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Sample records for magnetization reversal properties

  1. Magnetic properties and magnetization reversal of CoSm ∥ Cr thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Z. S.; Malhotra, S. S.; Liou, S. H.; Liu, Yi; Yu, M.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    1996-08-01

    In this paper the magnetic and structural properties of CoSm thin films with a Cr underlayer (CoSm‖Cr) are presented, with emphasis on the measurements of anisotropy at room and low temperature and magnetization reversal. The grain size of the Cr underlayer is about 250 Å and the thin CoSm layer (e.g., 240 Å) inherits this grain size. The CoSm layer consists of nanocrystallites, about 50 Å in diameter, embedded in an amorphous matrix. The Ar pressure, CoSm layer-thickness, and temperature dependencies of magnetic properties including magnetization, coercivity and especially the anisotropy were investigated systematically. CoSm‖Cr with coercivity up to 4.2 kOe at room temperature has been prepared. The intrinsic anisotropy is 4 × 10 6 and 1.4 × 10 7 erg/cm 3 at room temperature for CoSm(240 Å)‖Cr and CoSm(960 Å)‖Cr, respectively, and both increase to 3.9 × 10 7 erg/cm 3 at 10 K. Magnetization reversal studies indicate that the coercivity mechanism changes from wall pinning for samples prepared at lower Ar pressure (5-12 mT) to single-particle coherent rotation for samples prepared at higher pressure (30 mT). The correlations between the microstructure and magnetic properties are discussed.

  2. Magnetic properties of isolated Co nanoparticles in SiO 2 capsule prepared with reversed micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeiwa, Tetsuji; Segawa, Kazuhiro; Konishi, Kenji

    Magnetic properties and thermal stability of cobalt nanoparticles encapsulated in SiO 2 prepared with the reversed micelle technique with various w were investigated. The average diameters of the Co nanoparticles and SiO 2 capsules were about 2.9 and about 5.2 nm. The magnetization curves of Co nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetic nature. After annealing up to 673 K in vacuum, the magnetization increases by a factor of 2.4 and the average diameter of the Co particles increases by a factor of 1.3, although shape and size of the SiO 2 capsules were kept.

  3. Magnetic properties of iron-based soft magnetic composites with SiO2 coating obtained by reverse microemulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shen; Sun, Aizhi; Lu, Zhenwen; Cheng, Chuan; Gao, Xuexu

    2015-05-01

    In this work, iron-based soft magnetic composites coated with the amorphous SiO2 layer have been fabricated by utilizing tetraethoxysilane in the reverse microemulsion method, and then the effects of addition amount of SiO2 and annealing temperature on the magnetic properties were investigated. The results show that the surface of iron powders contains a thin amorphous SiO2 insulation layer, which effectively decreases the magnetic loss of synthesized magnets. The magnetic loss of coated samples decreased by 87.8% as compared with that of uncoated samples at 150 kHz. Magnetic measurements show that the sample with 1.25 wt% SiO2 has an acceptable real part and minimum imaginary part of permeability in comparison with other samples. Also, the annealing treatment increased the initial permeability, the maximum permeability and the magnetic induction and decreased the coercivity with increasing temperature in the range 300-600 °C. The results of the loss separation imply that the annealed SMCs have a higher hysteresis loss coefficient (k2) and lower eddy current loss coefficient (k3) as compared with the pure iron compacts after the same heat treatment due to the preservation of the SiO2 layer.

  4. Nanosecond magnetization reversal in nanocrystalline magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, I. Z.; Gandhi, A. A.; Khaddem-Mousavi, M. V.; Lynch, T. F.; Rahman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of dynamic magnetization reversal process in electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni and Ni80Fe20 films by employing nanosecond magnetic pulse technique. The surface morphology has been investigated using SEM, EDAX, XRD and AFM analyses and static magnetic properties of the films are characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Two different techniques are designed and employed to study the nanosecond magnetization reversal process in nanocrystalline thin films: Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) and nanosecond pulsed field magnetometer. Results of dynamical behavior as a function of several variables such as magnitude of applied bias magnetic field, amplitude and width of the pulsed magnetic field are analyzed in detail using both techniques. A computer simulation package called Object Oriented Micro-Magnetic Framework (OOMMF) has been used to simulate the magnetic domain patterns of the samples.

  5. Magnetic properties of pulse-reverse electrodeposited nanocrystalline NiFe/Cu composite wires in relation to the anodic current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seet, H. L.; Li, X. P.; Lee, K. S.; Chia, H. Y.; Zheng, H. M.; Ng, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    Ni80Fe20/Cu composite wires were developed using the pulse-reverse electrodeposition technique with the cathodic (positive) current Ic fixed at 1 mA and the anodic (negative) current IA varied from 10 to 90% of Ic. The relationship between the magnetic properties of pulse reverse electrodeposited nanocrystalline NiFe/Cu composite wires and the anodic current was investigated. The results showed that the smaller the magnitude of the anodic current, the smaller was the average nanocrystalline grain size of the deposited material and the better was the uniformity of the surface, and consequently, the better the magnetic properties.

  6. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  7. Effect of reversible adsorption on the magnetic properties of iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Zubov, V. E. Kudakov, A. D.; Levshin, N. L.; Vlasov, M. A.

    2013-05-15

    The reversible change in the domain structure and the magnetic domain width in bismuth-containing iron garnet films with an easy magnetization axis oriented normal to their surface during adsorption caused by hydrogen bonds is studied by a magnetooptical method. The dependence of the domain width on the vapor pressure of methyl alcohol or water in a cell with a sample is determined, and the time dependence of the domain width induced by the adsorption-desorption processes occurring between methyl alcohol molecules or water molecules on the film surface is studied. A model is proposed to explain the detected effects.

  8. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Filho, I. R.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (Tc) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides Tc, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (MR), and coercive field (Hc). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600-700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of nano nickel zinc ferrite synthesized by reverse micelle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Sangeeta; Katyal, S. C.; Singh, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel-zinc ferrites (Ni 0.58Zn 0.42Fe 2O 4) at different pH values (less than 9.6, 9.6, 10.96, and 11.40) for the alkali-precipitating reaction were synthesized by reverse micelle technique. X-ray diffraction reveals a well-defined nickel-zinc ferrite crystal phase at pH=9.6. Increase in pH value obstructs pure-phase formation and results in partial formation of α-Fe 2O 3. The magnetic behaviour of the samples was studied by superconducting quantum interference device. All the samples show superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature (300 K) and negligible hysteresis at low temperature (5 K). The low value of saturation magnetization is explained on the basis of spin canting. The high-field irreversibility and shifting of the hysteresis loop detected in single-phase sample has been assigned to a spin-disordered phase, which has a spin-freezing temperature of approximately 42 K and other two samples have an antiferromagnetic phase (α-Fe 2O 3) coupled to the ferromagnetic phase.

  10. Magnetic reversals and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a study of reversals of the earth's magnetic field over the past 165 Myr are presented. A stationary periodicity of 30 Myr emerges which predicts pulses of increased reversal activity centered at 10, 40, 70, . . . Myr before the present. The correlation between the reversal intensity and biological extinctions is examined, and a nontrivial discrepancy is found between the magnetic and extinction periodicity.

  11. Periodicity of the earth's magnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from an attempt to perform a relatively comprehensive analysis of the evidence for a periodicity, with harmonics, of the observed regular reversals of the earth's magnetic field. The database considered covers 296 reversals over the past 165 Myr. Histograms with bins 1 Myr apart reveal only 30 Myr reversal patterns. The reversal dates are fitted to a linear periodic function and a spectrum is computed for the residuals at the adopted dates. The possible presence of multiple periodicities is evaluated and over various time intervals. The analysis shows that a recently observed 15 Myr periodicity is probably a harmonic of the 29.5-30.5 Myr period. The calculations do not confirm an inherent magnetic reversal property of the earth. The reversals may arise from tectonic events or from impacts from extraterrestrial objects.

  12. Influence of the properties of soft collective spin wave modes on the magnetization reversal in finite arrays of dipolarly coupled magnetic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebliy, Maxim; Ognev, Alexey; Samardak, Alexander; Chebotkevich, Ludmila; Verba, Roman; Melkov, Gennadiy; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Slavin, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Magnetization reversal in finite chains and square arrays of closely packed cylindrical magnetic dots, having vortex ground state in the absence of the external bias field, has been studied experimentally by measuring static hysteresis loops, and also analyzed theoretically. It has been shown that the field Bn of a vortex nucleation in a dot as a function of the finite number N of dots in the array's side may exhibit a monotonic or an oscillatory behavior depending on the array geometry and the direction of the external bias magnetic field. The oscillations in the dependence Bn(N) are shown to be caused by the quantization of the collective soft spin wave mode, which corresponds to the vortex nucleation in a finite array of dots. These oscillations are directly related to the form and symmetry of the dispersion law of the soft SW mode: the oscillation could appear only if the minimum of the soft mode spectrum is not located at any of the symmetric points inside the first Brillouin zone of the array's lattice. Thus, the purely static measurements of the hysteresis loops in finite arrays of coupled magnetic dots can yield important information about the properties of the collective spin wave excitations in these arrays.

  13. Ancient Magnetic Reversals: Clues to the Geodynamo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the question posed by some that the earth's magnetic field may reverse. States that rocks magnetized by ancient fields may offer clues to the underlying reversal mechanism in the earth's core. (TW)

  14. Kondorski reversal in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Schubert, Eva; Enders, Axel; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetization reversal in nanowire systems, such as alnico-type permanent magnets, slanted columns produced by glancing-angle deposition, and nanowires embedded in alumina templates, is investigated by model calculations. The angular dependence of the domain-wall propagation is Kondorski-like, reminiscent of Kondorski pinning in bulk materials but with a somewhat different physics and consistent with Kerr hysteresis-loop measurements. Criss-cross patterning of alnicos improves the coercivity but reduces the remanence, with virtually zero net effect on energy product. Finally, we briefly discuss the wire-radius dependence of the coercivity in the context of "shape anisotropy" and the occurrence of interaction domains in alnico.

  15. Chemical and magnetic properties of rapidly cooled metastable ferri-ilmenite solid solutions - IV: the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, S. A.; Fabian, K.; Harrison, R. J.; Thomas, C. I.; Mukai, H.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic experiments, a Monte Carlo simulation and transmission electron microscopy observations combine to confirm variable chemical phase separation during quench and annealing of metastable ferri-ilmenite compositions, caused by inhomogeneous Fe-Ti ordering and anti-ordering. Separation begins near interfaces between growing ordered and anti-ordered domains, the latter becoming progressively enriched in ilmenite component, moving the Ti-impoverished hematite component into Fe-enriched diffusion waves near the interfaces. Even when disordered regions are eliminated, Fe-enriched waves persist and enlarge on anti-phase boundaries between growing and shrinking ordered and anti-ordered domains. Magnetic results and conceptual models show that magnetic ordering with falling T initiates in the Fe-enriched wave crests. Although representing only a tiny fraction of material, identified at highest Ts on a field-cooling curve, they control the `pre-destiny' of progressive magnetization at lower T. They can provide a positive magnetic moment in a minority of ordered ferrimagnetic material, which, by exchange coupling, then creates a self-reversed negative moment in the remaining majority. Four Ts or T ranges are recognized on typical field-cooling curves: TPD is the T range of `pre-destination'; TC is the predominant Curie T where major positive magnetization increases sharply; TMAX is where magnetization reaches a positive maximum, beyond which it is outweighed by self-reversed magnetization and TZM is the T where total magnetization passes zero. Disposition of these Ts on cooling curves indicate the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization. These results confirm much earlier suspicions that the `x-phase' responsible for self-reversed magnetization resides in Fe-enriched phase boundaries.

  16. Magnetization reversal in exchange biased nanocap arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhr, I. L.; van Dijken, S.; Malinowski, G.; Fischer, P.; Springer, F.; Hellwig, O.; Albrecht, M.

    2007-05-01

    Arrays of self-assembled polystyrene spheres with various particle sizes have been used as a substrate to study the exchange bias effect along the out-of-plane direction of Pt/Co multilayers capped with IrMn layers. The evolution of the reversal process of the resulting magnetic nanocaps was investigated by magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy (M-TXM). Tip-sample interaction-induced irreversible and reversible switching events have been observed during multiple scanning cycles in MFM imaging which are ascribed to the so-called training effect. During M-TXM imaging a drastic change in morphology has been found due to the x-ray exposure, leading to the formation of much larger spherical particles. Interestingly, these merged particles reveal again an exchange coupled single-domain magnetic cap with magnetic behaviour similar to magnetic films deposited directly on spheres of similar size. This paper was presented at the Materials Research Society Fall 2006 Meeting, 27 November-1 December 2006, as part of Symposium P: Nanoscale Magnets-Synthesis, Self-assembly, Properties and Applications, organized by J Fassbender, J Chapman and C A Ross.

  17. Micromagnetic simulations of thermally activated magnetization reversal of nanoscale magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gregory; Novotny, M. A.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2000-05-01

    Numerical integration of a stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is used to study dynamic processes in single-domain nanoscale magnets at nonzero temperatures. Special attention is given to including thermal fluctuations as a Langevin term, and the fast multipole method is used to calculate dipole-dipole interactions. It is feasible to simulate these dynamics on the nanosecond time scale for spatial discretizations that involve on the order of 104 nodes using a desktop workstation. The nanoscale magnets considered here are single pillars with large aspect ratio. Hysteresis-loop simulations are employed to study the stable and metastable configurations of the magnetization. Each pillar has magnetic end caps. In a time-dependent field the magnetization of the pillars is observed to reverse via nucleation, propagation, and coalescence of the end caps. In particular, the end caps propagate into the magnet and meet near the middle. A relatively long-lived defect is formed when end caps with opposite vorticity meet. Fluctuations are more important in the reversal of the magnetization for fields weaker than the zero-temperature coercive field, where the reversal is thermally activated. In this case, the process must be described by its statistical properties, such as the distribution of switching times, averaged over a large number of independent thermal histories.

  18. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Ni-Zn, Zn-Mn, and Ni-Mn ferrites synthesized by reverse micelle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubbala, S.; Nathani, H.; Koizol, K.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2004-05-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel-zinc, zinc-manganese, and nickel-manganese ferrites synthesized by reverse micelle synthesis technique were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction, and the magnetic behavior studied by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device. The mixed (Ni-Zn, Zn-Mn, and Ni-Mn) ferrites exhibit blocking temperatures of 11, 20, and 15 K, respectively. The small differences in the blocking temperatures are attributed to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and L-S coupling. The saturation magnetization of nanocrystalline Ni-Zn, Zn-Mn, and Ni-Mn at 300 K was 4.5, 9, and 7 emu/g, respectively, and at 2 K was 15, 19, and 14 emu/g, respectively. The lower saturation magnetization of the nanocrystalline ferrites compared to their bulk counterparts is attributed to the core-shell morphology of the particles consisting of ferromagnetically aligned core spins and a spin-glass-like surface layer.

  19. Non-uniform magnetization reversal in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Zhang, M.; Shen, B. G.; Sun, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetization reversal and exchange coupling are investigated in Pr-Fe-B melt-spun ribbons. In nanocomposite magnets, not only does the coercivity decrease but also magnetization reversal becomes more non-uniform in hard grains. The non-uniform magnetization reversal, resulting in a deterioration of squareness in hysteresis loop and a drop of the maximum Henkel plot value, mainly is caused by random arrangement of easy axes and intergranular soft regions among hard grains even with well exchange coupling between soft-hard grains in these ribbons. It is expected that the uniformity in magnetization reversal could be improved with the perfection of easy axes alignment in anisotropy nanocomposites.

  20. Chemical and magnetic properties of rapidly cooled metastable ferri-ilmenite solid solutions: implications for magnetic self-reversal and exchange bias—I. Fe-Ti order transition in quenched synthetic ilmenite 61

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Karl; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Ballaran, Tiziana Boffa; Burton, Benjamin P.

    2011-09-01

    Quenched ferri-ilmenite solid solutions X FeTiO3+ (1 -X) Fe2O3 with X≈ 0.60 contain chemical and magnetic structures important for understanding the unusual magnetic properties in this series, including self-reversal in igneous rocks and exchange bias. Here we study a composition X= 0.61, annealed at 1055 °C, above the Fe-Ti ordering temperature, then quenched. Presence of two interface-coupled phases is established by pot-bellied character of the room-temperature magnetic hysteresis loop, and large negative magnetic exchange bias below 30 K. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) dark-field imaging with the 003 reflection shows dominant Fe-Ti disordered antiferromagnetic and lesser ordered ferrimagnetic phases, the latter in lenses ≤8 nm thick. Parts of the ordered phase are in antiphase relationship, shown by high-resolution TEM imaging of Fe-rich and Ti-rich layers. TEM-EDX analyses indicate chemical phase separation during quench, with dominant compositions X= 0.56-0.63, extremes 0.50 and 0.70. Thermomagnetic experiments indicate compositions X= 0.56-0.61 are antiferromagnetic, X= 0.61-0.64 are ferrimagnetic. A sample held ˜5 min at 1063 K, increased in order, demonstrated by twofold increase in induced moment at 1 T. This then acquired self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization between 490 and 440 K. Progressive annealings of another sample at 773 K, 973 K, 1023 K and 1063 K, followed by cooling in a 1 T field, produced positive room-temperature magnetic exchange bias, only for 1023 K and 1063 K runs. These properties suggest growth of ordered regions from disordered regions, and expansion of some ordered domains against others across antiphase boundaries, thus creating self-organized structures essential for magnetic self-reversal and magnetic exchange bias.

  1. Partial spin reversal in magnetic deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, S.; Subedi, P.; Macià, F.; Li, S.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Christou, G.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-04-01

    The reversal of spins in a magnetic material as they relax toward equilibrium is accompanied by the release of Zeeman energy, which can lead to accelerated spin relaxation and the formation of a well-defined self-sustained propagating spin-reversal front known as magnetic deflagration. To date, studies of Mn12-acetate single crystals have focused mainly on deflagration in large longitudinal magnetic fields, and they found a fully spin-reversed final state. We report a systematic study of the effect of a transverse magnetic field on magnetic deflagration, and we demonstrate that in small longitudinal fields the final state consists of only partially reversed spins. Further, we measured the front speed as a function of applied magnetic field. The theory of magnetic deflagration, together with a modification that takes into account partial spin reversal, fits the transverse field dependence of the front speed but not its dependence on the longitudinal field. The most significant result of this study is the finding of a partially spin-reversed final state, which is evidence that the spins at the deflagration front are also only partially reversed.

  2. Magnetization ground state and reversal modes of magnetic nanotori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojkovic, Smiljan; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Altbir, Dora; Carvalho-Santos, Vagson L.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, and by means of micromagnetic simulations, we study the magnetic properties of toroidal nanomagnets. The magnetization ground state for different values of the aspect ratio between the toroidal and polar radii of the nanotorus has been obtained. Besides, we have shown that the vortex and the in-plane single domain states can appear as ground states for different ranges of the aspect ratio, while a single domain state with an out-of-plane magnetization is not observed. The hysteresis curves are also obtained, evidencing the existence of two reversal modes depending on the geometry: a vortex mode and a coherent rotation. A comparison between toroidal and cylindrical nanoparticles has been performed evidencing that nanotori can accommodate a vortex as the ground state for smaller volume than cylindrical nanorings.

  3. Magnetization reversal properties of Pr{sub 1-x}(Gd/Nd){sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x=0.3, 0.5, 0.7)

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Sanjay; Pal, Sudipta; Bose, Esa

    2015-06-24

    We report measurements of the temperature dependent magnetic properties of single phase orthorhombic perovskites system associated with space group Pbnm compounds Pr{sub 1-x}(Gd/Nd){sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x=0.3, 0.5, 0.7). Magnetic properties radically changes with the doping of Gd or Nd. A magnetization reversal is observed below the Neel temperature (T{sub N}), in DC magnetization measurements (at 50 Oe) in the doped compounds. The reversal of magnetization may be due to the antiparallel coupling between the two magnetic sublattices (|Pr+ Gd/ Nd | and Mn). The hysteresis plot taken at 50K indicates a ferrimagnetic characteristic and existence of spin canting of ions in the magnetic sublattices.

  4. Intrinsic anisotropy-defined magnetization reversal in submicron ring magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A. C.; Natali, M.; Lebib, A.; Chen, Y.

    2002-12-01

    We report a study of the effect of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in the magnetization reversal of submicron Co rings fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. For weak magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the complete reversal takes place via a transition from saturation at large negative fields, into a vortex configuration at small fields, and back to reverse saturation at large positive fields. When the anisotropy strength is increased to a critical value, the intermediate vortex configuration no longer exists in the magnetization reversal along the easy axis; instead, the reversal occurs through a rapid jump. However, when the applied field direction is far from the easy axis, the presence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy favors local vortex nucleation, and this leads to a similar switching process as found for low anisotropy. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that the magnetization reversal process of the rings, starts from a buckling-like reverse domain nucleation, followed by local vortex formation and an avalanche process of local vortex nucleation.

  5. Magnetization reversal in single ferromagnetic rectangular nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Alexandre B.; da Silva, Gilvânia L.; Rezende, Sergio M.; Azevedo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We report on the magnetoresistance (MR) investigation of the magnetization reversal processes in single rectangular nanowire of Permalloy. A set of nanowires with lengths ranging from 6 to 20 μm, thicknesses fixed in 10 nm, and widths between 250 nm and 1.2 μm, was fabricated by means of AFM local anodic oxidation lithography. Magnetoresistive hysteresis loops show an abrupt jump corresponding to the magnetization reversal that depends on the angle between the wire axis and the applied magnetic field direction. The field value corresponding to the abrupt jump of the MR was associated to the nucleation field deduced from the Brown equations. By the angular dependence of this magnetization reversal field we were able to identify the nucleation mode as the magnetization buckling. We have investigated the temperature dependence of the switching field as well as its stochastic nature as a function of the in-plane angle.

  6. Magnetic vortex state stability, reversal and dynamics in restricted geometries.

    PubMed

    Guslienko, K Yu

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic vortices are typically the ground states in geometrically confined ferromagnets with small magnetocrystalline anisotropy. In this article I review static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex state in small particles with nanoscale thickness and sub-micron and micron lateral sizes (magnetic dots). Magnetic dots made of soft magnetic material shaped as flat circular and elliptic cylinders are considered. Such mesoscopic dots undergo magnetization reversal through successive nucleation, displacement and annihilation of magnetic vortices. The reversal process depends on the stability of different possible zero-field magnetization configurations with respect to the dot geometrical parameters and application of an external magnetic field. The interdot magnetostatic interaction plays an important role in magnetization reversal for dot arrays with a small dot-to-dot distance, leading to decreases in the vortex nucleation and annihilation fields. Magnetic vortices reveal rich, non-trivial dynamical properties due to existance of the vortex core bearing topological charges. The vortex ground state magnetization distribution leads to a considerable modification of the nature of spin excitations in comparison to those in the uniformly magnetized state. A magnetic vortex confined in a magnetically soft ferromagnet with micron-sized lateral dimensions possesses a characteristic dynamic excitation known as a translational mode that corresponds to spiral-like precession of the vortex core around its equilibrium position. The translation motions of coupled vortices are considered. There are, above the vortex translation mode eigenfrequencies, several dynamic magnetization eigenmodes localized outside the vortex core whose frequencies are determined principally by dynamic demagnetizing fields appearing due to restricted dot geometry. The vortex excitation modes are classified as translation modes and radially or azimuthally symmetric spin waves over the vortex

  7. Thermodynamics and magnetization reversal in artificial brickwork spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wang, T. X.; Hou, Z. T.; Liu, H. Y.; Dai, X. F.; Liu, G. D.

    2016-05-01

    The thermodynamics and magnetization reversal behavior of three artificial frustrated brickwork systems are investigated by means of the Monte Carlo method. Three frustrated systems have different array patterns of ferromagnetic nanoislands, and consequently different geometry symmetry and magnetic properties. The simulated results show that two brickwork systems which have only 'three-spins' vertex exhibit the long-range ordered magnetic ground state, and one brickwork system that contains mixed 'two-spins' and 'four-spins' vertex as well as 'three-spins' vertex has a high degeneracy of ground state and no long-range order. In all three frustrated systems, there occurs the phase transition from the magnetic ground order to disorder. Three frustrated brickwork lattices show significant differences in the reversal mechanism in the presence of magnetic field for different lattice spacings.

  8. Origin of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Richard J; Kasama, Takeshi; White, Thomas A; Simpson, Edward T; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E

    2005-12-31

    The ability of certain magnetic minerals to acquire a remanent magnetization that opposes the direction of the Earth's magnetic field has fascinated rock magnetists since its discovery in 1951. Here, we determine the origin of this phenomenon, which is termed self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization (SR-TRM). We present direct transmission electron microscopy observations of negative exchange coupling across antiphase domain boundaries (APBs) in ilmenite-hematite. This coupling is linked intrinsically to the origin of SR-TRM and is responsible for the formation of two new classes of magnetic domain wall at APBs. We present simulations of the chemical and magnetic structure of the APBs and show that SR-TRM is generated by coupling between strongly ferrimagnetic Ti-rich domains and weakly ferrimagnetic Fe-rich domains, which form during the transition from short- to long-range cation order. PMID:16486415

  9. Atomic structure and magnetic properties of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles produced by reverse micelle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Everett E.; O'Connor, Charles J.; Harris, Vincent G.

    1999-04-01

    Using the aqueous cores of reverse micelles as nanoreactors, nanoparticles (d˜10 nm) of the mixed ferrite MnFe2O4 were produced. Seven processing trials were performed where the concentration of ammonium hydroxide, reaction temperature, and the oxidizing agent were varied. All trials result in Mn-ferrite particles with varying chemistry and structure. The Mn concentration in the resulting ferrite is strongly enhanced by both the presence of H2O2 as an oxidizing agent and a surplus of ammonium hydroxide. The increased Mn concentration correlates with a higher fraction of octahedrally coordinated Mn cations. When near-stoic amounts of ammonium hydroxide are used, the resulting ferrites are nearly stoichiometric with a more equitable distribution of Mn cations on the octahedral and tetrahedral sublattices. In all ferrite nanoparticles, the Mn cations have a preference for octahedral site occupancy that is larger than the 20% measured in bulk Mn-ferrite. We attribute the cation filling trends to the stabilization of excess trivalent Mn during processing.

  10. Magnetic stripes and skyrmions with helicity reversals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuzhen; Mostovoy, Maxim; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Zhang, Weizhu; Kimoto, Koji; Matsui, Yoshio; Kaneko, Yoshio; Nagaosa, Naoto; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2012-06-01

    It was recently realized that topological spin textures do not merely have mathematical beauty but can also give rise to unique functionalities of magnetic materials. An example is the skyrmion--a nano-sized bundle of noncoplanar spins--that by virtue of its nontrivial topology acts as a flux of magnetic field on spin-polarized electrons. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct visualization of skyrmions in noncentrosymmetric helimagnets. Topologically, skyrmions are equivalent to magnetic bubbles (cylindrical domains) in ferromagnetic thin films, which were extensively explored in the 1970s for data storage applications. In this study we use Lorentz microscopy to image magnetic domain patterns in the prototypical magnetic oxide-M-type hexaferrite with a hint of scandium. Surprisingly, we find that the magnetic bubbles and stripes in the hexaferrite have a much more complex structure than the skyrmions and spirals in helimagnets, which we associate with the new degree of freedom--helicity (or vector spin chirality) describing the direction of spin rotation across the domain walls. We observe numerous random reversals of helicity in the stripe domain state. Random helicity of cylindrical domain walls coexists with the positional order of magnetic bubbles in a triangular lattice. Most unexpectedly, we observe regular helicity reversals inside skyrmions with an unusual multiple-ring structure. PMID:22615354

  11. Fingerprinting Magnetic Nanostructures by First Order Reversal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai

    2007-03-01

    Realistic systems of magnetic nanostructures inevitably have inhomogeneities, which are manifested in distributions of magnetic properties, mixed magnetic phases, different magnetization reversal mechanisms, etc. The first order reversal curve (FORC) method [1-3] is ideally suited for ``fingerprinting'' such systems, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Here we present recent FORC studies on a few technologically important systems. In arrays of Fe nanodots [4], as the dot size decreases from 67 to 52nm, we have observed a vortex state to single-domain transition. Despite subtle changes in the major hysteresis loops, striking differences are seen in the FORC diagrams. The FORC method also gives quantitative measures of the magnetic phase fractions and vortex nucleation and annihilation fields. Furthermore, with decreasing temperature, it is more difficult to nucleate vortices within the dots and the single domain phase fraction increases. In exchange spring magnets [3], we have investigated the reversibility of the soft and hard layers and the interlayer exchange coupling. In FeNi/polycrystalline-FePt films, the FeNi and FePt layers reverse in a continuous process via a vertical spiral. In Fe/epitaxial-SmCo films, the reversal proceeds by a reversible rotation of the Fe soft layer, followed by an irreversible switching of the SmCo hard layer. As the SmCo partially demagnetizes, the Fe layer still remains reversible, as revealed by second order reversal curves (SORC). The exchange coupling between the two layers can be extracted as a function of the SmCo demagnetization state. These results demonstrate that FORC is a powerful method for magnetization reversal studies, due to its capability of capturing magnetic inhomogeneities, sensitivity to irreversible switching, and the quantitative phase information it can extract. Work done in collaboration with J. E. Davies, R. K. Dumas, J. Olamit, C. P. Li, I. V. Roshchin, I. K. Schuller, O. Hellwig, E. E. Fullerton, J. S

  12. Thermal magnetization reversal in arrays of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gregory; Novotny, M. A.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2001-06-01

    The results of large-scale simulations investigating the dynamics of magnetization reversal in arrays of single-domain nanomagnets after a rapid reversal of the applied field at nonzero temperature are presented. The numerical micromagnetic approach uses the Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation including contributions from thermal fluctuations and long-range dipole{endash}dipole demagnetizing effects implemented using a fast-multipole expansion. The individual model nanomagnets are 9 nm{times}9 nm{times}150 nm iron pillars similar to those fabricated on a surface with scanning tunneling microscope assisted chemical vapor deposition [S. Wirth , J. Appl. Phys. 85, 5249 (1999)]. Nanomagnets oriented perpendicular to the surface and spaced 300 nm apart in linear arrays are considered. The applied field is always oriented perpendicular to the surface. When the magnitude of the applied field is less than the coercive value, about 2000 Oe for an individual nanomagnet, magnetization reversal in the nanomagnets can only occur by thermally activated processes. Even though the interaction from the dipole moment of neighboring magnets in this geometry is only about 1 Oe, less than 1% of the coercive field, it can have a large impact on the switching dynamics. What determines the height of the free-energy barrier is the difference between the coercive and applied fields, and 1 Oe can be a significant fraction of that. The magnetic orientations of the neighbors are seen to change the behavior of the nanomagnets in the array significantly. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Magnetization reversal driven by a spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetization reversal of a magnetic free layer under spin transfer torque (STT) effect from a magnetic hard layer with a fixed magnetization direction and an oscillating layer is investigated. By including STT from the oscillating layer with in-plane anisotropy and orthogonal polarizer, magnetization-time dependence of free layer is determined. The results show that the frequency and amplitude of oscillations can be varied by adjusting the current density and magnetic properties. For an optimal oscillation frequency (f{sub opt}), a reduction of the switching time (t{sub 0}) of the free layer is observed. Both f{sub opt} and t{sub 0} increase with the anisotropy field of the free layer.

  14. Magnetic reversals of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, D. H.; Dessler, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that the gas-giant planets Jupiter and Saturn undergo solar-type magnetic reversals is examined using dynamo theory and radiotelescope data on decametriic emissions from Jupiter. Possible values are found for the effects of the fluctuating velocity field, the magnetic diffusivity, and change in the rotation rate of a dynamo over a characteristic length. The radio emissions from Jupiter decreased in intensity from 1961-72 and rose steadily to the end of 1978, which could have been caused by a change in the Jovian magnetic field. Since Jupiter may have a small rocky core embedded in metallic hydrogen which comprises 75 percent of the radius of the planet, the planetary magnetic field may extend into the cores of its satellites. The dynamo characteristics, like those of Saturn, would be chaotic, although quasi-periodic reversals could occur over intervals on the order of centuries instead of decades such as with the sun and much longer periods such as with the earth.

  15. Magnetic reversals in a modified shell model for magnetohydrodynamics turbulence.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Giuseppina; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the paper is the study of dynamo action using a simple nonlinear model in the framework of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The nonlinear behavior of the system is described by using a shell model for velocity field and magnetic field fluctuations, modified for the magnetic field at the largest scale by a term describing a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Turbulent fluctuations generate a dynamical situation where the large-scale magnetic field jumps between two states which represent the opposite polarities of the magnetic field. Despite its simplicity, the model has the capability to describe a long time series of reversals from which we infer results about the statistics of persistence times and scaling laws of cancellations between opposite polarities for different magnetic diffusivity coefficients. These properties of the model are compared with real paleomagnetic data, thus revealing the origin of long-range correlations in the process. PMID:20866731

  16. Magnetic reversals in a modified shell model for magnetohydrodynamics turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, Giuseppina; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the paper is the study of dynamo action using a simple nonlinear model in the framework of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The nonlinear behavior of the system is described by using a shell model for velocity field and magnetic field fluctuations, modified for the magnetic field at the largest scale by a term describing a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Turbulent fluctuations generate a dynamical situation where the large-scale magnetic field jumps between two states which represent the opposite polarities of the magnetic field. Despite its simplicity, the model has the capability to describe a long time series of reversals from which we infer results about the statistics of persistence times and scaling laws of cancellations between opposite polarities for different magnetic diffusivity coefficients. These properties of the model are compared with real paleomagnetic data, thus revealing the origin of long-range correlations in the process.

  17. Effect of high-frequency driving current on magnetization reversal in Co-rich amorphous microwires

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhik, A.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Blanco, J.M.

    2004-09-20

    Influence of high frequency electric current on the magnetization reversal in Co-rich glass covered amorphous microwires has been studied. The strong correlation between the coercivity and the circular magnetization in the outer shell of the wire has been found. The change of the mechanism of magnetization reversal in the presence of high-frequency circular magnetic field, which is related with the impedance properties, is presented.

  18. Lightweight Magnetic Cooler With a Reversible Circulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Weibo; McCormick, John

    2011-01-01

    A design of a highly efficient and lightweight space magnetic cooler has been developed that can continuously provide remote/distributed cooling at temperatures in the range of 2 K with a heat sink at about 15 K. The innovative design uses a cryogenic circulator that enables the cooler to operate at a high cycle frequency to achieve a large cooling capacity. The ability to provide remote/distributed cooling not only allows flexible integration with a payload and spacecraft, but also reduces the mass of the magnetic shields needed. The active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) system is shown in the figure. This design mainly consists of two identical magnetic regenerators surrounded by their superconducting magnets and a reversible circulator. Each regenerator also has a heat exchanger at its warm end to reject the magnetization heat to the heat sink, and the two regenerators share a cold-end heat exchanger to absorb heat from a cooling target. The circulator controls the flow direction, which cycles in concert with the magnetic fields, to facilitate heat transfer. Helium enters the hot end of the demagnetized column, is cooled by the refrigerant, and passes into the cold-end heat exchanger to absorb heat. The helium then enters the cold end of the magnetized column, absorbing heat from the refrigerant, and enters the hot-end heat exchanger to reject the magnetization heat. The efficient heat transfer in the AMRR allows the system to operate at a relatively short cycle period to achieve a large cooling power. The key mechanical components in the magnetic cooler are the reversible circulator and the magnetic regenerators. The circulator uses non-contacting, self-acting gas bearings and clearance seals to achieve long life and vibration- free operation. There are no valves or mechanical wear in this circulator, so the reliability is predicted to be very high. The magnetic regenerator employs a structured bed configuration. The core consists of a stack of thin

  19. Recording-media-related morphology and magnetic properties of crystalline CoPt3 and CoPt3-Au core-shell nanoparticles synthesized via reverse microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmanrokh, Ghazaleh; Hashim, Mansor; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Navasery, Manizheh; Soltani, Nayereh; Vaziri, Parisa; Kanagesan, Samikannu; Sabbaghizadeh, Rahim; Ezzad Shafie, Mohd Shamsul

    2014-09-01

    A comparative experimental study of the magnetic properties of CoPt3 and CoPt3/Au nanoparticles as well as a detailed study of the structural properties of the samples by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer is presented in this work. In addition, the effect of particle size on the structure and magnetic properties of nanoparticles prepared by microemulsion is studied. The correlation between particle size, crystallinity, and magnetization was studied as well. CoPt nanoparticles have been studied intensively over the last decade because of their increased magnetic anisotropy in the ordered phase that can be interesting for high density magnetic recording. A significant high coercivity for as-prepared CoPt3 and CoPt3-Au nanoparticles was obtained at room temperature and enhanced after annealing. The focused aim of our study is to obtain high coercivity at room temperature that follows the Curie-Weiss law. This indicates an interacting system in which the nanoparticles behave like single domain ferromagnetic materials in the particle size range of 8 to 35 nm. In addition, the interaction increases by cooling the samples to low temperature around 15 K. Temperature dependence 1/M graph was obtained to investigate the behavior of nanoparticles at low temperature and shows the best fit with Curie-Weis mode.

  20. Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal in Exchange Bias Systems*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael

    2001-03-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry measured the in-plane projection of the net-magnetization vector of polycrystalline Fe films exchange-coupled to (110) FeF2 antiferromagnetic (AF) films of controlled crystalline quality. For the sample with the single crystal AF film, we observed perpendicular exchange coupling across the ferromagnetic (F)-AF interface on either side of the hysteresis loop at coercivity. Perpendicular exchange coupling was observed regardless of cooling field orientation parallel or perpendicular to the AF anisotropy axis. Yet, for one orientation the exchange bias was zero; thus, perpendicular exchange coupling is not a sufficient condition for exchange bias. For samples with twinned AF films, an asymmetry in the spin flip scattering on either side of the hysteresis loop, and consequently in the magnetization reversal process, was observed. The origin of the asymmetry is explained by frustration of perpendicular exchange coupling, which enhances exchange bias and leads to 45° exchange coupling across the F-AF interface. The easy axis in the ferromagnet, which gives rise to asymmetric magnetization reversal in the twinned samples, is not present in samples with (110) textured polycrystalline AF films; and consequently exchange bias is reduced. *Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, BES-DMS under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-36, Grant No. DE-FG03-87ER-45332 and funds from the University of California Collaborative University and Laboratory Assisted Research. ÝWork in collaboration with A. Hoffmann, P. Yashar, J. Groves, R. Springer, P. Arendt (LANL), C. Leighton, K. Liu, Ivan K. Schuller (UCSD), J. Nogués (UAB), C.F. Majkrzak, J.A. Dura (NIST), H. Fritzsche (HMI), V. Leiner, H. Lauter (ILL).

  1. Numerical simulations of magnetic reversal in layered spring magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.S.; Kaper, H.G.; Leaf, G.K.

    2001-01-24

    This report summarizes the results of numerical investigations of magnetic reversal in layered spring magnets. A one-dimensional model is used of a film consisting of several atomic layers of soft material on top of several atomic layers of hard material. Each atomic layer is taken to be uniformly magnetized, and spatial inhomogeneities within an atomic layer are neglected. The state of such a system is described by a chain of magnetic spin vectors. Each spin vector behaves like a spinning top driven locally by the effective magnetic field and subject to damping (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation). A numerical integration scheme for the LLG equation is presented that is unconditionally stable and preserves the magnitude of the magnetization vector at all times. The results of numerical investigations for a bilayer in a rotating in-plane magnetic field show hysteresis with a basic period of 2{pi} at moderate fields and hysteresis with a basic period of {pi} (or any multiple thereof) at strong fields.

  2. Intercalation-driven reversible control of magnetism in bulk ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subho; Das, Bijoy; Knapp, Michael; Brand, Richard A; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst

    2014-07-16

    An extension in magnetoelectric effects is proposed to include reversible chemistry-controlled magnetization variations. This ion-intercalation-driven magnetic control can be fully reversible and pertinent to bulk material volumes. The concept is demonstrated for ferromagnetic iron oxide where the intercalated lithium ions cause valence change and partial redistribution of Fe(3+) cations yielding a large and fully reversible change in magnetization at room temperature. PMID:24591165

  3. Theoretical limit in the magnetization reversal of stoner particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, X R; Sun, Z Z

    2007-02-16

    Magnetization reversal of uniaxial Stoner particles under the Slonczewski spin-transfer torques of polarized electric currents is investigated. Based on the modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of magnetization dynamics, the theoretical limit of critical currents required to reverse a magnetization with an arbitrary polarized current is obtained. Under a constant polarization degree and constant current amplitude, the optimal current pulse for the fastest magnetization reversal is derived. These results can be used as benchmarks to evaluate different reversal strategies besides other possible usages. PMID:17359053

  4. Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Debangsu Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2014-02-21

    Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

  5. Magnetic properties of electrodeposited nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydon, G. P.; Hoon, S. R.; Farley, A. N.; Tomlinson, S. L.; Valera, M. S.; Attenborough, K.; Schwarzacher, W.

    1997-04-01

    Electrodeposited multilayered nanowires grown within a polycarbonate membrane constitute a new medium in which giant magnetoresistance (GMR) perpendicular to the plane of the multilayers can be measured. These structures can exhibit a perpendicular GMR of at least 22% at ambient temperature. We performed detailed studies both of reversible magnetization and of irreversible remanent magnetization curves for CoNiCu/Cu/CoNiCu multilayered and CoNiCu pulse-deposited nanowire systems with Co:Ni ratios of 6:4 and 7:3 respectively in the range 10 - 290 K, allowing the magnetic phases of these structures to be identified. Shape anisotropy in the pulse-deposited nanowire and inter-layer coupling in the multilayered nanowire are shown to make important contributions to the magnetic properties. Dipolar-like interactions are found to predominate in both nanowire systems. Magnetic force microscope (MFM) images of individual multilayered nanowires exhibit a contrast consistent with there being a soft magnetization parallel to the layers. Switching of the magnetic layers in the multilayered structure into the direction of the MFM tip's stray field is observed.

  6. Geometric control of the magnetization reversal in antidot lattices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Weigand, Markus; Träger, Nick; Schütz, Gisela; Goering, Eberhard J.; Skripnik, Maxim; Nowak, Ulrich; Haering, Felix; Ziemann, Paul; Wiedwald, Ulf

    2016-03-01

    While the magnetic properties of nanoscaled antidot lattices in in-plane magnetized materials have widely been investigated, much less is known about the microscopic effect of hexagonal antidot lattice patterning on materials with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. By using a combination of first-order reversal curve measurements, magnetic x-ray microscopy, and micromagnetic simulations we elucidate the microscopic origins of the switching field distributions that arise from the introduction of antidot lattices into out-of-plane magnetized GdFe thin films. Depending on the geometric parameters of the antidot lattice we find two regimes with different magnetization reversal processes. For small antidots, the reversal process is dominated by the exchange interaction and domain wall pinning at the antidots drives up the coercivity of the system. On the other hand, for large antidots the dipolar interaction is dominating which leads to fragmentation of the system into very small domains that can be envisaged as a basis for a bit patterned media.

  7. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jincheng; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Field induced magnetization reversal was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value (on nanometer scale) in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The ultralow field switching phenomenon was missed in the parallel configuration where both the anisotropic axes are aligned along the separation line of the two particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction [J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104303 (2011)] where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles might be implemented as a composite information bit.

  8. Magnetization reversal in TmCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshii, Kenji

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► We observed two magnetization reversals in TmCrO{sub 3}. ► The reversal at 28 K is attributed to antiparallel coupling between Cr{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. ► The other reversal originates from spin reorientation. ► Magnetocaloric effect is observed at the spin reorientation temperature. ► Characteristic magnetization switching is demonstrated. -- Abstract: The perovskite chromite TmCrO{sub 3} shows magnetization reversal at two temperatures. The reversal at ∼28 K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Tm{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments, while that at the lower temperature (∼6–7 K) is rooted in a rotation of the magnetic moments. Magnetocaloric measurements offer a relatively large entropy change (∼4–5 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1}) at the lower temperature. The reversal at ∼28 K is accompanied by a sign change of an exchange-bias-like field. The absence of the training effect suggests that this behavior is rooted in unidirectional magnetic anisotropy. The existence of the two magnetization reversals offers the characteristic switching of magnetization. For example, the magnetization is flipped without changing the direction of the applied magnetic field.

  9. Magnetization Reversal and Thermal Activation in Co/Pt Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrim, J. Mark; Kirby, Roger; Sellmyer, David

    2000-03-01

    Co/Pt multilayers not only display interesting intrinsic magnetic properties such as perpendicular anisotropy but also have technological applications. As grain sizes become smaller and smaller, the role of thermal activation becomes important in understanding magnetization reversal [1,2]. We have prepared [Co 3 Å/Pt 9 Å] x N thin films where N ranges from 6 to 24 by DC magnetron sputtering at various Ar pressures. As the sputtering gas pressure is changed, we find the lateral grain size changes from 20 nm to 45 nm. At the same time, the hysteresis loops become less square and the coercivity increases from a few hundred Oe to above 5 kOe. Activation volumes were determined for the samples both by the field sweep rate method and viscosity measurements. These results will be discussed in terms of simple models of thermally assisted magnetization reversal. This work is supported by NFS grant DMR 9623992 and CMRA. [1] J. S. Shen, R. D. Kirby, K. Wierman, Z. S. Shan, and D. J. Sellmyer, J. App. Phys. 73, 6418 (1993). [2] X. Chen and M. H. Kryder. J. App. Phys. 85, 5006 (1999).

  10. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  11. Chondrule magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P. J.; Obryan, M. V.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: chondrule magnetic properties; chondrules from the same meteorite; and REM values (the ratio for remanence initially measured to saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field). The preliminary field estimates for chondrules magnetizing environments range from minimal to a least several mT. These estimates are based on REM values and the characteristics of the remanence initially measured (natural remanence) thermal demagnetization compared to the saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field demagnetization.

  12. Magnetically Responsive Nanostructures with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingsheng; Yin, Yadong

    2016-05-25

    Stimuli-responsive materials can sense specific environmental changes and adjust their physical properties in a predictable manner, making them highly desired components for designing novel sensors, intelligent systems, and adaptive structures. Magnetically responsive structures have unique advantages in applications, as external magnetic stimuli can be applied in a contactless manner and cause rapid and reversible responses. In this Perspective, we discuss our recent progress in the design and fabrication of nanostructured materials with various optical responses to externally applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate tuning of the optical properties by taking advantage of the magnetic fields' abilities to induce magnetic dipole-dipole interactions or control the orientation of the colloidal magnetic nanostructures. The design strategies are expected to be extendable to the fabrication of novel responsive materials with new optical effects and many other physical properties. PMID:27115174

  13. Magnetization reversal modes in fourfold Co nano-wire systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic nano-wire systems are, as well as other patterned magnetic structures, of special interest for novel applications, such as magnetic storage media. In these systems, the coupling between neighbouring magnetic units is most important for the magnetization reversal process of the complete system, leading to a variety of magnetization reversal mechanisms. This article examines the influence of the magnetic material on hysteresis loop shape, coercive field, and magnetization reversal modes. While iron nano-wire systems exhibit flat or one-step hysteresis loops, systems consisting of cobalt nano-wires show hysteresis loops with several longitudinal steps and transverse peaks, correlated to a rich spectrum of magnetization reversal mechanisms. We show that changing the material parameters while the system geometry stays identical can lead to completely different hysteresis loops and reversal modes. Thus, especially for finding magnetic nano-systems which can be used as quaternary or even higher-order storage devices, it is rational to test several materials for the planned systems. Apparently, new materials may lead to novel and unexpected behaviour - and can thus result in novel functionalities.

  14. Reversible magnetization process and magnetoresistance of soft-magnetic (NiFe) /hard-magnetic (CoSm) bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibu, K.; Nagahama, T.; Shinjo, T.

    1996-10-01

    The magnetization process and magnetoresistance were studied for soft-magnetic (NiFe)/hard-magnetic (CoSm) bilayers. In the course of the magnetization reversal, the magnetic moments in the soft magnetic layer rotate reversibly, while they are pinned by the hard magnetic layer at the interface; consequently, the direction of the magnetic moment distributes successively as in a Bloch wall. The magnetoresistance also shows a reversible change, reflecting the magnetization process. The change is explained by means of the anisotropic magnetoresistance due to angle distributed magnetic moments.

  15. Magnetization reversal mechanism of a sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet with Dy segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Satsu, Yuichi; Komuro, Matahiro; Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2011-04-01

    The magnetization reversal mechanism of a sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet with Dy segregation near grain boundaries (GB) was studied using spin polarized scanning electron spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. More fine magnetic domains near GB were found in the magnet with Dy segregation than in the magnet without treatment. Magnetic modifications near the GB had no effect on the magnetization development. The domain wall motion of a quasihard magnetic component in the magnet with Dy segregation was suppressed in comparison with those in the magnet without treatment; this could also be confirmed in the different behaviors of asymmetry components toward a magnetic field direction between both magnets. From analyzing the probability of rotating magnetization near the GB, the magnetization reversal of the magnet with Dy segregation was more difficult to produce than those of the magnet without treatment.

  16. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Wu, B. L.; Ng, V.; Asbahi, M.; Yang, J. K. W.

    2014-10-20

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  17. Reverse draining of a magnetic soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D. E.; Pelesko, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the draining of a vertical magnetic soap film in the presence of a strong, nonuniform magnetic field. A colloidal suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a regular soap solution yields a magnetic soap solution, from which a soap film is formed across an isolated frame. Experiments demonstrate that with a strong magnet placed above the frame, the film may be made to flow upward against gravity. The amount of film draining upward is altered by varying the distance between the frame and magnet. A first mathematical model is developed for the evolution of the film. Simulations demonstrate qualitative agreement with the experiment.

  18. Reversible electric-field control of magnetization at oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, F A; Liu, Y H; Salafranca, J; Nemes, N; Iborra, E; Sanchez-Santolino, G; Varela, M; Garcia Hernandez, M; Freeland, J W; Zhernenkov, M; Fitzsimmons, M R; Okamoto, S; Pennycook, S J; Bibes, M; Barthélémy, A; te Velthuis, S G E; Sefrioui, Z; Leon, C; Santamaria, J

    2014-01-01

    Electric-field control of magnetism has remained a major challenge which would greatly impact data storage technology. Although progress in this direction has been recently achieved, reversible magnetization switching by an electric field requires the assistance of a bias magnetic field. Here we take advantage of the novel electronic phenomena emerging at interfaces between correlated oxides and demonstrate reversible, voltage-driven magnetization switching without magnetic field. Sandwiching a non-superconducting cuprate between two manganese oxide layers, we find a novel form of magnetoelectric coupling arising from the orbital reconstruction at the interface between interfacial Mn spins and localized states in the CuO2 planes. This results in a ferromagnetic coupling between the manganite layers that can be controlled by a voltage. Consequently, magnetic tunnel junctions can be electrically toggled between two magnetization states, and the corresponding spin-dependent resistance states, in the absence of a magnetic field. PMID:24953219

  19. Angular-dependent magnetization reversal processes in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetization reversal in interconnected kagome artificial spin ice structures has been studied through experimental MOKE measurements and micromagnetic simulations. This reversal is mediated by the propagation of magnetic domain walls along the interconnecting bars, which either nucleate at the vertex or arrive following an interaction in a neighboring vertex. The physical differences in these processes show a distinct angular dependence allowing the different contributions to be identified. The configuration of the initial magnetization state, either locally or on a full sublattice of the system, controls the reversal characteristics of the array within a certain field window. This shows how the available magnetization reversal routes can be manipulated and the system can be trained.

  20. Sun's Polar Magnetic Field Reversals in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishkalo, M. I.; Leiko, U. M.

    It is known that polar magnetic field of the Sun changes its sign at the maximum of solar cycle. These changes were called as polar field reversals. We investigated dynamics of high-latitude solar magnetic fields separately in northern and southern hemispheres. Solar polar field strength measurements from the Wilcox Solar Observatory and low-resolution synoptic magnetic maps from the SOLIS project and from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory were used. We analyzed total magnetic flux at near-polar zones, starting from 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85 degrees of latitude, and found time points when the total magnetic flux changed its sign. It was concluded that total magnetic flux changed its sign at first at lower latitudes and finally near the poles. Single polar magnetic field reversal was found in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere was characterized by three-fold magnetic field reversal. Polar magnetic field reversals finished in northern and southern hemispheres by CR 2150 and CR 2162, respectively.

  1. Site-specific magnetization reversal studies of magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, A.; Haskel, D.; Lang, J. C.; Islam, Z.; Srajer, G.; Ankudinov, A.; Subias, G.; Garcia, J.

    2006-04-01

    The mechanism of magnetization reversal in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) single crystals was studied using site-specific magnetic sensitive diffraction anomalous near-edge structure. By exploiting the angular dependence of the cross section, we are able to show that the mechanism of reversal involves a mixture of coherent rotation and domain formation. The results reveal additional details to that provided by XMCD measurements, which average over nonequivalent sites.

  2. Reversible and Irreversible Magnetization Switching in Co/Pt Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. E.; Liu, Kai; Hellwig, O.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2004-03-01

    The magnetization reversal processes in [Co(4ÅPt(7ÅN multilayers (N=5-150) with perpendicular anisotropy^1 have been investigated by a first order reversal curve (FORC) technique^2. In most samples, the resultant FORC distributions have three distinct regions: as the reversal magnetic field increases, the magnetization first goes through an irreversible switching process, the onset of which corresponds to the nucleation of reverse domains; interestingly a mostly reversible process is then observed, indicating the propagation of domains; finally a second irreversible process brings the sample to negative saturation, corresponding to the final annihilation of domains. For samples with larger numbers of repeats (N), the major loop becomes more and more slanted as the reverse domains form a labyrinth stripe domain state. Correspondingly, in the FORC distribution, the reversible region spans over a larger and larger field range. These irreversible and reversible processes are direct manifestations of reversal via domain nucleation and propagation, as well as rotation processes. ^1O. Hellwig, G. P. Denbeaux, J. B. Kortright, and E. E. Fullerton, Physica B 336, 136 (2003). ^2H. G. Katzgraber, F. Pázmándi, C. R. Pike, Kai Liu, R. T. Scalettar, K. L. Verosub, and G. T. Zimányi, Phys. Rev. Lett., 89, 257202 (2002).

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Analytical model for reverse characteristics of 4H-SiC merged PN-Schottky (MPS) diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qing-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Men; Lü, Hong-Liang; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zheng, Qing-Li

    2009-12-01

    A new analytical model for reverse characteristics of 4H-SiC merged PN-Schottky diodes (MPS or JBS) is developed. To accurately calculate the reverse characteristics of the 4H-SiC MPS diode, the relationship between the electric field at the Schottky contact and the reverse bias is analytically established by solving the cylindrical Poisson equation after the channel has pinched off. The reverse current density calculated from the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) theory is verified by comparing it with the experimental result, showing that they are in good agreement with each other. Moreover, the effects of P-region spacing (S) and P-junction depth (Xj) on the characteristics of 4H-SiC MPS are analysed, and are particularly useful for optimizing the design of the high voltage MPS diodes.

  4. Dynamic origin of first and second order phase transitions in magnetization reversal of elliptical nanodots.

    SciTech Connect

    Montoncello, F.; Giovannini, L.; Nizzoli, F.; Vavassori, P.; Grimsditch, M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. di Ferrara; CNISM; CNR-INFM; CIC nanoGUNE Res. Ctr.

    2008-06-01

    We study the magnetization reversal in elliptical nanodots with the external field applied exactly along the minor (hard) axis. By varying the magnitude of the applied field, several first and second order transitions take place and the system proceeds through magnetic configurations characterized by different symmetry properties. The dynamical matrix method is used to calculate the spin excitations as function of the applied field. This model system allows us to investigate the relationship between the singularities of the magnetization, the presence of soft spin excitations, and the symmetry properties of the static and dynamic magnetization fields. Rules that govern the transitions are formulated.

  5. Reversible magnetism switching in graphene-based systems via the decoration of photochromic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2013-11-01

    By first principles calculations, we demonstrate that when decorated with photochromic molecules, it is possible to use light to reversibly control the magnetic properties of a nanoscale magnetic system. The combination of a graphene-based magnetic system and a photochromic azobenzene molecule is chosen as a model system. The trans and cis isomers of the azobenzene molecule that can be converted between each other by means of photoexcitations are found to have drastically different effects on the magnetic properties of the system. The results may pave the way for the future design of light controllable molecular-scale spintronic devices.

  6. Particle Dynamics Discrimination Between Current Sheet Magnetic Field Reversal and Magnetic Neutral Line Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. F., Jr.; Holland, D. L.; Svetich, J.

    2014-12-01

    We consider dynamical signatures of ion motion that discriminate between a current sheet magnetic field reversal and a magnetic neutral line field. These two related dynamical systems have been studied previously as chaotic scattering systems with application to the Earth's magnetotail. Both systems exhibit chaotic scattering over a wide range of parameter values. The structure and properties of their respective phase spaces have been used to elucidate potential dynamical signatures that affect spacecraft measured ion distributions. In this work we consider the problem of discrimination between these two magnetic structures using charged particle dynamics. For example we show that signatures based on the well known energy resonance in the current sheet field provide good discrimination since the resonance is not present in the neutral line case. While both fields can lead to fractal exit region structuring, their characteristics are different and also may provide some field discrimination. Application to magnetotail field and particle parameters will be presented

  7. Stochastic nature of domain nucleation process in magnetization reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, Peter; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    Whether domain configurations that occur during magnetization reversal processes on a nanoscale are deterministic or nondeterministic is both fundamentally of great interest and technologically of utmost relevance[1]. However, due to the limited spatial resolution of the microscopic measurement techniques employed so far, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of local domain nucleation during magnetization reversal in real space at the nanometer scale has yet been reported. In this work, we have investigated a stochastic nature of domain nucleation process during magnetization reversal by utilizing magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy with high spatial resolution of 15 nm [2]. The sample used in our study is CoCrPt alloy film,which is the promising candidate for high-density perpendicular magnetic recording media. Typical domain configurations of (Co{sub 83}Cr{sub 17}){sub 87}Pt{sub 13} taken at an applied magnetic field of 383 Oe during three successive hysteretic cycles are illustrated in Fig. 1. Interestingly enough, one clearly notes that the domain nucleation process of CoCrPt alloy film is not deterministic, but stochastic for repeated hysteretic cycles. The stochastic nature was quantitatively confirmed by correlation coefficient, where the correlation coefficients increase as magnetization reversal was progressed. Nanomagnetic simulations considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film.

  8. Microscopic reversal behavior of magnetically capped nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, C. M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Hellwig, O.; Menzel, A.; Radu, F.; Makarov, D.; Albrecht, M.; Goncharov, A.; Schrefl, T.; Schlotter, W. F.; Rick, R.; Luening, J.

    2010-02-01

    The magnetic switching behavior of Co/Pd multilayer-capped nanospheres is investigated by x-ray spectro-holography. Images of the magnetic state of individual nanocaps are recorded as a function of externally applied magnetic field and the angle under which the field is applied, pertaining to magnetic data storage applications with patterned, tilted, and perpendicular storage media. Dispersed nanospheres with different coverage in the submonolayer regime are investigated simultaneously in a multiplexed experiment. In clustered nanosphere arrangements, we find that individual switching events are influenced by dipolar magnetostatic interactions. Micromagnetic simulations of the switching behavior complement the experimental observations, corroborating the influence of thermal activation processes and magnetostatic interactions in this system. Such magnetostatic interactions could lead to undesired cross-talk between bits in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording applications.

  9. Magnetization reversal process in elongated Co rings with engineered defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. S.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Ross, C. A.

    2008-03-01

    We report a significant modification of the magnetization reversal process in thin film rings with engineered defects created by a focused ion beam. Using magnetic force microscopy, with in situ in-plane field, we observe that the traditional onion-vortex transition that occurs in defect-free rings can be suppressed, and the reversal instead takes place through domain wall motion. We have also investigated the effects of defect size, location, and distribution on the overall magnetization state. The results are explained in terms of pinning of domain walls by the engineered defects.

  10. Fast chirality reversal of the magnetic vortex by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, W. L. Liu, R. H.; Urazhdin, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Erokhin, S. G.; Berkov, D.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of high-density information encoding in magnetic materials by topologically stable inhomogeneous magnetization configurations such as domain walls, skyrmions, and vortices has motivated intense research into mechanisms enabling their control and detection. While the uniform magnetization states can be efficiently controlled by electric current using magnetic multilayer structures, this approach has proven much more difficult to implement for inhomogeneous states. Here, we report direct observation of fast reversal of magnetic vortex by electric current in a simple planar structure based on a bilayer of spin Hall material Pt with a single microscopic ferromagnetic disk contacted by asymmetric electrodes. The reversal is enabled by a combination of the chiral Oersted field and spin current generated by the nonuniform current distribution in Pt. Our results provide a route for the efficient control of inhomogeneous magnetization configurations by electric current.

  11. Magnetic Helicity Reversals in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in promoting cyclic magnetic activity in a global, 3D, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a convective dynamo. This simulation is characterized by coherent bands of toroidal field that exist within the convection zone, with opposite polarities in the northern hemisphere (NH) and southern hemisphere (SH). Throughout most of the cycle, the magnetic helicity in these bands is negative in the NH and positive in the SH. However, during the declining phase of each cycle, this hemispheric rule reverses. We attribute this to a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that is induced by the interaction of the bands across the equator. This band interaction appears to be ultimately responsible for, or at least associated with, the decay and subsequent reversal of both the toroidal bands and the polar fields. We briefly discuss the implications of these results within the context of solar observations, which also show some potential evidence for toroidal band interactions and helicity reversals.

  12. Physical properties of magnetizable structure-reversible media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordonsky, V. I.; Shulman, Z. P.; Gorodkin, S. R.; Demchuk, S. A.; Prokhorov, I. V.; Zaltsgendler, E. A.; Khusid, B. M.

    1990-04-01

    Consideration is made of the effect of applied magnetic fields on the rheological, magnetic and thermophysical properties of magnetorheological suspensions (MRS). In a field, the shear stress highly increases, and the thermal conductivity grows and becomes anisotropic. Also, specific features of magnetization due to the mechanical mobility of the magnetic moment media are shown. An invariant dependence of viscosity is obtained, the effects of mechanical memory and reversing of shear stresses in a rotating field are revealed. The results are presented on the development of the magnetorheological effect model, on the structuring kinetics and on the methods of controlling the flow, heat and mass transfer. The possibility is shown of the purposeful impact on turbulent flow in an immersed jet and in a channel. Also, the results are given of theoretical and experimental studies of the rheology of systems with a nonmagnetic dispersed phase, i.e. of suspensions of nonmagnetic particles in a magnetic fluid and of particles of high-temperature superconducting ceramic. In both cases, the increase of shear stress in a field can be compared with that in MRS.

  13. Magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1985-11-01

    The flow of plasma and magnetic flux toward a wall is examined in a slab geometry where the magnetic field is parallel to the wall. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow with a quasisteady approximation is assumed that reduces the problem to three coupled ordinary differential equations. The calculated behavior shows that a thin current sheath is established at the wall in which a variety of phenomena appear, including significant resistive heating and rapid deceleration of the plasma flow. The sheath physics determines the speed at which flux and plasma flow toward the wall. The model has been applied to the field-reversal phase of a field-reversed theta pinch, during which the reduced magnetic field near the wall drives an outward flow of plasma and magnetic flux. The analysis leads to approximate expressions for the instantaneous flow speed, the loss of magnetic flux during the field reversal phase, the integrated heat flow to the wall, and the highest possible magnetic flux retained after reversal. Predictions from this model are compared with previous time-dependent MHD calculations and with experimental results from the TRX-1 [Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on the Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids, 27-29 October 1981 (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 1982), p. 61] and TRX-2 [Proceedings of the 6th U.S. Symposium on Compact Toroid Research, 20-23 February, 1984 (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, 1984), p. 154] experiments.

  14. The topology of intrasector reversals of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-11-01

    A technique has been developed recently to determine the polarities of interplanetary magnetic fields relative to their origins at the Sun by comparing energetic electron flow directions with local magnetic field directions. Here we use heat flux electrons from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plasma detector on the ISEE 3 spacecraft to determine the field polarities. We examine periods within well-defined magnetic sectors when the field directions appear to be reversed from the normal spiral direction of the sector. About half of these intrasector field reversals (IFRs) are cases in which the polarities match those of the surrounding sectors, indicating that those fields have been folded back toward the Sun. The more interesting cases are those with polarity reversals. We find no clear cases of isolated reverse polarity fields, which suggests that islands of reverse polarity in the solar source dipole field probably do not exist. The IFRs with polarity reversals are strongly associated with periods of bidirectional electron flows, suggesting that those fields occur only in conjunction with closed fields. We propose that both those IFRs and the bidirectional flows are signatures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In that case, many interplanetary CMEs are larger and more complex than previously thought, consisting of both open and closed field components.

  15. Combined first-order reversal curve and x-ray microscopy investigation of magnetization reversal mechanisms in hexagonal antidot lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Weigand, Markus; Stahl, Claudia; Träger, Nick; Kopp, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Goering, Eberhard J.; Haering, Felix; Ziemann, Paul; Wiedwald, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    The magnetization reversal in nanoscaled antidot lattices is widely investigated to understand the tunability of the magnetic anisotropy and the coercive field through nanostructuring of thin films. By investigating highly ordered focused ion beam milled antidot lattices with a combination of first-order reversal curves and magnetic x-ray microscopy, we fully elucidate the magnetization reversal along the distinct orientations of a hexagonal antidot lattice. This combination proves especially powerful as all partial steps of this complex magnetization reversal can be identified and subsequently imaged. Through this approach we discovered several additional steps that were neglected in previous studies. Furthermore, by imaging the microscopic magnetization state during each reversal step, we were able to link the coercive and interaction fields determined by the first-order reversal curve method to true microscopic magnetization configurations and determine their origin.

  16. Magnetization reversal in arrays of Co rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welp, U.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Hiller, J. M.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.

    2003-08-01

    The magnetization behavior of arrays of individual and coupled Co rings has been studied using superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, magneto-optical imaging, and Lorentz transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The transition from the polarized into the vortex state of isolated rings is shown to occur through the motion and annihilation of head-to-head domain boundaries. The chirality of the vortex state is fixed on subsequent magnetization cycles, indicating that it is predetermined by structural imperfections of the rings. The effect of interactions between the rings has been investigated in arrays of chains of touching rings. For fields applied parallel to the chains rings in extended sections of the chains are found to switch simultaneously. Neighboring rings in these sections can display alternating chirality as well as the same chirality accompanied by a 180° boundary on the nodes. For fields perpendicular to the chain direction the switching occurs pairwise. This coupling introduces a broad distribution of switching fields and correspondingly a magnetization curve that is significantly broader than that for the parallel orientation.

  17. Orientational, kinetic, and magnetic energy of geodynamo, reversals, and asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    Integral laws describing the evolution of the kinetic, magnetic, and orientational energy in the liquid core of the Earth, which are also valid in the interiors of the other terrestrial planets, are derived, simplified, and analyzed. These laws are coarsely approximated by a system of ordinary differential equations with a given energy of the convection. The characteristic velocities, magnetic fields, periods, and scales as the functions of the power of the convection are estimated for the states beyond and close to the reversal or excursion. With the assumed simplifications, the convection power should be close to a certain value in order to enable a relatively short reversal or excursion; significant deviation of the convection energy from this value will render the system into a long-term steady state. Here, two types of steady state are possible: the codirectional state with the magnetic field oriented along the velocity vector, and contradirectional state with the opposing orientations of the magnetic field and velocity. These states are not symmetric with respect to each other since, other factors being equal, the energy support of the convection and the average intensity of the magnetic field are typically higher in the contradirectional rather than codirectional state. The total duration of codirectional states is somewhat shorter than contradirectional states in the case when the convection power grows with time; in the case of a long-decreasing convection power, the situation is opposite. This asymmetry in the duration of steady states is confirmed by the paleomagnetic data on the timescale of the magnetic reversals. The length of the average interval between the reversals is controlled by the turbulent, thermal, electromagnetic, and visco-compositional diffusion. The predominant type of the diffusion can be in many cases identified from the dependence of the reversal frequency on the intensity of the magnetic field based on the paleomagnetic data. The

  18. Magnetization reversal and negative volume thermal expansion in Fe doped Ca2RuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, T. F.; Yuan, S. J.; Ye, F.; Chi, S.; Terzic, J.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, Z.; Liu, X.; Parkin, S.; Mao, W. L.; Cao, G.

    We report structural, magnetic, transport and thermal properties of single-crystal Ca2Ru1-xFexO4 (0 <= x <= 0.2) as functions of pressure, magnetic field and temperature. The central findings of this work are a pronounced magnetization reversal and a negative thermal expansion that are induced by Fe doping. Our results including neutron diffraction data suggest that the magnetization reversal is primarily a result of different temperature dependences of two antiparallel, competing Ru and Fe sublattices and that the negative thermal expansion is achieved via magnetic and metal-insulator transitions. We will present and discuss our results with comparison drawn with relevant systems. This work was supported by the NSF via Grant No. DMR-1265162.

  19. Liquid-crystalline elastomer-nanoparticle hybrids with reversible switch of magnetic memory.

    PubMed

    Haberl, Johannes M; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Mihut, Adriana M; Dietsch, Hervé; Hirt, Ann M; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-03-25

    A stimuli-responsive material is synthesized that combines the actuation potential of liquid-crystalline elastomers with the anisotropic magnetic properties of ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles. The resulting nanocomposite exhibits unique shape-memory features with magnetic information, which can be reversibly stored and erased via parameters typical of soft materials, such as high deformations, low stresses, and liquid-crystalline smectic-isotropic transition temperatures. PMID:23359417

  20. Magnetic field reversals: the geodynamo, laboratory experiments and models (Lewis Fry Richardson Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauve, S.

    2009-04-01

    I will first compare reversals of Earth's magnetic field known from palaeomagnetic data to the ones observed in a laboratory experiment for the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Despite major differences between the flow in Earth's core and in the experiment, both systems display reversals that share a lot of similar properties. I will understand them using a simple model in the framework of low dynamical system theory. Finally, I will discuss what can be learnt from numerical simulations.

  1. Electrical detection of magnetization reversal without auxiliary magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejník, K.; Novák, V.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.

    2015-05-01

    First-generation magnetic random access memories based on anisotropic magnetoresistance required magnetic fields for both writing and reading. Modern all-electrical read/write memories use instead nonrelativistic spin transport connecting the storing magnetic layer with a reference ferromagnet. Recent studies have focused on electrical manipulation of magnetic moments by relativistic spin torques requiring no reference ferromagnet. Here we report the observation of a counterpart magnetoresistance effect in such a relativistic system which allows us to electrically detect the sign of the magnetization without an auxiliary magnetic field or ferromagnet. We observe the effect in a geometry in which the magnetization of a uniaxial (Ga,Mn)As epilayer is set either parallel or antiparallel to a current-induced nonequilibrium spin polarization of carriers. In our structure, this linear-in-current magnetoresistance reaches 0.2% at current density of 106Acm -2 .

  2. Magnetization reversal using excitation of collective modes in nanodot matrices

    PubMed Central

    Elyasi, Mehrdad; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    The large arrays of magnetic dots are the building blocks of magnonic crystals and the emerging bit patterned media for future recording technology. In order to fully utilize the functionalities of high density magnetic nanodots, a method for the selective reversal of a single nanodot in a matrix of dots is desired. We have proposed a method for magnetization reversal of a single nanodot with microwave excitation in a matrix of magneto-statically interacting dots. The method is based on the excitation of collective modes and the spatial anomaly in the microwave power absorption. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate the possibility of switching a single dot from any initial state of a 3 by 3 matrix of dots, and develop a theoretical model for the phenomena. We discuss the applicability of the proposed method for introducing defect modes in magnonic crystals as well as for future magnetic recording. PMID:25601554

  3. Purely electric-field-driven perpendicular magnetization reversal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Yang, Tiannan; Wang, Jianjun; Huang, Houbing; Zhang, Jinxing; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2015-01-14

    If achieved, magnetization reversal purely with an electric field has the potential to revolutionize the spintronic devices that currently utilize power-dissipating currents. However, all existing proposals involve the use of a magnetic field. Here we use phase-field simulations to study the piezoelectric and magnetoelectric responses in a three-dimensional multiferroic nanostructure consisting of a perpendicularly magnetized nanomagnet with an in-plane long axis and a juxtaposed ferroelectric nanoisland. For the first time, we demonstrate a full reversal of perpendicular magnetization via successive precession and damping, driven purely by a perpendicular electric-field pulse of certain pulse duration across the nanoferroelectric. We discuss the materials selection and size dependence of both nanoferroelctrics and nanomagnets for experimental verification. These results offer new inspiration to the design of spintronic devices that simultaneously possess high density, high thermal stability, and high reliability. PMID:25549019

  4. Field orientation dependence of magnetization reversal in thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallarino, Lorenzo; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The magnetization reversal process of hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) (0001) oriented Co and C o90R u10 thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) has been studied as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field angle. Room temperature pure cobalt exhibits two characteristic reversal mechanisms. For angles near in-plane field orientation, the magnetization reversal proceeds via instability of the uniform magnetic state, whereas in the vicinity of the out-of-plane (OP) orientation, magnetization inversion takes place by means of domain nucleation. Temperature dependent measurements enable the modification of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and reveal a gradual disappearance of the domain nucleation process during magnetization reversal for elevated temperatures. Ultimately, this suppression of the domain nucleation process leads to the exclusive occurrence of uniform state instability reversal for all field orientations at sufficiently high temperature. Comparative magnetic measurements of C o90R u10 alloy samples allow the identification and confirmation of the high temperature remanent magnetization state of cobalt as an OP stripe domain state despite the reduction of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Detailed micromagnetic simulations supplement the experimental results and corroborate the physical understanding of the temperature dependent behavior. Moreover, they enable a comprehensive identification of the complex energy balance in magnetic films with PMA, for which three different magnetic phases occur for sufficiently high anisotropy values, whose coexistence point is tricritical in nature.

  5. Paleomagnetic Study of a Reversal of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Dunn, J R; Fuller, M; Ito, H; Schmidt, V A

    1971-05-21

    A detailed record of a field reversal has been obtained from the natural remanent magnetization of the Tatoosh intrusion in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. The reversal took place at 14.7 +/- 1 million years and is interpreted to be from reverse to normal. A decrease in the intensity of the field of about an order of magnitude occurs immediately before the reversal, while its orientation remains substantially unchanged. The onset of the reversal is marked by abrupt swinging of the virtual geomagnetic pole along an arc of a great circle. During the reversal the pole traces a path across the Pacific. In the last stage of the process recorded in the sections, the succession of virtual geomagnetic poles is very similar to those generated by secular variation in the recent past. Although the cooling rate of the intrusion is not sufficiently well known to permit a useful calculation of the duration of the reversal process, an estimate based on the length of the supposed secular variation cycles gives 1 to 4 x 103 years for the reversal of field direction and approximately 1 x 104 years for the time scale of the intensity changes. PMID:17792941

  6. Effect of reverse flotation on magnetic separation concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, S. O.; Afolabi, A. S.; Makhula, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    Reverse flotation studies on magnetite samples have revealed that the use of starch as a depressant of Fe-oxides has a hydrophilic effect on the surface of Fe-bearing silicates and significantly decreases Fe in the silica-rich stream when used in combination with an amine (Lilaflot D817M). In this study, the effect of reverse flotation on the optimization of products obtained from magnetic separation was investigated. Two different magnetic samples, zones 1 and 2, were milled to <75 μm and then subjected to low intensity magnetic separation (LIMS). The LIMS test conducted on the <75 μm shown an upgrade of 46.40wt% Fe, 28.40wt% SiO2 and 2.61wt% MnO for zone 1 and 47.60wt% Fe, 29.17wt% SiO2 and 0.50wt% MnO for zone 2. Further milling of the ore to <25 μm resulted in a higher magnetic-rich product after magnetic separation. Reverse flotation tests were conducted on the agitated magnetic concentrate feed, and the result shows a significant upgrade of Fe compared to that obtained from the non-agitated feed. Iron concentrations greater than 69%, and SiO2 concentrations less than 2% with overall magnetite recoveries greater than 67% and 71% were obtained for zones 1 and 2, respectively.

  7. Magnetization reversal in 3D nano-structures of different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nano-particles have been intensively studied during the last decade due to their potential utilization in various applications. An important topic is the dependence of magnetic properties on the exact samples shape. After demonstrating the influence of shape distortions in magnetic nano half-spheres on magnetization reversal processes and hysteresis shapes, a series of different 3D nano-objects from permalloy with shape modifications has been examined with respect to their magnetic properties. Modifications are performed by cutting parts of diverse samples between the extrema of a cuboid and a half-sphere. Simulations of these samples have been performed by Magpar, using external magnetic fields along two different axes, swept with two different speeds. Depending on the original particle shape and its modifications, several phenomena can be found: Cutting a hole in a cuboid can switch the hard axis from out-of-plane to the in-plane direction. In some nano-particles, strong oscillations occur which can be suppressed by appropriate shape modifications. In some of the nano-objects, the magnetization reversal mechanism is completely altered by a change in the field sweeping speed. The article gives an overview of the different possibilities to tailor magnetic properties of nano-systems.

  8. Temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in magnetic nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bosung; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-05-01

    We studied the temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in soft magnetic nanodots by micromagnetic numerical calculations within a framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert scheme. It was determined that vortex-core-switching events at non-zero temperatures occur stochastically, and that the threshold field strength increases with temperature for a given field frequency. The mechanism of core reversals at elevated temperatures is the same as that of vortex-antivortex-pair-mediated core reversals found at the zero temperature. The reversal criterion is also the out-of-plane component of a magnetization dip that should reach -p, which is to say, m z , dip = -p, where p is the original polarization, p = +1 (-1), for the upward (downward) core. By this criterion, the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair accompanies complete vortex-antivortex-annihilation-mediated core reversals, resulting in the maximum excess of the exchange energy density, Δ Eex cri ≈ 15.4 ± 0.2 mJ/cm3. This work provides the underlying physics of vortex-core reversals at non-zero temperatures, and potentiates the real application of vortex random access memory operating at elevated temperatures.

  9. Temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in magnetic nanodots

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bosung; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-05-07

    We studied the temperature effect on vortex-core reversals in soft magnetic nanodots by micromagnetic numerical calculations within a framework of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert scheme. It was determined that vortex-core-switching events at non-zero temperatures occur stochastically, and that the threshold field strength increases with temperature for a given field frequency. The mechanism of core reversals at elevated temperatures is the same as that of vortex-antivortex-pair-mediated core reversals found at the zero temperature. The reversal criterion is also the out-of-plane component of a magnetization dip that should reach −p, which is to say, m{sub z,dip} = −p, where p is the original polarization, p = +1 (−1), for the upward (downward) core. By this criterion, the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair accompanies complete vortex-antivortex-annihilation-mediated core reversals, resulting in the maximum excess of the exchange energy density, ΔE{sub ex}{sup cri} ≈ 15.4 ± 0.2 mJ/cm{sup 3}. This work provides the underlying physics of vortex-core reversals at non-zero temperatures, and potentiates the real application of vortex random access memory operating at elevated temperatures.

  10. Magnetic reversals in a simple model of magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Benzi, Roberto; Pinton, Jean-François

    2010-07-01

    We study a simple magnetohydrodynamical approach in which hydrodynamics and MHD turbulence are coupled in a shell model, with given dynamo constraints in the large scales. We consider the case of a low Prandtl number fluid for which the inertial range of the velocity field is much wider than that of the magnetic field. Random reversals of the magnetic field are observed and it shown that the magnetic field has a nontrivial evolution--linked to the nature of the hydrodynamics turbulence. PMID:20867710

  11. Dual polarity directions in basaltic-andesitic dykes—reversal record or self-reversed magnetization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebke, U.; Appel, E.; Neumann, U.; Ding, L.

    2012-08-01

    Rock magnetic analyses were performed on basaltic-andesitic dyke samples from the Lhasa Block, which were previously used for palaeomagnetic investigations of the India-Asia collision. The aim of the study is to prove whether antipodal directions separated in these samples represent different polarities of the Earth's magnetic field or a self-reversal magnetization. Reflected light microscopy, domain pattern observations and energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed two generations of titanomagnetite (TM) grains, one consisting of large-sized (˜20 μm to more than 100 μm) and inhomogeneous Ti-poor TM, and another with small (smaller than ˜10 μm) and rather homogeneous Ti-rich TM grains. Partial thermoremant magnetization experiments and reflected light microscopy show that magnetostatic or superexchange interaction between these two phases is unlikely. Temperature dependence of saturation magnetization and low-temperature curves of isothermal remanent magnetization disprove a possible N-type behaviour of the samples. A self-reversal due to ionic reordering can be ruled out as it requires a high degree of oxidation of the Ti-rich TMs, which was not observed. In summary, a self-reversal magnetization is very unlikely in the studied dyke samples, and therefore the observed antipodal directions most probably represent a record of different polarity epochs of the Earth's magnetic field. This conclusion implies that the time of remanence acquisition in the studied dykes was sufficiently long to average out paleosecular variation, supporting the significance and reliability of the palaeomagnetic results.

  12. Magnetization reversal of an individual exchange-biased permalloy nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchter, A.; Wölbing, R.; Wyss, M.; Kieler, O. F.; Weimann, T.; Kohlmann, J.; Zorin, A. B.; Rüffer, D.; Matteini, F.; Tütüncüoglu, G.; Heimbach, F.; Kleibert, A.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Poggio, M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the magnetization reversal mechanism in an individual permalloy (Py) nanotube (NT) using a hybrid magnetometer consisting of a nanometer-scale SQUID (nanoSQUID) and a cantilever torque sensor. The Py NT is affixed to the tip of a Si cantilever and positioned in order to optimally couple its stray flux into a Nb nanoSQUID. We are thus able to measure both the NT's volume magnetization by dynamic cantilever magnetometry and its stray flux using the nanoSQUID. We observe a training effect and a temperature dependence in the magnetic hysteresis, suggesting an exchange bias. We find a low blocking temperature TB=18 ±2 K, indicating the presence of a thin antiferromagnetic native oxide, as confirmed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy on similar samples. Furthermore, we measure changes in the shape of the magnetic hysteresis as a function of temperature and increased training. These observations show that the presence of a thin exchange-coupled native oxide modifies the magnetization reversal process at low temperatures. Complementary information obtained via cantilever and nanoSQUID magnetometry allows us to conclude that, in the absence of exchange coupling, this reversal process is nucleated at the NT's ends and propagates along its length as predicted by theory.

  13. Self-reversal and apparent magnetic excursions in Arctic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channell, J. E. T.; Xuan, C.

    2009-06-01

    The Arctic oceans have been fertile ground for the recording of apparent excursions of the geomagnetic field, implying that the high latitude field had unusual characteristics at least over the last 1-2 Myrs. Alternating field demagnetization of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of Core HLY0503-6JPC from the Mendeleev Ridge (Arctic Ocean) implies the presence of primary magnetizations with negative inclination apparently recording excursions in sediments deposited during the Brunhes Chron. Thermal demagnetization, on the other hand, indicates the presence of multiple (often anti-parallel) magnetization components with negative inclination components having blocking temperatures predominantly, but not entirely, below ~ 350 °C. Thermo-magnetic tests, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicate that the negative inclination components are carried by titanomaghemite, presumably formed by seafloor oxidation of titanomagnetite. The titanomaghemite apparently carries a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) that is partially self-reversed relative to the detrital remanent magnetization (DRM) carried by the host titanomagnetite. The partial self-reversal could have been accomplished by ionic ordering during oxidation, thereby changing the balance of the magnetic moments in the ferrimagnetic sublattices.

  14. Laser-induced magnetization dynamics and reversal in ferrimagnetic alloys.

    PubMed

    Kirilyuk, Andrei; Kimel, Alexey V; Rasing, Theo

    2013-02-01

    This review discusses the recent studies of magnetization dynamics and the role of angular momentum in thin films of ferrimagnetic rare-earth-transition metal (RE-TM) alloys, e.g. GdFeCo, where both magnetization and angular momenta are temperature dependent. It has been experimentally demonstrated that the magnetization can be manipulated and even reversed by a single 40 fs laser pulse, without any applied magnetic field. This switching is found to follow a novel reversal pathway, that is shown however to depend crucially on the net angular momentum, reflecting the balance of the two opposite sublattices. In particular, optical excitation of ferrimagnetic GdFeCo on a time scale pertinent to the characteristic time of the exchange interaction between the RE and TM spins, i.e. on the time scale of tens of femtoseconds, pushes the spin dynamics into a yet unexplored regime, where the two exchange-coupled magnetic sublattices demonstrate substantially different dynamics. As a result, the reversal of spins appears to proceed via a novel transient state characterized by a ferromagnetic alignment of the Gd and Fe magnetic moments, despite their ground-state antiferromagnetic coupling.Thus, optical manipulation of magnetic order by femtosecond laser pulses has developed into an exciting and still expanding research field that keeps being fueled by a continuous stream of new and sometimes counterintuitive results. Considering the progress in the development of plasmonic antennas and compact ultrafast lasers, optical control of magnetic order may also potentially revolutionize data storage and information processing technologies. PMID:23377279

  15. Investigation of the magnetization reversal mechanism of electrolessly deposited Co-B nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David; Kingston, Samuel; Rhen, Fernando M. F.

    2016-05-01

    Co-B nanotubes were prepared via an electroless deposition method. The morphology, magnetic properties and the magnetization reversal mechanism of the nanotubes were investigated. Deposition was carried out in porous polycarbonate membranes leading to the formation of Co-B nanotubes with an average external diameter of 400 nm and lengths up to 6 μm. Electroless deposition resulted in the formation of alloys with composition Co70B30 and a specific magnetization of 65.6 J T-1kg-1, which is about 40 % of that of pure Co (161 J T-1kg-1). The transversal and vortex modes were identified as the mechanisms responsible for magnetization reversal in the nanotubes. A crossover between the two modes is observed at low angles and the results are in line with current models for switching mechanisms of nanotubes.

  16. Control over magnetic properties in bulk hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Christian; Quesada, Adrian; Saerbeck, Thomas; Rubia, Miguel Angel De La; Garcia, Miguel Angel; Fernandez, Jose Francisco; Schuller, Ivan K.; UCSD Collaboration; Instituto de Ceramica, Madrid Collaboration; Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble Collaboration

    We present control of coercivity and remanent magnetization of a bulk ferromagnetic material embedded in bulk vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) by using a standard bulk synthesis procedure. The method generalizes the use of structural phase transitions of one material to control structural and magnetic properties of another. A structural phase transition (SPT) in the V2O3 host material causes magnetic properties of Ni to change as function of temperature. The remanent magnetization and the coercivity are reversibly controlled by the SPT without additional external magnetic fields. The reversible tuning shown here opens the pathway for controlling the properties of a vast variety of magnetic hybrid bulk systems. This Work is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science, U.S. Department of Energy, BES-DMS funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Science, DMR under grant DE FG02 87ER-45332.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Reversals in Optically Pumped Alkali-Metal Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Fei; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2007-06-01

    We report an unusual new phenomenon, peculiar sign reversals of the ground-state magnetic resonances and of the ``zero-dip" resonance (Zeeman resonance at zero field) of optically-pumped, alkali-metal vapors. These anomalies occur when a ``weak" circular polarized D1 laser light is tuned to pump atoms predominantly from the lower ground-state hyperfine multiplet. One can understand the signal reversals in simple, semi-quantitative way with reference to this distribution. uantitative computer simulations are in excellent greement with observations.

  18. Magnetic resonance reversals in optically pumped alkali-metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, F.; Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-05-01

    We report an unusual phenomenon, peculiar sign reversals of the ground-state magnetic resonances and of the zero-dip resonance (Zeeman resonance at zero field) of optically pumped, alkali-metal vapors. These anomalies occur when a weak circularly polarized D1 laser light is tuned to pump atoms predominantly from the lower ground-state hyperfine multiplet. One can understand the signal reversals in a simple, semiquantitative way with reference to the spin-temperature distribution. Quantitative computer simulations are in excellent agreement with observations.

  19. Voltage controlled core reversal of fixed magnetic skyrmions without a magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Dhritiman; Al-Rashid, Md Mamun; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2016-01-01

    Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate core reversal of a fixed magnetic skyrmion by modulating the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a nanomagnet with an electric field. We can switch reversibly between two skyrmion states and two ferromagnetic states, i.e. skyrmion states with the magnetization of the core pointing down/up and periphery pointing up/down, and ferromagnetic states with magnetization pointing up/down, by sequential increase and decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The switching between these states is explained by the fact that the spin texture corresponding to each of these stable states minimizes the sum of the magnetic anisotropy, demagnetization, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and exchange energies. This could lead to the possibility of energy efficient nanomagnetic memory and logic devices implemented with fixed skyrmions without using a magnetic field and without moving skyrmions with a current. PMID:27506159

  20. Voltage controlled core reversal of fixed magnetic skyrmions without a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Dhritiman; Al-Rashid, Md Mamun; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2016-01-01

    Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate core reversal of a fixed magnetic skyrmion by modulating the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a nanomagnet with an electric field. We can switch reversibly between two skyrmion states and two ferromagnetic states, i.e. skyrmion states with the magnetization of the core pointing down/up and periphery pointing up/down, and ferromagnetic states with magnetization pointing up/down, by sequential increase and decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The switching between these states is explained by the fact that the spin texture corresponding to each of these stable states minimizes the sum of the magnetic anisotropy, demagnetization, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and exchange energies. This could lead to the possibility of energy efficient nanomagnetic memory and logic devices implemented with fixed skyrmions without using a magnetic field and without moving skyrmions with a current. PMID:27506159

  1. Size and shape dependence study of magnetization reversal in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Sougata; Bedanta, Subhankar

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic Antidot Lattice (MAL) arrays of Co have been prepared in micron range using ultraviolet (UV) lithography technique with different shapes and sizes. Magnetization reversal in such MAL systems has been studied by magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) based microscopy by varying the angle between the easy axis and the external magnetic field. The domain images evidence that the magnetization reversal along easy axis is highly dominated by nucleation of domains which is subsequently accompanied by domain wall motion. We have observed that with increase in active magnetic area domain size increases but on the contrary coercivity decreases. The presence of periodic holes turns the MALs magnetically hard when compared to similar thickness of continuous thin film. The magnetization relaxation along easy axis for the Co MAL at constant dc field fits very well with the exponential law of Fatuzzo-Labrune indicating domain nucleated dominant process.

  2. Voltage controlled core reversal of fixed magnetic skyrmions without a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dhritiman; Al-Rashid, Md Mamun; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2016-08-01

    Using micromagnetic simulations we demonstrate core reversal of a fixed magnetic skyrmion by modulating the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a nanomagnet with an electric field. We can switch reversibly between two skyrmion states and two ferromagnetic states, i.e. skyrmion states with the magnetization of the core pointing down/up and periphery pointing up/down, and ferromagnetic states with magnetization pointing up/down, by sequential increase and decrease of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The switching between these states is explained by the fact that the spin texture corresponding to each of these stable states minimizes the sum of the magnetic anisotropy, demagnetization, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and exchange energies. This could lead to the possibility of energy efficient nanomagnetic memory and logic devices implemented with fixed skyrmions without using a magnetic field and without moving skyrmions with a current.

  3. Magnetic Bistability and Controllable Reversal of Asymmetric Ferromagnetic Nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, F. Q.; Chern, G. W.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Zhu, X. C.; Zhu, J. G.; Chien, C. L.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetization reversals through the formation of a vortex state and the rotation of an onion state are two processes with comparable probabilities for symmetric magnetic nanorings with a radius of about 50 nanometers. This magnetic bistability is the manifestation of the competition between the exchange energy and the magnetostatic energy in nanomagnets. The relative probability of the two processes in symmetric nanorings is dictated by the ring geometry and cannot be altered after fabrication. In this work, we report a novel type of nanorings—asymmetric nanorings. By tuning the asymmetry, we can control the fraction of the vortex formation process from about 40% to nearly 100% by utilizing the direction of the external magnetic field. The observed results have been accounted for by the dependence of the domain-wall energy on the local cross-section area for which we have provided theoretical calculations.

  4. Solar Magnetic Field Reversals and the Role of Dynamo Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRosa, M. L.; Brun, A. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  5. SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSALS AND THE ROLE OF DYNAMO FAMILIES

    SciTech Connect

    DeRosa, M. L.

    2012-09-20

    The variable magnetic field of the solar photosphere exhibits periodic reversals as a result of dynamo activity occurring within the solar interior. We decompose the surface field as observed by both the Wilcox Solar Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager into its harmonic constituents, and present the time evolution of the mode coefficients for the past three sunspot cycles. The interplay between the various modes is then interpreted from the perspective of general dynamo theory, where the coupling between the primary and secondary families of modes is found to correlate with large-scale polarity reversals for many examples of cyclic dynamos. Mean-field dynamos based on the solar parameter regime are then used to explore how such couplings may result in the various long-term trends in the surface magnetic field observed to occur in the solar case.

  6. Transition states of magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel; Kent, Andrew; Stein, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    Thin ferromagnetic rings are of interest for fundamental studies of magnetization reversal, in part, because they are a rare example of a geometry for which an analytical solution for the rate of thermally induced switching has been determined [1]. The theoretical model predicts the transition state to be either a global magnetization rotation of constant azimuthal angle or a localized fluctuation, denoted the instanton saddle. Numerically we have confirmed that for a range of values of external magnetic field and ring size the instanton saddle is energetically favored [2]. The model takes the annular width to be small compared to the mean radius of the annulus; in which case the main contribution to the magnetization energy comes from the surface magnetostatic energy. We present numerical micromagnetic calculations of the activation energy for thermally induced magnetization reversal for the two different transition states for the case when the annular width is equal in magnitude to the mean radius of the ring. Results of the total and surface magnetostatic energies are compared for different ring sizes. [1] K. Martens, D.L. Stein, A.D. Kent, PRB 73, 054413 (2006) [2] G.D. Chaves-O'Flynn, K. Xiao, D.L. Stein, A. D. Kent, arXiv:0710.2546 (2007)

  7. Magnetic reversal spurts: Rain gauges for comet showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Abrupt increases in the rate of magnetic reversals (magnetic reversal spurts) were first studied by many others. They hypothesized that spurts result from increased turbulence in the earth's core dynamo during episodes of intense bolide bombardment of the earth. Mechanisms for creating episodes of intense bombardment of the earth involve gravitational perturbation of the Oort cloud of comets, either by a hidden planet, a solar companion, or massive matter in the galactic plane. Herein, the time variation in reversal rate is analyzed using methods of statistical density estimation. A smooth, continuous estimate of reversal rate is obtained using an adaptive kernel method, in which the kernel width is adjusted as a function of reversal rate. The estimates near the ends of the data series (at 165 my ago and the present) are obtained by extending the data by reflection. The results show that the reversal spurts are not associated demonstrably with extinctions or well-dated impacts. If the spurts do record episodes of intense bombardment of the earth, then the mass extinctions do not, in general, occur at times of impacts. Furthermore, the large impact craters seen are not obviously related to the spurts, suggesting that the craters may have been caused by bolides of a different nature and with a different temporal pattern. However, the most simple explanation seems to be that the spurts do not record comet showers, either because the recording mechanism suggested by Muller and Morris is not effective or because comet showers are not triggered in the ways considered by Hut et al.

  8. Magnetization reversal in magnetic dot arrays: Nearest-neighbor interactions and global configurational anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Fin, Samuele; Pancaldi, Matteo; Vavassori, Paolo; Sarella, Anandakumar; Bisero, Diego

    2016-05-01

    Various proposals for future magnetic memories, data processing devices, and sensors rely on a precise control of the magnetization ground state and magnetization reversal process in periodically patterned media. In finite dot arrays, such control is hampered by the magnetostatic interactions between the nanomagnets, leading to the non-uniform magnetization state distributions throughout the sample while reversing. In this paper, we evidence how during reversal typical geometric arrangements of dots in an identical magnetization state appear that originate in the dominance of either Global Configurational Anisotropy or Nearest-Neighbor Magnetostatic interactions, which depends on the fields at which the magnetization reversal sets in. Based on our findings, we propose design rules to obtain the uniform magnetization state distributions throughout the array, and also suggest future research directions to achieve non-uniform state distributions of interest, e.g., when aiming at guiding spin wave edge-modes through dot arrays. Our insights are based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect and Magnetic Force Microscopy measurements as well as the extensive micromagnetic simulations.

  9. Magnetically induced enhancement of reversibly responding conductometric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Caitlin; Laminack, William; Tune, Travis; Gole, James

    2014-04-28

    Small magnetic fields are found to greatly enhance the reversible room temperature conductometric responses of n and p- type porous silicon (PS) interfaces, treated with nanostructured island sites containing paramagnetic Co(II) and Fe(II). At concentrations sufficiently low so as to avoid cross talk between the nanostructured island sites, the response to NO concentrations demonstrates the significant effect which the Co(II) and Fe(II) have on the decorated extrinsic semiconductor majority charge carriers as they direct a dominant electron transduction process for reversible electron transduction and chemical sensing (Inverse Hard and Soft acid/base principle) in the absence of significant chemical bond formation. Co(II) and Fe(II) oxide sites enhance response and provide a means for small magnetic fields to interact with and enhance the sensor interface response. For p-type systems, the interaction is with small virtually constant thermal electron populations lying above the Fermi energy at 0 K. The electron removal rate increases with magnetic field strength. At the highest magnetic fields and NO analyte concentrations the available electron population is depleted, and the response to the analyte decreases at higher concentrations. At lower magnetic fields (<1000 G), the response faithfully follows concentration. For n-type systems, the magnetic field interaction increases resistance. This increase in response may be attributed to the interaction with donor levels ∼0.025 eV below the conduction band. A substantial enhancement of sensor response relative to that for the Co(II) and Fe(II) treated PS interfaces is observed, with the introduction of a small magnetic field greatly increasing an already enhanced conductometric response.

  10. Nonstochastic magnetic reversal in artificial quasicrystalline spin ice

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, B.; Bhat, V. S.; Woods, J.; Teipel, E.; Smith, N.; De Long, L. E.; Sklenar, J.; Ketterson, J. B.; Hastings, J. T.

    2014-05-07

    We have measured the isothermal DC magnetization of Penrose P2 tilings (P2T) composed of wire segments of permalloy thin film. Micromagnetic simulations reproduce the coercive fields and “knee anomalies” observed in experimental data and show magnetic shape anisotropy constrains segments to be single-domain (Ising spins) at low fields, similar to artificial spin ice (ASI). Mirror symmetry controls the initial reversal of individual segments oriented parallel to the applied field, followed by complex switching of multiple adjacent segments (“avalanches”) of various orientations such that closed magnetization loops (“vortices”) are favored. Ferromagnetic P2T differ from previously studied ASI systems due to their aperiodic translational symmetry and numerous inequivalent pattern vertices, which drive nonstochastic switching of segment polarizations.

  11. Origins of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal in Exchange Biased Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Shuoguo; Li, Yang; Chen, Ning; Liu, Shuai; Li, Minghua; Yu, Guanghua; Department of Materials Physics; Chemistry, University of Science; Technology Beijing Team; State Key Laboratory Of Magnetism, Beijing National LaboratoryCondensed Matter Physics, Institu Team; University of Puerto Rico At Mayaguez Team

    2011-03-01

    Novel asymmetric magnetization reversal behaviors (ARBs) as well as positive exchange bias (EB) are observed by using the alternating gradient force magnetometer (AGM) in both Co/FeMn bilayer with an oblique out-of-plane exchange anisotropy and the Co/FeMn bilayer in which Co layer has a quite heavy thickness. There are two different ARBs, arised from the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic layer respectively under the perpendicular magnetization. Our results show that two intrinsic origins of the ARBs (i.e. the competing anisotropy and the inhomogeneity of the magnetic structure) coexist. Both of them are indispensable for the development of the ARBs in our Co/FeMn multilayers. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant no. DMR-0821284, NASA under Grant Nos. NNX10AM80H and NNX07AO30A.

  12. Magnetization reversal in permalloy ferromagnetic nanowires investigated with magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. B.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2008-07-01

    The magnetization reversal process in single Permalloy (Ni81Fe19) nanowires has been investigated by magnetoresistance measurements as a function of the angle between the applied field and the wire direction. The Permalloy nanostructures fabricated on an ultrathin film by atomic force microscopy consist of two large rectangular pads connected by a nanowire with the shape of a long thin narrow tape. For each field direction in the plane of the film the dependence of the magnetoresistance on the field value exhibits two main contributions: one from the pads and one from the nanowire. The contribution from the pads is due to a usual anisotropic magnetoresistance characteristic of coherent magnetization rotation, whereas the contribution from the nanowire is an abrupt transition at the switching field. The dependence of the switching field on the in-plane field angle is quantitatively described by a model of nucleation field with the buckling magnetization rotation mode.

  13. Tokamak equilibria with toroidal current reversal: properties and computational issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2006-11-30

    Several properties of axisymmetric plasma equilibria with toroidal-current reversal (TCR) are discussed using some unifying concepts from catastrophe theory. Namely, those of structural stability of functions near critical points, singularity unfolding by small perturbations, and model parameter-space division by bifurcation sets are found to be of particular usefulness. Magnetic configurations displaying, simultaneously, TCR and nested flux surfaces are thence shown to be necessarily degenerate and structurally unstable, meaning that they are easily transformed into non-nested ones by small perturbations in the model parameter set. This should lead to a new paradigm when discussing TCR equilibria, as most of present knowledge relies mainly on the properties of nested solutions, which is expected to favor the study of the broader class of non-nested configurations that recently attracted a considerable discussion in the fusion community. In addition, it is also shown how TCR imposes some constraints on plasma profiles, and how these may be dealt with computationally while keeping the ability to manipulate the shape of the inner island system.

  14. Controlling the magnetization reversal in planar nanostructures with wire-ring morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, R. M.; Aranda, A.; Palma, J. L.; Lopez, C. E.; Escrig, J.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetization reversal in planar nanowires has been controlled using structures with a larger area pad connected to a nanowire or by means of patterned variations in the planar nanowire such as notches. In this letter, we have introduced a magnetic nanostructure defined as a planar nanostructure with wire-ring morphology. In particular, we have performed micromagnetic simulations to investigate how the magnetic properties (coercivity and remanence) change as a function of the geometric parameters of the nanostructure. Additionally, we observe that when the ring is very thin, the system reverses its magnetization by nucleation and propagation of domain walls along the nanowire. Conversely, when the ring has very thick walls, or directly turns into a solid cylinder, the system nucleates a vortex in the ring/cylinder, and then propagates the domain walls toward the nanowire sections. This reversal process is characterized by a step or plateau in the hysteresis curve, that is, a region in which differential magnetic susceptibility presents a local minimum or, ideally, vanishes. Finally, this nanostructure can be used in many potential applications related to the control of domain walls in planar nanowires.

  15. Distinguishing magnetic particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles with first-order reversal curves

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, Monika; Hirt, Ann M.; Widdrat, Marc; Faivre, Damien; Tompa, Éva; Pósfai, Mihály; Uebe, Rene; Schüler, Dirk

    2014-09-28

    Magnetic nanoparticles encompass a wide range of scientific study and technological applications. The success of using the nanoparticles in various applications demands control over size, dispersibility, and magnetics. Hence, the nanoparticles are often characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, and magnetic hysteresis loops. TEM analysis requires a thin layer of dispersed particles on the grid, which may often lead to particle aggregation thus making size analysis difficult. Magnetic hysteresis loops on the other hand provide information on the bulk property of the material without discriminating size, composition, and interaction effects. First order reversal curves (FORCs), described as an assembly of partial hysteresis loops originating from the major loop are efficient in identifying the domain size, composition, and interaction in a magnetic system. This study presents FORC diagrams on a variety of well-characterized biogenic and synthetic magnetite nanoparticles. It also introduces deconvoluted reversible and irreversible components from FORC as an important method for obtaining a semi-quantitative measure of the effective magnetic particle size. This is particularly important in a system with aggregation and interaction among the particles that often leads to either the differences between physical size and effective magnetic size. We also emphasize the extraction of secondary components by masking dominant coercivity fraction on FORC diagram to explore more detailed characterization of nanoparticle systems.

  16. Distinguishing magnetic particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles with first-order reversal curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Monika; Widdrat, Marc; Tompa, Éva; Uebe, Rene; Schüler, Dirk; Pósfai, Mihály; Faivre, Damien; Hirt, Ann M.

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles encompass a wide range of scientific study and technological applications. The success of using the nanoparticles in various applications demands control over size, dispersibility, and magnetics. Hence, the nanoparticles are often characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction, and magnetic hysteresis loops. TEM analysis requires a thin layer of dispersed particles on the grid, which may often lead to particle aggregation thus making size analysis difficult. Magnetic hysteresis loops on the other hand provide information on the bulk property of the material without discriminating size, composition, and interaction effects. First order reversal curves (FORCs), described as an assembly of partial hysteresis loops originating from the major loop are efficient in identifying the domain size, composition, and interaction in a magnetic system. This study presents FORC diagrams on a variety of well-characterized biogenic and synthetic magnetite nanoparticles. It also introduces deconvoluted reversible and irreversible components from FORC as an important method for obtaining a semi-quantitative measure of the effective magnetic particle size. This is particularly important in a system with aggregation and interaction among the particles that often leads to either the differences between physical size and effective magnetic size. We also emphasize the extraction of secondary components by masking dominant coercivity fraction on FORC diagram to explore more detailed characterization of nanoparticle systems.

  17. Magnetization reversal in individual micrometer-sized polycrystalline Permalloy rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. A.; Hayward, T. J.; Tse, D. H. Y.; Bland, J. A. C.; Castaño, F. J.; Ross, C. A.

    2005-03-01

    The magnetization reversal of individual 2 μm and 5 μm diameter polycrystalline Permalloy rings, with respective widths 0.75 μm and 1 μm, thickness 45 nm, has been investigated by focused magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry. Micromagnetic simulation of the reversal in the 2 μm diameter ring reveals that the onion-to-vortex state switching occurs by nucleation and subsequent annihilation of vortex walls that span the width of the ring, and that the vortex-to-reverse-onion state switching occurs by expansion of a reverse domain. The hysteresis loop shows good agreement with the experimental MOKE loop. Measurements of the switching through one-half of a 5 μm diameter ring enable the determination of the circulation of the vortex states accessed during one applied field cycle. The rings switch via one vortex state (either clockwise or anticlockwise) on both downward and upward applied field sweeps. The number of applied field cycles spent switching via one vortex state before changing to switch via the opposite vortex state is random, likely to be due to the history of the spin configuration and thermal fluctuations.

  18. Magnetic field reversals, polar wander, and core-mantle coupling.

    PubMed

    Courtillot, V; Besse, J

    1987-09-01

    True polar wander, the shifting of the entire mantle relative to the earth's spin axis, has been reanalyzed. Over the last 200 million years, true polar wander has been fast (approximately 5 centimeters per year) most of the time, except for a remarkable standstill from 170 to 110 million years ago. This standstill correlates with a decrease in the reversal frequency of the geomagnetic field and episodes of continental breakup. Conversely, true polar wander is high when reversal frequency increases. It is proposed that intermittent convection modulates the thickness of a thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle and consequently the core-to-mantle heat flux. Emission of hot thermals from the boundary layer leads to increases in mantle convection and true polar wander. In conjunction, cold thermals released from a boundary layer at the top of the liquid core eventually lead to reversals. Changes in the locations of subduction zones may also affect true polar wander. Exceptional volcanism and mass extinctions at the Cretaceous-Tertiary and Permo-Triassic boundaries may be related to thermals released after two unusually long periods with no magnetic reversals. These environmental catastrophes may therefore be a consequence of thermal and chemical couplings in the earth's multilayer heat engine rather than have an extraterrestrial cause. PMID:17801638

  19. Langevin simulation of thermally activated magnetization reversal in nanoscale pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gregory; Novotny, M. A.; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2001-10-01

    Numerical solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert micromagnetic model incorporating thermal fluctuations and dipole-dipole interactions (calculated by the fast multipole method) are presented for systems composed of nanoscale iron pillars of dimension 9nm x 9nm x 150nm. Hysteresis loops generated under sinusoidally varying fields are obtained, while the coercive field is estimated to be 1979{+-}14 Oe using linear field sweeps at T=0 K. Thermal effects are essential to the relaxation of magnetization trapped in a metastable orientation, such as happens after a rapid reversal of an external magnetic field less than the coercive value. The distribution of switching times is compared to a simple analytic theory that describes reversal with nucleation at the ends of the nanomagnets. Results are also presented for arrays of nanomagnets oriented perpendicular to a flat substrate. Even at a separation of 300 nm, where the field from neighboring pillars is only {approx}1 Oe, the interactions have a significant effect on the switching of the magnets.

  20. The Radial Electric Field in Tokamak with Reversed Magnetic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Horton, Wendell; Sugama, Hideo

    1998-10-01

    Neoclassical theory with the impurity rotational velocity is used to evaluate the radial electric field Er in tokamaks. The result of the complete matrix method for the deuterium-carbon plasma is compared with a reduced analytic formula for determining Er [Ernst et al., (1998)]. The analytic formula is shown to overestimate the Er magnitude and its gradient. Then two transport measures of the effect of the Er shear are compared for the reverse shear and enhanced reversed shear discharges in TFTR [Mazzucato et al., (1996)]. We show that the combined Er and magnetic shear measure Υs from linear stability theory gives a higher correlation with the observed transition between the two discharges than the vorticity measure ωs from Er shear alone.

  1. Ballistic conductance of Ni nanowire with a magnetization reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smogunov, Alexander; Dal Corso, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio

    2004-09-01

    The approach proposed by Choi and Ihm for calculating the ballistic conductance of open quantum systems is generalized to deal with magnetic transition metals. The method has been implemented with ultrasoft pseudopotentials and plane wave basis set in a DFT-LSDA ab initio scheme. We present the quantum-mechanical conductance calculations for monoatomic Ni nanowire with a single spin reversal. We find that a spin reversal blocks the conductance of d electrons at the Fermi energy of the Ni nanowire. On the other hand, two s electrons (one per each spin) are perfectly transmitted in the whole energy window giving 2 G0 for the total conductance. The relevance of these results in connection with recent experimental data is discussed.

  2. Parallel heat transport in reversed shear magnetic field configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevski, D.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.

    2012-03-01

    Transport in magnetized plasmas is a key problem in controlled fusion, space plasmas, and astrophysics. Three issues make this problem particularly challenging: (i) The extreme anisotropy between the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field), χ, and the perpendicular, χ, conductivities (χ/χ may exceed 10^10 in fusion plasmas); (ii) Magnetic field lines chaos; and (iii) Nonlocal parallel transport. We have recently developed a Lagrangian Green's function (LG) method to solve the local and non-local parallel (χ/χ->∞) transport equation applicable to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields. footnotetext D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, PRL, 106, 195004 (2011); D. del-Castillo-Negrete, L. Chac'on, Phys. Plasmas, APS Invited paper, submitted (2011). The proposed method overcomes many of the difficulties faced by standard finite different methods related to the three issues mentioned above. Here we apply the LG method to study transport in reversed shear configurations. We focus on the following problems: (i) separatrix reconnection of magnetic islands and transport; (ii) robustness of shearless, q'=0, transport barriers; (iii) leaky barriers and shearless Cantori.

  3. Synthesis and magnetic reversal of bi-conical Ni nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biziere, N.; Lassalle Ballier, R.; Clochard, M. C.; Viret, M.; Wade, T. L.; Balanzat, E.; Wegrowe, J. E.

    2011-09-01

    Template synthesis in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes has been used to grow hour glass shaped nickel nanowires with a constriction in the range of tens of nanometers at the center. Anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements have been performed on a single nanowire to follow magnetization reversal of the structure. The results are explained via 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the appearance of a complex vortex state close to the constriction whose propagation depends on the angle between the cone axis and the applied field. The interest of this original growth process for spintronics is discussed.

  4. Model for Heat Pinch in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiao-ming; X, Qiu M.; Wang, Ai-ke

    1998-10-01

    A simple model is proposed to explain the recent experiment in TFTR and the more recent one in JT-60U. In the model the significant reduction of effective thermal diffusivities of ions and electrons (χieff and χeeff) is attributed to the inward flows of drift wave energy, induced by the synergistic effects of the reversed magnetic shear and E × B velocity shear, where E is due to ion pressure gradient. Numerical results demonstrate the predictions of the present model, in particular, the numerical results for χieff are in good agreement with experimental trents.

  5. Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.

    2013-06-15

    Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configurations is numerically investigated by using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model in slab geometry. To explore different dynamic processes in locked modes, three equilibrium states are adopted. Stable, marginal, and unstable current profiles for double tearing modes are designed by varying the current intensity between two resonant surfaces separated by a certain distance. Further, the dynamic characteristics of locked modes in the three RMS states are identified, and the relevant physics mechanisms are elucidated. The scaling behavior of critical perturbation value with initial plasma velocity is numerically obtained, which obeys previously established relevant analytical theory in the viscoresistive regime.

  6. Effect of the shape and lateral dimensions on the magnetization reversal in permalloy nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, A. K.; Egorov, S. V.; Uspenskaya, L. S.

    2016-04-01

    Kinetics of magnetization reversal in patterned permalloy films with nanometer thickness is studied by means of magneto-optic visualization technique, Bitter technique and micromagnetic simulations. The reversal modes and critical dimensions at which a change of the magnetization scenario in the structures takes place are determined. The experimentally observed critical dimensions are shown to differ from the calculated ones by two orders of magnitude. The crucial influence of the ferro-fluid on magnetic patterns and magnetization reversal parameters is found.

  7. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  8. Introducing artificial length scales to tailor magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, J.; Strache, T.; Liedke, M. O.; Markó, D.; Wintz, S.; Lenz, K.; Keller, A.; Facsko, S.; Mönch, I.; McCord, J.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetism is a collective phenomenon. Hence, a local variation on the nanoscale of material properties, which act on the magnetic properties, affects the overall magnetism in an intriguing way. Of particular importance are the length scales on which a material property changes. These might be related to the exchange length, the domain wall width, a typical roughness correlation length, or a length scale introduced by patterning of the material. Here we report on the influence of two artificially created length scales: (i) ion erosion templates that serve as a source of a predefined surface morphology (ripple structure) and hence allow for the investigation of roughness phenomena. It is demonstrated that the ripple wave length can be easily tuned over a wide range (25-175 nm) by varying the primary ion erosion energy. The effect of this ripple morphology on the induced uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in soft magnetic Permalloy films is studied. Only below a ripple wavelength threshold (≈60 nm) is a significant induced magnetic anisotropy found. Above this threshold the corrugated Permalloy film acts as a flat film. This cross-over is discussed in the frame of dipolar interactions giving rise to the induced anisotropies. (ii) Ion implantation through a lithographically defined mask, which is used for a magnetic property patterning on various length scales. The resulting magnetic properties are neither present in non-implanted nor in homogeneously implanted films. Here new insight is gained by the comparison of different stripe patterning widths ranging from 1 to 10 μm. In addition, the appearance of more complicated magnetic domain structures, i.e. spin-flop domain configurations and head-on domain walls, during hard axis magnetization reversal is demonstrated. In both cases the magnetic properties, the magnetization reversal process as well as the magnetic domain configurations depend sensitively on the artificially introduced length scale.

  9. Reversible "triple-Q" elastic field structures in a chiral magnet.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2016-01-01

    The analytical solution of the periodic elastic fields in chiral magnets caused by presence of periodically distributed eigenstrains is obtained. For the skyrmion phase, both the periodic displacement field and the stress field are composed of three "triple-Q" structures with different wave numbers. The periodic displacement field, obtained by combining the three "triple-Q" displacement structures, is found to have the same lattice vectors with the magnetic skyrmion lattice. We find that for increasing external magnetic field, one type of "triple-Q" displacement structure and stress structure undergo a "configurational reversal", where the initial and the final field configuration share similar pattern but with opposite direction of all the field vectors. The solution obtained is of fundamental significance for understanding the emergent mechanical properties of skyrmions in chiral magnets. PMID:27457629

  10. Improved confinement with reversed magnetic shear in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    Highly peaked density and pressure profiles in a new operating regime have been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The q-profile has a region of reversed magnetic shear extending from the magnetic axis to r/a {approximately}0.3-0.4. The central electron density rises from 0.45 x 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} to nearly 1.2 x 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} during neutral beam injection. The electron particle diffusivity drops precipitously in the plasma core with the onset of the improved confinement mode and can be reduced by a factor of {approximately}50 to near the neoclassical particle diffusivity level.

  11. Asymmetric magnetization reversal process in Co nanohill arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, W. O.; Martinez, L.; Jaafar, M.; Asenjo, A.; Vazquez, M.

    2009-11-15

    Co thin films deposited by sputtering onto nanostructured polymer [poly(methyl methacrylate)] were prepared following replica-antireplica process based on porous alumina membrane. In addition, different capping layers were deposited onto Co nanohills. Morphological and compositional analysis was performed by atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy techniques to obtain information about the surface characteristics. The observed asymmetry in the magnetization reversal process at low temperatures is ascribed to the exchange bias generated by the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic interface promoted by the presence of Co oxide detected in all the samples. Especially relevant is the case of the Cr capping, where an enhanced magnetic anisotropy in the Co/Cr interface is deduced.

  12. Suppression/Reversal of Natural Convection by Exploiting the Temperature/Composition Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Natural convection, driven by temperature-or concentration gradients or both, is an inherent phenomenon during solidification of materials on Earth. This convection has practical consequences (e.g effecting macrosegregation) but also renders difficult the scientific examination of diffusive/conductive phenomena during solidification. It is possible to halt, or even reverse, natural convection by exploiting the variation (with temperature, for example) of the susceptibility of a material. If the material is placed in a vertical magnetic field gradient, a buoyancy force of magnetic origin arises and, at a critical field gradient, can balance the normal buoyancy forces to halt convection. At higher field gradients the convection can be reversed. The effect has been demonstrated in experiments at Marshall Space Flight Center where flow was measured by PIV in MnCl2 solution in a superconducting magnet. In auxiliary experiments the field in the magnet and the properties of the solution were measured. Computations of the natural convection, its halting and reversal, using the commercial software FLUENT were in good agreement with the measurements.

  13. Polarity reversals and tilt of the Earth's magnetic dipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolginov, A. Z.

    1993-01-01

    There is evidence that the terrestrial magnetic field is connected with the Earth's mantle: (1) there are magnetic anomalies that do not take part in the westward drift of the main field, but are fixed with respect to the mantle; (2) the geomagnetic pole position flips in a particular way by preferred meridional paths during a reversal; and (3) magnetic polarity reversals are correlated with the activations of geological processes. These facts may be explained if we take into account that a significant horizontal temperature gradient can exist in the top levels of the liquid core because of the different thermoconductivity of the different areas of the core-mantle boundary. These temperature inhomogeneities can penetrate the core because fluxes along the core boundary (the thermal wind) can be strongly suppressed by a small redistribution of the chemical composition in the top of the core. The nonparallel gradients of the temperature, density, and composition on the top of the core create a curled electric field that produces a current and a magnetic field. This seed-field can be amplified by motions in the core. The resulting field does not forget the seed-field distribution and in this way the field on the Earth surface (that can be created only in regions with high conductivity, i.e. in the core) is connected with the core-mantle boundary. Contrary to the usual approach to the dynamo problem, we will take into account that the seed field of thermoelectric origin is acting not only at some initial moment of time but permanently.

  14. Magnetic properties of nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamiya, Hiroaki

    With recent progress of nanotechnology for spin-electronic devices, a rich potential for nanomagnets has attracted considerable attention. Some fundamental issues, however, are still open to question. This study throws a new light on the issues by using the techniques: preparation techniques for uniform nanomagnets and techniques for estimation of equilibrium states. The results show that conventional models for classical phenomena of individual nanomagnets should be renewed in some respects. In addition, it is shown that existence of macroscopic quantum phenomena is doubtful in the Kelvin regime, even if magnetization of the individual nanomagnet is considerably small. On the other hand, we can find that assembled nanomagnets show cooperative phenomena: spin glasslike order in randomly assembled nanomagnets and some phase transitions in dipolar-coupled nanomagnets with sufficient mobility. Some references are appended for English-speaking readers.

  15. Diffusion properties of active particles with directional reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großmann, R.; Peruani, F.; Bär, M.

    2016-04-01

    The diffusion properties of self-propelled particles which move at constant speed and, in addition, reverse their direction of motion repeatedly are investigated. The internal dynamics of particles triggering these reversal processes is modeled by a stochastic clock. The velocity correlation function as well as the mean squared displacement is investigated and, furthermore, a general expression for the diffusion coefficient for self-propelled particles with directional reversal is derived. Our analysis reveals the existence of an optimal, finite rotational noise amplitude which maximizes the diffusion coefficient. We comment on the relevance of these results with regard to biological systems and suggest further experiments in this context.

  16. On the magnetization reversal of the oxide-based exchange spring magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debangsu; Shivakumara, C.; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2011-04-01

    The role of the soft phase (Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4) on the magnetization reversal and coercivity mechanism of the Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4/BaFe12O19 nanocomposite has been investigated. The presence of the interacting field and the disorder in the nanocomposite has been confirmed by the variation of Jr/Jr(∞) vs Jd/Jr(∞) and the irreversible magnetization. To understand the relative strength of the pinning and the nucleation, the magnetic viscosity measurement has been done and the thermal activation volume has been estimated. From the Barbier plot and the activation volume measurement, the dominant mechanism governing the magnetization reversal process has been proposed.

  17. Dipping Magnetic Reversal Boundaries at Endeavor Deep: Implications for Crustal Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pockalny, R. A.; Shields, A. C.; Larson, R. L.; Popham, C.

    2005-12-01

    Endeavor Deep, created by ongoing rifting along the northeastern boundary of the Juan Fernandez Microplate, provides a generous 75-km long view of the upper 1-3 km of oceanic crust created ~3 Ma at a fast-spreading ridge (~80 km/Myr, half-rate). Recent near-bottom surveys with the ROV Jason collected high-resolution video, rock samples, and 3-component magnetometer data along a 5 km-wide section of the southern wall of the deep. The video and rock samples define a crustal section with 300-500 m of primarily pillows and flows overlying a 400-500 m transition zone of extrusives and dykes. Forward modeling of the total magnetic intensity calculated from the 3-component magnetometer data identifies a magnetic polarity reversal that corresponds to a reversal boundary within magnetic anomaly 2a (C2An.2r - C2AN.3n , ~3.33 Ma). The location of the modeled polarity transition suggests the reversal boundary dips downward toward the original ridge axis with shallow dips (15 degrees) in the extrusive layer becoming increasingly steeper (25 degrees) in the deeper transition zone. The dipping character of the reversal boundary has also been observed along the walls of the Blanco Fracture Zone and is consistent with evolving crustal accretion models for seafloor created at intermediate- and fast-spreading rates, which predicts the rotation of the upper extrusive layer back toward the ridge axis. As a consequence of this rotation, originally horizontal flow boundaries will dip back toward the ridge axis and the magnitude of the dip will increase with depth into the crustal section. A small reversed magnetic polarity is also observed deeper within normally magnetized C2AN.3n chron, but with a very shallow dip (3-5 degrees). We doubt this is another normal-reverse-normal polarity transition, since the anomaly suspiciously coincides with the transition from dykes to extrusives. Therefore, we believe this anomaly is either the result of an edge-effect created by the different magnetic

  18. Magnetic Reconnection in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, N.E.

    2001-06-01

    Magnetic field line reconnection is a process whereby magnetic field lines which are otherwise topologically preserved by, and frozen into, a plasma can break and reconnect to form field lines with different topologies. It plays a significant role in a wide variety of plasmas, including stellar, space and laboratory plasmas. The focus of this dissertation is the underlying dynamics of reconnection in one particular kind of laboratory plasma: the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Specifically, this dissertation reports measurements, made using a pair of insertable diagnostics in conjunction with arrays of magnetic sensing coils positioned near the plasma surface, of the spatial structure of the magnetic and parallel current density fluctuations associated with reconnection in the edge of MST. At least 4 significant results are obtained form such measurements. First we observe direct evidence of reconnection which takes the form of tearing modes in an RFP. Specifically we measure a (radial) magnetic field fluctuation that causes reconnection in the so-called reversal surface, or q = 0 surface, in the edge of MST. Notably this evidence of reconnection at the reversal surface is the first of its kind in an RFP. Second, we measure the radial width of the associated current sheet, or fluctuation in the component of the current density parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. Such current sheets are a characteristic feature of the reconnection process but their radial widths are sensitive to the specific effects that allow reconnection to occur sometimes call non-ideal effects because reconnection is forbidden by ideal MHD. We compare the observed width to those expected from models of reconnection that incorporate different non-ideal effects in Ohm's law. In particular we see that the observed width is significantly larger than those expected form resistivity in the context of linearly unstable tearing modes and electron inertia. It is a factor of a few larger than the

  19. Recording-media-related morphology and magnetic properties of crystalline CoPt{sub 3} and CoPt{sub 3}-Au core-shell nanoparticles synthesized via reverse microemulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bahmanrokh, Ghazaleh Hashim, Mansor; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Kanagesan, Samikannu; Sabbaghizadeh, Rahim; Ezzad Shafie, Mohd Shamsul; Navasery, Manizheh; Soltani, Nayereh; Vaziri, Parisa

    2014-09-07

    A comparative experimental study of the magnetic properties of CoPt{sub 3} and CoPt{sub 3}/Au nanoparticles as well as a detailed study of the structural properties of the samples by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer is presented in this work. In addition, the effect of particle size on the structure and magnetic properties of nanoparticles prepared by microemulsion is studied. The correlation between particle size, crystallinity, and magnetization was studied as well. CoPt nanoparticles have been studied intensively over the last decade because of their increased magnetic anisotropy in the ordered phase that can be interesting for high density magnetic recording. A significant high coercivity for as-prepared CoPt{sub 3} and CoPt{sub 3}-Au nanoparticles was obtained at room temperature and enhanced after annealing. The focused aim of our study is to obtain high coercivity at room temperature that follows the Curie-Weiss law. This indicates an interacting system in which the nanoparticles behave like single domain ferromagnetic materials in the particle size range of 8 to 35 nm. In addition, the interaction increases by cooling the samples to low temperature around 15 K. Temperature dependence 1/M graph was obtained to investigate the behavior of nanoparticles at low temperature and shows the best fit with Curie-Weis mode.

  20. Inhomogeneities in spin states and magnetization reversal of geometrically identical elongated Co rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. S.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Goolaup, S.; Singh, N.; Jung, W.; Castaño, F. J.; Ross, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    The magnetic configurations and magnetic reversal processes in arrays of geometrically identical rounded rectangular Co rings have been investigated. Magnetic imaging reveals a range of configurations, including diagonal onion, horseshoe onion, and vortex states. Reversal from the onion to the vortex state can occur via different routes involving domain wall motion within the rings, and the mechanism depends on the applied field orientation.

  1. Do micromagnetic simulations correctly predict hard magnetic hysteresis properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toson, P.; Zickler, G. A.; Fidler, J.

    2016-04-01

    Micromagnetic calculations using the finite element technique describe semi-quantitatively the coercivity of novel rare earth permanent magnets in dependence on grain size, grain shape, grain alignment and composition of grain boundaries and grain boundary junctions and allow the quantitative prediction of magnetic hysteretic properties of rare earth free magnets based on densely packed elongated Fe and Co nanoparticles, which depend on crystal anisotropy, aspect ratio and packing density. The nucleation of reversed domains preferentially takes place at grain boundary junctions in granular sintered and melt-spun magnets independently on the grain size. The microstructure and the nanocompostion of the intergranular regions are inhomogeneous and too complex in order to make an exact model for micromagnetic simulations and to allow a quantitative prediction. The incoherent magnetization reversal processes near the end surfaces reduce and determine the coercive field values of Co- and Fe-based nanoparticles.

  2. Rotating magnetic quadrupole current drive for field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Milroy, Richard D.; Guo, H.Y.

    2005-07-15

    In the translation, confinement, and sustainment experiment [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough, S. J. Tobin, L. S. Schrank, W. A. Reass, and G. A. Wurden, Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are created and sustained using a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF is usually in the form of a rotating dipole, which in vacuum penetrates uniformly to the axis of symmetry. However, plasma conditions in the FRC normally adjust so that the RMF only partially penetrates the plasma column. We have investigated the possibility of using a rotating quadrupole rather than a rotating dipole magnetic field. The vacuum field from a quadrupole is proportional to radius and cannot penetrate to the axis of symmetry; however, this is not a disadvantage if the current drive is confined to the outer region of the FRC. It was found that the quadrupole drive efficiency is comparable to that of a dipole, but the rotating dipole is more effective at stabilizing the n=2 rotational instability. A strong internal oscillation in B{sub {theta}} is often observed in FRCs sustained by a quadrupole field. The spectral content of the signals indicates that an internal n=1 magnetic structure forms and corotates with the electrons. Similar but much lower amplitude structures can form when a rotating dipole is employed (edge-driven mode)

  3. Perpendicular magnetization reversal mechanism of functional FePt films for magnetic storage medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Da-Hua; Chi, Po-Wei; Chao, Chung-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Magnetization reversal mechanism and related surface morphology of functional FePt(001) alloy films with large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have been explored by alternate-atomic-layer deposition onto Pt/MgO(100) substrates via electron beam evaporation, and all evaporated films have been kept at in-situ substrate heating temperature of 400 °C. The FePt alloy film was composed of ultrathin [Fe (0.5 nm)/Pt (0.5 nm)]n Fe/Pt multilayer structures. The corresponding thickness of multilayer films was controlled by the periodic bilayer numbers (n) and varied in the range from 15 nm (n = 15) to 30 nm (n = 30). The surface topography was observed and varied from granular-like island to continuous microstructures with increasing the periodic numbers of Fe/Pt bilayer films. The measurement of angular dependent coercivity showed a tendency of the near rotation of reverse-domain type (n = 15) shift towards the domain-wall motion as a typical peak behavior (n = 30) with increasing the periodic bilayer numbers of Fe/Pt multilayers. On the basis of all magnetic measurements and corresponding magnetization analysis, indicating that the perpendicular magnetization reversal mechanism and related surface morphology of ordered FePt(001) alloy films could be systematically controlled by varying the periodic bilayer numbers accompanied with the thickness dependence.

  4. Low temperature magnetic force microscope study of magnetization reversal in patterned nanoislands of SrRuO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Livnat; Reiner, James W.; Klein, Lior

    2012-04-01

    SrRuO3 is an itinerant ferromagnet (Tc˜150K) characterized by large uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy (K1˜7.7×106erg/cm3) and relatively low saturation magnetization (Ms=213emu /cm3) - properties which make SrRuO3 an extremely hard magnetic material. We have patterned arrays of rectangular nanoislands of a high quality epitaxial film of SrRuO3 with sides ranging between 50 and 500 nm, and studied their magnetization reversal at 4 K using a low temperature magnetic force microscope. We find that the nucleation field for many of the nanoislands is very close to that expected by the Stoner-Wohlfarth model (˜3.8T) and from nanoislands which exhibit partial reversals we can determine an upper bound for the nucleation volume on the order of 100×100×10nm3. We also find that domain wall pinning in the nanoislands is extremely high and in some cases the depinning field exceeds ˜3T.

  5. Field Reversed Configuration Translation and the Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Wurden, G. A.; Sieck, P. E.; Waganaar, W. J.; Dorf, L.; Kostora, M.; Cortez, R. J.; Degnan, J. H.; Ruden, E. L.; Domonkos, M.; Adamson, P.; Grabowski, C.; Gale, D. G.; Kostora, M.; Sommars, W.; Frese, M.; Frese, S.; Camacho, J. F.; Parks, P.; Siemon, R. E.; Awe, T.; Lynn, A. G.; Gribble, R.

    2009-06-01

    After considerable design and construction, we describe the status of a physics exploration of magnetized target fusion (MTF) that will be carried out with the first flux conserving compression of a high pressure field-reversed configuration (FRC). The upgraded Los Alamos (LANL) high density FRC experiment FRXL has demonstrated that an appropriate FRC plasma target can be created and translated on a time scale fast enough to be useful for MTF. Compression to kilovolt temperature is expected to form a Mbar pressure, high energy density laboratory plasma (HEDLP). Integrated hardware on the new Field Reversed Compression and Heating Experiment (FRCHX) at the Air Force Research Laboratory Shiva Star facility, has formed initial FRC's and will radially compress them within a cylindrically symmetric aluminum "liner". FRXL has shown that time scales for FRC translation to the target region are significantly shorter than the typical FRC lifetime. The hardware, diagnostics, and design rationales are presented. Pre-compression plasma formation and trapping experimental data from FRXL and FRCHX are shown.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in the multiferroic Ge(1-x)Mn(x)Te semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Przybylińska, H; Springholz, G; Lechner, R T; Hassan, M; Wegscheider, M; Jantsch, W; Bauer, G

    2014-01-31

    Ge(1-x)Mn(x)Te is shown to be a multiferroic semiconductor, exhibiting both ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties. By ferromagnetic resonance we demonstrate that both types of order are coupled to each other. As a result, magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal is achieved. Switching of the spontaneous electric dipole moment is monitored by changes in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This also reveals that the ferroelectric polarization reversal is accompanied by a reorientation of the hard and easy magnetization axes. By tuning the GeMnTe composition, the interplay between ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity can be controlled. PMID:24580486

  7. Magnetic reversal dynamics of a quantum system on a picosecond timescale

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Alexey V; Soloviev, Igor I; Bakurskiy, Sergey V; Tikhonova, Olga V

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present our approach for a consistent, fully quantum mechanical description of the magnetization reversal process in natural and artificial atomic systems by means of short magnetic pulses. In terms of the simplest model of a two-level system with a magnetic moment, we analyze the possibility of a fast magnetization reversal on the picosecond timescale induced by oscillating or short unipolar magnetic pulses. We demonstrate the possibility of selective magnetization reversal of a superconducting flux qubit using a single flux quantum-based pulse and suggest a promising, rapid Λ-scheme for resonant implementation of this process. In addition, the magnetization reversal treatment is fulfilled within the framework of the macroscopic theory of the magnetic moment, which allows for the comparison and explanation of the quantum and classical behavior. PMID:26665066

  8. Magnetic reversal dynamics of a quantum system on a picosecond timescale.

    PubMed

    Klenov, Nikolay V; Kuznetsov, Alexey V; Soloviev, Igor I; Bakurskiy, Sergey V; Tikhonova, Olga V

    2015-01-01

    We present our approach for a consistent, fully quantum mechanical description of the magnetization reversal process in natural and artificial atomic systems by means of short magnetic pulses. In terms of the simplest model of a two-level system with a magnetic moment, we analyze the possibility of a fast magnetization reversal on the picosecond timescale induced by oscillating or short unipolar magnetic pulses. We demonstrate the possibility of selective magnetization reversal of a superconducting flux qubit using a single flux quantum-based pulse and suggest a promising, rapid Λ-scheme for resonant implementation of this process. In addition, the magnetization reversal treatment is fulfilled within the framework of the macroscopic theory of the magnetic moment, which allows for the comparison and explanation of the quantum and classical behavior. PMID:26665066

  9. Large reversible magnetocaloric effect in a Ni-Co-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Cong, D. Y.; Ma, L.; Nie, Z. H.; Wang, Z. L.; Suo, H. L.; Ren, Y.; Wang, Y. D.

    2016-01-01

    Reversibility of the magnetocaloric effect in materials with first-order magnetostructural transformation is of vital significance for practical magnetic refrigeration applications. Here, we report a large reversible magnetocaloric effect in a Ni49.8Co1.2Mn33.5In15.5 magnetic shape memory alloy. A large reversible magnetic entropy change of 14.6 J/(kg K) and a broad operating temperature window of 18 K under 5 T were simultaneously achieved, correlated with the low thermal hysteresis (˜8 K) and large magnetic-field-induced shift of transformation temperatures (4.9 K/T) that lead to a narrow magnetic hysteresis (1.1 T) and small average magnetic hysteresis loss (48.4 J/kg under 5 T) as well. Furthermore, a large reversible effective refrigeration capacity (76.6 J/kg under 5 T) was obtained, as a result of the large reversible magnetic entropy change, broad operating temperature window, and small magnetic hysteresis loss. The large reversible magnetic entropy change and large reversible effective refrigeration capacity are important for improving the magnetocaloric performance, and the small magnetic hysteresis loss is beneficial to reducing energy dissipation during magnetic field cycle in potential applications.

  10. Magnetization reversal studies in structurally tailored cobalt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Daljit; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.; Gupta, Rekha; Kotnala, R. K.

    2013-10-01

    Cobalt nanowires (NWs) having hcp crystal structure are structurally tailored for different preferred orientations (PO) of (0002), (101¯0), (112¯0) and (101¯1) by varying bath temperature and bath concentration in commercially available 50 nm pore diameter polycarbonate (PCT) and 20 nm pore diameter anodic alumina (AAO) membranes. The magnetization studies show orientation dependent competition of magneto-crystalline anisotropy with shape anisotropy. The large effective anisotropy, Keff (along longitudinal direction) of 1.42×106 erg/cc is observed in (0002) PO NWs, which changes sign (-1.50×106 erg/cc) in (101¯0) PO NWs. The angular dependence of coercivity [HC(θ)] in (0002) oriented Co NWs exhibits a non-monotonic behavior in both the 50 nm and 20 nm samples. The fitting of HC(θ) data reveals that the magnetization reversal mechanism initially takes place by curling and subsequently changes to coherent rotation mode after a certain transition angle, which is higher in case of denser NW array. This increase in transition angle can be attributed to the increased magneto-static interactions in the AAO membrane array having 103 times higher NW areal-density than that in PCT membrane array. Role of dipolar/ magnetostatic anisotropy studied by varying NW areal-density and NW diameter.

  11. Numerical Studies of Magnetization Reversal in Thin Annular Nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel; Kent, Andrew; Stein, Daniel; Bedau, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    The rate of thermally activated magnetization reversal in thin ferromagnetic nanorings has been found analytically in a 1D model in which the demagnetization energy is approximated by a local surface term [1]. Numerical micromagnetic calculations confirm all aspects of the analytic model for narrow thin rings, such as permalloy rings of 200 nm mean radius, 40 nm width and 2 nm thickness [2]. However, the model breaks down in for extremely wide rings, when the ring width approaches its mean diameter. Here we present numerical micromagnetic results for the transition states between the clockwise and counterclockwise state in this limit. We describe how the two transition configurations of narrow rings cease to be saddles of the energy functional. Also, a new low energy metastable state is found to exist for a narrow range of fields. We discuss the results of applying the String Method [3] to determine the transition states and energy barriers between the lowest magnetization configurations of rings. [1] K. Martens, D.L. Stein, and A.D. Kent, PRB 73, 054413 (2006) [2] G. D. Chaves-O'Flynn, D.L. Stein, and A.D. Kent, arXiv:0811.0440 (2008) [3] W. E, W. Ren, E. Vanden-Eijnden, J. Chem. Phys 126, 164103 (2007)

  12. Observation of two step magnetization reversal in Fe0 . 25 TaS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, S. B.; Choi, Y. J.; Horibe, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.; Wu, Weida

    2011-03-01

    Understanding magnetic coercivity mechanisms in strong ferromagnets is crucial for new technologies. We studied domain wall pinning in a highly anisotropic ferromagnet of single crystalline Fe 0 . 25 Ta S2 by utilizing variable temperature magnetic force microscopy (VT-MFM). Magnetic domain structure and the magnetization reversal were investigated in magnetic fields up to 8 tesla at several temperature. Our results revealed the existence of two step magnetization reversal in Fe 0 . 25 Ta S2 . The real space images of magnetic domains, showing this intriguing phenomenon, will be presented.

  13. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    PubMed

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  14. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  15. Magnetic reversal phenomena of perpendicular magnetic islands fabricated by block copolymer lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilievski, Filip; Ross, C. A.; Vancso, G. J.

    2008-04-01

    Templated block copolymer lithography has been proposed as a method of fabricating patterned magnetic media. This paper discusses the magnetic properties of perpendicular CoCrPt magnetic uniaxial islands in a range of sizes (5-15nm thick, 20-35nm diameter) fabricated by this method. Sputter-deposited films of perpendicular CoCrPt films were patterned in a series of reactive and ion beam etches. The magnetic islands maintain the perpendicular magnetization from the film, but show increased coercivity (800-1650Oe) as compared to the film (150Oe). Time-scale-dependent magnetic measurements show switching volumes (V*) on the order of the physical volume of the dots (˜5000nm3), suggesting that the dots switch their magnetization coherently and independently of each other. Last, we demonstrate selectively removable topographic templates for imposing long-range order to the system.

  16. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (σ) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  17. Microwave assisted magnetization reversal in cylindrical antidot arrays with in-plane and perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, Mehmet; Ture, Kerim; Aktas, Gulen; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor; Garcia, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    Porous anodic alumina is a particularly attractive self-ordered system used as template to fabricate nanostructures. The anodic film contains a self-ordered hexagonal array of parallel pores with tunable pore size and interpore distance, and whose pore locations can be templated. Deposition of magnetic films onto porous alumina leads to the formation of porous magnetic films, whose properties differ significantly from those of unpatterned films. The study of antidot arrays has both technological and fundamental importance. Although porous alumina films are typically synthesized in a planar geometry, in this work we deposited NiFe and Ti/CoCrPt magnetic films with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy onto cylindrical-geometry porous anodic alumina substrates to achieve cylindrical antidot arrays. The effect of both, the magnitude of the AC current and the circular magnetic field on the magnetization reversal has been studied for in-plane and perpendicular anisotropies. The level of reduction in the switching field was found to be dependent on the power, the frequency of the microwave pulses and the circular applied magnetic field. Such a reduction is associate with the competition between pumping and damping processes.

  18. Magnetic anisotropy and reversal mechanisms in dual layer exchanged coupled perpendicular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, T.; Lengsfield, B.; Do, H.; Terris, B. D.

    2008-04-01

    We report the magnetic properties of perpendicular media with a layered structure in which a high anisotropy, segregated, granular CoCrPt-oxide base layer is capped by a lower anisotropy CoCrPt-based film. Anisotropy field (Hk) data show that for the thickness of oxide media studied here, the measured value of Hk remains constant as cap thickness increases. This provides strong evidence that the anisotropy of the composite grain is controlled by the hard oxide layer and is not a simple average of the anisotropy of the oxide and cap layers. The reversal mechanism is explored by determining the angle dependent switching as a function of cap thickness. In the absence of a cap layer, the media show a Stoner-Wohlfarth-like reversal which becomes more Kondorsky-like [1/cos(θ)] when a critical cap thickness is reach, which we interpret as indicating greater lateral exchange coupling.

  19. Anomalous magnetization reversal due to proximity effect of antiphase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofin, R. G. S.; Wu, Han-Chun; Shvets, I. V.

    2011-12-01

    Here we report anomalous double switching hysteresis loop and high coercivity (˜0.1 T) in Fe3O4(110) thin films. Our analytical model based on spin chains confined within small antiphase boundary domains (APBDs) suggests a significant proximity effect of antiferromagnetic antiphase boundaries (APBs). Furthermore, the calculated domain size (D) follows the well-known scaling relation D=Ct. The results suggest that the interface exchange coupling between neighboring magnetic domains through antiferromagnetic APBs is responsible for the double switching hysteresis. Our findings could help advance the studies of anomalous properties of magnetic materials originating from growth defects. This effect can be utilized for the tunability of exchange bias in devices.

  20. Reversible assembly of magnetized particles: Application to water-borne pathogen enumeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Qasem

    2009-12-01

    Reversible assembly of magnetized particles and cells has been proposed and implemented. The approach is based on magnetized particles or magnetically labeled cell immobilization in an array of individual particle/cell for optical counting. The device has been tested for few types of magnetic particles and one water-borne pathogen: Giardia Lamblia. An individual particle immobilization efficiency of 92% was achieved.

  1. Magnetic properties of multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles with alternating magnetic wire and tube segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Aravena, D.; Corona, R. M.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic properties in multisegmented cylindrical nanostructures comprised of nanowire and nanotube segments are investigated numerically as a function of their geometry. In this work we report systematic changes in the coercivity and remanence in these systems. Besides, we have found the ideal conditions for a magnetic configuration with two antiparallel domains that could be used to help to stabilize magnetic nanoparticles inside ferromagnetic multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles. This magnetic behavior is due to the fact that the tube segment reverses its magnetization before the wire segment, allowing the control of the magnetic domain walls motion between two segments. In this way, these magnetic nanoobjects can be an alternative to store information or even perform logic functions.

  2. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-01-01

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr2O3 and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (rv25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of r-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect,1,2 where an antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling exists between two ferromagnetic (FM) layers separated by a certain type of magnetic or non-magnetic spacer,3 has significant potential for application in the magnetic recording industry. Soon after the discovery of the GMR, the magnetic properties of multilayer systems (FeCr) became a subject of intensive study. The application of bulk iron-chromium (Fe-Cr) alloys has been of great interest, as these alloys exhibit favorable prop- erties including corrosion resistance, high strength, hardness, low oxidation rate, and strength retention at elevated temper- ature. However, the structural and magnetic properties of Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters (NCs) have not been investigated in-depth. Of all NCs, Fe-based clusters have unique magnetic properties as well as favorable catalytic characteristics in reactivity, selectivity, and durability.4 The incorporation of dopant of varied type and concentration in Fe can modify its chemical ordering, thereby optimizing its electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and opening up many new applications. The substitution of an Fe atom (1.24 A°) by a Cr atom (1.25 A° ) can easily modify the magnetic properties, since (i) the curie temperature (Tc ) of Fe is 1043 K, while Cr is an itinerant AFM with a bulk Neel temperature TN =311 K, and (ii) Fe

  3. Electrodeposition and magnetic properties of FeCo alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Zhou, Mingge; Zhu, Minggang; Yang, Xu; Yue, Ming

    2012-04-01

    FeCo alloys thin films have been successfully electrodeposited on Ag films. The morphology, structure, composition, and magnetic property of the FeCo films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, induction-coupled plasma spectrometry, vibrating sample magnetometer and network analyzer. The use of reverse pulse current in the process of electrodepostion can reduce the surface roughness obviously. The effects of anodic current density and thickness are studied. The results show that the film fabricated under appropriate conditions has low coercivity and excellent high-frequency magnetic property.

  4. Reverse osmosis membrane of high urea rejection properties. [water purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric membranes suitable for use in reverse osmosis water purification because of their high urea and salt rejection properties are prepared by generating a plasma of an unsaturated hydrocarbon monomer and nitrogen gas from an electrical source. A polymeric membrane is formed by depositing a polymer of the unsaturated monomer from the plasma onto a substrate, so that nitrogen from the nitrogen gas is incorporated within the polymer in a chemically combined form.

  5. Exchange bias effect modified asymmetric magnetization reversal in Ni/YMnO3 multiferroic bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Junlu; Zheng, Dongxing; Li, Dong; Jin, Chao; Li, Peng; Feng, Liefeng; Bai, Haili

    2016-04-01

    Exchange bias (EB) effect modified asymmetric magnetization reversal in Ni/YMnO3 multiferroic bilayers was investigated by combining anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with free energy methods. The promotion and inhibition effects of EB field on magnetization rotation result in the asymmetry of magnetization reversal. The AMR curves exhibit shape transition from arc-like to sin2θH-dependence with increasing external fields due to the competition between Zeeman energy and interfacial coupling energy. The phase shift and asymmetric behaviors become weak as the EB field decreases. Our work suggests that controlling the EB effect can be an alternative way to manipulate the magnetization reversal in exchange biased systems.

  6. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy of the Permian and Carboniferous: The extension of the magnetic reversal record into the Paleozoic

    SciTech Connect

    Opdyke, N.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Magnetic polarity stratigraphy has revolutionized stratigraphic studies in Jurassic to Pleistocene sediments. These studies have been greatly facilitated by the reversal record that is recorded in rocks of the ocean floor. For times prior to the Jurassic, the reversal history of the magnetic field must be determined and eventually related through the type section concept. The magnetic reversal history of the late Paleozoic is dominated by the Permo-Carboniferous reversed superchron (PCRS), which extends from the late Permian to the Carboniferous (Westphalian). Recent studies by the author and his students in Middle Carboniferous sediments of eastern Canada, Pennsylvania, Arizona, and Nevada reveal that the magnetic field has reversed frequently in late Mississippian and early Pennsylvanian times (Meramecian through late Morrowan). The polarity of the magnetic field over this interval is approximately 50% normal and 50% reversed. The frequency of reversal appears to be about one reversal per m.y. The possibility, therefore, exists that this pattern may be used for continental and intercontinental correlation. Attempts are currently underway to correlate this magnetic stratigraphy to fossiliferous marine sections. The base of the PCRS is probably of Atokan age.

  7. Magnetic field reversals in the Milky Way- "cherchez le champ magnetique".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallee, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    Radio observations of nearby spiral galaxies have tremendously enhanced our knowledge of their global magnetic field distributions. Recent theoretical developments in the area of dynamos have also helped in the interpretation of magnetic field data in spiral galaxies. When it comes to the magnetic field in the Milky Way galaxy, our position in the Milky Way's galactic disk hinders our attempts at interpreting the observational data. This makes the proposition of "cherchez le champ magnetique" a difficult one to follow. Some recent papers have attempted to fit magnetic field models to spiral galaxies, and in particular to the Milky Way galaxy. Magnetic field reversals in the Milky Way are crucial to all interpretations, be they axisymmetric spiral (ASS) or bisymmetric spiral (BSS) global magnetic field models. Magnetic field reversals can be found in both ASS and BSS magnetic field models, not just BSS ones. The axisymmetric spiral (ASS) magnetic field models produced by the dynamo theory already predict magnetic field reversals, and they are of the type observed in the Milky Way. The small number of magnetic field reversals observed in the Milky Way is compatible with the ASS magnetic field models. The bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic field models as applied to the pulsar RM data and to the QSO and galaxies data have many problems, due to the many pitfalls in model fitting the magnetic field reversals observed in the Milky Way. Many pitfalls are discussed here, including the incomplete comparisons of BSS versus ASS models, the number of spiral arms to be used in modelling, and the proper distance to pulsars via the more accurate distribution of thermal electrons within spiral arms. The two magnetic field reversals in our Milky Way are clearly located in the interarm regions. Predicted magnetic field reversals are periodic, while observed ones are not periodic. Magnetic field reversals cannot be masked effectively by local interstellar magnetised shells. The

  8. Magnetization reversal of FePt hard/soft stacked nanocomposite particle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.

    2006-10-01

    Microstructure and magnetic properties of interfacially disordered FePt nanoparticles with a diameter of about 10nm were investigated. Sputter deposition of amorphous Al2O3 overlayer caused the disordering of L10-FePt particles at the interface. The assembly of these partially disordered FePt nanoparticles is equivalent to the composite medium consisting of the exchange coupled soft and hard layers. Coercivity Hc of the interfacially disordered FePt nanoparticles significantly decreased with increasing thickness of the disordered layer. Comparison with theoretical calculations has shown that this reduction of Hc is attributed to the so-called spin flop state during the magnetization reversal. The interfacial disordering method has been demonstrated to be a promising technique for fabricating FePt-based soft/hard stacked composite media.

  9. Magnetization reversal of FePt hard/soft stacked nanocomposite particle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y. K.; Hono, K.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.

    2006-10-01

    Microstructure and magnetic properties of interfacially disordered FePt nanoparticles with a diameter of about 10 nm were investigated. Sputter deposition of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayer caused the disordering of L1{sub 0}-FePt particles at the interface. The assembly of these partially disordered FePt nanoparticles is equivalent to the composite medium consisting of the exchange coupled soft and hard layers. Coercivity H{sub c} of the interfacially disordered FePt nanoparticles significantly decreased with increasing thickness of the disordered layer. Comparison with theoretical calculations has shown that this reduction of H{sub c} is attributed to the so-called spin flop state during the magnetization reversal. The interfacial disordering method has been demonstrated to be a promising technique for fabricating FePt-based soft/hard stacked composite media.

  10. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. B.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, T. N.; Chen, L. Q.; Ma, X. Q.

    2014-09-22

    Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane magnetization reversal in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase-field microelasticity theory. It is found that the critical current density for in-plane magnetization reversal decreases dramatically with an increasing substrate strain, since the effective elastic field can drag the magnetization to one of the four in-plane diagonal directions. A potential strain-assisted multilevel bit spin transfer magnetization switching device using substrate misfit strain is also proposed.

  11. Sputtering Pressure Effects on Magnetization Reversal Mechanism and Magnetic Switching Volumes of CoSm/Cr Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Soon Young; Kim, Sung Bong; Kim, Sang In; Shan, Z. S.; Sellmyer, David J.

    2002-08-01

    The sputtering pressure effects on magnetization reversal and magnetic switching volumes of CoSm/Cr films have been investigated. It is found that the magnetization reversal changed from wall pinning for samples prepared at low pressure to single particle rotation for samples prepared at high pressure. The magnetic switching volumes increased with increasing the Ar pressure to values in the range of 5.2{\\mathendash}9.0 × 10-18 cm3. These switching volumes satisfy Sharrock’s requirement for the thermal stability of high-density magnetic recording.

  12. Structural and magnetic properties with large reversible magnetocaloric effect in (La1-xPrx)0.85Ag0.15MnO3 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Ayaş, Ali; Akyol, Mustafa; Ekicibil, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    We report on the effect of Pr doping on structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in (La1-xPrx)0.85Ag0.15MnO3 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) compounds. The main crystal structure has been studied by performing X-ray diffraction method and structural analysis based on Rietveld method where it is found that although samples at low concentration level (x ≤ 0.2) have rhombohedral phase ?, others (x ≥ 0.3) have orthorhombic (Pbnm) phase. Scanning electron microscope images show that the average particle size decreases by increasing Pr amount in the main structure. It is observed that the second-order transition temperature from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase is dramatically decreased from 262 to 138 K by increasing Pr concentration in (La1-xPrx)0.85Ag0.15MnO3. On the other hand, all samples have also antiferromagnetic coupling observed below TN ~ 50 K. The maximum magnetic entropy change (-ΔSM)max and relative cooling power values were found in the range of 7.90-2.88 J/kg K and 213.32-153.50 J/kg, respectively, under 50 kOe field change in our samples. It can be argued that particularly the compounds LPAM with x = 0.0, 0.1 and 0.2 are expected to be promising candidate for magnetic refrigeration.

  13. Magnetic Structure, Magnetization Reversal and Spin Dynamics of Micron-sized Permalloy Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaobin; Liu, Zhigang; Malac, Marek; Qian, Hui; Freeman, Mark; Metlushko, Vitali; Ilic, Bojan

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic ring structure is currently of great interest due to its potential application for magnetic storage and sensors [1]. In this talk, we present a study of 2 μm sized Permalloy rings on 25 nm SiN membrane prepared by electron beam lithography. The magnetic structures are examined by Lorentz microscopy. The Lorentz microscopy images indicate that the demagnetized state is the expected circulation of the magnetization. The head-to-head or tail-to-tail domains in the onion states (remanence after saturation) are found to be vortices. Diffractional magnetooptic Kerr effect magnetometry [2] is used (in zero, first, and second orders) to study the magnetization reversal, and the results are compared to the micromagnetic modeling based on Landau-Liftshitz-Gilbert equation. Finally, ultrafast scanning Kerr microscopy in spectroscopic mode is used to study the spin dynamics of the ring [3]. The ultrafast transient field is applied perpendicular to the rings, while a dc bias is applied in the plane. We find that the processional frequency in the circulating magnetization state is almost bias field-independent, while it splits into two field-dependent frequencies at larger bias (>100 Oe). These results will also be discussed in relation to micromagnetic modeling. [1] J.-G. Zhu, et al., JAP 87, 6668 (2000). [2] P. Vavassori, et al., PRB 67, 134429 (2003). [3] W. K. Hiebert, et al., PRL 79, 1134 (1997).

  14. Modeling Magnetic Properties in EZTB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A software module that calculates magnetic properties of a semiconducting material has been written for incorporation into, and execution within, the Easy (Modular) Tight-Binding (EZTB) software infrastructure. [EZTB is designed to model the electronic structures of semiconductor devices ranging from bulk semiconductors, to quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. EZTB implements an empirical tight-binding mathematical model of the underlying physics.] This module can model the effect of a magnetic field applied along any direction and does not require any adjustment of model parameters. The module has thus far been applied to study the performances of silicon-based quantum computers in the presence of magnetic fields and of miscut angles in quantum wells. The module is expected to assist experimentalists in fabricating a spin qubit in a Si/SiGe quantum dot. This software can be executed in almost any Unix operating system, utilizes parallel computing, can be run as a Web-portal application program. The module has been validated by comparison of its predictions with experimental data available in the literature.

  15. The Magnetic Properties Experiments on Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, J. M.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Hviid, S. F.; Madsen, M. B.

    1996-09-01

    A remarkable result from the Viking missions was the discovery that the Martian soil is highly magnetic, in the sense that the soil is attracted by permanent magnets. Both the strong and weak magnets on the Viking landers were saturated with dust throughout the mission. Appropriate limits for the spontaneous magnetization sigma_S were advanced: 1 Am(2) (kg soil)(-1) < sigma_S < 7 Am(2) (kg soil)(-1) . The essential difference between the Magnet Arrays for Mars Pathfinder and the Viking Magnetic Properties Experiment is that Magnet Arrays on Pathfinder will include magnets of lower strengths that the weakest Viking magnet. The five magnets consist of small ring magnets concentric with oppositely polarized cylindrical magnets. The outer diameter of the ring magnets is 18 mm. Discrete (single phase) particles of strongly magnetic minerals (gamma -Fe2O3 or Fe3O4) will stick to all five magnets, while composite (multiphase) particles will stick preferentially to the strongest magnets. Two Magnet Arrays are placed on the Pathfinder lander, with a distance of 1180 and 1450 mm, respectively, from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The magnets will attract airborne dust, and the dust on the magnets will be periodically viewed by the IMP. The images transmitted to Earth are the data on which conclusions on the magnetic properties of the dust will be based. Besides the Magnet Arrays the Pathfinder lander carries two other types of magnets. The Tip Plate Magnet is placed at a distance of 10 cm from the IMP, and thus allows a rather high resolution imaging of the dust clinging to the magnet. The Ramp Magnets are placed near the end of the ramps by which the micro-rover will descend to the surface. The dust on the Ramp Magnets will be studied by the APX-spectrometer of the micro-rover.

  16. Obtaining Magnetic Properties of Meteorites Using Magnetic Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Nabelek, L.; Mazanec, M.; Simon, K.; Hruba, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic images of Murchison meteorite's and Chelyabinsk meteorite's thin section have been obtained from magnetic scanning system from Youngwood Science and Engineering (YSE) capable of resolving magnetic anomalies down to 10-3 mT range from about 0.3 mm distance between the probe and meteorite surface (resolution about 0.15 mm). Anomalies were produced repeatedly, each time after application of magnetic field pulse of varying amplitude and constant, normal or reversed, direction. This process resulted in both magnetizing and demagnetizing of the meteorite thin section, while keeping the magnetization vector in the plane of the thin section. Analysis of the magnetic data allows determination of coercivity of remanence (Bcr) for the magnetic sources in situ. Value of Bcr is critical for calculating magnetic forces applicable during missions to asteroids where gravity is compromised. Bcr was estimated by two methods. First method measured varying dipole magnetic field strength produced by each anomaly in the direction of magnetic pulses. Second method measured deflections of the dipole direction from the direction of magnetic pulses (Nabelek et al., 2015). Nabelek, L., Mazanec, M., Kdyr, S., and Kletetschka, G., 2015, Magnetic, in situ, mineral characterization of Chelyabinsk meteorite thin section: Meteoritics & Planetary Science.

  17. Exchange coupling, antiphase boundaries, and the origin of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. J.; Kasama, T.; White, T. A.; Simpson, E. T.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2005-12-01

    /antiordered APDs, with enhanced enrichment observed in simulations performed within the hematite-ilmenite miscibility gap. Simulations show no evidence of SR-TRM in systems containing two equally well-ordered ferrimagnetic (FM) domains separated by Fe-enriched AF boundaries. Systems displaying partial long-range order, however, do display SR-TRM. Partial long-range order is characterized by a mixture of highly ordered Ti-rich FM domains and poorly (anti)ordered Fe-rich domains with a weak FM moment. The Fe-enriched antiordered regions fulfill all of the requirements of the x-phase: they are the first to become magnetically ordered on cooling; they are very close to being antiferromagnetic, but carry a small net moment due to partial cation order; they are negatively exchanged-coupled to the neighbouring ordered APDs; they are metastable, appearing only in systems that are partway through the transformation from short- to long-range order. These properties lead to a self-reversal in net magnetisation on cooling.

  18. Magnetization reversal mechanism of Nd-Fe-B films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaoxi; Ishida, Go; Morisako, Akimitsu

    2011-04-01

    The microstructure and magnetic properties of Nd-Fe-B films with thicknesses from 100 nm to 3 nm have been investigated. All the films show excellent perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a squareness ratio of 1 in the perpendicular direction and almost zero coercivity in the in-plane direction. Of particular interest is that the initial magnetization curves sensitively depended on the film thickness. Films thicker than 15 nm show steep initial magnetization curve. Although the films have coercivities larger than 21 kOe, the films can be fully magnetized from the thermally demagnetized state with a field as small as 5 kOe. With the decrease of film thickness to 5 nm, the initial magnetization curve becomes flat. The evolution of initial magnetization curves with film thickness can be understood by the microstructure of the films. Films with thickness of 15 nm show close-packed grains without any intergranular phases. Such microstructures lead to steep initial magnetization curves. On the other hand, when the film thickness decreased to 3 nm, the film thickness became nonuniform. Such microstructure leads to flat initial magnetization curves.

  19. A detailed study of magnetization reversal in individual Ni nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Vilanova Vidal, Enrique; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Mohammed, Hanan; Kosel, Jürgen

    2015-01-19

    Magnetic nanowires have emerged as essential components for a broad range of applications. In many cases, a key property of these components is the switching field, which is studied as a function of the angle between the field and the nanowire. We found remarkable differences of up to 100% between the switching fields of different nanowires from the same fabrication batch. Our experimental results and micromagnetic simulations indicate that the nanowires exhibit a single domain behavior and that the switching mechanism includes vortex domain wall motion across the nanowire. The differences between the switching fields are attributed to different cross-sections of the nanowires, as found by electron microscopy. While a circular cross-section yields the smallest switching field values, any deviation from this shape results in an increase of the switching field. The shape of the nanowires' cross-sections is thus a critical parameter that has not been previously taken into account.

  20. Magnetic domain structure and magnetization reversal in submicron-scale Co dots

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C J; Fernandez, A; Gibbons, M; Wall, M A

    1998-09-24

    We present a magnetic force microscopy (MFM) analysis of arrays of submicron-scale Co dots fabricated by interference lithography. The dots are thin (180--300 Å) and elliptical in shape. MFM reveals that these structures relax into highly ordered remanent states whose symmetry and configuration are governed by their shape anisotropy. In particular, when the dots are saturated along their long-axis, a uniformly magnetized state persists at remanence. However, when the dots are saturated along their short-axis, they relax into a single-vortex state in which the circulation can have either sign. Both states are characterized by smoothly varying magnetization patterns and a high degree of uniformity across the array. We attribute the ordered behavior of these.structures to the film microstructure, which allows the shape anisotropy to dominate over magnetocrystalline anjsotropy. By imaging a series of minor-loop remanent states, we show that magnetization reversal in these structures occurs via the nucleation and annihilation of a single vortex. Magnetic hysteresis loop measurements are consistent with these observations and provide additional details. Furthermore, we present the results of micromagnetic simulations, which are in excellent agreement with both the MFM images and the hysteresis loop measurements. © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic phase transitions and magnetization reversal in MnRuP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampen-Kelley, P.; Mandrus, D.

    The ternary phosphide MnRuP is an incommensurate antiferromagnetic metal crystallizing in the non-centrosymmetric Fe2P-type crystal structure. Below the Neel transition at 250 K, MnRuP exhibits hysteretic anomalies in resistivity and magnetic susceptibility curves as the propagation vectors of the spiral spin structure change discontinuously across T1 = 180 K and T2 = 100 K. Temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction data indicate that the first-order spin reorientation occurs in the absence of a structural transition. A strong magnetization reversal (MR) effect is observed upon cooling the system through TN in moderate dc magnetic fields. Positive magnetization is recovered on further cooling through T1 and maintained in subsequent warming curves. The field dependence and training of the MR effect in MnRuP will be discussed in terms of the underlying magnetic structures and compared to anomalous MR observed in vanadate systems. This work is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation GBMF4416 and U.S. DOE, Office of Science, BES, Materials Science and Engineering Division.

  2. Electric-field-driven magnetization reversal in square-shaped nanomagnet-based multiferroic heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ren-Ci; Nan, Ce-Wen E-mail: cwnan@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, J. J. E-mail: cwnan@tsinghua.edu.cn; Chen, Long-Qing; Hu, Jia-Mian

    2015-04-06

    Based on phase field modeling and thermodynamic analysis, purely electric-field-driven magnetization reversal was shown to be possible in a multiferroic heterostructure of a square-shaped amorphous Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} nanomagnet on top of a ferroelectric layer through electrostrain. The reversal is made possible by engineering the mutual interactions among the built-in uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, the geometry-dependent magnetic configuration anisotropy, and the magnetoelastic anisotropy. Particularly, the incorporation of the built-in uniaxial anisotropy made it possible to reverse magnetization with one single unipolar electrostrain pulse, which is simpler than previous designs involving the use of bipolar electrostrains and may alleviate ferroelectric fatigue. Critical conditions for triggering the magnetization reversal are identified.

  3. Bio-inspired artificial cilia with magnetic dynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Leilei; Zheng, Yongmei

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the structure and properties of natural cilia, we focused on a facile template-free approach to prepare magnetic artificial cilia grown on the substrate (glass, PDMS, or others). In an applied magnetic field, the cilia formed spontaneously and immediately from magnetic nanoparticles and elastomeric polymer in a liquid solvent by bottom-up self-assembly. The length of prepared cilia could be in the scale of millimeter and reach a high aspect ratio of even over 100. We studied the effect of the magnetic strength applied and the size of nanoparticles to get tunable scale of cilia. The cilia show reversibly bending in an external magnetic field and this bending actuation gave some important functions: to transport macroscopic nonmagnetic materials on the cilia and to mix liquids.

  4. Nucleation of reversed domain and pinning effect on domain wall motion in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Shen, B. G.; Niu, E.; Sun, J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The magnetization behaviors show a strong pinning effect on domain wall motion in optimally melt-spun Pr8Fe87B5 ribbons at room temperature. According to analysis, the coercivity is determined by the nucleation field of reversed domain, and the pinning effect, which results from the weak exchange coupling at interface, makes domain nucleation processes independent and leads to non-uniform magnetization reversals. At a temperature of 60 K, owing to the weak exchange coupling between soft-hard grains, magnetization reversal undergoes processes of spring domain nucleation in soft grains and irreversible domain nucleation in hard grains, and the pinning effect remains strong among hard grains.

  5. Hysteresis of the magnetic properties of soft magnetic gels.

    PubMed

    Zubarev, A Yu; Chirikov, D N; Borin, D Yu; Stepanov, G V

    2016-08-14

    We present results of an experimental and theoretical study of the magnetic properties of soft magnetic gels consisting of micron-sized magnetizable particles embedded in a polymer matrix. Experiments demonstrate hysteretic dependences of composite magnetization on an applied magnetic field and non-monotonic, with maximum, dependence of the sample susceptibilities on the field. We propose a theoretical approach which describes the main physical features of these experimental results. PMID:27406554

  6. Robust Magnetic Properties of a Sublimable Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Kiefl, Evan; Mannini, Matteo; Bernot, Kevin; Yi, Xiaohui; Amato, Alex; Leviant, Tom; Magnani, Agnese; Prokscha, Thomas; Suter, Andreas; Sessoli, Roberta; Salman, Zaher

    2016-06-28

    The organization of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) on surfaces via thermal sublimation is a prerequisite for the development of future devices for spintronics exploiting the richness of properties offered by these magnetic molecules. However, a change in the SMM properties due to the interaction with specific surfaces is usually observed. Here we present a rare example of an SMM system that can be thermally sublimated on gold surfaces while maintaining its intact chemical structure and magnetic properties. Muon spin relaxation and ac susceptibility measurements are used to demonstrate that, unlike other SMMs, the magnetic properties of this system in thin films are very similar to those in the bulk, throughout the full volume of the film, including regions near the metal and vacuum interfaces. These results exhibit the robustness of chemical and magnetic properties of this complex and provide important clues for the development of nanostructures based on SMMs. PMID:27139335

  7. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.

    2014-11-03

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  8. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.; Aliev, F. G.

    2014-11-01

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  9. Electron thermal transport within magnetic islands in the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H. D.; Reusch, J. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2010-05-15

    Tearing mode induced magnetic islands have a significant impact on the thermal characteristics of magnetically confined plasmas such as those in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). New Thomson scattering diagnostic capability on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP has enabled measurement of the thermal transport characteristics of islands. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) profiles can now be acquired at 25 kHz, sufficient to measure the effect of an island on the profile as the island rotates by the measurement point. In standard MST plasmas with a spectrum of unstable tearing modes, remnant islands are present in the core between sawtoothlike reconnection events. Associated with these island remnants is flattening of the T{sub e} profile inside the island separatricies. This flattening is characteristic of rapid parallel heat conduction along helical magnetic field lines. In striking contrast, a temperature gradient within an m=1, n=5 island is observed in these same plasmas just after a sawtooth event when the m=1, n=5 mode may briefly come into resonance near the magnetic axis. This suggests local heating and relatively good confinement within the island. Local power balance calculations suggest reduced thermal transport within this island relative to the confinement properties of standard MST discharges between reconnection events. The magnetic field and island structure is modeled with three-dimensional nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations (DEBS code) with Lundquist numbers matching those in MST during standard discharges. During improved confinement plasmas with reduced tearing mode activity, temperature fluctuations correlated with magnetic signals are small with characteristic fluctuation amplitudes of order T-tilde{sub e}/T{sub e}approx2%.

  10. Onset of a Propagating Self-Sustained Spin Reversal Front in a Magnetic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, P.; Vélez, S.; Macià, F.; Li, S.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Christou, G.; Kent, A. D.

    2013-05-01

    The energy released in a magnetic material by reversing spins as they relax toward equilibrium can lead to a dynamical instability that ignites self-sustained rapid relaxation along a deflagration front that propagates at a constant subsonic speed. Using a trigger heat pulse and transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields, we investigate and control the crossover between thermally driven magnetic relaxation and magnetic deflagration in single crystals of Mn12-acetate.

  11. Magnetization Reversal Process of Single Crystal α-Fe Containing a Nonmagnetic Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiu-Lin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    The magnetization reversal process and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated in this work based on the Landau-Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The evolutions of the magnetic domain morphology are studied, and our analyses show that the magnetization reversal process is affected by the interaction between the moving domain wall and the existing nonmagnetic particles. This interaction strongly depends on the size of the particles, and it is found that particles with a particular size contribute the most to magnetic hardening.

  12. Magnetic Reversal of Electric Polarization with Fixed Chirality of Magnetic Structure in a Chiral-Lattice Helimagnet MnSb_{2}O_{6}.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M; Seki, S; Sato, T J; Nambu, Y; Hong, T; Matsuda, M; Cao, H B; Ishiwata, S; Tokura, Y

    2016-07-22

    The correlation between magnetic and dielectric properties has been investigated for the single crystal of the chiral triangular-lattice helimagnet MnSb_{2}O_{6}. We found that the spin-spiral plane in the ground state has a considerable tilting from the (110) plane and that the sign of the spin-spiral tilting angle is coupled to the clockwise or counterclockwise manner of spin rotation and accordingly to the sign of magnetically induced electric polarization. This leads to unique magnetoelectric responses such as the magnetic-field-induced selection of a single ferroelectric domain as well as the reversal of electric polarization just by a slight tilting of the magnetic field direction, where the chiral nature of the crystal structure plays a crucial role through the coupling of the chirality between the crystal and magnetic structures. Our results demonstrate that crystallographic chirality can be an abundant source of novel magnetoelectric functions with coupled internal degrees of freedom. PMID:27494497

  13. Magnetic Reversal of Electric Polarization with Fixed Chirality of Magnetic Structure in a Chiral-Lattice Helimagnet MnSb2 O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Seki, S.; Sato, T. J.; Nambu, Y.; Hong, T.; Matsuda, M.; Cao, H. B.; Ishiwata, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2016-07-01

    The correlation between magnetic and dielectric properties has been investigated for the single crystal of the chiral triangular-lattice helimagnet MnSb2 O6 . We found that the spin-spiral plane in the ground state has a considerable tilting from the (110) plane and that the sign of the spin-spiral tilting angle is coupled to the clockwise or counterclockwise manner of spin rotation and accordingly to the sign of magnetically induced electric polarization. This leads to unique magnetoelectric responses such as the magnetic-field-induced selection of a single ferroelectric domain as well as the reversal of electric polarization just by a slight tilting of the magnetic field direction, where the chiral nature of the crystal structure plays a crucial role through the coupling of the chirality between the crystal and magnetic structures. Our results demonstrate that crystallographic chirality can be an abundant source of novel magnetoelectric functions with coupled internal degrees of freedom.

  14. Polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core by a unipolar, non-resonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field.

    SciTech Connect

    Keavney, D. J.; Cheng, X. M.; Buchanan, K. S.

    2009-06-24

    We report the polarity reversal of a magnetic vortex core using a nonresonant in-plane pulsed magnetic field of arbitrary waveform studied using time-resolved x-ray photoemission electron microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The imaging and simulations show that a 5 mT pulse, higher than the critical field for nonlinear effects, effectively leads to the randomization of the vortex core polarity. The micromagnetic simulations further show that the onset of stochastic core polarity randomization does not necessarily coincide with the critical reversal field, leading to a field window for predictable core reversal.

  15. Magnetic and electrical properties of Martian particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olhoeft, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The only determinations of the magnetic properties of Martian materials come from experiments on the two Viking Landers. The results suggest Martian soil containing 1 to 10 percent of a highly magnetic phase. Though the magnetic phase mineral was not conclusively identified, the predominate interpretation is that the magnetic phase is probably maghemite. The electrical properties of the surface of Mars were only measured remotely by observations with Earth based radar, microwave radiometry, and inference from radio-occultation of Mars orbiting spacecraft. No direct measurements of electrical properties on Martian materials have been performed.

  16. Magnetization-reversal processes in an ultrathin Co/Au film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, J.; Grolier, V.; Meyer, P.; Lemerle, S.; Maziewski, A.; Stefanowicz, E.; Tarasenko, S. V.; Tarasenko, V. V.; Kisielewski, M.; Renard, D.

    1997-06-01

    Magnetization-reversal processes in a ferromagnetic cobalt film structure (Au/Co/Au), with perpendicular anisotropy, were investigated by magneto-optical magnetometry and microscopy. In the considered ultrathin Co film, the magnetization reversal between the two Ising-spin equilibrium states is dominated by the domain-wall motion mechanism. We focused our studies on processes initiated from a given demagnetized state. Starting from a magnetically saturated state generated under a large field HS, applied perpendicular to the film, this demagnetized state is created through magnetic aftereffects in a field Hd antiparallel but smaller than HS and applied during a selected time. Direct (RD) and indirect (RI) magnetization processes are then studied from this state for application of the field parallel and antiparallel to Hd, respectively. The dynamics of the magnetization reversal is much faster for the RI process since it is initiated from a quasihomogeneous 'Swiss cheese' domain state with small nonreversed regions. The magnetic accommodation phenomenon is studied, and a domain-shape memory effect evidenced. A theoretical analysis of the dynamics of magnetization processes is proposed, starting from the model of a patchy inhomogeneous media with a realistic distribution of local coercivities. The pertinent parameters for calculations are deduced from our experimental data using appropriate analytical expressions of the magnetic relaxation time and domain-wall velocity under a field. Computer simulations using these parameters reproduce well the time evolution of the magnetic domain pattern and different magnetization curves both for RD and RI magnetization processes.

  17. Glucose biosensor based on multisegment nanowires exhibiting reversible magnetic control.

    PubMed

    Gerola, Gislaine P; Takahashi, Giovanna S; Perez, Geraldo G; Recco, Lucas C; Pedrosa, Valber A

    2014-11-01

    We describe the amperometric detection of glucose using oriented nanowires with magnetic switching of the bioelectrochemical process. The fabrication process of the nanowires was prepared through controlled nucleation and growth during a stepwise electrochemical deposition, and it was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry were used to study the magnetoswitchable property; this control was accomplished by changing the surface orientation of nanowires. Under the optimal condition, the amperometric response was also linear up to a glucose concentration of 0.1-16.0 mmol L(-1) with a sensitivity of 81 μA mM(-1). The detection limit was estimated for 4.8×10(-8) mol L(-1), defined from a signal/noise ratio of 3. It also exhibits good reproducibility and high selectivity with insignificant interference from ascorbic acid, acetoaminophen, and uric acid. The resulting biosensor was applied to detect the blood sugar in human serum samples without any pretreatment, and the results were comparatively in agreement with the clinical assay. PMID:25127595

  18. Polarity Reversal Time of the Magnetic Dipole Component of the Sun in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamada, Kazuyuki

    2013-04-01

    The Sun's general magnetic field has shown polarity reversal three times during the last three solar cycles. We attempt to estimate the upcoming polarity reversal time of the solar magnetic dipole by using the coronal field model and synoptic data of the photospheric magnetic field. The scalar magnetic potential of the coronal magnetic field is expanded into a spherical harmonic series. The long-term variations of the dipole component (g01) calculated from the data of National Solar Observatory/Kitt Peak and Wilcox Solar Observatory are compared with each other. It is found that the two g01 values show a similar tendency and an approximately linear increase between the Carrington rotation periods CR 2070 and CR 2118. The next polarity reversal is estimated by linear extrapolation to be between CR 2132.2 (December 2012) and CR2134.8 (March 2013).

  19. Micromagnetic modeling of the effects of stress on magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, B.; Lo, C. C. H.; Lee, S. J.; Jiles, D. C.

    2001-06-01

    A micromagnetic model has been developed for investigating the effect of stress on the magnetic properties of thin films. This effect has been implemented by including the magnetoelastic energy term into the Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation. Magnetization curves of a nickel film were calculated under both tensile and compressive stresses of various magnitudes applied along the field direction. The modeling results show that coercivity increased with increasing compressive stress while remanence decreased with increasing tensile stress. The results are in agreement with the experimental data in the literature and can be interpreted in terms of the effects of the applied stress on the irreversible rotation of magnetic moments during magnetization reversal under an applied field. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Electric field controlled reversible magnetic anisotropy switching studied by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Xue, Desheng; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2014-03-10

    In this letter, spin rectification was used to study the electric field controlled dynamic magnetic properties of the multiferroic composite which is a Co stripe with induced in-plane anisotropy deposited onto a Pb(Mg{sub 1∕3}Nb{sub 2∕3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} substrate. Due to the coupling between piezoelectric and magnetoelastic effects, a reversible in-plane anisotropy switching has been realized by varying the history of the applied electric field. This merit results from the electric hysteresis of the polarization in the nonlinear piezoelectric regime, which has been proved by a butterfly type electric field dependence of the in-plane anisotropy field. Moreover, the electric field dependent effective demagnetization field and linewidth have been observed at the same time.

  1. A Stable Pentagonal Bipyramidal Dy(III) Single-Ion Magnet with a Record Magnetization Reversal Barrier over 1000 K.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Vieru, Veacheslav; Ungur, Liviu; Jia, Jian-Hua; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Lan, Yanhua; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Gao, Song; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2016-04-27

    Single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with a large spin reversal barrier have been recognized to exhibit slow magnetic relaxation that can lead to a magnetic hysteresis loop. Synthesis of highly stable SMMs with both large energy barriers and significantly slow relaxation times is challenging. Here, we report two highly stable and neutral Dy(III) classical coordination compounds with pentagonal bipyramidal local geometry that exhibit SMM behavior. Weak intermolecular interactions in the undiluted single crystals are first observed for mononuclear lanthanide SMMs by micro-SQUID measurements. The investigation of magnetic relaxation reveals the thermally activated quantum tunneling of magnetization through the third excited Kramers doublet, owing to the increased axial magnetic anisotropy and weaker transverse magnetic anisotropy. As a result, pronounced magnetic hysteresis loops up to 14 K are observed, and the effective energy barrier (Ueff = 1025 K) for relaxation of magnetization reached a breakthrough among the SMMs. PMID:27054904

  2. Magnetization reversal of in-plane uniaxial Co films and its dependence on epitaxial alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Idigoras, O. Suszka, A. K.; Berger, A.; Vavassori, P.; Obry, B.; Hillebrands, B.; Landeros, P.

    2014-02-28

    This work studies the influence of crystallographic alignment onto magnetization reversal in partially epitaxial Co films. A reproducible growth sequence was devised that allows for the continuous tuning of grain orientation disorder in Co films with uniaxial in-plane anisotropy by the controlled partial suppression of epitaxy. While all stable or meta-stable magnetization states occurring during a magnetic field cycle exhibit a uniform magnetization for fully epitaxial samples, non-uniform states appear for samples with sufficiently high grain orientation disorder. Simultaneously with the occurrence of stable domain states during the magnetization reversal, we observe a qualitative change of the applied field angle dependence of the coercive field. Upon increasing the grain orientation disorder, we observe a disappearance of transient domain wall propagation as the dominating reversal process, which is characterized by an increase of the coercive field for applied field angles away from the easy axis for well-ordered epitaxial samples. Upon reaching a certain disorder threshold level, we also find an anomalous magnetization reversal, which is characterized by a non-monotonic behavior of the remanent magnetization and coercive field as a function of the applied field angle in the vicinity of the nominal hard axis. This anomaly is a collective reversal mode that is caused by disorder-induced frustration and it can be qualitatively and even quantitatively explained by means of a two Stoner-Wohlfarth particle model. Its predictions are furthermore corroborated by Kerr microscopy and by Brillouin light scattering measurements.

  3. Improving magnetic properties of ultrasmall magnetic nanoparticles by biocompatible coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costo, R.; Morales, M. P.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the effect of a biocompatible surface coating layer on the magnetic properties of ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles. Particles were synthesized by laser pyrolysis and fully oxidized to maghemite by acid treatment. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was systematically coated with either phosphonate (phosphonoacetic acid or pamidronic acid) or carboxylate-based (carboxymethyl dextran) molecules and the binding to the nanoparticle surface was analyzed. Magnetic properties at low temperature show a decrease in coercivity and an increase in magnetization after the coating process. Hysteresis loop displacement after field cooling is significantly reduced by the coating, in particular, for particles coated with pamidronic acid, which show a 10% reduction of the displacement of the loop. We conclude that the chemical coordination of carboxylates and phosphonates reduces the surface disorder and enhances the magnetic properties of ultrasmall maghemite nanoparticles.

  4. High temperature structural and magnetic properties of cobalt nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Atmane, Kahina; Zighem, Fatih; Soumare, Yaghoub; Ibrahim, Mona; Boubekri, Rym; Maurer, Thomas; Margueritat, Jeremie; Piquemal, Jean-Yves; Ott, Frederic; Chaboussant, Gregory; Schoenstein, Frederic; Jouini, Noureddine; Viau, Guillaume

    2013-01-15

    We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanoparticles ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X ray diffraction (XRD) and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. The coercivity can be modelled by {mu}{sub 0}H{sub C}=2(K{sub MC}+K{sub shape})/M{sub S} with K{sub MC} the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K{sub shape} the shape anisotropy constant and M{sub S} the saturation magnetization. H{sub C} decreases linearly when the temperature is increased due to the loss of the Co magnetocrystalline anisotropy contribution. At 500 K, 50% of the room temperature coercivity is preserved corresponding to the shape anisotropy contribution only. We show that the coercivity drop is reversible in the range 300-500 K in good agreement with the absence of particle alteration. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. - Graphical abstract: We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanorods ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X-ray diffraction and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic Co nanorods are prepared using the polyol process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and texture properties of the Co nanorods are preserved up to 500 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of the Co nanorods are irreversibly altered above 525 K.

  5. Development of Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Gun Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Wynkoop, Tyler; Intrator, Thomas; Weber, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC (field-reversed configuration) plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. This trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties. It also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we plan to test and characterize a new system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. This system will use an array of plasma guns to form the initial plasma. Initial characterization of the plasma gun behavior will be presented.

  6. Magnetic compensation, field-dependent magnetization reversal, and complex magnetic ordering in Co2TiO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, S.; Thota, S.; Joshi, D. C.; Krautz, M.; Waske, A.; Behler, A.; Eckert, J.; Sarkar, T.; Andersson, M. S.; Mathieu, R.; Narang, V.; Seehra, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The complex nature of magnetic ordering in the spinel C o2Ti O4 is investigated by analyzing the temperature and magnetic field dependence of its magnetization (M ), specific heat (Cp), and ac magnetic susceptibilities χ' and χ″. X-ray diffraction of the sample synthesized by the solid-state reaction route confirmed the spinel structure whereas x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows its electronic structure to be C o2Ti O4=[C o2 +] [C o3 +T i3 +] O4 . From analysis of the temperature dependence of the dc paramagnetic susceptibility, the magnetic moments μ (A ) =3.87 μB and μ (B ) =5.19 μB on the A and B sites are determined with μ (B ) in turn yielding μ (T i3 +) =1.73 μB and μ (C o3 +) =4.89 μB . Analysis of the dc and ac susceptibilities combined with the weak anomalies observed in the Cp vs T data shows the existence of a quasi-long-range ferrimagnetic state below TN˜47.8 K and a compensation temperature Tcomp˜32 K , the latter characterized by sign reversal of magnetization with its magnitude depending on the applied magnetic field and the cooling protocol. Analysis of the temperature dependence of M (field cooled) and M (zero field cooled) data and the hysteresis loop parameters is interpreted in terms of large spin clusters. These results in C o2Ti O4 , significantly different from those reported recently in isostructural C o2Sn O4=[C o2 +] [C o2 +S n4 +] O4 , warrant further investigations of its magnetic structure using neutron diffraction.

  7. Low-Noise YBa2Cu3O7 Nano-SQUIDs for Performing Magnetization-Reversal Measurements on Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, T.; Wölbing, R.; Reiche, C. F.; Müller, B.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Mühl, T.; Büchner, B.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2015-04-01

    We fabricate YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) direct-current nano- superconducting quantum-interference devices (nano-SQUIDs) based on grain-boundary Josephson junctions by focused-ion-beam patterning. Characterization of electric transport and noise properties at 4.2 K in a magnetically shielded environment yields a very small inductance L of a few pH for an optimized device geometry. This, in turn, results in very low values of flux noise <50 n Φ0/Hz1 /2 in the thermal white-noise limit, which yields spin sensitivities of a few μB/Hz1 /2 (Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum, and μB is the Bohr magneton). We observe frequency-dependent excess noise up to 7 MHz, which can be eliminated only partially by bias reversal readout. This behavior indicates the presence of fluctuators of unknown origin, possibly related to defect-induced spins in the SrTiO3 substrate. We demonstrate the potential of using YBCO nano-SQUIDs for the investigation of small spin systems, by placing a 39-nm-diameter Fe nanowire encapsulated in a carbon nanotube on top of a nonoptimized YBCO nano-SQUID and by measuring the magnetization reversal of the Fe nanowire via the change of magnetic flux coupled to the nano-SQUID. The measured flux signals upon magnetization reversal of the Fe nanowire are in very good agreement with estimated values, and the determined switching fields indicate magnetization reversal of the nanowire via curling mode.

  8. Magnetization reversal induced by in-plane current in Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Yamanouchi, M. Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Fukami, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate in-plane current-induced magnetization reversal under an in-plane magnetic field in Hall bar shaped devices composed of Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis. The observed relationship between the directions of current and magnetization switching and Ta thickness dependence of magnetization switching current are accordance with those for magnetization reversal by spin transfer torque originated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer.

  9. Magnetization reversal of a single cobalt cluster using a RF field pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamion, A.; Raufast, C.; Bonet, E.; Dupuis, V.; Fournier, T.; Crozes, T.; Bernstein, E.; Wernsdorfer, W.

    2010-05-01

    Technological improvements require the understanding of dynamical magnetization reversal processes at the nanosecond time scales. In this paper, we present the first magnetization reversal measurements performed on a single cobalt cluster (counting only a thousand of spins), using the micro-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technique by applying a constant magnetic field combined with a radio-frequency (RF) field pulse. First of all, we present the different technical steps necessary to detect the magnetic reversals at low temperature ( T=35 mK) of a well-defined nanoparticle prepared by low energy clusters beam deposition (LECBD). We previously showed that the three-dimensional (3D)-switching Stoner-Wohlfarth astroid represents the magnetic anisotropy of the nanoparticle. Then, an improved device coupled with a gold stripe line, allow us to reverse such macrospin, using a RF pulse. A qualitative understanding of the magnetization reversal by non-linear resonance has been obtained with the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation.

  10. Formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergey

    2013-10-01

    There has been considerable effort in developing experiments for studies of both collisionless and radiative shocks in high energy density plasmas (HEDP), but there is still very limited experimental information the concerning properties of HEDP shocks in the presence of a magnetic field. A new experimental platform, based on the use of supersonic ablation plasma flows in inverse wire array z-pinches, was developed for studies of shocks in magnetized HEDP plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (MA ~ 5 - 6 , Vflow 100 km/s, ni ~ 1017 cm-3) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect the shocks formed in the interaction with conducting obstacles. Experiments show that in addition to the formation of a ``standard'' reverse shock in a stagnated HEDP plasma, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional shock-like feature in the upstream plasma. This shock is triggered by the pile-up of magnetic flux diffusing into the upstream flow, despite a relatively small initial level of the frozen-in magnetic field (the flow ram pressure being much greater than the magnetic field pressure). The thickness of this shock is much smaller than the m.f.p. for the ion-ion collisions, the shock is formed at a distance of ~c/ωpi from the foil and remains stationary for the duration of the experiment (~100 ns). The plasma parameters in the flow and in the shock are measured using optical Thomson scattering, two-color laser interferometry, monochromatic X-ray radiography and miniature magnetic probes. The quantitative data from this experiment, especially the spatial profiles of the density and of the flow velocity measured simultaneously in the upstream and downstream of the shock, will allow detailed verification of MHD and PIC codes used by the HEDP community. Supported by EPSRC Grant EP/G001324/1 and by the OFES under DOE Cooperative Agreement DESC

  11. Lattice distortion accompanied by magnetization reversal in A-type antiferromagnetic manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jong-Suck; Iyama, Ayato; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Magnetostriction was investigated for layered A-type antiferromagnetic SmMnO3 showing large magnetocapacitive effects around a temperature (TTP) where ferrimagnetically coupled Mn 3d and Sm 4f moments were reversed simultaneously. Upon sweeping temperature or a magnetic field, a significant lattice distortion was observed at TTP or the coercive field, respectively. This indicates that the lattice is strongly coupled with the magnetic configuration. We discuss the lattice distortion accompanied by the magnetization reversal in terms of a partial change in the orbital state of Mn eg electrons.

  12. Antiphase domains and reverse thermoremanent magnetism in ilmenite-hematite minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawson, C.A.; Nord, G.L., Jr.; Dowty, Eric; Hargraves, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of synthetic ilmenite-hematite samples by transmission electron microscopy has for the first time revealed the presence of well-defined antiphase domains and antiphase domain boundaries in this mineral system. Samples quenched from 1300??C have a high density of domain boundaries, whereas samples quenched from 900??C have a much lower density. Only the high-temperature samples acquire reverse thermoremanent magnetism when cooled in an applied magnetic field. The presence of a high density of domain boundaries seems to be a necessary condition for the acquisition of reverse thermoremanent magnetism.

  13. Polar cap magnetic field reversals during solar grand minima: could pores play a role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švanda, Michal; Brun, Allan Sacha; Roudier, Thierry; Jouve, Laurène

    2016-02-01

    We study the magnetic flux carried by pores located outside active regions with sunspots and investigate their possible contribution to the reversal of the global magnetic field of the Sun. We find that they contain a total flux of comparable amplitude to the total magnetic flux contained in polar caps. The pores located at distances of 40-100 Mm from the closest active region systematically have the correct polarity of the magnetic field to contribute to the polar cap reversal. These pores can be found predominantly in bipolar magnetic regions. We propose that during grand minima of solar activity, such a systematic polarity trend, which is akin to a weak magnetic (Babcock-Leighton-like) source term, could still be operating but was missed by the contemporary observers because of the limited resolving power of their telescopes.

  14. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-07-01

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results.

  15. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-08-01

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results. PMID:24953042

  16. The magnetic properties of seamless steel pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willcock, S. N. M.; Tanner, B. K.; Mundell, P. A.

    1987-03-01

    The magnetic and metallurgical properties of seamless pipe steel have been investigated as a function of position around the pipe circumference. No changes in magnetic properties were found to be associated with the four cycle spiral variations in pipe wall thickness introduced during forging. A weaker single cycle thickness variation was accompanied by a change both in magnetic properties and pearlite fraction. The coercive field predicted from an empirical relationship between grain size and ferrite and pearlite fractions was found to be in excellent agreement with that measured experimentally.

  17. Magnetic and electronic properties of ruthenocuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Y.; Schneider, M. L.; Frazer, B. H.; Rast, S.; Onellion, M.; Asaf, U.; Felner, I.; Nowik, I.; Ali, N.; Roy, S.; Prester, M.; Drobac, D.; Zivkovic, I.; Perfetti, L.; Reginelli, A.; Ariosa, D.; Margaritondo, G.

    2001-03-01

    We present data on as-prepared, oxygen annealed, and hydrogen loaded ruthenocuprate samples. We include: * magnetic measurements: magnetization,^1 ac susceptibility; * electronic properties: x-ray photoemission,^1,2 x-ray absorption^3; * the effects of hydrogen loading and of oxygen annealing. We concentrate on the changes of magnetic properties with carrier concentration, and discuss the superconducting properties only briefly. ^1B.H. Frazer et.al., Phys. Rev. B. ^2B.H. Frazer et.al., Euro. J. Phys., in press (2000). ^3Y. Hirai et.al., submitted.

  18. Reversals of the solar magnetic dipole in the light of observational data and simple dynamo models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Moss, D.; Sokoloff, D.; Hoeksema, J. T.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Observations show that the photospheric solar magnetic dipole usually does not vanish during the reversal of the solar magnetic field, which occurs in each solar cycle. In contrast, mean-field solar dynamo models predict that the dipole field does become zero. In a recent paper it was suggested that this contradiction could be explained as a large-scale manifestation of small-scale magnetic fluctuations of the surface poloidal field. Aims: Our aim is to confront this interpretation with the available observational data. Methods: Here we compare this interpretation with Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) photospheric magnetic field data in order to determine the amplitude of magnetic fluctuations required to explain the phenomenon and to compare the results with predictions from a simple dynamo model which takes these fluctuations into account. Results: We demonstrate that the WSO data concerning the magnetic dipole reversals are very similar to the predictions from our very simple solar dynamo model, which includes both mean magnetic field and fluctuations. The ratio between the rms value of the magnetic fluctuations and the mean field is estimated to be about 2, in reasonable agreement with estimates from sunspot data. The reversal epoch, during which the fluctuating contribution to the dipole is larger than that from the mean field, is about 4 months. The memory time of the fluctuations is about 2 months. Observations demonstrate that the rms of the magnetic fluctuations is strongly modulated by the phase of the solar cycle. This gives additional support to the concept that the solar magnetic field is generated by a single dynamo mechanism rather than also by independent small-scale dynamo action. A suggestion of a weak nonaxisymmetric magnetic field of a fluctuating nature arises from the analysis, with a lifetime of about 1 year. Conclusions: The behaviour of the magnetic dipole during the reversal epoch gives valuable information about details of solar

  19. Domain-specific magnetization reversals on a Permalloy square ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. R.; Freeland, J. W.; Srajer, G.; Metlushko, V.; You, Chun-Yeol

    2004-06-01

    We present domain-specific magnetization reversals extracted from soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements on a Permalloy square ring array. The extracted domain-specific hysteresis loops reveal that the magnetization of the domain parallel to the field is strongly pinned, while those of other domains rotate continuously. In comparison with the micromagnetic simulation, the hysteresis loop on the pinned domain indicates a possibility of the coexistence of the square rings with the vortex and onion states.

  20. Reversible susceptibility studies of magnetization switching in FeCoB synthetic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Cosmin; Cimpoesu, Dorin; Girt, Erol; Ju, Ganping; Stancu, Alexandru; Spinu, Leonard

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we present a study of switching characteristics of a series of synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) structures using reversible susceptibility experiments. Three series of SAF samples were considered in our study with (t1, t2), the thickness of the FeCoB layers of (80nm, 80nm), (50nm, 50nm), and (80nm, 20nm) and with the interlayer of Ru ranging from 0to2nm. A vector vibrating sample magnetometer was used to measure the hysteresis loops along the different directions in the plane of the samples. The reversible susceptibility experiments were performed using a resonant method based on a tunnel diode oscillator. We showed that the switching peaks in the susceptibility versus field plots obtained for different orientations of the applied dc field can be used to construct the switching diagram of the SAF structure. The critical curve constitutes the fingerprint of the switching behavior and provides information about micromagnetic and structural properties of SAF which is an essential component of modern magnetic random access memories.

  1. Stochastic reversal dynamics of two interacting magnetic dipoles: A simple model experiment.

    PubMed

    Plihon, Nicolas; Miralles, Sophie; Bourgoin, Mickael; Pinton, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the dynamics of two coupled magnetic dipoles. The experiment consists in two coplanar permanent disk magnets separated by a distance d, each allowed to rotate on a fixed parallel axis-each magnet's axis being perpendicular to its dipolar moment vector. A torque of adjustable strength can be externally applied to one of the magnets, the other magnet being free. The driving torque may be time-independent or temporally fluctuating. We study the influence of the parameters of the driving torque on the dynamics of the coupled system, in particular the emergence of dynamical regimes such as stochastic reversals. We report transitions between stationary and stochastic reversal regimes. All the observed features can be understood by a simple mechanical dynamical model. The transition between statistically stationary regimes and reversals is explained introducing an effective potential energy incorporating both the coupling between magnets and the external driving. Relations between this simple experimental model with macroscopic models of magnetic spin coupling, as well as with chaotic reversals of turbulent dynamos, are discussed. PMID:27575140

  2. Stochastic reversal dynamics of two interacting magnetic dipoles: A simple model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plihon, Nicolas; Miralles, Sophie; Bourgoin, Mickael; Pinton, Jean-François

    2016-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the dynamics of two coupled magnetic dipoles. The experiment consists in two coplanar permanent disk magnets separated by a distance d , each allowed to rotate on a fixed parallel axis—each magnet's axis being perpendicular to its dipolar moment vector. A torque of adjustable strength can be externally applied to one of the magnets, the other magnet being free. The driving torque may be time-independent or temporally fluctuating. We study the influence of the parameters of the driving torque on the dynamics of the coupled system, in particular the emergence of dynamical regimes such as stochastic reversals. We report transitions between stationary and stochastic reversal regimes. All the observed features can be understood by a simple mechanical dynamical model. The transition between statistically stationary regimes and reversals is explained introducing an effective potential energy incorporating both the coupling between magnets and the external driving. Relations between this simple experimental model with macroscopic models of magnetic spin coupling, as well as with chaotic reversals of turbulent dynamos, are discussed.

  3. Magnetic properties of ground-state mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimonis, V.

    2016-04-01

    Starting with the bag model a method for the study of the magnetic properties (magnetic moments, magnetic dipole transition widths) of ground-state mesons is developed. We calculate the M1 transition moments and use them subsequently to estimate the corresponding decay widths. These are compared with experimental data, where available, and with the results obtained in other approaches. Finally, we give the predictions for the static magnetic moments of all ground-state vector mesons including those containing heavy quarks. We have a good agreement with experimental data for the M1 decay rates of light as well as heavy mesons. Therefore, we expect our predictions for the static magnetic properties ( i.e., usual magnetic moments) to be of sufficiently high quality, too.

  4. Sudden motility reversal indicates sensing of magnetic field gradients in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain

    PubMed Central

    González, Lina M; Ruder, Warren C; Mitchell, Aaron P; Messner, William C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Many motile unicellular organisms have evolved specialized behaviors for detecting and responding to environmental cues such as chemical gradients (chemotaxis) and oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). Magnetotaxis is found in magnetotactic bacteria and it is defined as the passive alignment of these cells to the geomagnetic field along with active swimming. Herein we show that Magnetospirillum magneticum (AMB-1) show a unique set of responses that indicates they sense and respond not only to the direction of magnetic fields by aligning and swimming, but also to changes in the magnetic field or magnetic field gradients. We present data showing that AMB-1 cells exhibit sudden motility reversals when we impose them to local magnetic field gradients. Our system employs permalloy (Ni80Fe20) islands to curve and diverge the magnetic field lines emanating from our custom-designed Helmholtz coils in the vicinity of the islands (creating a drop in the field across the islands). The three distinct movements we have observed as they approach the permalloy islands are: unidirectional, single reverse and double reverse. Our findings indicate that these reverse movements occur in response to magnetic field gradients. In addition, using a permanent magnet we found further evidence that supports this claim. Motile AMB-1 cells swim away from the north and south poles of a permanent magnet when the magnet is positioned less than ∼30 mm from the droplet of cells. All together, these results indicate previously unknown response capabilities arising from the magnetic sensing systems of AMB-1 cells. These responses could enable them to cope with magnetic disturbances that could in turn potentially inhibit their efficient search for nutrients. PMID:25478682

  5. Sudden motility reversal indicates sensing of magnetic field gradients in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain.

    PubMed

    González, Lina M; Ruder, Warren C; Mitchell, Aaron P; Messner, William C; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-06-01

    Many motile unicellular organisms have evolved specialized behaviors for detecting and responding to environmental cues such as chemical gradients (chemotaxis) and oxygen gradients (aerotaxis). Magnetotaxis is found in magnetotactic bacteria and it is defined as the passive alignment of these cells to the geomagnetic field along with active swimming. Herein we show that Magnetospirillum magneticum (AMB-1) show a unique set of responses that indicates they sense and respond not only to the direction of magnetic fields by aligning and swimming, but also to changes in the magnetic field or magnetic field gradients. We present data showing that AMB-1 cells exhibit sudden motility reversals when we impose them to local magnetic field gradients. Our system employs permalloy (Ni(80)Fe(20)) islands to curve and diverge the magnetic field lines emanating from our custom-designed Helmholtz coils in the vicinity of the islands (creating a drop in the field across the islands). The three distinct movements we have observed as they approach the permalloy islands are: unidirectional, single reverse and double reverse. Our findings indicate that these reverse movements occur in response to magnetic field gradients. In addition, using a permanent magnet we found further evidence that supports this claim. Motile AMB-1 cells swim away from the north and south poles of a permanent magnet when the magnet is positioned less than ∼30 mm from the droplet of cells. All together, these results indicate previously unknown response capabilities arising from the magnetic sensing systems of AMB-1 cells. These responses could enable them to cope with magnetic disturbances that could in turn potentially inhibit their efficient search for nutrients. PMID:25478682

  6. Switching modes in easy and hard axis magnetic reversal in a self-assembled antidot array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haering, Felix; Wiedwald, Ulf; Nothelfer, Steffen; Koslowski, Berndt; Ziemann, Paul; Lechner, Lorenz; Wallucks, Andreas; Lebecki, Kristof; Nowak, Ulrich; Gräfe, Joachim; Goering, Eberhard; Schütz, Gisela

    2013-11-01

    We study the reversal mechanisms in a self-assembled, hexagonally ordered Fe antidot array with a period of 200 nm and an antidot diameter of 100 nm which was prepared by polystyrene nanosphere lithography. Direction-dependent information in such a self-assembled sample is obtained by measuring the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) through constrictions processed by focused ion beam milling in nearest neighbor and next nearest neighbor directions. We show that such an originally integral method can be used to investigate the strong in-plane anisotropy introduced by the antidot lattice. The easy and hard axis reversal mechanisms and corresponding AMR signals are modeled by micromagnetic simulations. Additional in-field magnetic force microscopy studies allow the correlation of microscopic switching to features in the integral AMR. We find that the easy axis of magnetization is connected to a distinct periodic magnetic domain pattern, which can be observed during the whole magnetization reversal. While this process is driven by nucleation and propagation of reversed domains, the hard axis reversal is characterized by a (stepwise) rotation of the magnetization via the antidot lattice’ easy axes.

  7. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices.

  8. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  9. Magnetic field induced flow pattern reversal in a ferrofluidic Taylor-Couette system.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Sebastian; Do, Younghae; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of ferrofluidic wavy vortex flows in the counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system, with a focus on wavy flows with a mixture of the dominant azimuthal modes. Without external magnetic field flows are stable and pro-grade with respect to the rotation of the inner cylinder. More complex behaviors can arise when an axial or a transverse magnetic field is applied. Depending on the direction and strength of the field, multi-stable wavy states and bifurcations can occur. We uncover the phenomenon of flow pattern reversal as the strength of the magnetic field is increased through a critical value. In between the regimes of pro-grade and retrograde flow rotations, standing waves with zero angular velocities can emerge. A striking finding is that, under a transverse magnetic field, a second reversal in the flow pattern direction can occur, where the flow pattern evolves into pro-grade rotation again from a retrograde state. Flow reversal is relevant to intriguing phenomena in nature such as geomagnetic reversal. Our results suggest that, in ferrofluids, flow pattern reversal can be induced by varying a magnetic field in a controlled manner, which can be realized in laboratory experiments with potential applications in the development of modern fluid devices. PMID:26687638

  10. First order reversal curves analysis of the temperature effect on magnetic interactions in barium ferrite with La-Co addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marcos I.; Bercoff, Paula G.; Bertorello, Héctor R.

    2009-10-01

    First order reversal curves (FORCs) distributions are a powerful tool for investigating hysteresis and interactions in magnetic systems and have been widely applied. La-Co substitution in barium hexaferrites has also been extensively studied. The most effective substitution to improve the magnetic properties (coercive field and energy product) is given by x=y=0.2 in the formula Ba1-xLaxFe12-yCoyO19. In this work, this stoichiometry is initially used to obtain a state where more than one phase is present. The magnetic behavior as a function of temperature was studied in order to have an insight into the magnetic interactions that originate a decrease in the magnetic performance of Ba hexaferrite magnets. The sample was structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetically studied in a SQUID magnetometer. FORC distributions were used to study the dependence of the magnetic interactions with the temperature. FORC diagrams performed on the sample at different temperatures exhibit similar characteristics, such as the spread in the hc-hu plane and a spread out of the hc-axes. These features are interpreted in terms of exchange-interacting particles and dipolar interactions, respectively. As the temperature decreases, stronger interactions are noticed among hard and soft phases.

  11. Tetrahydrobiopterin improves diastolic dysfunction by reversing changes in myofilament properties

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Monasky, Michelle M.; Gu, Lianzhi; Taglieri, Domenico M.; Patel, Bindiya G.; Liu, Hong; Wang, Qiongying; Greener, Ian; Dudley, Samuel C.; Solaro, R. John

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of heart failure with preserved left ventricular function, there are no specific treatments, partially because the mechanism of impaired relaxation is incompletely understood. Evidence indicates that cardiac relaxation may depend on nitric oxide (NO), generated by NO synthase (NOS) requiring the co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Recently, we reported that hypertension-induced diastolic dysfunction was accompanied by cardiac BH4 depletion, NOS uncoupling, a depression in myofilament cross-bridge kinetics, and S-glutathionylation of myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). We hypothesized that the mechanism by which BH4 ameliorates diastolic dysfunction is by preventing glutathionylation of MyBP-C and thus reversing changes of myofilament properties that occur during diastolic dysfunction. We used the deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt mouse model, which demonstrates mild hypertension, myocardial oxidative stress, and diastolic dysfunction. Mice were divided into two groups that received control diet and two groups that received BH4 supplement for 7 days after developing diastolic dysfunction at post-operative day 11. Mice were assessed by echocardiography. Left ventricular papillary detergent-extracted fiber bundles were isolated for simultaneous determination of force and ATPase activity. Sarcomeric protein glutathionylation was assessed by immunoblotting. DOCA-salt mice exhibited diastolic dysfunction that was reversed after BH4 treatment. Diastolic sarcomere length (DOCA-salt 1.70±0.01 vs. DOCA-salt+BH4 1.77±0.01 μm, P<0.001) and relengthening (relaxation constant, τ, DOCA-salt 0.28±0.02 vs. DOCA-salt+BH4 0.08±0.01, P<0.001) were also restored to control by BH4 treatment. pCa50 for tension increased in DOCA-salt compared to sham but reverted to sham levels after BH4 treatment. Maximum ATPase rate and tension cost (ΔATPase/ΔTension) decreased in DOCA-salt compared to sham, but increased after BH4 treatment. Cardiac My

  12. Static magnetic properties of Maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfiqar; Rahman, Muneeb Ur; Usman, M.; Hasanain, Syed Khurshid; Zia-ur-Rahman; Ullah, Amir; Kim, Ill Won

    2014-12-01

    We report the static magnetic properties of Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 14 ± 1.8 nm synthesized via a co-precipitation method. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and the field-cooled (FC) magnetization measurements were performed using a physical properties measurements system (PPMS) at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. The ZFC/FC measurements showed a typical superparamagnetic behavior with a narrow size distribution.

  13. Onset of a Propagating Self-Sustained Spin Reversal Front in a Magnetic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Andrew D.

    2014-03-01

    The energy released in a magnetic material by reversing spins as they relax toward equilibrium can lead to a dynamical magnetic instability in which all the spins in a sample rapidly reverse in a run-away process known as magnetic deflagration. A well-defined front separating reversed and un-reversed spins develops that propagates at a constant speed. This process is akin to a chemical reaction in which a flammable substance ignites and the resulting exothermic reaction leads via thermal conduction to increases in the temperature of an adjacent unburned substance that ignites it. In a magnetic system the reaction is the reversal of spins that releases Zeeman energy and the magnetic anisotropy barrier is the reaction's activation energy. An interesting aspect of magnetic systems is that these key energies-the activation energy and the energy released-can be independently controlled by applied magnetic fields enabling systematic studies of these magnetic instabilities. We have studied the instability that leads to the ignition of magnetic deflagration in a thermally driven Mn12-Ac molecular magnet single crystal. Each Mn12-ac molecule is a uniaxial nanomagnet with spin 10 and energy barrier of 60 K. We use a longitudinal field (a field parallel to the easy axis) to set the energy released and a transverse field to control the activation energy. A heat pulse is applied to one end of the crystal to initiate the process. We study the crossover between slow magnetic relaxation and rapid, self-sustained magnetic deflagration as a function of these fields at low temperature (0.5 K). An array of Hall sensors adjacent to a single crystal is used to detect and measure the speed of the spin-reversal front. I will describe a simple model we developed based on a reaction-diffusion process that describes our experimental findings. I will also discuss prospects for observing spin-fronts driven by magnetic dipole interactions between molecules that can be sonic, i.e. travel near

  14. Influence of carbon doping on the reversible magnetization of MgB 2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisterer, M.; Krutzler, C.; Zehetmayer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Kazakov, S. M.; Karpinski, J.

    2007-09-01

    The reversible magnetization of Mg(B1-xCx)2 single crystals with varying carbon content (x = 0-0.095) was measured by SQUID magnetometry. It was found to be strongly influenced by the two-band character of this material. At low magnetic fields charge carriers of both bands contribute to superconductivity and to diamagnetism. At high fields the π-band is suppressed and the σ-band mainly determines the magnetization. This allows us to extract information on both bands by analyzing the reversible magnetization in terms of two band Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. The "intrinsic" magnetic penetration increases in both bands with increasing carbon content, but the σ-band remains crucial for the upper critical field. Changes in the field dependence of the resulting "effective" penetration depth by carbon doping are discussed.

  15. Study on the pulse reverse electrodeposition of Fe-nano-Si composite coatings in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yunbo; Zhou, Pengwei; Zhou, Junfeng; Wang, Huai; Fan, Lijun; Dong, Licheng; Zheng, Tianxiang; Shen, Weiwen

    2014-08-01

    Composite iron deposits containing nano-silicon particles were prepared under direct current (DCED) and pulse reverse current electrodeposition (PRED) conditions in the presence of magnetic field. The influences of magnetic field and pulse reverse current on the co-deposition of silicon particles as well as the surface morphology of coatings were investigated respectively. Results showed that PRED regime exhibits fewer incorporated silicon particles than those obtained under DCED condition when no magnetic field was applied. Under the influence of magnetic field, the silicon particles of coatings increased significantly, meanwhile, many projecting deposits named “mountain ranges” appeared on the surface of coatings. However, the numbers of “mountain ranges” showed a trend of reduce with increasing the pulse frequency under magnetic field and therefore the surface morphology of coatings became more smooth and flat.

  16. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Manchanda, Priyanka; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Cui, Jun

    2014-07-01

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  17. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R; Manchanda, P; Takeuchi, I; Cui, J

    2014-05-31

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  18. Geometry Dependence of Magnetization Reversal in Nanocomposite Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, Ralph; Manchanda, Priyanka; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Cui, Jun

    2014-06-11

    The geometrical optimization of aligned hard-soft permanent-magnet nanocomposites is investigated by model calculations. Considered criteria are the shapes of the soft and c-axis-aligned hard phases, the packing fraction of the soft phase, and magnetostatic interactions. Taking into account that the energy product is enhanced via the volume fraction of the soft phase, subject to maintaining coercivity, we find that the best structures are soft-magnetic cubes as well as long rods with a square cross section. Comparing embedded soft cubes with embedded soft spheres of the same size, our nucleation-field analysis shows that the volume fraction of the soft phase is enhanced by 91%, with a coercivity reduction of only 25%. Magnetostatic interactions often but not always deteriorate the permanent-magnet performance, as exemplified by the example of MnBi:FeCo bilayers and multilayers.

  19. Characterization of the magnetization reversal of perpendicular Nanomagnetic Logic clocked in the ns-range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemys, Grazvydas; Trummer, Christian; Gamm, Stephan Breitkreutz-v.; Eichwald, Irina; Schmitt-Landsiedel, Doris; Becherer, Markus

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the magnetization reversal of fabricated Co/Pt nanomagnets with perpendicular anisotropy within a wide range of magnetic field pulse widths. This experiment covers the pulse lengths from 700 ms to 20 ns. We observed that the commonly used Arrhenius model fits very well the experimental data with a single parameter set for pulse times above 100 ns (tp > 100 ns). However, below 100 ns (tp < 100 ns), a steep increase of the switching field amplitude is observed and the deviation from the Arrhenius model becomes unacceptable. For short pulse times the model can be adjusted by the reversal time term for the dynamic switching field which is only dependent on the pulse amplitude and not on temperature anymore. Precise modeling of the magnetization reversal in the sub-100 ns-range is crucially important to ensure reliable operation in the favored GHz-range as well as to explore and design new kinds of Nanomagnetic Logic circuits and architectures.

  20. Direct real-space observation of nearly stochastic behavior in magnetization reversal process on a nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Im, M.-Y.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, K.-D.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    We report a non-deterministic nature in the magnetization reversal of nanograins of CoCrPt alloy film. Magnetization reversal process of CoCrPt alloy film is investigated using high resolution soft X-ray microscopy which provides real space images with a spatial resolution of 15 nm. Domain nucleation sites mostly appear stochastically distributed within repeated hysteretic cycles, where the correlation increases as the strength of the applied magnetic field increases in the descending and ascending branches of the major hysteresis loop. In addition, domain configuration is mostly asymmetric with inversion of an applied magnetic field in the hysteretic cycle. Nanomagnetic simulation considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the nearly stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film. With the bit size in high-density magnetic recording media approaching nanometer length scale, one of the fundamental and crucial issues is whether the domain nucleation during magnetization reversal process exhibits a deterministic behavior. Repeatability of local domain nucleation and deterministic switching behavior are basic and essential factors for achieving high performance in high-density magnetic recording [1-3]. Most experimental studies on this issue reported so far have been mainly performed by indirect probes through macroscopic hysteresis loop and Barkhausen pattern measurements, which provide the ensemble-average magnetization. Thus, they are inadequate to gain insight into the domain-nucleation behavior on a nanometer length scale during the magnetization reversal process [4-6]. Very recently, coherent X-ray speckle metrology, where the speckle pattern observed in reciprocal space acts as a fingerprint of the domain configurations, was adopted to investigate stochastic behavior in the magnetization reversal of a Co/Pt multilayer film [7,8]. However, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of

  1. Magnetic properties of ISABELLE superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E; Engelmann, R; Greene, A F; Herrera, J; Jaeger, K; Kirk, H; Robins, K

    1981-01-01

    A number of superconducting quadrupole magnets have been constructed in the ISABELLE project during the past year. With these quadrupoles, it was intended to test construction techniques, magnet performance and measuring capability in an effort to arrive at a quadrupole design satisfactory for use in the storage ring accelerator. While these magnets are designed to have dimensions and field properties close to those needed for regular cell ISABELLE quadrupoles, no effort was made to make them identical to one another. This report details the performance characteristics of one of these magnets, MQ3005.

  2. Dynamics and efficiency of magnetic vortex circulation reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbánek, Michal; Uhlíř, Vojtěch; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Kan, Jimmy J.; Eibagi, Nasim; VaÅatka, Marek; Flajšman, Lukáš; Kalousek, Radek; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Šikola, Tomáš; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic switching of the vortex circulation in magnetic nanodisks by fast-rising magnetic field pulse requires annihilation of the vortex core at the disk boundary and reforming a new vortex with the opposite sense of circulation. Here we study the influence of pulse parameters on the dynamics and efficiency of the vortex core annihilation in permalloy (Ni80Fe20 ) nanodisks. We use magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy to experimentally determine a pulse rise time-pulse amplitude phase diagram for vortex circulation switching and investigate the time-resolved evolution of magnetization in different regions of the phase diagram. The experimental phase diagram is compared with an analytical model based on Thiele's equation describing high-amplitude vortex core motion in a parabolic potential. We find that the analytical model is in good agreement with experimental data for a wide range of disk geometries. From the analytical model and in accordance with our experimental finding we determine the geometrical condition for dynamic vortex core annihilation and pulse parameters needed for the most efficient and fastest circulation switching. The comparison of our experimental results with micromagnetic simulations shows that the micromagnetic simulations of "ideal" disks with diameters larger than ˜250 nm overestimate nonlinearities in susceptibility and eigenfrequency. This overestimation leads to the core polarity switching near the disk boundary, which then in disagreement with experimental findings prevents the core annihilation and circulation switching. We modify the micromagnetic simulations by introducing the "boundary region" of reduced magnetization to simulate the experimentally determined susceptibility and in these modified micromagnetic simulations we are able to reproduce the experimentally observed dynamic vortex core annihilation and circulation switching.

  3. Variability of magnetic soil properties in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Remke L.; Harrison, J. Bruce J.; Hendrickx, Jan M. H.; Borchers, Brian; North, Ryan E.; Simms, Janet E.; Jasper, Chris; Smith, Christopher W.; Li, Yaoguo

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic soils can seriously hamper the performance of electromagnetic sensors for the detection of buried land mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Soils formed on basaltic substrates commonly have large concentrations of ferrimagnetic iron oxide minerals, which are the main cause of soil magnetic behavior. Previous work has shown that viscous remanent magnetism (VRM) in particular, which is caused by the presence of ferrimagnetic minerals of different sizes and shapes, poses a large problem for electromagnetic surveys. The causes of the variability in magnetic soil properties in general and VRM in particular are not well understood. In this paper we present the results of laboratory studies of soil magnetic properties on three Hawaiian Islands: O"ahu, Kaho"olawe, and Hawaii. The data show a strong negative correlation between mean annual precipitation and induced magnetization, and a positive correlation between mean annual precipitation and the frequency dependent magnetic behavior. Soil erosion, which reduces the thickness of the soil cover, also influences the magnetic properties.

  4. Using Polar Coronal Hole Area Measurements to Determine the Solar Polar Magnetic Field Reversal in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karna, N.; Webber, S.A. Hess; Pesnell, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of solar polar coronal hole (PCH) areas since the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows how the polar regions have evolved during Solar Cycle 24. We present PCH areas from mid-2010 through 2013 using data from the Atmospheric Imager Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instruments onboard SDO. Our analysis shows that both the northern and southern PCH areas have decreased significantly in size since 2010. Linear fits to the areas derived from the magnetic-field properties indicate that, although the northern hemisphere went through polar-field reversal and reached solar-maximum conditions in mid-2012, the southern hemisphere had not reached solar-maximum conditions in the polar regions by the end of 2013. Our results show that solar-maximum conditions in each hemisphere, as measured by the area of the polar coronal holes and polar magnetic field, will be offset in time.

  5. Magnetization reversal of submicrometer Co rings with uniaxial anisotropy via scanning magnetoresistance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyong; Mazumdar, D.; Schrag, B. D.; Shen, W.; Xiao, Gang

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated the magnetization reversal mechanism of narrow submicrometer Co rings using scanning magnetoresistance microscopy. Thermal annealing in a magnetic field introduced a uniaxial anisotropy and significant structural changes in the samples. We have observed a complicated multidomain state at intermediate field ranges, and onion states at saturation, for samples annealed in a field. This observation is in contrast to the flux-closed vortex state for unannealed rings. Micromagnetic simulations have shown that the switching occurs through a gradual noncoherent buckling-like reversal process followed by coherent rotation.

  6. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  7. Magnetization reversal phenomena in (Cr0.70Ti0.30)5S6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yuji; Sato, Tetsuya; Anzai, Shuichiro

    2005-12-01

    Magnetization reversal phenomena (MRP) along magnetic order-order transitions have recently been reported on impurity-doped magnetic systems. Because imperfect long-range magnetic order exists in these systems, it is expected that a systematic investigation of MRP will give physical information on thermomagnetic processes of magnetic systems in the range from the micro- to nanoscales. As a typical order-order transition (a state doubly modulated by helical and canting orders to a collinear ferrimagnetic state) has been known to occur on Cr5S6 at a transition temperature Tt, we investigate the magnetizations of (Cr0.70Ti0.30)5S6 on heating and cooling runs in various magnetic fields. At 20Oe, the field-cooled magnetization just below the Curie temperature has a positive sign; the sign turns negative below the compensation temperature TCM (first step) and finally returns to positive below Tt (second step). The first-step MRP observed in this system is explained by the potential barriers resulting from anisotropy energy when the preferred direction of collinear ferrimagnetic moment reverses. The proposed mechanism for second-step MRP is the pinning effect caused by the impurity atoms (Ti) in the helical long-range-order chains. Comparing other examples of MRPs, we discuss the roles of local impurity centers in the thermomagnetic process in magnetic order-order transitions.

  8. Magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Park, H.; Podila, R.; Wadehra, A.; Ayala, P.; Oliveira, L.; He, J.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Howard, A.; Wilkins, J.; Rao, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    While studying magnetism of d- and f-electron systems has been consistently an active research area in physics, chemistry, and biology, there is an increasing interest in the novel magnetism of p-electron systems, especially in graphene and graphene-derived nanostructures. Bulk graphite is diamagnetic in nature, however, graphene is known to exhibit either a paramagnetic response or weak ferromagnetic ordering. Although many groups have attributed this magnetism in graphene to defects or unintentional magnetic impurities, there is a lack of compelling evidence to pinpoint its origin. To resolve this issue, we systematically studied the influence of entropically necessary intrinsic defects (e.g., vacancies, edges) and extrinsic dopants (e.g., S-dopants) on the magnetic properties of graphene. We found that the saturation magnetization of graphene decreased upon sulfur doping suggesting that S-dopants demagnetize vacancies and edges. Our density functional theory calculations provide evidence for: (i) intrinsic defect demagnetization by the formation of covalent bonds between S-dopant and edges/vacancies concurring with the experimental results, and (ii) a net magnetization from only zig-zag edges, suggesting that the possible contradictory results on graphene magnetism in the literature could stem from different defect-types. Interestingly, we observed peculiar local maxima in the temperature dependent magnetizations that suggest the coexistence of different magnetic phases within the same graphene samples.

  9. Magnetization reversal and enhanced tunnel magnetoresistance ratio in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions based on exchange spring electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yin, Xiaolu; Le Roy, D.; Jiang, Jun; Wei, H. X.; Liou, S. H.; Han, X. F.

    2013-04-01

    The [Co/Pt]n multilayer based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction stacks with wedged Co60Fe20B20 insertions up to 2 nm, and corresponding perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions were magnetically and electrically investigated. The focus is on the influence of CoFeB insertions in the free and reference electrodes on the overall junction magnetization reversal and magnetoresistance response. The exchange spring behavior was revealed as the Co60Fe20B20 spins canting towards the in-plane direction in the [Co/Pt]n/Co60Fe20B20 hard/soft perpendicular magnetic electrodes. The broad range thickness of wedged Co60Fe20B20 insertion enables to reveal the critical transition, in particular, from rigid coupling to exchange spring coupling. With the help of 375°C annealing under 10 kOe magnetic field, the recovery from distinct multi-domain structure to nearly single domain structure was distinctly observed in the unpatterned perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (p-MTJ) films with CoFeB thickness tCFB≥1.5 nm. Meanwhile, for the corresponding patterned perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with AlOx barrier, the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio exhibited an intense enhancement over 100%. The TMR results and spin configurations were illustrated using an exchange spring model in both magnetic electrodes. The presented study shows the benefit of using exchange spring magnetic electrodes in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction on their performance.

  10. Buffer layer annealing effects on the magnetization reversal process in Pd/Co/Pd systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassatoui, A.; Belhi, R.; Vogel, J.; Abdelmoula, K.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of annealing the buffer layer on the magnetization reversal behavior in Pd/Co/Pd thin films using magneto-optical Kerr microscopy. It was found that annealing the buffer layer at 150 °C for 1 h decreases the coercivity and increases the saturation magnetization and the effective magnetic anisotropy constant. This study also shows that the annealing induces a change of the magnetization reversal from a mixed nucleation and domain wall propagation process to one dominated by domain wall propagation. This result demonstrates that the main effect of annealing the buffer layer is to decrease the domain wall pinning in the Co layer, favoring the domain wall propagation mode.

  11. Magnetic properties of the Esquel Pallasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, A. M.; Tarduno, J. A.; Cottrell, R. D.

    2009-12-01

    Pallasites are stony-iron meteorites consisting mainly of olivine crystals suspended in an iron-nickel matrix. One hypothesis holds that pallasites are formed from the intrusion of a liquid iron-nickel core into the solid silicate mantle of a parent body. The magnetic properties of the olivine crystals could help provide insight into the veracity of this explanation. The olivine crystals may contain magnetic inclusions that record useful information regarding magnetic fields present in the parent body. The best recorders of magnetic information are single domain in nature; domain structure of magnetic inclusions can be examined by recording their hysteresis properties. Olivine crystals were separated from a sample of the Esquel pallasite. Crystal fragments were often stained or coated with non-olivine minerals, which required cleaning to remove. An Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometer (AGFM) was used to measure magnetic hysteresis properties, and a Superconducting Quantum Interface Device Cryogenic Rock Magnetometer was used to measure the natural remanent magnetization of the samples. Preliminary data indicate single domain carriers in select olivine crystals that carry records of strong ancient fields. This is a presentation of preliminary results collected during a summer REU at the University of Rochester.

  12. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Jamison, Andrew C.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Willson, Richard C.; Lee, T. Randall

    2013-01-01

    The tremendous interest in magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is reflected in published research that ranges from novel methods of synthesis of unique nanoparticle shapes and composite structures to a large number of MNP characterization techniques, and finally to their use in many biomedical and nanotechnology-based applications. The knowledge gained from this vast body of research can be made more useful if we organize the associated results to correlate key magnetic properties with the parameters that influence them. Tuning these properties of MNPs will allow us to tailor nanoparticles for specific applications, thus increasing their effectiveness. The complex magnetic behavior exhibited by MNPs is governed by many factors; these factors can either improve or adversely affect the desired magnetic properties. In this report, we have outlined a matrix of parameters that can be varied to tune the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. For practical utility, this review focuses on the effect of size, shape, composition, and shell-core structure on saturation magnetization, coercivity, blocking temperature, and relaxation time. PMID:23912237

  13. Cyanide Single-Molecule Magnets Exhibiting Solvent Dependent Reversible "On" and "Off" Exchange Bias Behavior.

    PubMed

    Pinkowicz, Dawid; Southerland, Heather I; Avendaño, Carolina; Prosvirin, Andrey; Sanders, Codi; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Pedersen, Kasper S; Dreiser, Jan; Clérac, Rodolphe; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Simeoni, Giovanna G; Schnegg, Alexander; Holldack, Karsten; Dunbar, Kim R

    2015-11-18

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties of four new complex salts, (PPN){[Mn(III)(salphen)(MeOH)]2[M(III)(CN)6]}·7MeOH (Mn2M·7MeOH) (M = Fe, Ru, Os and Co; PPN(+) = bis(triphenylphosphoranylidene)ammonium cation; H2salphen = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-diaminobenzene), and a mixed metal Co/Os analogue (PPN){[Mn(III)(salphen)(MeOH)]2[Co(III)0.92Os(III)0.08(CN)6]}·7MeOH were undertaken. It was found that all compounds exhibit switchable single-molecule magnet (SMM) and exchange-bias behavior depending on the interstitial methanol content. The pristine (PPN){[Mn(salphen)(MeOH)]2[Os(CN)6]}·7MeOH (Mn2Os·7MeOH) behaves as an SMM with an effective barrier for the magnetization reversal, (Ueff/kB), of 17.1 K. Upon desolvation, Mn2Os exhibits an increase of Ueff/kB to 42.0 K and an opening of the hysteresis loop observable at 1.8 K. Mn2Os·7MeOH shows also exchange-bias behavior with magnetic hysteresis loops exhibiting a shift in the quantum tunneling to 0.25 T from zero-field. The Fe(III) and Ru(III) analogues were prepared as reference compounds for assessing the effect of the 5d versus 4d and 3d metal ions on the SMM properties. These compounds are also SMMs and exhibit similar effects but with lower energy barriers. These findings underscore the importance of introducing heavy transition elements into SMMs to improve their slow relaxation of the magnetization properties. The (PPN){[Mn(III)(salphen)(MeOH)]2[Co(III)(CN)6]}·7MeOH (Mn2Co·7MeOH) analogue with a diamagnetic Co(III) central atom and the mixed Co/Os (PPN){[Mn(III)(salphen)(MeOH)]2[Co(III)0.92Os(III)0.08(CN)6]}·7MeOH (Mn2Co/Os·7MeOH) "magnetically diluted" system with a 9:1 Co/Os metal ratio were prepared in order to further probe the nature of the energy barrier increase upon desolvation of Mn2Os. In addition, inelastic neutron scattering and frequency-domain Fourier-transform THz electron paramagnetic resonance spectra obtained on Mn2Os·7MeOH and Mn2Os in combination with the magnetic data

  14. Reversible clustering of magnetic nanobiocatalysts for high-performance biocatalysis and easy catalyst recycling.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thao P N; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Wen; Li, Zhi

    2012-05-14

    Reversible clusters of nanobiocatalysts are developed via non-covalent interaction among enzyme-bound iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Dissociation of the clusters by shaking during biotransformation enables high catalytic performance, and re-clustering by stopping shaking after reaction allows for easy magnetic separation. The novel concept is demonstrated with alcohol dehydrogenase RDR for the enantioselective reduction of 7-methoxy-2-tetralone. PMID:22450568

  15. Electrochemical fabrication and magnetization properties of CoCrPt nanowires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamaila, S.; Liu, D. P.; Sharif, R.; Chen, J. Y.; Liu, H. R.; Han, X. F.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetization properties of CoCrPt alloy nanocylinders (nanowires and nanotubes) fabricated by low cost electrodeposition method have been investigated. Angular dependence of coercivity depicts curling mode of magnetization reversal process for CoCrPt nanowires (NWs) while for nanotubes (NTs) there is a transition from curling to coherent mode as a function of field angle. The effective anisotropy during reversal process is determined from a competition between the magnetostatic interactions, surface effects, and shape anisotropy in NTs while in NWs shape anisotropy is the dominant anisotropy. Furthermore, magnetization and remanence curves describe that the surface effects and dipolar coupling are increased in NTs as compared to the NWs due to their geometry. These results depict that the magnetization properties are influenced by the geometry of nanocylinders, which can become good candidate for ultrahigh density magnetic recording media.

  16. Magnetic reversal in Dy-doped DyF e2/YF e2 superlattice films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenning, G. B. G.; Bowden, G. J.; de Groot, P. A. J.; van der Laan, G.; Figueroa, A. I.; Bencok, P.; Steadman, P.; Hesjedal, T.

    2015-03-01

    Reversible magnetic exchange springs can be formed in the magnetically soft YF e2 layers of epitaxial DyF e2/YF e2 multilayer films. Here we show that the insertion of just two monolayers of DyF e2 , placed directly in the middle of the YF e2 layers, brings about substantial changes. Results are presented for a Dy-doped (110)-oriented [DyFe2(60Å) /YFe2(120 Å ) /DyFe2(8 Å ) /YFe2(120 Å ) ] 15 multilayer film, measured at 100 K in fields of up to ±10 T. Using bulk magnetometry, micromagnetic modeling, and Dy-specific x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, it is shown that Dy doping substantially increases the number of spin states available to the system. Altogether 12 distinct spring states are identified which bring additional complexity to the magnetic reversal process. In particular, the exchange springs are no longer reversible, exhibiting magnetic exchange-spring collapse. Full and partial magnetic loops are presented for fields applied along the in-plane easy [001] axis and the in-plane hard [1 ¯10 ] axis. In particular, it is demonstrated that exchange-spring collapse is sharpest when the field is applied along a hard in-plane [1 ¯10 ] axis.

  17. Magnetic properties and anisotropy in magnetic thin films and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenli

    A systematic study of the magnetic properties and anisotropy in magnetic thin films as well as superlattices is presented in this thesis. The main objective is to investigate by means of the Green function technique the order-disorder phase transition and reorientation transition in a non-perturbative microscopic theory valid in the whole temperature range of interest. We consider the magnetic systems that may consist of an arbitrary number of layers with any spin. We start with a discussion of general properties and origins of anisotropies of the magnetic systems, and a list of questions that we are trying to answer. A comparison between different theoretical approaches follows. The Green function method is used to derive analytical expressions for various anisotropies. The energy spectrum and the spontaneous magnetization are obtained as well. Based on these results, the transition temperature and the Curie temperature are calculated as functions of the Fe film thickness. It is shown that the condition for the reorientation transition is equivalent to that for the zero energy gap at the bottom of the spin-wave spectrum. Special features under the influence of normal external field, anisotropic exchange couplings and next-nearest-neighbor couplings on the magnetization reorientation of magnetic thin films are then investigated in detail. It is demonstrated that the nature of perpendicular remanent (PR) depends primarily on the surface anisotropy and film thickness. The magnetic properties of Tb/Fe superlattices are also studied. It shows ferrimagnetic properties and normal uniaxial anisotropy. An approximation is proposed to treat magnetic Ni films of arbitrary thickness and arbitrary lattice structure for general spin. It is a much simpler way of calculation, in which one does not have to solve the determinant equation, especially the one with off-diagonal elements. The temperature and thickness dependence of various anisotropies are then investigated. There

  18. Numerical simulation of magnetic compression on a field-reversed configuration plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Okada, S.; Goto, S.

    1999-12-01

    A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of an axial magnetic compression on a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma is carried out for the parameter range of a corresponding experiment conducted on the FRC Injection Experiment (FIX) [S. Okada et al., 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 1998 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna) (in press)]. The simulation results show that during the initial stage of the magnetic compression the front part of the FRC plasma is mainly compressed radially, and that after this stage, the compression is primarily axial. Of particular interest is expected that the closed magnetic flux surfaces of the FRC can be retained without any degradation during the magnetic compression process. Further, it is observed in the simulation that the axial magnetic compression enables a transition of the MHD equilibrium from a long and thin to a short and fat FRC. The effects of this magnetic compression on FRC plasmas are discussed.

  19. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  20. Ultra-fast magnetic vortex core reversal by a local field pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Rückriem, R.; Albrecht, M.; Schrefl, T.

    2014-02-03

    Magnetic vortex core reversal of a 20-nm-thick permalloy disk with a diameter of 100 nm was studied by micromagnetic simulations. By applying a global out-of-plane magnetic field pulse, it turned out that the final core polarity is very sensitive to pulse width and amplitude, which makes it hard to control. The reason for this phenomenon is the excitation of radial spin waves, which dominate the reversal process. The excitation of spin waves can be strongly suppressed by applying a local field pulse within a small area at the core center. With this approach, ultra-short reversal times of about 15 ps were achieved, which are ten times faster compared to a global pulse.

  1. First order reversal curve investigation of the hard and soft magnetic phases of annealed CoFeCu nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasi-Kashi, M.; Ramazani, A.; Golafshan, E.; Arefpour, M.; Jafari-Khamse, E.

    2013-11-01

    (CoFe)1-xCux (x=0.12-0.84) nanowire arrays were ac-pulse electrodeposited into anodic aluminum oxide templates. The electrodeposition was performed in a constant electrolyte while Cu content was controlled by off-time between pulses. Nanowires with 30 nm diameter and the certain lengths with the both bcc-CoFe and fcc-Cu phases were obtained. Magnetization and coercivity of the nanowires decreased with increasing the Cu content. Annealing improved the coercivity and a remarkable increase in magnetization of nanowires with high Cu contents was observed. A two-phase treatment was seen for annealed samples with high Cu contents. First order reversal curves showed a hard magnetic phase with almost constant magnetic properties and coercivity of ~2500 Oe. The results showed that main source of the various magnetic behaviors of the samples may be attributed to increase in soft magnetic phase. A single domain treatment with a narrow interacting field and coercive field distributions was also observed for the annealed samples with high Cu content.

  2. Magnetic properties of L10-FePt/Fe exchange-coupled composite nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L. S.; Hu, J. F.; Zong, B. Y.; Zeng, S. W.; Ariando; Chen, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic properties of L10-FePt/Fe exchange-coupled composite (ECC) nanodots were investigated by Hall effect measurement due to its high sensitivity. The FePt/Fe nanodots showed coercivity changing irregularly with respect to the Fe thickness, which deviated from the simulated results, where the coercivity of the ECC dots reduced with increasing Fe soft layer thickness. It was found that the edge damage induced by ion milling affected the coercivity of the nanodots significantly and the magnetization reversal mechanism. Domain wall nucleation and propagation was revealed in the FePt single domain dots. In the FePt/Fe ECC nanodots, the magnetization gradually reversed from the out-of-plane direction towards the in-plane direction before switching to the reverse out-of-plane direction. The critical size of single magnetic domains in the FePt/Fe ECC nanodots increased with increasing Fe soft layer thickness.

  3. An Enhanced Nonlinear Critical Gradient for Electron Turbulent Transport due to Reversed Magnetic Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Hammet, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2011-05-11

    The first nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment show that reversed magnetic shear can suppress thermal transport by increasing the nonlinear critical gradient for electron-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence to three times its linear critical value. An interesting feature of this turbulence is non- linearly driven off-midplane radial streamers. This work reinforces the experimental observation that magnetic shear is likely an effective way of triggering and sustaining e-ITBs in magnetic fusion devices.

  4. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  5. Hysteretic magnetic pinning and reversible resistance switching in high-temperature superconductor/ferromagnet multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visani, C.; Metaxas, P. J.; Collaudin, A.; Calvet, B.; Bernard, R.; Briatico, J.; Deranlot, C.; Bouzehouane, K.; Villegas, J. E.

    2011-08-01

    We study a high-critical temperature superconducting (YBa2Cu3O7-δ)/ferromagnetic (Co/Pt multilayer) hybrid that exhibits resistance switching driven by the magnetic history: depending on the direction of the external field, a pronounced decrease or increase of the mixed-state resistance is observed as magnetization reversal occurs within the Co/Pt multilayer. We demonstrate that stray magnetic fields cause these effects via (i) creation of vortices/antivortices and (ii) magnetostatic pinning of vortices that are induced by the external field.

  6. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T.; Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  7. The magnetic and hyperfine properties of iron in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzain, M.; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Gismelseed, A.; Al-Rawas, A.; Yousif, A.; Widatallah, H.; Al-Barwani, M.

    2014-04-01

    The magnetic and hyperfine properties of iron impurities in 3C- and 6H- silicon-carbide are calculated using the abinitio method of full-potential linear-augmented-plane-waves. The iron atoms are introduced at substitutional carbon, Fe C , and silicon, Fe Si , sites as well as at the tetrahedral interstitial sites with four nearest neighbours carbon atoms, Fe I (C), and four nearest neighbours silicon atoms, Fe I (Si). The effect of introducing vacancies at the neighbours of these sites is also studied. Fe atoms with complete neighbors substituted at Si or C sites are found to be nonmagnetic, while Fe atoms at interstitial sites are magnetic. Introduction of a vacancy at a neighboring site reverse the picture.

  8. Alignment of the Earth's Magnetic Field with the Axis of Rotation and Reversals of Polarity: Laboratory Experiments on a Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Crane, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    A mechanism that can cause the earth's external magnetic field to be aligned with the axis of rotation and to reverse at random times is described. It depends upon two arbitrary assumptions: (a) A dipole magnetic source, of unspecified nature, deep within the core, wanders randomly in direction. (b) The conducting fluid at the outer boundary of the core circulates in a pattern that is symmetrical with respect to the earth's axis of rotation. It is shown that such a circulating layer will act as an anisotropic screen, which will suppress the field of the transverse component of the source dipole. The field observed outside the core will be mainly that of the axial component of the source, and it will reverse abruptly whenever the direction of the source crosses the equatorial plane. Quantitative experimental studies, made on small-scale models, of the effects and their properties are described. The only datum that even suggests a value that may be used for the angular velocity of the circulating outer layer with respect to the source is the angular velocity of the westward drift of the earth's nondipolar field. If that value is used, the anisotropic screening effect comes out to be strong enough to give alignment and reversal characteristics that are similar to those found from paleomagnetic studies. PMID:16592194

  9. Dynamic in situ observation of voltage-driven repeatable magnetization reversal at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Nelson, C. T.; Yang, T. N.; Shen, Y.; Chen, L. Q.; Ramesh, R.; Nan, C. W.

    2016-03-01

    Purely voltage-driven, repeatable magnetization reversal provides a tantalizing potential for the development of spintronic devices with a minimum amount of power consumption. Substantial progress has been made in this subject especially on magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures. Here, we report the in situ observation of such phenomenon in a NiFe thin film grown directly on a rhombohedral Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PMN-PT) ferroelectric crystal. Under a cyclic voltage applied perpendicular to the PMN-PT without a magnetic field, the local magnetization of NiFe can be repetitively reversed through an out-of-plane excursion and then back into the plane. Using phase field simulations we interpret magnetization reversal as a synergistic effect of the metastable ferroelastic switching in the PMN-PT and an electrically rotatable local exchange bias field arising from the heterogeneously distributed NiO clusters at the interface.

  10. Dynamic in situ observation of voltage-driven repeatable magnetization reversal at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Nelson, C. T.; Yang, T. N.; Shen, Y.; Chen, L. Q.; Ramesh, R.; Nan, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Purely voltage-driven, repeatable magnetization reversal provides a tantalizing potential for the development of spintronic devices with a minimum amount of power consumption. Substantial progress has been made in this subject especially on magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures. Here, we report the in situ observation of such phenomenon in a NiFe thin film grown directly on a rhombohedral Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PMN-PT) ferroelectric crystal. Under a cyclic voltage applied perpendicular to the PMN-PT without a magnetic field, the local magnetization of NiFe can be repetitively reversed through an out-of-plane excursion and then back into the plane. Using phase field simulations we interpret magnetization reversal as a synergistic effect of the metastable ferroelastic switching in the PMN-PT and an electrically rotatable local exchange bias field arising from the heterogeneously distributed NiO clusters at the interface. PMID:27029464

  11. Dynamic in situ observation of voltage-driven repeatable magnetization reversal at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Nelson, C T; Yang, T N; Shen, Y; Chen, L Q; Ramesh, R; Nan, C W

    2016-01-01

    Purely voltage-driven, repeatable magnetization reversal provides a tantalizing potential for the development of spintronic devices with a minimum amount of power consumption. Substantial progress has been made in this subject especially on magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures. Here, we report the in situ observation of such phenomenon in a NiFe thin film grown directly on a rhombohedral Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)0.7Ti0.3O3(PMN-PT) ferroelectric crystal. Under a cyclic voltage applied perpendicular to the PMN-PT without a magnetic field, the local magnetization of NiFe can be repetitively reversed through an out-of-plane excursion and then back into the plane. Using phase field simulations we interpret magnetization reversal as a synergistic effect of the metastable ferroelastic switching in the PMN-PT and an electrically rotatable local exchange bias field arising from the heterogeneously distributed NiO clusters at the interface. PMID:27029464

  12. Linear and nonlinear magnetic properties of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, I.; Nagy, S.; Dietrich, S.

    2015-10-01

    Within a high-magnetic-field approximation, employing Ruelle's algebraic perturbation theory, a field-dependent free-energy expression is proposed which allows one to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids modeled as dipolar hard-sphere systems. We compare the ensuing magnetization curves, following from this free energy, with those obtained by Ivanov and Kuznetsova [Phys. Rev. E 64, 041405 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevE.64.041405] as well as with new corresponding Monte Carlo simulation data. Based on the power-series expansion of the magnetization, a closed expression for the magnetization is also proposed, which is a high-density extension of the corresponding equation of Ivanov and Kuznetsova. From both magnetization equations the zero-field susceptibility expression due to Tani et al. [Mol. Phys. 48, 863 (1983), 10.1080/00268978300100621] can be obtained, which is in good agreement with our MC simulation results. From the closed expression for the magnetization the second-order nonlinear magnetic susceptibility is also derived, which shows fair agreement with the corresponding MC simulation data.

  13. Linear and nonlinear magnetic properties of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Nagy, S; Dietrich, S

    2015-10-01

    Within a high-magnetic-field approximation, employing Ruelle's algebraic perturbation theory, a field-dependent free-energy expression is proposed which allows one to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids modeled as dipolar hard-sphere systems. We compare the ensuing magnetization curves, following from this free energy, with those obtained by Ivanov and Kuznetsova [Phys. Rev. E 64, 041405 (2001)] as well as with new corresponding Monte Carlo simulation data. Based on the power-series expansion of the magnetization, a closed expression for the magnetization is also proposed, which is a high-density extension of the corresponding equation of Ivanov and Kuznetsova. From both magnetization equations the zero-field susceptibility expression due to Tani et al. [Mol. Phys. 48, 863 (1983)] can be obtained, which is in good agreement with our MC simulation results. From the closed expression for the magnetization the second-order nonlinear magnetic susceptibility is also derived, which shows fair agreement with the corresponding MC simulation data. PMID:26565247

  14. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brink, A.; Vermijs, G.; Solignac, A.; Koo, J.; Kohlhepp, J. T.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2016-03-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface.

  15. Field-free magnetization reversal by spin-Hall effect and exchange bias.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, A; Vermijs, G; Solignac, A; Koo, J; Kohlhepp, J T; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2016-01-01

    As the first magnetic random access memories are finding their way onto the market, an important issue remains to be solved: the current density required to write magnetic bits becomes prohibitively high as bit dimensions are reduced. Recently, spin-orbit torques and the spin-Hall effect in particular have attracted significant interest, as they enable magnetization reversal without high current densities running through the tunnel barrier. For perpendicularly magnetized layers, however, the technological implementation of the spin-Hall effect is hampered by the necessity of an in-plane magnetic field for deterministic switching. Here we interface a thin ferromagnetic layer with an anti-ferromagnetic material. An in-plane exchange bias is created and shown to enable field-free S HE-driven magnetization reversal of a perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/IrMn structure. Aside from the potential technological implications, our experiment provides additional insight into the local spin structure at the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interface. PMID:26940861

  16. Magnetic properties and energy-mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongjun; Lee, Changhoon; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Gong, Xingao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-28

    The magnetic energy levels of a given magnetic solid are closely packed in energy because the interactions between magnetic ions are weak. Thus, in describing its magnetic properties, one needs to generate its magnetic energy spectrum by employing an appropriate spin Hamiltonian. In this review article we discuss how to determine and specify a necessary spin Hamiltonian in terms of first principles electronic structure calculations on the basis of energy-mapping analysis and briefly survey important concepts and phenomena that one encounters in reading the current literature on magnetic solids. Our discussion is given on a qualitative level from the perspective of magnetic energy levels and electronic structures. The spin Hamiltonian appropriate for a magnetic system should be based on its spin lattice, i.e., the repeat pattern of its strong magnetic bonds (strong spin exchange paths), which requires one to evaluate its Heisenberg spin exchanges on the basis of energy-mapping analysis. Other weaker energy terms such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin exchange and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies, which a spin Hamiltonian must include in certain cases, can also be evaluated by performing energy-mapping analysis. We show that the spin orientation of a transition-metal magnetic ion can be easily explained by considering its split d-block levels as unperturbed states with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) as perturbation, that the DM exchange between adjacent spin sites can become comparable in strength to the Heisenberg spin exchange when the two spin sites are not chemically equivalent, and that the DM interaction between rare-earth and transition-metal cations is governed largely by the magnetic orbitals of the rare-earth cation. PMID:23128376

  17. Reverse DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore by magnetic tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hongbo; Ling, Xinsheng Sean

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-driven DNA translocation through nanopores has attracted wide interest for many potential applications in molecular biology and biotechnology. However, it is intrinsically difficult to control the DNA motion in standard DNA translocation processes in which a strong electric field is required in drawing DNA into the pore, but it also leads to uncontrollable fast DNA translocation. Here we explore a new type of DNA translocation. We dub it ‘reverse DNA translocation’, in which the DNA is pulled through a nanopore mechanically by a magnetic bead, driven by a magnetic-field gradient. This technique is compatible with simultaneous ionic current measurements and is suitable for multiple nanopores, paving the way for large scale applications. We report the first experiment of reverse DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore using magnetic tweezers. PMID:19420602

  18. Nucleation controlled magnetization reversal mechanism in oriented L10 FeCoPt ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Rajan; Sehdev, Neeru; Lamba, S.; Annapoorni, S.

    2016-01-01

    The angular dependence of scaled coercivity is investigated within the framework of various theoretical models to gather an insight into the magnetization reversal mechanism in hard magnetic materials. FeCoPt ternary alloy thin films with low concentration of Co were successfully fabricated on an <100> Si substrate with different working pressures in order to attain an optimum energy product. The structural and hysteresis curve analysis show an improvement in atomic ordering and orientation of easy axis with annealing temperature. The experimental data for angular dependence of coercivity along with the theoretical predications based on the nucleation model indicates that the dominant reversal mechanism is nucleation along with a slight contribution from pinning. The magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging also supports the above model. The evolution of morphology and microstructure characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was directly linked to an increase in surface roughness.

  19. Magnetization reversal of uncompensated Fe moments in exchangebiased Ni/FeF2 bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Liu, Kai; Li, Zhipan; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2006-01-01

    The magnetization reversal of uncompensated Fe moments in exchange biased Ni/FeF{sub 2} bilayers was determined using soft x-ray magnetic circular and linear dichroism. The hysteresis loops resulting from the Fe moments are almost identical to those of the ferromagnetic Ni layer. However, a vertical loop shift indicates that some Fe moments are pinned in the antiferromagnetically ordered FeF{sub 2}. The pinned moments are oriented antiparallel to small cooling fields leading to negative exchange bias, but parallel to large cooling fields resulting in positive exchange bias. No indication for the formation of a parallel antiferromagnetic domain wall in the FeF{sub 2} layer upon magnetization reversal in the Ni layer was found.

  20. Sign reversal of magnetization in Mn substituted SmCrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Bibhuti B.; Ravi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Single phase samples of orthorhombic SmCr1-xMnxO3 compounds were prepared for x=0 to 0.50. Analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns shows a systematic increase in lattice parameters with increase in Mn concentration. The phenomenon of magnetization reversal is observed for x=0.10-0.30 samples with a maximum magnetic compensation temperature of 126 K. The mechanism of magnetization reversal is explained by considering the competition between the paramagnetic moments of Mn3+ and Sm3+ ions under the influence of negative internal field due to antiferromagnetically ordered Cr3+ ions and the canted ferromagnetic component of Cr3+ ions. For x≥0.40, the samples exhibit ferromagnetic like behavior.

  1. Magnetic and velocity fluctuation measurements in the REPUTE-1 reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, A.; Ohdachi, S.; Oikawa, T.; Shinohara, S.; Yamagishi, K.; Toyama, H.; Miyamoto, K. )

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic and velocity fluctuations are studied in the REPUTE-1 [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion [bold 28], 805 (1986)] reversed-field pinch (RFP). The first measurement of velocity fluctuation in an RFP plasma has been done using a Doppler shift of the O V(O[sup 4+], 278.1 nm) line. The fluctuation level increases as the radius of the viewing chord increases. Magnetic fluctuation measurements by an insertable probe reveal that the radial cross correlation of toroidal field fluctuation changes its sign at the radius slightly inside the reversal surface. The level of magnetohydrodynamic dynamo term is estimated from magnetic fluctuations at the surface correlation changes and oxygen velocity fluctuations measured with the chord distance of 115 mm. The dynamo term and that due to resistivity are the same level. This fact is consistent with Ohm's law on which magnetohydrodynamic dynamo models are based.

  2. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

    2014-01-27

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  3. DNA recovery from a single bacterial cell using charge-reversible magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Toyoda, Takahiro; Mogi, Takeyuki; Taguchi, Tomoyuki; Tanaami, Takeo; Yoshino, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Highly efficient DNA recovery from a single bacterial cell was performed by means of imidazole-modified magnetic nanoparticles (Imi-MNPs). The modification by imidazole was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The Imi-MNPs were highly efficient at DNA extraction owing to the charge-reversible properties of Imi-MNPs, whereby DNA is attached to the particles at low pH and eluted at high pH because of electrostatic interactions. The DNA recovery ratio was determined by real-time PCR, and it revealed that complete recovery was guaranteed at ≥10(3) genome copies of Bacillus subtilis. Extraction of DNA from single bacterial cells was followed by PCR amplification of 16S rDNA and capillary electrophoresis. We achieved detection of single bacterial cells with a detection rate of 80%. We believe that our DNA recovery strategy may serve as a powerful tool for efficient DNA extraction and should be useful for quality control of cosmetics, foods, and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26704992

  4. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.Y.; Hoffman, A.L.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    2005-06-15

    Rotating magnetic fields (RMF) have been employed to both form and sustain currents in field reversed configurations (FRC). A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up magnetic field lines with even small ratios of vacuum RMF B{sub {omega}} to external confinement field B{sub e}. A recently proposed innovation was to use an antisymmetric arrangement of RMF, but vacuum calculations with full RMF penetration showed that very low values of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} would still be required to provide field-line closure. Recent comparisons of symmetric and antisymmetric RMF drive on the translation, confinement, and sustainment (TCS) facility [A. L. Hoffman, H. Y. Guo, J. T. Slough et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)] have shown strong improvements in the basic confinement properties of the FRCs when using antisymmetric drive, even with ratios of B{sub {omega}}/B{sub e} as high as 0.3. This is due to normal standard operation with only partial penetration of the RMF beyond the FRC separatrix. The uniform transverse RMF in vacuum is shielded by the conducting plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component. Simple numerical calculations using analytical solutions for the partially penetrated antisymmetric RMF, superimposed on Grad-Shafranov solutions for the poloidal FRC fields, show good field-line closure for the TCS experimental conditions. The antisymmetric arrangement also leads to more efficient current drive and improved stabilization of rotational modes.

  5. Magnetic reversal in ion-irradiated FePt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Ferré, J.; Plantevin, O.; Cruguel, H.; Fortuna, F.; Bernas, H.; Marty, A.; Beigné, C.; Samson, Y.

    2010-09-01

    Previous work on ion irradiation control of FePt thin film magnetic anisotropy is extended to ultrathin films (2-10 nm). The effects of 30 keV He ion irradiation on the magnetic properties are explored as a function of ion fluence and film thickness. Depending on their growth conditions, the thinnest films exhibit different magnetic properties. Although this affects their final magnetic behaviour, we show that after irradiation at 300 °C the easy magnetization axis may rotate entirely from in-plane to out-of-plane at very low fluences, e.g. 2 × 1013 He+ cm-2 on 5 nm thick film. This demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of the magnetic anisotropy to ion-induced local L10 ordering. Under these conditions, ultrathin films may exhibit perfectly square hysteresis loops with 100% remanent magnetization and low coercivity.

  6. Reliable spin-transfer torque driven precessional magnetization reversal with an adiabatically decaying pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, D.; Ryan, C. A.; Ohki, T.; Kent, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    We show that a slowly decaying current pulse can lead to nearly deterministic precessional switching in the presence of noise. We consider a biaxial macrospin, with an easy axis in-plane and a hard axis out-of-plane, typical of thin film nanomagnets patterned into asymmetric shapes. Out-of-plane precessional magnetization orbits are excited with a current pulse with a component of spin polarization normal to the film plane. By numerically integrating the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation we show that thermal noise leads to strong dephasing of the magnetization orbits. However, an adiabatically decreasing pulse amplitude overwhelmingly leads to magnetization reversal, with a final state dependent on the pulse polarity. We develop an analytic model to explain this phenomena and to determine the pulse decay time necessary for adiabatic magnetization relaxation and thus deterministic magnetization switching.

  7. Refocusing properties of periodic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankiewicz, N.

    1976-01-01

    The use of depressed collectors for the efficient collection of spent beams from linear-beam microwave tubes depends on a refocusing procedure in which the space charge forces and transverse velocity components are reduced. The refocusing properties are evaluated of permanent magnet configurations whose axial fields are approximated by constant plateaus or linearly varying fields. The results provide design criteria and show that the refocusing properties can be determined from the plateau fields alone.

  8. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  9. Magnetic properties of Martian surface material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis that the magnetic properties of the Martian surface material are due to the production of a magnetic phase in the clay mineral nontronite by transient shock heating is examined. In the course of the investigation a magnetic material is produced with rather unusual properties. Heating from 900 C to 1000 C, of natural samples of nontronite leads first to the production of what appears to be Si doped maghemite gamma (-Fe2O3). Although apparently metastable, the growth of gamma -Fe2O3 at these temprtures is unexpected, and its relative persistence of several hours at 1000 C is most surprising. Continued annealing of this material for longer periods promote the crystallization of alpha Fe2O3 and cristobalite (high temperature polymorph of SiO2). All available data correlate this new magnetic material with the cristobalite hence our naming it magnetic ferri cristobalite. Formation of this magnetic cristobalite, however, may require topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  10. Magnetic properties of pelagic marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, A. P.; Florindo, F.; Chang, L.; Jovane, L.; Heslop, D.; Larrasoaña, J.

    2013-05-01

    Pelagic carbonates are deposited far from the continents, usually at water depths of 3,000-6,000 m, at rates slower than 10 cm/kyr. Pelagic carbonates are globally important and have yielded many outstanding paleomagnetic records both from ocean drilling and analysis of outcrops from tectonically uplifted sedimentary sequences. Recent recognition of the widespread preservation of biogenic magnetite has fundamentally changed our understanding of the magnetic properties of pelagic carbonates. We review evidence concerning the range of magnetic minerals typically preserved in these sediments, the effects of magnetic mineral diagenesis on paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic records carried by pelagic carbonates and what they tell us about the environments concerned. Despite recent advances, much remains to be discovered. We are only at early stages of understanding how biogenic magnetite gives rise to paleomagnetic signals and whether it is responsible for a poorly understood biogeochemical remanent magnetization. Recently developed techniques hold much potential for testing how different species of magnetotactic bacteria, which produce different magnetite morphologies, respond to changing nutrient and oxygenation conditions and whether it will be possible to develop proxies for ancient nutrient conditions from well calibrated modern records of such processes. A tantalizing link between giant magnetofossils and Paleogene hyperthermal events needs to be tested and much more needs to be learned about the relationship between climate and the organisms that biomineralized these giant magnetite particles. Despite being studied for over 70 years, the magnetic properties of pelagic carbonates hold many secrets that await discovery.

  11. Magnetic properties of Martian surface material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-06-01

    The hypothesis that the magnetic properties of the Martian surface material are due to the production of a magnetic phase in the clay mineral nontronite by transient shock heating is examined. In the course of the investigation a magnetic material is produced with rather unusual properties. Heating from 900 C to 1000 C, of natural samples of nontronite leads first to the production of what appears to be Si doped maghemite gamma (-Fe2O3). Although apparently metastable, the growth of gamma -Fe2O3 at these temprtures is unexpected, and its relative persistence of several hours at 1000 C is most surprising. Continued annealing of this material for longer periods promote the crystallization of alpha Fe2O3 and cristobalite (high temperature polymorph of SiO2). All available data correlate this new magnetic material with the cristobalite hence our naming it magnetic ferri cristobalite. Formation of this magnetic cristobalite, however, may require topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  12. The effects of thermally reversible agents on PVC stability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Yao, J.; Xiong, X. H.; Jia, C. X.; Ren, R.; Chen, P.; Liu, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    One kind of thermally reversible cross-linking agents for improving PVC thermally stability was synthesized. The chemical structure and thermally reversible characteristics of cross-linking agents were investigated by FTIR and DSC analysis, respectively. FTIR results confirmed that the cyclopentadienyl barium mercaptides ((CPD-C2H4S)2Ba) were successfully synthesized. DSC results showed it has thermally reversible characteristics and the depolymerization temperature was between 170 °C and 205 °C. The effects of cross-linking reaction time on gel content of Poly(vinyl chloride) compounds was evaluated. The gel content value arrived at 42% after being cross-linked for 25 min at 180 C. The static thermally stability measurement proved that the thermally stability of PVC compounds was improved.

  13. Magnetization reversal mechanism of perpendicularly exchange-coupled composite L10-FePt/CoCrPt bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Zhou, S. M.; Ge, J. J.; Du, J.; Sun, L.

    2009-06-01

    Magnetization reversal mechanism in perpendicularly exchange-coupled composite hard/soft L10-FePt/CoCrPt bilayers with different soft layer thickness has been studied using magnetometry and magnetotransport measurements. For thin soft layers, the magnetization reversal process can be described by the rigid model. For thick soft layers, a different magnetization reversal process is observed which consists of three stages. An exchange-spring spin structure is first formed from the positive saturation magnetic field to small negative magnetic field. In the second stage, a Néel wall is driven and squeezed. In the last stage, multiple domain structure is formed laterally to reduce the dipolar interaction and the magnetization reversal is accomplished by the pinned domain wall motion in the hard layer.

  14. Magnetic dipole discharges. I. Basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Teodorescu-Soare, C. T.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-08-15

    A simple discharge is described which uses a permanent magnet as a cold cathode and the metallic chamber wall as an anode. The magnet's equator is biased strongly negative, which produces secondary electrons due to the impact of energetic ions. The emitted electrons are highly confined by the strong dipolar magnetic field and the negative potential in the equatorial plane of the magnet. The emitted electrons ionize near the sheath and produce further electrons, which drift across field lines to the anode while the nearly unmagnetized ions are accelerated back to the magnet. A steady state discharge is maintained at neutral pressures above 10{sup −3} mbar. This is the principle of magnetron discharges, which commonly use cylindrical and planar cathodes rather than magnetic dipoles as cathodes. The discharge properties have been investigated in steady state and pulsed mode. Different magnets and geometries have been employed. The role of a background plasma has been investigated. Various types of instabilities have been observed such as sheath oscillations, current-driven turbulence, relaxation instabilities due to ionization, and high frequency oscillations created by sputtering impulses, which are described in more detail in companion papers. The discharge has also been operated in reactive gases and shown to be useful for sputtering applications.

  15. Magnetic properties of metal-substituted haematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. A.; Fitzpatrick, R. W.; Gilkes, R. J.; Dobson, J.

    1999-08-01

    Mineral and isothermal magnetic properties of Al-, Mn- and Ni-substituted haematites were characterized and their relationships evaluated in order to interpret better the results of magnetic analyses of soils and recent sediments. Aluminium, manganese and nickel haematites generally behaved as single-domain (SD) particles. The influence of incorporated Al on the magnetic behaviour of haematite was consistent with Al acting as a paramagnetic dilutent. Mass magnetic susceptibility (chi) and SIRM_800 decreased as the level of Al substitution increased. Incorporation of Mn and Ni increased chi, which could be associated with enhancement of the spin canting effect of haematite. The stability of SIRM_800 to demagnetization for Al-haematite appears to be related to a defect mechanism associated with the development of smaller crystallites arising from Al substitution. Magnetic domain rotation or flipping was probably inhibited, being blocked by structural defects during magnetization and demagnetization, and resulted in a low but stable partial SIRM (SIRM_800). %IRM/SIRM_800 demagnetization curves and estimated (B_o)_CR values of <=100 mT for Mn-haematite indicate pseudo-single-domain/multidomain-like behaviour despite Mn-haematite having particle and crystallite dimensions similar to Ni-haematite, which did not show this behaviour. Data indicate that parameters involving unsaturated, partial SIRM should be used with caution in magnetic studies of soils and sediments.

  16. Magnetic properties of the Imilac Pallasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J.; Tarduno, J. A.; Cottrell, R. D.

    2009-12-01

    Pallasites are a type of stony-iron meteorite containing olivine crystals within an iron-nickel alloy. Magnetic inclusions, which can be found in the olivine crystals, may contain a memory of exposure to ancient magnetic fields. By studying the properties of the magnetic inclusions, we can learn more about the fields present during formation and how this relates to the evolution of the parent bodies. An important step in this research is to find appropriate samples to measure. The best magnetic recorders are single domain (SD) magnetic grains; to search for potential carriers of SD grains we separated gem-like olivine crystals from a sample of the Imilac pallasite. Crystal fragments were cleaned to remove iron staining; the fragments were further scanned with a visible light microscope to exclude samples with large (potentially multidomain) magnetic inclusions. Measurements of these select samples with an Alternating Gradient Force Magnetometer (AGFM) suggest the presence of single domain magnetic inclusions suitable for the preservation of paleofields. We will present preliminary paleointensity analyses of these samples. This is a presentation of results collected during a REU summer program at the University of Rochester.

  17. Integral physicochemical properties of reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyaeva, O. A.; Shubenkova, E. G.; Poshelyuzhnaya, E. G.; Lutaeva, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The effect the degree of hydration has on optical and electrophysical properties of water/AOT/ n-hexane system is studied. It is found that AOT reverse micelles form aggregates whose dimensions grow along with the degree of hydration and temperature. Aggregation enhances their electrical conductivity and shifts the UV spectrum of AOT reverse emulsions to the red region. Four states of water are found in the structure of AOT reverse micelles.

  18. Influence of shape, size and internal structure on magnetic properties of core-edge nanodots with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Milińska, E. Wawro, A.

    2014-11-21

    The properties of perpendicularly magnetized isolated nanodots different in shape, size, and internal structure are simulated by micromagnetic calculations. Investigated dots are magnetically uniform, or they are composed of a core and an edge characterized by different anisotropy—stronger or weaker than that of the core. Based on calculated hysteresis loops, we discuss in details the magnetization reversal processes, stability of magnetic structures, and spin configurations in the dots.

  19. Magnetic reversal of an artificial square ice: dipolar correlation and charge ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jason; Stein, Aaron; Langridge, Sean; Marrows, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Artificial spin ices are lithographically patterned arrays of single domain nanomagnets [1-4]. The elongated elements form a 2D system of interlinked vertices at which Ising-like dipole moments meet with incompatible interactions. They are directly analogous to 3D bulk spin ice materials [5]. We report on the magnetic reversal of an athermal artificial square ice pattern subject to a sequence of magnetic fields applied slightly off the diagonal symmetry axis, investigated via magnetic force microscopy of the remanent states that result [1]. From an initial diagonally polarised state, sublattice independent reversal is observed via bulk-nucleated incrementally-pinned flipped moment chains along parallel channels of magnetic elements, as evident from analysis of vertex populations and dipolar correlation functions. Weak dipolar interactions between adjacent chains favour antialignment and give rise to weak charge ordering of ``monopole'' vertices during reversal. [4pt] [1] J. P. Morgan, A. Stein, S. Langridge & C.H. Marrows, New Journal of Physics (2011), 13, 105002.[0pt] [2] R. F. Wang et al., Nature (2006), 439, 303-306.[0pt] [3] E. Mengotti et al., Nature Physics (2011), 7, 68-74.[0pt] [4] J. P. Morgan et al., Nature Physics (2011), 7, 75-79.[0pt] [5] M. J. Harris et al., PRL (1997), 79, 2554-255

  20. Magnetic properties of maraging steel in relation to deformation and structural phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Ali, A.; Hashmi, F.; Khan, A.Q. ); Hasnain, S.K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-03-01

    Magnetic properties in annealed and cold rolled conditions have been investigated for maraging steel grade 18%Ni-2,400. The austenite content, coercive field, saturation magnetization and remanence were determined after aging for 1 h in the temperature range from 400 to 800 C. The results show that the degree of deformation imparted to martensite influences both the amount of reverted austenite and the magnetic properties obtained following aging. Transmission electron microscopy was carried out in order to investigate the structural changes taking place during reversion of austenite.

  1. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  2. Nanoscale magnetization reversal caused by electric field-induced ion migration and redistribution in cobalt ferrite thin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaojian; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Gang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-04-28

    Reversible nanoscale magnetization reversal controlled merely by electric fields is still challenging at the moment. In this report, first-principles calculation indicates that electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be achieved by the appearance of unidirectional magnetic anisotropy along the (110) direction in Fe-deficient cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2-x)O4, CFO), as a result of the migration and local redistribution of the Co(2+) ions adjacent to the B-site Fe vacancies. In good agreement with the theoretical model, we experimentally observed that in the CFO thin films the nanoscale magnetization can be reversibly and nonvolatilely reversed at room temperature via an electrical ion-manipulation approach, wherein the application of electric fields with appropriate polarity and amplitude can modulate the size of magnetic domains with different magnetizations up to 70%. With the low power consumption (subpicojoule) characteristics and the elimination of external magnetic field, the observed electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be used for the construction of energy-efficient spintronic devices, e.g., low-power electric-write and magnetic-read memories. PMID:25794422

  3. Magnetic properties of heterotrophic bacteria (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovceva, Nadezda V.; Glebova, Irina N.; Romanuk, Anatoly V.

    1994-05-01

    The magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization) of six species of heterotrophic bacteria were studied: alcaligenes faecalis 81, arthrobacter globiformis BKM 685, bacillus cereus 8, leptothrix pseudo-ochracea D-405, proteus vulgaris 14, and seliberia stellata. It has been shown that the magnetic properties of bacteria depend on (1) the peculiarity of the micro-organism (species-specific and connected with cultivation conditions); (2) the source of the iron in the media. Most of the bacteria are diamagnetic in media with a minimum of iron (χ∞=-7.2-0.3×10-6 sm3/g). The spore forming species (bacillus cereus) has increased diamagnetism. Usually the bacteria are paramagnetic in iron-containing media because they concentrate into Fe compounds. The paramagnetism of the iron-concentrating species (anthrobacter globiformis -χpar=2.4×10-6, leptothrix pseudo-ochtracea χpar=11.0×10-6 and seliberia stellata χpar=3.2×10-6 sm3/g) depends, in general, on magnetically ordered compounds. Iron compounds not accumulated by proteus vulgaris and these species are always diamagnetic .

  4. Magnetic properties of pelagic marine carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Andrew P.; Florindo, Fabio; Chang, Liao; Heslop, David; Jovane, Luigi; Larrasoaña, Juan C.

    2013-12-01

    Pelagic carbonates are deposited far from continents, usually at water depths of 3000-6000 m, at rates below 10 cm/kyr, and are a globally important sediment type. Recent advances, with recognition of widespread preservation of biogenic magnetite (the inorganic remains of magnetotactic bacteria), have fundamentally changed our understanding of the magnetic properties of pelagic carbonates. We review evidence for the magnetic minerals typically preserved in pelagic carbonates, the effects of magnetic mineral diagenesis on paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic records of pelagic carbonates, and what magnetic properties can tell us about the open-ocean environments in which pelagic carbonates are deposited. We also discuss briefly late diagenetic remagnetisations recorded by some carbonates. Despite recent advances in our knowledge of these phenomena, much remains undiscovered. We are only at early stages of understanding how biogenic magnetite gives rise to paleomagnetic signals in sediments and whether it carries a poorly understood biogeochemical remanent magnetisation. Recently developed techniques have potential for testing how different magnetotactic bacterial species, which produce different magnetite morphologies, respond to changing nutrient and oxygenation conditions. Future work needs to test whether it is possible to develop proxies for ancient nutrient conditions from well-calibrated modern magnetotactic bacterial occurrences. A tantalizing link between giant magnetofossils and Paleogene hyperthermal events needs to be tested; much remains to be learned about the relationship between climate and the organisms that biomineralised these large and novel magnetite morphologies. Rather than being a well-worn subject that has been studied for over 60 years, the magnetic properties of pelagic carbonates hold many secrets that await discovery.

  5. Magnetic and structural properties of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariona, N.; Camacho-Aguilar, K. I.; Ramos-González, R.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Herrera-Trejo, M.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2016-05-01

    A rich variety of ferrihydrite/hematite nanocomposites (NCs) with specific size, composition and properties were obtained in transformation reactions of 2-line ferrihydrite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the NCs consist of clusters of strongly aggregated nanoparticles (NPs) similarly to a "plum pudding", where hematite NPs "raisins" are surrounded by ferrihydrite "pudding". Magnetic measurements of the NCs correlate very well with TEM results; i.e., higher coercive fields correspond to greater hematite crystallite size. First order reversal curve (FORC) measurements were used for the characterization of the magnetic components of the NCs. FORC diagrams revealed that the NCs prepared at short times are composed by single domains with low coercivity, and NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min exhibited elongated distribution along the Hc axis. It suggested that these samples consist of mixtures of different kinds of hematite particles, ones with low coercivity and others with coercivity greater than 600 Oe. For NCs prepared at times larger than 60 min, Mossbauer spectroscopy revealed the presence of two sextets, which one was assigned to fine hematite particles and other to hematite particles with hyperfine parameters near to bulk hematite. The correlation of the structural and magnetic properties of the ferrihydrite/hematite NCs revealed important characteristics of these materials which have not been reported elsewhere.

  6. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-12-16

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  7. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2007-02-20

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  8. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Effects in Propagating Relativistic Ejecta: Reverse Shock and Magnetic Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.I.; Zhang, B.; Giacomazzo, B.; Hardee, P.E.; Nagataki, S.; Hartmann, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    We solve the Riemann problem for the deceleration of arbitrarily magnetized relativistic ejecta injected into a static unmagnetized medium. We find that for the same initial Lorentz factor, the reverse shock becomes progressively weaker with increasing magnetization s (the Poynting-to-kinetic energy flux ratio), and the shock becomes a rarefaction wave when s exceeds a critical value, sc, defined by the balance between the magnetic pressure in the ejecta and the thermal pressure in the forward shock. In the rarefaction wave regime, we find that the rarefied region is accelerated to a Lorentz factor that is significantly larger than the initial value. This acceleration mechanism is due to the strong magnetic pressure in the ejecta.

  10. Domain structures and magnetization reversal in Co/Pd and CoFeB/Pd multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Ranjbar, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Domain structures and magnetization reversal of (Co/Pd) and (CoFeB/Pd) multilayers with 7 and 14 repeats were investigated. The Co-based multilayers show much larger coercivities, a better squareness, and a sharper magnetization switching than CoFeB-based multilayers. From magnetic force microscopy observations, both structures show strong reduction in domains size as the number of repeats increases but the magnetic domains for Co-based multilayers are more than one order of magnitude larger than for CoFeB-based multilayers. By imaging domains at different times, breaks in the (CoFeB/Pd) multilayer stripes were observed within only few hours, while no change could be seen for (Co/Pd) multilayers. Although CoFeB single layers are suitable for magnetoresistive devices due to their large spin polarization and low damping constants, their lamination with Pd suffers mainly from thermal instability.

  11. Tracking a large pseudostreamer to pinpoint the southern polar magnetic field reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, Laurel; Guennou, Chloé; Seaton, Daniel B.; Gibson, Sarah; Auchère, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015.

  12. Origin of the Reversible Thermochromic Properties of Polydiacetylenes Revealed by Ultrafast Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baek, Junwoo; Joung, Joonyoung F; Lee, Songyi; Rhee, Hanju; Kim, Myung Hwa; Park, Sungnam; Yoon, Juyoung

    2016-01-21

    Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) with thermochromic properties undergo colorimetric transitions when the external temperature is varied. This capability has the potential to enable these materials to be used as temperature sensors. These thermochromic properties of PDAs stem from their temperature-dependent optical properties. In this work, we studied the temperature-dependent optical properties of Bis-PDA-Ph, which exhibits reversible thermochromic properties, and PCDA-PDA, which exhibits irreversible thermochromic properties, by UV-visible absorption and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results indicate that the electronic relaxation of PDAs occurs via an intermediate state in cases where the material exhibits reversible thermochromic properties, whereas the excited PDAs relax directly back to the ground state when irreversible thermochromic properties are observed. The existence of this intermediate state in the electronic relaxation of PDAs thus plays an important role in determining their thermochromic properties. These results are very important for both understanding and strategically modulating the thermochromic properties of PDAs. PMID:26719954

  13. Voltage induced reversible and irreversible change of magnetic coercivity in Co/ZnO heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chuan-Che; Chang, Po-Chun; Mudinepalli, Venkata Ramana; Hsieh, Tsung-Chun; Lo, Fang-Yuh; Lin, Wen-Chin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the application of bias voltage to 4-8 nm Co/275 nm ZnO heterostructures changed the magnetic behavior reversibly or irreversibly, depending on the different voltage-induced mechanisms. The magnetic coercivity (Hc) monotonically decreased 20% when the small voltages of 0-8 V were applied. The Hc reduction was symmetric with the voltage polarity, and the reversibility was demonstrated by cyclically switching the bias voltage between 0 and 7 V. While a large voltage up to 40 V was applied to the Co/ZnO junction, the current heating effect became considerable and the Co-oxide was formed, as confirmed by depth-profiling X-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis. The presence of Co-oxide in the Co films induced the irreversible reduction of the Kerr signal and Hc at room temperature. The considerable Hc enhancement at 130 K also indicates the exchange bias coupling effect from the antiferromagnetic Co-oxide.

  14. Magnetic Properties of selected Prussian Blue Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Manjita

    Prussian Blue Analogs (PBAs) of composition M[M(C,N)6 ] 2.xH2O are bimetallic cyanide complexes, where M and M are bivalent or trivalent transition metals and x is number of water molecule per unit cell. The PBAs form cubic framework structures, which consist mostly of alternating MIIIN6 and MIIC 6 octahedrals. However, occupancies of the octrahedrals are not perfect: they may be empty and the charges are balanced by the guest water molecules at the lattice site (C or N site) or the interstitial site (between the octahedrals) of the unit cell. Most (but not all) PBAs exhibit negative thermal expansion behavior, i.e. volume decrease with increasing temperature. Another area of interest in PBA research is the occurrence of unusual magnetic properties. Similar to other molecular magnets, large crystal-field splitting due to the octrahedral environment may result in a combination of low- or high-spin configurations of the localized magnetic moments, i.e. spin crossover effects may be found. My dissertation focuses on the magnetic properties of the selected 3d transition-metal PBAs, namely metal hexacyanochromates M3[Cr(C,N)6 ]2.xH2O, metal hexcyanoferrates M3[Fe(C,N)6]2.xH2O and metal hexcyanocobaltates M3[Co(C,N)6]2 .xH2O where M = Mn, Co, Ni and Cu. In particular, I analyzed the temperature and field dependencies of the bulk magnetic response of those PBAs. My results show that the magnetic susceptibility of all studied PBAs follows the Curie-Weiss behavior in the paramagnetic region up to room temperature; however, some of the compounds exhibit long-range magnetic order at lower temperatures (ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic). In particular, the data provide evidence for magnetic ground states for most of the metal hexacyanochromates and all of the metal hexacyanoferrates but none of the hexacyanocobaltates that were studied. For each of the compounds, my analysis provides a measure of the effective magnetic moment, which is then compared with the predicted

  15. Partial barriers to heat transport in monotonic- q and reversed shear 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Blazevski, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    The quantitative understanding of the role of magnetic field stochasticity on transport in 3-D configurations is of paramount importance for the magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas. Problems of interest include the control of ELMs by RMPs and the assessment of heat fluxes at the divertor. In this contribution we present numerical solutions of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation describing transport of heat pulses in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields. To overcome the limitations of standard approaches, we use a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method that allows the efficient and accurate integration of the anisotropic heat transport equation with local and non-local parallel heat flux closures in integrable and chaotic B fields. The results provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations exhibit partial barriers to heat transport. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial ``leaky'' barriers that slow down or even stop the inward propagation of heat pulses. The magnetic field connection length, < lB > , exhibits a strong gradient where the partial barriers form, and it reaches a plateau whose value determines the ``porosity'' of the barrier. Heat pulses are shown to slow down considerably in the shear reversal region and, as a result, the time delay of the temperature response in chaotic reversed shear configurations is about an order of magnitude larger than the time delay in monotonic q-profiles.

  16. Scaling of magnetic reversal avalanches in connected structures of artificial kagome ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumings, John; Daunheimer, Stephen; Drisko, Jasper; Chern, Gia-Wei; Moessner, Roderich; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2015-03-01

    We will present results on magnetic avalanches observed by Lorentz-force transmission electron microscopy during the magnetic reversal of magnetic lattices. The lattices are fabricated from permalloy (Ni80Fe20) in the geometry known as artificial kagome ice. The avalanches show power law behavior in the probability of reaching a given size scale, with the power law persisting right up to a cutoff for the size of the sample. Such behavior occurs in the vicinity of critical transitions, and we will present an analysis of the evidence for such critical behavior in our system. We will make connections with the model of directed percolation, where the magnetic reversal may be considered as an infiltration of magnetic charges of opposites signs from the two opposite ends of the lattice. The possible realization of a system of directed percolation in two dimensions (one spatial, plus one field-directed time dimension), could open up new avenues for research with artificial spin ices. Supported by NSF CAREER Award DMR-1056974.

  17. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body Stoner particles system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    Magnetic mechanism of nanoparticles has attracted explosive attention in the development of modern information industry. On the base of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we studied the magnetization reversal in a system of two Stoner particles with uniaxial anisotropies and static magnetic interaction. Using micromagnetic simulation, two typical geometrical configurations of perpendicular(PERP) and parallel(PARA) configuration where the diameter of each particle is 20nm are considered. We found that when the separation between two particles has 23nm in PERP configuration ultralow switching field strength, 17mT can be realized, which satisfies the zero-field condition in our previous works[J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104303(2011)] according to the chosen parameters of cobalt material. For other separation values the switching field are multiple of lowest field. However, in PARA configuration the switching field changes with the separation faintly. This two-body system considered in our work might be implement as a composite information bit and our results offer further possibilities for its applications in information storage and/or fast magnetic response. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body Stoner particles system.

  18. Reversed magnetic shear suppression of electron-scale turbulence on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuh, Howard Y.; Levinton, F. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Smith, D. R.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Park, H. K.

    2009-11-01

    Electron thermal internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) are observed in reversed (negative) magnetic shear NSTX discharges^1. These e-ITBs can be created with either neutral beam heating or High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) RF heating. The e-ITB location occurs at the location of minimum magnetic shear determined by Motional Stark Effect (MSE) constrained equilibria. Statistical studies show a threshold condition in magnetic shear for e-ITB formation. High-k fluctuation measurements at electron turbulence wavenumbers^3 have been made under several different transport regimes, including a bursty regime that limits temperature gradients at intermediate magnetic shear. The growth rate of fluctuations has been calculated immediately following a change in the local magnetic shear, resulting in electron temperature gradient relaxation. Linear gyrokinetic simulation results for NSTX show that while measured electron temperature gradients exceed critical linear thresholds for ETG instability, growth rates can remain low under reversed shear conditions up to high electron temperatures gradients. ^1H. Yuh, et. al., PoP 16, 056120 ^2D.R. Smith, E. Mazzucato et al., RSI 75, 3840 ^3E. Mazzucato, D.R. Smith et al., PRL 101, 075001

  19. Strain-assisted magnetization reversal in Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Dennis, C L; Chen, P J; Iunin, Y L; Finkel, P; Staruch, M; Shull, R D

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional materials composed of ultrathin magnetic films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy combined with ferroelectric substrates represent a new approach toward low power, fast, high density spintronics. Here we demonstrate Co/Ni multilayered films with tunable saturation magnetization and perpendicular anisotropy grown directly on ferroelectric PZT [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] substrate plates. Electric fields up to ±2 MV/m expand the PZT by 0.1% and generate at least 0.02% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayered film. Modifying the strain with a voltage can reduce the coercive field by over 30%. We also demonstrate that alternating in-plane tensile and compressive strains (less than 0.01%) can be used to propagate magnetic domain walls. This ability to manipulate high anisotropy magnetic thin films could prove useful for lowering the switching energy for magnetic elements in future voltage-controlled spintronic devices. PMID:27297638

  20. Strain-assisted magnetization reversal in Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Dennis, C. L.; Chen, P. J.; Iunin, Y. L.; Finkel, P.; Staruch, M.; Shull, R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional materials composed of ultrathin magnetic films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy combined with ferroelectric substrates represent a new approach toward low power, fast, high density spintronics. Here we demonstrate Co/Ni multilayered films with tunable saturation magnetization and perpendicular anisotropy grown directly on ferroelectric PZT [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] substrate plates. Electric fields up to ±2 MV/m expand the PZT by 0.1% and generate at least 0.02% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayered film. Modifying the strain with a voltage can reduce the coercive field by over 30%. We also demonstrate that alternating in-plane tensile and compressive strains (less than 0.01%) can be used to propagate magnetic domain walls. This ability to manipulate high anisotropy magnetic thin films could prove useful for lowering the switching energy for magnetic elements in future voltage-controlled spintronic devices.

  1. Duffing oscillation-induced reversal of magnetic vortex core by a resonant perpendicular magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Chun, Byong Sun; Kim, Wondong; Qiu, Z. Q.; Hwang, Chanyong

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of the magnetic vortex state in a circular nanodisk was studied under a perpendicular alternating magnetic field that excites the radial modes of the magnetic resonance. Here, we show that as the oscillating frequency is swept down from a frequency higher than the eigenfrequency, the amplitude of the radial mode is almost doubled to the amplitude at the fixed resonance frequency. This amplitude has a hysteresis vs. frequency sweeping direction. Our result showed that this phenomenon was due to a Duffing-type nonlinear resonance. Consequently, the amplitude enhancement reduced the vortex core-switching magnetic field to well below 10 mT. A theoretical model corresponding to the Duffing oscillator was developed from the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation to explore the physical origin of the simulation result. This work provides a new pathway for the switching of the magnetic vortex core polarity in future magnetic storage devices. PMID:25145837

  2. Duffing oscillation-induced reversal of magnetic vortex core by a resonant perpendicular magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Chun, Byong Sun; Kim, Wondong; Qiu, Z Q; Hwang, Chanyong

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of the magnetic vortex state in a circular nanodisk was studied under a perpendicular alternating magnetic field that excites the radial modes of the magnetic resonance. Here, we show that as the oscillating frequency is swept down from a frequency higher than the eigenfrequency, the amplitude of the radial mode is almost doubled to the amplitude at the fixed resonance frequency. This amplitude has a hysteresis vs. frequency sweeping direction. Our result showed that this phenomenon was due to a Duffing-type nonlinear resonance. Consequently, the amplitude enhancement reduced the vortex core-switching magnetic field to well below 10 mT. A theoretical model corresponding to the Duffing oscillator was developed from the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to explore the physical origin of the simulation result. This work provides a new pathway for the switching of the magnetic vortex core polarity in future magnetic storage devices. PMID:25145837

  3. Strain-assisted magnetization reversal in Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Gopman, D. B.; Dennis, C. L.; Chen, P. J.; Iunin, Y. L.; Finkel, P.; Staruch, M.; Shull, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional materials composed of ultrathin magnetic films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy combined with ferroelectric substrates represent a new approach toward low power, fast, high density spintronics. Here we demonstrate Co/Ni multilayered films with tunable saturation magnetization and perpendicular anisotropy grown directly on ferroelectric PZT [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] substrate plates. Electric fields up to ±2 MV/m expand the PZT by 0.1% and generate at least 0.02% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayered film. Modifying the strain with a voltage can reduce the coercive field by over 30%. We also demonstrate that alternating in-plane tensile and compressive strains (less than 0.01%) can be used to propagate magnetic domain walls. This ability to manipulate high anisotropy magnetic thin films could prove useful for lowering the switching energy for magnetic elements in future voltage-controlled spintronic devices. PMID:27297638

  4. Magnetic properties of artificially synthesized ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Lee, H. I.; Cho, S.-B.; Yoon, S.; Suh, B. J.; Jang, Z. H.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, K.-S.

    2005-05-01

    Human ferritin homopolymers with H or L subunits (rHF and rLF) were genetically engineered in E coli. Apoferritins were then reconstituted with 2000 Fe atoms. A big difference was observed in the rates of iron uptake, whereas the mean core size was similar in rHF and rLF. Magnetization of the recombinant human ferritins were measured as functions of temperature and field. The blocking temperature TB(H) at low fields is considerably higher in rLF than in rHF. From the fit of M(H ) data to a modified Langevin function: M(H )=M0L(μpH/kBT)+χaH, the effective magnetic moment μp is found to be much larger in rLF than in rHF. Experimental data demonstrate that the magnetic properties, in particular, the uncompensated spins of ferritin core are related to the biomineralization process in ferritins.

  5. Remanent magnetic properties of unbrecciated eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisowski, Stanley M.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the remanent magnetic properties of five unbrecciated eucrites, ranging from the coarse-grained cumulate Moore County to the quenched melt rock ALH 81001 in order to assess the strength of the magnetic field associated with their parent body during their formation. Two of the meteorites are judged as unlikely to have preserved their primary thermal remanence because of large variations in subsample remanence intensity and direction (Ibitira), and lack of NRM resistance to AF and thermal demagnetization (PCA 82502). The lack of a strong (greater than 0.01 mT) magnetizing field during their cooling on the eucrite parent body is inferred from the low normalized NRM intensities for subsamples of ALH 81001 and Yamato 791195.

  6. Formation of field-reversed ion rings in a magnetized background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Omelchenko, Y.A.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-07-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a magnetic cusp into neutral gas immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. In anticipation of a new experimental thrust to create strong field-reversed ion rings the beam evolution is investigated in a preformed background plasma on a time scale greater than an ion cyclotron period, using a new two and a half-dimensional (21/2-D) hybrid, particle-in-cell (PIC) code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as macro-particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. It is shown that under appropriate conditions axial beam bunching occurs in the downstream applied field and a compact field-reversed ring is formed. It is observed that the ring is reflected in a ramped magnetic field. Upon reflection its axial velocity is very much less than that expected from a single particle model due to the transfer of the mean axial momentum to the background ions. This increases the time available to apply a pulsed mirror for trapping the ring experimentally. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Observations of the reappearance of polar coronal holes and the reversal of the polar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Davis, J. M.; Mcintosh, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Observational data relating to the evolution of the polar magnetic field around sunspot maximum is examined. Particular emphasis is given to coronal hole observations performed during the last two solar maxima. Long-term averages of the latitudinal dependence of the photospheric magnetic field and the evolutionary pattern of the polar crown filaments are used to trace the poleward motion of the reversal of the large-scale field and are compared to the redevelopment of polar holes. Within the context of phenomenological models of the solar cycle, it is concluded that: (1) the process of polarity reversal and redevelopment of polar holes is discontinuous, with surges of flux of old-cycle polarity interrupting the poleward migration of new-cycle flux; (2) contrary to the Babcock (1961) hypothesis, the polar crown disappears months after the magnetic pole reversal; and (3) the observations support suggestions of a poleward meridional flow around solar maximum that cannot be accounted for by Leighton-type (1964) diffusion.

  8. Magnetic and Magneto-Optical Properties of Nano - Multilayer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Xiang

    Structural, magnetic and magneto-optical properties were investigated experimentally in nanostructured rare earth/Fe (rare earth=Gd, Tb, Dy), Co/Pt and Bi-doped DIG/T (T=Fe, Co, Dy and DIG=Dy-Iron-Garnet) multilayer thin films. In the rare earth/Fe system, it was found that the magnetization reversal could be correlated with the intrinsic magnetic parameters, especially the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. It was found that higher anisotropy leads to magnetization reversal primarily by domain wall motion due to the higher domain wall energy. The coercivities of these multilayers were strongly dependent on the temperature as well as magnetic field sweep rate, and a strong magnetic after effect was observed. These results demonstrate that thermal activation plays an important role in the determination of the coercivity. The coercivity of Co/Pt multilayer thin films increases with increasing total thickness of the film and magnetization reversal behavior was largely by wall motion, independent of thickness. However the magnetic domain structure depends strongly on the total thickness, presumably due to subtle differences in the defect structures which pin domain walls. In agreement with other studies, it was found that magnetic polarization of the Pt atoms contributed significantly to the total magnetization and Kerr rotation at blue wavelength. Amorphous DIG/Fe multilayer films were prepared by magnetron sputtering, and subsequently crystallized by rapid thermal annealing. The resulting films had small grain size (down to 10 nm) so that they are appropriate materials for magneto-optical storage applications. Depending on the Bi composition, Faraday rotation of up to 15 degrees/ μm was observed. Domain wall expansion into maze-like domains dominated the reversal process. The dielectric constant tensors, including the off-diagonal component responsible for magneto-optical activity, are reported for several samples.

  9. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-07-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  10. Magnetic Properties of Friction Stir Processed Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shamiparna; Martinez, Nelson Y.; Das, Santanu; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Grant, Glenn J.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Polikarpov, Evgueni

    2016-03-01

    Of the many existing inspection or monitoring systems, each has its own advantages and drawbacks. These systems are usually comprised of semi-remote sensors that frequently cause difficulty in reaching complex areas of a component. This study proposes to overcome that difficulty by developing embedded functional composites, so that embedding can be achieved in virtually any component part and periodically can be interrogated by a reading device. The "reinforcement rich" processed areas can then be used to record properties such as strain, temperature, and stress state, to name a few, depending on the reinforcement material. Friction stir processing was used to fabricate a magnetostrictive composite by embedding galfenol particles into a nonmagnetic aluminum matrix. The aim was to develop a composite that produces strain in response to a varying magnetic field. Reinforcements were distributed uniformly in the matrix. Magnetization curves were studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer. A simple and cost-effective setup was developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of the composites. Important factors affecting the magnetic properties were identified and the processing route was modified to improve the magnetic response.

  11. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Z. X.; Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G.; Ethier, S.; Gao, C.; Rice, J.

    2015-05-04

    We report that intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. Here we focus on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear (sˆ) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak sˆ . Basedmore » on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak sˆ discharges and that the value of sˆ crit is consistent with the experimental results sˆ expcrit [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. In conclusion, the consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive sˆ .« less

  12. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.; Tynan, G.; Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Diamond, P. H.; Gao, C.; Rice, J.

    2015-05-15

    Intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. This work focuses on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear (s{sup ^}) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak s{sup ^}. Based on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak s{sup ^} discharges and that the value of s{sup ^}{sub crit} is consistent with the experimental results s{sup ^}{sub crit}{sup exp}≈0.2∼0.3 [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. The consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak s{sup ^} and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive s{sup ^}.

  13. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. X.; Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G.; Ethier, S.; Gao, C.; Rice, J.

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. This work focuses on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear ( s ̂ ) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak s ̂ . Based on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak s ̂ discharges and that the value of s ̂ c r i t is consistent with the experimental results ŝ c r i t e x p ≈ 0.2 ˜ 0.3 [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. The consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak s ̂ and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive s ̂ .

  14. Intrinsic torque reversals induced by magnetic shear effects on the turbulence spectrum in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z. X.; Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G.; Ethier, S.; Gao, C.; Rice, J.

    2015-05-04

    We report that intrinsic torque, which can be generated by turbulent stresses, can induce toroidal rotation in a tokamak plasma at rest without direct momentum injection. Reversals in intrinsic torque have been inferred from the observation of toroidal velocity changes in recent lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. Here we focus on understanding the cause of LHCD-induced intrinsic torque reversal using gyrokinetic simulations and theoretical analyses. A new mechanism for the intrinsic torque reversal linked to magnetic shear (sˆ) effects on the turbulence spectrum is identified. This reversal is a consequence of the ballooning structure at weak sˆ . Based on realistic profiles from the Alcator C-Mod LHCD experiments, simulations demonstrate that the intrinsic torque reverses for weak sˆ discharges and that the value of sˆ crit is consistent with the experimental results sˆ expcrit [Rice et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 125003 (2013)]. In conclusion, the consideration of this intrinsic torque feature in our work is important for the understanding of rotation profile generation at weak and its consequent impact on macro-instability stabilization and micro-turbulence reduction, which is crucial for ITER. It is also relevant to internal transport barrier formation at negative or weakly positive sˆ .

  15. Magnetic Properties of CoFe_2O4 and Fe_3O_4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Robert; Chan, T.; Kenning, G. G.; Huang, L.; Yan, Y.

    2002-03-01

    In order to optimize the magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles for use as Magnetic Resonance Imaging contrast agents and other in vivo biological applications, we have synthesized CoFe_2O_4(Liu, C.; Bingsuo, Z.; Rondinone, A.J.; Zhang, Z.J. J. Am. Chem. Soc.) 122, 6263 (2000). and Fe_3O_4(Shen, T.; Weissleder, R.; Papisov, M.; Bogdanov, A.; Brady, T. MRM) 29, 599 (1993). magnetic nanoparticles of sizes 5, 8, and 11nm using water-in-oil reverse micelles. Size was determined using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Magnetic properties were measure from 10K-340K using SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of magnetic field has been performed at approximately body temperature ( ~310K) in order to help us determine the optimal size and composition for in vivo application.

  16. Micromagnetic study of exchange interaction effect on magnetization reversal mode of CoFeAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizah, Umi Muflihatun Nurul; Trihandaru, Suryasatriya; Wibowo, Nur Aji

    2016-02-01

    A magnetization switching dynamics of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material CoFeAl has been simulated. This simulation was conducted using Landau-Lifshift Gilbert equation. The used magnetic parameters are magnetic anisotropy 2.3 × 106 erg/cm3, magnetic saturation 10 kG, medium Gilbert damping 0.3 and various exchange constants in a range of (1.5 - 4.0) × 10-7 erg/cm. CoFeAl is modeled as a parallel-pipe with the dimension is 50 × 50 × 20 nm3. As a result, this simulation predicts that the chosen materials exhibit good thermal stability which is greatly affected by exchange energy. Magnetization reversal mechanism is dominated by domain wall propagation process. Moreover, the simultaneous distribution of thermal with external magnetic field on the materials reduces the writing field which reaches the minimum value when exchange constant is 3.5 × 10-7 erg/cm.

  17. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin–orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin–orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x–y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x–y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  18. Magnetic properties of ordered NiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, P. E.; Franse, J. J. M.

    1988-04-01

    Thermal expansion, forced volume magnetostriction and high magnetic field data are presented on the ordered equiatomic NiPt compound. Values are derived for the magnetovolume parameter κC (≃3 × 10 -6kg2A-2m-4), and for the electronic and lattice Grüneisen parameters (Γ e ≊ 5.6; Γ latt ≊ 2.5) . Ordering effects on the magnetoelastic properties are studied for alloys containing 40-60 at % Ni.

  19. Local and nonlocal anisotropic transport in reversed shear magnetic fields: Shearless Cantori and nondiffusive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazevski, Daniel; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2013-06-01

    A study of anisotropic heat transport in reversed shear (nonmonotonic q-profile) magnetic fields is presented. The approach is based on a recently proposed Lagrangian-Green's function method that allows an efficient and accurate integration of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) heat transport equation. The magnetic field lines are described by a nontwist Hamiltonian system, known to exhibit separatrix reconnection and robust shearless (dq/dr=0) transport barriers. The changes in the magnetic field topology due to separatrix reconnection lead to bifurcations in the equilibrium temperature distribution. For perturbations of moderate amplitudes, magnetic chaos is restricted to bands flanking the shearless region. As a result, the temperature flattens in the chaotic bands and develops a very sharp radial gradient at the shearless region. For perturbations with larger amplitude, shearless Cantori (i.e., critical magnetic surfaces located at the minimum of the q profile) give rise to anomalous temperature relaxation involving widely different time scales. The first stage consists of the relatively fast flattening of the radial temperature profile in the chaotic bands with negligible flux across the shearless region that, for practical purposes, on a short time scale acts as an effective transport barrier despite the lack of magnetic flux surfaces. In the long-time scale, heat starts to flow across the shearless region, albeit at a comparatively low rate. The transport of a narrow temperature pulse centered at the reversed shear region exhibits weak self-similar scaling with non-Gaussian scaling functions indicating that transport at this scale cannot be modeled as a diffusive process with a constant diffusivity. Evidence of nonlocal effective radial transport is provided by the existence of regions with nonzero heat flux and zero temperature gradient. Parametric flux-gradient plots exhibit multivalued loops that question the applicability of the Fourier

  20. Local and nonlocal anisotropic transport in reversed shear magnetic fields: shearless Cantori and nondiffusive transport.

    PubMed

    Blazevski, Daniel; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2013-06-01

    A study of anisotropic heat transport in reversed shear (nonmonotonic q-profile) magnetic fields is presented. The approach is based on a recently proposed Lagrangian-Green's function method that allows an efficient and accurate integration of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) heat transport equation. The magnetic field lines are described by a nontwist Hamiltonian system, known to exhibit separatrix reconnection and robust shearless (dq/dr=0) transport barriers. The changes in the magnetic field topology due to separatrix reconnection lead to bifurcations in the equilibrium temperature distribution. For perturbations of moderate amplitudes, magnetic chaos is restricted to bands flanking the shearless region. As a result, the temperature flattens in the chaotic bands and develops a very sharp radial gradient at the shearless region. For perturbations with larger amplitude, shearless Cantori (i.e., critical magnetic surfaces located at the minimum of the q profile) give rise to anomalous temperature relaxation involving widely different time scales. The first stage consists of the relatively fast flattening of the radial temperature profile in the chaotic bands with negligible flux across the shearless region that, for practical purposes, on a short time scale acts as an effective transport barrier despite the lack of magnetic flux surfaces. In the long-time scale, heat starts to flow across the shearless region, albeit at a comparatively low rate. The transport of a narrow temperature pulse centered at the reversed shear region exhibits weak self-similar scaling with non-Gaussian scaling functions indicating that transport at this scale cannot be modeled as a diffusive process with a constant diffusivity. Evidence of nonlocal effective radial transport is provided by the existence of regions with nonzero heat flux and zero temperature gradient. Parametric flux-gradient plots exhibit multivalued loops that question the applicability of the Fourier

  1. Focusing properties of near-field time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosny, Julien; Fink, Mathias

    2007-12-01

    A time-reversal mirror (TRM) is a plane apparatus that generates the time symmetric of a wave produced by an initial source. Here we look for the conditions to obtain subwavelength focusing when the initial source is in the near field of the TRM and the propagating medium is homogeneous and isotropic. Three variants of TRM are studied: TRM made of monopoles, dipoles, or both of them. The analysis is performed in terms of evanescent and propagative waves. We conclude that only the dipole-TRM leads to subwavelength focusing.

  2. Focusing properties of near-field time reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Rosny, Julien de; Fink, Mathias

    2007-12-15

    A time-reversal mirror (TRM) is a plane apparatus that generates the time symmetric of a wave produced by an initial source. Here we look for the conditions to obtain subwavelength focusing when the initial source is in the near field of the TRM and the propagating medium is homogeneous and isotropic. Three variants of TRM are studied: TRM made of monopoles, dipoles, or both of them. The analysis is performed in terms of evanescent and propagative waves. We conclude that only the dipole-TRM leads to subwavelength focusing.

  3. Capping effect in magnetic properties of Ag ultra-thin films on Co/Pt(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. E.; Su, C. W.; Chen, F. C.; Shern, C. S.; Chen, R. H.

    2002-02-01

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect was used to study the changes of the magnetic property for Ag ultra-thin films deposited on Co/Pt (1 1 1) surface. The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has a significant enhancement when the system is annealed and the Co-Pt alloy is formed. The magnetization disappears at lower temperatures, and appears at higher temperature after 1 ML Ag/1 ML Co/Pt (1 1 1) ultra-thin film was annealed at 710 K. This magnetization is reversible. The thermal energy triggering the motion of the magnetic domain walls is the possible mechanism for the larger magnetization at high temperature.

  4. Shearless bifurcation on symplectic maps of magnetic field lines in tokamaks with reversed current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoloni, B.; Schelin, A. B.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce two-dimensional symplectic maps to describe the Poincaré maps of magnetic field lines in large aspect ratio tokamak equilibria with reversed non-monotonic plasma current density profiles. For these maps, we investigate the effect of the symmetry breaking due to the toroidal correction with a peculiar invariant, namely, a magnetic surface with a null rotation number, enclosing a vanishing current. We find that this rotationless invariant surface is surrounded by many small island chains. Furthermore, near such invariant, the symmetry breaking gives rise to two magnetic shearless invariants surrounded by twin island chains. We also find chaotic lines adjacent to all the observed islands created by the considered structurally unstable equilibria.

  5. Influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization reversal with perpendicular easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hongguang Deng, Ning

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the influence of thermal agitation on the electric field induced precessional magnetization switching probability with perpendicular easy axis by solving the Fokker-Planck equation numerically with finite difference method. The calculated results show that the thermal agitation during the reversal process crucially influences the switching probability. The switching probability can be achieved is only determined by the thermal stability factor Δ of the free layer, it is independent on the device dimension, which is important for the high density device application. Ultra-low error rate down to the order of 10{sup −9} can be achieved for the device of thermal stability factor Δ of 40. Low damping factor α material should be used for the free layer for high reliability device applications. These results exhibit potential of electric field induced precessional magnetization switching with perpendicular easy axis for ultra-low power, high speed and high density magnetic random access memory (MRAM) applications.

  6. Magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite synthesized by the reverse micelle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A.; Gubbala, S.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2004-06-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel ferrite of crystallite size 5-8 nm, synthesized by the reverse micelle technique were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques, and the magnetic behavior studied by superconducting quantum interference device. Nanocrystalline nickel ferrite exhibit a blocking temperature of 16 K. They do not attain saturation magnetization even at a high field of 50 kOe. The lack of saturation in high field occurs in association with high field irreversibility and open loop at 50 kOe. The saturation magnetization at 300 K is 25.4 emu/g and at 2 K is 35.5 emu/g, which is significantly lower than that reported for the multidomain bulk nickel ferrite (55 emu/g). This is discussed in terms of a two-component nanoparticle system consisting of a spin glass-like surface layer of a few atomic layers thick and ferrimagnetically aligned core spins.

  7. Surface induced magnetization reversal of MnP nanoclusters embedded in GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Christian; Lambert-Milot, Samuel; Desjardins, Patrick; Masut, Remo A.; Ménard, David

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the quasi-static magnetic behavior of ensembles of ferromagnetic nanoparticles consisting of MnP nanoclusters embedded in GaP(001) epilayers grown at 600, 650, and 700 °C. We use a phenomenological model, in which surface effects are included, to reproduce the experimental hysteresis curves measured as a function of temperature (120-260 K) and direction of the applied field. The slope of the hysteresis curve during magnetization reversal is determined by the MnP nanoclusters size distribution, which is a function of the growth temperature. Our results show that the coercive field is very sensitive to the strength of the surface anisotropy, which reduces the energy barrier between the two states of opposite magnetization. Notably, this reduction in the energy barrier increases by a factor of 3 as the sample temperature is lowered from 260 to 120 K.

  8. Time-Resolved AMR measurements of current induced magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Kelly, D.; Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    2001-03-01

    Time-resolved detection of the magnetization switching in static magnetic fields was achieved by pulsing current densities of about 107 A/cm2 in single isolated Nickel nanowires (80nm in diameter, 6000 nm in length, electrodeposited in porous membranes), using a Weathstone bridge of a 1GHz bandwidth. This irreversible transition is found to occur in a time of about 10 ns. The time of switching within the pulse, tsw, is measured as a function of applied field and current. The temperature rise due to Joule heating is deduced from the change in resistance. The entire set of data tsw(H,T) are fitted with a simple activation law, with the energy barrier height as the unique fitting parameter. The results show a strong departure from pure thermal activation indicating a current-induced magnetization reversal.

  9. Switching probabilities of magnetic vortex core reversal studied by table top magneto optic Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterle, G.; Gangwar, A.; Gräfe, J.; Noske, M.; Förster, J.; Woltersdorf, G.; Stoll, H.; Back, C. H.; Schütz, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied vortex core reversal in a single submicron Permalloy disk by polar Kerr microscopy. A sophisticated lock-in-technique based on repetitive switching of the magnetic vortex core and a continuous calibration allows for a reliable determination of the switching probability. This highly sensitive method facilitates the detection of a change in the magnetic moment of the tiny magnetic vortex core which is about 1.5 × 10-17 A m2. We have investigated vortex core switching caused by excitation of the vortex core gyromode with varying frequencies and amplitudes. The frequency range in which switching occurs was found to broaden with increasing excitation amplitude, whereby the highest frequency in this range shifts stronger to higher frequencies than the lowest frequency to lower frequencies. The experimental results are in good agreement with micromagnetic simulations.

  10. Magnetostatic interaction in soft magnetic bilayer ribbons unambiguously identified by first-order reversal curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, M.; Martínez-García, J. C.; Škorvánek, I.; Marcin, J.; Švec, P.; Gorria, P.

    2015-09-01

    Monolithic amorphous Fe73.5Nb3Si13.5B9Cu1/Fe74.5Nb3Si13.5B9 bilayer ribbons were obtained by double-nozzle melt-spinning and subsequently annealed to produce a composite with a tailored nano/micro-crystalline structure. The overall magnetic behavior is characterized by butterfly-shaped high field hysteresis loops and positively biased low field ones. The main questions we wish to address here are whether the global magnetic behavior of the bilayer can be separated into the individual contributions of each layer and the magneto-coupling between them can be well understood. For that purpose, we performed first-order reversal curve analysis, which enabled us to distinctly identify two phases, of ultra-soft and semi-soft magnetic natures, whose mutual predominant interaction is the magnetostatic coupling.

  11. Size-dependent reversal of grains in perpendicular magnetic recording media measured by small-angle polarized neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, S. J.; Thomson, T.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Takano, K.; Venkataramana, V.; Ray, S. J.; Wismayer, M. P.; de Vries, M. A.; Do, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Lee, S. L.

    2010-09-01

    Polarized small-angle neutron scattering has been used to measure the magnetic structure of a CoCrPt-SiOx thin-film data storage layer, contained within a writable perpendicular recording media, at granular (<10 nm) length scales. The magnetic contribution to the scattering is measured as the magnetization is reversed by an external field, providing unique spatial information on the switching process. A simple model of noninteracting nanomagnetic grains provides a good description of the data and an analysis of the grain-size dependent reversal provides strong evidence for an increase in magnetic anisotropy with grain diameter.

  12. Reversible electrical properties of LEC GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, D. C.; Theis, W. M.; Yu, P. W.; Sizelove, J. R.; Ford, W.; Mathur, G.

    1987-01-01

    Undoped, low-pressure, liquid-encapsulated Czochralski GaAs can be reversibly changed from conducting ( ρ ˜ 1Ω-cm) to semi-insulating ( ρ ˜ 107Ω-cm) by either slow or fast cooling, respectively, after a 5 hr, 950° C soak in an evacuated quartz ampoule. The semi-insulating wafers are very uniform and lead to tight threshold-voltage control in direct-implant MESFET’s. We have studied crystals in both states by temperature-dependent Hall effect, photoluminescence, IR absorption, mass spectroscopy, and DLTS. It is shown that donor and acceptor concentrations are typically more than an order of magnitude greater than the C and Si concentrations, which are both less than 3 × 1014 cm-3. The EL2 concentration remains relatively constant at about 1.0 × 1016 cm-3. Thus, the normal EL2-Si-C compensation model does not apply. The most likely explanation for the reversibility involves a delicate balance between native-defect donors and acceptors in equilibrium at 950° C, but with the donors dominating after a slow cool, and the acceptors after a fast cool. A consistent model includes a dominant donor at Ec 0.13eV, probably VAs AsGa, and a dominant acceptor at Ev + 0.07eV, probably VGa GaAs. In this model, vacancy motion is very important during the slow cool. Such processes must be strongly considered in the growth of bulk, high-purity GaAs.

  13. Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal in perpendicular [Co/Ni]N/TbCo composite structures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M. H.; Zhang, Zongzhi; Tian, S. Y.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal characteristics in the perpendicular heterostructures consisting of an amorphous ferrimagnetic (FI) TbxCo100–x alloy layer exchange-coupled with a ferromagnetic (FM) [Co/Ni]N multilayer have been investigated. As compared with pure TbxCo100–x alloy, the magnetization compensation composition of the heterostructures shift to a higher Tb content, implying Co/Ni also serves to compensate the Tb moment in TbCo layer. The net magnetization switching field Hc⊥ and interlayer interfacial coupling field Hex, are not only sensitive to the magnetization and thickness of the switched TbxCo100–x or [Co/Ni]N layer, but also to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy strength of the pinning layer. By tuning the layer structure we achieve simultaneously both large Hc⊥ = 1.31 T and Hex = 2.19 T. These results, in addition to the fundamental interest, are important to understanding of the interfacial coupling interaction in the FM/FI heterostructures, which could offer the guiding of potential applications in heat-assisted magnetic recording or all-optical switching recording technique. PMID:26074295

  14. Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal in perpendicular [Co/Ni]N/TbCo composite structures.

    PubMed

    Tang, M H; Zhang, Zongzhi; Tian, S Y; Wang, J; Ma, B; Jin, Q Y

    2015-01-01

    Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal characteristics in the perpendicular heterostructures consisting of an amorphous ferrimagnetic (FI) TbxCo(100-x) alloy layer exchange-coupled with a ferromagnetic (FM) [Co/Ni]N multilayer have been investigated. As compared with pure TbxCo(100-x) alloy, the magnetization compensation composition of the heterostructures shift to a higher Tb content, implying Co/Ni also serves to compensate the Tb moment in TbCo layer. The net magnetization switching field Hc⊥ and interlayer interfacial coupling field Hex, are not only sensitive to the magnetization and thickness of the switched TbxCo(100-x) or [Co/Ni]N layer, but also to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy strength of the pinning layer. By tuning the layer structure we achieve simultaneously both large Hc⊥ = 1.31 T and Hex = 2.19 T. These results, in addition to the fundamental interest, are important to understanding of the interfacial coupling interaction in the FM/FI heterostructures, which could offer the guiding of potential applications in heat-assisted magnetic recording or all-optical switching recording technique. PMID:26074295

  15. Magnetization reversal in individual Py and CoFeB nanotubes locally probed via anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertl, K.; Heimbach, F.; Maendl, S.; Rueffer, D.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.

    2016-03-01

    Using anisotropic magnetoresistance in a multi-probe configuration and local heating with a scanning laser, we investigate the magnetization reversal of individual permalloy (Py) and CoFeB nanotubes with spatial resolution. Nanocrystalline Py and amorphous CoFeB nanotubes are found to reverse via domain wall movement and chirality switching, respectively. Our experiments provide an understanding of the role of microstructure and magnetic anisotropy in the switching of ferromagnetic nanotubes at room temperature.

  16. Reverse shock emission driven by post-merger millisecond magnetar winds: Effects of the magnetization parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. D.; Wang, L. J.; Dai, Z. G.

    2016-08-01

    The study of short-duration gamma-ray bursts provides growing evidence that a good fraction of double neutron star mergers lead to the formation of stable millisecond magnetars. The launch of Poynting flux by the millisecond magnetars could leave distinct electromagnetic signatures that reveal the energy dissipation processes in the magnetar wind. In previous studies, we assume that the magnetar wind becomes completely lepton-dominated so that electrons/positrons in the magnetar wind are accelerated by a diffusive shock. However, theoretical modeling of pulsar wind nebulae shows that in many cases the magnetic field energy in the pulsar wind may be strong enough to suppress diffusive shock acceleration. In this paper, we investigate the reverse shock emission and the forward shock emission with an arbitrary magnetization parameter σ of a magnetar wind. We find that the reverse shock emission strongly depends on σ, and in particular that σ ~ 0.3 leads to the strongest reverse shock emission. Future observations would be helpful to diagnose the composition of the magnetar wind.

  17. Simulations of magnetic reversal in continuously distorted artificial spin ice lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Barry; Bhat, Vinayak; Woods, Justin; Hastings, J. Todd; de Long, Lance

    2014-03-01

    Artificial spin ice (ASI) systems consist of lithographically patterned ferromagnetic segments that behave as Ising spins. The honeycomb lattice is an ASI analogue of the Kagomé spin ice lattice found in bulk pyrochlore crystals. We have developed a method to continuously distort the honeycomb lattice such that the pattern vertex spacings follow a Fibonacci chain sequence. The distortions break the rotational symmetry of the honeycomb lattice and alter the segment orientations and lengths such that all vertices retain three-fold coordination, but are no longer equivalent. We have performed micromagnetic simulations (OOMMF) of magnetization reversal for many samples having different strengths of distortion, and found the kinetics of magnetic reversal to be dramatically slowed, and avalanches (sequential switching of neighboring segments) shortened by only small deviations from perfect honeycomb symmetry. The coercivity increases as the distortion is strengthened, which is consistent with the retarded reversal. Research supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45653 and NSF Grant EPS-0814194.

  18. Explicit time-reversible orbit integration in Particle In Cell codes with static homogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacchini, L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2009-04-01

    A new explicit time-reversible orbit integrator for the equations of motion in a static homogeneous magnetic field - called Cyclotronic integrator - is presented. Like Spreiter and Walter's Taylor expansion algorithm, for sufficiently weak electric field gradients this second order method does not require a fine resolution of the Larmor motion; it has however the essential advantage of being symplectic, hence time-reversible. The Cyclotronic integrator is only subject to a linear stability constraint ( ΩΔ t < π, Ω being the Larmor angular frequency), and is therefore particularly suitable to electrostatic Particle In Cell codes with uniform magnetic field where Ω is larger than any other characteristic frequency, yet a resolution of the particles' gyromotion is required. Application examples and a detailed comparison with the well-known (time-reversible) Boris algorithm are presented; it is in particular shown that implementation of the Cyclotronic integrator in the kinetic codes SCEPTIC and Democritus can reduce the cost of orbit integration by up to a factor of ten.

  19. Rock-magnetic properties of multicomponent natural remanent magnetization in alluvial red beds (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiver, Pauline P.; Langereis, Cor G.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Krijgsman, Wout

    2003-05-01

    An earlier study of the cyclic Miocene red bed sequence of La Gloria (Spain) by Krijgsman et al. indicated complicated behaviour of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) in parts of the section, particularly close to reversal boundaries. We resampled part of the section with high resolution and used extensive rock-magnetic analyses to characterize the magnetic remanence carriers. Below a conspicuous hydromorphous layer, the magnetic contributions of haematite and magnetite are approximately equal, while in the brown layers on top of the hydromorphous layer the contribution of magnetite is drastically reduced. This is probably related to a change in hydrological conditions. The NRM is characterized by: (1) a low-temperature (200-360 °C) overprint of unknown age, (2) a medium-temperature (360-580 °C) component, interpreted as the characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM); and (3) a high-temperature haematite component (600- 680 °C), carrying the same directions as the medium-temperature component. There is no perceivable delay in NRM acquisition between the medium- and the high-temperature components; they are both regarded as primary. The behaviour of the NRM seems to be similar in the cyclic lithologies. The acquisition of NRM thus seems to be independent of lithology in the cyclic part of the section. The higher sampling resolution yielded the detection of a new polarity zone, which probably represents a geomagnetic feature according to rock-magnetic properties. However, the more detailed magnetostratigraphy of the resampled part of the section indicates that the earlier correlation to the geomagnetic polarity timescale is no longer tenable. Therefore, the La Gloria section should no longer be used as a magnetostratigraphic dating tool of mammal biochronology.

  20. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers synthesized by surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization for the enrichment and determination of synthetic estrogens in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Minjun; Kong, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers have attracted significant interest because of their multifunctionality of selective recognition of target molecules and rapid magnetic response. In this contribution, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized via surface-initiated reversible addition addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using diethylstilbestrol as the template for the enrichment of synthetic estrogens. The uniform imprinted surface layer and the magnetic property of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers favored a fast binding kinetics and rapid analysis of target molecules. The static and selective binding experiments demonstrated a desirable adsorption capacity and good selectivity of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in comparison to magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers. Accordingly, a corresponding analytical method was developed in which magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were employed as magnetic solid-phase extraction materials for the concentration and determination of four synthetic estrogens (diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, dienestrol, and bisphenol A) in fish pond water. The recoveries of these synthetic estrogens in spiked fish pond water samples ranged from 61.2 to 99.1% with a relative standard deviation of lower than 6.3%. This study provides a versatile approach to prepare well-defined magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers sorbents for the analysis of synthetic estrogens in water solution. PMID:25989155

  1. Stable, polymer-directed and SPION-nucleated magnetic amphiphilic block copolymer nanoprecipitates with readily reversible assembly in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Marco; Hatton, Fiona L; Slater, Rebecca A; Chambon, Pierre; North, Jocelyn; Peacock, Anita K; He, Tao; McDonald, Tom O; Owen, Andrew; Rannard, Steve P

    2016-03-24

    The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications. PMID:26973155

  2. Magnetic properties of nano-composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xia

    Chemical synthesis routes for hollow spherical BaFe12O 19, hollow mesoporous spherical BaFe12O19, worm-shape BaFe12O19 and FeCo particles were developed. These structured particles have great potentials for the applications including magnetic recording medium, catalyst support, and energy storage. Magnetically exchange coupled hard/soft SrFe12O19/FeCo and MnBi/FeCo composites were synthesized through a newly proposed process of magnetic self-assembly. These exchange coupled composites can be potentially used as rare-earth free permanent magnets. Hollow spherical BaFe12O19 particles (shell thickness ˜5 nm) were synthesized from eth-ylene glycol assisted spray pyrolysis. Hollow mesoporous spherical BaFe12O19 particles (shell thickness ˜100 nm) were synthesized from ethanol assisted spray pyrolysis, followed by alkaline ethylene glycol etching at 185 °C. An alpha-Fe2O3 and BaCO3 nanoparticle mixture was synthesized with reverse microemulsion, followed by annealing at 900 °C for 2 hours to get worm-shape BaFe 12O19 particles, which consisted of 3-7 stacked hexagonal plates. FeCo nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing FeCl2 and CoCl2 in diphenyl ether with n-butyllithium at 200 °C in an inert gas environment. The surfactant of oleic acid was used in the synthesis to make particles well dispersed in nonpolar solvents (such as hexane). SrFe12O19/FeCo core/shell particles were prepared through a magnetic self-assembly process. The as-synthesized soft FeCo nanoparticles were magnetically attracted by hard SrFe12O19 parti-cles, forming a SrFe12O19/FeCo core/shell structure. The magnetic self-assembly mechanism was confirmed by applying alternating-current demagnetization to the core/shell particles, which re-sulted in a separation of SrFe 12O19 and FeCo particles. MnBi/FeCo composites were synthesized, and the exchange coupling between MnBi and FeCo phases was demonstrated by smooth magnetic hysteresis loop of MnBi/FeCo composites. The thermal stability of Mn

  3. Correlation Between Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Before and After Reversion of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargas, Gemma; Zapata, Ana; Roa, Joan Josep; Sapezanskaia, Ina; Mateo, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Reversion treatments are a way to improve the mechanical response of metastable austenitic stainless steels by means of grain refinement. To effectively apply those treatments, the steel must be previously deformed to induce a significant amount of martensitic transformation. In this work, the effect of reversion treatments was studied on a commercial AISI 301LN grade subjected to an industrial cold rolling process, with thickness reductions not higher than 40 pct. Microstructural changes and evolution of both monotonic and cyclic mechanical properties were investigated after cold rolling and upon reversion treatments. Results revealed that the finer austenitic microstructure obtained after reversion leads to an interesting combination of properties, with strong increments in hardness and yield strength, and also fatigue limit improvement, as compared to the initial annealed condition.

  4. Tin dioxide nanoparticles: Reverse micellar synthesis and gas sensing properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Vaidya, Sonalika; Ahmad, Tokeer; Sujatha Devi, P.; Das, Dipankar; Ganguli, Ashok K.

    2008-02-05

    Tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been synthesized by reverse micellar route using cetyltrimethyl ammoniumbromide (CTAB) as the surfactant. Monophasic tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) was obtained using NaOH as the precipitation agent at 60 deg. C, however, when liquor NH{sub 3} was used as precipitating agent then crystalline SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles are obtained at 500 deg. C. SnO{sub 2} prepared using NaOH show crystallite size of 4 and 12 nm after heating at 60 and 500 deg. C respectively using X-ray line broadening studies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show agglomerated particles of sizes 70 and 150 nm, respectively. The grain size was found to be 6-8 nm after heating the precursor obtained (using liquor NH{sub 3}) at 500 deg. C by X-ray line broadening and the TEM studies. Dynamic light-scattering (DLS) studies show the aggregates of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with uniform size distribution. Moessbauer studies show an increase of s-electron density at the Sn sites compared to bulk SnO{sub 2} and a finite quadrupole splitting indicative of lowering of symmetry around tin atoms. The gas sensing characteristics have also been investigated using n-butane which show high sensitivity and fast recovery time.

  5. Electron solvation in aqueous reverse micelles: Equilibrium properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laria, Daniel; Kapral, Raymond

    2002-10-01

    Microscopic aspects of electron solvation in aqueous reverse micelles are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Two micelle sizes, with water/surfactant ratios of 3 and 7.5, are examined. The electron is treated quantum mechanically using Feynman path integral methods while the water, surfactant head groups, and counter ions are treated classically. Through computations of the free energy as a function of the radial distance, the electron is found to be preferentially solvated in the interior of the micelle in the "bulk" water pool. For small micelles, the presence of the electron leads to a depletion of water in the central region of the micelle and thus strongly disrupts the water equilibrium structure. Contact and solvent-separated ion pairs between the electron and Na+ counter ions are found to play an important role in the equilibrium structure. For the two micelle sizes investigated, the most stable solvation structures correspond to contact ion pairs. The localization of the electronic charge distribution is found to increase with micelle size, signaling more efficient solvation in larger micelles.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation for thermal assisted reversal process of micro-magnetic torus ring with bistable closure domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kenichi; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for temperature dependences of closure domain parameter for a magnetic micro-torus ring cluster under magnetic field on limited temperature regions. Simulation results show that magnetic field on tiny limited temperature region can reverse magnetic closure domain structures when the magnetic field is applied at a threshold temperature corresponding to intensity of applied magnetic field. This is one of thermally assisted switching phenomena through a self-organization process. The results show the way to find non-wasteful pairs between intensity of magnetic field and temperature region for reversing closure domain structure by temperature dependence of the fluctuation of closure domain parameter. Monte Carlo method for this simulation is very valuable to optimize the design of thermally assisted switching devices.

  7. Properties of GRB Lightcurves from Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Granot, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism within Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) outflows, driving their extremely luminous prompt γ-ray emission is still uncertain. The leading candidates are internal shocks and magnetic reconnection. While the emission from internal shocks has been extensively studied, that from reconnection still has few quantitative predictions. We study the expected prompt-GRB emission from magnetic reconnection and compare its temporal and spectral properties to observations. The main difference from internal shocks is that for reconnection one expects relativistic bulk motions with Lorentz factors Γ' ≳ a few in the jet's bulk frame. We consider such motions of the emitting material in two anti-parallel directions (e.g. of the reconnecting magnetic-field lines) within an ultra-relativistic (with Γ ≫ 1) thin spherical reconnection layer. The emission's relativistic beaming in the jet's frame greatly affects the light-curves. For emission at radii R0 < R < R0 + ΔR (with Γ = const) the observed pulse width is ΔT ˜ (R0/2cΓ2) max (1/Γ', ΔR/R0), i.e. up to ˜Γ' times shorter than for isotropic emission in the jet's frame. We consider two possible magnetic reconnection modes: a quasi steady-state with continuous plasma flow into and out of the reconnection layer, and sporadic reconnection in relativistic turbulence that produces relativistic plasmoids. Both of these modes can account for many observed prompt-GRB properties: variability, pulse asymmetry, the very rapid declines at their end and pulse evolutions that are either hard to soft (for Γ' ≲ 2) or intensity tracking (for Γ' > 2). However, only the relativistic turbulence mode can naturally account also for the following correlations: luminosity-variability, peak luminosity - peak frequency and pulse width energy dependence / spectral lags.

  8. Stable, polymer-directed and SPION-nucleated magnetic amphiphilic block copolymer nanoprecipitates with readily reversible assembly in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardiello, Marco; Hatton, Fiona L.; Slater, Rebecca A.; Chambon, Pierre; North, Jocelyn; Peacock, Anita K.; He, Tao; McDonald, Tom O.; Owen, Andrew; Rannard, Steve P.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications.The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental details, NMR spectra, GPC chromatograms, kinetics experiments, graphs of nanopreciptate aggregation and cycling studies and SPION characterisation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00788k

  9. Polarity Reversal of the Solar Photospheric Magnetic Field During Activity Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-06-01

    The large-scale solar magnetic field reverses its polarity during the maximum phase of each activity cycle. As observed on the photosphere, active region (AR) magnetic flux migrates poleward in narrow, sheared streams resulted from large-scale flows and diffusion. A small net flux of the trailing sunspot polarity eventually aggregates at high latitudes, manifesting the poloidal field of the next cycle. We characterize this process for the ongoing cycle 24 based on four years' line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The axial dipole component reversed sign in early 2012, but the poleward flux migration was grossly out of phase in the two hemispheres. As a proxy, the northern polar field (taken as mean above 70 degrees latitude) switched from negative to positive in late 2012, whereas the southern remained positive as of March 2014. Three factors that are in line with the surface flux transport model may have contributed. First, AR emergence started and peaked earlier in the north. Second, several ARs with small or inverse tilt angles (w.r.t. the Joy's law) emerged in the south in late 2010. Third, meridional flow speed inferred from helioseismology varied greatly prior to 2013; slower streams (compared to a three-year mean at the same latitude) appeared earlier in the north. We correlate HMI with the long-running Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) dataset, and compare the current cycle with the previous three.

  10. Magnetization reversal and exchange bias effects in hard/soft ferromagnetic bilayers with orthogonal anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, D.; Torrejon, J.; Béron, F.; Redondo, C.; Batallan, F.; Toperverg, B. P.; Devishvili, A.; Sierra, B.; Castaño, F.; Pirota, K. R.; Ross, C. A.

    2012-11-01

    The magnetization reversal processes are discussed for exchange-coupled ferromagnetic hard/soft bilayers made from Co0.66Cr0.22Pt0.12 (10 and 20 nm)/Ni (from 0 to 40 nm) films with out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic easy axes respectively, based on room temperature hysteresis loops and first-order reversal curve analysis. On increasing the Ni layer thicknesses, the easy axis of the bilayer reorients from out-of-plane to in-plane. An exchange bias effect, consisting of a shift of the in-plane minor hysteresis loops along the field axis, was observed at room temperature after in-plane saturation. This effect was associated with specific ferromagnetic domain configurations experimentally determined by polarized neutron reflectivity. On the other hand, perpendicular exchange bias effect was revealed from the out-of-plane hysteresis loops and it was attributed to residual domains in the magnetically hard layer.

  11. Magnetization reversal and dynamics in non-interacting NiFe mesoscopic ring arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, M.; Husale, S.; Varandani, D.; Gupta, A.; Senguttuvan, T. D.; Mehta, B. R.; Budhani, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of magnetization (M) reversal and relaxation as a function of temperature (T) are reported in three non-interacting NiFe ring arrays having fixed ring outer diameter and varying widths. Additionally, the dependence of M(H) loop on the angle (θ) between magnetic field (H) and the plane of the rings is addressed. The M(H) loops show a double step transition from onion state (OS) to vortex state (VS) at all temperatures (T = 3 to 300 K) and angles (θ = 0 to 90°). The critical reversal fields HC1 (OS to VS) and HC2 (VS to OS) show a pronounced dependence on T, ring width, and θ. Estimation of the transverse and vortex domain wall energies reveals that the latter is favored in the OS. The OS is also the remanent state in the smallest rings and decays with the effective energy scale (U0/T) of 50 and 32 meV/K at 10 and 300 K, respectively. The robust in-plane anisotropy of magnetization of ring assemblies is established by scaling the M(H) with θ.

  12. The radial electric field in a tokamak with reversed magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Horton, W.; Sugama, H.

    1999-06-01

    Neoclassical theory with the impurity rotational velocity is used to evaluate the radial electric field, Er, in a tokamak. The result of using the complete matrix method for the deuterium-carbon plasma is compared with a reduced analytic formula for determining Er [Ernst et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 665 (1998)]. The analytic formula is shown to overestimate the Er magnitude and its gradient. Two transport measures of the effect of the Er shear are compared for the reversed shear and enhanced reversed shear discharges in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Mazzucato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3145 (1996)]. It is shown that the combined Er and magnetic shear measure, Υs, from linear stability theory gives a higher correlation with the observed transition between the two discharges than the vorticity measure ωs from Er shear alone.

  13. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in palaeomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a 2 yr long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first-order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multidomain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first-order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  14. Magnetic properties of iron minerals produced by natural iron- and manganese-reducing groundwater bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrajevitch, Alexandra; Kondratyeva, Lubov M.; Golubeva, Evgeniya M.; Kodama, Kazuto; Hori, Rie S.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the contribution of biogenic magnetic particles into sedimentary assemblages is a current challenge in paleomagnetism. It has been demonstrated recently that magnetic particles produced through biologically controlled mineralization processes, such as magnetosomes from magnetotactic bacteria, contribute to the recording of natural remanent magnetization in marine and lacustrian sediments. Contributions from other, biologically induced, mineralization types, which are known from multiple laboratory experiments to include magnetic minerals, remain largely unknown. Here, we report magnetic properties of iron minerals formed by a community of iron- and manganese-reducing bacteria isolated from a natural groundwater deposit during a two year long incubation experiment. The main iron phases of the biomineralized mass are lepidocrocite, goethite and magnetite, each of which has environmental significance. Unlike the majority of the previous studies that reported superparamagnetic grain size, and thus no remanence carrying capacity of biologically induced magnetite, hysteresis and first order reversal curves measurements in our study have not detected significant superparamagnetic contribution. The biomineralized mass, instead, contains a mixture of single-domain to pseudo-single-domain and multi-domain magnetite particles that are capable of carrying a stable chemical remanent magnetization. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition parameters and first order reversal curves signatures of the biomineralized samples deviate from previously proposed criteria for the distinction of extracellular (biologically induced) magnetic particles in mixtures. Given its potential significance as a carrier of natural remanent magnetization, environmental requirements, distribution in nature and the efficiency in the geomagnetic field recording by biologically induced mineralization need comprehensive investigation.

  15. Surface-imprinted magnetic particles for highly selective sulfonamides recognition prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xia; Pan, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liang; Wang, Sicen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) were prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using sulfamerazine as the template. With the controlled/living property of RAFT polymerization, the resulting MMIPs showed high selectivity for sulfonamides recognition. The MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The static and selectivity binding experiments demonstrated the desirable adsorption capacity and high selectivity of the MMIPs. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four sulfonamides from aqueous solution. The recoveries of the spiked pond water ranged from 61.2 to 94.1% with RSD lower than 6.5%. This work demonstrated a versatile approach for the preparation of well-constructed MMIPs for application in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26637219

  16. Nature of magnetization reversal in exchange-coupled polycrystalline NiO-Co bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Harsh Deep; Yang, David X.; Chen, P. J.; Brown, H. J.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Egelhoff, W. F.

    2000-06-01

    The nature of magnetization reversal in exchange-coupled NiO-Co polycrystalline bilayers was investigated. As-deposited bilayers exhibit a moderate value of exchange bias HE (=-0.9 mT) and a significantly enhanced coercivity (HNiO-Coc=12.4 mT), which is roughly 5 times the coercivity of a reference Co single film (HCoc=2.7 mT). Real time investigation of magnetization reversal in exchange-coupled NiO-Co bilayers shows that reversal is highly local and nonuniform in nature. It is preceded by the formation of precursors or embryos of reversed domains as the applied field reaches a critical value ≅8.8-9.0 mT. Once this critical applied field value is reached, numerous reversed domains are formed. Growths of such reversed domains occur primarily by the abrupt nucleation and the subsequent coalescence together of reversed domains; wall motion is not the dominant growth mode. Clear evidence is presented which shows that the strength of exchange bias varies at the microscopic scale across the sample. This manifests itself as different microscopic regions switching abruptly at different fields, and a given microscopic area switching at different fields in the positive and negative field directions. When the applied field is along the unidirectional anisotropy, reversal of a given strongly coupled microscopic region is aided by exchange bias, and such a region switches first; the same region undergoes reversal last when the polarity of the applied field is changed to oppose unidirectional anisotropy. Significantly, it was found that, locally, the measured value of exchange bias may vary by a factor of 3 or more from the macroscopically measured value of HE (=-0.9 mT) obtained from the shift of the M-H loop. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) shows that that the local variation in HE may be explained by considering the underlying microstructure and interfacial topography of the NiO-Co interface. HRTEM results show that the NiO surface parallel to the

  17. Effects of terbium sulfide addition on magnetic properties, microstructure and thermal stability of sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-Bin, Li; Shuo, Liu; Xue-Jing, Cao; Bei-Bei, Zhou; Ling, Chen; A-Ru, Yan; Gao-Lin, Yan

    2016-07-01

    To increase coercivity and thermal stability of sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets for high-temperature applications, a novel terbium sulfide powder is added into (Pr0.25Nd0.75)30.6Cu0.15FebalB1 (wt.%) basic magnets. The effects of the addition of terbium sulfide on magnetic properties, microstructure, and thermal stability of sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets are investigated. The experimental results show that by adding 3 wt.% Tb2S3, the coercivity of the magnet is remarkably increased by about 54% without a considerable reduction in remanence and maximum energy product. By means of the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) technology, it is observed that Tb is mainly present in the outer region of 2:14:1 matrix grains and forms a well-developed Tb-shell phase, resulting in enhancement of H A, which accounts for the coercivity enhancement. Moreover, compared with Tb2S3-free magnets, the reversible temperature coefficients of remanence (α) and coercivity (β) and the irreversible flux loss of magnetic flow (h irr) values of Tb2S3-added magnets are improved, indicating that the thermal stability of the magnets is also effectively improved. Project supported by the Science Funds from the Ministry of Science and Technology, China (Grant Nos. 2014DFB50130 and 2011CB612304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51172168 and 51072139).

  18. Punching Deterioration Mechanism of Magnetic Properties of Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaido, Chikara; Mogi, Hisashi; Fujikura, Masahiro; Yamasaki, Jiro

    This paper discusses the deterioration mechanism of magnetic properties of cores due to punching and proposes the modeling, as the best design of motors, considering manufacturing motors, is important in order to improve the high performance of motors corresponding to energy saving. In producing motors, magnetic cores with laminated steel sheets are made of punched sheets, and then the magnetic properties of steel sheets are deteriorated by plastic deformation and the induced residual stress due to punching. In this paper, the punching deterioration mechanism is investigated by observing magnetic domains at steel surfaces near sheared parts. Tensile and compressive stresses induced at cut steel edges deteriorate the magnetic properties of punched steel sheets in high flux densities as the compression deterioration is stronger than the tension improvement, and improve permeabilities at low magnetic field because the increases in permeabilities with tensile stresses are emphasized. Therefore, it is necessary to model the magnetic properties of motor magnetic cores, taking account of these magnetic phenomena.

  19. Plasma edge transport with magnetic islands—a comparison between tokamak and reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaccio, G.; Schmitz, O.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Frerichs, H.; Agostini, M.; Scarin, P.; Spizzo, G.; Vianello, N.; White, R. B.

    2014-06-01

    In the reversed-field pinch (RFP) edge, measured transport and flows are strongly influenced by magnetic islands (Vianello 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073025). In fact, these islands determine a differential radial diffusion of electrons and ions which, interacting with the wall, give rise to a characteristic edge ambipolar potential. Such island structures also arise in tokamak plasmas, when resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied for control of edge-localized modes. They impose a characteristic modulation to edge electron density and temperature fields, in close correlation with the local magnetic vacuum topology (Schmitz 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 054001). In order to develop a generic picture of particle transport with magnetic islands located in the plasma edge between RFPs and tokamaks with RMP, test-particle transport simulations are done on TEXTOR with the same tool used in RFX-mod, namely, the guiding-centre code ORBIT (White and Chance 1984 Phys. Fluids 27 2455-67). A typical TEXTOR discharge in the (m, n) = (12, 4) configuration is reconstructed and analysed with ORBIT. We use Poincaré and connection length analysis of electrons and ion orbits to analyse the magnetic structure taking into account the different gyro-orbits of both constituents. Density distributions of test ions and electrons are calculated and used to obtain an initial estimate of the plasma potential and radial electric field around the island.

  20. Ergodic properties and thermodynamic behavior of elementary reversible cellular automata. I. Basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Takesue, Shinji )

    1989-08-01

    This is the first part of a series devoted to the study of thermodynamic behavior of large dynamical systems with the use of a family of full-discrete and conservative models named elementary reversible cellular automata (ERCAs). In this paper, basic properties such as conservation laws and phase space structure are investigated in preparation for the later studies. ERCAs are a family of one-dimensional reversible cellular automata having two Boolean variables on each site. Reflection and Boolean conjugation symmetries divide them into 88 equivalence classes. For each rule, additive conserved quantities written in a certain form are regarded as a kind of energy, if they exist. By the aid of the discreteness of the variables, every ERCA satisfies the Liouville theorem or the preservation of phase space volume. Thus, if an energy exists in the above sense, statistical mechanics of the model can formally be constructed. If a locally defined quantity is conserved, however, it prevents the realization of statistical mechanics. The existence of such a quantity is examined for each class and a number of rules which have at least one energy but no local conservation laws are selected as hopeful candidates for the realization of thermodynamic behavior. In addition, the phase space structure of ERCAs is analyzed by enumerating cycles exactly in the phase space for systems of comparatively small sizes. As a result, it is revealed that a finite ERCA is not ergodic, that is, a large number of orbits coexist on an energy surface. It is argued that this fact does not necessarily mean the failure of thermodynamic behavior on the basis of an analogy with the ergodic nature of infinite systems.

  1. Reversible and Nonvolatile Modulations of Magnetization Switching Characteristic and Domain Configuration in L10-FePt Films via Nonelectrically Controlled Strain Engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun; Zhao, Jiancheng; Yang, Feng; Hao, Shijie; Gong, Kui; Hu, Di; Cao, Yi; Jiang, Xumin; Wang, Zhongqiang; Chen, Lei; Li, Sirui; Sun, Li; Cui, Lishan; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-03-23

    Reversible and nonvolatile modulation of magnetization switching characteristic in ferromagnetic materials is crucial in developing spintronic devices with low power consumption. It is recently discovered that strain engineering can be an active and effective approach in tuning the magnetic/transport properties of thin films. The primary method in strain modulation is via the converse piezoelectric effect of ferroelectrics, which is usually volatile due to the reliance of the required electric field. Also the maximum amount of deformation in ferroelectrics is usually limited to be less than 1%, and the corresponding magnetoelastic strain energy introduced to ferromagnetic films is on the order of 10(4) J/m(3), not enough to overcome magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (Ku) in many materials. Different from using conventional strain inducing substrates, this paper reports on the significantly large, reversible, and nonvolatile lattice strain in the L10-FePt films (up to 2.18%) using nonelectrically controlled shape memory alloy substrates. Introduced lattice strain can be large enough to effectively affect domain structure and magnetic reversal in FePt. A noticeable decrease of coercivity field by 80% is observed. Moreover, the coercivity field tunability using such substrates is nonvolatile at room temperature and is also reversible due to the characteristics of the shape memory effect. This finding provides an efficient avenue for developing strain assisted spintronic devices such as logic memory device, magnetoresistive random-access memory, and memristor. PMID:26939773

  2. Reversible electrically-driven magnetic domain wall rotation in multiferroic heterostructures to manipulate suspended on-chip magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Mark; Sohn, Hyunmin; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Hockel, Joshua; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; McLellan, Brenda; Marcus, Matthew; Doran, Andrew; Young, Anthony; Kläui, Mathias; Carman, Gregory; Bokor, Jeffrey; Candler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate reversible electrically-driven, strain-mediated domain wall (DW) rotation in Ni rings fabricated on piezoelectric [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrates. An electric field applied across the PMN-PT substrate induces a strain in the Ni rings producing DW rotation around the ring toward the dominant PMN-PT strain axis by inverse magnetostriction. We observe DWs reversibly cycled between their initial and rotated state as a function of the applied electric field with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photo-emission electron microscopy. The DW rotation is analytically predicted using a fully coupled micromagnetic/elastodyanmic multi-physics simulation to verify that the experimental behavior is caused by the electrically-generated strain in this multiferroic system. Finally, this DW rotation is used to capture and manipulate magnetic particles in a fluidic environment to demonstrate a proof-of-concept energy-efficient pathway for multiferroic-based lab-on-a-chip applications. Supported by TANMS (NSF 11-537), E3S, US Dept of Energy (DE-AC02-05CH11231), EU, and DFG.

  3. Brunhes-Matuyama Magnetic Polarity Reversal Tracing using Chinese loess10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic polarity reversal is generally considered to occur synchronously around the world, and is commonly used as a time marker. However, in the case of the most recent reversal, the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) reversal (~780 ka), comparison of paleomagnetic studies in Chinese loess-paleosol sequences versus marine sediments revealed a marked discrepancy in timing of this event (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out the 10Be studies in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau, both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7corresponding to MIS 19. These results have proven that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996) and reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the magnetic polarity reversal recorded in these same Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Jin, C.S.,et al., 2011,PALAEOGEOGR PALAEOCL, 299, 309-3172.Liu, Q.S., et al., 2008, EARTH

  4. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Heidrich, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil.

  5. MHD Equilibrium with Reversed Current Density and Magnetic Islands Revisited: the Vacuum Vector Potential Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L. Braga, F.

    2013-10-01

    The solution of Grad-Shafranov equation determines the stationary behavior of fusion plasma inside a tokamak. To solve the equation it is necessary to know the toroidal current density profile. Recent works show that it is possible to determine a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium with reversed current density (RCD) profiles that presents magnetic islands. In this work we show analytical MHD equilibrium with a RCD profile and analyze the structure of the vacuum vector potential associated with these equilibria using the virtual casing principle.

  6. Modelling dielectric and magnetic properties of ferroconcrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, T.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    This contribution discusses the modelling and parameterization of dielectric and magnetic properties of ferroconcrete by using numerical electromagnetic field analysis software. The software is based on the Method of Moments (MoM). The shielding effectiveness (SE) of the ferroconcrete DUT was already measured in a study by order of the government. According to these results, the ferroconcrete DUT is modelled and calculated. Therefore the DUT is subdivided into two parts. The first part represents the reinforcement mesh; the second part represents the lossy concrete with complex permittivity. Afterwards, the reflection and transmission properties of numerical analysed building materials are validated and compared with the measurement results in a frequency range of 30-1000 MHz.

  7. A strong angular dependence of magnetic properties of magnetosome chains: Implications for rock magnetism and paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinhua; Ge, Kunpeng; Pan, Yongxin; Williams, Wyn; Liu, Qingsong; Qin, Huafeng

    2013-10-01

    Single-domain magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria (magnetosomes) and aligned in chains are of great interest in the biosciences and geosciences. Here, we investigated angular variation of magnetic properties of aligned Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 cells, each of which contains one single fragmental chain of magnetosomes. With measurements at increasing angles from the chain direction, we observed that (i) the hysteresis loop gradually changes from nearly rectangular to a ramp-like shape (e.g., Bc and remanence decrease), (ii) the acquisition and demagnetization curves of IRM shift toward higher fields (e.g., Bcr increases), and (iii) the FORC diagram shifts toward higher coercivity fields (e.g., Bc,FORC increases). For low-temperature results, compared to unoriented samples, the samples containing aligned chains have a much lower remanence loss of field-cooled (δFC) and zero-field-cooled (δZFC) remanence upon warming through the Verwey transition, higher δ-ratio (δ = δFC/δZFC) for the measurement parallel to the chain direction, and lower δ-ratio, larger δFC and δZFC values for the perpendicular measurement. Micromagnetic simulations confirm the experimental observations and reveal that the magnetization reversal of magnetosome chain appears to be noncoherent at low angles and coherent at high angles. The simulations also demonstrate that the angular dependence of magnetic properties is related to the dispersion degree of individual chains, indicating that effects of anisotropy need to be accounted for when using rock magnetism to identify magnetosomes or magnetofossils once they have been preserved in aligned chains. Additionally, this study experimentally demonstrates an empirical correspondence of the parameter Bc,FORC to Bcr rather than Bc, at least for magnetite chains with strong shape anisotropy. This suggests FORC analysis is a good discriminant of magnetofossils in sediments and rocks.

  8. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Beck, J. Warren; Kong, Xianghui; An, Zhisheng; Qiang, Xiaoke; Wu, Zhenkun; Xian, Feng; Ao, Hong

    2015-04-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19 (Tauxe et al., 1996; Zhou and Shackleton, 1999), leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments (Wang et al., 2006; Liu et al., 2008; Jin and Liu, 2011). Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity (Masarik and Beer, 1999). This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records (Tauxe et al., 1996). These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess

  9. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Raedler, K.H. ); Ness, N.F. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus, only the dipole and quadrupole contributoins are considered. The magnetic fields are analyzed by decomposing them into those parts which have simple symmetry properties with respect to the rotation axis and the equatorial plane. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of Earth and Jupiter. Compared to Earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis, by now rather well known, but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets. The implications of these results for dynamo models are discussed. With a vgiew to Cowling's theorem the symmetry of the fields is investigated with respect to not only the rotation axis but also to other axes intersecting the plaentary center. Surprisingly, the high degree of asymmetry of the Uranian field that is observed with respect to the rotation axis reduces considerably to being compare to that for Earth or Jupiter when the appropriate axis is employed.

  10. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  11. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Redi, M.H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E.J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas (P{sub NBI}=15 thinspthinspMW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14thinspthinspMeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40{percent} beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length {Delta}t=70 thinspthinspms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita {ital et al.,} Nucl.thinspthinspFusion {bold 37}, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Anomalous Beam-Ion Loss in TFTR Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R. V.; McCune, D. C.; Medley, S. S.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S.; Synakowski, E. J.; von Goeler, S.; White, R. B.; Zweben, S. J.

    1999-02-01

    Anomalous beam-ion loss has been observed in an experiment with short tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium-beam-heated Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor plasmas ( PNBI = 15 MW) with reversed magnetic shear (RS). Comparisons of the measured total 14 MeV neutron emission, the neutron flux along eight radial locations, and the perpendicular plasma stored energy with predictions from an extensive set of TRANSP simulations suggest that about 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the tritium beam pulse length Δt = 70 ms. In contrast with recent results [K. Tobita et al., Nucl. Fusion 37, 1583 (1997)] from RS experiments at JT-60U, we were not able to show conclusively that magnetic field ripple is responsible for this anomaly.

  13. Two-dimensional nonlinear cylindrical equilibria with reversed magnetic shear and sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.; Throumoulopoulos

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear translational symmetric equilibria with up to quartic flux terms in free functions, reversed magnetic shear, and sheared flow are constructed in two ways: (i) quasi-analytically by an ansatz, which reduces the pertinent generalized Grad-Shafranov equation to a set of ordinary differential equations and algebraic constraints which is then solved numerically, and (ii) completely numerically by prescribing analytically a boundary having an X-point. This latter case presented in Sec. 4 is relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project. The equilibrium characteristics are then examined by means of pressure, safety factor, current density, and electric field. For flows parallel to the magnetic field, the stability of the equilibria constructed is also examined by applying a sufficient condition. It turns out that the equilibrium nonlinearity has a stabilizing impact, which is slightly enhanced by the sheared flow. In addition, the results indicate that the stability is affected by the up-down asymmetry.

  14. Convective Power Loss Measurements in a Field Reversed Configuration with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Paul

    The Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment Upgrade (TCSU) experiment achieves direct formation and sustainment of a field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma through rotating magnetic fields (RMF). The pre-ionized gas necessary for FRC formation is supplied by a magnetized cascade arc source that has been developed for TCSU. To ensure ideal FRC performance, the condition of the vacuum chamber prior to RMF start-up has been characterized with the use of a fast response ion gauge. A circuit capable of gating the puff valves with initial high voltage for quick response and then indefinite operational voltage was also designed. A fully translatable combination Langmuir / Mach probe was also built to measure the electron temperature, electron density, and ion velocity of the FRC. These measurements were also successfully completed in the FRC exhaust jets allowing for an accurate analysis of the FRC power loss through convection.

  15. Magnetic properties and microstructure of bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets solidified in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Lai, Y. S.; Hsieh, C. C.; Chang, W. C.; Chang, H. W.; Sun, A. C.

    2011-04-01

    The Nd-Fe-B bulk magnets with a slab shape of 0.9 x 4 x 15 mm{sup 3} were prepared by injection casting into a copper mold. The effects of applying a magnetic field during the casting process on the magnetic properties and microstructure of Nd{sub 9.5}Fe{sub 71.5}Ti{sub 2.5}Zr{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 1}B{sub 14.5}C{sub 0.5} alloy have been studied. The results show that the sample cast with magnetic field has a stronger (00L) texture of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase with the c-axis perpendicular to the slab plane than the sample cast without magnetic field. The intensity of the texture weakens from surface to inner region of the bulk magnets. Applying a magnetic field during the casting process is helpful to refine the grain size effectively. As a result, the magnetic properties are improved from B{sub r} = 5.8 kG, {sub i}H{sub c} = 6.5 kOe, and (BH){sub max} = 5.9 MGOe for thesample cast without magnetic field to B{sub r} = 6.1 kG, {sub i}H{sub c} = 10.3 kOe, and (BH){sub max} = 7.3 MGOe for the sample cast with a 3.7 kOe magnetic field.

  16. Variation of Magnetic Fluctuation due to Gas Puffing in Edge Region of Reversed-Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2016-09-01

    We measured the variation of magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations observed during the gas puffing in the edge region of the toroidal pinch experiment-reversed experiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma. In the short period in which the electron density increased slowly just after the gas puffing, the confinement of fast electrons in the core region was maintained by the decrease in the fast radial magnetic fluctuation with the deepening of the reversal of the toroidal field. During the following period in which the electron density increased rapidly, the radial gradient of electron density decreased, and the loss of fast electrons from the core region increased owing to the increase in the toroidal and radial magnetic fluctuations in the high-frequency band, although the poloidal magnetic fluctuation decreased. Therefore, the confinement of fast electrons would be maintained by keeping the radial gradient of plasma thermal pressure with a moderate neutral particle supply of small quantity in a short time.

  17. Magnetization reversal in cobalt-aluminum fine-particle ferromagnets: Microstructure and coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltser, A. M.; Soffa, W. A.

    1990-06-01

    The magnetic age hardening produced by decomposition of a β-CoAl(B2) alloy has been studied by correlating the microstructure with the changes in magnetic properties during aging. A model based on coherent rotation has been developed to describe quantitatively the intrinsic coercivity of these fine-particle ferromagnets as well as the temperature dependence of the coercivity over the temperature range from 77 to 757 K. The model incorporates both magnetocrystalline anisotropy constants K1 and K2 in addition to the shape anisotropy of the elongated single-domain particles of metastable HCP cobalt which precipitate from solid solution during heat treatment. The magnetic properties of the particles are shown to depend critically on the crystallography of the solid-state transformation and particle morphology which were determined by transmission electron microscopy and diffraction.

  18. Reversible “triple-Q” elastic field structures in a chiral magnet

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yangfan; Wang, Biao

    2016-01-01

    The analytical solution of the periodic elastic fields in chiral magnets caused by presence of periodically distributed eigenstrains is obtained. For the skyrmion phase, both the periodic displacement field and the stress field are composed of three “triple-Q” structures with different wave numbers. The periodic displacement field, obtained by combining the three “triple-Q” displacement structures, is found to have the same lattice vectors with the magnetic skyrmion lattice. We find that for increasing external magnetic field, one type of “triple-Q” displacement structure and stress structure undergo a “configurational reversal”, where the initial and the final field configuration share similar pattern but with opposite direction of all the field vectors. The solution obtained is of fundamental significance for understanding the emergent mechanical properties of skyrmions in chiral magnets. PMID:27457629

  19. Helical states with ordered magnetic topology in the Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S.; Gobbin, M.; Spizzo, G.

    2008-11-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration for magnetic confinement has shown to develop helical configurations characterized by good magnetic surfaces both in experiments and visco-resistive 3D MHD numerical computations [1]. In the RFX-mod experiment, quasi-single helicity (QSH) states with ordered magnetic topology have been found to develop both spontaneously during high current discharges [2] and in a stimulated way through the periodic oscillation of the toroidal flux (so-called OPCD technique) [3]. In both cases, the expulsion of the separatrix of the dominant mode has proved to be the key for significant chaos healing [4], as expected by theory [5]. In this work, we present results of visco-resistive 3D MHD numerical modeling aiming at clarifying the mechanism and the conditions for separatrix expulsion and chaos healing in spontaneous and stimulated cases. The effect is investigated by reconstruction of the magnetic topology through field line tracing algorithms and by study of test particle dynamics. [1] S. Cappello, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 46, B313 (2004) & references therein. [2] M. Valisa et al., invited oral, EPS Conf. on Plasma Physics (2008). [3] D. Terranova et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 095001 (2007). [4] R. Lorenzini et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 025005 (2008). [5] D. F. Escande, R. Paccagnella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3169 (2000).

  20. Magnetization reversal in the orthochromite Y0 . 5 Gd0.5 CrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Alejandro; Escudero, Roberto; Escamilla, Raul; Morales, Fransisco; Verdin, Eduardo

    Complex oxide of transition metal with perovskite structure represent fascinating playground for basic solid state research: new electronics and exotic ground states emerge via the competing interplay like spin, orbital, charge as well as lattice degree of freedom. Accordingly, orthochromites are not exception to the rule. In these compounds have been found ferroelectric polarization, spin reorientation transition along with the characteristic behavior known as; magnetization reversal (MR) consisting that a characteristic temperature, T*, the system becomes diamagnetic. In this work, the magnetic behavior of the equimolar Y0.5Gd0.5CrO3 composition was studied. Negative magnetization was observed at T*~70 K in FC mode, and applied field of 100 Oe. The characteristic hysteresis loop in the M-H graph of the pristine sample disappears for a wide range of temperature below of TN, and the characteristic spin reorientation is shifted from 14 K in GdCrO3 to 5 K for Y0.5Gd0.5CrO3. The negative magnetization is explained according the model that take into account the anisotropic and antisymmetric exchange interaction between Gd +3 - Cr +3 sublattice. A.D. and R.E. thanks to grants by DGAPA-PAPIIT, IN103213 and IN 106014 respectively.

  1. Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles Prepared in One Step by Reverse Microemulsion Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    López, Raúl G.; Pineda, María G.; Hurtado, Gilberto; de León, Ramón Díaz; Fernández, Salvador; Saade, Hened; Bueno, Darío

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CMNP) were obtained at 70 °C and 80 °C in a one-step method, which comprises precipitation in reverse microemulsion in the presence of low chitosan concentration in the aqueous phase. X-ray diffractometry showed that CMNP obtained at both temperatures contain a mixture of magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles with ≈4.5 nm in average diameter, determined by electron microscopy, which suggests that precipitation temperature does not affect the particle size. The chitosan coating on nanoparticles was inferred from Fourier transform infrared spectrometry measurements; furthermore, the carbon concentration in the nanoparticles allowed an estimation of chitosan content in CMNP of 6%–7%. CMNP exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior with relatively high final magnetization values (≈49–53 emu/g) at 20 kOe and room temperature, probably due to a higher magnetite content in the mixture of magnetic nanoparticles. In addition, a slight direct effect of precipitation temperature on magnetization was identified, which was ascribed to a possible higher degree of nanoparticles crystallinity as temperature at which they are obtained increases. Tested for Pb2+ removal from a Pb(NO3)2 aqueous solution, CMNP showed a recovery efficacy of 100%, which makes them attractive for using in heavy metals ion removal from waste water. PMID:24084716

  2. Magnetic pressure driven implosion of solid liner suitable for compression of field reverse configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Degnan, J.H.; Bartlett, R.; Cavazos, T.

    1999-07-01

    The initial design and performance of a magnetic pressure driven imploding solid liner with dimensions suitable for compressing a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) is presented and discussed. The nominal liner parameters are 30 cm length, 5 cm outer radius, {approximately}0.1 cm thickness, Al material. The liner is imploded by magnetic pressure from an axial discharge driven by a 1,300 microfarad capacitor bank. Other nominal discharge parameters are {approximately}80 kV initial bank voltage, {approximately}44 nanohenry initial total inductance, and {approximately} milliohm series resistance. The discharge current exceeds 10 mega-amps in {approximately} 9 {micro}sec. Several types of calculations indicate that such a liner will implode in {approximately} 22 to 25 /{micro}sec, and will achieve a >0.3 cm/{micro}sec implosion velocity by the time the liner has imploded to {approximately}2.5 cm radius. This performance and these dimensions are suitable for FRC formation and compression, as discussed by K Schoenberg, R. Siemon, et al. (1). The diagnostics for the initial experiments include current (via Rogowski coils and inductive magnetic probes), voltage (via capacitive divider probes), flash radiography, and diagnostic magnetic field compression. Several types of simulations, including two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, are also discussed.

  3. Magnetic colloid by PLA: Optical, magnetic and thermal transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. K.; Shahi, A. K.; Gopal, Ram

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids of cobalt and cobalt oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully synthesized using liquid phase-pulse laser ablation (LP-PLA) in ethanol and double distilled water, respectively. The mechanism of laser ablation in liquid media and formation process for Co target in double distilled water (DDW) and ethanol are speculated based on the reactions between laser generated highly nascent cobalt species and vaporized solvent media in a confined high temperature and pressure at the plume-surrounding liquid interface region. Optical absorption, emission, vibrational and rotational properties have been investigated using UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier transform-infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, respectively. In this study optical band gap of cobalt oxide ferrofluids has been engineered using different pulse energy of Nd:YAG laser in the range of (2.80-3.60 eV). Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) is employed to determine the magnetic properties of ferrofluids of cobalt and cobalt oxide NPs while their thermal conductivities are examined using rotating disc method. Ferrofluids have gained enormous curiosity due to many technological applications, i.e. drug delivery, coolant and heating purposes.

  4. Synthesis of magnetic nickel spinel ferrite nanospheres by a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jilin; Shi Jianxin; Gong Menglian

    2009-08-15

    Nickel ferrite nanospheres were successfully synthesized by a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal method. The reverse emulsion was composed of water, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, polyoxyethylene(10)nonyl phenyl ether, iso-amyl alcohol and hexane. During the hydrothermal process, beta-FeO(OH) and Ni{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 0.25}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.125}(OH){sub 2}.0.38H{sub 2}O (INCHH) nanorods formed first and then transformed into nickel spinel ferrite nanospheres. The phase transformation mechanism is proposed based on the results of X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. Nickel ferrite may form at the end of the INCHH nanorods or from the solution accompanied by the dissolution of beta-FeO(OH) and INCHH nanorods. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that a few Fe{sup 3+} ions have been reduced to Fe{sup 2+} ions during the formation of nickel ferrite. The maximum magnetization of the nickel ferrite nanospheres obtained after hydrothermal reaction for 30 h is 55.01 emu/g, which is close to that of bulk NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: Nickel ferrite nanospheres were obtained through a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal process. The phase transformation as a function of reaction time was studied based on the XRD, TEM and EDS analyses.

  5. Reverse Polarity Magnetized Melt Rocks from the Cretaceous/Tertiary Chicxulub Structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Marin, Luis; Sharpton, Virgil L.

    1994-01-01

    We report paleomagnetic results for core samples of the breccia and andesitic rocks recovered from the Yucatan-6 Petrolcos Mexicanos exploratory well within the Chicxulub structure (about 60 km SSW from its center), northern Yucatan, Mexico. A previous study has shown that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts and an Ar/Ar date of 65.2 +/- 0.4 Ma. Andesitic rocks are characterized by stable single-component magnetizations with a mean inclination of -42.6 deg +/- 2.4 deg. Breccias present a complex paleomagnetic record characterized by multivectorial magnetizations with widely different initial NRM inclinations. However, after alternating field demagnetization, well defined characteristic components with upward inclinations are defined. IRM acquisition experiments, comparison of IRM and NRM coercivity spectra and the single component magnetization of the andesitic rocks indicate the occurrence of iron-rich titanomagnetites of single or pseudo-single domain states as the dominant magnetic carriers. Mean inclinations from the andesitic rocks and most of the breccia samples give a mean inclination of about -40 deg to -45 deg, indicating a reverse polarity for the characteristic magnetization that is consistent with geomagnetic chron 29R, which spans the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. The inclination is also consistent with the expected value (and corresponding paleolatitude) for the site estimated from the reference polar wander curve for North America. We suggest that the characteristic magnetizations for the andesitic and breccia rocks are the result of shock heating at the time of formation of the impact structure and that the age, polarity and pateolatitude are consistent with a time at the K/T boundary.

  6. Resonant Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (RTAEs) in Neutral Beam Heated Reverse Magnetic Shear Plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; G.Y.-Fu; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Nazikian; R.V. Budny

    1999-11-01

    Resonant Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (RTAEs) [1, 2] excited by neutral beam ions are observed in the region of the internal transport barrier in enhanced reverse shear (ERS) plasmas on TFTR. These modes occur in multiples of the same toroidal mode number in the range n=2-4 and appear as highly localized structures near the minimum in the q-profile with frequency near to that expected for TAEs. Unlike regular TAEs, these modes are observed in plasmas where the birth velocity of beam ions is well below the fundamental or sideband resonance condition. Theoretical analysis indicates that the Toroidicity induced Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) does not exist in these discharges due to strong pressure gradients (of the thermal and fast ions) which moves the mode frequency down into the lower Alfven continuum. However a new non-perturbative analysis (where the energetic particles are allowed to modify the mode frequency and mode structure) indicates that RTAEs can be driven by neutral beam ions in the weak magnetic shear region of ERS plasma, consistent with observations on TFTR. The importance of such modes is that they may affect the alpha particle heating profile or enhance the loss of energetic alpha particles in an advanced tokamak reactor where large internal pressure gradients and reverse magnetic shear operation are required to sustain large bootstrap current.

  7. Loess 10Be evidence for an asynchronous Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Beck, W.; Kong, X.; An, Z.; Qiang, X.; Wu, Z.; Xian, F.; Ao, H.

    2015-12-01

    In Chinese loess the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal appears to occur about 25 ka prior to the established axial dipole reversal age found in many marine sediments, i.e., in Chinese loess this magnetic reversal boundary is found in glacial loess unit L8 which is thought to be correlated with Marine Isotope Stage 20 (MIS 20), in marine sediment records, however, this boundary is commonly found in interglacial period of MIS 19[1-2], leading to the debate on uncertainties of paleoclimatic correlation between the Chinese loess-paleosol sequences and marine sediments[3-5]. Based on this issue, here we propose to use the cosmogenic 10Be to address this conundrum. 10Be is a long-lived radionuclide produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols. Its atmospheric production rate is inversely proportional to the geomagnetic field intensity [6]. This allows us to reconstruct past geomagnetic field intensity variations using 10Be concentrations recorded in different sedimentary archives. We carried out both the 10Be studies and paleogeomagnetic measurements in Luochuan and Xifeng sections in Chinese Loess Plateau. Both loess profiles show that 10Be production rate was at a maximum-an indication of the dipole field reversal-at ca. 780 ± 3 ka BP., in paleosol unit S7 corresponding to MIS 19, proving that the timing of B-M reversal recorded in Chinese loess is synchronous with that seen in marine records [1]. These results reaffirmed the conventional paleoclimatic correlation of loess-paleosol sequences with marine isotope stages and the standard loess timescale as correct. However, it is ~25 ka younger than the age (depth) of the paleogeomagnetic measurements, which show that the B-M boundary is in L8 in these two Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, demonstrating that loess magnetic overprinting has occurred. 1.Tauxe, L., et al., 1996, EARTH PLANET SC LETT, 140, 133-1462.Zhou, L.P., and Shackleton, 1999

  8. Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Electrodeposited Cobalt Film

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, Md S; Taylor, B. J.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Thompson, James R; Sinclair, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt films were electrodeposited onto both iron and copper substrates from an aqueous solution containing a mixture of cobalt sulfate, boric acid, sodium citrate, and vanadyl sulfate. The structural, intermetallic diffusion and magnetic properties of the electrodeposited films were studied. Cobalt electrodeposition was carried out in a passively divided cell aided by addition of vanadyl sulfate to keep the counter electrode clean. The divided electrolytic cell with very negative current densities cause the electrodeposited Co to adopt a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, which is more magnetically reversible than the hexagonally close-packed (hcp) structured Co. The coercive field is also significantly less in the fcc-electrodeposited cobalt than in the hcp. SEM images show dense, uniform Co films without any cracks or porosity. Beside the deposition current, thickness of the film was also found to affect the crystal orientation particularly on iron substrates. Diffusion of cobalt film into the iron substrate was studied under reduced environment and a fast process was observed.

  9. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2014-01-15

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub θ}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  10. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q. We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2×10^{3}reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra/Q=10, where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach. PMID:27176392

  11. Regular flow reversals in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Igaki, Kazuto; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Vogt, Tobias; Zuerner, Till; Eckert, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Bénard convection was studied experimentally using a liquid metal inside a box with a square horizontal cross section and aspect ratio of five. Systematic flow measurements were performed by means of ultrasonic velocity profiling that can capture time variations of instantaneous velocity profiles. Applying a horizontal magnetic field organizes the convective motion into a flow pattern of quasi-two-dimensional rolls arranged parallel to the magnetic field. The number of rolls has the tendency to decrease with increasing Rayleigh number Ra and to increase with increasing Chandrasekhar number Q . We explored convection regimes in a parameter range, at 2 ×103reversals in which five rolls periodically change the direction of their circulation with gradual skew of the roll axes can be considered as the most remarkable one. The regime appears around a range of Ra /Q =10 , where irregular flow reversals were observed in Yanagisawa et al. We performed the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis on the spatiotemporal velocity distribution and detected that the regular flow reversals can be interpreted as a periodic emergence of a four-roll state in a dominant five-roll state. The POD analysis also provides the definition of the effective number of rolls as a more objective approach.

  12. Magnetic Properties of FePt based Nanocomposite Thin Films Grown on Low Cost Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, A.; Biswas, B.; Singh, A. K.; Saravanan, P.; Perumal, A.

    We report a systematic investigation of temperature dependent magnetic properties of FePt single and FePt(30)/M/Fe(5) nanocomposite thin films prepared by sputtering technique on low cost substrates at ambient temperature and post annealed at different temperatures. With increasing annealing temperature, L10 ordering, hard magnetic properties and thermal stability of FePt films are improved. The formation of interlayer exchange coupling between hard and soft magnetic layers in FePt/M(Al,Cu,C)/Fe films depends strongly on interlayer materials and interface morphology. A strong interlayer exchange coupling was achieved when the C interlayer thickness was about 0.5 nm, which enhances saturation magnetization largely. Also, the magnetization reversal process changes from incoherent to coherent switching process, which results a single hysteresis loop. High temperature magnetic studies revealed that the effective reduction in the coercivity decreases from 34 Oe/K to 13 Oe/K by the introduction of a thin C(0.5 nm) layer in FePt/C/Fe film. This reveals a promising approach to improve the stability of hard magnetic properties at high temperatures, suitable for high temperature magnetic applications.

  13. Inverse Dipolar Magnetic Anomaly Over the Volcanic Cone Linked to Reverse Polarity Magnetizations in Lavas and Tuffs - Implications for the Conduit System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Trigo-Huesca, A.

    2012-12-01

    A combined magnetics and paleomagnetic study of Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a magnetic link between lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that lavas and ash tuffs carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Conduit geometry is one of the important controlling factors in eruptive dynamics of basaltic volcanoes. However volcanic conduits are often not, or only partly, exposed. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  14. A Study of Magnetic Properties of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wajnberg, E.; de Souza, L. H. Salvo; de Barros, Henrique G. P. Lins; Esquivel, Darci M. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first direct measurements of magnetic properties of magnetotactic bacteria from natural samples are presented. Measurements were made at 4.2 K, using a Superconducting Quantum Interfering Device (SQUID) magnetometer. From the magnetization results an anisotropy is obtained that is typical of magnetized ferro- or ferri-magnetic materials. The average magnetic moment of the bacteria determined from the results is in good agreement with the estimated moment from electron microscopy. ImagesFIGURE 2 PMID:19431685

  15. Magnetic Properties of the Chelyabinsk meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Badyukov, D. D.; Nazarov, M. A.; Rochette, P.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite (the fall of February 15, 2013; Russia) is a LL5 ordinary chondrite. Numerous (thousands) stones fell as a shower to the south and the south-west of the city of Chelyabinsk. The stones consist of two intermixed lithologies, with the majority (2/3) being a light lithology with a typical chondritic texture and shock stage S4 (~30 GPa). The second lithology (1/3) is an impact melt breccia (IMB) consisting of blackened chondrite fragments embedded in a fine-grained matrix. We investigated the magnetic properties of the meteorite stones collected immediately after the fall by the expedition of the Vernadsky Institute, Moscow. The low-field magnetic susceptibility (χ0) of 174 fragments (135 chondritic and 39 IMB) weighing >3 g was measured. Each sample was measured three times in mutually perpendicular directions to average anisotropy. Also hysteresis loops (saturation magnetization Ms, coercivity Bc) and back-field remanence demagnetization curves (coercivity of remanence Bcr) in the temperature range from 10K to 700°C and other characteristics of some pieces (NRM, SIRM with their thermal and alternating field demagnetization spectra) were acquired. The mean logχ0 is 4.57×0.09 (s.d.) for the light lithology and 4.65×0.09 (s.d.) (×10-9 m3/kg) for the IMB, indicating that IMB is slightly richer in metal than the light chondritic lithology. According to [1], Chelyabinsk is three times more magnetic than the average LL5 fall, but similar to other metal-rich LL5 (e.g., Paragould, Aldsworth, Bawku, Richmond), as well as L/LL chondrites (e.g., Glanerbrug, Knyahinya, Qidong). The estimation of metal content from the Ms value gives 3.7 wt.% for the light fragments and 4.1 wt.% for IMB whereas the estimation from χ0 yields overestimated contents, e.g., 6.9 wt.% for the light lithology. Thermomagnetic curves Ms(T) up to 800°C identify the main magnetic carriers at room temperature (T0) and above as taenite and kamacite (no tetrataenite found), in

  16. Magnetic properties of Ag/Co/Pt( 1 1 1 ) ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C. W.; Chen, F. C.; Wu, Y. E.; Shern, C. S.

    2002-06-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of Ag/Co/Pt(1 1 1) ultrathin films was studied by the surface magneto-optic Kerr effect. Some interesting magnetic properties were observed. The location of Ag atoms on Co sites seems to prevent the spin reversal of Co. The saturated magnetization is not significantly changed after Ag ultrathin films are deposited on the Co/Pt(1 1 1) surfaces. The Curie temperatures increase after the Ag ultrathin film deposition. During thermal annealing, the out-of-plane magnetization in the Ag capped films is enhanced dramatically. The structural changes and the evolution of the chemical composition at the interfaces during the annealing were studied by low-energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy, respectively. The giant enhancement of the out-of-plane magnetization is due to the formation of Co-Pt alloy and Ag overlayer improving the interface structure.

  17. Optimization of the magnetic properties of nanostructured Y-Co-Fe alloys for permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozman, P.; Venkatesan, M.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2016-05-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of ball-milled Fe-doped Y Co5-xFex(0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) were investigated. The magnetization increases with Fe-doping up to the solid solubility limit, x = 0.3 without destroying the crystal structure or degrading the coercivity. A special magnet array is designed using ring magnets for pressing the powders under magnetic field in order to achieve magnetic alignment. A dramatic increase in magnetization is observed for magnetically aligned Y Co4.8Fe0.2 pressed ingots.

  18. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  19. Nonlinear evolution of neo-classical tearing modes in reversed magnetic shear tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wei, Lai; Yu, Fang

    2015-04-01

    Linear and nonlinear neo-classical double tearing modes (NDTMs) in the reversed magnetic shear configuration with different separations Δrs between two same rational surfaces are numerically studied by means of reduced magnetohydrodynamic simulations, taking into account different bootstrap current fractions fb. It is found that in the case of large Δrs, an explosive burst of fast reconnection, which was previously observed only in the intermediate Δrs case with fb = 0 (Ishii Y. et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 205002), can also be induced if the fraction of bootstrap current fb is sufficiently high. In the case of intermediate Δrs, such explosive bursts can effectively be brought forward, since the bootstrap current significantly destabilizes the tearing mode on the outer rational surface. In the case of small Δrs, higher order harmonics of the NDTMs become dominantly unstable in the linear phase, if fb continues increasing. In its nonlinear phase, the local modification of bootstrap current near the magnetic islands makes the islands move inwards, while the recovery of the Ohm current tends to make them move outwards. The different dynamics of complicated motions of magnetic islands (or rational surfaces) determined by these two effects are analysed in detail in the cases of different fb values.

  20. Resonant vortex-core reversal in magnetic nano-spheres as robust mechanism of efficient energy absorption and emission

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Koog; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Min-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    We report on novel vortex-core reversal dynamics in nano-spheres of single-vortex spin configuration as revealed by micromagnetic simulations combined with analytical derivations. When the frequency of an AC magnetic field is tuned to the frequency of the vortex-core precession around the direction of a given static field, oscillatory vortex-core reversals occur, and additionally, the frequency is found to change with both the strength of the applied AC field and the particle size. Such resonant vortex-core reversals in nano-spheres may provide a new and efficient means of energy absorption by, and emission from, magnetic nanoparticles, which system can be effectively implemented in bio-applications such as magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:27531408

  1. Magnetic properties modeling of soft magnetic composite materials using two-dimensional vector hybrid hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dandan; Liu, Fugui; Li, Yongjian; Zhao, Zhigang; Zhang, Changgeng; Yang, Qingxin

    2014-05-01

    A 2-D vector hybrid hysteresis model for a soft magnetic composite (SMC) material is established, which is combined with classical Preisach model and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. The rotational magnetic properties of SMC materials were studied using the vector model, and the computed results were compared with the experimental measurement. It is shown that the vector hybrid model can effectively simulate the rotational magnetic properties under low magnetization fields.

  2. Dynamic phase transition phenomena and magnetization reversal process in uniaxial ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel, Yusuf

    2015-09-01

    By utilizing the Monte Carlo simulation technique with Metropolis algorithm, we have studied the dynamic phase transition properties such as dynamic hysteresis loops and frequency dispersion of their area in the presence of externally applied oscillating magnetic fields. Particular attention has been paid on the variation of the hysteresis loop area (HLA) curves and their maximal behavior at different temperature regimes. In order to understand the physical mechanism behind the maximum lossy point observed in HLA curves, time series of instantaneous magnetization, as well as micromagnetic domain structures have been provided. Most of the qualitative aspects of the results reported in the present work are shown to be not model-specific type but common phenomenon observed in dynamic magnetic systems.

  3. Magnetic properties of frictional volcanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan; Biggin, Andrew; Ferk, Annika; Leonhardt, Roman

    2015-04-01

    During dome-building volcanic eruptions, highly viscous magma extends through the upper conduit in a solid-like state. The outer margins of the magma column accommodate the majority of the strain, while the bulk of the magma is able to extrude, largely undeformed, to produce magma spines. Spine extrusion is often characterised by the emission of repetitive seismicity, produced in the upper <1 km by magma failure and slip at the conduit margins. The rheology of the magma controls the depth at which fracture can occur, while the frictional properties of the magma are important in controlling subsequent marginal slip processes. Upon extrusion, spines are coated by a carapace of volcanic fault rocks which provide insights into the deeper conduit processes. Frictional samples from magma spines at Mount St. Helens (USA), Soufriere Hills (Montserrat) and Mount Unzen (Japan) have been examined using structural, thermal and magnetic analyses to reveal a history of comminution, frictional heating, melting and cooling to form volcanic pseudotachylyte. Pseudotachylyte has rarely been noted in volcanic materials, and the recent observation of its syn-eruptive formation in dome-building volcanoes was unprecedented. The uniquely high thermal conditions of volcanic environments means that frictional melt remains at elevated temperatures for longer than usual, causing slow crystallisation, preventing the development of some signature "quench" characteristics. As such, rock-magnetic tests have proven to be some of the most useful tools in distinguishing pseudotachylytes from their andesite/ dacite hosts. In volcanic pseudotachylyte the mass normalised natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) when further normalised with the concentration dependent saturation remanence (Mrs) was found to be higher than the host rock. Remanence carriers are defined as low coercive materials across all samples, and while the remanence of the host rock displays similarities to an anhysteretic remanent

  4. Magnetic Properties of Brazilian Peats From SA~o Paulo State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquó, T. S.; Thompson, R.; Partiti, C. S. M.

    The low temperature magnetic properties of peats from middle Paraíba do Sul Valley (São Paulo State) Brazil have been studied in 5 meter long cores with maximum radio- carbon ages of around 11,000 years BP. The magnetic susceptibility in general is low, but consistently presents an increase near the bottom of profile. Results from Möss- bauer spectroscopy indicate the presence of Fe3+ and Fe2+ at the bottom of cores, but only de presence of Fe3+ at the top of cores. The additional Fe2+ at the bottom of cores, may be related to the higher magnetic susceptibility. Measurements from a SQUID magnetometer MPMS XL show a strong (super)paramagnetic behavior in (i) hysteresis loops (fields up to 6 T, at both room temperature and 10K) and in (ii) low temperature magnetic curves. Slope changes on 1/ plots indicate that two mag- netic components are responsible for the low temperature magnetic properties. During heating using a Bartington (air atmosphere) susceptibility bridge, some peat samples generate new phases with higher magnetic susceptibility than initially. The new phases have reversible magnetic properties and Curie temperatures of around 580oC. These samples usually are from the bottom of the core.

  5. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Might Complement Two-Dimensional Echocardiography in the Detection of a Reversible Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madanieh, Raef; Mathew, Shawn; Shah, Pratik; Vatti, Satya K.; Madanieh, Abed; Kosmas, Constantine E.; Vittorio, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reversible nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy in a male in his 60s who presented with an acute heart failure syndrome. Both conventional two-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) demonstrated severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction; however, both modalities were devoid of significant valvular heart disease as well as the presence of fibrosis, infiltration, inflammation, and scar. After six months of aggressive neurohumoral modulation, there was complete reverse remodeling and normalization of left ventricular function, which highlights the role of cMRI as an adjunct to two-dimensional echocardiography in the detection of a potentially reversible nonischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26740746

  6. Porous Polyelectrolyte Hydrogels With Enhanced Swelling Properties Prepared Via Thermal Reverse Casting Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Aurelio; Netti, Paolo A.

    2010-06-01

    In this work we investigated the preparation and characterization of porous polyelectrolyte hydrogels via thermal reverse casting technique. Polyacrylamide hydrogels were synthesized by free-radical crosslinking polymerization into the space of an agarose gel which, after the setting of the chemical gel, was removed to allow the formation of an interconnected porosity pathway. Two different monomer/agarose solution ratios were selected for the reverse casting process and, the resulting hydrogels characterized in terms of morphological, micro-structural and thermal properties, as well as swelling capability in solutions at different ionic strength. The results of this study demonstrated that proposed technique allowed the design of porous polyacrylamide hydrogels with well controlled pore structures. Furthermore, if compared to non porous polyacrylamide hydrogel, the as obtained hydrogels were characterized by enhanced swelling properties and that, these properties were fine tuned by the appropriate selection of the templating agent concentration.

  7. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields can impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Bruno Mendes; Ferreira Filho, Moisés Bonifacio Alves; Jimenez, George Chaves; de Morais, Rosana Nogueira; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nogueira, Romildo de Albuquerque; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro

    2014-06-01

    Male infertility is often related to reproductive age couples experiencing fertility-related issues. Men may have fertility problems associated with reversible testicular damage. Considering that men have been increasingly exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields generated by the production, distribution and use of electricity, this study analyzed whether 60 Hz and 1 mT magnetic field exposure may impair spermatogenesis recovery after reversible testicular damage induced by heat shock using rats as an experimental model. Adult male rats were subjected to a single testicular heat shock (HS, 43 °C for 12 min) and then exposed to the magnetic field for 15, 30 and 60 d after HS. Magnetic field exposure during the spermatogenesis recovery induced changes in testis components volume, cell ultrastructure and histomorphometrical parameters. Control animals had a reestablished and active spermatogenesis at 60 d after heat shock, while animals exposed to magnetic field still showed extensive testicular degeneration. Magnetic field exposure did not change the plasma testosterone. In conclusion, extremely low-frequency magnetic field may be harmful to fertility recovery in males affected by reversible testicular damage. PMID:23781997

  8. REVERSIBLE CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN LATE-ONSET COBALAMIN C DEFECT.

    PubMed

    Gurkas, E; Kartal, A; Aydin, K; Kucukçongar, A; Dilber, C; Ceylaner, S

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin C (Cbl C) disease is an inborn error of intracellular cobalamin metabolism. Two distinct clinical types are defined according to the age of onset. We describe an 8 year old girl with late-onset Cbl C disease presenting with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Mutation analysis revealed homozygous c.394C>T (p.R132X) mutation in the MMACHC gene. Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after the treatment are provided. MRI of the brain before treatment showed bilateral patchy focal hyperintensities in the white matter and cortical atrophy. After treatment with intramuscular hydroxycobalamin, oral folinic acid, oral betaine, normalization of MRI findings can be achieved in addition to clinical improvement. We present this case to draw attention to the reversibility of clinical and MRI findings in the late onset Cbl C disease after treatment. PMID:26852513

  9. Stochastic Ion Heating in a Field-reversed Configuration Geometry by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Cohen, A.S. Landsman, and A.H. Glasser

    2007-06-25

    Ion heating by application of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) to a prolate field-reversed configuration(FRC) is explored by analytical and numerical techniques. For odd-parity RMF (RMFo), perturbation analysis shows ions in figure-8 orbits gain energy at resonances of the RMFo frequency, ωR, with the figure-8 orbital frequency, ω. Since figure-8 orbits tend to gain the most energy from the RMF and are unlikely to escape in the cusp region (where most losses occur), they are optimal candidates for rapid stochastic heating, as compared to cyclotron and betatron orbits. Comparisons are made between heating caused by even- and odd-parity RMFs and between heating in currently operating and in reactor-scale FRC devices.

  10. Magnetization Reversal in Ferromagnetic Films Patterned with Antiferromagnetic Gratings of Various Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Ross, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic switching behavior in continuous NiFe films patterned with IrMn gratings is investigated experimentally and with micromagnetic simulations. The samples made by a two-step deposition process consist of a 10-nm-thick NiFe layer on which is placed 10-nm-thick IrMn stripes with width from 100 to 500 nm and period from 240 nm to 1 μ m . Exchange bias is introduced by field cooling in directions parallel or perpendicular to the IrMn stripes. The samples display a two-step hysteresis loop for higher stripe width and period, as the pinned and unpinned regions of the NiFe reverse independently but a one-step loop for lower stripe periods. The transition between these regimes is reproduced by micromagnetic modeling.

  11. Magnetic interaction reversal in watermelon nanostructured Cr-doped Fe nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Dai, Qilin; Tang, Jinke; Bowden, Mark; Engelhard, Mark; Wu, Yaqiao

    2013-11-11

    Cr-doped core-shell Fe/Fe-oxide nanoclusters (NCs) were synthesized at varied atomic percentages of Cr from 0 at. % to 8 at. %. The low concentrations of Cr (<10 at. %) were selected in order to inhibit the complete conversion of the Fe-oxide shell to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the Fe core to FeCr alloy. The magnetic interaction in Fe/Fe-oxide NCs (∼25 nm) can be controlled by antiferromagnetic Cr-dopant. We report the origin of σ-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at. %) unlike in previous studies, and the interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction in watermelon-like Cr-doped core-shell NCs.

  12. Unmixing Multi-Component Magnetic Mixtures in Geologic Materials Using First Order Reversal Curve Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.; Li, Y.; Muraszko, J.; Channell, J. E. T.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Hodell, D. A.; Necula, C.; Panaiotu, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a magnetic unmixing method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams. PCA provides an objective and robust statistical framework for unmixing, because it represents data variability as a linear combination of a limited number of principal components that are derived purely on the basis of natural variations contained within the dataset. For PCA we have resampled FORC distributions on grids that capture diagnostic signatures of magnetic domain states. Individual FORC diagrams were then recast as linear combinations of end-member (EM) FORC diagrams, located at user-defined positions in PCA space. The EM selection is guided by constraints derived from physical modeling, and is imposed by data scatter. To test our model, we have investigated temporal variations of two EMs in bulk North Atlantic sediment cores collected from the Rockall Trough and the Iberian Continental Margin. Sediments from these sites contain a mixture of magnetosomes and granulometrically distinct detrital magnetite. We have also quantified the spatial variation of three EM components in surficial sediments along the flow path of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). These samples were separated into granulometric fractions, which also assisted in constraining EM definition. The unmixing model reveals systematic variations in EM relative abundance as a function of distance along NADW flow. Finally, we have applied PCA to the combined dataset of Rockall Trough and NADW sediments, which can be recast as a four-EM mixture, providing enhanced discrimination between components. Our method forms the foundation of a general solution to the problem of unmixing multi-component magnetic mixtures, a fundamental task of rock magnetic studies.

  13. Magnetic bead-based reverse colorimetric immunoassay strategy for sensing biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Xu, Mingdi; Hou, Li; Chen, Guonan; Tang, Dianping

    2013-07-16

    A novel reverse colorimetric immunoassay (RCIA) strategy was for the first time designed and utilized for sensitive detection of low-abundance protein (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, used in this case) in biological fluids by coupling highly catalytic efficient catalase with magnetic bead-based peroxidase mimics. To construct such a RCIA system, two nanostructures including magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles were first synthesized and functionalized with anti-PSA capture antibody and catalase/anti-PSA detection antibody, respectively. Thereafter, a specific sandwich-type immunoassay format was employed for determination of PSA by using functional gold nanoparticles as enzymatic bioreactors and anti-PSA-conjugated magnetic beads as a colorimetric developer. The carried catalase, followed by the sandwiched immunocomplex, partially consumed the added hydrogen peroxide in the detection solution, which slowed down the catalytic efficiency of magnetic bead-based peroxidase mimics toward TMB/H2O2, thereby weakening the visible color and decreasing the colorimetric density. Different from conventional colorimetric immunoassay, the RCIA method determined the residual hydrogen peroxide in the substrate after consumption. Under the optimal conditions, the developed RCIA exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) toward PSA with a detection limit of 0.03 ng mL(-1) at the 3Sblank level. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were below 6.1% and 9.3%, respectively. Additionally, the methodology was further validated for the analysis of 12 PSA clinical serum specimens, giving results in good accordance with those obtained by the commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. PMID:23806145

  14. Study of in situ magnetization reversal processes for nanoscale Co rings using off-axis electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Wang, H.; McCartney, M. R.; Smith, David J.

    2005-03-01

    We report a study of the magnetic switching behavior of nanoscale Co rings using off-axis electron holography. Arrays of 10nm thick polycrystalline Co rings with 400nm outer diameter (OD) and different inner diameter (ID) were fabricated by electron-beam lithography. The switching behavior of the rings was studied for different OD/ID ratios, and two kinds of reversal mechanism were identified. For OD/ID of 400nm/250nm and 400nm/50nm, the reversal started from the so-called onion (bidomain) state, proceeding to a stable vortex state, and finally to the reversed onion state. For intermediate OD/ID of 400nm/150nm, the reversal was instead accomplished via rotation of head-to-head domain walls around the rings to the reversed onion state without formation of a vortex state. The OD/ID ratio of the rings thus played the most important role in determining the switching process. Irrespective of the reversal mechanism, the coercive field of the rings and the range of the field needed to reverse their magnetization, both increased as the inner ring diameter was increased (i.e., narrower ring). The significance of different contributions to the total energy in causing these differences in switching behavior is briefly discussed.

  15. Microstructure and magnetic properties of Fe-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingers, R. T.; Kozlowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    Fe-Co soft magnetic alloys exhibit high magnetic saturation, high yield strength, and moderate core loss. Use of such materials in cyclic high temperature high stress environments, such as generators and magnetic bearings, gives impetus to determining material properties. In particular, Hiperco® Alloy 50HS, provided by Carpenter Technology Corporation, has been a subject of our study. In order to fully understand the overall behavior of the alloy, both mechanical and magnetic properties must be investigated. Magnetic performance is a function of grain size, which varies with the annealing process. Fe-Co samples have been treated by various annealing recipes ranging in temperature from 1300 to 1350 °F and magnetic saturation along with hysteresis loop measurements made using a vibrating sample magnetometer. An etching and sample preparation process was developed and microstructural analyses were performed. The correlation between composition, heat treatment, microstructure, and magnetic properties of these samples is discussed.

  16. The Aharanov-Bohm effect, magnetic monopoles and reversal in spin-ice lattices.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Shawn D; Zhu, Yimei

    2013-06-01

    The proof of the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect has been one of the most important experiments of the last century and used as essential evidence for the theory of gauge fields. In this article, we look at its fundamental relation to the Dirac monopole and string. Despite the Dirac string being invisible to the AB effect, it can be used to study emergent quasiparticles in condensed matter settings that behave similar to the fundamental monopoles and strings between them. We utilize phase-imaging method based on the AB effect to study the ordering in a one-model system - that of frustrated spin ice - to understand the ordering processes that occur during a magnetic field reversal cycle. The reversal is linked to the propagation of monopole defects linked by flux channels, reminiscent of Dirac strings. Monopole interactions govern the defect densities within the lattice. Furthermore, we exploit these interactions to propose a new ordering method in which high degrees of ground-state ordering can be achieved in a frustrated system. PMID:23549453

  17. Magnetic properties of biomineral particles produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raĭkher, Yu. L.; Stepanov, V. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Ladygina, V. P.; Balaev, D. A.; Ishchenko, L. A.; Balasoiu, M.

    2010-02-01

    Ferrihydrite nanoparticles (2-5 nm in size) produced by bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca in the course of biomineralization of iron salt solutions from a natural medium exhibit unique magnetic properties: they are characterized by both the antiferromagnetic order inherent in a bulk ferrihydrite and the spontaneous magnetic moment due to the decompensation of spins in sublattices of a nanoparticle. The magnetic susceptibility enhanced by the superantiferromagnetism effect and the magnetic moment independent of the magnetic field provide the possibility of magnetically controlling these natural objects. This has opened up the possibilities for their use in nanomedicine and bioengineering. The results obtained from measurements of the magnetic properties of the ferrihydrite produced by Klebsiella oxytoca in its two main crystalline modifications are reported, and the data obtained are analyzed theoretically. This has made it possible to determine numerical values of the magnetic parameters of real biomineral nanoparticles.

  18. Magnetization Reversal by Out-of-plane Voltage in BiFeO3-based Multiferroic Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, J J; Hu, J M; Peng, Ren-Ci; Gao, Y; Shen, Y; Chen, L Q; Nan, C W

    2015-01-01

    Voltage controlled 180° magnetization reversal has been achieved in BiFeO3-based multiferroic heterostructures, which is promising for the future development of low-power spintronic devices. However, all existing reports involve the use of an in-plane voltage that is unfavorable for practical device applications. Here, we investigate, using phase-field simulations, the out-of-plane (i.e., perpendicular to heterostructures) voltage controlled magnetism in heterostructures consisting of CoFe nanodots and (110) BiFeO3 thin film or island. It is predicted that the in-plane component of the canted magnetic moment at the CoFe/BiFeO3 interface can be reversed repeatedly by applying a perpendicular voltage across the bottom (110) BiFeO3 thin film, which further leads to an in-plane magnetization reversal in the overlaying CoFe nanodot. The non-volatility of such perpendicular voltage controlled magnetization reversal can be achieved by etching the continuous BiFeO3 film into isolated nanoislands with the same in-plane sizes as the CoFe nanodot. The findings would provide general guidelines for future experimental and engineering efforts on developing the electric-field controlled spintronic devices with BiFeO3-based multiferroic heterostructures. PMID:25995062

  19. Magnetization Reversal by Out-of-plane Voltage in BiFeO3-based Multiferroic Heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J.M.; Peng, Ren-Ci; Gao, Y.; Shen, Y.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage controlled 180° magnetization reversal has been achieved in BiFeO3-based multiferroic heterostructures, which is promising for the future development of low-power spintronic devices. However, all existing reports involve the use of an in-plane voltage that is unfavorable for practical device applications. Here, we investigate, using phase-field simulations, the out-of-plane (i.e., perpendicular to heterostructures) voltage controlled magnetism in heterostructures consisting of CoFe nanodots and (110) BiFeO3 thin film or island. It is predicted that the in-plane component of the canted magnetic moment at the CoFe/BiFeO3 interface can be reversed repeatedly by applying a perpendicular voltage across the bottom (110) BiFeO3 thin film, which further leads to an in-plane magnetization reversal in the overlaying CoFe nanodot. The non-volatility of such perpendicular voltage controlled magnetization reversal can be achieved by etching the continuous BiFeO3 film into isolated nanoislands with the same in-plane sizes as the CoFe nanodot. The findings would provide general guidelines for future experimental and engineering efforts on developing the electric-field controlled spintronic devices with BiFeO3-based multiferroic heterostructures. PMID:25995062

  20. Characterization of the fluorescence emission properties of prodan in different reverse micellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Bidisa; Guharay, Jayanti; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2000-06-01

    We have examined the steady state and time resolved fluorescence emission properties of the hydrophobic fluorescence probe, prodan, in three representative reverse micellar systems formed by the surfactants poly(oxyethylene) (tetramethylbutyl) phenylether (Triton X-100, neutral), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, cationic) and sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT, anionic) in organic solvent media containing different concentrations of water. The results obtained from the experiments indicate conspicuous dependence of the emission behaviour of prodan on the type of surfactant used and the water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0). The nature of the emission profiles, along with relevant parameters namely emission maximum ( λemmax), anisotropy ( r) and lifetime ( τ) data are used to infer the distribution and microenvironments of the prodan molecules in the reverse micelles at different w0 values. Furthermore, quantitative estimates have been obtained for the polarities (in terms of the empirical polarity parameter ET(30)) of the sites of solubilization of the fluorophore in different reverse micellar systems.

  1. Magnetization reversal of a Nd-Cu-infiltrated Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnet observed with small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kotaro Ono, Kanta; Ueno, Tetsuro; Yano, Masao; Shoji, Tetsuya; Sakuma, Noritsugu; Manabe, Akira; Kato, Akira; Harada, Masashi; Keiderling, Uwe

    2015-05-07

    The magnetization reversal process of Nd-Fe-B nanocrystalline magnets infiltrated with Nd-Cu alloy was examined using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The magnetic-field dependence of SANS intensity revealed a qualitative difference between Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples and as-deformed samples. Insufficient magnetic isolation along the direction perpendicular to the nominal c-axis is expected from comparable SANS intensities for different ranges of q values along this direction. For small q values near the coercivity field, Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples show a noticeable reduction in SANS intensity along the nominal c-axis, which is parallel to the external magnetic field. This indicates less spatial fluctuation of magnetic moments in Nd-Cu-infiltrated samples, owing to magnetically isolated Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains.

  2. Ferrimagnetic Tb-Fe Alloy Thin Films: Composition and Thickness Dependence of Magnetic Properties and All-Optical Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebler, Birgit; Hassdenteufel, Alexander; Reinhardt, Patrick; Karl, Helmut; Albrecht, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Ferrimagnetic rare earth - transition metal Tb-Fe alloy thin films exhibit a variety of different magnetic properties, which depends strongly on composition and temperature. In this study, first the influence of the film thickness (5 - 85 nm) on the sample magnetic properties was investigated in a wide composition range between 15 at.% and 38 at.% of Tb. From our results, we find that the compensation point, remanent magnetization, and magnetic anisotropy of the Tb-Fe films depend not only on the composition but also on the thickness of the magnetic film up to a critical thickness of about 20-30 nm. Beyond this critical thickness, only slight changes in magnetic properties are observed. This behavior can be attributed to a growth-induced modification of the microstructure of the amorphous films, which affects the short range order. As a result, a more collinear alignment of the distributed magnetic moments of Tb along the out-of-plane direction with film thickness is obtained. This increasing contribution of the Tb sublattice magnetization to the total sample magnetization is equivalent to a sample becoming richer in Tb and can be referred to as an “effective” composition. Furthermore, the possibility of all-optical switching, where the magnetization orientation of Tb-Fe can be reversed solely by circularly polarized laser pulses, was analyzed for a broad range of compositions and film thicknesses and correlated to the underlying magnetic properties.

  3. Evolution of magnetic properties and exchange interactions in Ru doped YbCrO3.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Biswajit; Sarkar, Babusona; Dev Ashok, Vishal; De, S K

    2016-10-26

    Magnetic properties of YbCr1-x Ru x O3 as a function of temperature and magnetic field have been investigated to explore the intriguing magnetic phenomena in rare-earth orthochromites. A quantitative analysis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the mixed valence state (Yb(3+) and Yb(2+)) of Yb ions for the highest doped sample. Field-cooled magnetization reveals a broad peak around 75 K and then becomes zero at about 20-24 K, due to the antiparallel coupling between Cr(3+) and Yb(3+) moments. An increase of the Ru(4+) ion concentration leads to a slight increase of compensation temperature T comp from 20 to 24 K, but the Néel temperature remains constant. A larger value of the magnetic moment of Yb ions gives rise to negative magnetization at low temperature. An external magnetic field significantly modifies the temperature dependent magnetization. Simulation of temperature dependent magnetization data, below T N, based on the three (two) magnetic sub-lattice model predicts stronger intra-sublattice exchange interaction than that of inter-sublattice. Thermal hysteresis and Arrot plots suggest first order magnetic phase transition. Random substitution of Ru(4+) ion reduces the magnetic relaxation time. Weak ferromagnetic component in canted antiferromagnetic system and negative internal magnetic field cause zero-field-cooled exchange bias effect. Large magnetocrystalline anisotropy associated with Ru creates high coercivity in the Ru doped sample. A maximum value of magnetocaloric effect is found around the antiferromagnetic ordering of Yb(3+) ions. Antiferromagnetic transition at about 120 K and temperature induced magnetization reversal lead to normal and inverse magnetocaloric effects in the same material. PMID:27554537

  4. Magnetic and dielectric properties of Mn2V2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannigrahi, J.; Giri, S.; Majumdar, S.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic and dielectric properties of the manganese di-vanadate compound Mn2V2O7 are reported. The sample shows martensitic type structural transition close to room temperature which is evident both in the magnetic and dielectric data. Mn2V2O7 shows signature of antiferromagnetic type ordering around 17 K with concomitant anomaly in the dielectric properties at the same point, although no spontaneous electric polarization was found below 17 K. This clearly signifies a magnetic order driven electric anomaly and possibly it is antiferroelectric type with no net polarization. The dielectric relaxation behaviours show marked difference across the structural transition close to room temperature. Interestingly, the sample shows reversible switching behaviour across the structural transition close to 300 K between high and low dielectric states which can have important practical applications.

  5. Injection-Molded Soft Magnets Prepared from Fe-Based Metallic Glass: Mechanical and Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tian; Huang, Ran; Huang, Jia; Ouyang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The injection-molded metallic glass soft magnet is prepared from the powder of melt-spun ribbon of Fe36Co36B20Si4Nb4 glassy alloy and Nylon 6,6 of wt.% from 5 to 20 via the polymer injection molding technology. The product is characterized by the SEM, mechanical, and magnetic test. The results indicate that this type of materials has comparable mechanical properties and morphological feature with the conventional injection-molded NdFeB magnet and exhibits excellent soft magnetic behaviors. The magnetic properties of the injected magnets are compared with the raw metallic glass, solvent-casted resin bonding magnets, and thermal-treated magnets to confirm that the processing temperature of Nylon injection does not affect the magnetism. The injection technology is a practical processing method to be applied on the metallic glass for potential usage.

  6. Influencing the properties of dysprosium single-molecule magnets with phosphorus donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Thomas; Tuna, Floriana; Ungur, Liviu; Collison, David; McInnes, Eric J L; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Layfield, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are a type of coordination compound that can retain magnetic information at low temperatures. Single-molecule magnets based on lanthanides have accounted for many important advances, including systems with very large energy barriers to reversal of the magnetization, and a di-terbium complex that displays magnetic hysteresis up to 14 K and shows strong coercivity. Ligand design is crucial for the development of new single-molecule magnets: organometallic chemistry presents possibilities for using unconventional ligands, particularly those with soft donor groups. Here we report dysprosium single-molecule magnets with neutral and anionic phosphorus donor ligands, and show that their properties change dramatically when varying the ligand from phosphine to phosphide to phosphinidene. A phosphide-ligated, trimetallic dysprosium single-molecule magnet relaxes via the second-excited Kramers' doublet, and, when doped into a diamagnetic matrix at the single-ion level, produces a large energy barrier of 256 cm(-1) and magnetic hysteresis up to 4.4 K. PMID:26130418

  7. Influencing the properties of dysprosium single-molecule magnets with phosphorus donor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Thomas; Tuna, Floriana; Ungur, Liviu; Collison, David; McInnes, Eric J.L.; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Layfield, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are a type of coordination compound that can retain magnetic information at low temperatures. Single-molecule magnets based on lanthanides have accounted for many important advances, including systems with very large energy barriers to reversal of the magnetization, and a di-terbium complex that displays magnetic hysteresis up to 14 K and shows strong coercivity. Ligand design is crucial for the development of new single-molecule magnets: organometallic chemistry presents possibilities for using unconventional ligands, particularly those with soft donor groups. Here we report dysprosium single-molecule magnets with neutral and anionic phosphorus donor ligands, and show that their properties change dramatically when varying the ligand from phosphine to phosphide to phosphinidene. A phosphide-ligated, trimetallic dysprosium single-molecule magnet relaxes via the second-excited Kramers' doublet, and, when doped into a diamagnetic matrix at the single-ion level, produces a large energy barrier of 256 cm−1 and magnetic hysteresis up to 4.4 K. PMID:26130418

  8. Reversible Tuning of Individual Carbon Nanotube Mechanical Properties via Defect Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Longze; Cheng, Yong; Golberg, Dmitri; Wang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-08-10

    The structural defects that inevitably exist in real-world carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are generally considered undesirable because they break the structural perfection and may result in drastically degraded CNT properties. On the other hand, the deliberate defect introduction can provide a possibility to tailor the tube mechanical properties. Herein, we present a fully controllable technique to handle defects by using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Young's modulus, quality factor of the resonation and tensile strength of CNTs can be controllably, reversibly, and repeatedly tuned. Parallel high-resolution visualizing of structural defects suggests that the property tuning cycles are primarily attributed to the reversible conversion of defects at the atomic scale: the defects are created in the form of vacancies and interstitials under electron irradiation, and they vanish through the recombination via current-induced annealing. For applications, such as reversible frequency-tuned CNT resonators, this defect-engineering technique is demonstrated to be uniquely precise; the frequency may be tuned with 0.1%/min accuracy, improved by 1 order of magnitude compared with the existing approaches. We believe that these results will be highly valuable in a variety of property-tunable CNT-based composites and devices. PMID:27454869

  9. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  10. Magnetization reversal process and domain wall resistance in a water drop shape ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. C.; Chiang, D. P.; Yao, Y. D.

    2006-03-01

    Patterned permalloy (Ni80-Fe20) materials have been fabricated by e-beam lithography in the shape of water drop ring. A tip is intentionally added into ring as geometrical defects to interrupt the continuity of magnetization reversal process, in order to create domain wall. Image from Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with real- time external field confirmed this domain structure. As a result of magneto- resistance (MR) measurement, the ratio of MR is about 0.137 ˜ 0.233% and 0.23 ˜ 0.71% at sweeping angles of samples and sweeping external field, respectively. The ratio of the change in the electric resistance which is measured by I-V curve is just about the value of domain wall MR ratio which is measured by sweeping angles and external field. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated that the domain wall motion along the direction of perimeter in a ferromagnetic ring at its onion state; and the critical field to form onion state is near 200 Oe and the lowest field which can still drag the domain wall is between 100 and 50 Oe.

  11. Anisotropic reversible piezoresistivity in magnetic-metallic/polymer structured elastomeric composites: modelling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Mietta, José Luis; Tamborenea, Pablo I; Martin Negri, R

    2016-01-14

    Structured elastomeric composites (SECs) with electrically conductive fillers display anisotropic piezoresistivity. The fillers do not form string-of-particle structures but pseudo-chains formed by grouping micro-sized clusters containing nanomagnetic particles surrounded by noble metals (e.g. silver, Ag). The pseudo-chains are formed when curing or preparing the composite in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, thus pseudo-chains are aligned in the direction of the field. The electrical conduction through pseudo-chains is analyzed and a constitutive model for the anisotropic reversible piezoresistivity in SECs is proposed. Several effects and characteristics, such as electron tunnelling, conduction inside the pseudo-chains, and chain-contact resistivity, are included in the model. Experimental results of electrical resistance, R, as a function of the normal stress applied in the direction of the pseudo-chains, P, are very well fitted by the model in the case of Fe3O4[Ag] microparticles magnetically aligned while curing in polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS. The cross sensitivity of different parameters (like the potential barrier and the effective distance for electron tunnelling) is evaluated. The model predicts the presence of several gaps for electron tunnelling inside the pseudo-chains. Estimates of those parameters for the mentioned experimental system under strains up to 20% are presented. Simulations of the expected response for other systems are performed showing the influence of Young's modulus and other parameters on the predicted piezoresistivity. PMID:26477664

  12. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  13. The diversity of retrotransposons and the properties of their reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Eickbush, Thomas H; Jamburuthugoda, Varuni K

    2008-06-01

    A number of abundant mobile genetic elements called retrotransposons reverse transcribe RNA to generate DNA for insertion into eukaryotic genomes. Four major classes of retrotransposons are described here. First, the long-terminal-repeat (LTR) retrotransposons have similar structures and mechanisms to those of the vertebrate retroviruses. Genes that may enable these retrotransposons to leave a cell have been acquired by these elements in a number of animal and plant lineages. Second, the tyrosine recombinase retrotransposons are similar to the LTR retrotransposons except that they have substituted a recombinase for the integrase and recombine into the host chromosomes. Third, the non-LTR retrotransposons use a cleaved chromosomal target site generated by an encoded endonuclease to prime reverse transcription. Finally, the Penelope-like retrotransposons are not well understood but appear to also use cleaved DNA or the ends of chromosomes as primer for reverse transcription. Described in the second part of this review are the enzymatic properties of the reverse transcriptases (RTs) encoded by retrotransposons. The RTs of the LTR retrotransposons are highly divergent in sequence but have similar enzymatic activities to those of retroviruses. The RTs of the non-LTR retrotransposons have several unique properties reflecting their adaptation to a different mechanism of retrotransposition. PMID:18261821

  14. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  15. Magnetism in nanoparticles: tuning properties with coatings.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Patricia; de la Presa, Patricia; Marín, Pilar; Multigner, Marta; Alonso, José María; Rivero, Guillermo; Yndurain, Félix; González-Calbet, José María; Hernando, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews the effect of organic and inorganic coatings on magnetic nanoparticles. The ferromagnetic-like behaviour observed in nanoparticles constituted by materials which are non-magnetic in bulk is analysed for two cases: (a) Pd and Pt nanoparticles, formed by substances close to the onset of ferromagnetism, and (b) Au and ZnO nanoparticles, which were found to be surprisingly magnetic at the nanoscale when coated by organic surfactants. An overview of theories accounting for this unexpected magnetism, induced by the nanosize influence, is presented. In addition, the effect of coating magnetic nanoparticles with biocompatible metals, oxides or organic molecules is also reviewed, focusing on their applications. PMID:24201075

  16. Viking magnetic properties investigation: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Hargraves, R B; Collinson, D W; Spitzer, C R

    1976-10-01

    Three permanent magnet arrays are aboard the Viking lander. By sol 35, one array, fixed on a photometric reference test chart on top of the lander, has clearly attracted magnetic particles from airborne dust; two other magnet arrays, one strong and one weak, incorporated in the backhoe of the surface sampler, have both extracted considerable magnetic mineral from the surface as a result of nine insertions associated with sample acquisition. The loose martian surface material around the landing site is judged to contain 3 to 7 percent highly magnetic mineral which, pending spectrophotometric study, is thought to be mainly magnetite. PMID:17793086

  17. Viking magnetic properties investigation - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.; Collinson, D. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    Three permanent-magnet arrays are aboard the Viking lander. By sol 35, one array, fixed on a photometric reference test chart on top of the lander, has clearly attracted magnetic particles from airborne dust; two other magnet arrays, one strong and one weak, incorporated in the backhoe of the surface sampler, have both extracted considerable magnetic mineral from the surface as a result of nine insertions associated with sample acquisition. The loose Martian surface material around the landing site is judged to contain 3 to 7 per cent highly magnetic mineral which, pending spectrophotometric study, is thought to be mainly magnetite.

  18. Electronic and magnetic properties of nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Gayanath; Zhang, Zhiwei; Kocharian, Armen

    We have performed tight-binding calculations with open boundary conditions on a set of twisted nanoribbons (4x100), monitoring the band structure as a function of the twist angle θ. When this angle is zero, the ribbon is rectangular and when it is 60 degrees, the ribbon is cut from a honeycomb lattice. Depending on the parameters of the tight-binding model and the filling factor, semi-metallic or insulating behavior is observed. We have also studied the electronic structure of such ribbons due to the adsorption of small atoms such as nitrogen, a magnetic field and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The role of the adsorbed atoms and the Rashba term with regard to the conducting properties and the symmetry breaking of the ribbons will be discussed in some detail. In addition, the effects of electronic correlations on selected small ribbons will be examined. The authors acknowledge the computing facilities provided by the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  19. Principal physics of rotating magnetic-field current drive of field reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A.L.; Guo, H.Y.; Miller, K.E.; Milroy, R.D.

    2006-01-15

    After extensive experimentation on the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment rotating magnetic-field (RMF)-driven field reversed configuration (FRC) device [A. L. Hoffman et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 41, 92 (2002)], the principal physics of RMF formation and sustainment of standard prolate FRCs inside a flux conserver is reasonably well understood. If the RMF magnitude B{sub {omega}} at a given frequency {omega} is high enough compared to other experimental parameters, it will drive the outer electrons of a plasma column into near synchronous rotation, allowing the RMF to penetrate into the plasma. If the resultant azimuthal current is strong enough to reverse an initial axial bias field B{sub o} a FRC will be formed. A balance between the RMF applied torque and electron-ion friction will determine the peak plasma density n{sub m}{proportional_to}B{sub {omega}}/{eta}{sup 1/2}{omega}{sup 1/2}r{sub s}, where r{sub s} is the FRC separatrix radius and {eta} is an effective weighted plasma resistivity. The plasma total temperature T{sub t} is free to be any value allowed by power balance as long as the ratio of FRC diamagnetic current, I{sup '}{sub dia}{approx_equal}2B{sub e}/{mu}{sub o}, is less than the maximum possible synchronous current, I{sup '}{sub sync}=e{omega}r{sub s}{sup 2}/2. The RMF will self-consistently penetrate a distance {delta}{sup *} governed by the ratio {zeta}=I{sup '}{sub dia}/I{sup '}{sub sync}. Since the FRC is a diamagnetic entity, its peak pressure p{sub m}=n{sub m}kT{sub t} determines its external magnetic field B{sub e}{approx_equal}(2{mu}{sub o}p{sub m}){sup 1/2}. Higher FRC currents, magnetic fields, and poloidal fluxes can thus be obtained, with the same RMF parameters, simply by raising the plasma temperature. Higher temperatures have also been noted to reduce the effective plasma resistivity, so that these higher currents can be supported with surprisingly little increase in absorbed RMF power.

  20. Magnetic unmixing of first-order reversal curve diagrams using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, Ioan; Harrison, Richard J.; Li, Yuting; Muraszko, Joy R.; Channell, James E. T.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Hodell, David A.

    2015-09-01

    We describe a quantitative magnetic unmixing method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams. For PCA, we resample FORC distributions on grids that capture diagnostic signatures of single-domain (SD), pseudosingle-domain (PSD), and multidomain (MD) magnetite, as well as of minerals such as hematite. Individual FORC diagrams are recast as linear combinations of end-member (EM) FORC diagrams, located at user-defined positions in PCA space. The EM selection is guided by constraints derived from physical modeling and imposed by data scatter. We investigate temporal variations of two EMs in bulk North Atlantic sediment cores collected from the Rockall Trough and the Iberian Continental Margin. Sediments from each site contain a mixture of magnetosomes and granulometrically distinct detrital magnetite. We also quantify the spatial variation of three EM components (a coarse silt-sized MD component, a fine silt-sized PSD component, and a mixed clay-sized component containing both SD magnetite and hematite) in surficial sediments along the flow path of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). These samples were separated into granulometric fractions, which helped constrain EM definition. PCA-based unmixing reveals systematic variations in EM relative abundance as a function of distance along NADW flow. Finally, we apply PCA to the combined data set of Rockall Trough and NADW sediments, which can be recast as a four-EM mixture, providing enhanced discrimination between components. Our method forms the foundation of a general solution to the problem of unmixing multicomponent magnetic mixtures, a fundamental task of rock magnetic studies.

  1. Fingerprinting Morphology of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys Using First Order Reversal Curves (FORC) and Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchin, Igor V.; Lapa, Pavel N.; Krycka, Kathryn L.; Maranville, Brian B.; Monroe, James A.; Franco, Brian E.; Karaman, Ibrahim

    In Ni-Mn-In- and Ni-Mn-Sn-based alloys, two magnetic phases with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange couplings between two nearest Mn atoms can coexist. The interaction between these phases results in exchange bias (EB). The EB field depends on the cluster sizes. Using the first order reversal curve (FORC) analysis of magnetization for Ni-Co-Mn-Sn and Ni-Co-Mn-In samples with different heat treatment, we can obtain information about cluster sizes of the structural phases in these alloys. This is especially important for polycrystalline alloy samples where dark-field images showing different phases are hard to obtain. Such a Ni-Co-Mn-Sn polycrystalline sample was characterized with small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Analyses of the scattering as a function of wavevector transfer in 50 Oe and 15 kOe applied field yield the average magnetic domain size of 21.2 +/-6.6 nm and a polydispersity of 0.32 +/-0.02 at 300 K, in good agreement with our prediction. The temperature evolution of the domain size will be discussed. Using an off-specular reflectometer in transmission geometry, the same sample was measured at a field of 270 Oe and 5.15 kOe. The fit of the 270 Oe data yields grain sizes of approximately 0.11-0.12 μm with polydispersities between 0.98 and 1.27. Supported by Texas A&M University, US-DOE, and US NSF-DMR.

  2. Collisionless reversed magnetic shear trapped electron instability and contribution of sidebands to anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.; Singh, Raghvendra

    2005-11-01

    By keeping account of the trapped electron ∇B and curvature drifts, it is found that the spatial decay of the collisionless electron drift wave is governed either by the trapped electron response or by the resonant interaction of ions with the sidebands of the primary oscillation. In the former case, pairs of spatially bounded unstable and damped solutions are obtained for negative magnetic shear (ŝ<0) if, as usual, LTe=1/∂rlnTe<0; there are no bounded solutions if ŝLTe<0. In the latter case, there is either a set of bounded damped solutions if ηi>0 or a set of bounded unstable solutions if ηi<0. The unstable modes have a radiating character and the growth rates are γ ˜(2n+1)√1+2q2 ∣ŝ∣∣LNωe*/qR∣ (n is the Hermite polynomial solution index, q the safety factor, ŝ the magnetic shear parameter, R the major radius, ωe* the electron diamagnetic frequency, LN=1/∂rlnNe, and ηi=LN/LTi).The sidebands are responsible for unusually large ratios Qe/TeΓe, where Qe and Γe are the anomalous electron energy flux and the particle flux. These results may explain the box-type Te profile observed in lower hybrid current drive reversed magnetic shear plasmas on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [H. Ninomiya and the JT-60U Team, Phys. Fluids B 4, 2070 (1992)]. It is finally demonstrated that the ballooning hypothesis generally leads to conflicting requirements: it is thus hardly relevant for the electron drift branch! The "radiating" boundary condition that has formerly been imposed on the slab solution is finally discussed.

  3. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10‑16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications.

  4. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10−16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  5. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10(-16) emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  6. Influence of small-scale magnetic field on the reverse positron current in the inner gaps of radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, D. P.; Goglichidze, O. A.; Tsygan, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    The reverse positron current flowing through the inner gap of an old radio pulsar in the presence of a small-scale magnetic field is found. Computations for the case of both strong and weak screening of the longitudinal electric field by the electron-positron plasma are presented.

  7. THE MAGNETIZATION DEGREE OF THE OUTFLOW POWERING THE HIGHLY POLARIZED REVERSE-SHOCK EMISSION OF GRB 120308A

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuai; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    GRB 120308A, a long duration γ-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift, was distinguished by a highly polarized early optical afterglow emission that strongly suggests an ordered magnetic field component in the emitting region. In this work, we model the optical and X-ray emission in the reverse and forward shock scenario and show that the strength of the magnetic field in the reverse-shock region is ∼10 times stronger than that in the forward shock region. Consequently, the outflow powering the highly polarized reverse-shock optical emission was mildly magnetized at a degree of σ ∼ a few percent. Considering the plausible magnetic energy dissipation in both the acceleration and prompt emission phases of the GRB outflow, the afterglow data of GRB 120308A provides us with compelling evidence that, at least for some GRBs, a nonignorable fraction of the energy was released in the form of Poynting flux, confirming the finding first made in the reverse-forward shock emission modeling of the optical afterglow of GRB 990123 by Fan et al. in 2002 and Zhang et al. in 2003.

  8. Volume properties of reverse micellar systems AOT/ n-heptane/DMSO-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A. R.; Shahinyan, G. A.; Markarian, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    The volume properties of reverse micellar systems bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium salt/ n-heptane/dimethyl sulfoxide-water are studied via densitometry. The presence of dimethyl sulfoxide and the increase in its amount in a dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixed solvent raise the apparent volume of the polar phase. This increase is also observed when the degree of hydration of the polar core and the temperature are raised.

  9. Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Model of Deeptow Magnetic Survey in the Southwest Subbasin of South China Sea Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Sun, Z.; Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    South China Sea basin, which evolved from Cenozoic continental margin rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading, is a classic example of a marginal sea in Western Pacific. Since the early 1980's, several models have been proposed for the formation of this sea basin. The previous studies were based mainly on the distribution of magnetic anomaly lineation obtained from aerial and shipboard measurements. However, large water depth (over 4.5km) and thick sediment cover (up to 1km or more) make the magnetic anoamaly information not so well displayed in aerial and shipboard data. To better understand the evolution of the sea basin, we increased anomaly amplitudes by collecting magnetic data along deep-tow profiles over the magnetic lineations in the South China Sea oceanic area. The one across the southwest subsea basin was analyzed first. The total field magnetic measurements were processed through filtering, resampling, diurnal variation removal, continuation to a level datum, regional field correction, projection to a common azimuth, and deskewing. A magnetic polarity reversal timescale was constructed by matching deep-tow anomalies with a simple, rectangular block magnetization model with the expansion rate for oceanic crust. We analyzed the spreading duration, rate, asymmetry, and reversal events of Southwest subbasin, in reference to the recent GTS2012 geomagnetic polarity representative data and concluded that the Southwest subbasin opened from around 21.767 Ma and stopped around C5C at about 15.974Ma. The full spreading rate varied from 8 to 40 cm/yr. Spreading is usually asymmetric by showing alternate faster spreading rate in one slab than the other in different time periods. From the comparison, several small reversal were revealed in addition to the standard geomagnetic polarity. These findings helped to understand the evolution of the Southwest subbasin of South China Sea and will also help to establish new reversal discrimination.

  10. Reversible Control of Magnetism in La0.67 Sr0.33 MnO3 through Chemically-Induced Oxygen Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Alexander; Gilbert, Dustin; Maranville, Brian; Borchers, Julie; Kirby, Brian; Arenholz, Elke; Alaan, Urusa; Suzuki, Yuri; Liu, Kai

    There has been a surge of interest in controlling magnetism through oxygen migration for applications in hybrid ionic/magnetoelectric device architectures. With a rich magnetic and electronic phase diagram, the colossal magnetoresistive perovskite (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSMO) is an ideal candidate for achieving large modulations in magnetic properties with small changes in oxygen content. We demonstrate reversible control of magnetism in LSMO films through interfacial oxygen migration. Gd metal capping layers deposited onto LSMO leach oxygen from the film to form porous Gd2O3. X-ray absorption and polarized neutron reflectometry measurements show Mn valence alterations consistent with high oxygen vacancy concentrations, resulting in suppressed magnetization and increased coercive fields. Oxygen migration is observed both at the interface and also throughout the majority of a 40 nm thick film, suggesting extensive oxygen vacancy diffusion. After Gd-capped LSMO is exposed to atmospheric oxygen for a prolonged period of time, oxygen diffuses through the Gd2O3 layer and the magnetization of the LSMO returns to the uncapped value. These findings showcase perovskite heterostructures as ideal candidates for developing functional interfaces through chemically-induced oxygen migration.

  11. Surface controlled magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Bahadur, D.; Aslam, M.

    2013-02-01

    To understand the influence of surface organic-inorganic interactions on the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles, magnetite (Fe3O4) of mean size 4-16 nm (standard deviation σ ≤ 15 %) are synthesized by three different thermolysis techniques. The surface functionality is controlled through either amine or amine-acid both taking as surfactant for Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesis. Magnetic investigations revealed that samples prepared using amine as a multifunctional agent (only one surfactant) shows superior magnetic properties than the nanoparticles produced by the approach utilizing oleic acid and oleylamine.

  12. Correlation of magnetic properties with deformation in electrical steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the utilization of magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) and hysteresis loops methods for the non-destructive characterization of deformed electrical steel samples. For this reason electrical steel samples were subjected to uniaxial tensile tests on elastic and plastic region of deformations. Both the MBN and hysteresis loops were measured. The results shown a strong degradation of the magnetic properties on plastically strains. This was attributed to the irreversible movement of the magnetic domain walls, due to the presence of high dislocation density. The resulting magnetic properties were further evaluated by examining the microstructure of the deformed samples by using scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Viking magnetic properties investigation: further results.

    PubMed

    Hargraves, R B; Collinson, D W; Arvidson, R E; Spitzer, C R

    1976-12-11

    The amounts of magnetic particles held on the reference test chart and backhoe magnets on lander 2 and lander 1 are comparable, indicating the presence of an estimated 3 to 7 percent by weight of relatively pure, strongly magnetic particles in the soil at the lander 2 sampling site. Preliminary spectrophotometric analysis of the material held on the backhoe magnets on lander 1 indicates that its reflectance characteristics are indistinguishable from material within a sampling trench with which it has been compared. The material on the RTC magnet shows a different spectrum, but it is suspected that the difference is the result of a reflectance contribution from the magnesium metal covering on the magnet. It is argued that the results indicate the presence, now or originally, of magnetite, which may be titaniferous. PMID:17797090

  14. Viking magnetic properties investigation - Further results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.; Collinson, D. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1976-01-01

    The amounts of magnetic particles held on the reference test chart and backhoe magnets on lander 2 and lander 1 are comparable, indicating the presence of an estimated 3 to 7 percent by weight of relatively pure, strongly magnetic particles in the soil at the lander 2 sampling site. Preliminary spectrophotometric analysis of the material held on the backhoe magnets on lander 1 indicates that its reflectance characteristics are indistinguishable from material within a sampling trench with which it has been compared. The material on the RTC magnet shows a different spectrum, but it is suspected that the difference is the result of a reflectance contribution from the magnesium metal covering on the magnet. It is argued that the results indicate the presence, now or originally, of magnetite, which may be titaniferous.

  15. Circular dichroic properties and average dimensions of DNA-containing reverse micellar aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Adriana V; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2002-05-01

    With the aim of investigating the compartmentation of nucleic acids and surfactant aggregates, we have studied the circular dichroic properties of DNA solubilized in reverse micelles. DNA incorporated in AOT/isooctane reverse micelles (AOT=bis-2-ethyl-hexyl sodium sulfosuccinate) assumes an anomalous circular dichroism (CD) spectrum with the characteristic features of a psi spectrum. Older literature observations could therefore be confirmed that attribute these spectral changes to the fact that the reverse micelles induce the formation of a condensed form of DNA. A dynamic light scattering (DLS) characterization of the DNA-containing micellar solutions was carried out, and three populations of aggregates in a polar solvent are observed, with an average radius centered at 5, 100 and 1000 nm, respectively, all three containing DNA. Several forms of DNA, including a plasmid, have been investigated. The formation of 1 microm-large aggregates depends on the DNA concentration and such aggregates disappear in the course of a few hours. Conversely, the 100 nm aggregates are stable for at least 1 day and contain DNA in a normal spectral state at low concentration and in a condensed form-it is the characteristic psi spectrum-in a higher concentration range. The solubilization of DNA in reverse micelles brings about unexpected larger structures in hydrocarbon solution, and whereas the very large component can be with all likelihood be attributed to clusters of smaller reverse micelles, the components at 100 nm radius appear to be a quite stable and characteristic feature of DNA-containing reverse micelles. PMID:11988222

  16. Enhancement in magnetic properties of magnesium substituted bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jianlong; Xie, Dan E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Teng, Changjiu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Yilin; Ren, Tian-Ling E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zeng, Min; Gao, Xingsen; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-06-14

    We report a potential way to effectively improve the magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) nanoparticles through Mg{sup 2+} ion substitution at the Fe-sites of BFO lattice. The high purity and structural changes induced by Mg doping are confirmed by X-ray powder diffractometer and Raman spectra. Enhanced magnetic properties are observed in Mg substituted samples, which simultaneously exhibit ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. A physical model is proposed to support the observed ferromagnetism of Mg doped samples, and the superparamagnetic properties are revealed by the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The improved magnetic properties and soft nature obtained by Mg doping in BFO nanoparticles demonstrate the possibility of BFO nanoparticles to practical applications.

  17. Magnetization reversal in Ni/FeF2 heterostructures with the coexistence of positive and negative exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovylina, Miroslavna; Morales, Rafael; Labarta, Amílcar; Batlle, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Magnetization reversal mechanisms are studied in Ni/FeF2 heterostructures with the coexistence of positive and negative exchanged bias (PEB/NEB), showing single and double hysteresis loops (DHL) in magnetoresistance measurements. Micromagnetic simulations show that PEB and NEB domains of a minimum critical size must be introduced in order to reproduce the occurrence of DHLs. The simulations reveal that different magnetic configurations and, hence, different magnetization reversal processes take place in a ferromagnet (FM) on top of minority PEB domains that are either greater or smaller than the critical size. In particular, for the case of DHLs, core reversal of a depthwise domain wall is observed over minority PEB domains when the magnetic field is decreased from positive saturation. As the field is further decreased, a complex domain-wall evolution takes place in the FM, including the dependences of the domain-wall width and domain size on the magnetic field and distance from the antiferromagnet (AF). These effects should be taken into account when the domain size is estimated from data measured by depth-dependent techniques since they average the distribution of domain sizes in the FM for different distances from the AF.

  18. Magnetic and magnetothermal properties and the magnetic phase diagram of high purity single crystalline terbium along the easy magnetization direction

    SciTech Connect

    Zverev, V. I.; Tishin, A. M.; Chernyshov, A. S.; Mudryk, Ya; Gschneidner Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2014-01-21

    The magnetic and magnetothermal properties of a high purity terbium single crystal have been re-investigated from 1.5 to 350 K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 75 kOe using magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements. The magnetic phase diagram has been refined by establishing a region of the fan-like phase broader than reported in the past, by locating a tricritical point at 226 K, and by a more accurate definition of the critical fields and temperatures associated with the magnetic phases observed in Tb.

  19. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein. PMID:27163463

  20. Viking magnetic properties experiment - Extended mission results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargraves, R. B.; Collinson, D. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Cates, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The backhoe magnets on Viking Lander (VL) 2 were successfully cleaned, followed by a test involving successive insertions of the cleaned backhoe into the surface. Rapid saturation of the magnets confirmed evidence from primary mission results that the magnetic mineral in the Martian surface is widely distributed, most probably in the form of composite particles of magnetic and nonmagnetic minerals. An image of the VL 2 backhoe taken via the X4 magnifying mirror demonstrates the fine-grained nature of the attracted magnetic material. The presence of maghemite and its occurrence as a pigment in, or a thin coating on, all mineral particles or as discrete, finely divided and widely distributed crystallites, are consistent with data from the inorganic analysis experiments and with laboratory simulations of results of the biology experiments on Mars.

  1. Lunar magnetic anomalies and surface optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.; Schubert, G.

    1980-04-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of lunar magnetic anomalies on the darkening of the lunar surface by solar wind ion bombardment. It is shown that lunar magnetic anomalies with dipole moments much greater than 5 x 10 to the 13th gauss cu cm will strongly deflect the typical solar wind, producing local plasma voids at the lunar surface. Direct measurements of lunar magnetic fields have shown most lunar magnetic fields to have moments below this level, with the exception of anomalies detected in the areas of the Reiner Gamma albedo feature, the Van de Graaff-Aitken region and Mare Marginis. Such magnetic anomalies are shown to be capable of accounting for the higher albedo and swirl-like morphology f these features by the deflection and focusing incident solar wind ions, which tend to darken the surface upon impact.

  2. Dielectric and Magnetic Properties in Relaxor Magnet LuFeCoO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Minoru; Masuda, Takatsugu

    2016-03-01

    Dielectric and magnetic properties in the relaxor magnet LuFeCoO4 having a triangular lattice are studied by permittivity, magnetization, and neutron diffraction measurements. We found that LuFeCoO4 has the nuclear diffuse scattering induced by Polar Nanoregions (PNRs) where local polarizations in nanoregions are randomly oriented. Synchronized changes in PNRs and magnetic short-range order with decreasing temperature are observed, which reveal the existence of the strong coupling between dielectricity and magnetism. The coincidence of the correlation lengths of the nuclear atoms and spins in the crystallographic a-b plane at the onset temperature of two-dimensional magnetic order is confirmed, suggesting that the magnetic order develops inside the PNRs. With further decreasing temperature, the magnetic correlation extends beyond the domain wall of the crystal cluster in contrast with another relaxor magnet BiFeO3-1/3BaTiO3.

  3. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  4. Passive Superconducting Flux Conservers for Rotating-Magnetic-Field-Driven Field-Reversed Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Oz, E.; Myers, C. E.; Edwards, M. R.; Berlinger, B.; Brooks, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2011-01-05

    The Princeton Field-Reversed Configuration (PFRC) experiment employs an odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMFo) current drive and plasma heating system to form and sustain high-Β plasmas. For radial confinement, an array of coaxial, internal, passive, flux-conserving (FC) rings applies magnetic pressure to the plasma while still allowing radio-frequency RMFo from external coils to reach the plasma. The 3 ms pulse duration of the present experiment is limited by the skin time (τfc) of its room-temperature copper FC rings. To explore plasma phenomena with longer characteristic times, the pulse duration of the next-generation PFRC-2 device will exceed 100 ms, necessitating FC rings with (τfc > 300 ms. In this paper we review the physics of internal, discrete, passive FCs and describe the evolution of the PFRC's FC array. We then detail new experiments that have produced higher performance FC rings that contain embedded high-temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. Several HTS tape winding configurations have been studied and a wide range of extended skin times, from 0.4 s to over 103 s, has been achieved. The new FC rings must carry up to 3 kA of current to balance the expected PFRC-2 plasma pressure, so the dependence of the HTS-FC critical current on the winding configuration and temperature was also studied. From these experiments, the key HTS-FC design considerations have been identified and HTS-FC rings with the desired performance characteristics have been produced.

  5. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  6. Comparison of Microinstability Properties for Stellarator Magnetic Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rewoldt; L.-P. Ku; W.M. Tang

    2005-06-16

    The microinstability properties of seven distinct magnetic geometries corresponding to different operating and planned stellarators with differing symmetry properties are compared. Specifically, the kinetic stability properties (linear growth rates and real frequencies) of toroidal microinstabilities (driven by ion temperature gradients and trapped-electron dynamics) are compared, as parameters are varied. The familiar ballooning representation is used to enable efficient treatment of the spatial variations along the equilibrium magnetic field lines. These studies provide useful insights for understanding the differences in the relative strengths of the instabilities caused by the differing localizations of good and bad magnetic curvature and of the presence of trapped particles. The associated differences in growth rates due to magnetic geometry are large for small values of the temperature gradient parameter n identical to d ln T/d ln n, whereas for large values of n, the mode is strongly unstable for all of the different magnetic geometries.

  7. EM Properties of Magnetic Minerals at RADAR Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stillman, D. E.; Olhoeft, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous missions to Mars have revealed that Mars surface is magnetic at DC frequency. Does this highly magnetic surface layer attenuate RADAR energy as it does in certain locations on Earth? It has been suggested that the active magnetic mineral on Mars is titanomaghemite and/or titanomagnetite. When titanium is incorporated into a maghemite or magnetite crystal, the Curie temperature can be significantly reduced. Mars has a wide range of daily temperature fluctuations (303K - 143K), which could allow for daily passes through the Curie temperature. Hence, the global dust layer on Mars could experience widely varying magnetic properties as a function of temperature, more specifically being ferromagnetic at night and paramagnetic during the day. Measurements of EM properties of magnetic minerals were made versus frequency and temperature (300K- 180K). Magnetic minerals and Martian analog samples were gathered from a number of different locations on Earth.

  8. Magnetic Properties of the Recently Fallen Baszkowka Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, E.; Lang, B.

    1996-03-01

    We are studying the magnetic properties of the Baszkowka L5 chondrite. This meteorite fell on August 25, 1994, at 4 PM local time in Baszkowka settlement, a distance of 2.5 km to the south from the center of Warsaw, the capital of Poland. The fall, which was observed, included a single 15 kg body of regular shape (the segment of a sphere). The magnetic study of the meteorite was inaugurated in the autumn of 1995. Having in mind a detailed examination of rock magnetic properties, we have started with measuremetns of the natural remanent magnetization and magnetic susceptibility. Until now the detailed parameters of the hysteresis loop have been determined. The examination of Curie temperatures of magnetic carriers and thermal plus AF demagnetication of specimens are in progress.

  9. Magnetic properties and thermal stability of MnBi/NdFeB hybrid bonded magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Yue, M.; Yang, Y. X.; Zhang, D. T.; Liu, W. Q.; Zhang, J. X.; Guo, Z. H.; Li, W.

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic properties and thermal stability were investigated for the MnBi/NdFeB (MnBi = 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 wt.%) bonded hybrid magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Effect of MnBi content on the magnetic properties of the hybrid magnets was studied. With increasing MnBi content, the coercivity of the MnBi/NdFeB hybrid magnets increases rapidly, while the remanence and maximum energy product drops simultaneously. Thermal stability measurement on MnBi magnet, NdFeB magnet, and the hybrid magnet with 20 wt.% MnBi indicates that both the NdFeB magnet and the MnBi/NdFeB hybrid magnet have a negative temperature coefficient of coercivity, while the MnBi magnet has a positive one. The (BH)max of the MnBi/NdFeB magnet (MnBi = 20 wt.%) is 5.71 MGOe at 423 K, which is much higher than 3.67 MGOe of the NdFeB magnet, indicating a remarkable improvement of thermal stability.

  10. Magnetic properties and thermal stability of MnBi/NdFeB hybrid bonded magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, S.; Yue, M.; Yang, Y. X.; Zhang, D. T.; Liu, W. Q.; Zhang, J. X.; Guo, Z. H.; Li, W.

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic properties and thermal stability were investigated for the MnBi/NdFeB (MnBi = 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 wt.%) bonded hybrid magnets prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Effect of MnBi content on the magnetic properties of the hybrid magnets was studied. With increasing MnBi content, the coercivity of the MnBi/NdFeB hybrid magnets increases rapidly, while the remanence and maximum energy product drops simultaneously. Thermal stability measurement on MnBi magnet, NdFeB magnet, and the hybrid magnet with 20 wt.% MnBi indicates that both the NdFeB magnet and the MnBi/NdFeB hybrid magnet have a negative temperature coefficient of coercivity, while the MnBi magnet has a positive one. The (BH){sub max} of the MnBi/NdFeB magnet (MnBi = 20 wt.%) is 5.71 MGOe at 423 K, which is much higher than 3.67 MGOe of the NdFeB magnet, indicating a remarkable improvement of thermal stability.

  11. Reversible Structural Swell-Shrink and Recoverable Optical Properties in Hybrid Inorganic-Organic Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yupeng; Wang, Yusheng; Xu, Zai-Quan; Liu, Jingying; Song, Jingchao; Xue, Yunzhou; Wang, Ziyu; Zheng, Jialu; Jiang, Liangcong; Zheng, Changxi; Huang, Fuzhi; Sun, Baoquan; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Bao, Qiaoliang

    2016-07-26

    Ion migration in hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites has been suggested to be an important factor for many unusual behaviors in perovskite-based optoelectronics, such as current-voltage hysteresis, low-frequency giant dielectric response, and the switchable photovoltaic effect. However, the role played by ion migration in the photoelectric conversion process of perovskites is still unclear. In this work, we provide microscale insights into the influence of ion migration on the microstructure, stability, and light-matter interaction in perovskite micro/nanowires by using spatially resolved optical characterization techniques. We observed that ion migration, especially the migration of MA(+) ions, will induce a reversible structural swell-shrink in perovskites and recoverably affect the reflective index, quantum efficiency, light-harvesting, and photoelectric properties. The maximum ion migration quantity in perovskites was as high as approximately 30%, resulting in lattice swell or shrink of approximately 4.4%. Meanwhile, the evidence shows that ion migration in perovskites could gradually accelerate the aging of perovskites because of lattice distortion in the reversible structural swell-shrink process. Knowledge regarding reversible structural swell-shrink and recoverable optical properties may shed light on the development of optoelectronic and converse piezoelectric devices based on perovskites. PMID:27386731

  12. Hydrophilic magnetic nanoclusters with thermo-responsive properties and their drug controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerod, Siraprapa; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2015-10-01

    Synthesis and drug controlled release properties of thermo-responsive magnetic nanoclusters grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm)) and poly(NIPAAm-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PEGMA) copolymers were described. These magnetic nanoclusters were synthesized via an in situ radical polymerization in the presence of acrylamide-grafted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Poly(NIPAAm) provided thermo-responsive properties, while PEGMA played a role in good water dispersibility to the nanoclusters. The ratios of PEGMA to NIPAAm in the (co)polymerization in the presence of the MNPs were fine-tuned such that the nanoclusters with good water dispersibility, good magnetic sensitivity and thermo responsiveness were obtained. The size of the nanoclusters was in the range of 50-100 nm in diameter with about 100-200 particles/cluster. The nanoclusters were well dispersible in water at room temperature and can be suddenly agglomerated when temperature was increased beyond the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (32 °C). The release behavior of an indomethacin model drug from the nanoclusters was also investigated. These novel magnetic nanoclusters with good dispersibility in water and reversible thermo-responsive properties might be good candidates for the targeting drug controlled release applications.

  13. Crystal structure, magnetic properties and advances in hexaferrites: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jotania, Rajshree

    2014-10-01

    Hexaferrites are hard magnetic materials and specifically ferri-magnetic oxides with hexagonal magnetoplumbite type crystallographic structure. Hexagonal ferrites are used as permanent magnets, high-density perpendicular and magneto-optical recording media, and microwave devices like resonance isolators, filters, circulators, phase shifters because of their high magnetic permeability, high electrical resistivity and moderable permittivity. In addition to these; hexagonal ferrites have excellent chemical stability, mechanical hardness and low eddy current loss at high frequencies. The preparation of hexaferrites is a complicated process. Various experimental techniques like standard ceramic techniques, solvent free synthesis route, co precipitation, salt-melt, ion exchange, sol-gel, citrate synthesis, hydrothermal synthesis, spray drying, water-in-oil microemulsion, reverse micelle etc are used to prepare hexaferrite materials. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties, crystallite size of hexaferrites depend upon nature of substituted ions, method of preparation, sintering temperature and time. The recent interest is nanotechnology, the development of hexaferrite fibres and composites with carbon nano tubes (CNT). Magnetic properties of some doped and un-doped hexaferrites are discussed here. Recent advances in hexaferrites also highlighted in present paper.

  14. Processing, properties and some novel applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, D.; Giri, J.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.; Sriharsha, T.; Pradhan, P.; Prasad, N. K.; Barick, K. C.; Ambashta, R. D.

    2005-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been prepared by various soft chemical methods including self-assembly. The bare or surface-modified particles find applications in areas such as hyperthermia treatment of cancer and magnetic field-assisted radioactive chemical separation. We present here some of the salient features of processing of nanostructured magnetic materials of different sizes and shapes, their properties and some possible applications. The materials studied included metals, metal--ceramic composites, and ferrites.

  15. The magnetic properties experiments on Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, M. B.; Hviid, S. F.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Knudsen, J. M.; Goetz, W.; Pedersen, C. T.; Dinesen, A. R.; Mogensen, C. T.; Olsen, M.; Hargraves, R. B.

    1999-04-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander carried two magnet arrays, each containing five small permanent magnets of varying strength. The magnet arrays were passively exposed to the wind borne dust on Mars. By the end of the Mars Pathfinder mission a bull's-eye pattern was visible on the four strongest magnets of the arrays showing the presence of magnetic dust particles. From the images we conclude that the dust suspended in the atmosphere is not solely single phase particles of hematite (α-Fe2O3) and that single phase particles of the ferrimagnetic minerals maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) are not present as free particles in any appreciable amount. The material on the strongest magnets seems to be indistinguishable from the bright surface material around the lander. From X-ray fluorescence it is known that the soil consists mainly of silicates. The element iron constitutes about 13% of the soil. The particles in the airborne dust seem to be composite, containing a few percent of a strongly magnetic component. We conclude that the magnetic phase present in the airborne dust particles is most likely maghemite. The particles thus appear to consist of silicate aggregates stained or cemented by ferric oxides, some of the stain and cement being maghemite. These results imply that Fe2+ ions were leached from the bedrock, and after passing through a state as free Fe2+ ions in liquid water, the Fe2+ was oxidized to Fe3+ and then precipitated. It cannot, however, be ruled out that the magnetic particles are titanomagnetite (or titanomaghemite) occurring in palagonite, having been inherited directly from the bedrock.

  16. Well-defined and biocompatible hydrogels with toughening and reversible photoresponsive properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shunli; Li, Kewen; Tan, Linhua; Cen, Lian; Fu, Guodong

    2016-02-21

    In the present study, novel hydrogels with extremely high strength, reversible photoresponsive and excellent biocompatible properties were prepared. The functional hydrogels were synthesized from a well-defined poly (ethylene glycol) polymer with spiropyran groups at a given position (PEG-SP) via a Cu(i)-catalyst Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. The molecular structures of the sequential intermediates for PEG-SP hydrogel preparation were verified by (1)HNMR and FT-IR. The mechanical property, swelling ratio, compression strength, surface hydrophilicity, and biocompatibility of the resulting hydrogel were characterized. Since spiropyran is pivotal to the switch in hydrophilicity on the hydrogel surface, the swelling ratio of PEG-SP hydrogel under Vis irradiation has a major decrease (155%). Before and after UV light irradiation, the contact angle of the hydrogel has a change of 13.8°. The photoresponsive property of this hydrogel was thus demonstrated, and such a property was also shown to be reversible. The well-defined PEG-SP hydrogel can also sustain a compressive stress of 49.8 MPa without any macro- or micro-damage, indicating its outstanding mechanical performance. Furthermore, it possessed excellent biocompatibility as demonstrated by its performance in an in vivo porcine subcutaneous implantation environment. No inflammation was observed and it got along well with the adjacent tissue. The above features indicate that PEG-SP hydrogels are promising as an implantable matrix for potential applications in biomaterial. PMID:26744299

  17. Enhanced magnetic-field-induced optical properties of nanostructured magnetic fluids by doping nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Pu, Shengli; Ji, Hongzhu; Yu, Guojun

    2012-05-01

    Ferronematic materials composed of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl nematic liquid crystal and oil-based Fe3O4 magnetic fluid were prepared using ultrasonic agitation. The birefringence (Δ n) and figure of merit of optical properties ( Q = Δ n/α, where α is the extinction coefficient) of pure magnetic fluids and the as-prepared ferronematic materials were examined and compared. The figure of merit of optical properties weighs the birefringence and extinction of the materials and is more appropriate to evaluate their optical properties. Similar magnetic-field- and magnetic-particle-concentration-dependent properties of birefringence and figure of merit of optical properties were obtained for the pure magnetic fluids and the ferronematic materials. For the ferronematic materials, the values of Q increase with the volume fractions of nematic liquid crystal under certain fixed field strength and are larger than those of their corresponding pure magnetic fluids at high field region. In addition, the enhancement of Q value increases monotonously with the magnetic field and becomes remarkable when the applied magnetic field is beyond 50 mT. The maximum relative enhanced value of Q R exceeds 6.8% in our experiments. The results of this work may conduce to extend the pragmatic applications of nanostructured magnetic fluids in optical field.

  18. Enhanced magnetic-field-induced optical properties of nanostructured magnetic fluids by doping nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Pu, Shengli; Ji, Hongzhu; Yu, Guojun

    2012-01-01

    Ferronematic materials composed of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl nematic liquid crystal and oil-based Fe3O4 magnetic fluid were prepared using ultrasonic agitation. The birefringence (Δn) and figure of merit of optical properties (Q = Δn/α, where α is the extinction coefficient) of pure magnetic fluids and the as-prepared ferronematic materials were examined and compared. The figure of merit of optical properties weighs the birefringence and extinction of the materials and is more appropriate to evaluate their optical properties. Similar magnetic-field- and magnetic-particle-concentration-dependent properties of birefringence and figure of merit of optical properties were obtained for the pure magnetic fluids and the ferronematic materials. For the ferronematic materials, the values of Q increase with the volume fractions of nematic liquid crystal under certain fixed field strength and are larger than those of their corresponding pure magnetic fluids at high field region. In addition, the enhancement of Q value increases monotonously with the magnetic field and becomes remarkable when the applied magnetic field is beyond 50 mT. The maximum relative enhanced value of QR exceeds 6.8% in our experiments. The results of this work may conduce to extend the pragmatic applications of nanostructured magnetic fluids in optical field. PMID:22587542

  19. Enhanced magnetic-field-induced optical properties of nanostructured magnetic fluids by doping nematic liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ferronematic materials composed of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl nematic liquid crystal and oil-based Fe3O4 magnetic fluid were prepared using ultrasonic agitation. The birefringence (Δn) and figure of merit of optical properties (Q = Δn/α, where α is the extinction coefficient) of pure magnetic fluids and the as-prepared ferronematic materials were examined and compared. The figure of merit of optical properties weighs the birefringence and extinction of the materials and is more appropriate to evaluate their optical properties. Similar magnetic-field- and magnetic-particle-concentration-dependent properties of birefringence and figure of merit of optical properties were obtained for the pure magnetic fluids and the ferronematic materials. For the ferronematic materials, the values of Q increase with the volume fractions of nematic liquid crystal under certain fixed field strength and are larger than those of their corresponding pure magnetic fluids at high field region. In addition, the enhancement of Q value increases monotonously with the magnetic field and becomes remarkable when the applied magnetic field is beyond 50 mT. The maximum relative enhanced value of QR exceeds 6.8% in our experiments. The results of this work may conduce to extend the pragmatic applications of nanostructured magnetic fluids in optical field. PMID:22587542

  20. Time-reversal symmetry violation in molecules induced by nuclear magnetic quadrupole moments.

    PubMed

    Flambaum, V V; DeMille, D; Kozlov, M G

    2014-09-01

    Recent measurements in paramagnetic molecules improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Time-reversal (T) and parity (P) symmetry violation in molecules may also come from their nuclei. We point out that nuclear T, P-odd effects are amplified in paramagnetic molecules containing deformed nuclei, where the primary effects arise from the T, P-odd nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM). We perform calculations of T, P-odd effects in the molecules TaN, ThO, ThF+, HfF+, YbF, HgF, and BaF induced by MQMs. We compare our results with those for the diamagnetic TlF molecule, where the T, P-odd effects are produced by the nuclear Schiff moment. We argue that measurements in molecules with MQMs may provide improved limits on the strength of T, P-odd nuclear forces, on the proton, neutron, and quark EDMs, on quark chromo-EDMs, and on the QCD θ term and CP-violating quark interactions. PMID:25238355