By removing the effect of the dipolar field, an intrinsic switching field distribution (SFD) is shown in a map with a hexagonal array. A detailed study of the dipolar field in ordered nanorod arrays with various diameters and pitches was carried out by numerical calculations.

  19. Magnetic properties of Martian surface material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-06-01

    The hypothesis that the magnetic properties of the Martian surface material are due to the production of a magnetic phase in the clay mineral nontronite by transient shock heating is examined. In the course of the investigation a magnetic material is produced with rather unusual properties. Heating from 900 C to 1000 C, of natural samples of nontronite leads first to the production of what appears to be Si doped maghemite gamma (-Fe2O3). Although apparently metastable, the growth of gamma -Fe2O3 at these temprtures is unexpected, and its relative persistence of several hours at 1000 C is most surprising. Continued annealing of this material for longer periods promote the crystallization of alpha Fe2O3 and cristobalite (high temperature polymorph of SiO2). All available data correlate this new magnetic material with the cristobalite hence our naming it magnetic ferri cristobalite. Formation of this magnetic cristobalite, however, may require topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  20. Magnetic properties of Martian surface material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis that the magnetic properties of the Martian surface material are due to the production of a magnetic phase in the clay mineral nontronite by transient shock heating is examined. In the course of the investigation a magnetic material is produced with rather unusual properties. Heating from 900 C to 1000 C, of natural samples of nontronite leads first to the production of what appears to be Si doped maghemite gamma (-Fe2O3). Although apparently metastable, the growth of gamma -Fe2O3 at these temprtures is unexpected, and its relative persistence of several hours at 1000 C is most surprising. Continued annealing of this material for longer periods promote the crystallization of alpha Fe2O3 and cristobalite (high temperature polymorph of SiO2). All available data correlate this new magnetic material with the cristobalite hence our naming it magnetic ferri cristobalite. Formation of this magnetic cristobalite, however, may require topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  1. Low Temperature Magnetic Ordering of the Magnetic Ionic Plastic Crystal, Choline[FeCl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pedro, I.; García-Saiz, A.; Andreica, D.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Blanco, J. A.; Amato, A.; Rodríguez Fernández, J.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the nature of the low temperature magnetic ordering of a magnetic ionic plastic crystal, Choline[FeCl4]. This investigation was carried out using heat capacity measurements, neutron diffraction experiments and muon spin relaxation (μSR) spectroscopy. The calorimetric measurements show the onset of an unusual magnetic ordering below 4 K with a possible second magnetic phase transition below 2 K. Low temperature neutron diffraction data reveal a three dimensional antiferromagnetic ordering at 2 K compatible with the previous magnetometry results. The analysis of μSR spectra indicates a magnetic phase transition below 2.2 K. At 1.6 K, the analysis of the shape of the μSR spectra suggests the existence of an additional magnetic phase with features of a possible incommensurate magnetic structure.

  2. Ferromagnetic ordering in NpAl2: Magnetic susceptibility and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Griveau, J.-C.; Eloirdi, R.; Selfslag, C.; Colineau, E.; Caciuffo, R.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of the neptunium based ferromagnetic compound NpAl2. We used magnetization measurements and 27Al NMR spectroscopy to access magnetic features related to the paramagnetic and ordered states (TC=56 K). While very precise DC SQUID magnetization measurements confirm ferromagnetic ordering, they show a relatively small hysteresis loop at 5 K reduced with a coercive field HCo~3000 Oe. The variable offset cumulative spectra (VOCS) acquired in the paramagnetic state show a high sensitivity of the 27Al nuclei spectral parameters (Knight shifts and line broadening) to the ferromagnetic ordering, even at room temperature.

  3. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  4. Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Charles M. Falco

    2012-09-13

    This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

  5. Porphyrins as Second Order Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Homer

    Because of the unusually high thermal and chemical stability of porphyrins as well as their very large pi-conjugated systems, three classes of high beta-value push-pull porphyrins were synthesized and subsequently successfully engineered into Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films for a systematic evaluation of porphyrins as chi^{(2)} materials. Class I explored the effects of the number of donor-acceptor groups on the porphyrin periphery (i.e., H_2(an_3P), H_2 (cis-a_2n_2P), H_2(a_3nP), H _2(a_4P) where a = 4-(N-octadecylamido)phenyl or 4-(N-octadecyl-amino)phenyl; n = 4-nitrophenyl; P = 5,10,15,20 substituted tetraarylporphyrinate (2-).). Class II examined the effect of varying the strength of cis-substituted donor-acceptor pairs on the porphyrin periphery (i.e., H_2(cis-a_2n _2P), H_2(cis-c _2p_2P), and H_2 (cis-h_2py_2P) where c = 4-(2-cholesteryloxy)-ethoxyphenyl; h = 4-hydroxyphenyl or 4-methoxyphenyl; and py = 4-pyridyl or 4-(N-octadecyl) pyridiniumyl). Class III looked at the respone of a heterosubstituted bis- push-pull cerium sandwich porphyrin complex, (Ce ^{IV}(TPyP)(TMeP)) ^{4+}I_4 (where Py = 4-(N-octadecyl)pyridiniumyl and Me = 4-methoxyphenyl). Characterization of the porphyrin LB films reveals rather surprising behavior. The isotherm data show that the mean molecular area of the porphyrins increase smoothly from 80-200A as the number of aliphatic chains increase around the porphyrin periphery from one to four. In addition, based on UV-visible linear dichroism, all of the porphyrin films possess C _{infty v} symmetry and adopt a tilt angle, theta, of about 33^circ with respect to the fused quartz substrate. The proposed fixed orientation model suggests that the interporphyrin pi -pi interactions dominate the porphyrin orientation while the number of aliphatic chains around the porphyrin periphery determines the porphyrin's packing density in the LB film. After these monolayers were transferred to fused quartz substrates, the chi^{(2)} response of these

  6. Magnetism, Magnetic Materials and their Applications III - Proceedings of the III Latin American Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leccabue, F.; Sagredo, V.

    1996-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Section I: Fundamental, Techniques and Materials * Magnetism in finite size Ising aggregates * Magnetic anisotropy in thin films * Magnetocrystalline anisotropy in rare earth intermetallics * Ferromagnetism vs Kondo effect in normal and superconducting CeTyX4-y * Magnetic phase transition and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of rare-earth transition-metal alloys * Giant magnetoresistance and related effects in multilayer and granular magnetic materials for practical applications * Magnetic properties of dilute PdMn alloys * TbFe amorphous thin films. Structural, magnetic and magnetoelastic studies * Nanophase exchange coupled alloys with enhanced hard magnetic properties * Exchange interactions in ferrimagnetic rare earth-transition metal multilayers * Superparamagnetic relaxation in interacting γ-Fe2O3 particles * Magnetic circular X-ray dichroism * Non-frustrated domains in Ising lattices with competing interactions * Thermomagnetic and X-ray diffraction analysis of Nd3Fe29-xTix and (Nd1-xYx)3Fe27.3Ti1.7 alloys * Electron paramagnetic resonance above the ordering temperature in La1-xCaxMnO3+δ * Spin-polarisation at Cr/Fe and Mn/Fe interfaces * Interplay of segregation, phase separation and magnetism in cobalt-copper slabs * High temperature behaviour of amorphous and nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials * Preparation of magnetic oxide thin films * Magnetic interactions in enhanced-remanence permanent magnets * Section II: Poster Session : Fundamental, Techniques and Materials * Magnetic properties in inorganic materials * Thermoreflactance measurements on Cd1-xCoxSe magnetic semiconductors * Analytical solutions of the NCA equations for the Coqblin-Schrieffer model in the zero temperature limit * Magneto-structural and spectroscopic investigation of MnxCd1-xIn2Te4 solid solutions * Magnetic after-effect processes in barium hexagonal ferrites * Electron paramagnetic resonance in PtFe alloys

  7. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Frank

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  8. Multiferroic BaCoF4 in Thin Film Form: Ferroelectricity, Magnetic Ordering, and Strain.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent A; García-Castro, Andrés Camilo; KC, Amit; Schrecongost, Dustin; Cen, Cheng; Romero, Aldo H; Lederman, David

    2016-02-01

    Multiferroic materials have simultaneous magnetic and ferroelectric long-range orders and can be potentially useful for a wide range of applications. Conventional ferroelectricity in oxide perovskites favors nonmagnetic electronic configurations of transition metal ions, thus limiting the number of intrinsic multiferroic materials. On the other hand, this is not necessarily true for multiferroic fluorides. Using molecular beam epitaxy, we demonstrate for the first time that the multiferroic orthorhombic fluoride BaCoF4 can be synthesized in thin film form. Ferroelectric hysteresis measurements and piezoresponse force microscopy show that the films are indeed ferroelectric. From structural information, magnetic measurements, and first-principles calculations, a modified magnetic ground state is identified which can be represented as a combination of bulk collinear antiferromagnetism with two additional canted spin orders oriented along orthogonal axes of the BaCoF4 unit cell. The calculations indicate that an anisotropic epitaxial strain is responsible for this unusual magnetic ground state. PMID:26745210

  9. High performance electrical, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and nanorods

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit , Kang; Sukill

    2012-02-21

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  10. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-10-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18-21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials.

  11. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18–21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  12. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Jair C C; Scopel, Wanderlã L; Paz, Wendel S; Bernardes, Leandro V; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitanić, Tonči; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at (13)C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18-21 T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  13. NMR study of new ruthenates with high magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, P. L.; Chakrabarty, Tanmoy

    The Ru based compounds, Ca3LiRuO6 and Ca3NaRuO6 show unusually high magnetic ordering temperature. Extended super exchange model is invoked to explain the magnetic behavior in the isostructural compound Ca3LiOsO6. We have carried out NMR investigation on these two Ru-based compounds. Ca3LiRuO6 is a weak ferromagnet with a magnetic ordering temperature (TC) of 115 K which is explored by the temperature dependence of 7Li NMR line shift, line-width and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) . Above TC, a broad maximum is observed in the evolution of line-width of the spectra. We speculate that this feature might be attributed to some low-dimensional magnetic behavior. Contrastingly, Ca3NaRuO6 with similar structure and local geometry of the Ru5+ ions is a conventional antiferromagnet with a transition temperature of 90 K. The temperature dependence of 23Na NMR line shift and 1/T1 is studied across magnetic transition in Ca3NaRuO6. The temperature variation of line-width is found to be different compared to Ca3LiRuO6. In both these systems, 1/T1 decreases significantly below ordering temperature, characteristic of many antiferromagnetic systems.

  14. Magnetic Alignment and Charge Transport Improvement in Functional Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.

    The realization of nanostructured functional materials by self-assembly in polymers and polymer nanocomposites is adversely affected by persisting structural defects which greatly diminish the performance of the material. The use of magnetic fields to impose long-range order is investigated in three distinct systems - ion-conducting block copolymers, semiconducting nanowire-polymer composites and lyotropic surfactant mesophases. The alignment process is quantitatively studied with X-ray scattering and microscopic methods. Time and temperature resolved data collected in situ during the magnetic experiments provide an insight into the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process. These data together with simultaneous electrical conductivity measurements allow relating fundamental structural properties (e.g., morphology and long-range order) to transport properties (i.e., conductivity). In particular, it is demonstrated that magnetic fields offer a viable route for improvement of electric conductivity in these systems. More than an order of magnitude increase in conductivity is recorded in magnetically-annealed materials. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered solid polymer electrolyte membranes, heterojunction photovoltaic devices and generally help to understand charge transport mechanisms in anisotropic heterogeneous systems.

  15. Magnetic field induced 1st order transitions: Recent studies, and some new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddah, P.

    2015-05-01

    Phase transitions are caused by varying temperature, or pressure, or magnetic field. The observation of 1st order magneto-structural transitions has created application possibilities based on magnetoresistance, magnetocaloric effect, magnetic shape memory effect, and magneto-dielectric effect. Magnetic field induced transitions, and phase coexistence of competing magnetic phases down to the lowest temperature, gained prominence over a decade ago with theoretical models suggesting that the ground state is not homogeneous. Researchers at Indore pushed an alternative view that this phase coexistence could be due to glasslike "kinetic arrest" of a disorder-broadened first-order magnetic transition between two states with long-range magnetic order, resulting in phase coexistence down to the lowest temperatures. The CHUF (cooling and heating in unequal field) protocol created at Indore allows the observation of `devitrification', followed by `melting'. I show examples of measurements establishing kinetic arrest in various materials, emphasizing that glasslike arrest of 1st order magnetic transitions may be as ubiquitous as glass formation following the arrest of 1st order structural transitions.

  16. Chemisorption and magnetization: a bond order-rigid band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, R.; Salahub, D. R.

    1990-11-01

    We briefly review and analyze results of self-consistent LSD calculations on the effect of chemisorption of CO, H, O and C on the magnetism of nickel clusters. Guided by the similarities in these four cases, we propose a model which relates the change in magnetization of a ferromagnetic surface, caused by a chemisorbed species, to magnetic properties of the clean surface and to a qualitative description of the adsorbate-surface bond. The two key quantities in this model are the adsorbate-surface bond order and the spin polarization of the states at the Fermi energy. In the simplest version of this model, the bond order determines the number of electrons that will fill the metal band. In turn, the polarization of states at the Fermi energy determines how the electrons will partition in up and down spins. We contrast our model with the bond number model. Comparisons with experiments are made at a semi-quantitative level.

  17. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C. P.; Zhou, Yan

    2014-03-15

    Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  18. Emergent long-range magnetic ordering in manganite superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burganov, Bulat; Macke, Sebastian; Monkman, Eric; Adamo, Carolina; Shai, Daniel; Schlom, Darrell; Sawatzky, George; Shen, Kyle

    2015-03-01

    Complex oxides composed into atomically precise heterostructures host a plethora of new phenomena driven by interface effects, dimensionality, correlations and strain. An example is emergent ferromagnetism in the superlattices (SL) of LaMnO3/SrMnO3 and the dimensionality-driven metal insulator transition, still not well understood theoretically. We use soft x-ray scattering combined with SQUID magnetometry to determine the magnetic and orbital ordering in the (LaMnO3)2n /(SrMnO3)n SL for n =1,2,3,4. By composition this system is close to colossal-magnetoresistive La2/3Sr1/3MnO3, an FM metal below 400K. The system undergoes a metal-insulator transition with higher n and is believed to have a complex magnetic ordering. We observe an unexpected long-range order in the n =4 sample where the magnetic period is equal to two chemical periods. The observed half-order Bragg peaks show strong linear and no circular dichroism. The temperature and polarization dependence of reflectometry points towards alignment between A-type AFM orders in the neighboring LaMnO3 layers, which is very unusual and indicates a long range interaction acting across the thick SrMnO3 layers with nominally G-type spin configuration. We simulate the reflectometry data for several model spin configurations to further elucidate the nature of this ordering.

  19. Magnetization and magnetostriction in highly magnetostrictive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thoelke, J.B.

    1993-05-26

    The majority of this research has been in developing a model to describe the magnetostrictive properties of Terfenol-D, Tb{sub 1{minus}x}Dy{sub x}Fe{sub y} (x = 0.7-0.75 and y = 1.8--2.0), a rare earth-iron alloy which displays much promise for use in device applications. In the first chapter an introduction is given to the phenomena of magnetization and magnetostriction. The magnetic processes responsible for the observed magnetic properties of materials are explained. An overview is presented of the magnetic properties of rare earths, and more specifically the magnetic properties of Terfenol-D. In the second chapter, experimental results are presented on three composition of Tb{sub 1{minus}x}Dy{sub x}Fe{sub y} with x = 0.7, y= 1.9, 1.95, and x= 0.73, y= 1.95. The data were taken for various levels of prestress to show the effects of composition and microstructure on the magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Terfenol-D. In the third chapter, a theoretical model is developed based on the rotation of magnetic domains. The model is used to explain the magnetic and magnetostrictive properties of Terfenol-D, including the observed negative strictions and large change in strain. The fourth chapter goes on to examine the magnetic properties of Terfenol-D along different crystallographic orientations. In the fifth chapter initial data are presented on the time dependence of magnetization in nickel.

  20. Magnetic field induced third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation in a ZnMgSe strained quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J. Abraham Hudson Peter, A. John

    2014-04-24

    Third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation is investigated in a Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se/Zn{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}Se/Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se quantum well in the presence of magnetic field strength. The confinement potential is considered as the addition of energy offsets of the conduction band (or valence band) and the strain-induced potential in our calculations. The material dependent effective mass is followed throughout the computation because it has a high influence on the electron energy levels in low dimensional semiconductor systems.

  1. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  2. Giant magnetoresistance materials for magnetic recording technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Adams, C.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work focused on a class of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca, Ba, or Sr) that exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition near a ferromagnetic phase transition temperature. This yields a very large magnetoresistance; thus these materials may have important uses as magnetic sensors in a variety of applications, ranging from automobiles to read heads for magnetic storage. In addition, the transport current in the ferromagnetic state is likely to be very highly polarized, which means that additional device applications using the phenomena of spin-polarized tunneling can be envisioned. Use of these materials as magnetic sensors depends upon learning to control the synthesis parameters (principally temperature, pressure and composition) to achieve a specific carrier concentration and/or mobility. A second challenge is the high magnetic fields ({ge}1 Tesla) currently required to achieve a large change in resistance. The authors began an investigation of two novel approaches to this field-sensitivity problem, involving the development of multilayer structures of the TMO materials. Finally, they began to explore the use of epitaxial strain as a means of changing the transport properties in thin-film multilayers.

  3. Second-order magnetic critical points at finite magnetic fields: Revisiting Arrott plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustingorry, S.; Pomiro, F.; Aurelio, G.; Curiale, J.

    2016-06-01

    The so-called Arrott plot, which consists in plotting H /M against M2, with H the applied magnetic field and M the magnetization, is used to extract valuable information in second-order magnetic phase transitions. Besides, it is widely accepted that a negative slope in the Arrott plot is indicative of a first-order magnetic transition. This is known as the Banerjee criterion. In consequence, the zero-field transition temperature T* is reported as the characteristic first-order transition temperature. By carefully analyzing the mean-field Landau model used for studying first-order magnetic transitions, we show in this work that T* corresponds in fact to a triple point where three first-order lines meet. More importantly, this analysis reveals the existence of two symmetrical second-order critical points at finite magnetic field (Tc,±Hc) . We then show that a modified Arrott plot can be used to obtain information about these second-order critical points. To support this idea we analyze experimental data on La2 /3Ca1 /3MnO3 and discuss an estimate for the location of the triple point and the second-order critical points.

  4. Phonon induced magnetism in ionic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Oscar D.; Antolin, Nikolas; Jin, Hyungyu; Heremans, Joseph P.; Windl, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric phenomena in magnetic materials create exciting possibilities in future spin caloritronic devices by manipulating spin information using heat. An accurate understanding of the spin-lattice interactions, i.e. the coupling between magnetic excitations (magnons) and lattice vibrations (phonons), holds the key to unraveling their underlying physics. We report ab initio frozen-phonon calculations of CsI that result in non-zero magnetization when the degeneracy between spin-up and spin-down electronic density of states is lifted for certain phonon displacement patterns. For those, the magnetization as a function of atomic displacement shows a sharp resonance due to the electronic states on the displaced Cs atoms, while the electrons on indium form a continuous background magnetization. We relate this resonance to the generation of a two-level system in the spin-polarized Cs partial density of states as a function of displacement, which we propose to be described by a simple resonant-susceptibility model. Current work extends these investigations to semiconductors such as InSb. ODR and WW are supported by the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF MRSEC at OSU (Grant DMR-0820414).HJ and JPH are supported by AFOSR MURI Cryogenic Peltier Cooling, Contract #FA9550-10-1-0533.

  5. Dynamic Characterization of Thin Film Magnetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei

    A broadband dynamic method for characterizing thin film magnetic material is presented. The method is designed to extract the permeability and linewidth of thin magnetic films from measuring the reflection coefficient (S11) of a house-made and short-circuited strip line testing fixture with or without samples loaded. An adaptive de-embedding method is applied to remove the parasitic noise of the housing. The measurements were carried out with frequency up to 10GHz and biasing magnetic fields up to 600 Gauss. Particular measurement setup and 3-step experimental procedures are described in detail. The complex permeability of a 330nm thick continuous FeGaB, 435nm thick laminated FeGaB film and a 100nm thick NiFe film will be induced dynamically in frequency-biasing magnetic field spectra and compared with a theoretical model based on Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations and eddy current theories. The ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) phenomenon can be observed among these three magnetic materials investigated in this thesis.

  6. Cooperative Ordering and Kinetics of Cellulose Nanocrystal Alignment in a Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    De France, Kevin J; Yager, Kevin G; Hoare, Todd; Cranston, Emily D

    2016-08-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are emerging nanomaterials that form chiral nematic liquid crystals above a critical concentration (C*) and additionally orient within electromagnetic fields. The control over CNC alignment is significant for materials processing and end use; to date, magnetic alignment has been demonstrated using only strong fields over extended or arbitrary time scales. This work investigates the effects of comparatively weak magnetic fields (0-1.2 T) and CNC concentration (1.65-8.25 wt %) on the kinetics and degree of CNC ordering using small-angle X-ray scattering. Interparticle spacing, correlation length, and orientation order parameters (η and S) increased with time and field strength following a sigmoidal profile. In a 1.2 T magnetic field for CNC suspensions above C*, partial alignment occurred in under 2 min followed by slower cooperative ordering to achieve nearly perfect alignment in under 200 min (S = -0.499 where S = -0.5 indicates perfect antialignment). At 0.56 T, nearly perfect alignment was also achieved, yet the ordering was 36% slower. Outside of a magnetic field, the order parameter plateaued at 52% alignment (S = -0.26) after 5 h, showcasing the drastic effects of relatively weak magnetic fields on CNC alignment. For suspensions below C*, no magnetic alignment was detected. PMID:27407001

  7. Orbital nematic order and interplay with magnetism in the two-orbital Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentao; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H

    2015-06-10

    Motivated by the recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on FeSe and iron pnictide families of iron-based superconductors, we have studied the orbital nematic order and its interplay with antiferromagnetism within the two-orbital Hubbard model. We used random phase approximation (RPA) to calculate the dependence of the orbital and magnetic susceptibilities on the strength of interactions and electron density (doping). To account for strong electron correlations not captured by RPA, we further employed non-perturbative variational cluster approximation (VCA) capable of capturing symmetry broken magnetic and orbitally ordered phases. Both approaches show that the electron and hole doping affect the two orders differently. While hole doping tends to suppress both magnetism and orbital ordering, the electron doping suppresses magnetism faster. Crucially, we find a realistic parameter regime for moderate electron doping that stabilizes orbital nematicity in the absence of long-range antiferromagnetic order. This is reminiscent of the non-magnetic orbital nematic phase observed recently in FeSe and a number of iron pnictide materials and raises the possibility that at least in some cases, the observed electronic nematicity may be primarily due to orbital rather than magnetic fluctuations. PMID:25988222

  8. First-Order Particle Acceleration in Magnetically-driven Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  9. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  10. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  11. Magnetic mesoporous materials for removal of environmental wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Jinwoo; Um, Wooyong; Kim, Jaeyun; Joo, Jin; Lee, Jin Hyung; Kwak, Ja Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Changha; Lee, Hongshin; Addleman, Raymond S.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-09-15

    We have synthesized two different magnetic mesoporous materials that can be easily separated from aqueous solutions by applying a magnetic field. Synthesized magnetic mesoporous materials, Mag-SBA-15 (magnetic ordered mesoporous silica) and Mag-OMC (magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon), have a high loading capacity of contaminants due to high surface area of the supports and high magnetic activity due to the embedded iron oxide particles. Application of surface-modified Mag-SBA-15 was investigated for the collection of mercury from water. The mercury adsorption using Mag-SBA-15 was rapid during the initial contact time and reached a steady-state condition, with an uptake of approximately 97% after 7 hours. Application of Mag-OMC for collection of organics from water, using fluorescein as an easily trackable model analyte, was explored. The fluorescein was absorbed into Mag-OMC within minutes and the fluorescent intensity of solution was completely disappeared after an hour. In another application, Mag-SBA-15 was used as a host of tyrosinase, and employed as recyclable catalytic scaffolds for tyrosinase-catalyzed biodegradation of catechol. Tyrosinase aggregates in Mag-SBA-15, prepared in a two step process of tyrosinase adsorption and crosslinking, could be used repeatedly for catechol degradation with no serious loss of enzyme activity. Considering these results of cleaning up water from toxic inorganic, organic and biochemical contaminants, magnetic mesoporous materials have a great potential to be employed for the removal of environmental contaminants and potentially for the application in large-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  12. Size-Induced Chemical and Magnetic Ordering in Individual Fe-Au Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Pinaki; Manchanda, Priyanka; Kumar, Pankaj; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J; Kashyap, Arti; Skomski, Ralph; Sellmyer, David; Shield, Jeffrey E

    2014-08-26

    Formation of chemically ordered compounds of Fe and Au is inhibited in bulk materials due to their limited mutual solubility. However, here we report the formation of chemically ordered L12-type Fe3Au and FeAu3 compounds in Fe–Au sub-10 nm nanoparticles, suggesting that they are equilibrium structures in size-constrained systems. The stability of these L12-ordered Fe3Au and FeAu3 compounds along with a previously discovered L10-ordered FeAu has been explained by a size-dependent equilibrium thermodynamic model. Furthermore, the spin ordering of these three compounds has been computed using ab initio first-principle calculations. All ordered compounds exhibit a substantial magnetization at room temperature. The Fe3Au had a high saturation magnetization of about 143.6 emu/g with a ferromagnetic spin structure. The FeAu3 nanoparticles displayed a low saturation magnetization of about 11 emu/g. This suggests a antiferromagnetic spin structure, with the net magnetization arising from uncompensated surface spins. First-principle calculations using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP) indicate that ferromagnetic ordering is energetically most stable in Fe3Au, while antiferromagnetic order is predicted in FeAu and FeAu3, consistent with the experimental results.

  13. Magnetic surface states in high polarization materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Dowben, Peter A.

    2011-10-01

    Surfaces are often different materials, and typically have a different electronic structure from the bulk and since the dawn of surface science, surface-localized electronic states, surface states, have been extensively studied and investigated with growing accuracy. Of particular importance to spintronics are magnetic surface states. Interfaces will play a very important role in many spintronics devices, yet the interface properties are often ignored, poorly understood or badly characterized. For many nominally half metal materials, materials that in some ground state calculations exhibit 100% spin polarization, the magnetic surface states may significantly reduce the effective spin polarization. We review the magnetic surface states of several well known and often highly touted high spin polarized materials such as NiMnSb, Fe3O4, CoS2 and CrO2. Finally, we summarize surface state measurements of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets Cr2O3, which has electrically controllable net surface spins, a major complication to the study of CrO2 by photoemission.

  14. Emerging magnetic order in platinum atomic contacts and chains

    PubMed Central

    Strigl, Florian; Espy, Christopher; Bückle, Maximilian; Scheer, Elke; Pietsch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The development of atomic-scale structures revealing novel transport phenomena is a major goal of nanotechnology. Examples include chains of atoms that form while stretching a transition metal contact or the predicted formation of magnetic order in these chains, the existence of which is still debated. Here we report an experimental study of the magneto-conductance (MC) and anisotropic MC with atomic-size contacts and mono-atomic chains of the nonmagnetic metal platinum. We find a pronounced and diverse MC behaviour, the amplitude and functional dependence change when stretching the contact by subatomic distances. These findings can be interpreted as a signature of local magnetic order in the chain, which may be of particular importance for the application of atomic-sized contacts in spintronic devices of the smallest possible size. PMID:25649440

  15. Magnetism of directly ordered Sm-Co clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Balamurugan, B; Skomski, R; Li, XZ; Hadjipanayis, GC; Sellmyer, DJ

    2012-04-01

    Sm-Co bulk alloys have shown superior permanent-magnet properties, but research on Sm-Co nanoparticles is challenging because of the need to control particle size, size-distribution, crystalline ordering, and phase purity. In the present study, a cluster-deposition method was used to produce Sm-Co nanoparticles having desired crystal structures without the requirement of subsequent high-temperature thermal annealing. Poorly crystallized SmCo5 nanoparticles exhibit a low room-temperature coercivity of only 100 Oe, whereas crystalline SmCo5 and Sm2Co17 nanoparticles show room-temperature coercivities of 2000 and 750 Oe, respectively. The direct synthesis of Sm-Co nanoparticles having sizes of less than 10 nm and a high degree of atomic ordering is an important step toward creating nanoparticle building blocks for permanent-magnets and other significant applications. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3677668

  16. Optimizing Energy Conversion: Magnetic Nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Dylan; Dann, Martin; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2015-03-01

    We present herein the work started at SUNY Oswego as a part of a SUNY 4E grant. The SUNY 4E Network of Excellence has awarded SUNY Oswego and collaborators a grant to carry out extensive studies on magnetic nanoparticles. The focus of the study is to develop cost effective rare-earth-free magnetic materials that will enhance energy transmission performance of various electrical devices (solar cells, electric cars, hard drives, etc.). The SUNY Oswego team has started the preliminary work for the project and graduate students from the rest of the SUNY 4E team (UB, Alfred College, Albany) will continue the project. The preliminary work concentrates on analyzing the properties of magnetic nanoparticle candidates, calculating molecular orbitals and band gap, and the fabrication of thin films. SUNY 4E Network of Excellence Grant.

  17. Fingerprinting Magnetic Nanostructures by First Order Reversal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai

    2007-03-01

    Realistic systems of magnetic nanostructures inevitably have inhomogeneities, which are manifested in distributions of magnetic properties, mixed magnetic phases, different magnetization reversal mechanisms, etc. The first order reversal curve (FORC) method [1-3] is ideally suited for ``fingerprinting'' such systems, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Here we present recent FORC studies on a few technologically important systems. In arrays of Fe nanodots [4], as the dot size decreases from 67 to 52nm, we have observed a vortex state to single-domain transition. Despite subtle changes in the major hysteresis loops, striking differences are seen in the FORC diagrams. The FORC method also gives quantitative measures of the magnetic phase fractions and vortex nucleation and annihilation fields. Furthermore, with decreasing temperature, it is more difficult to nucleate vortices within the dots and the single domain phase fraction increases. In exchange spring magnets [3], we have investigated the reversibility of the soft and hard layers and the interlayer exchange coupling. In FeNi/polycrystalline-FePt films, the FeNi and FePt layers reverse in a continuous process via a vertical spiral. In Fe/epitaxial-SmCo films, the reversal proceeds by a reversible rotation of the Fe soft layer, followed by an irreversible switching of the SmCo hard layer. As the SmCo partially demagnetizes, the Fe layer still remains reversible, as revealed by second order reversal curves (SORC). The exchange coupling between the two layers can be extracted as a function of the SmCo demagnetization state. These results demonstrate that FORC is a powerful method for magnetization reversal studies, due to its capability of capturing magnetic inhomogeneities, sensitivity to irreversible switching, and the quantitative phase information it can extract. Work done in collaboration with J. E. Davies, R. K. Dumas, J. Olamit, C. P. Li, I. V. Roshchin, I. K. Schuller, O. Hellwig, E. E. Fullerton, J. S

  18. Magnetoresistance and magnetic ordering in praseodymium and neodymium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, M. A.; Bogach, A. V.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, N. A.; Filipov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Sluchanko, N. E.

    2009-11-15

    The magnetoresistance {Delta}{rho}/{rho} of single-crystal samples of praseodymium and neodymium hexaborides (PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6}) has been measured at temperatures ranging from 2 to 20 K in a magnetic field of up to 80 kOe. The results obtained have revealed a crossover of the regime from a small negative magnetoresistance in the paramagnetic state to a large positive magnetoresistive effect in magnetically ordered phases of the PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6} compounds. An analysis of the dependences {Delta}{rho}(H)/{rho} has made it possible to separate three contributions to the magnetoresistance for the compounds under investigation. In addition to the main negative contribution, which is quadratic in the magnetic field (-{Delta}{rho}/{rho} {proportional_to} H{sup 2}), a linear positive contribution ({Delta}{rho}/{rho} {proportional_to} H) and a nonlinear ferromagnetic contribution have been found. Upon transition to a magnetically ordered state, the linear positive component in the magnetoresistance of the PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6} compounds becomes dominant, whereas the quadratic contribution to the negative magnetoresistance is completely suppressed in the commensurate magnetic phase of these compounds. The presence of several components in the magnetoresistance has been explained by assuming that, in the antiferromagnetic phases of PrB{sub 6} and NdB{sub 6}, ferromagnetic nanoregions (ferrons) are formed in the 5d band in the vicinity of the rareearth ions. The origin of the quadratic contribution to the negative magnetoresistance is interpreted in terms of the Yosida model, which takes into account scattering of conduction electrons by localized magnetic moments of rare-earth ions. Within the approach used, the local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub loc} has been estimated. It has been demonstrated that, in the temperature range T{sub N} < T < 20 K, the behavior of the local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub loc} for the compounds under investigation can

  19. Far-from-equilibrium magnetic granular layers: dynamic patterns, magnetic order and self-assembled swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    Ensembles of interacting particles subject to an external periodic forcing often develop nontrivial collective behavior and self-assembled dynamic patterns. We study emergent phenomena in magnetic granular ensembles suspended at a liquid-air and liquid-liquid interfaces and subjected to a transversal alternating magnetic field. Experiments reveal a new type of nontrivially ordered dynamic self-assembled structures (in particular, ``magnetic snakes'', ``asters'', ``clams'') emerging in such systems in a certain range of excitation parameters. These non-equilibrium dynamic structures emerge as a result of the competition between magnetic and hydrodynamic forces and have complex magnetic ordering. Transition between different self-assembled phases with parameters of external driving magnetic field is observed. I will show that above some frequency threshold magnetic snakes spontaneously break the symmetry of the self-induced surface flows (symmetry breaking instability) and turn into swimmers. Self-induced surface flows symmetry can be also broken in a controlled fashion by introduction of a large bead to a magnetic snake (bead-snake hybrid), that transforms it into a robust self-locomoting entity. Some features of the self-localized structures can be understood in the framework of an amplitude equation for parametric waves coupled to the conservation law equation describing the evolution of the magnetic particle density and the Navier-Stokes equation for hydrodynamic flows.

  20. Magnetic cassette for radiographic film material

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, D.

    1985-03-26

    A radiographic film cassette having a plurality of magnet components integral with the cassette holder for adhering the cassette to ferrous material in X-raying for defects in welds or fissures in shipyards, pipe lines, or the like. What is provided is a substantially flexible cassette envelope comprising first and second layers of radiographic intensifying screens with a sheet of radiographic film positioned therebetween. The cassette would be a cassette envelope constructed of waterproof fabric or other suitable material providing a light-free environment, and having the ability to flex around the curvature of the surface of a pipe or the like to be x-rayed. There is further provided a plurality of magnet components, preferably situated in each corner of the cassette envelope and flexibly attached thereto for overall adherence of the envelope to the surface of the pipe or the like to be x-rayed during the process.

  1. Magnetic order driven by orbital ordering in the semiconducting KFe1.5Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing; Yao, Dao-Xin

    2016-04-01

    The two-orbital Hubbard model is studied numerically by using the Hartree-Fock approximation in both real space and momentum space, and the ground-state properties of the alkali metal iron selenide semiconducting KFe1.5Se2 are investigated. A rhombus-type Fe vacancy order with stripetype antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is found, as was observed in neutron scattering experiments [J. Zhao, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 267003 (2012)]. Hopping parameters are obtained by fitting the experimentally observed stripe AFM phase in real space. These hopping parameters are then used to study the ground-state properties of the semiconductor in momentum space. It is found to be a strongly correlated system with a large on-site Coulomb repulsion U, similar to the AFM Mott insulator — the parent compound of copper oxide superconductors. We also find that the electronic occupation numbers and magnetizations in the d xz and d yz orbitals become different simultaneously when U > U c (˜3.4 eV), indicating orbital ordering. These results imply that the rotational symmetry between the two orbitals is broken by orbital ordering and thus drives the strong anisotropy of the magnetic coupling that has been observed by experiments and that the stripe-type AFM order in this compound may be caused by orbital ordering together with the observed large anisotropy.

  2. Metal-organic magnetic materials based on cobalt phthalocyanine and possibilities of their application in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Avetik R.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Kaliya, O. L.

    1999-04-01

    Cobalt phthalocyanines (CoPc), doped with sodium, exhibit ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature. Magnetic dilution or variation in dopant concentration leads to the formation of new magnetic materials. A proposed scheme of oncological disease treatment includes magnetic concentration of CoPc particles in the tumor zone and ascorbic acid injection into the organism for stimulation of oxidation reactions, which destroy the tumor.

  3. Magnetism in parent Fe-chalcogenides: quantum fluctuations select a plaquette order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Natalia; Ducatman, Samuel; Chubukov, Andrey

    2013-03-01

    The analysis of magnetism in parent compounds of iron-based superconductors (FeSCs) is an integral part of the program to understand the origin of superconductivity in these materials. Here we analyze magnetic order in iron-chalcogenide Fe1+yTe - the parent compound of high-temperature superconductor Fe1+yTe1-xSex. Neutron scattering experiments show that magnetic order in this material contains components with momentum Q1 = (π / 2 , π / 2) and Q2 = (π / 2 , - π / 2) in Fe-only Brillouin zone. The actual spin order depends on the interplay between these two components. Previous works argued that spin order is a single- Q state (either Q1 or Q2). Such an order breaks rotational C4 symmetry and order spins into a double diagonal stripe. We show that quantum fluctuations actually select another order - a double Q plaquette state with equal weight of Q1 and Q2 components, which preserves C4 symmetry but breaks Z4 translational symmetry. We argue that the plaquette state is consistent with recent neutron scattering experiments on Fe1+yTe. supported by the grant NSF-DMR-0844115

  4. Study of the effect of magnetic ordering on order-disorder transitions in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Ambika Prasad; Sanyal, Biplab; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2014-06-01

    We set up a mean-field approximation in a random Ising model characterized by two order parameters: the local sublattice magnetization and a mean-field occupation variable which act as an order parameter for the order-disorder transition. In the effective model Hamiltonian the two order-parameters are coupled. We solve the coupled equations arising from this to describe the total phase diagram. The exchange energies for FeCo alloys have then been accurately obtained from first-principles based on the technique of orbital peeling and a Monte Carlo analysis using a coupled Metropolis-Kawasaki updating has been carried out. Our results reasonably successfully agree with earlier experimental data.

  5. Hysteretic behavior and magnetic ordering in CeRuSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mydosh, J. A.; Strydom, A. M.; Baenitz, M.; Chevalier, B.; Hermes, W.; Pöttgen, R.

    2011-02-01

    We report the thermodynamic and transport properties of the newly synthesized Ce-intermetallic compound CeRuSn. This ternary stannide possesses an unconventional structure with two Ce sites at room temperature which exhibit different valencies. Just below room temperature there are large thermal hysteretic effects in the magnetic susceptibility, in the specific heat, as well as in electronic and heat transport properties suggesting the formation of an incommensurate charge density wave modulation whose q vector changes as a function of temperature. Our measurements indicate that one site displays magnetic Ce3+ behavior while the other is a valence fluctuator. At 2.7 K antiferromagnetic long-range order occurs within one-half of the Ce sites, e.g., the magnetic entropy of the transition is (1)/(2)Rln2. Below TN a series of metamagnetic transitions takes place in rather small fields (~1-2 T), leaving a magnetically fluctuating background. Such behavior is unique among the many Ce-transition-metal compounds.

  6. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L C; Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Guiblin, N; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M; Valencia, S

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  7. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  8. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-05-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics.

  9. Prominence material identified in magnetic cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuo; Marsch, E.; Tu, C.-Y.

    2010-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) often appear in coronagraph images as three-part structures composed of a leading bright front, a dark cavity and a bright core, which are believed to be associated with the sheath of compressed solar wind, the erupting magnetic flux rope and the cool and dense prominence plasma, respectively. However, a convincing identification of this three-part structure in the in-situ solar wind is extremely rare. Therefore, there still remains an open question as to what kind of signatures these three CME parts will reveal in the in situ data ([5]). Our work presents a clear identification of prominence material from in situ observations of the solar wind magnetic field and plasma parameters. The Helios 2 solar probe detected a magnetic cloud at 0.5 AU on 30 March 1976. In this event, we found a region with lower proton temperature and higher proton number density than outside, which is consistent with key features of a prominence as cold and dense solar material. During the same time we also found the occurrence of what possibly is He+, which is a special ion expected to occur only in prominence ejecta. Furthermore, the above observations were all made at a location related to the turning point of a bipolar structure of the interplanetary magnetic field, which is coincident with the notion that a solar prominence lies under the magnetic field lines of a bipolar region and is oriented along the neutral line. Furthermore, from our analysis of solar wind velocity distribution functions (VDFs) we can confirm by kinetic evidence that the plasma inside this special region is colder and more isotropic than outside. Above all, our observations circumstantially confirm the 3-part CME model as described in references [10] and [7].

  10. Nature of magnetic ordering in Ni(OH)2 nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rall, James; Seehra, Mohindar

    2009-03-01

    Nickel hydroxides are important for their potential applications in rechargeable batteries and as precursors for NiO and Ni catalysts. β--Ni(OH)2 has the CdI2 layered structure with Ni atoms forming a hexagonal unit cell. Here, we report on the magnetic ordering in 17 nm x 4 nm nanosheets of β--Ni(OH)2 . Measurements of the magnetization M as a function of temperature (2K to 300K) and magnetic field H up to ±65kOe are reported. M vs. T data in H =100 Oe for the ZFC case shows a peak in M at TN = 24 K characteristic of antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering; however for T > TN, the Curie-Weiss (χ = C/(T - θ)) fit yields θ = 26K characteristic of ferromagnetism. Following Takada (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 21, 2745, 1966), we measured M vs. H loops from T = 2K to 25K and observed a metamagnetic transition at Hc = 56 kOe at 2K, with Hc decreasing with increasing T. These results suggests strong ferromagnetic coupling among Ni within (001) sheets and a weaker antiferromagnetic coupling in the neighboring (001) sheets, and [001] as the easy axis. This model is used to determine the exchange constants consistent with the observed Curie-Weiss variation.

  11. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Phillips, L C; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Garcia, V; Fusil, S; Briddon, P R; Guiblin, N; Mougin, A; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Valencia, S; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics. PMID:24464245

  12. Electric-field control of magnetic order above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Phillips, L. C.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Garcia, V.; Fusil, S.; Briddon, P. R.; Guiblin, N.; Mougin, A.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Valencia, S.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2014-04-01

    Controlling magnetism by means of electric fields is a key issue for the future development of low-power spintronics. Progress has been made in the electrical control of magnetic anisotropy, domain structure, spin polarization or critical temperatures. However, the ability to turn on and off robust ferromagnetism at room temperature and above has remained elusive. Here we use ferroelectricity in BaTiO3 crystals to tune the sharp metamagnetic transition temperature of epitaxially grown FeRh films and electrically drive a transition between antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order with only a few volts, just above room temperature. The detailed analysis of the data in the light of first-principles calculations indicate that the phenomenon is mediated by both strain and field effects from the BaTiO3. Our results correspond to a magnetoelectric coupling larger than previous reports by at least one order of magnitude and open new perspectives for the use of ferroelectrics in magnetic storage and spintronics.

  13. Magnetic branes in third order Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Bostani, N.; Hendi, S. H.

    2008-09-15

    Considering both the nonlinear invariant terms constructed by the electromagnetic field and the Riemann tensor in gravity action, we obtain a new class of (n+1)-dimensional magnetic brane solutions in third order Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity. This class of solutions yields a spacetime with a longitudinal nonlinear magnetic field generated by a static source. These solutions have no curvature singularity and no horizons but have a conic geometry with a deficit angle {delta}. We find that, as the Born-Infeld parameter decreases, which is a measure of the increase of the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic field, the deficit angle increases. We generalize this class of solutions to the case of spinning magnetic solutions and find that, when one or more rotation parameters are nonzero, the brane has a net electric charge which is proportional to the magnitude of the rotation parameters. Finally, we use the counterterm method in third order Lovelock gravity and compute the conserved quantities of these spacetimes. We found that the conserved quantities do not depend on the Born-Infeld parameter, which is evident from the fact that the effects of the nonlinearity of the electromagnetic fields on the boundary at infinity are wiped away. We also find that the properties of our solution, such as deficit angle, are independent of Lovelock coefficients.

  14. Ordering and thermal excitations in dipolar coupled single domain magnet arrays (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östman, Erik; Arnalds, Unnar; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2015-09-01

    For a small island of a magnetic material the magnetic state of the island is mainly determined by the exchange interaction and the shape anisotropy. Two or more islands placed in close proximity will interact through dipolar interactions. The state of a large system will thus be dictated by interactions at both these length scales. Enabling internal thermal fluctuations, e.g. by the choice of material, of the individual islands allows for the study of thermal ordering in extended nano-patterned magnetic arrays [1,2]. As a result nano-magnetic arrays represent an ideal playground for the study of physical model systems. Here we present three different studies all having used magneto-optical imaging techniques to observe, in real space, the order of the systems. The first study is done on a square lattice of circular islands. The remanent magnetic state of each island is a magnetic vortex structure and we can study the temperature dependence of the vortex nucleation and annihilation fields [3]. The second are long chains of dipolar coupled elongated islands where the magnetization direction in each island only can point in one of two possible directions. This creates a system which in many ways mimics the Ising model [4] and we can relate the correlation length to the temperature. The third one is a spin ice system where elongated islands are placed in a square lattice. Thermal excitations in such systems resemble magnetic monopoles [2] and we can investigate their properties as a function of temperature and lattice parameters. [1] V. Kapaklis et al., New J. Phys. 14, 035009 (2012) [2] V. Kapaklis et al., Nature Nanotech 9, 514(2014) [3] E. Östman et al.,New J. Phys. 16, 053002 (2014) [4] E. Östman et al.,Thermal ordering in mesoscopic Ising chains, In manuscript.

  15. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C₃₂H₁₆MnN₈).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T(C)  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T(C) has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ' and χ″, near the quoted T(C). Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k(B)  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k(B)  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured |D|/  >  J. PMID:26954989

  16. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C32H16MnN8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T C  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T C has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ‧ and χ″, near the quoted T C. Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k B  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k B  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured \\mid D\\mid   >  J.

  17. Magnetic ordering in fullerene charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tohru; Yamabe, Tokio; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi

    1997-07-01

    We have determined the ground states of the charge-transfer (CT) complexes in which the energy levels of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of donors and the lowest unoccupied MO (LUMO) of acceptors are closely located, and examined some fullerene complexes consisting of C60, C70, tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE), and 1,1',3,3'-tetramethyl-Δ2,2'-bi(imidazolidine) (TMBI). The observed magnetic properties of TDAE-C60, TMBI-C60, and TDAE-C70 can be accounted for by employing realistic parameters. The effective Hamiltonian including up to the fourth-order perturbation has also been derived in the fourfold degenerate model space. The effective Hamiltonian can plausibly reproduce the magnetic phase diagram obtained by the variational treatment of TDAE-C60. It has been shown that the third and the fourth processes contribute to the stabilization of the antiferromagnetic state.

  18. Electrodeposition of highly uniform magnetic nanoparticle arrays in ordered alumite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming; Zangari, Giovanni; Shamsuzzoha, Mohammad; Metzger, Robert M.

    2001-05-01

    We report the fabrication of nanometer scale ordered arrays of magnetic cylindrical nanoparticles with low aspect ratio (height/radius a=0.2-7) and ultrahigh uniformity. Anodization and electrochemical deposition are employed for template synthesis and metal particle growth, respectively. Particle uniformity is achieved by an electrodeposition scheme, utilizing pulse reverse voltage wave forms to control nucleation and growth of the particles. The resulting nanoparticles are polycrystalline and grains are randomly oriented. The magnetic properties of the array are dominated by particle shape and by interparticle magnetostatic interactions. A very clear transition of the anisotropy from perpendicular to in plane is observed at an aspect ratio a of about two. The arrays exhibit good thermal stability, demonstrating a great potential of these structures as future recording media in a patterned scheme. The pulse reverse electrodeposition technique shows great promise for the synthesis of nanostructures of various nature.

  19. Proximity-driven enhanced magnetic order at ferromagnetic-insulator-magnetic-topological-insulator interface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingda; Zhu, Yimei; Chang, Cui -Zu; Kirby, B. J.; Jamer, Michelle E.; Cui, Wenping; Wu, Lijun; Wei, Peng; Heiman, Don; Li, Ju; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Katmis, Ferhat

    2015-08-17

    Magnetic exchange driven proximity effect at a magnetic-insulator–topological-insulator (MI-TI) interface provides a rich playground for novel phenomena as well as a way to realize low energy dissipation quantum devices. In this study, we report a dramatic enhancement of proximity exchange coupling in the MI/magnetic-TI EuS/Sb2–xVxTe3 hybrid heterostructure, where V doping is used to drive the TI (Sb2Te3) magnetic. We observe an artificial antiferromagneticlike structure near the MI-TI interface, which may account for the enhanced proximity coupling. The interplay between the proximity effect and doping in a hybrid heterostructure provides insights into the engineering of magnetic ordering.

  20. Proximity-driven enhanced magnetic order at ferromagnetic-insulator-magnetic-topological-insulator interface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Mingda; Zhu, Yimei; Chang, Cui -Zu; Kirby, B. J.; Jamer, Michelle E.; Cui, Wenping; Wu, Lijun; Wei, Peng; Heiman, Don; Li, Ju; et al

    2015-08-17

    Magnetic exchange driven proximity effect at a magnetic-insulator–topological-insulator (MI-TI) interface provides a rich playground for novel phenomena as well as a way to realize low energy dissipation quantum devices. In this study, we report a dramatic enhancement of proximity exchange coupling in the MI/magnetic-TI EuS/Sb2–xVxTe3 hybrid heterostructure, where V doping is used to drive the TI (Sb2Te3) magnetic. We observe an artificial antiferromagneticlike structure near the MI-TI interface, which may account for the enhanced proximity coupling. The interplay between the proximity effect and doping in a hybrid heterostructure provides insights into the engineering of magnetic ordering.

  1. Proximity-Driven Enhanced Magnetic Order at Ferromagnetic-Insulator-Magnetic-Topological-Insulator Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingda; Chang, Cui-Zu; Kirby, Brian. J.; Jamer, Michelle E.; Cui, Wenping; Wu, Lijun; Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yimei; Heiman, Don; Li, Ju; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic exchange driven proximity effect at a magnetic-insulator-topological-insulator (MI-TI) interface provides a rich playground for novel phenomena as well as a way to realize low energy dissipation quantum devices. Here we report a dramatic enhancement of proximity exchange coupling in the MI/magnetic-TI EuS /Sb2 -xVx Te3 hybrid heterostructure, where V doping is used to drive the TI (Sb2 Te3 ) magnetic. We observe an artificial antiferromagneticlike structure near the MI-TI interface, which may account for the enhanced proximity coupling. The interplay between the proximity effect and doping in a hybrid heterostructure provides insights into the engineering of magnetic ordering.

  2. Absence of Magnetic Order and Persistent Spin Dynamics in Tb2Ge2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallas, Alannah; Arevalo-Lopez, Angel; Wilson, Murray; Liu, Lian; Attfield, J. Paul; Uemura, Yasutomo; Wiebe, Chris; Luke, Graeme

    2015-03-01

    The terbium pyrochlores exhibit many unique magnetic properties, which has generated significant interest in this family of frustrated materials. A candidate spin liquid, Tb2Ti2O7 fails to magnetically order, despite strong antiferromagnetic correlations. The application of external pressure has been found to produce partial antiferromagnetic order in Tb2Ti2O7. Recently, we synthesized a new member of this family, Tb2Ge2O7. Due to the large ionic radii decrease from titanium to germanium, Tb2Ge2O7 can be considered a chemical pressure analog of Tb2Ti2O7. However, neutron scattering measurements revealed an absence of magnetic order in Tb2Ge2O7 down to 20 mK and dominant ferromagnetic correlations. Now, we have investigated the low temperature magnetism of Tb2Ge2O7 with muon spin rotation. Our zero field μSR measurements confirm an absence of static order in Tb2Ge2O7. We find a sharp increase in magnetic correlations below 10 K and persistent spin dynamics down to 25 mK. Our longitudinal field μSR measurements on Tb2Ge2O7 at 25 mK are consistent with a system of fluctuating moments, with a fluctuation rate of 11 MHz. This fluctuation rate is nearly temperature independent below 2.5 K.

  3. Imaging Magnetic Order and Frustration on Distinct Sublattices in Artificial Quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Barry; Balk, Andrew; Bhat, Vinayaka; Teipel, Eric; Smith, Nathan; Unguris, John; Hastings, Jeffrey Todd; de Long, Lance

    Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) was used to acquire direct images of as-grown magnetization textures for Permalloy thin films patterned into Penrose P2 tilings (P2T). Simulations yield a low-energy manifold of textures composed of two distinct, perfectly ordered sublattices and two sublattices that remain frustrated. As-grown P2T samples exhibited large domains of the two ordered sublattices in the room-temperature SEMPA images. Higher resolution Monte Carlo simulations based on long-range dipolar interactions predict the two frustrated sublattices will order. These results indicate 3rd generation P2T will offer the first example of magnetic order in a quasicrystalline material. Research at University of Kentucky supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER-45653, and U.S. National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR-1506979.

  4. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-09-22

    The work described in this grant report was focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T = Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x = 0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which were published in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Materials Chemistry and Physics. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of

  5. CaMn2Al10: Itinerant Mn magnetism on the verge of magnetic order

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steinke, L.; Simonson, J. W.; Yin, W. -G.; Smith, G. J.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Zellman, S.; Puri, A.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-07-24

    We report the discovery of CaMn2Al10, a metal with strong magnetic anisotropy and moderate electronic correlations. Magnetization measurements find a Curie-Weiss moment of 0.83μB/Mn, significantly reduced from the Hund's rule value, and the magnetic entropy obtained from specific heat measurements is correspondingly small, only ≈ 9% of Rln2. These results imply that the Mn magnetism is highly itinerant, a conclusion supported by density functional theory calculations that find strong Mn-Al hybridization. Consistent with the layered nature of the crystal structure, the magnetic susceptibility χ is anisotropic below 20 K, with a maximum ratio of χ[010]/χ[001] ≈ 3.5. A strong power-lawmore » divergence χ(T) ~ T–1.2 below 20 K implies incipient ferromagnetic order, an Arrott plot analysis of the magnetization suggests a vanishing low Curie temperature TC ~ 0. Our experiments indicate that CaMn2Al10 is a rare example of a system where the weak and itinerant Mn-based magnetism is poised on the verge of order.« less

  6. Magnetic field-induced switching of magnetic ordering in SrFeO3- δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Radheep, D.; Shanmugapriya, K.; Palanivel, Balan; Murugan, Ramaswamy

    2016-08-01

    The oxygen-deficient strontium iron oxide SrFeO3- δ (SFO) exhibits richness in the phase diagram over a broad range of temperatures and for other external parameters. Room-temperature X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrum reveals that the structure of synthesized SFO system consists of two mixed phases, i.e., major orthorhombic and minor tetragonal phases. The low-temperature Raman and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements indicated a structural transition below 253 K. The magnetic property of the synthesized SFO for various external magnetic field (up to 5 T) reveals possible variation in oxygen stoichiometry. Also, the application of external H increases Neel transition temperature ( T N), suppresses the hysteresis width ( W H), and thus weakens the first-order nature of the transition. Our analysis revealed the vanishing of hysteresis and the first-order antiferromagnetic transition becomes a crossover above a critical magnetic field H CR ≈ 5 T. Possible switching of magnetic ordering and oxidation state observed in same system enhances interest in related compounds which may be used in magnetic sensors and other magnetic switching devices.

  7. Characteristics of anthropogenic magnetic materials in roadside dusts in Seoul, Korea using thermo-magnetic behaviors and electron microscope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Doh, S.; Park, Y.

    2006-12-01

    It has been previously reported that magnetic concentration parameter (e.g., magnetic susceptibility) has a close affinity with heavy metal concentration in roadside dust of the Seoul metropolitan area. Magnetic concentration and magnetic particle size show systematic seasonal fluctuations (high and large during winter; low and small in summer) because of seasonal influx variation of anthropogenic magnetic materials. These observations suggest that magnetic parameters could be utilized as a proxy method of assessing heavy metal pollution in urban areas. In order to characterize anthropogenic magnetic materials and to find their potential sources, magnetic extracts from roadside dusts of Seoul metropolitan area were subject to SEM observation, elemental analysis (EDS), and thermo-magnetic experiments. Magnetic materials from vehicle emission and abraded brake lining were also observed for the comparison. The magnetic particles can be classified based on the morphology and elemental composition of the particles. Magnetic spherules are the most frequently observed type of particle throughout the study area. These particles are often associated with the elemental C and Al-Ca-Na-Si materials, and are believed to be the product of fossil fuel combustions in power plants, industries, and domestic heating systems. Aggregates of iron-oxides and Fe-C-S materials are probably originated from vehicle emission, while aggregates of pure Fe and Al-Ca-Fe-K-Mg-Si materials appear to be derived from abrasion of motor vehicle brake system. These aggregates are frequently observed in industrial sections of the city as well as areas of heavy traffic. Angular magnetic particles accompanied by silicates are only observed in park area and probably formed by natural process such as pedogenesis or weathering. Thermo-magnetic experiments indicate that the major magnetic phase in the studied samples is magnetite. Two distinctive behaviors observed are the presence of low Curie temperature

  8. The superexchange interactions and magnetic ordering in low-dimentional ludwigite Ni5GeB2O10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofronova, S. N.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Eremin, E. V.; Nazarenko, I. I.; Volkov, N. V.; Kartashev, A. V.; Moshkina, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    The ludwigite Ni5Ge(BO5)2 belongs to a family of oxyborates which have low-dimensional subunits in the form of three-leg ladders unit structure. This material was studied by magnetic and thermodynamic measurements. Ni5Ge(BO5)2 does not show full long-range magnetic order, but one goes into a partial ordering or spin-glass state at 87 K. The superexchange interactions were calculated in the framework of a simple indirect coupling model. Different models of magnetic structure of Ni5Ge(BO5)2 and its unique magnetic behaviour was discussed.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Energy Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Reina, Rafael

    In today's society there is high demand to have access to energy for portable devices in different forms. Capacitors with high performance in small package to achieve high charge/discharge rates, and batteries with their ability to store electricity and make energy mobile are part of this demand. The types of internal dielectric material strongly affect the characteristics of a capacitor, and its applications. In a battery, the choice of the electrolyte plays an important role in the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) formation, and the cathode material for high output voltage. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are research techniques that exploit the magnetic properties of the electron and certain atomic nuclei to determine physical and chemical properties of the atoms or molecules in which they are contained. Both EPR and NMR spectroscopy technique can yield meaningful structural and dynamic information. Three different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, High energy density capacitors where EPR measurements described herein provide an insight into structural and chemical differences in the dielectric material of a capacitor. Next, as the second project, Electrolyte solutions where an oxygen-17 NMR study has been employed to assess the degree of preferential solvation of Li+ ions in binary mixtures of EC (ethylene carbonate) and DMC (dimethyl carbonate) containing LiPF6 (lithium hexafluo-rophosphate) which may be ultimately related to the SEI formation mechanism. The third project was to study Bismuth fluoride as cathode material for rechargeable batteries. The objective was to study 19F and 7Li MAS NMR of some nanocomposite cathode materials as a conversion reaction occurring during lithiation and delithation of the BiF3/C nanocomposite.

  10. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  11. Magnetic Order in the Mixed-Spin Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet NaxMnO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisnell, Robin; Parshall, Dan; Li, Xin; Larson, Amber; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Rodriguez, Efrain; Lynn, Jeffrey

    NaxTMO2 (TM = transition metal) materials consist of alternating layers of Na and TM ions with the TM ions arranged on a geometrically frustrated triangular lattice. Na can be easily and reversibly removed from these materials, making them of interest for application in rechargeable batteries and allowing for exploration of their rich phase diagrams as a function of Na concentration. Na ordering is an important factor in ground state selection, and is driven by electrostatic interactions in many NaxTMO2 systems. The TM = Mn series differs in that Na ordering is driven by a cooperative Jahn-Teller effect, due to the coexistence of Jahn-Teller active Mn3+ and inactive Mn4+ ions. This effect also results in an ordered arrangement of the Mn3+ and Mn4+ ions, and thus of spin-2 and spin-3/2 moments. For x = 5/8, we have recently shown the coexistence of charge and magnetic stripe orderings. Here, we present the results of neutron diffraction measurements performed on single crystal samples of NaxMnO2 and discuss the details of the magnetic structure in the magnetically ordered phase.

  12. Magnetic Compensation for Second-Order Doppler Shift in LITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tjoelker, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainty in the frequency of a linear-ion-trap frequency standard (LITS) can be reduced substantially by use of a very small magnetic inhomogeneity tailored to compensate for the residual second-order Doppler shift. An effect associated with the relativistic time dilatation, one cause of the second-order Doppler shift, is ion motion that is attributable to the trapping radio-frequency (RF)electromagnetic field used to trap ions. The second-order Doppler shift is reduced by using a multi-pole trap; however it is still the largest source of systematic frequency shift in the latest generation of LITSs, which are among the most stable clocks in the world. The present compensation scheme reduces the frequency instability of the affected LITS to about a tenth of its previous value. The basic principles of prior generation LITSs were discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. Below are recapitulated only those items of basic information necessary to place the present development in context. A LITS includes a microwave local oscillator, the frequency of which is stabilized by comparison with the frequency of the ground state hyperfine transition of 199Hg+ ions. The comparison involves a combination of optical and microwave excitation and interrogation of the ions in a linear ion trap in the presence of a nominally uniform magnetic field. In the current version of the LITS, there are two connected traps (see figure): (1) a quadrupole trap wherein the optical excitation and measurement take place and (2) a 12-pole trap (denoted the resonance trap), wherein the microwave interrogation takes place. The ions are initially loaded into the quadrupole trap and are thereafter shuttled between the two traps. Shuttling ions into the resonance trap allows sensitive microwave interrogation to take place well away from loading interference. The axial magnetic field for the resonance trap is generated by an electric current in a finely wound wire coil surrounded by

  13. Novel diluted magnetic semiconductor materials based on zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Deepayan

    The primary aim of this work was to develop a ZnO based diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) materials system which displays ferromagnetism above room temperature and to understand the origin of long-range ferromagnetic ordering in these systems. Recent developments in the field of spintronics (spin based electronics) have led to an extensive search for materials in which semiconducting properties can be integrated with magnetic properties to realize the objective of successful fabrication of spin-based devices. For these devices we require a high efficiency of spin current injection at room temperature. Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) can serve this role, but they should not only display room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) but also be capable of generating spin polarized carriers. Transition metal doped ZnO has proved to be a potential candidate as a DMS showing RTFM. The origin of ferromagnetic ordering in ZnO is still under debate. However, the presence of magnetic secondary phases, composition fluctuations and nanoclusters could also explain the observation of ferromagnetism in the DMS samples. This encouraged us to investigate Cu-doped(+ spin in the 2+ valence state) ZnO system as a probable candidate exhibiting RTFM because neither metallic Cu nor its oxides (Cu2O or CuO) are ferromagnetic. The role of defects and free carriers on the ferromagnetic ordering of Cu-doped ZnO thin films was studied to ascertain the origin of ferromagnetism in this system. A novel non-equilibrium Pulsed Laser Deposition technique has been used to grow high quality epitaxial thin films of Cu:ZnO and (Co,Cu):ZnO on c-plane Sapphire by domain matching epitxay. Both the systems showed ferromagnetic ordering above 300K but Cu ions showed a much stronger ferromagnetic ordering than Co, especially at low concentrations (1-2%) of Cu where we realized near 100% polarization. But, the incorporation of Cu resulted in a 2-order of magnitude rise in the resistivity from 10-1 to 101

  14. Magnetic order near 270 K in mineral and synthetic Mn2FeSbO6 ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, R.; Ivanov, S. A.; Bazuev, G. V.; Hudl, M.; Lazor, P.; Solovyev, I. V.; Nordblad, P.

    2011-05-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of Mn2FeSbO6 single-crystalline mineral and ceramic samples synthesized under thermobaric treatment have been investigated, and compared to theoretical predictions based on first-principles electronic structure calculations. This ilmenite system displays a sharp magnetic transition just below the room temperature related to a ferrimagnetic ordering of the Mn2+ and Fe3+ cations, which makes Mn2FeSbO6 a promising candidate for designing functional magnetic materials.

  15. Magnetic Performance of a Nanocomposite Permanent Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Han, Guang-Bing; Gao, Ru-Wei

    2011-08-01

    We build a sandwiched structure model in which the intergranular phase (IP) is homogeneously distributed between soft and hard magnetic grains, and gives a continuously anisotropic expression of the coupling part under the assumption that the IP weakens the intergrain exchange-coupling interaction. Based on the idea that the hardening mechanism is of the pinning type, we calculate the effect of the IP's thickness d and its anisotropy constant K1(0) on the intrinsic coercivity of a nanocomposite permanent material. The calculated results indicate that the domain wall goes twice through irreversible domain wall displacement during the process of moving from soft to hard magnetic grains, and the intrinsic coercivity increases with increasing d, but decreases with increasing K1(0). When d and K1(0) take 2 nm and 0.7Kh, respectively, with Kh being the anisotropy constant in the inner part of the hard magnetic grain, the calculated intrinsic coercivity is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-01-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form −K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated −K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface. PMID:27246631

  17. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Timopheev, A A; Sousa, R; Chshiev, M; Nguyen, H T; Dieny, B

    2016-01-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form -K2cos(4)θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial -K1cos(2)θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated -K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from "easy-axis" to "easy-cone" regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface. PMID:27246631

  18. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-06-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form ‑K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated ‑K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface.

  19. CaMn2Al10 : Itinerant Mn magnetism on the verge of magnetic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, L.; Simonson, J. W.; Yin, W.-G.; Smith, G. J.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Zellman, S.; Puri, A.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery of CaMn2Al10 , a metal with strong magnetic anisotropy and moderate electronic correlations. Magnetization measurements find a Curie-Weiss moment of 0.83 μB/Mn , significantly reduced from the Hund's rule value, and the magnetic entropy obtained from specific heat measurements is correspondingly small, only ≈9 % of R ln 2 . These results imply that the Mn magnetism is highly itinerant, a conclusion supported by density functional theory calculations that find strong Mn-Al hybridization. Consistent with the layered nature of the crystal structure, the magnetic susceptibility χ is anisotropic below 20 K, with a maximum ratio of χ[010 ]/χ[001 ]≈3.5 . A strong power-law divergence χ (T ) ˜T-1.2 below 20 K implies incipient ferromagnetic order with a low Curie temperature TC<2 K . Our experiments indicate that CaMn2Al10 is a rare example of a system where the weak and itinerant Mn-based magnetism is poised on the verge of order.

  20. Magnetic filtration process, magnetic filtering material, and methods of forming magnetic filtering material

    SciTech Connect

    Taboada-Serrano, Patricia; Tsouris, Constantino; Contescu, Cristian I; McFarlane, Joanna

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides magnetically responsive activated carbon, and a method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon. The method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon typically includes providing activated carbon in a solution containing ions of ferrite forming elements, wherein at least one of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +3 and at least a second of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +2, and increasing pH of the solution to precipitate particles of ferrite that bond to the activated carbon, wherein the activated carbon having the ferrite particles bonded thereto have a positive magnetic susceptibility. The present invention also provides a method of filtering waste water using magnetic activated carbon.

  1. Spatially resolved quantitative magnetic order measurement in spinel CuCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Negi, D. S.; Loukya, B.; Datta, R.; Ramasamy, K.; Gupta, A.

    2015-05-04

    We have utilized spatially resolved high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy to quantify the relative percentage of ferromagnetic order in the core and the surface regions of CuCr{sub 2}S{sub 4} nanoparticles with nanocube and nanocluster morphology. The organic capping layer is found to play a significant role in restoring magnetic order at the surface. The technique is based on recording the fine features of the Cr L{sub 3} absorption edge and matching them with the theoretical spectra. The nanoscale probing technique we have developed is quite versatile and can be extended to understand magnetic ordering in a number of nanodimensional magnetic materials.

  2. Electric field control of the magnetic order parameter of magnetic pillars embedded in a ferroelectric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael; Wang, Q.; Chen, A.; Lookman, T.; Jia, Q. X.; Gilbert, D. A.; Borchers, J. A.; Holladay, B.; Sinha, S.

    Using polarized beam small angle neutron scattering (SANS) we quantitatively measured the influence of an electric field on correlation of magnetism in a ferroelectric/ferrimagnetic nanocomposite. The nanocomposite consists of ~12 nm wide pillars of CoFe2O4 (dark regions, inset figure left), a room temperature ferrimagnet, embedded in a ferroelectric, BaTiO3, matrix (light regions, inset figure right). We used a model-free method to extract the correlations of the magnetic structure from the SANS data (figure below). We found a 700 kV/cm electric field induced a change of magnetization of ~2% (scattering geometry, inset figure left). We explain our results using a simple representation for free energy that attributes coupling between electric polarization and magnetic order parameters to strain.

  3. Distinguishing magnetic particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles with first-order reversal curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Monika; Hirt, Ann M.; Widdrat, Marc; Faivre, Damien; Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, Mihály; Uebe, Rene; Schüler, Dirk

    2014-09-28

    Magnetic nanoparticles encompass a wide range of scientific study and technological applications. The success of using the nanoparticles in various applications demands control over size, dispersibility, and magnetics. Hence, the nanoparticles are often characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, and magnetic hysteresis loops. TEM analysis requires a thin layer of dispersed particles on the grid, which may often lead to particle aggregation thus making size analysis difficult. Magnetic hysteresis loops on the other hand provide information on the bulk property of the material without discriminating size, composition, and interaction effects. First order reversal curves (FORCs), described as an assembly of partial hysteresis loops originating from the major loop are efficient in identifying the domain size, composition, and interaction in a magnetic system. This study presents FORC diagrams on a variety of well-characterized biogenic and synthetic magnetite nanoparticles. It also introduces deconvoluted reversible and irreversible components from FORC as an important method for obtaining a semi-quantitative measure of the effective magnetic particle size. This is particularly important in a system with aggregation and interaction among the particles that often leads to either the differences between physical size and effective magnetic size. We also emphasize the extraction of secondary components by masking dominant coercivity fraction on FORC diagram to explore more detailed characterization of nanoparticle systems.

  4. Distinguishing magnetic particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles with first-order reversal curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Monika; Widdrat, Marc; Tompa, Éva; Uebe, Rene; Schüler, Dirk; Pósfai, Mihály; Faivre, Damien; Hirt, Ann M.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles encompass a wide range of scientific study and technological applications. The success of using the nanoparticles in various applications demands control over size, dispersibility, and magnetics. Hence, the nanoparticles are often characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, and magnetic hysteresis loops. TEM analysis requires a thin layer of dispersed particles on the grid, which may often lead to particle aggregation thus making size analysis difficult. Magnetic hysteresis loops on the other hand provide information on the bulk property of the material without discriminating size, composition, and interaction effects. First order reversal curves (FORCs), described as an assembly of partial hysteresis loops originating from the major loop are efficient in identifying the domain size, composition, and interaction in a magnetic system. This study presents FORC diagrams on a variety of well-characterized biogenic and synthetic magnetite nanoparticles. It also introduces deconvoluted reversible and irreversible components from FORC as an important method for obtaining a semi-quantitative measure of the effective magnetic particle size. This is particularly important in a system with aggregation and interaction among the particles that often leads to either the differences between physical size and effective magnetic size. We also emphasize the extraction of secondary components by masking dominant coercivity fraction on FORC diagram to explore more detailed characterization of nanoparticle systems.

  5. Thickness-Dependent and Magnetic-Field-Driven Suppression of Antiferromagnetic Order in Thin V5S8 Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Will J; Yuan, Jiangtan; Guo, Hua; Zhou, Panpan; Lou, Jun; Natelson, Douglas

    2016-06-28

    With materials approaching the 2D limit yielding many exciting systems with intriguing physical properties and promising technological functionalities, understanding and engineering magnetic order in nanoscale, layered materials is generating keen interest. One such material is V5S8, a metal with an antiferromagnetic ground state below the Néel temperature TN ∼ 32 K and a prominent spin-flop signature in the magnetoresistance (MR) when H∥c ∼ 4.2 T. Here we study nanoscale-thickness single crystals of V5S8, focusing on temperatures close to TN and the evolution of material properties in response to systematic reduction in crystal thickness. Transport measurements just below TN reveal magnetic hysteresis that we ascribe to a metamagnetic transition, the first-order magnetic-field-driven breakdown of the ordered state. The reduction of crystal thickness to ∼10 nm coincides with systematic changes in the magnetic response: TN falls, implying that antiferromagnetism is suppressed; and while the spin-flop signature remains, the hysteresis disappears, implying that the metamagnetic transition becomes second order as the thickness approaches the 2D limit. This work demonstrates that single crystals of magnetic materials with nanometer thicknesses are promising systems for future studies of magnetism in reduced dimensionality and quantum phase transitions. PMID:27163511

  6. Noncollinear and noncoplanar magnetic order in the extended Hubbard model on anisotropic triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasrija, Kanika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the importance of noncollinear and noncoplanar magnetic phases in determining various electrical properties in magnets, we investigate the magnetic phase diagram of the extended Hubbard model on an anisotropic triangular lattice. We map out the ground-state phase diagram within a mean-field scheme that treats collinear, noncollinear, and noncoplanar phases on equal footing. In addition to the standard ferromagnet and 120∘ antiferromagnet states, we find the four-sublattice flux, the 3Q noncoplanar, and the noncollinear charge-ordered states to be stable at specific values of filling fraction n . Inclusion of a nearest-neighbor Coulomb repulsion leads to intriguing spin-charge-ordered phases. The most notable of these are the collinear and noncollinear magnetic states at n =2 /3 , which occur together with a pinball-liquid-like charge order. Our results demonstrate that the elementary single-orbital extended Hubbard model on a triangular lattice hosts unconventional spin-charge ordered phases, which are similar to those reported in more complex and material-specific electronic Hamiltonians.

  7. A wireless and passive pressure sensor system based on the magnetic higher-order harmonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ee Lim

    The goal of this work is to develop a magnetic-based passive and wireless pressure sensor for use in biomedical applications. Structurally, the pressure sensor, referred to as the magneto-harmonic pressure sensor, is composed of two magnetic elements: a magnetically-soft material acts as a sensing element, and a magnetically hard material acts as a biasing element. Both elements are embedded within a rigid sensor body and sealed with an elastomer pressure membrane. Upon excitation of an externally applied AC magnetic field, the sensing element is capable of producing higher-order magnetic signature that is able to be remotely detected with an external receiving coil. When exposed to environment with changing ambient pressure, the elastomer pressure membrane of pressure sensor is deflected depending on the surrounding pressure. The deflection of elastomer membrane changes the separation distance between the sensing and biasing elements. As a result, the higher-order harmonic signal emitted by the magnetically-soft sensing element is shifted, allowing detection of pressure change by determining the extent of the harmonic shifting. The passive and wireless nature of the sensor is enabled with an external excitation and receiving system consisting of an excitation coil and a receiving coil. These unique characteristics made the sensor suitable to be used for continuous and long-term pressure monitoring, particularly useful for biomedical applications which often require frequent surveillance. In this work, abdominal aortic aneurysm is selected as the disease model for evaluation the performance of pressure sensor and system. Animal model, with subcutaneous sensor implantation in mice, was conducted to demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of pressure sensor in biological environment.

  8. Highly ordered ultralong magnetic nanowires wrapped in stacked graphene layers

    PubMed Central

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Gautron, Eric; Xu, Wei; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Angleraud, Benoit; Granier, Agnès

    2012-01-01

    Summary We report on the synthesis and magnetic characterization of ultralong (1 cm) arrays of highly ordered coaxial nanowires with nickel cores and graphene stacking shells (also known as metal-filled carbon nanotubes). Carbon-containing nickel nanowires are first grown on a nanograted surface by magnetron sputtering. Then, a post-annealing treatment favors the metal-catalyzed crystallization of carbon into stacked graphene layers rolled around the nickel cores. The observed uniaxial magnetic anisotropy field oriented along the nanowire axis is an indication that the shape anisotropy dominates the dipolar coupling between the wires. We further show that the thermal treatment induces a decrease in the coercivity of the nanowire arrays. This reflects an enhancement of the quality of the nickel nanowires after annealing attributed to a decrease of the roughness of the nickel surface and to a reduction of the defect density. This new type of graphene–ferromagnetic-metal nanowire appears to be an interesting building block for spintronic applications. PMID:23365798

  9. Magnetic properties of frictional volcanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan; Biggin, Andrew; Ferk, Annika; Leonhardt, Roman

    2015-04-01

    During dome-building volcanic eruptions, highly viscous magma extends through the upper conduit in a solid-like state. The outer margins of the magma column accommodate the majority of the strain, while the bulk of the magma is able to extrude, largely undeformed, to produce magma spines. Spine extrusion is often characterised by the emission of repetitive seismicity, produced in the upper <1 km by magma failure and slip at the conduit margins. The rheology of the magma controls the depth at which fracture can occur, while the frictional properties of the magma are important in controlling subsequent marginal slip processes. Upon extrusion, spines are coated by a carapace of volcanic fault rocks which provide insights into the deeper conduit processes. Frictional samples from magma spines at Mount St. Helens (USA), Soufriere Hills (Montserrat) and Mount Unzen (Japan) have been examined using structural, thermal and magnetic analyses to reveal a history of comminution, frictional heating, melting and cooling to form volcanic pseudotachylyte. Pseudotachylyte has rarely been noted in volcanic materials, and the recent observation of its syn-eruptive formation in dome-building volcanoes was unprecedented. The uniquely high thermal conditions of volcanic environments means that frictional melt remains at elevated temperatures for longer than usual, causing slow crystallisation, preventing the development of some signature "quench" characteristics. As such, rock-magnetic tests have proven to be some of the most useful tools in distinguishing pseudotachylytes from their andesite/ dacite hosts. In volcanic pseudotachylyte the mass normalised natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) when further normalised with the concentration dependent saturation remanence (Mrs) was found to be higher than the host rock. Remanence carriers are defined as low coercive materials across all samples, and while the remanence of the host rock displays similarities to an anhysteretic remanent

  10. Tuning order in the cuprate superconductors by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Subir

    2002-03-01

    An innovative series of recent neutron scattering(B. Lake et al.), Science 291, 1759 (2001); B. Khyakovich et al., preprint; B. Lake et al., preprint. and STM(J. Hoffman et al.), Science, Feb 2002. experiments have shed new light on the nature of strong correlations in the cuprate superconductors. Some of these experiments use a magnetic field, applied perpendicular to the CuO2 layers, to tune the low temperature properties of the superconducting state. Their results support the idea that ground state correlations in the doped Mott insulator can be described using a framework of competing order parameters, and of proximity to quantum phase transitions associated with them. In our view, they also offer compelling evidence that the orders competing with superconductivity are spin and charge density waves. The predictions(E. Demler, S. Sachdev, and Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87), 067202 (2001); S. Sachdev, cond- mat/0108238 A. Polkovnikov, S. Sachdev, M. Vojta, and E. Demler, cond- mat/0110329. of the theories of such quantum transitions will be reviewed and compared with the recent experimental results. In particular, we show that the quantum theory of a spin-density-wave ordering transition in a superconductor simultaneously describes a variety of observations with a single set of typical parameters: the field dependence of the elastic neutron scattering intensity, the absence of satellite Bragg peaks associated with the vortex lattice in existing neutron scattering experiments, and the spatial extent of the charge order in STM experiments.

  11. Recent advances in the microstructure design of materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubina, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Successful operation of a magnetic cooling device depends crucially on the performance of active magnetic refrigerant material. Extensive research activity has been concentrated on optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials by chemical composition modification. Here, it is shown how the design of appropriate microstructure can be used to control the magnetic properties as well as mechanical stability of refrigerant materials experiencing a first-order magnetic phase transition. In particular, introducing porosity in LaFe13-xSix alloys provides long-term stability by sacrificing only a small fraction of the magnetocaloric effect and results in the desired reduction of the magnetic and thermal hysteresis by a factor of 5, as compared to bulk alloys. Reducing crystallite size down to the nanometer range is shown to substantially lower magnetic hysteresis. On the other hand, the magnetocaloric effect is weakened by about 40% and 60% in alloys with grain size of 70 and 44 nm, respectively.

  12. Recent advances in the microstructure design of materials for near room temperature magnetic cooling (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubina, Julia

    2011-04-01

    Successful operation of a magnetic cooling device depends crucially on the performance of active magnetic refrigerant material. Extensive research activity has been concentrated on optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials by chemical composition modification. Here, it is shown how the design of appropriate microstructure can be used to control the magnetic properties as well as mechanical stability of refrigerant materials experiencing a first-order magnetic phase transition. In particular, introducing porosity in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} alloys provides long-term stability by sacrificing only a small fraction of the magnetocaloric effect and results in the desired reduction of the magnetic and thermal hysteresis by a factor of 5, as compared to bulk alloys. Reducing crystallite size down to the nanometer range is shown to substantially lower magnetic hysteresis. On the other hand, the magnetocaloric effect is weakened by about 40% and 60% in alloys with grain size of 70 and 44 nm, respectively.

  13. Exploring Possible Magnetic Properties of Ordered Manganese Monolayer on Wurtzite GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Chinchore, A.; Wang, K.; Lin, W.; Chen, T.; Liu, Y.; Pak, J.

    2009-03-01

    For future spin-based device technologies, it is crucial to investigate magnetic material systems using techniques having high magnetic resolution. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy has proven to be extremely powerful for resolving magnetic structure down to even the atomic scale. Of great interest lately are transition-metal-on-semiconductor systems. We have recently discovered a well-ordered Mn monolayer having 3x3-R30^o structure, formed on wurtzite gallium nitride.[1] It is intriguing to explore the possibility of atomic-scale magnetic ordering in this system. For this purpose, we have designed a new SP-STM system combined with a highly flexible, epitaxial nitride growth facility. The new SP-STM has been designed for variable-low-temperature operation within an applied magnetic field of up to +/- 4.5 Tesla. Initial results with the new system are expected within the very near future. Work is supported by DOE (Grant No.DE-FG02-06ER46317) and NSF (Grant No. 0730257). Equipment support from ONR is also acknowledged. [1] A. Chinchore et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93(18), 181908 (2008).

  14. Magnetic Order and Transitions in the Spin-web Compound Cu3TeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Månsson, Martin; Prša, Krunoslav; Sugiyama, Jun; Andreica, Daniel; Luetkens, Hubertus; Berger, Helmuth

    The spin-web compound Cu3TeO6, belongs to an intriguing group of materials where magnetism is governed by3d9 copper Cu2+ ions. This compound has been sparsely experimentally studied and we here present the first investigation of its local magnetic properties using muon-spin relaxation/rotation(μ+SR). Our results show a clear long-range 3D magnetic order below TN as indicated by clear zero-field (ZF) muon-precessions. At TN = 61.7K a very sharp transition is observed in the weak transverse-field (wTF) as well as ZF data. Contrary to suggestions by susceptibility measurements and inelastic neutron scattering, we find no evidence for either static or dynamic (on the time-scale of μ+SR) spin-correlations above TN.

  15. Magnetic properties of high Si steel with variable ordering obtained through thermomechanical processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, D.; Ros-Yañez, T.; Vandenberghe, R. E.; De Grave, E.; De Wulf, M.; Houbaert, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Alloys with a Si content of 4.2 and 5.4 wt % Si were produced to investigate the effect of increasing the Si on the materials processing and properties and to understand the effect of the order-disorder phenomenon on its magnetic properties. Different cooling rates after hot rolling were applied: Slow cooling from 780 °C to room temperature in 26 h, air cooling and water quench, followed by cold rolling until 0.5 to 0.7 mm thickness. Magnetic properties were measured after pickling and annealing at 950 °C for 2 h. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to study the effect of thermomechanical cycles on the ordering phenomena. It was noticed that the quenched samples have the highest values for the magnetic polarization, while slowly cooled samples have the lowest, for the power losses higher values are obtained for the quenched materials. The highest values for the polarization in the quenched samples were explained as a result of a higher B2 ordering.

  16. Soft ferrite materials for magnetic temperature transducers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miclea, C.; Tanasoiu, C.; Miclea, C. F.; Gheorghiu, A.; Tanasoiu, V.

    2005-04-01

    Soft ferrites in the CuZnTi system, having the formula Cu 1-xZn xTi yFe 2-yO 4, with 0.50⩽ x⩽0.60 and 0.00⩽ y⩽0.05 were investigated as a function of composition, sintering temperature and cooling speed, in order to obtain materials with controlled TC and very high change rate of permeability with temperature around their TC. The effect of Zn and Ti additions was a drastic change of the Curie temperature with about 10-12 °C for each atomic percent of Zn and Ti introduced into the spinel lattice while the cooling speed changed the behaviour of magnetic permeability with temperature around the Curie point. An application using such magnetic temperature sensors for a thermostat is presented.

  17. Role of magnetic and orbital ordering at the metal-insulator transition in NdNiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Scagnoli, V.; Staub, U.; Mulders, A. M.; Janousch, M.; Meijer, G. I.; Hammerl, G.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Stojic, N.

    2006-03-01

    Soft x-ray resonant scattering at the Ni L{sub 2,3} edges is used to test models of magnetic- and orbital-ordering below the metal-insulator transition in NdNiO{sub 3}. The large branching ratio of the L{sub 3} to L{sub 2} intensities of the (1/2 0 1/2) reflection and the observed azimuthal angle and polarization dependence originates from a noncollinear magnetic structure. The absence of an orbital signal and the noncollinear magnetic structure show that the nickelates are materials for which orbital ordering is absent at the metal-insulator transition.

  18. Analysis of tristable energy harvesting system having fractional order viscoelastic material

    SciTech Connect

    Oumbé Tékam, G. T.; Woafo, P.; Kitio Kwuimy, C. A.

    2015-01-15

    A particular attention is devoted to analyze the dynamics of a strongly nonlinear energy harvester having fractional order viscoelastic flexible material. The strong nonlinearity is obtained from the magnetic interaction between the end free of the flexible material and three equally spaced magnets. Periodic responses are computed using the KrylovBogoliubov averaging method, and the effects of fractional order damping on the output electric energy are analyzed. It is obtained that the harvested energy is enhanced for small order of the fractional derivative. Considering the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property as control parameter, the complexity of the system response is investigated through the Melnikov criteria for horseshoes chaos, which allows us to derive the mathematical expression of the boundary between intra-well motion and bifurcations appearance domain. We observe that the order and strength of the fractional viscoelastic property can be effectively used to control chaos in the system. The results are confirmed by the smooth and fractal shape of the basin of attraction as the order of derivative decreases. The bifurcation diagrams and the corresponding Lyapunov exponents are plotted to get insight into the nonlinear response of the system.

  19. Magnetic ordering temperature of nanocrystalline Gd: enhancement of magnetic interactions via hydrogenation-induced “negative” pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshina, E. A.; Khmelevskyi, S.; Politova, G.; Kaminskaya, T.; Drulis, H.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-03-01

    Gadolinium is a nearly ideal soft-magnetic material. However, one cannot take advantage of its properties at temperatures higher than the room temperature where Gd loses the ferromagnetic ordering. By using high-purity bulk samples with grains ~200 nm in size, we present proof-of-concept measurements of an increased Curie point (TC) and spontaneous magnetization in Gd due to hydrogenation. From first-principles we explain increase of TC in pure Gd due to the addition of hydrogen. We show that the interplay of the characteristic features in the electronic structure of the conduction band at the Fermi level in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase of Gd and “negative” pressure exerted by hydrogen are responsible for the observed effect.

  20. Magnetic ordering temperature of nanocrystalline Gd: enhancement of magnetic interactions via hydrogenation-induced “negative” pressure

    PubMed Central

    Tereshina, E. A.; Khmelevskyi, S.; Politova, G.; Kaminskaya, T.; Drulis, H.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium is a nearly ideal soft-magnetic material. However, one cannot take advantage of its properties at temperatures higher than the room temperature where Gd loses the ferromagnetic ordering. By using high-purity bulk samples with grains ~200 nm in size, we present proof-of-concept measurements of an increased Curie point (TC) and spontaneous magnetization in Gd due to hydrogenation. From first-principles we explain increase of TC in pure Gd due to the addition of hydrogen. We show that the interplay of the characteristic features in the electronic structure of the conduction band at the Fermi level in the high-temperature paramagnetic phase of Gd and “negative” pressure exerted by hydrogen are responsible for the observed effect. PMID:26931775

  1. Magnetic ordering induced giant optical property change in tetragonal BiFeO3.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Ding, Hang-Chen; Gong, Shi Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic ordering could have significant influence on band structures, spin-dependent transport, and other important properties of materials. Its measurement, especially for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, however, is generally difficult to be achieved. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of magnetic ordering detection using a noncontact and nondestructive optical method. Taking the tetragonal BiFeO3 (BFO) as an example and combining density functional theory calculations with tight-binding models, we find that when BFO changes from C1-type to G-type AFM phase, the top of valance band shifts from the Z point to Γ point, which makes the original direct band gap become indirect. This can be explained by Slater-Koster parameters using the Harrison approach. The impact of magnetic ordering on band dispersion dramatically changes the optical properties. For the linear ones, the energy shift of the optical band gap could be as large as 0.4 eV. As for the nonlinear ones, the change is even larger. The second-harmonic generation coefficient d33 of G-AFM becomes more than 13 times smaller than that of C1-AFM case. Finally, we propose a practical way to distinguish the two AFM phases of BFO using the optical method, which is of great importance in next-generation information storage technologies. PMID:26648508

  2. Magnetic ordering induced giant optical property change in tetragonal BiFeO3

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Ding, Hang-Chen; Gong, Shi Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic ordering could have significant influence on band structures, spin-dependent transport, and other important properties of materials. Its measurement, especially for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, however, is generally difficult to be achieved. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of magnetic ordering detection using a noncontact and nondestructive optical method. Taking the tetragonal BiFeO3 (BFO) as an example and combining density functional theory calculations with tight-binding models, we find that when BFO changes from C1-type to G-type AFM phase, the top of valance band shifts from the Z point to Γ point, which makes the original direct band gap become indirect. This can be explained by Slater-Koster parameters using the Harrison approach. The impact of magnetic ordering on band dispersion dramatically changes the optical properties. For the linear ones, the energy shift of the optical band gap could be as large as 0.4 eV. As for the nonlinear ones, the change is even larger. The second-harmonic generation coefficient d33 of G-AFM becomes more than 13 times smaller than that of C1-AFM case. Finally, we propose a practical way to distinguish the two AFM phases of BFO using the optical method, which is of great importance in next-generation information storage technologies. PMID:26648508

  3. Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, Jacob; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the full generalization of the Cartesian coordinate-based higher-order theory for functionally graded materials developed by the authors during the past several years. This theory circumvents the problematic use of the standard micromechanical approach, based on the concept of a representative volume element, commonly employed in the analysis of functionally graded composites by explicitly coupling the local (microstructural) and global (macrostructural) responses. The theoretical framework is based on volumetric averaging of the various field quantities, together with imposition of boundary and interfacial conditions in an average sense between the subvolumes used to characterize the composite's functionally graded microstructure. The generalization outlined herein involves extension of the theoretical framework to enable the analysis of materials characterized by spatially variable microstructures in three directions. Specialization of the generalized theoretical framework to previously published versions of the higher-order theory for materials functionally graded in one and two directions is demonstrated. In the applications part of the paper we summarize the major findings obtained with the one-directional and two-directional versions of the higher-order theory. The results illustrate both the fundamental issues related to the influence of microstructure on microscopic and macroscopic quantities governing the response of composites and the technologically important applications. A major issue addressed herein is the applicability of the classical homogenization schemes in the analysis of functionally graded materials. The technologically important applications illustrate the utility of functionally graded microstructures in tailoring the response of structural components in a variety of applications involving uniform and gradient thermomechanical loading.

  4. Materials science: Magnetic nanoparticles line up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivre, Damien; Bennet, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    Certain bacteria contain strings of magnetic nanoparticles and therefore align with magnetic fields. Inspired by these natural structures, researchers have now fabricated synthetic one-dimensional arrays of such particles.

  5. Nonlinear reduced order homogenization of materials including cohesive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzen, Felix; Leuschner, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of composite materials is strongly influenced by the nonlinear behavior of the interface between the constituents. In order to make reliable yet computationally efficient predictions for such materials, a reduced order model is developed. Conceptual ideas of the NTFA (Michel and Suquet, Int J Solids Struct 40:6937-6955, 2003, Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 193:5477-5502, 2004) and of the pRBMOR (Fritzen, Hodapp and Leuschner Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 260:143-154, 2013, Fritzen et al., Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 278:186-217, 2014) are adopted. The key idea is to parameterize the displacement jumps on the cohesive interfaces by a reduced basis of global ansatz functions. Micromechanical considerations and the potential structure of the constitutive models lead to a variational formulation and reduced equilibrium conditions. The effect of the preanalysis phase on the accuracy is investigated using geometrically optimal training directions. The reduced model is tested for three-dimensional microstructures. Besides the effective stress response, the tension-compression asymmetry and the distribution of the separation of the interface are investigated. Memory savings on the order of are realized. The computing time is reduced considerably.

  6. Reinvestigation of long-range magnetic ordering in icosahedral Tb-Mg-Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Z.; Fisher, I. R.; Zarestky, J.; Canfield, P. C.; Stassis, C.; Goldman, A. I.

    1998-05-01

    We present results of a study of possible magnetic ordering in the icosahedral phase of Tb-Mg-Zn probed by bulk magnetization measurements and neutron diffraction. Measurements on both crushed single grains and cast polycrystalline samples of Tb-Mg-Zn were performed. Magnetization measurements on both samples reveal only a spin-glass-like transition at approximately 5.8 K. Neutron diffraction from the crushed single grains reveals only short-range magnetic ordering at low temperatures, with no evidence of the long-range magnetic ordering reported previously [Charrier, Ouladdiaf, and Schmitt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4637 (1997)]. Likewise, the cast polycrystalline samples exhibit primarily diffuse magnetic scattering at low temperature, but at least one relatively sharp diffraction peak was observed. Our results indicate that for single grain samples there is no long-range magnetic ordering and that, at best, the magnetic ordering in these quasicrystalline alloys is not very robust.

  7. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Shuai, M; Klittnick, A; Shen, Y; Smith, G P; Tuchband, M R; Zhu, C; Petschek, R G; Mertelj, A; Lisjak, D; Čopič, M; Maclennan, J E; Glaser, M A; Clark, N A

    2016-01-01

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field. PMID:26817823

  8. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core-shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10-2 μB/Au atom, respectively.

  9. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shuai, M.; Klittnick, A.; Shen, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Tuchband, M. R.; Zhu, C.; Petschek, R. G.; Mertelj, A.; Lisjak, D.; Čopič, M.; et al

    2016-01-28

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. We find Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, includingmore » liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth’s magnetic field.« less

  10. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, M.; Klittnick, A.; Shen, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Tuchband, M. R.; Zhu, C.; Petschek, R. G.; Mertelj, A.; Lisjak, D.; Čopič, M.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Clark, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field.

  11. Spontaneous liquid crystal and ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal magnetic nanoplates

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, M.; Klittnick, A.; Shen, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Tuchband, M. R.; Zhu, C.; Petschek, R. G.; Mertelj, A.; Lisjak, D.; Čopič, M.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Clark, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ferrofluids are familiar as colloidal suspensions of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents. The dispersed particles are randomly oriented but their moments become aligned if a magnetic field is applied, producing a variety of exotic and useful magnetomechanical effects. A longstanding interest and challenge has been to make such suspensions macroscopically ferromagnetic, that is having uniform magnetic alignment in the absence of a field. Here we report a fluid suspension of magnetic nanoplates that spontaneously aligns into an equilibrium nematic liquid crystal phase that is also macroscopically ferromagnetic. Its zero-field magnetization produces distinctive magnetic self-interaction effects, including liquid crystal textures of fluid block domains arranged in closed flux loops, and makes this phase highly sensitive, with it dramatically changing shape even in the Earth's magnetic field. PMID:26817823

  12. Third- and fifth-order optical nonlinearities in organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, A. A.; Wamsley, C.; Hagan, D. J.; Van Stryland, E. W.; Reinhardt, Bruce A.; Roderer, Paul; Dillard, Ann G.

    1994-10-01

    We measure the nonlinear optical properties of solutions of a bisbenzethiozole-substituted thiophene compound (BBTDOT) and didecyloxy substituted polyphenyl (DDOS) using the Z-scan technique with 532 nm picosecond pulses. Both compounds exhibit two-photon absorption (2PA) and excited-state absorption (ESA) from the 2PA generated excited states. We measure the magnitude and sign of the real (refractive) and imaginary (2PA) parts of the third-order hyperpolarizability, and the excited-state absorptive and refractive cross sections. We observe third-order self-focusing in BBTDOT and self-defocusing in DDOS while both show excited-state defocusing. All these effects were previously observed and modeled in semiconductors giving insight into the nonlinearities occurring in these organic materials.

  13. First-order magnetization process as a tool of magnetic-anisotropy determination: Application to the uranium-based intermetallic U3C u4G e4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, D. I.; Henriques, M. S.; Andreev, A. V.; Skourski, Y.; Richter, M.; Havela, L.; Wosnitza, J.

    2016-02-01

    Uranium-based intermetallic compounds often display very strong magnetic anisotropies, the energy of which is usually not directly accessible by common experimental methods. Here, we report on static- and pulsed-field studies of U3C u4G e4 . This material orders ferromagnetically at TC=73 K with the easy magnetization direction along the a axis and a strong b c -plane anisotropy. The magnetization measured for fields along the hard b direction displays a first-order magnetization process that can be described well by use of a phenomenological theory yielding anisotropy constants up to the sixth order. This phenomenological description, working excellently for U3C u4G e4 , may also be applied for other uranium-based compounds.

  14. Dynamic magnetic compaction of porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-29

    IAP Research began development of the Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) process three years before the CRADA was established. IAP Research had experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of the process, and conducted a basic market survey. IAP identified and opened discussions with industrial partners and established the basic commercial cost structure. The purpose of this CRADA project was to predict and verify optimum pressure vs. time history for the compaction of porous copper and tungsten. LLNL modeled the rapid compaction of powdered material from an initial density of about 30% theoretical maximum to more than 90% theoretical maximum. The compaction simulations were benchmarked against existing data and new data was acquired by IAP Research. The modeling was used to perform parameter studies on the pressure loading time history, initial porosity and temperature. LLNL ran simulations using codes CALE or NITO and compared the simulations with published compaction data and equation of state (EOS) data. This project did not involve the development or modification of software code. CALE and NITO were existing software programs at LLNL. No modification of these programs occurred within the scope of the CRADA effort.

  15. Magnetic compensation, field-dependent magnetization reversal, and complex magnetic ordering in Co2TiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, S.; Thota, S.; Joshi, D. C.; Krautz, M.; Waske, A.; Behler, A.; Eckert, J.; Sarkar, T.; Andersson, M. S.; Mathieu, R.; Narang, V.; Seehra, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The complex nature of magnetic ordering in the spinel C o2Ti O4 is investigated by analyzing the temperature and magnetic field dependence of its magnetization (M ), specific heat (Cp), and ac magnetic susceptibilities χ' and χ″. X-ray diffraction of the sample synthesized by the solid-state reaction route confirmed the spinel structure whereas x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows its electronic structure to be C o2Ti O4=[C o2 +] [C o3 +T i3 +] O4 . From analysis of the temperature dependence of the dc paramagnetic susceptibility, the magnetic moments μ (A ) =3.87 μB and μ (B ) =5.19 μB on the A and B sites are determined with μ (B ) in turn yielding μ (T i3 +) =1.73 μB and μ (C o3 +) =4.89 μB . Analysis of the dc and ac susceptibilities combined with the weak anomalies observed in the Cp vs T data shows the existence of a quasi-long-range ferrimagnetic state below TN˜47.8 K and a compensation temperature Tcomp˜32 K , the latter characterized by sign reversal of magnetization with its magnitude depending on the applied magnetic field and the cooling protocol. Analysis of the temperature dependence of M (field cooled) and M (zero field cooled) data and the hysteresis loop parameters is interpreted in terms of large spin clusters. These results in C o2Ti O4 , significantly different from those reported recently in isostructural C o2Sn O4=[C o2 +] [C o2 +S n4 +] O4 , warrant further investigations of its magnetic structure using neutron diffraction.

  16. Inkjet printing of magnetic materials with aligned anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Han; Spencer, Jeremy; Jander, Albrecht; Nielsen, Jeffrey; Stasiak, James; Kasperchik, Vladek; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-01

    3-D printing processes, which use drop-on-demand inkjet printheads, have great potential in designing and prototyping magnetic materials. Unlike conventional deposition and lithography, magnetic particles in the printing ink can be aligned by an external magnetic field to achieve both high permeability and low hysteresis losses, enabling prototyping and development of novel magnetic composite materials and components, e.g., for inductor and antennae applications. In this work, we report an inkjet printing technique with magnetic alignment capability. Magnetic films with and without particle alignment are printed, and their magnetic properties are compared. In the alignment-induced hard axis direction, an increase in high frequency permeability and a decrease in hysteresis losses are observed. Our results suggest that unique magnetic structures with arbitrary controllable anisotropy, not feasible otherwise, may be fabricated via inkjet printing.

  17. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Magnetic Order in Uranium-Based Heavy Fermion Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Jean-Guy

    UPt_3, URu_2 Si_2, UNi_2 Al_3 and UPd_2 Al_3 form a special group among the uranium alloys because they exhibit heavy fermion character, magnetic order and superconductivity. This main interest in the study of this group of compounds resides in the simultaneous occurrence of magnetism and superconductivity at low temperature. Such a state could potentially involve an unconventional superconducting pairing mechanism, different from that contained in standard BCS theory. In this thesis, the magnetic states of three of these materials (URu_2Si _2, UNi_2Al _3 and UPd_2Al _3) is investigated with neutron and the relatively new resonant magnetic X-ray scattering techniques. The work presented here on URu_2Si _2 follows an earlier effort that demonstrated the applicabililty of the resonant X-ray technique to this weak magnetic system. Access to reciprocal space was extended in order to confirm the multipolar form of the resonant X-ray cross-section and to explore the limits of the technique compared to neutron scattering. The situation with the newly discovered UNi_2Al _3 and UPd_2Al _3 was different since their magnetic structure and phases needed first to be established. This task was achieved using two magnetic probes (neutron and X-ray scattering). Several magnetic order parameters in the normal and in the superconducting phase were also measured. The incommensurate magnetic order found in UNi_2Al_3 by neutron scattering constitutes the first observation of long range order in this compound. Other measurements on this compound provided some clues about the evolution of the magnetic structure in high magnetic fields.

  18. FOREWORD: Focus on Materials Analysis and Processing in Magnetic Fields Focus on Materials Analysis and Processing in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka, Yoshio; Hirota, Noriyuki; Horii, Shigeru; Ando, Tsutomu

    2009-03-01

    Recently, interest in the applications of feeble (diamagnetic and paramagnetic) magnetic materials has grown, whereas the popularity of ferromagnetic materials remains steady and high. This trend is due to the progress of superconducting magnet technology, particularly liquid-helium-free superconducting magnets that can generate magnetic fields of 10 T and higher. As the magnetic energy is proportional to the square of the applied magnetic field, the magnetic energy of such 10 T magnets is in excess of 10 000 times that of conventional 0.1 T permanent magnets. Consequently, many interesting phenomena have been observed over the last decade, such as the Moses effect, magnetic levitation and the alignment of feeble magnetic materials. Researchers in this area are widely spread around the world, but their number in Japan is relatively high, which might explain the success of magnetic field science and technology in Japan. Processing in magnetic fields is a rapidly expanding research area with a wide range of promising applications in materials science. The 3rd International Workshop on Materials Analysis and Processing in Magnetic Fields (MAP3), which was held on 14-16 May 2008 at the University of Tokyo, Japan, focused on various topics including magnetic field effects on chemical, physical, biological, electrochemical, thermodynamic and hydrodynamic phenomena; magnetic field effects on the crystal growth and processing of materials; diamagnetic levitation, the magneto-Archimedes effect, spin chemistry, magnetic orientation, control of structure by magnetic fields, magnetic separation and purification, magnetic-field-induced phase transitions, properties of materials in high magnetic fields, the development of NMR and MRI, medical applications of magnetic fields, novel magnetic phenomena, physical property measurement by magnetic fields, and the generation of high magnetic fields. This focus issue compiles 13 key papers selected from the proceedings of MAP3. Other

  19. Development of a Thin Film Magnetic Moment Reference Material

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, D. P.; Halloran, S. T.; Owings, R. R.; da Silva, F. C. S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of a magnetic moment reference material for low moment magnetic samples. We first conducted an inter-laboratory comparison to determine the most useful sample dimensions and magnetic properties for common instruments such as vibrating sample magnetometers (VSM), SQUIDs, and alternating gradient field magnetometers. The samples were fabricated and then measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Their magnetic moments were calibrated by tracing back to the NIST YIG sphere, SRM 2853. PMID:27096108

  20. Development of a Thin Film Magnetic Moment Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Pappas, D P; Halloran, S T; Owings, R R; da Silva, F C S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of a magnetic moment reference material for low moment magnetic samples. We first conducted an inter-laboratory comparison to determine the most useful sample dimensions and magnetic properties for common instruments such as vibrating sample magnetometers (VSM), SQUIDs, and alternating gradient field magnetometers. The samples were fabricated and then measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Their magnetic moments were calibrated by tracing back to the NIST YIG sphere, SRM 2853. PMID:27096108

  1. Magnetic properties modeling of soft magnetic composite materials using two-dimensional vector hybrid hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dandan; Liu, Fugui; Li, Yongjian; Zhao, Zhigang; Zhang, Changgeng; Yang, Qingxin

    2014-05-01

    A 2-D vector hybrid hysteresis model for a soft magnetic composite (SMC) material is established, which is combined with classical Preisach model and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. The rotational magnetic properties of SMC materials were studied using the vector model, and the computed results were compared with the experimental measurement. It is shown that the vector hybrid model can effectively simulate the rotational magnetic properties under low magnetization fields.

  2. Spin-orbit correlated magnetic order in honeycomb α-RuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Vijay Shankar; Kim, Heung-Sik; Kee, Hae-Young

    2015-03-01

    There has been a lot of recent interest in the combined effects of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and electronic correlations in transition metal compounds. RuCl3 with layered honeycomb structure was proposed as a candidate material, where SOC boosts the electronic interaction, leading to an insulating phase. However, the role of SOC is not clear in materials with 4d-orbitals, since SOC strength is weaker than 5d-orbital materials. Here we study electronic band structures of honeycomb RuCl3 using ab-initio and tight binding methods, and estimate its SOC strength. We find that SOC in RuCl3 is not strong enough to justify an effective jeff = 1 / 2 single band unlike in the iridates. However, when electronic interactions are introduced, a magnetic order develops, and upper- and lower-Hubbard bands are characterized by jeff = 1 / 2 and 3 / 2 , respectively. Within a mean field theory with multi-orbital bands, we find that a zig-zag magnetic order is a ground state. Experimental implications are also discussed.

  3. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  4. Plasmonic devices and sensors built from ordered nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Kobayashi, Yoji; Houk, Ronald J. T.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Long, Jeffrey R.; Robertson, Ian M.; House, Stephen D.; Graham, Dennis D.; Talin, Albert Alec; Chang, Noel N.; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this project is to lay the foundation for using ordered nanoporous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to create devices and sensors whose properties are determined by the dimensions of the MOF lattice. Our hypothesis is that because of the very short (tens of angstroms) distances between pores within the unit cell of these materials, enhanced electro-optical properties will be obtained when the nanopores are infiltrated to create nanoclusters of metals and other materials. Synthetic methods used to produce metal nanoparticles in disordered templates or in solution typically lead to a distribution of particle sizes. In addition, creation of the smallest clusters, with sizes of a few to tens of atoms, remains very challenging. Nanoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a promising solution to these problems, since their long-range crystalline order creates completely uniform pore sizes with potential for both steric and chemical stabilization. We report results of synthetic efforts. First, we describe a systematic investigation of silver nanocluster formation within MOFs using three representative MOF templates. The as-synthesized clusters are spectroscopically consistent with dimensions {le} 1 nm, with a significant fraction existing as Ag{sub 3} clusters, as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance. Importantly, we show conclusively that very rapid TEM-induced MOF degradation leads to agglomeration and stable, easily imaged particles, explaining prior reports of particles larger than MOF pores. These results solve an important riddle concerning MOF-based templates and suggest that heterostructures composed of highly uniform arrays of nanoparticles within MOFs are feasible. Second, a preliminary study of methods to incorporate fulleride (K{sub 3}C{sub 60}) guest molecules within MOF pores that will impart electrical conductivity is described.

  5. Refrustration and competing orders in the prototypical Dy2Ti2O7 spin ice material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henelius, P.; Lin, T.; Enjalran, M.; Hao, Z.; Rau, J. G.; Altosaar, J.; Flicker, F.; Yavors'kii, T.; Gingras, M. J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Spin ices, frustrated magnetic materials analogous to common water ice, have emerged over the past 15 years as exemplars of high frustration in three dimensions. Recent experimental developments aimed at interrogating anew the low-temperature properties of these systems, in particular whether the predicted transition to long-range order occurs, behoove researchers to scrutinize our current dipolar spin ice model description of these materials. In this work, we do so by combining extensive Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory calculations to analyze data from previous magnetization, diffuse neutron scattering, and specific-heat measurements on the paradigmatic Dy2Ti2O7 spin ice material. In this work, we also reconsider the possible importance of the nuclear specific heat Cnuc in Dy2Ti2O7 . We find that Cnuc is not entirely negligible below a temperature ˜0.5 K and must therefore be taken into account in a quantitative analysis of the calorimetric data of this compound below that temperature. We find that in this material, small effective spin-spin exchange interactions compete with the magnetostatic dipolar interaction responsible for the main spin ice phenomenology. This causes an unexpected "refrustration" of the long-range order that would be expected from the incompletely self-screened dipolar interaction and which positions the material at the boundary between two competing classical long-range-ordered ground states. This allows for the manifestation of new physical low-temperature phenomena in Dy2Ti2O7 , as exposed by recent specific-heat measurements. We show that among the four most likely causes for the observed upturn of the specific heat at low temperature [an exchange-induced transition to long-range order, quantum non-Ising (transverse) terms in the effective spin Hamiltonian, the nuclear hyperfine contribution, and random disorder], only the last appears to be reasonably able to explain the calorimetric data.

  6. Control over magnetic properties in bulk hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Christian; Quesada, Adrian; Saerbeck, Thomas; Rubia, Miguel Angel De La; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Fernandez, Jose Francisco; Schuller, Ivan K.; UCSD Collaboration; Instituto de Ceramica, Madrid Collaboration; Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble Collaboration

    We present control of coercivity and remanent magnetization of a bulk ferromagnetic material embedded in bulk vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) by using a standard bulk synthesis procedure. The method generalizes the use of structural phase transitions of one material to control structural and magnetic properties of another. A structural phase transition (SPT) in the V2O3 host material causes magnetic properties of Ni to change as function of temperature. The remanent magnetization and the coercivity are reversibly controlled by the SPT without additional external magnetic fields. The reversible tuning shown here opens the pathway for controlling the properties of a vast variety of magnetic hybrid bulk systems. This Work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science, U.S. Department of Energy, BES-DMS funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Science, DMR under grant DE FG02 87ER-45332.

  7. Application of broadband alternating current magnetic susceptibility to the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles in natural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    A new method is proposed for characterizing magnetic particles by measuring low-field alternating current magnetic susceptibility at a number of frequency steps spanning four orders of magnitude, from 125 Hz to 512 kHz. This method was tested using natural samples with various grain size distributions, including basalt (Kilauea, Hawaii), loess and paleosol (Luochuan, China), tuff (Yucca Mountain, Nevada), granite (Minnesota Valley, Minnesota), and andesite (Sakurajima, Japan). The resulting frequency spectrum of magnetic susceptibility (FSMS) of the basalt, loess/paleosol, and tuff decreases with increasing frequency, but at different rates of decrease. The FSMS of the basalt is characterized by a monotonic decrease with increasing frequency over the entire range. The FSMS of the loess/paleosol and the tuff decreases more markedly than that of the basalt, which agrees with previous results showing that superparamagnetic particles are dominant in such material. Quantitative estimates using FSMSs allow reconstruction of characteristic grain size distributions and clearly identify differences in the distribution of superparamagnetic particles. The multidomain granite sample has no distinct frequency dependence, which is probably due to the smooth displacement of domain walls in the presence of the external field. In contrast, the FSMSs of the andesite samples exhibit maxima over a limited frequency range, between 16 and 128 kHz. This behavior, together with low-temperature measurements, can be accounted for by magnetic resonance of domain walls in the multidomain phenocrysts.

  8. Simulation of the inspection of planar non-magnetic materials with electro magnetic acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prémel, Denis; Reboud, C.; Chatillon, S.; Reverdy, F.; Mahaut, S.

    2012-05-01

    For some specific applications in ultrasonic non destructive evaluation, EMATs (ElectroMagnetic Acoustic Transducers) are very useful for generating and receiving ultrasonic waves. EMAT works without any contact and liquid coupling. Various surface or bulk waves with any arbitrary polarities and orientations may be generated by changing the orientation of the magnets and the coils. Unfortunately, these types of probes show a poor sensitivity as receivers. CEA LIST has developed simulation tools, based on semi-analytical models dedicated to eddy current and ultrasonic testing, in order to predict signals obtained when inspecting planar structures. The first step of these developments concerns the inspection of conducting non-ferromagnetic materials. By combining eddy currents due to coils with the static magnetic field provided by magnets, the 3D Lorentz's force distribution is computed in the time domain and used as input for the semi-analytical ultrasonic models to compute the simulation of ultrasonic bulk waves and flaw interaction in the piece. This communication presents a specific configuration for our first experimental validation. The computation time is sufficiently low to perform parametric studies to improve the performances of the EMAT.

  9. Iron oxohydroxide-polyacrylic acid magnetic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata-Zamora, M. E.; Arriola, H.; Nava, N.; Saniger, J. M.

    1996-08-01

    Powdered nanometer-sized precipitates of Fe(II)Fe(III) 2O x(OH) y were obtained by reacting solutions of ferrous-ferric salts with a Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratio < 2, with an excess of ammonium hydroxide. These precipitates were then mixed at room temperature with a solution of polyacrylic acid (PAA) in order to obtain a composite material. The XRD analysis showed that the iron oxohydroxide precipitates, with an average size around 10 nm, were crystalline and had a spinel structure resembling to either magnetite or maghemite. The Mössbauer spectra of the iron oxohydroxide particles presented a major magnetic phase with the double Zeeman splitting characteristic of magnetite and a minor paramagnetic phase probably originated by the nanometer size of the particles. Its structure was found to correspond to a disordered spinel, as result of the analysis of the intrinsic magnetic field and its splitting parameters. The composite material PAA-Fe(II)Fe(III) 2O x(OH) y presented a diffractogram close to the original oxohydroxide, but its Mössbauer spectrum showed a major paramagnetic phase. This change was explained as a consequence of the chemical coordination of the nanometer sized iron oxohydroxides particles with the PAA carboxylate groups.

  10. Dynamic Magnetic Field Applications for Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Grugel, Richard N.; Motakef, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic fields, variable in time and space, can be used to control convection in electrically conducting melts. Flow induced by these fields has been found to be beneficial for crystal growth applications. It allows increased crystal growth rates, and improves homogeneity and quality. Particularly beneficial is the natural convection damping capability of alternating magnetic fields. One well-known example is the rotating magnetic field (RMF) configuration. RMF induces liquid motion consisting of a swirling basic flow and a meridional secondary flow. In addition to crystal growth applications, RMF can also be used for mixing non-homogeneous melts in continuous metal castings. These applied aspects have stimulated increasing research on RMF-induced fluid dynamics. A novel type of magnetic field configuration consisting of an axisymmetric magnetostatic wave, designated the traveling magnetic field (TMF), has been recently proposed. It induces a basic flow in the form of a single vortex. TMF may find use in crystal growth techniques such as the vertical Bridgman (VB), float zone (FZ), and the traveling heater method. In this review, both methods, RMF and TMF are presented. Our recent theoretical and experimental results include such topics as localized TMF, natural convection dumping using TMF in a vertical Bridgman configuration, the traveling heater method, and the Lorentz force induced by TMF as a function of frequency. Experimentally, alloy mixing results, with and without applied TMF, will be presented. Finally, advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, will be discussed.

  11. Magnetic reversal of an artificial square ice: dipolar correlation and charge ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason; Stein, Aaron; Langridge, Sean; Marrows, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Artificial spin ices are lithographically patterned arrays of single domain nanomagnets [1-4]. The elongated elements form a 2D system of interlinked vertices at which Ising-like dipole moments meet with incompatible interactions. They are directly analogous to 3D bulk spin ice materials [5]. We report on the magnetic reversal of an athermal artificial square ice pattern subject to a sequence of magnetic fields applied slightly off the diagonal symmetry axis, investigated via magnetic force microscopy of the remanent states that result [1]. From an initial diagonally polarised state, sublattice independent reversal is observed via bulk-nucleated incrementally-pinned flipped moment chains along parallel channels of magnetic elements, as evident from analysis of vertex populations and dipolar correlation functions. Weak dipolar interactions between adjacent chains favour antialignment and give rise to weak charge ordering of ``monopole'' vertices during reversal. [4pt] [1] J. P. Morgan, A. Stein, S. Langridge & C.H. Marrows, New Journal of Physics (2011), 13, 105002.[0pt] [2] R. F. Wang et al., Nature (2006), 439, 303-306.[0pt] [3] E. Mengotti et al., Nature Physics (2011), 7, 68-74.[0pt] [4] J. P. Morgan et al., Nature Physics (2011), 7, 75-79.[0pt] [5] M. J. Harris et al., PRL (1997), 79, 2554-255

  12. Magnetic order near 270 K in mineral and synthetic Mn{sub 2}FeSbO{sub 6} ilmenite

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, R.; Hudl, M.; Nordblad, P.; Ivanov, S. A.; Bazuev, G. V.; Lazor, P.; Solovyev, I. V.

    2011-05-16

    The structural and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 2}FeSbO{sub 6} single-crystalline mineral and ceramic samples synthesized under thermobaric treatment have been investigated, and compared to theoretical predictions based on first-principles electronic structure calculations. This ilmenite system displays a sharp magnetic transition just below the room temperature related to a ferrimagnetic ordering of the Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} cations, which makes Mn{sub 2}FeSbO{sub 6} a promising candidate for designing functional magnetic materials.

  13. Anisotropy: Spin order and magnetization of single-crystalline Cu4(OH) 6FBr barlowite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tian-Heng; Isaacs, Eric D.; Schlueter, John A.; Singleton, John

    2016-06-01

    Despite decades-long fascination, the difficulty of maintaining high lattice symmetry in frustrated nonbipartite S =1/2 materials that can also be made into high-quality single crystals has been a persistent challenge. Here we report magnetization studies of a single-crystal sample of barlowite, Cu4(OH) 6 FBr , which has a geometrically perfect kagome motif. At T ≤4.2 K and 35 ≤μ0H ≤65 T, the interlayer spins are fully polarized, and the kagome-intrinsic magnetization is consistent with a Heisenberg model having J /kB=-180 K. Several field-driven anomalies are observed, having varied scalings with temperature. At an applied field, kagome disorder caused by the interlayer spins is smaller than that in herbertsmithite. At T ≤ 15 K, the bulk magnetic moment comes from the interlayer spins. An almost coplanar spin order suggests that the magnitude of in-plane Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is smaller than 0.006(6) J . On the other hand, the possibility of a spin-liquid state in the kagome lattice coexisting with ordered interlayer spins is left open.

  14. Magnetically Controlled Shape Memory Behaviour—Materials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, A. P.; Sheikh, A.; Neumann, K.; Neumann, K.-U.; Pooley, D.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    2008-06-01

    For most metals a microscopic change in shape occurs above the elastic limit by the irreversible creation and movement of dislocations. However a large number of metallic systems undergo structural, martensitic, phase transformations which are diffusionless, displacive first order transitions from a high-temperature phase to one of lower symmetry below a certain temperature TM. These transitions which have been studied for more than a century are of vital importance because of their key role in producing shape memory phenomena enabling the system to reverse large deformations in the martensitic phase by heating into the austenite phase. In addition to a change in shape (displacement) the effect can also produce a force or a combination of both. Materials having this unique property are increasing being used in medical applications—scoliosis correction, arterial clips, stents, orthodontic wire, orthopaedic implants etc. The structural phase transition essential for shape memory behaviour is usually activated by a change in temperature or applied stress. However for many applications such as for actuators the transformation is not sufficiently rapid. Poor energy conversion also limits the applicability of many shape memory alloys. In medicine a change of temperature or pressure is often inappropriate and new ferromagnetic materials are being considered in which the phenomena can be controlled by an applied magnetic field at constant temperature. In order to achieve this, it is important to optimise three fundamental parameters. These are the saturation magnetisation σs, the Curie temperature Tc and the martensitic temperature TM. Here, σs is important because the magnetic pressure driving the twin boundary motion is 2σsH. Furthermore the material must be in the martensitic state at the operating temperature which should be at or above room temperature. This may be achieved by alloying or controlling the stoichiometry. Recently new intermetallic compounds based

  15. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with belt of ferro or paramagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Stewart, Walter F.; Henke, Michael D.; Kalash, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 12 to 77K range utilizes a belt which carries ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material and which is disposed in a loop which passes through the center of a solenoidal magnet to achieve cooling. The magnetic material carried by the belt, which can be blocks in frames of a linked belt, can be a mixture of substances with different Curie temperatures arranged such that the Curie temperatures progressively increase from one edge of the belt to the other. This magnetic refrigerator can be used to cool and liquefy hydrogen or other fluids.

  16. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with belt of ferro or paramagnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Stewart, W.F.; Henke, M.D.; Kalash, K.E.

    1986-04-03

    A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 12 to 77 K range utilizes a belt which carries ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material and which is disposed in a loop which passes through the center of a solenoidal magnet to achieve cooling. The magnetic material carried by the belt, which can be blocks in frames of a linked belt, can be a mixture of substances with different Curie temperatures arranged such that the Curie temperatures progressively increase from one edge of the belt to the other. This magnetic refrigerator can be used to cool and liquefy hydrogen or other fluids.

  17. On the magnetic order of Gd5Ge3

    SciTech Connect

    Cadogan, J M; Ryan, D H; Mudryk, Ya.; Pecharsky, V K; Gschneidner, K A

    2014-05-07

    We have investigated the magnetic structure of Gd5Ge3 by neutron powder diffraction down to 3.6 K. This compound presents three events in the heat capacity which we show are related to fundamental changes in the magnetic order. The primary antiferromagnetic ordering occurs at 82(2) K and produces a magnetic cell that is tripled with respect to the underlying orthorhombic crystal cell. The propagation vector is k1=[00⅓] . At 74(2) K, the magnetic order becomes “anti-C” with a propagation vector k2 = [1 0 0]. A third change in the magnetic order occurs at 40(2) K, and the new magnetic structure is essentially the “anti-C” structure but with the addition of a tripled magnetic component corresponding to a propagation vector k3 = [⅓ 0 0] .

  18. Study of magnetic materials for biomedical and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahid Nisar

    We have studied different aspects of magnetic materials in bulk, nanoparticles, and thinfilm form with emphasis on their use in biomedical and technological applications. In this work: (1) We have synthesized several new Gd based compounds and alloys and have optimized their magnetic properties for the self-controlled hyperthermia applications. The self-controlled hyperthermia is a new non-invasive technique to employ heat treatment to cure cancerous cells without overheating the normal cells. The need for developing such materials was dictated by the lack of existing magnetic materials with magnetic ordering temperatures in the temperature range of (40-45)°C, which is the critical operating temperature range for the hyperthermia applications. (2) We have produced gold coated Fe-Au nanoparticles which are biocompatible and can easily be functionalized through gold surface for various technological applications, besides hyperthermia applications. Contrary to the previous reports of time dependent degradation of magnetic properties of the Fe-Au nanoparticles, our gold coated nanoparticles are quite robust and their magnetic properties remain unchanged under the ambient conditions. We have made a comprehensive study of the Fe-Au nanoparticles, and have observed that superparamgnetic Fe-Au nanoparticles can be produced with variable Fe content up to 30 at.% and the particle size remains nearly uniform (˜ 5 nm). When subjected to annealing at elevated temperatures, the magnetic core in the Fe-Au nanoparticles undergoes various interesting changes and the blocking temperature and magnetization increase when nanoparticles are annealed at elevated temperatures. The observation of the Verwey transition at ˜ 125K in the magnetization versus temperature data for samples annealed at 450°C and above indicates the formation of Fe3O4. The absence of any oxide peaks in the as-formed sample and presence of oxide peaks in the samples annealed at 450°C and above in the x

  19. The Magnetic Ordering of Heavy Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordström, Lars

    1998-03-01

    The electronic and magnetic structures of the rare earth metals with hcp structure (Gd--Tm) are calculated by a full-potential LAPW method, which allows for non-collinear magnetism within the local approximation to spin-density functional theory. The 4f electrons are taken as localized, but their spin moment constrained as to fulfil Russel-Saunders coupling, polarizes the itinerant valence electrons. It is found that there are two competing magnetic structures; the ferromagnetic state, which dominates for the left-most elements (Gd and Tb), and a planar helical wave, which is found to have lowest energy for the last elements Er and Tm. In Ho the competition between the two leads to a compromise --- a helical cone. This trend is in accordance with the experimental situation. The mechanism behind the stabilization of the helical wave is confirmed to be an opening of a partial gap at the so-called ``webbing'' of the Fermi surface. This feature is found to exhibit nesting, a fact which is known both from earlier non-spin-polarized calculations and de Haas-van Alphen measurements. In contrast to prevailing models and earlier more primitive calculations, this nesting is found to exist for all elements, i.e. even for gadolinium. Instead, the magnitude of the spin splitting of the valence electrons due to the magnetic 4f states, is found to be an important quantity which has been missed out in the standard models for the magnetic structure of the rare earths.

  20. Magnetic ordering and crystal field effects in quasi-caged structure compound PrFe2Al8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Ghosh, Sarit K.; Ramesh Kumar, K.; Strydom, André M.

    2016-04-01

    The compound PrFe2Al8 possesses a three-dimensional network structure resulting from the packing of Al polyhedra centered at the transition metal element Fe and the rare earth Pr. Along the c-axis, Fe and Pr form chains which are separated from each other by the Al-network. In this paper, the magnetism and crystalline electric field effects in PrFe2Al8 are investigated through the analysis of magnetization and specific heat data. A magnetic phase transition in the Pr lattice is identified at TNPr ≈ 4 K in dc magnetization and ac susceptibility data. At 2 K, the magnetization isotherm presents a ferromagnetic saturation, however, failing to reach full spin-only ferromagnetic moment of Pr3+. Metamagnetic step-like low-field features are present in the magnetization curve at 2 K which is shown to shift upon field-cooling the material. Arrott plots centered around TPrN display "S"-like features suggestive of an inhomogeneous magnetic state. The magnetic entropy, Sm, estimated from specific heat outputs a value of R ln(2) at TN2 suggesting a doublet state for Pr3+. The magnetic specific heat is modeled by using a 9-level Schottky equation pertinent to the Pr3+ ion with J=4. Given the crystalline electric field situation of Pr3+, the inference of a doublet state from specific heat and consequent long-range magnetic order is an unexpected result.

  1. Magnetic Ordering in Sr3YCo4O10+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishida, Takayoshi; Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Sales, Brian C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Transition-metal oxides often exhibit complex magnetic behavior due to the strong interplay between atomic-structure, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Cobaltates, especially, exhibit complex behavior because of cobalt’s ability to adopt various valence and spin state configurations. The case of the oxygen-deficient perovskite Sr3YCo4O10+x (SYCO) has attracted considerable attention because of persisting uncertainties about its structure and the origin of the observed room temperature ferromagnetism. Here we report a combined investigation of SYCO using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations. Guided by theoretical results on Co-O distances projected on different planes, the atomic-scale images of several different orientations, especially of the fully oxygenated planes, allow the unambiguous extraction of the underlying structure. The calculated magnetic properties of the new structure are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Magnetic Ordering in Sr3YCo4O10+x

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Takayoshi; Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Sales, Brian C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Transition-metal oxides often exhibit complex magnetic behavior due to the strong interplay between atomic-structure, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Cobaltates, especially, exhibit complex behavior because of cobalt’s ability to adopt various valence and spin state configurations. The case of the oxygen-deficient perovskite Sr3YCo4O10+x (SYCO) has attracted considerable attention because of persisting uncertainties about its structure and the origin of the observed room temperature ferromagnetism. Here we report a combined investigation of SYCO using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations. Guided by theoretical results on Co-O distances projected on different planes, the atomic-scale images of several different orientations, especially of the fully oxygenated planes, allow the unambiguous extraction of the underlying structure. The calculated magnetic properties of the new structure are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26818899

  3. Magnetic Ordering in Sr3YCo4O10+x.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Takayoshi; Kapetanakis, Myron D; Yan, Jiaqiang; Sales, Brian C; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Transition-metal oxides often exhibit complex magnetic behavior due to the strong interplay between atomic-structure, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Cobaltates, especially, exhibit complex behavior because of cobalt's ability to adopt various valence and spin state configurations. The case of the oxygen-deficient perovskite Sr3YCo4O10+x (SYCO) has attracted considerable attention because of persisting uncertainties about its structure and the origin of the observed room temperature ferromagnetism. Here we report a combined investigation of SYCO using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations. Guided by theoretical results on Co-O distances projected on different planes, the atomic-scale images of several different orientations, especially of the fully oxygenated planes, allow the unambiguous extraction of the underlying structure. The calculated magnetic properties of the new structure are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26818899

  4. Magnetic Ordering in Sr3YCo4O10+x

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kishida, Takayoshi; Kapetanakis, Myron D.; Yan, Jiaqiang; Sales, Brian C.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2016-01-28

    Transition-metal oxides often exhibit complex magnetic behavior due to the strong interplay between atomic-structure, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. Cobaltates, especially, exhibit complex behavior because of cobalt’s ability to adopt various valence and spin state configurations. The case of the oxygen-deficient perovskite Sr3YCo4O10+x (SYCO) has gained considerable attention because of persisting uncertainties about its structure and the origin of the observed room temperature ferromagnetism. Here we report a combined investigation of SYCO using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations.

  5. Magnetic Materials Suitable for Fission Power Conversion in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial fission reactors use combinations of shielding and distance to protect power conversion components from elevated temperature and radiation. Space mission systems are necessarily compact and must minimize shielding and distance to enhance system level efficiencies. Technology development efforts to support fission power generation scenarios for future space missions include studying the radiation tolerance of component materials. The fundamental principles of material magnetism are reviewed and used to interpret existing material radiation effects data for expected fission power conversion components for target space missions. Suitable materials for the Fission Power System (FPS) Project are available and guidelines are presented for bounding the elevated temperature/radiation tolerance envelope for candidate magnetic materials.

  6. MSWI boiler fly ashes: magnetic separation for material recovery.

    PubMed

    De Boom, Aurore; Degrez, Marc; Hubaux, Paul; Lucion, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, ferrous materials are usually recovered from Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) bottom ash by magnetic separation. To our knowledge, such a physical technique has not been applied so far to other MSWI residues. This study focuses thus on the applicability of magnetic separation on boiler fly ashes (BFA). Different types of magnet are used to extract the magnetic particles. We investigate the magnetic particle composition, as well as their leaching behaviour (EN 12457-1 leaching test). The magnetic particles present higher Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni concentration than the non-magnetic (NM) fraction. Magnetic separation does not improve the leachability of the NM fraction. To approximate industrial conditions, magnetic separation is also applied to BFA mixed with water by using a pilot. BFA magnetic separation is economically evaluated. This study globally shows that it is possible to extract some magnetic particles from MSWI boiler fly ashes. However, the magnetic particles only represent from 23 to 120 g/kg of the BFA and, though they are enriched in Fe, are composed of similar elements to the raw ashes. The industrial application of magnetic separation would only be profitable if large amounts of ashes were treated (more than 15 kt/y), and the process should be ideally completed by other recovery methods or advanced treatments. PMID:21306886

  7. Evidence for coexisting magnetic order in frustrated three-dimensional honeycomb iridates Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breznay, Nicholas; Ruiz, Alejandro; Frano, Alex; Analytis, James

    The search for unconventional magnetism has found a fertile hunting ground in 5d iridium oxide (iridate) materials. The competition between coulomb, spin-orbit, and crystal field energy scales in honeycomb iridates leads to a quantum magnetic system with localized spin-1/2 moments communicating through spin-anisotropic Kitaev exchange interactions. Although early and ongoing work has focused on layered two-dimensional honeycomb compounds such as Na2IrO3 and a 4d analog, RuCl3, recently discovered polytypes of Li2IrO3 take on three-dimensional honeycomb structures. Bulk thermodynamic studies, as well as recent resonant x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy experiments, have uncovered a rich phase diagram for these three-dimensional honeycomb iridates. Low temperature incommensurate and commensurate magnetic orders can be stabilized by tuning the applied magnetic field, displaying a delicate coexistence that signals highly frustrated magnetism.

  8. Eddy current characterization of magnetic treatment of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1992-01-01

    Eddy current impedance measuring methods have been applied to study the effect that magnetically treated materials have on service life extension. Eddy current impedance measurements have been performed on Nickel 200 specimens that have been subjected to many mechanical and magnetic engineering processes: annealing, applied strain, magnetic field, shot peening, and magnetic field after peening. Experimental results have demonstrated a functional relationship between coil impedance, resistance and reactance, and specimens subjected to various engineering processes. It has shown that magnetic treatment does induce changes in a material's electromagnetic properties and does exhibit evidence of stress relief. However, further fundamental studies are necessary for a thorough understanding of the exact mechanism of the magnetic-field processing effect on machine tool service life.

  9. Magnetic materials selection for static inverter and converter transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1971-01-01

    Different magnetic alloys best suited for high-frequency and high-efficiency applications were comparatively investigated together with an investigation of each alloy's inherent characteristics. One of the characteristics in magnetic materials deterimental in transformer design is the residual flux density, which can be additive on turn-on and cause the transformer to saturate. Investigation of this problem led to the design of a transformer with a very low residual flux. Tests were performed to determine the dc and ac magnetic properties at 2400 Hz using square-wave excitation. These tests were performed on uncut cores, which were then cut for comparison of the gapped and ungapped magnetic properties. The optimum transformer was found to be that with the lowest residual flux and a small amount of air gap in the magnetic material. The data obtained from these tests are described, and the potential uses for the materials are discussed.

  10. Short- and long-range magnetic order in LaMnAsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Michael A.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of the layered oxypnictide LaMnAsO have been revisited using neutron scattering and magnetization measurements. The present measurements identify the Néel temperature TN=360 (1 ) K. Below TN the critical exponent describing the magnetic order parameter is β =0.33 -0.35 , consistent with a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Above this temperature, diffuse magnetic scattering indicative of short-range magnetic order is observed, and this scattering persists up to TSRO=650 (10 ) K. The magnetic susceptibility shows a weak anomaly at TSRO and no anomaly at TN. Analysis of the diffuse scattering data using a reverse Monte Carlo algorithm indicates that above TN nearly two-dimensional, short-range magnetic order is present with a correlation length of 9.3(3) Å within the Mn layers at 400 K. The inelastic scattering data reveal a spin gap of 3.5 meV in the long-range ordered state, and strong, low-energy (quasielastic) magnetic excitations emerging in the short-range ordered state. Comparison with other related compounds correlates the distortion of the Mn coordination tetrahedra to the sign of the magnetic exchange along the layer-stacking direction, and suggests that short-range order above TN is a common feature in the magnetic behavior of layered Mn-based pnictides and oxypnictides.

  11. Short- and long-range magnetic order in LaMnAsO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McGuire, Michael A.; Garlea, Vasile Ovidiu

    2016-02-02

    The magnetic properties of the layered oxypnictide LaMnAsO have been revisited using neutron scattering and magnetization measurements. The present measurements identify the Néel temperature TN = 360(1) K. Below TN the critical exponent describing the magnetic order parameter is β=0.33–0.35 , consistent with a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Above this temperature, diffuse magnetic scattering indicative of short-range magnetic order is observed, and this scattering persists up to TSRO = 650(10) K. Morevoer, the magnetic susceptibility shows a weak anomaly at TSRO and no anomaly at TN. Analysis of the diffuse scattering data using a reverse Monte Carlo algorithm indicates that abovemore » TN nearly two-dimensional, short-range magnetic order is present with a correlation length of 9.3(3) Å within the Mn layers at 400 K. The inelastic scattering data reveal a spin gap of 3.5 meV in the long-range ordered state, and strong, low-energy (quasielastic) magnetic excitations emerging in the short-range ordered state. When we compared it with other related compounds correlates the distortion of the Mn coordination tetrahedra to the sign of the magnetic exchange along the layer-stacking direction, and suggests that short-range order above TN is a common feature in the magnetic behavior of layered Mn-based pnictides and oxypnictides.« less

  12. Observation of dimension dependent magnetic ordering in bismuth ferrite particulate and fiber nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Sakar, M.; Bharathkumar, S.; Balakumar, S.; Saravanan, P.

    2015-06-24

    Nanoparticles and nanofibers of bismuth ferrite were fabricated by sol-gel and electrospinning methods respectively. The structural and morphological analysis was carried out by XRD and FESEM techniques respectively. The magnetic measurements were carried out by SQUID magnetometer. The BFO nanofibers showed an enhanced magnetic property compared to nanoparticles. The observed magnetic properties were found to be associated with their magnetic ordering in the system where the antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic core/shell like nature and ‘canted’ spin structure ordering was found to be the magnetic origin in the particulate and fiber nanostructures respectively.

  13. Quantum Criticality and Unconventional Order in Magnetic and Dielectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, S. E.; Smith, R.; Sutherland, M. L.; Alireza, P.; Saxena, S. S.; Lonzarich, G. G.

    2012-12-01

    We present an overview of unconventional phenomena arising close to ferromagnetic and ferroelectric quantum phase transitions. The applicability and potential breakdown of traditional field theories of quantum criticality and the emergence of a multiplicity of critical fields in particular will be discussed.

  14. Thermo-magnetic materials for use in designing intelligent actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Yoshimutsu; Yoshimura, Fumikatsu; Hatakeyama, Iwao; Ishii, Yoshikazu

    1994-12-31

    The authors present the concept of an intelligent thermal actuator designed by using thermally sensitive magnetic materials. The use of the magnetic transition of FeRh alloy is very effective in increasing the actuator functions. These functions are freedom of direction, tuning temperature, and increasing both sensitivity and power. Two new types of actuator, a remote controlled optical driven thermo-magnetic motor and a temperature sensitive spring-less valve, are proposed and experimental results are shown.

  15. Experimental characterization of magnetic materials for the magnetic shielding of cryomodules in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sah, Sanjay; Myneni, Ganapati; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2015-10-26

    The magnetic properties of two important passive magnetic shielding materials (A4K and Amumetal) for accelerator applications, subjected to various processing and heat treatment conditions are studied comprehensively over a wide range of temperatures: from cryogenic to room temperature. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of processing on the extent of degradation of the magnetic properties of both materials and investigate the possibility of restoring these properties by re-annealing.

  16. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  17. Annual Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, 29th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 8-11, 1983, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, R.; Koon, N.C.; Cooper, B.R.

    1984-03-15

    Various topics on magnetism and magnetic materials are addressed. The subjects considered include: spin glasses, amorphous magnetism, actinide and rare earth intermetallics, magnetic excitation, itinerant magnetism and magnetic structure, valence instabilities, Kondo effect, transport and Hall effects, mixed valence and Kondo compounds, superconductivity and magnetism, d and f electron magnetism and superconductivity, Fe-based microcrystalline and permanent magnetic alloys, hard and soft magnetic materials, and magnetooptics. Also discussed are: numerical methods for magnetic field computation, recording theory and experiments, recording heads and media, magnetic studies via hyperfine interactions, magnetic semiconductors, magnet insulators, transition metal systems, random fields, critical phenomena and magnetoelastic effects and resonance, surfaces and interfaces, magnetostatic waves and resonance, bubble materials and implantation, bubble devices and physics, magnetic separation, ferrofluids, magnetochemistry, new techniques and materials, and new applications.

  18. Spin frustration in one-dimensional magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás-Almenar, J. J.; Coronado, E.; Gallart, J. C.; Georges, R.; Gomez-García, Carlos J.

    1992-02-01

    Spin frustration is investigated in a classical-spin chain formed by antiferromagnetically coupled triangles sharing corners. This model considers two different magnetic sublattices which are coupled by three different Heisenberg exchange interactions. An exact expression of the zero-field magnetic susceptibility is derived and used in order to analyze the magnetic properties of the two-sublattice manganese chain MnMn(CDTA)·7H 2O.

  19. Magnetic patterning using ion irradiation for highly ordered CoPt alloys with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Abes, M.; Venuat, J.; Muller, D.; Carvalho, A.; Schmerber, G.; Beaurepaire, E.; Dinia, A.; Pierron-Bohnes, V.

    2004-12-15

    We used a combination of ion irradiation and e-beam lithography to magnetically pattern an ordered CoPt alloy with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Ion irradiation disorders the alloy and strongly reduces the magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic force microscopy showed a regular array of 1 {mu}m{sup 2} square dots with perpendicular anisotropy separated by 1 {mu}m large ranges with in-plane anisotropy. This is further confirmed by magnetic measurements, which showed that arrays protected by a 200 nm Pt layer present the same coercive field and the same perpendicular anisotropy as before irradiation. This is promising for applications in magnetic recording technologies.

  20. Magnetic ordering temperatures in rare earth metal dysprosium under ultrahigh pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic ordering temperatures in heavy rare earth metal dysprosium (Dy) have been studied using an ultrasensitive electrical transport measurement technique in a designer diamond anvil cell to a pressure of 69 GPa and a temperature of 10 K. Previous studies using magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures were able to track magnetic ordering temperature only till 7 GPa in the hexagonal close packed (hcp) phase of Dy. Our studies indicate that the magnetic ordering temperature shows an abrupt drop of 80 K at the hcp-Sm phase transition followed by a gradual decrease that continues till 17 GPa. This is followed by a rapid increase in the magnetic ordering temperatures in the double hcp phase and finally leveling off in the distorted face centered cubic phase of Dy. Our studies reaffirm that 4f-shell remains localized in Dy and there is no loss of magnetic moment or 4f-shell delocalization for pressures up to 69 GPa.

  1. Intrinsic magnetic order and inhomogeneous transport in Gd-implanted zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, John; Williams, Grant V. M.; Murmu, Peter P.; Ruck, Ben J.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results from magnetic, resistivity, and Hall effect measurements on a ferromagnetically ordered 5% Gd low energy implanted ZnO single crystal. Temperature-dependent magnetization measurements show that the Gd ions do not contribute to the magnetic order; hence, the magnetic order is intrinsic. The electronic transport in the Gd-implanted region is inhomogeneous, and there is a nonlinear Hall resistance. The nonlinear Hall resistance is likely to be a consequence of the inhomogeneous transport and not due to an anomalous Hall effect.

  2. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-05-05

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

  3. Magnetic smart material application to adaptive x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon; Cao, J.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled ({100-400 micron thickness) electroformed replicated optics or slumped glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the midfrequency ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a permanently magnetic material. The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback, locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. Designs and basic concepts as applied to space borne X-ray optics will be described.

  4. Modulated magnetism in the ferromagnet PrPtAl: Clear experimental evidence of the `order by disorder' theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J.-Ph.; O'Neill, Chris; Walker, Alex; Lithgow, Calum; Abdul-Jabbar, Gino; Yelland, Edward; Sokolov, Dmitry A.; Huxley, Andrew D.

    The ferromagnet PrPtAl is unlike any other. At the phase boundary between paramagnetism and ferromagnetism the fluctuations of the order parameter are so strong that energetically favourable phases of novel modulated magnetism emerge. In fact, it's the lack of order (the 'disorder') that is pivotal to promote a new 'order'. This mechanism is referred to as 'order by disorder' and is the centre of numerous theoretical studies. In this seminar, following an introduction on the topic of ferromagnetic materials, I will show how we can use both electrical and thermal conductivities to learn everything about these phases of modulated magnetism and to validate the predictions of the 'order by disorder' theory.

  5. Magnetization studies of first-order magnetostructural phase transition in polycrystalline FeRh thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Huang, Ping; Chen, Zhe; He, Chenchong; Wang, Yuxin; Yan, Biao

    2012-10-01

    The nucleation and growth of the transformed phase in the matrix of the original phase played an important role in the progress of magnetic transition. In spite of extensive investigations in B2 ordered FeRh alloy systems, until now few studies have been conducted for clarifying the nucleation and growth mechanism of the antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic phase transition in FeRh alloys. In this work, B2 ordered polycrystalline FeRh thin films were fabricated on glass substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequent heat treatment. The as-deposited film shows a nonmagnetic property because of its face centred cubic structure. After annealing, the polycrystalline FeRh thin films show a clear first-order magnetostructural phase transition. The FeRh thin film shows an overall activation energy of about 228.6 kJ mol-1 for the entire first-order magnetostructural phase transition process. Results suggest that the first-order magnetostructural phase transition in ordered FeRh thin films follows the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model with characteristic exponent n in the range 1-4, indicating that the phase transition process is a multi-step process characterized by different nucleation and growth mechanisms of the new ferromagnetic phase. The results obtained in this study will shed light on the underlying physics of the first-order magnetostructural phase transition of ordered FeRh alloys. The applicability of the concepts used in this study to the FeRh system shows universality and can be applied to other material systems where there is a first-order magnetostructural phase transition such as in manganites.

  6. Coexistence of Magnetic Order and Ferroelectricity at 2D Nanosheet Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Bao-Wen; Osada, Minoru; Ebina, Yasuo; Ueda, Shigenori; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2016-06-22

    Multiferroic materials, in which the electronic polarization can be switched by a magnetic field and vice versa, are of fundamental importance for new electronic technologies. However, there exist very few single-phase materials that exhibit such cross-coupling properties at room temperature, and heterostructures with a strong magnetoelectric coupling have only been made with complex techniques. Here, we present a rational design for multiferroic materials by use of a layer-by-layer engineering of 2D nanosheets. Our approach to new multiferroic materials is the artificial construction of high-quality superlattices by interleaving ferromagnetic Ti0.8Co0.2O2 nanosheets with dielectric perovskite-structured Ca2Nb3O10 nanosheets. Such an artificial structuring allows us to engineer the interlayer coupling, and the (Ti0.8Co0.2O2/Ca2Nb3O10/Ti0.8Co0.2O2) superlattices induce room-temperature ferroelectricity in the presence of the ferromagnetic order. Our technique provides a new route for tailoring artificial multiferroic materials in a highly controllable manner. PMID:27295544

  7. Magnetic relaxation dynamics driven by the first-order character of magnetocaloric La(Fe,Mn,Si)13.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Edmund; Bratko, Milan; Caplin, A David; Barcza, Alexander; Katter, Matthias; Ghivelder, Luis; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-08-13

    Here, we study the temporal evolution of the magnetic field-driven paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the La(Fe,Mn,Si)13 material family. Three compositions are chosen that show varying strengths of the first-order character of the transition, as determined by the relative magnitude of their magnetic hysteresis and temperature separation between the zero-field transition temperature Tc and the temperature Tcrit, where the transition becomes continuous. Systematic variations in the fixed field, isothermal rate of relaxation are observed as a function of temperature and as a function of the degree of first-order character. The relaxation rate is reduced in more weakly first-order compositions and is also reduced as the temperature is increased towards Tcrit At temperatures above Tcrit, the metastability of the transition vanishes along with its associated temporal dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. PMID:27402929

  8. Digital lock-in detection of site-specific magnetism in magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Haskel, Daniel; Lang, Jonathan C.; Srajer, George

    2008-07-22

    The polarization and diffraction characteristics of x-rays incident upon a magnetic material are manipulated to provide a desired magnetic sensitivity in the material. The contrast in diffracted intensity of opposite helicities of circularly polarized x-rays is measured to permit separation of magnetic signals by element type and by atomic environment. This allows for the direct probing of magnetic signals from elements of the same species in nonequivalent atomic environments to better understand the behavior and characteristics of permanent magnetic materials. By using known crystallographic information together with manipulation of the polarization of x-rays having energies tuned near element-specific electronic excitations and by detecting and comparing the incident and diffracted photons at the same frequency, more accurate magnetic measurements can be made over shorter observation periods.

  9. Magnetic domain structure and thermal stabilization of laser treatment zones in soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudov, V. I.; Dragoshanskii, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    A combined effect of laser treatment and introduced fine-grained weakly magnetic impurity Mg-P-B defects on the magnetic structure and physical properties of anisotropic electrotechnical materials has been investigated. Specific features of changes in the type and behavior of the magnetic domain structure under different types of deformation (laser irradiation, scratching, and introduction of interstitial defects) have been revealed. The physical basis and optimum conditions of increase in thermal stability of local laser treatment zones in soft magnetic alloys have been determined. The obtained results open the prospects of decreasing magnetic losses in soft magnetic alloys and producing magnetic materials with a high level of physical and mechanical properties that are more resistant to operating conditions.

  10. Pulse propagation, dispersion, and energy in magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Scalora, Michael; D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Mattiucci, Nadia; Akozbek, Neset; Bloemer, Mark J; Centini, Marco; Sibilia, Concita; Bertolotti, Mario

    2005-12-01

    We discuss pulse propagation effects in generic, electrically and magnetically dispersive media that may display large material discontinuities, such as a surface boundary. Using the known basic constitutive relations between the fields, and an explicit Taylor expansion to describe the dielectric susceptibility and magnetic permeability, we derive expressions for energy density and energy dissipation rates, and equations of motion for the coupled electric and magnetic fields. We then solve the equations of motion in the presence of a single interface, and find that in addition to the now-established negative refraction process an energy exchange occurs between the electric and magnetic fields as the pulse traverses the boundary. PMID:16486072