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Sample records for magnetohydrodynamic jets interacting

  1. On magnetohydrodynamic solitons in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear solitary wave propagation in a compressible magnetic beam model of an extragalactic radio jet is examined and shown to lead to solitons of the Benjamin-Ono type. A number of similarities between such magnetic beam models of jets and models of solar photospheric flux tubes are pointed out and exploited. A single soliton has the appearance of a symmetric bulge on the jet which propagates faster than the jet's flow.

  2. Magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of hypervelocity neutral plasma jets and their interactions with materials generating extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan; Sitaraman, Hariswaran

    2014-10-01

    The development of a Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) numerical tool to study high density thermal plasma in a co-axial plasma gun is presented. The MHD governing equations are numerically solved using a matrix free implicit scheme in an unstructured grid finite volume framework. The MHD model is used to characterize the high energy jet which emanates from the accelerator. The solver is then used to predict the conditions created at the surface of a flat plate placed at a fixed distance from the exit of the gun. The model parameters are adjusted so that the energy density of the jet impacting the plate is of the same order of magnitude as that of the Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruptions in thermonuclear fusion reactors. The idea is to use the pressure and temperature on the plate surface to obtain an estimate of the stress created on the plate due to jet impact. The model is used to quantify damage caused by ELM disruptions on the confining material surface.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of a compound liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1989-10-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stability of a compound nonmiscible fluid jet is discussed. A general eigenvalue relation, for that model which involves the fluid inertia, capillarity and electromagnetic forces, is derived. The model is capillary unstable only for small axisymmetric disturbances and stable for the rest. The magnetic fields interior and exterior to the gas-mantle jet have always a stabilizing influence. The radii ratio of the concentric jets plays an important role in the (instability) stability states and are (decreasing) increasing with increasing magnetic field intensity as the exterior radius is much larger than the interior radius; under some restrictions of the radii ratio and above a certain value of the magnetic field the capillary instability is omitted and completely suppressed and then stability sets in. The latter result is verified analytically and confirmed numerically in the case in which the cylindrical surface of the outer jet is sited at infinity.

  4. A Magnetohydrodynamic Boost for Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Zhang, Bing

    2007-01-01

    We performed relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the hydrodynamic boosting mechanism for relativistic jets explored by Aloy & Rezzolla (2006) using the RAISHIN code. Simulation results show that the presence of a magnetic field changes the properties of the shock interface between the tenuous, overpressured jet (V^z j) flowing tangentially to a dense external medium. We find that magnetic fields can lead to more efficient acceleration of the jet, in comparison to the pure-hydrodynamic case. A "poloidal" magnetic field (B^z), tangent to the interface and parallel to the jet flow, produces both a stronger outward moving shock and a stronger inward moving rarefaction wave. This leads to a large velocity component normal to the interface in addition to acceleration tangent to the interface, and the jet is thus accelerated to larger Lorentz factors than those obtained in the pure-hydrodynamic case. Likewise, a strong "toroidal" magnetic field (B^y), tangent to the interface but perpendicular to the jet flow, also leads to stronger acceleration tangent to the shock interface relative to the pure-hydrodynamic case. Thus. the presence and relative orientation of a magnetic field in relativistic jets can significant modify the hydrodynamic boost mechanism studied by Aloy & Rezzolla (2006).

  5. A Magnetohydrodynamic Boost for Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Hartmann, dieter; Nishikwa, Ken-Ichi; Zhang, Bing

    2006-01-01

    We have performed relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the hydrodynamic boosting mechanism for relativistic jets explored by Aloy & Rezzolla (2006) using the RAISHIN code. Simulation results show that the presence of a magnetic field may change the properties of the shock interface between the tenuous, overpressured jet (V(sub j) (sup z)) flowing tangentially to a dense external medium. Magnetic fields can lead to more efficient acceleration of the jet, in comparison to the pure-hydrodynamic case. A poloidal magnetic field (B(sup z)), tangent to the interface and parallel to the jet flow, produces both a stronger outward moving shock and inward moving rarefaction wave. This leads to a large velocity component normal to the interface in addition to acceleration tangent to the interface, and the jet is thus accelerated to a larger Lorentz factors than those obtained in the pure-hydrodynamic case. In contrast, a strong toroidal magnetic field (B(sup y)), tangent to the interface but perpendicular to the jet flow, also leads to stronger acceleration tangent to the shock interface relative to the pure-hydrodynamic case, but to a lesser extent than found for the poloidal case due to the fact that the velocity component normal to the shock interface is now much smaller. Overall, the acceleration efficiency in the toroidal case is less than that of the poloidal case but both geometries still result in higher Lorentz factors than the pure-hydrodynamic case. Thus, the presence and relative orientation of a magnetic field in relativistic jets can have a significant influence on the hydrodynamic boost mechanism studied by Aloy & Rezzolla (2006).

  6. COUNTER-ROTATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cayatte, V.; Sauty, C.; Vlahakis, N.; Tsinganos, K.; Matsakos, T.; Lima, J. J. G.

    2014-06-10

    Young stellar object observations suggest that some jets rotate in the opposite direction with respect to their disk. In a recent study, Sauty et al. showed that this does not contradict the magnetocentrifugal mechanism that is believed to launch such outflows. Motion signatures that are transverse to the jet axis, in two opposite directions, have recently been measured in M87. One possible interpretation of this motion is that of counter-rotating knots. Here, we extend our previous analytical derivation of counter-rotation to relativistic jets, demonstrating that counter-rotation can indeed take place under rather general conditions. We show that both the magnetic field and a non-negligible enthalpy are necessary at the origin of counter-rotating outflows, and that the effect is associated with a transfer of energy flux from the matter to the electromagnetic field. This can be realized in three cases: if a decreasing enthalpy causes an increase of the Poynting flux, if the flow decelerates, or if strong gradients of the magnetic field are present. An illustration of the involved mechanism is given by an example of a relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jet simulation.

  7. Nucleosynthesis in Magnetohydrodynamical Jets from Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Kotake, K.

    2011-10-28

    We investigate the heavy-element nucleosynthesis of a massive star whose mass in the main sequence stage is M{sub ms} = 70 M{sub {center_dot}}. Detailed calculations of the nucleosynthesis are performed during the hydrostatic stellar evolution until the core composed of iron-group nuclei begins to collapse. As a supernova explosion model, a collapsar model is constructed whose jets are driven by magnetohydrodynamical effects of a differentially rotating core. The heavy-element nucleosynthesis inside the jet of a collapsar model is followed along the trajectories of stream lines of the jet. We combine the results of both hydrostatic and heavy-element nucleosyntheses to compare with the solar abundances. We find that neutron-rich elements of 70140.

  8. Efficient acceleration of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kenji; Takahara, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, galactic microquasars, and gamma-ray bursts are widely considered to be magnetohydrodynamically driven by black hole accretion systems, although the conversion mechanism from the Poynting into the particle kinetic energy flux is still open. Recent detailed numerical and analytical studies of global structures of steady, axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with specific boundary conditions have not reproduced as rapid an energy conversion as required by observations. In order to find more suitable boundary conditions, we focus on the flow along a poloidal magnetic field line just inside the external boundary, without treating the transfield force balance in detail. We find some examples of the poloidal field structure and corresponding external pressure profile for an efficient and rapid energy conversion as required by observations, and that the rapid acceleration requires a rapid decrease of the external pressure above the accretion disk. We also clarify the differences between the fast magnetosonic point of the MHD flow and the sonic point of the de Laval nozzle.

  9. Jet Rotation Driven by Magnetohydrodynamic Shocks in Helical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfvén Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  10. JET ROTATION DRIVEN BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfven Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  11. Formation of Relativistic Jets : Magnetohydrodynamics and Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver J. G.

    2011-11-01

    In this thesis, the formation of relativistic jets is investigated by means of special relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations and synchrotron radiative transfer. Our results show that the magnetohydrodynamic jet self-collimation paradigm can also be applied to the relativistic case. In the first part, jets launched from rotating hot accretion disk coronae are explored, leading to well collimated, but only mildly relativistic flows. Beyond the light-cylinder, the electric charge separation force balances the classical trans-field Lorentz force almost entirely, resulting in a decreased efficiency of acceleration and collimation in comparison to non-relativistic disk winds. In the second part, we examine Poynting dominated flows of various electric current distributions. By following the outflow for over 3000 Schwarzschild radii, highly relativistic jets of Lorentz factor 8 and half-opening angles below 1 degree are obtained, providing dynamical models for the parsec scale jets of active galactic nuclei. Applying the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the quasi-stationary simulation models, we solve the relativistically beamed synchrotron radiation transport. This yields synthetic radiation maps and polarization patterns that can be used to confront high resolution radio and (sub-) mm observations of nearby active galactic nuclei. Relativistic motion together with the helical magnetic fields of the jet formation site imprint a clear signature on the observed polarization and Faraday rotation. In particular, asymmetries in the polarization direction across the jet can disclose the handedness of the magnetic helix and thus the spin direction of the central engine. Finally, we show first results from fully three-dimensional, high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of jet formation from a rotating magnetosphere and examine the jet stability. Relativistic field-line rotation leads to an electric charge separation force that opposes the magnetic Lorentz

  12. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OF SELF-COLLIMATING RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Vaidya, Bhargav; Meliani, Zakaria E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-08-10

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow-magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000{sup 2} Schwarzschild radii allowing jets to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting-dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of {Gamma} {approx_equal} 8 and is collimated to 1{sup 0}. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive very long baseline interferometry radio and (sub-) millimeter diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra, and Faraday rotation measure (RM) directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate depolarization and the detectability of a {lambda}{sup 2}-law RM depending on beam resolution and observing frequency. We find non-monotonic intrinsic RM profiles that could be detected at a resolution of 100 Schwarzschild radii. In our collimating jet geometry, the strict bimodality in the polarization direction (as predicted by Pariev et al.) can be circumvented. Due to relativistic aberration, asymmetries in the polarization vectors across the jet can hint at the spin direction of the central engine.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic solitons and radio knots in jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, R.

    1986-01-01

    Weakly nonlinear surface waves are examined in the context of the beam model for jetlike radio sources. By introducing a finite scale length, viz. the beam radius, geometrical dispersion can act to balance nonlinear wave growth and thereby produce solitons, localized wave packets of stable waveform. A method for obtaining a soliton equation from the MHD equations is presented and then applied to radio knots in jets.

  14. A General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Jet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-05-01

    We have performed a fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity ~0.3c) is created, as shown by previous two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The three-dimensional simulation ran over 100 light crossing time units (τS=rS/c, where rS≡2GM/c2), which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted owing in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting of the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r=3rS. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outward with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward-moving torsional Alfvén waves. This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk because of the lack of streaming material from an accompanying star.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Origin of Jets from Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    A review is made of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and simulation of outflows from disks for different distributions of magnetic field threading the disk. In one limit of a relatively weak, initially diverging magnetic field, both thermal and magnetic pressure gradients act to drive matter to an outflow, while a toroidal magnetic field develops which strongly collimates the outflow. The collimation greatly reduces the field divergence and the mass outflow rate decreases after an initial peak. In a second limit of a strong magnetic field, the initial field configuration was taken with the field strength on the disk decreasing outwards to small values so that collimation was reduced. As a result, a family of stationary solutions was discovered where matter is driven mainly by the strong magnetic pressure gradient force. The collimation in this case depends on the pressure of an external medium. These flows are qualitatively similar to the analytic solutions for magnetically driven outflows. The problem of the opening of a closed field line configuration linking a magnetized star and an accretion disk is also discussed.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of a Streaming Gas Core Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.; Elazab, Samia S.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic instability of a streaming fluid jet (radius R0) ambient with streaming liquid is studied to the axisymmetric (m{=}0) and the non-axisymmetric (m{≥slant}1) disturbances (m is the azimuthal wavenumber). When the surface tension effect is suppressed; the jet is stable to all m{≥slant}0 for all wavelengths. In the absence of the magnetic field; the model is stable to all m{≥slant}1 for all wavelengths and also stable to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is equal to or shorter than 2π R0. While it is unstable only to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is longer than 2π R0. The streaming has a destabilizing effect. If the magnetic fields are sufficiently high, so that the Alfvén wave velocities are greater than the streaming velocities of the two fluids; the jet is stable against all disturbances and vice versa.

  17. DETERMINING THE OPTIMAL LOCATIONS FOR SHOCK ACCELERATION IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Polko, Peter; Markoff, Sera; Meier, David L.

    2010-11-10

    Observations of relativistic jets from black hole systems suggest that particle acceleration often occurs at fixed locations within the flow. These sites could be associated with critical points that allow the formation of standing shock regions, such as the magnetosonic modified fast point (MFP). Using the self-similar formulation of special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics by Vlahakis and Koenigl, we derive a new class of flow solutions that are both relativistic and cross the MFP at a finite height. Our solutions span a range of Lorentz factors up to at least 10, appropriate for most jets in X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, and a range in injected particle internal energy. A broad range of solutions exists, which will allow the eventual matching of these scale-free models to physical boundary conditions in the analysis of observed sources.

  18. A General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Jet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation ofjet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity approx.0.3c) is created, as shown by previous two-dimensional axi- symmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The three-dimensional simulation ran over 100 light crossing time units (T(sub s) = r(sub s)/c, where r(sub s = 2GM/c(sup 2), which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted owing in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting of the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation in the region around r = 3r(sub s). At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface ofthe thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outward with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward-moving torsional Alfven waves. This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk because of the iack of streaming materiai from an accompanying star.

  19. Interaction between perpendicular magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Y. Q.; Habbal, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    A general analysis is made of the collision and merging of perpendicular shocks as well as the interaction between a shock and a tangential discontinuity. It is found that two head-on shocks diminish both in strength after collisions and a tangential discontinuity forms between them. The property of the discontinuity depends on the relative strength of the two shocks. No discontinuity occurs if the shocks are equal in strength. The emerging of two shocks propagating in the same direction results in a strong shock followed by a tangential discontinuity and a reverse wave. The reverse wave is a rarefaction wave if one or both of the shocks are strong. If the shocks are both weak, a critical adiabatic index (CAI) exists. The reverse wave is a rarefaction wave if the wavelength is less than the CAI and a shock exists if the wavelength is greater than the CAI. As a wake shock enters from a medium of higher wave impedance into that of lower wave impedance, the reflected wave is a rarefaction wave and the total pressure ratio decreases and the velocity jump increases after the shock passes through the border.

  20. Protostellar jets and magnetised turbulence with smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are an integral component of the formation of stars. During my thesis work, I built new methods to model magnetic fields in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics which enforce the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field and reduce numerical dissipation of the magnetic field. Using these methods, we have performed simulations of isolated protostar formation, studying the production of jets and outflows of material and their effect on transporting angular momentum away from the protostar and reducing the efficiency of star formation. A major code comparison project on the small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification of magnetic fields was performed, using conditions representative of molecular clouds, the formation site of stars. The results were compared against results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and qualitative behaviour. I will outline the numerical methods developed, and present the results from our protostar and molecular cloud simulations.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic models of bipolar knotty jet in henize 2-90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C.; Sahai, R.

    2004-01-01

    A remarkably linear, bipolar, knotty jet was recently discovered in Hen 2-90, an object classified as a young planetary nebula. Using two-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we investigate periodic variations in jet density and velocity as the mechanism for producing the jet and its knotty structures.

  2. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EFFECTS ON PULSED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT JETS. I. 2.5D SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E. C.; Frank, A.; Hartigan, P.

    2015-02-10

    In this paper, we explore the dynamics of radiative axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets at high resolution using adaptive mesh refinement methods. The goal of the study is to determine both the dynamics and emission properties of such jets. To that end, we have implemented microphysics enabling us to produce synthetic maps of Hα and [S II]. The jets are pulsed either sinusoidally or randomly via a time-dependent ejection velocity which leads to a complicated structure of internal shocks and rarefactions as has been seen in previous simulations. The high resolution of our simulations allows us to explore in great detail the effect of pinch forces (due to the jet's toroidal magnetic field) within the ''working surfaces'' where pulses interact. We map the strong Hα emission marking shock fronts and the strong [S II] emission inside cooling regions behind shocks as observed with high-resolution images of jets. We find that pinch forces in the stronger field cases produce additional emission regions along the axis as compared with purely hydrodynamic runs. These simulations are a first step to understanding the full three-dimensional emission properties of radiative MHD jets.

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. III. ROTATING RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-09-20

    We have investigated the influence of jet rotation and differential motion on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box. Displacement of the initial helical magnetic field leads to the growth of the CD kink instability. We find that, in accordance with the linear stability theory, the development of the instability depends on the lateral distribution of the poloidal magnetic field. If the poloidal field significantly decreases outward from the axis, then the initial small perturbations grow strongly, and if multiple wavelengths are excited, then nonlinear interaction eventually disrupts the initial cylindrical configuration. When the profile of the poloidal field is shallow, the instability develops slowly and eventually saturates. We briefly discuss implications of our findings for Poynting-dominated jets.

  4. JET FORMATION FROM MASSIVE YOUNG STARS: MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS VERSUS RADIATION PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Bhargav; Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Beuther, Henrik E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-11-20

    Observations indicate that outflows from massive young stars are more collimated during their early evolution compared to later stages. Our paper investigates various physical processes that impact the outflow dynamics, i.e., its acceleration and collimation. We perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations particularly considering the radiation pressure exerted by the star and the disk. We have modified the PLUTO code to include radiative forces in the line-driving approximation. We launch the outflow from the innermost disk region (r < 50 AU) by magnetocentrifugal acceleration. In order to disentangle MHD effects from radiative forces, we start the simulation in pure MHD and later switch on the radiation force. We perform a parameter study considering different stellar masses (thus luminosity), magnetic flux, and line-force strength. For our reference simulation-assuming a 30 M{sub Sun} star-we find substantial de-collimation of 35% due to radiation forces. The opening angle increases from 20 Degree-Sign to 32 Degree-Sign for stellar masses from 20 M{sub Sun} to 60 M{sub Sun }. A small change in the line-force parameter {alpha} from 0.60 to 0.55 changes the opening angle by {approx}8 Degree-Sign . We find that it is mainly the stellar radiation that affects the jet dynamics. Unless the disk extends very close to the star, its force is too small to have much impact. Essentially, our parameter runs with different stellar masses can be understood as a proxy for the time evolution of the star-outflow system. Thus, we have shown that when the stellar mass (thus luminosity) increases with age, the outflows become less collimated.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup –1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  6. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  7. General relativistic magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the jet in M 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościbrodzka, Monika; Falcke, Heino; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2016-02-01

    Context. The connection between black hole, accretion disk, and radio jet can be constrained best by fitting models to observations of nearby low-luminosity galactic nuclei, in particular the well-studied sources Sgr A* and M 87. There has been considerable progress in modeling the central engine of active galactic nuclei by an accreting supermassive black hole coupled to a relativistic plasma jet. However, can a single model be applied to a range of black hole masses and accretion rates? Aims: Here we want to compare the latest three-dimensional numerical model, originally developed for Sgr A* in the center of the Milky Way, to radio observations of the much more powerful and more massive black hole in M 87. Methods: We postprocess three-dimensional GRMHD models of a jet-producing radiatively inefficient accretion flow around a spinning black hole using relativistic radiative transfer and ray-tracing to produce model spectra and images. As a key new ingredient in these models, we allow the proton-electron coupling in these simulations depend on the magnetic properties of the plasma. Results: We find that the radio emission in M 87 is described well by a combination of a two-temperature accretion flow and a hot single-temperature jet. Most of the radio emission in our simulations comes from the jet sheath. The model fits the basic observed characteristics of the M 87 radio core: it is "edge-brightened", starts subluminally, has a flat spectrum, and increases in size with wavelength. The best fit model has a mass-accretion rate of Ṁ ~ 9 × 10-3M⊙ yr-1 and a total jet power of Pj ~ 1043 erg s-1. Emission at λ = 1.3 mm is produced by the counter-jet close to the event horizon. Its characteristic crescent shape surrounding the black hole shadow could be resolved by future millimeter-wave VLBI experiments. Conclusions: The model was successfully derived from one for the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way by appropriately scaling mass and

  8. A General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation of Jet Formation with a State Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Richardson, G.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Hardee, P.; Fushman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have performed the first fully three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The initial simulation results show that a bipolar jet (velocity sim 0.3c) is created as shown by previous two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations with mirror symmetry at the equator. The 3-D simulation ran over one hundred light-crossing time units which is considerably longer than the previous simulations. We show that the jet is initially formed as predicted due in part to magnetic pressure from the twisting the initially uniform magnetic field and from gas pressure associated with shock formation. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. It should be noted that no streaming matter from a donor is included at the outer boundary in the simulation (an isolated black hole not binary black hole). The wind flows outwards with a wider angle than the initial jet. The widening of the jet is consistent with the outward moving shock wave. This evolution of jet-disk coupling suggests that the low/hard state of the jet system may switch to the high/soft state with a wind, as the accretion rate diminishes.

  9. THE PARABOLIC JET STRUCTURE IN M87 AS A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC NOZZLE

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi E-mail: asada@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2013-10-01

    The structure and dynamics of the M87 jet from sub-milliarcsec to arcsecond scales are continuously examined. We analyzed the Very Long Baseline Array archival data taken at 43 and 86 GHz to measure the size of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) cores. Millimeter/sub-millimeter VLBI cores are considered as innermost jet emissions, which has been originally suggested by Blandford and Königl. Those components fairly follow an extrapolated parabolic streamline in our previous study so that the jet has a single power-law structure with nearly 5 orders of magnitude in the distance starting from the vicinity of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), less than 10 Schwarzschild radius (r{sub s}). We further inspect the jet parabolic structure as a counterpart of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nozzle in order to identify the property of a bulk acceleration. We interpret that the parabolic jet consists of Poynting-flux dominated flows, powered by large-amplitude, nonlinear torsional Alfvén waves. We examine the non-relativistic MHD nozzle equation in a parabolic shape. The nature of trans-fast magnetosonic flow is similar to the one of transonic solution of Parker's hydrodynamic solar wind; the jet becomes super-escape as well as super-fast magnetosonic at around ∼10{sup 3} r{sub s}, while the upstream trans-Alfvénic flow speed increases linearly as a function of the distance at ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} r{sub s}. We here point out that this is the first evidence to identify these features in astrophysical jets. We propose that the M87 jet is magnetically accelerated, but thermally confined by the stratified interstellar medium inside the sphere of gravitational influence of the SMBH potential, which may be a norm in active galactic nucleus jets.

  10. The effect of compressibility on magnetohydrodynamic jets and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praturi, Divya Sri; Girimaji, Sharath

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility and magnetic field on the evolution of planar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets. These jets are susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability when subjected to an in-plane transverse velocity perturbation. Various linear stability analyses have shown that compressibility and magnetic field along the jet have a stabilizing influence on the KH instability. We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using magneto gas kinetic method (MGKM) to study the effect of the Mach number, Alfvén Mach number, and the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the jet velocity direction on the flow-field evolution. In MGKM, the magnetic effects are added as source terms in the hydrodynamic gas kinetic scheme which also take into account the non-ideal MHD terms for finite plasma conductivity and the Hall effects. An in-depth analysis of linear and nonlinear physics is presented. The first author was supported by Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Study HEEP fellowship.

  11. Multiwave Interactions in Turbulent Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear wave-wave interactions in turbulent jets were investigated based on the integrated energy of each scale of motion in a cross section of the jet. The analysis indicates that two frequency components in the axisymmetric mode can interact with other background frequencies in the axisymmetric mode, thereby amplifying an enormous number of other frequencies. Two frequency components in a single helical mode cannot, by themselves, amplify other frequency components. But combinations of frequency components of helical and axisymmetric modes can amplify other frequencies in other helical modes. The present computations produce several features consistent with experimental observations such as: (1) dependency of the interactions on the initial phase differences, (2) enhancement of the momentum thickness under multifrequency forcing, and (3) the increase in background turbulence under forcing. In a multifrequency-excited jet, mixing enhancement was found to be a result of the turbulence enhancement rather than simply the amplification of forced wave components. The excitation waves pump energy from the mean flow to the turbulence, thus enhancing the latter. The high frequency waves enhance the turbulence close to the jet exit, but, the low frequency waves are most effective further downstream.

  12. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of weakly magnetized and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly magnetized and strongly magnetized stationary or weakly relativistic (v = c/2) sheath have been performed. A magnetic field parallel to the flow is used in these simulations performed by the new GRMHD numerical code RAISHIN used in its RMHD configuration. In the numerical simulations the Lorentz factor gamma = 2.5 jet is precessed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. In the simulations sound speeds are less than or equal to c/the square root of 3 in the weakly magnetized simulations and less than or equal to 0.56 c in the strongly magnetized simulations. The Alfven wave speed is less than or equal to 0.07 c in the weakly magnetized simulations and less than or equal to 0.56 c in the strongly magnetized simulations. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations capable of describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized relativistically moving sheath. The theoretical dispersion relation allows investigation of effects associated with maximum possible sound speeds, Alfven wave speeds near light speed and relativistic sheath speeds. The prediction of increased stability of the weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and the stabilization of the strongly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds is verified by the numerical simulation results.

  13. Driving Solar Spicules and Jets with Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence: Testing a Persistent Idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2015-10-01

    The solar chromosphere contains thin, highly dynamic strands of plasma known as spicules. Recently, it has been suggested that the smallest and fastest (Type II) spicules are identical to intermittent jets observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. These jets appear to expand out along open magnetic field lines rooted in unipolar network regions of coronal holes. In this paper we revisit a thirty-year-old idea that spicules may be caused by upward forces associated with Alfvén waves. These forces involve the conversion of transverse Alfvén waves into compressive acoustic-like waves that steepen into shocks. The repeated buffeting due to upward shock propagation causes nonthermal expansion of the chromosphere and a transient levitation of the transition region (TR). Some older models of wave-driven spicules assumed sinusoidal wave inputs, but the solar atmosphere is highly turbulent and stochastic. Thus, we model this process using the output of a time-dependent simulation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The resulting mode-converted compressive waves are strongly variable in time, with a higher TR occurring when the amplitudes are large and a lower TR when the amplitudes are small. In this picture, the TR bobs up and down by several Mm on timescales less than a minute. These motions produce narrow, intermittent extensions of the chromosphere that have similar properties as the observed jets and Type II spicules.

  14. Two-dimensional non-reacting jet-gas mixing in an MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) second stage combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to aid in the design of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) second stage combustor. A two-dimensional steady state computer model, based on mass and momentum conservation laws for multiple gas species, is used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the combustor in which a jet of oxidizer is injected into a confined cross-stream gas flow. The model predicts jet-gas mixing patterns by computing the velocity and species concentration distributions in the combustor. In this paper the effects of parametric variation of jet angle and flow symmetry on the mixing patterns were evaluated. The modeling helps to determine better mixing patterns for the combustor design because improved mixing can increase combustion efficiency and enhance MHD generator performance. A parametric study reveals that (1) non-reacting jet-gas mixing strongly depends on jet angle for coflow injection (jet angle < 90 degrees), (2) counterflow jets have better jet-gas mixing, (3) asymmetry of the inlet gas flow affects the mixing pattern, and (4) exit flow characteristics from two-dimensional simulation can be matched reasonably well with experimental data when experimental jet and simulated slot jet Reynolds numbers are of the same order. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Nonlinear wave interactions in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The rotating magnetohydrodynamic flows of a thin layer of astrophysical and space plasmas with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field are considered in the shallow water approximation. The presence of a vertical external magnetic field changes significantly the dynamics of wave processes in an astrophysical plasma, in contrast to a neutral fluid and a plasma layer in an external toroidal magnetic field. There are three-wave nonlinear interactions in the case under consideration. Using the asymptotic method of multiscale expansions, we have derived nonlinear equations for the interaction of wave packets: three magneto- Poincare waves, three magnetostrophic waves, two magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and two magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. The existence of decay instabilities and parametric amplification is predicted. We show that a magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, a magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, a magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and a magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. There are the following parametric amplification mechanisms: the parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, the parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, the amplification of a magneto-Poincare wave in the field of a magnetostrophic wave, and the amplification of a magnetostrophic wave in the field of a magneto-Poincare wave. The instability growth rates and parametric amplification factors have been found for the corresponding processes.

  16. The interaction of a magnetohydrodynamical shock with a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, filamentary cloud. We investigate the effects of various filament lengths and orientations on the interaction using different orientations of the magnetic field, and vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the filament χ, and the plasma beta, in order to determine their effect on the evolution and lifetime of the filament. We find that in a parallel magnetic field filaments have longer lifetimes if they are orientated more `broadside' to the shock front, and that an increase in χ hastens the destruction of the cloud, in terms of the modified cloud-crushing time-scale, tcs. The combination of a mild shock and a perpendicular or oblique field provides the best condition for extending the life of the filament, with some filaments able to survive almost indefinitely since they are cocooned by the magnetic field. A high value for χ does not initiate large turbulent instabilities in either the perpendicular or oblique field cases but rather draws the filament out into long tendrils which may eventually fragment. In addition, flux ropes are only formed in parallel magnetic fields. The length of the filament is, however, not as important for the evolution and destruction of a filament.

  17. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Jets from Black Hole Accretions Disks: Two-Component Jets Driven by Nonsteady Accretion of Magnetized Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Shinji; Shibata, Kazunari; Kudoh, Takahiro

    1998-03-01

    The radio observations have revealed the compelling evidence of the existence of relativistic jets not only from active galactic nuclei but also from ``microquasars'' in our Galaxy. In the cores of these objects, it is believed that a black hole exists and that violent phenomena occur in the black hole magnetosphere, forming the relativistic jets. To simulate the jet formation in the magnetosphere, we have newly developed the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code. Using the code, we present a model of these relativistic jets, in which magnetic fields penetrating the accretion disk around a black hole play a fundamental role of inducing nonsteady accretion and ejection of plasmas. According to our simulations, a jet is ejected from a close vicinity to a black hole (inside 3rS, where rS is the Schwarzschild radius) at a maximum speed of ~90% of the light velocity (i.e., a Lorentz factor of ~2). The jet has a two-layered shell structure consisting of a fast gas pressure-driven jet in the inner part and a slow magnetically driven jet in the outer part, both of which are collimated by the global poloidal magnetic field penetrating the disk. The former jet is a result of a strong pressure increase due to shock formation in the disk through fast accretion flow (``advection-dominated disk'') inside 3rS, which has never been seen in the nonrelativistic calculations.

  18. Radio Jet Interactions with Massive Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wiita, P. J.; Joyce, J.; Hooda, J. S.

    1998-12-01

    Rather high resolution three-dimensional simulations of hydrodynamical jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. The parameters we employ are suitable for moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. Before they cross this interface, these simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive clouds within the galactic halo, with densities 10 or more times higher than the ambient atmospheric density, and 100's of times the jet density. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and could correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for off-center collisions, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets crossing tilted interfaces in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions, particularly with weaker jets, could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. The possibility of jets being bent, yet remaining stable, after such collisions is also investigated. This work was supported by NPACI allocation GSU200 on the Cray T90 and by RPE funds at Georgia State University.

  19. Towards Observational Astronomy of Jets in Active Galaxies from General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantua, Richard; Roger Blandford, Jonathan McKinney and Alexander Tchekhovskoy

    2016-01-01

    We carry out the process of "observing" simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with relativistic jets (hereafter called jet/accretion disk/black hole (JAB) systems) from ray tracing between image plane and source to convolving the resulting images with a point spread function. Images are generated at arbitrary observer angle relative to the black hole spin axis by implementing spatial and temporal interpolation of conserved magnetohydrodynamic flow quantities from a time series of output datablocks from fully general relativistic 3D simulations. We also describe the evolution of simulations of JAB systems' dynamical and kinematic variables, e.g., velocity shear and momentum density, respectively, and the variation of these variables with respect to observer polar and azimuthal angles. We produce, at frequencies from radio to optical, fixed observer time intensity and polarization maps using various plasma physics motivated prescriptions for the emissivity function of physical quantities from the simulation output, and analyze the corresponding light curves. Our hypothesis is that this approach reproduces observed features of JAB systems such as superluminal bulk flow projections and quasi-periodic oscillations in the light curves more closely than extant stylized analytical models, e.g., cannonball bulk flows. Moreover, our development of user-friendly, versatile C++ routines for processing images of state-of-the-art simulations of JAB systems may afford greater flexibility for observing a wide range of sources from high power BL-Lacs to low power quasars (possibly with the same simulation) without requiring years of observation using multiple telescopes. Advantages of observing simulations instead of observing astrophysical sources directly include: the absence of a diffraction limit, panoramic views of the same object and the ability to freely track features. Light travel time effects become significant for high Lorentz factor and small angles between

  20. Radio jet interactions with massive clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, Paul J.; Wang, Zhongxiang; Hooda, Jagbir S.

    2002-05-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of light hydrodynamic jets are computed using the Zeus-3D code. We employ parameters corresponding to moderate to high power radio jets emerging through a galactic atmosphere or halo, and eventually crossing a tilted pressure matched interface with a hotter intracluster medium. These simulations aim the jets so that they hit massive dense clouds within the galactic halo. Such clouds are set up with radii several times that of the jet, and nominally correspond to giant molecular cloud complexes or small cannibalized galaxies. We find that powerful jets eventually disperse the clouds, but that, for the off-center collisions considered, non-axisymmetric instabilities are induced in those jets. Those instabilities grow faster for lower Mach number jets, and can produce disruptions substantially sooner than occurred in our earlier work on jets in the absence of collisions with massive clouds. Such interactions could be related to some Compact Steep Spectrum source morphologies. Very weak jets can be effectively halted by reasonably massive clouds, and this may have relevance for the paucity of radio jets in spiral galaxies. Slow, dense jets may be bent, yet remain stable for fairly extended times, thereby explaining some Wide-Angle-Tail and most "dog-leg" morphologies.

  1. Interaction of a supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma jet with an ambient medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bocchi, M.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G.; Bland, S. N.; de Grouchy, P.; Hall, G. N.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Khoory, E.; Patankar, S.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J.; Smith, R.; Chittenden, J. P.; Krishnan, M.; Madden, R. E.; Wilson-Elliot, K.; Ciardi, A.; Frank, A.

    2012-02-01

    An experimental investigation into the interaction of a supersonic, radiatively cooled plasma jet with argon gas is presented. The jet is formed by ablation of an aluminum foil driven by a 1.4 MA, 250 ns current pulse in a radial foil Z-pinch configuration. The outflow consists of a supersonic (Mach number ˜3-5), dense (ion density ni ˜ 1018 cm-3), highly collimated (half-opening angle ˜2°-5°) jet surrounded by a lower density halo plasma moving with the same axial velocity as the jet. The addition of argon above the foil leads to the formation of a shock driven by the ablation of halo plasma, together with a bow-shock driven by the dense jet. Experimental data with and without the presence of argon are compared with three-dimensional, magneto-hydrodynamic simulations using the GORGON code.

  2. Minimum induced drag configurations with jet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for determining the optimum camber shape and twist distribution for the minimum induced drag in the wing-alone case without prescribing the span loading shape. The same method was applied to find the corresponding minimum induced drag configuration with the upper-surface-blowing jet. Lan's quasi-vortex-lattice method and his wing-jet interaction theory was used. Comparison of the predicted results with another theoretical method shows good agreement for configurations without the flowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  3. Exotic interactions among C-jets and Pb-jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The C-jets and Pb-jets were surveyed on the part of Chacaltaya emulsion chamber No.19 amounting to an exposure of 28.8 sq m yr. It is shown that the adopted events make up an unbiased sample of C-jets for sigma sub E gamma TeV. Mini-Centauro interaction gives the most natural explanation for the eight pinaught-less C-jets with three or more constituent shower core. Out of the eight double-cored pinaught-less events, three are found to have visible invariant masses 1.8 GeV/c. Three Pb-jets-lower are composed of double cores whose respective visible transverse momenta are greater than 0.5 GeV/c, suggesting that they are of Geminion origin or chiron origin. The energies of the parent particles are estimated to be 100 to 200 TeV for all three kinds of events. The implications of this energy estimate and the frequency of observed exotic events are discussed.

  4. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  5. A magnetohydrodynamic model of the M87 jet. II. Self-consistent quad-shock jet model for optical relativistic motions and particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Masanori

    2014-04-20

    We describe a new paradigm for understanding both relativistic motions and particle acceleration in the M87 jet: a magnetically dominated relativistic flow that naturally produces four relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks (forward/reverse fast and slow modes). We apply this model to a set of optical super- and subluminal motions discovered by Biretta and coworkers with the Hubble Space Telescope during 1994-1998. The model concept consists of ejection of a single relativistic Poynting jet, which possesses a coherent helical (poloidal + toroidal) magnetic component, at the remarkably flaring point HST-1. We are able to reproduce quantitatively proper motions of components seen in the optical observations of HST-1 with the same model we used previously to describe similar features in radio very long baseline interferometry observations in 2005-2006. This indicates that the quad relativistic MHD shock model can be applied generally to recurring pairs of super/subluminal knots ejected from the upstream edge of the HST-1 complex as observed from radio to optical wavelengths, with forward/reverse fast-mode MHD shocks then responsible for observed moving features. Moreover, we identify such intrinsic properties as the shock compression ratio, degree of magnetization, and magnetic obliquity and show that they are suitable to mediate diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic particles via the first-order Fermi process. We suggest that relativistic MHD shocks in Poynting-flux-dominated helical jets may play a role in explaining observed emission and proper motions in many active galactic nuclei.

  6. Interaction of small-amplitude fluctuations with a strong magnetohydrodynamic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, H.-C.; Russell, C. T.

    1982-05-01

    The interaction of small fluctuations with a strong magnetohydrodynamic shock is considered theoretically in the most general situation using an ideal model. An analytical treatment of the cutoff conditions for penetration of the upstream fluctuation through the bow shock is presented. The situation in which there exist unique solutions of the interaction is investigated quantitatively. Numerical examples of the interaction of waves in the solar wind with the terrestrial bow shock are given to illustrate the refracted waves to be found in the earth's magnetosheath.

  7. Interaction of small-amplitude fluctuations with a strong magnetohydrodynamic shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuang, H.-C.; Russell, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of small fluctuations with a strong magnetohydrodynamic shock is considered theoretically in the most general situation using an ideal model. An analytical treatment of the cutoff conditions for penetration of the upstream fluctuation through the bow shock is presented. The situation in which there exist unique solutions of the interaction is investigated quantitatively. Numerical examples of the interaction of waves in the solar wind with the terrestrial bow shock are given to illustrate the refracted waves to be found in the earth's magnetosheath.

  8. Relativistic jet interaction with forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Wagner, Alex; Slatyer Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting simulations of jets interacting with molecular and atomic gas on scales of a few kpc in forming galaxies. Competing processes, such as the dispersion of gas in the galaxy and star formation in the high-pressure environment determine whether positive or negative feedback predominates. We shall present our new simulations including an assessment of these different effects. Our simulations also predict the velocity and velocity dispersion of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies, which are undergoing interaction with relativistic jets. These results are of interest to radio and optical spectral imaging observations of galaxies undergoing feedback. The other product of our simulations is the determination of the free-free optical depth due to free-free absorption. This is relevant to the low frequency turnover in Gigahertz Peak Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources.

  9. Particle-jet interactions in an MHD second stage combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Lottes, S.A.; Chang, S.L.

    1992-07-01

    An Argonne two-phase combustion flow computer code is used to simulate reacting flows to aid in the development of an advanced combustor for magnetohydrodynamic power generation. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two- dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and particles. The combustion code includes turbulence, integral combustion, and particle evaporation submodels. A recently developed integral combustion submodel makes calculations more efficient and more stable while still preserving the major physical effects of the complex combustion processes. The combustor under investigation is a magnetohydrodynamic second stage combustor in which opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream of hot coal gas flow following a first stage swirl combustor. The simulation is intended to enhance the understanding the of seed particle evaporation in the combustor and evaluate the effects of combustor operating conditions on seed particle evaporation and vapor dispersion, which directly affect overall magnetohydrodynamic power generation. Computation results show that oxidizer jet angle and particle size may greatly affect particle evaporation and vapor dispersion. At a jet angle about 130 degrees, particle evaporation rate is the highest because of the highest average gas temperature. As particle size increases beyond 10 microns in diameter, the effects of particle size on wall deposition rate, evaporation delay, and downstream seed vapor dispersion become more pronounced. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  11. Analysis of some acoustics-jet flow interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical problems in the interactions between the mean-shear flows and the acoustic field in the planar and circular jets are examined. These problems are basic in understanding the effects of coherent large structure on the generation and complications of sound in a sub-sonic jet. Three problems were investigated: (1) spatial (vs. temporal) normal mode analysis in a planar jets; (2) a slightly divergent, planar jet; and (3) acoustic waves in an axisymmetrical jet.

  12. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-01

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  13. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-15

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  14. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Jet Formation with a Thin Keplerian Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Hardee, Philip; Gerald, J. Fishman

    2006-01-01

    We have performed several simulations of black hole systems (non-rotating, black hole spin parameter a = 0.0 and rapidly rotating, a = 0.95) with a geometrically thin Keplerian disk using the newly developed RAISHIN code. The simulation results show the formation of jets driven by the Lorentz force and the gas pressure gradient. The jets have mildly relativistic speed (greater than or equal to 0.4 c). The matter is continuously supplied from the accretion disk and the jet propagates outward until each applicable terminal simulation time (non-rotating: t/tau S = 275 and rotating: t/tau S = 200, tau s equivalent to r(sub s/c). It appears that a rotating black hole creates an additional, faster, and more collimated inner outflow (greater than or equal to 0.5 c) formed and accelerated by the twisted magnetic field resulting from frame-dragging in the black hole ergosphere. This new result indicates that jet kinematic structure depends on black hole rotation.

  15. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Jets Injected into an Oblique Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Sakai, Jun-ichi; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Sol, Hélène; Mutel, Robert L.

    1998-05-01

    We discuss the structure and relativistic kinematics that develop in three spatial dimensions when a moderately hot, supersonic jet propagates into a denser background medium and encounters resistance from an oblique magnetic field. Our simulations incorporate relativistic MHD in a four-dimensional spacetime and clearly show that (1) relatively weak, oblique fields (at 1/16 of the equipartition value) have only a negligible influence on the propagating jet and they are passively pushed away by the relativistically moving head; (2) oblique fields in equipartition with the ambient plasma provide more resistance and cause bending at the jet head but the magnitude of this deflection and the associated backflow are small compared to those identified by previous studies. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy, and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently during the simulations. The effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in three-dimensional space rather than as a two-dimensional slab structure. Applied to relativistic extragalactic jets from blazars, the new results are encouraging, since superluminal outflows exhibit bending near their sources and their environments are profoundly magnetized--but observations do not provide support for irregular kinematics such as large-scale vortical motions and pronounced reverse flows near the points of origin.

  16. Profile-turbulence interactions, magnetohydrodynamic relaxations, and transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Thyagaraja, A.; Knight, P.J.; Baar, M.R. de; Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Min, E.

    2005-09-15

    The dynamical behavior of the global, two-fluid, electromagnetic model of a tokamak plasma is explored under conditions corresponding to the Rijnhuizen tokamak project [A. J. H. Donne, Plasma Phys. Rep. 20, 192 (1994)] using the CUTIE code [A. Thyagaraja, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, B255 (2000)]. Simulations of an off-axis electron-cyclotron-heated (350 kW) hydrogen discharge and a purely Ohmic one over several resistive evolution times ({tau}{sub res}{approx_equal}15-20 ms) are described. The results illustrate profile-turbulence interactions and the spectral transfer processes implicated in the spontaneous generation and maintenance of mesoscale zonal flows and dynamo currents. Relaxation phenomena, including off- and on-axis sawteeth and periodically repeating edge ballooning instabilities mediated by these mechanisms, are presented. The CUTIE model reproduces many observed features of the experiment qualitatively and suggests that global electromagnetic simulations may play an essential role in understanding tokamak turbulence and transport.

  17. Jet-Supercavity Interaction: Insights from Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeny, M. J.; Krane, M. H.; Kirschner, I. N.; Kinzel, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate some of the claims of Paryshev (2006) regarding changes to ventilated cavity behavior caused by the interaction of a jet with the cavity closure region. The experiments, conducted in the 1.22m dia. Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel, were performed for EDD to tunnel diameter of 0.022, Fr = 14.5 and 26.2. The model consisted of a converging-section nozzle mounted to the base of a 27.9mm 37° cone cavitator placed on the tunnel centerline at the end of a 138.4mm long streamlined strut. A ventilated cavity was formed over the model, then an air jet, issuing from a converging nozzle, was initiated. Changes to cavity behavior were quantified in terms of cavitation number, thrust-to- drag ratio, and stagnation pressure ratio at the jet nozzle. The results show that, while the overall trends predicted by Paryshev were observed, the data did not fully collapse, suggesting that many of the effects neglected by Paryshev's model have measureable effect.

  18. Physics and evolution of constant opening angle jets using a quasi-one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koupelis, Theodoros

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the significance of the assumptions of infinite conductivity and time independence in the context of an ideal MHD model for constant opening angle jets. The model is developed by projecting the MHD equations onto the jet axis. We find that for initially sub-Alfvenic flows (i.e., flows emanating from active galactic nuclei and neutron stars) wind-type solutions exist only when the field lines at the origin are wound up in a direction opposite to the direction of rotation of the compact source. We discuss the possibility that the time evolution of these outflows may be a cycle between breeze- and wind-type solutions as a result of continuous changes in the boundary conditions at the origin due to accretion. We propose that such cycles may explain the apparent one-sideness of some jets, especially the ones for which we cannot use arguments of relativistic beaming. We examine the dependence of the wind-type solutions on the following parameters describing the outflow at the origin: the degree of winding of the field lines, the value of the gas pressure, the polytropic index, the strength of the magnetic field, the value of the rotational velocity, the gravitational potential of the compact object, and the injection velocity. We compare results with results obtained previously, and discuss briefly the qualitative features and physical interpretation of the solutions for outflows emanating from neutron stars and protostars.

  19. Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in circular ducts at intermediate Hartmann numbers and interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molokov, S.; Reed, C. B.

    2003-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows in circular ducts in nonuniform magnetic fields are studied with reference to liquid metal blankets and divertors of fusion reactors. Flows in small and medium size reactors are characterized by moderate and low values of the Hartmann number (˜ 50-2000) and the interaction parameter (˜ 0.1-1000). The validity of the high-Hartmann number flow model for the intermediate range is discussed and the results of theoretical and experimental investigations are presented. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  20. Wind Instability and Interaction of Vibrations of a Thin Plate with a Magnetohydrodynamic Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Gorbatenko, B. B.; Mezhonnova, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the resonance effect of a magnetohydrodynamic hypersonic shear flow on an elastic plate placed in it causes the development of wind instability. Plate bending oscillations propagating along the flow are stabilized in the hypersonic flow regime, whereas waves running at an angle to the flow remain unstable. Expression derived for the instability increment allows conclusions about the effect of the magnetic field on the interaction of waves with the flow to be drawn as well as about the feasibility of its suppression in an unstable flow regime.

  1. Nucleosynthesis in a massive star associated with magnetohydrodynamical jets from collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Kotake, K.; Yamada, S.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis during the stellar evolution and the jet-like supernova explosion of a massive star of 70 Msolar having the solar metallicity in the main sequence stage. The nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed with large nuclear reaction networks, where the weak s-, p-, and r-processes are taken into account. As a result s-elements of 60 > A > 90 and r-elements of 90 > A > 160 are highly overproduced relative to the solar system abundances. We find that the Sr-Y-Zr isotopes are primarily synthesized in the explosive nucleosynthesis which could be one of the sites of the lighter element primary process (LEPP).

  2. Nucleosynthesis in a massive star associated with magnetohydrodynamical jets from collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Kotake, K.; Yamada, S.

    2012-11-12

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis during the stellar evolution and the jet-like supernova explosion of a massive star of 70 M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} having the solar metallicity in the main sequence stage. The nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed with large nuclear reaction networks, where the weak s-, p-, and r-processes are taken into account. As a result s-elements of 60 > A > 90 and r-elements of 90 > A > 160 are highly overproduced relative to the solar system abundances. We find that the Sr-Y-Zr isotopes are primarily synthesized in the explosive nucleosynthesis which could be one of the sites of the lighter element primary process (LEPP).

  3. Jet-intracluster medium interaction in Hydra A - I. Estimates of jet velocity from inner knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. A.; Wagner, A. Y.; Bicknell, G. V.; Sutherland, R. S.; McNamara, B. R.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first stage of an investigation of the interactions of the jets in the radio galaxy Hydra A with the intracluster medium. We consider the jet kinetic power, the galaxy and cluster atmosphere and the inner structure of the radio source. Analysing radio observations of the inner lobes of Hydra A by Taylor et al. we confirm the jet power estimates ˜1045 erg s-1 derived by Wise et al. from dynamical analysis of the X-ray cavities. With this result and a model for the galaxy halo, we explore the jet-intracluster medium interactions occurring on a scale of 10 kpc using two-dimensional, axisymmetric, relativistic pure hydrodynamic simulations. A key feature is that we identify the three bright knots in the northern jet as biconical reconfinement shocks, which result when an overpressured jet starts to come into equilibrium with the galactic atmosphere. Through an extensive parameter space study we deduce that the jet velocity is approximately 0.8c at a distance 0.5 kpc from the black hole. The combined constraints of jet power, the observed jet radius profile along the jet and the estimated jet pressure and jet velocity imply a value of the jet density parameter χ ≈ 13 for the northern jet. We show that for a jet β = 0.8 and θ = 42°, an intrinsic asymmetry in the emissivity of the northern and southern jet is required for a consistent brightness ratio ≈7 estimated from the 6-cm Very Large Array image of Hydra A.

  4. Interaction of Hydra A jets with the intracluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Mohammad Ali; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent; Wagner, Alex; Slatyer Sutherland, Ralph; McNamara, Brian

    2015-08-01

    An important research area of modern astronomy is to understand the physics of jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and their interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) or intracluster medium (ICM). The aims of our project is to understand the energetics and composition of the jet near its origin, and its interaction with the ICM, focusing on detailed models of the inner structure of a spectacular radio source Hydra A. The key features of our modelling are that 1) We identify the four bright knots in the northern jet of Hydra A as biconical reconfinement shocks, which result when an over-pressured jet starts to come into equilibrium whit the galactic atmosphere 2) The curved morphology of the source and the turbulent transition of the jet to a plume are produced by the dynamical interaction of a precessing jet with the ICM. We provided an innovative theoretical approach to estimate the jet velocity from the information of the inner jet knots and the oscillation of the jet boundary. We also explored the complex morphology of the source and the heating of the ambient medium via the forward shock using a three dimensional precessing jet-ICM interaction model. With the 3D models We successfully reproduced key features of the source, for example, i) Four bright knots along the jet trajectory at approximately correct locations, 2) The curvature of the jet within 10 kpc, 3) The turbulent transition of the jet to a plume, and 4) A misaligned bright knot in the turbulent flaring zone. From our model we determined that the heating of the atmosphere by the jet would be gentle, which is consistent with the assessment of the physics of cooling flow.

  5. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials [preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S-W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  6. Interaction of Relativistic Jets with Their Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic jets such as those emitted by active galactic nuclei are observed to be collimated over great distances, but the cause of this collimation is uncertain. Also not fully understood are the means by which these jets become accelerated to their extreme velocities. To probe these questions, I examine the possibility of collimation and acceleration of relativistic jets by the pressure of the ambient medium surrounding the jet base, in the limit in which the jet interior has lost causal contact with its surroundings. I model the jet with an ultrarelativistic equation of state, injected into an ambient medium that has a pressure that decreases as a power of spherical radius, p ~ r^-n. Within the range 2jet interior will be out of causal contact, but the outer layers of the jet gradually collimate toward the jet axis, leading to the formation of a shocked boundary layer. By constructing partially self-similar solutions to the fluid equations within this boundary layer, I examine the impact of the external pressure profile on the behavior of the fluid in the layer. I determine both the structure of the jet and the rate of energy conversion from internal to kinetic as the jet propagates outward, establishing both the collimation and acceleration profiles of the jet. I will discuss the differences in predicted jet behavior based on whether the jet is purely hydrodynamic or whether the model also includes the effects of a toroidal magnetic field threading the jet interior. I will also describe the conditions that create specific observed jet morphology, such as the "hollow cone" structure seen in jets such as M87. Finally, I will discuss the specific application of these models to describe the relativistic jets that are created by some tidal disruption events --- events in which a star passing near a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is torn apart by tidal forces, and the star material then accretes back onto the SMBH --- such as in the observations of Swift

  7. Relativistic Jet Formation from Black Hole Magnetized Accretion Disks: Method, Tests, and Applications of a General RelativisticMagnetohydrodynamic Numerical Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Shinji; Shibata, Kazunari; Kudoh, Takahiro

    1999-09-01

    Relativistic jets are observed in both active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and ``microquasars'' in our Galaxy. It is believed that these relativistic jets are ejected from the vicinity of black holes. To investigate the formation mechanism of these jets, we have developed a new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) code. We report on the basic methods and test calculations to check whether the code reproduces some analytical solutions, such as a standing shock and a Keplerian disk with a steady state infalling corona or with a corona in hydrostatic equilibrium. We then apply the code to the formation of relativistic MHD jets, investigating the dynamics of an accretion disk initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a nonrotating corona (either in a steady state infall or in hydrostatic equilibrium) around a nonrotating black hole. The numerical results show the following: as time goes on, the disk loses angular momentum as a result of magnetic braking and falls into the black hole. The infalling motion of the disk, which is faster than in the nonrelativistic case because of general relativistic effects below 3rS (rS is the Schwarzschild radius), is strongly decelerated around r=2rS by centrifugal force to form a shock inside the disk. The magnetic field is tightly twisted by the differential rotation, and plasma in the shocked region of the disk is accelerated by the JXB force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In addition, and interior to, this magnetically driven jet, we also found a gas-pressure-driven jet ejected from the shocked region by the gas-pressure force. This two-layered jet structure is formed not only in the hydrostatic corona case but also in the steady state falling corona case.

  8. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2012-01-01

    Many configurations proposed for the next generation of aircraft rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from the observers on the ground. However, the ability to predict the shielding effect and any new noise sources that arise from the high-speed jet flow interacting with a hard surface is currently limited. Furthermore, quality experimental data from jets with surfaces nearby suitable for developing and validating noise prediction methods are usually tied to a particular vehicle concept and, therefore, very complicated. The Jet/Surface Interaction Test was intended to supply a high quality set of data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions and jet flows to researchers developing aircraft noise prediction tools. During phase one, the goal was to measure the noise of a jet near a simple planar surface while varying the surface length and location in order to: (1) validate noise prediction schemes when the surface is acting only as a jet noise shield and when the jet/surface interaction is creating additional noise, and (2) determine regions of interest for more detailed tests in phase two. To meet these phase one objectives, a flat plate was mounted on a two-axis traverse in two distinct configurations: (1) as a shield between the jet and the observer (microphone array) and (2) as a reflecting surface on the opposite side of the jet from the observer.

  9. Jet-intracluster medium interaction in Hydra A - II. The effect of jet precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, M. A.; Bicknell, G. V.; Wagner, A. Y.; Sutherland, R. S.; McNamara, B. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present three-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet interacting with the intracluster medium and compare the simulated jet structure with the observed structure of the Hydra A northern jet. For the simulations, we use jet parameters obtained in the parameter space study of the first paper in this series and probe different values for the precession period and precession angle. We find that for a precession period P ≈ 1 Myr and a precession angle ψ ≈ 20°, the model reproduces (i) the curvature of the jet, (ii) the correct number of bright knots within 20 kpc at approximately correct locations and (iii) the turbulent transition of the jet to a plume. The Mach number of the advancing bow shock ≈1.85 is indicative of gentle cluster atmosphere heating during the early stages of the AGN's activity.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic structure of a plasmoid in fast reconnection in low-beta plasmas: Shock-shock interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-03-15

    The shock structure of a plasmoid in magnetic reconnection in low-beta plasmas is investigated by two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Using a high-accuracy code with unprecedented resolution, shocks, discontinuities, and their intersections are resolved and clarified. Contact discontinuities emanate from triple-shock intersection points, separating fluids of different origins. Shock-diamonds inside the plasmoid appear to decelerate a supersonic flow. New shock-diamonds and a slow expansion fan are found inside the Petschek outflow. A sufficient condition for the new shock-diamonds and the relevance to astrophysical jets are discussed.

  11. LIF Measurement of Interacting Gas Jet Flow with Plane Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, A.; Kurihara, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    2011-05-01

    Discharging rarefied gas jets in low-pressure conditions are interesting and important phenomena from an engineering point of view. For example they relate to the attitude control of the space satellite, or the semiconductor technology. The jets, however, deform to the complicated shapes by interacting with solid walls. In this paper we have performed the experiments the flow visualization as a first step by applying the LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) method on the jet-wall interaction. Jet is spouting out from a φ1.0 mm circular hole into the low pressure air chamber, impinging on a flat plate. The LIF visualization of interacting rarefied gas jet is carried out by using the iodine (I2) tracer and argon ion laser.

  12. A Parametric Study of Jet Interactions with Rarefied Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional computational techniques, in particular the uncoupled CFD-DSMC of the present study, are available to be applied to problems such as jet interactions with variable density regions ranging from a continuum jet to a rarefied free stream. When the value of the jet to free stream momentum flux ratio approximately greater than 2000 for a sharp leading edge flat plate forward separation vortices induced by the jet interaction are present near the surface. Also as the free stream number density n (infinity) decreases, the extent and magnitude of normalized pressure increases and moves upstream of the nozzle exit. Thus for the flat plate model the effect of decreasing n (infinity) is to change the sign of the moment caused by the jet interaction on the flat plate surface.

  13. Simulation of the Interaction Between Two Counterflowing Rarefied Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-05-20

    A preliminary analysis of the flow between a jet of argon plasma and one containing argon excited states is conducted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). As a prelude to the use of more advanced models and to help design the accompanying experiment, a simplified model is formulated that ignores electron kinetics and field effects. This model allows the capture of most of the gas dynamics phenomena present with a standard DSMC code. Two interaction criteria are then used and compared to analyze the flow pattern of the interaction. An increase in the mass flow rate of the neutral jet is found to increase the level of interaction between the jets.

  14. Simulation of the Interaction Between Two Counterflowing Rarefied Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitzine, Cyril; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-05-01

    A preliminary analysis of the flow between a jet of argon plasma and one containing argon excited states is conducted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). As a prelude to the use of more advanced models and to help design the accompanying experiment, a simplified model is formulated that ignores electron kinetics and field effects. This model allows the capture of most of the gas dynamics phenomena present with a standard DSMC code. Two interaction criteria are then used and compared to analyze the flow pattern of the interaction. An increase in the mass flow rate of the neutral jet is found to increase the level of interaction between the jets.

  15. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clif

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are t to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  16. Developing an Empirical Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    The process of developing an empirical model for jet-surface interaction noise is described and the resulting model evaluated. Jet-surface interaction noise is generated when the high-speed engine exhaust from modern tightly integrated or conventional high-bypass ratio engine aircraft strikes or flows over the airframe surfaces. An empirical model based on an existing experimental database is developed for use in preliminary design system level studies where computation speed and range of configurations is valued over absolute accuracy to select the most promising (or eliminate the worst) possible designs. The model developed assumes that the jet-surface interaction noise spectra can be separated from the jet mixing noise and described as a parabolic function with three coefficients: peak amplitude, spectral width, and peak frequency. These coefficients are fit to functions of surface length and distance from the jet lipline to form a characteristic spectra which is then adjusted for changes in jet velocity and/or observer angle using scaling laws from published theoretical and experimental work. The resulting model is then evaluated for its ability to reproduce the characteristic spectra and then for reproducing spectra measured at other jet velocities and observer angles; successes and limitations are discussed considering the complexity of the jet-surface interaction noise versus the desire for a model that is simple to implement and quick to execute.

  17. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-02-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to gain an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in material removal by fluidjet machining processes. Experiments were performed to determine conditions under which the liquid jet impacting a solid material will cause material removal and also to delineate possible physical mechanisms of mass removal at optimum jet-cutting conditions. We have also carried out numerical simulations of jet-induced surface pressure rises and of the material deformation and spallation behavior due to multiple droplet impacts. Results obtained from the experiments and theoretical calculations and their physical implications are also discussed.

  18. Inductive and Electrostatic Acceleration in Relativistic Jet-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.; Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-13

    We report on the observation of rapid particle acceleration in numerical simulations of relativistic jet-plasma interactions and discuss the underlying mechanisms. The dynamics of a charge-neutral, narrow, electron-positron jet propagating through an unmagnetized electron-ion plasma was investigated using a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell computer code. The interaction excited magnetic filamentation as well as electrostatic (longitudinal) plasma instabilities. In some cases, the longitudinal electric fields generated inductively and electrostatically reached the cold plasma wave-breaking limit, and the longitudinal momentum of about half the positrons increased by 50% with a maximum gain exceeding a factor of two. The results are relevant to understanding the micro-physics at the interface region of an astrophysical jet with the interstellar plasma, for example, the edge of a wide jet or the jet-termination point.

  19. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  20. Overview of the Jet/Surface Interaction Test (JSIT1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Brown, Cliff; Bencic, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This material was presented at the Acoustics Technical Working Group Meeting on April22, 2011. It provides an overview of an experiment called the Jet / Surface Interaction Test which was conducted to expand the database available regarding how a planar surface interacts with a jet to shield and/or enhance the jet noise. This presentation focuses on data obtained during Phase 1 of the test, JSIT1, which was conducted using the Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig located in the Aeroacoustics Propulsion Lab at NASA GRCduring January and February, 2011. A second phase of the test, JSIT2, is planned for 2012.There were two parts of the phase 1 test. In part 1, known as the shielding surface part of the test, a planar surface was placed between the jet and the microphones. In part 2, the reflecting surface part of the test, the surface was placed on the opposite side of the jet so that the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Phased array, pressure sensitive paint, and far field acoustic data obtained during JSIT1 are presented. The phased array data illustrate how the jet noise is blocked by the shielding surface. It also shows that the low frequency scrubbing noise generated when the surface is impacted by the jet comes predominantly from the surface trailing edge. The far field data show the trailing edge noise to be a dipole source. The pressure sensitive paint data show how the pressure distribution on the surface varies as the surface is traversed toward jet.This material was presented at the Acoustics Technical Working Group Meeting on April22, 2011. It provides an overview of an experiment called the Jet/Surface Interaction Test which was conducted to expand the database available regarding how a planar surface interacts with a jet to shield and/or enhance the jet noise. This presentation focuses on data obtained during Phase 1 of the test, JSIT1, which was conducted using the Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig located in the Aeroacoustics

  1. Interaction of jet noise with a nearby panel assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreevy, J. L.; Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1995-04-01

    A model of the interaction of the noise from a spreading subsonic jet with a panel-stringer assembly is studied numerically in two dimensions. The radiation resulting from this flow/acoustic/structure coupling is computed and analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. The jet is initially excited by a pulse-like source inserted into the flowfield. The pulse triggers instabilities associated with the inviscid instability of the jet mean flow shear layer. These instabilities in turn generate sound which provides the primary loading for the panels. The resulting structural vibration and radiation depends strongly on panel placement relative to the jet/nozzle configuration. Results are obtained for the panel responses as well as the transmitted and incident pressure. The effect of the panels is to act as a narrow filter, converting the relatively broadband forcing, heavily influenced by jet instabilities, into radiation concentrated in narrow spectral bands.

  2. 3D Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Solar Wind/Earth's Magnetosphere Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalim, M. S.; Poedts, S.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present results of real-time 3D global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere using time-varying data from the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite during a few big magnetic storm events of the previous and current solar cycles, namely the 06 April 2000, 20 November 2003 and 05 April 2010 storms. We introduce a numerical magnetic storm index and compare the geo-effectiveness of these events in terms of this storm index which is a measure for the resulting global perturbation of the Earth's magnetic field. Steady simulations show that the upstream solar wind plasma parameters enter the low-β switch-on regime for some time intervals during a magnetic storm causing a complex dimpled bow shock structure. We also investigate the traces of such bow shock structures during time-dependent simulations of the events. We utilize a 3D, implicit, parallel, unstructured grid, compressible finite volume ideal MHD solver with an anisotropic grid adaptation technique for the computer simulations.

  3. A multifluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between Jupiter's magnetosphere and its moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M.; Tenishev, V.; Toth, G.; van der Holst, B.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa is believed to contain a subsurface water ocean whose finite electrical conductance imposes clear induction signatures on the magnetic field in its surroundings. The evidence rests heavily on measurements performed by the magnetometer on board the Galileo spacecraft during multiple flybys of the moon. Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere has become a major target of research in planetary science, partly because of the potential of a salty ocean to harbor life outside our own planet. Thus it is of considerable interest to develop numerical simulations of the Europa-Jupiter interaction that can be compared with data in order to refine our knowledge of Europa's subsurface structure. In this presentation we show aspects of Europa's interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere extracted from a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code BATS-R-US recently developed at the University of Michigan. The model dynamically separates magnetospheric and pick-up ions and is capable of capturing some of the physics previously accessible only to kinetic approaches. The model utilizes an adaptive grid to maintain the high spatial resolution on the surface required to resolve the portion of Europa's neutral atmosphere with a scale height of a few tens of kilometers that is in thermal equilibrium. The model also derives the electron temperature, which is crucial to obtain the local electron impact ionization rates and hence the plasma mass loading in Europa's atmosphere. We compare our results with observations made by the plasma particles and fields instruments on the Galileo spacecraft to validate our model. We will show that multifluid MHD is able to reproduce the basic features of the plasma moments and magnetic field observations obtained during the Galileo E4 and E26 flybys at Europa.

  4. An Analytical Investigation of Wing-Jet Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction between the wing and an inviscid jet with Mach number nonuniformity is formulated by using a two-vortex-sheet model for the jet. One of the vortex sheets accounts for the induced jet flow and the other the induced outer flow. No additional source distribution is needed for the jet at an angle of attack. The above problem is solved by satisfying the jet and wing tangency and the jet pressure-continuity conditions and using a quasi vortex lattice method for computing the induced flow field. The latter method is derived through theoretical consideration by properly accounting for singularities present in the equations and possesses the same simplicity and generality as the conventional vortex lattice method but has a better rate of numerical convergence. The resulting system of algebraic equations is solved by Purcell's vector method. The numerical formulation is first applied to the wing-slipstream interaction problem. Results for one centered-jet configuration are compared with those predicted by some existing theories.

  5. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-06-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  6. Synthetic Jet Interaction With A Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Douglas R.

    2002-01-01

    effectiveness of synthetic jet actuators in an application setting has been confirmed through a number of studies, the fluid dynamic mechanism by which control is effected is not well understood. Issues like yaw angle arid velocity ratio that have been studied for steady control jets have not been investigated for synthetic jets. Moreover, the role played by the inherently unsteady nature of a synthetic jet in the interaction with the controlled flow is not known. Some recent work by Rinehart and Glazer and Smith suggests that away from tile immediate vicinity of the jet orifice the flow field is steady in the mean, and that the interaction of a synthetic jet and a boundary layer creates a secondary flow in the boundary layer consisting primarily of streamwise vortices.

  7. Interaction of a Liquid Gallium Jet with ISTTOK Edge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, R. B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.

    2008-04-01

    The use of liquid metals as plasma facing components in tokamaks has recently experienced a renewed interest stimulated by their advantages in the development of a fusion reactor. Liquid metals have been proposed to solve problems related to the erosion and neutronic activation of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing an efficient heat exhaust from fusion devices. Presently the most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state range when compared, for example, with gallium that has essentially better thermal properties and lower vapor pressure. To explore further these properties, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying, fully formed liquid gallium jet with the plasma. The interacting, 2.3 mm diameter, jet is generated by hydrostatic pressure and has a 2.5 m/s flow velocity. The liquid metal injector has been build to allow the positioning of the jet inside the tokamak chamber, within a 13 mm range. This paper presents the first obtained experimental results concerning the liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction. A stable jet has been obtained, which was not noticeably affected by the magnetic field transients. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with the gallium jet without degradation of the discharge or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. This observation is supported by spectroscopic measurements showing that gallium radiation is limited to the region around the jet. Furthermore, the power deposited on the jet has been evaluated at different radial locations and the surface temperature increase estimated.

  8. Overexpanded viscous supersonic jet interacting with a unilateral barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, B. M.; Maslennikov, V. G.; Sakharov, V. A.; Serova, E. V.

    1986-07-01

    The interaction of a two-dimensional supersonic jet with a unilateral barrier parallel to the flow symmetry plane was studied to account for effects due to gas viscosity and backgound-gas ejection from the region into which the jet expands. In the present experiments, the incident shock wave was reflected at the end of a shock tube equipped with a nozzle. The jet emerged into a pressure chamber 6 cu m in volume and the environmental pressure ratio of the flow in the quasi-stationary phase remained constant. The light source was an OGM-20 laser operating in the giant-pulse mode. Due to background-gas ejection, the gas density in the vicinity of the barrier is much less than on the unconfined side of the jet. The resulting flow is characterized by two distinct environmental pressure ratios: the flow is underexpanded near the barrier, while on the other side it is overexpanded.

  9. Interaction of multiple supersonic jets with a transonic flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.; Manela, J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of multiple high pressure, supersonic, radial or tangential jets, that are injected from the circumference of the base plane of an axisymmetric body, on its longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients in transonic flow is studied experimentally. The interaction of the jets with the body flow field increases the pressures on the forebody, thus altering its lift and static stability characteristics. It is shown that, within the range of parameters studied. This interaction has a stabilizing effect on the body. The contribution to lift and stability is significant at small angles of attack and decreases nonlinearly at higher angles when the crossflow mechanism becomes dominant.

  10. Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Generation of sound due to scrubbing of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated within the framework of the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far-field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore- Brown equation. The propagation Green's function should be solved numerically starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. The equivalent sources of aerodynamic sound are associated with non-linear momentum flux and enthalpy flux terms that appear in the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. These multi-pole sources should be modeled and evaluated with input from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver with an appropriate turbulence model.

  11. The interaction of synthetic jets with turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing

    In recent years, a promising approach to the control of wall bounded as well as free shear flows, using synthetic jet (oscillatory jet with zero-net-mass-flux) actuators, has received a great deal of attention. A variety of impressive flow control results have been achieved experimentally by many researchers including the vectoring of conventional propulsive jets, modification of aerodynamic characteristics of bluff bodies, control of lift and drag of airfoils, reduction of skin-friction of a flat plate boundary layer, enhanced mixing in circular jets, and control of external as well as internal flow separation and of cavity oscillations. More recently, attempts have been made to numerically simulate some of these flowfields. Numerically several of the above mentioned flow fields have been simulated primarily by employing the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations with a turbulence model and a limited few by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). In simulations, both the simplified boundary conditions at the exit of the jet as well as the details of the cavity and lip have been included. In this dissertation, I describe the results of simulations for several two- and three-dimensional flowfields dealing with the interaction of a synthetic jet with a turbulent boundary layer and control of separation. These simulations have been performed using the URANS equations in conjunction with either one- or a two-equation turbulence model. 2D simulations correspond to the experiments performed by Honohan at Georgia Tech. and 3D simulations correspond to the CFD validation test cases proposed in the NASA Langley Research Center Workshop---"CFD Validation of Synthetic Jets and Turbulent Separation Control" held at Williamsburg VA in March 2004. The sources of uncertainty due to grid resolution, time step, boundary conditions, turbulence modeling etc. have been examined during the computations. Extensive comparisons for various flow variables are made with the

  12. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions With Uniquely Tailored Chevrons: 3. Jet-Flap Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russ H.; Mengle, Vinod G.; Brunsniak, Leon; Elkoby, Ronen

    2006-01-01

    Propulsion airframe aeroacoustic (PAA) interactions, resulting from the integration of engine and airframe, lead to azimuthal asymmetries in the flow/acoustic field, e.g., due to the interaction between the exhaust jet flow and the pylon, the wing and its high-lift devices, such as, flaps and flaperons. In the first two parts of this series we have presented experimental results which show that isolated and installed nozzles with azimuthally varying chevrons (AVCs) can reduce noise more than conventional chevrons when integrated with a pylon and a wing with flaps at take-off conditions. In this paper, we present model-scale experimental results for the reduction of jet-flap interaction noise source due to these AVCs and document the PAA installation effects (difference in noise between installed and isolated nozzle configurations) at both approach and take-off conditions. It is found that the installation effects of both types of chevron nozzles, AVCs and conventional, are reversed at approach and take-off, in that there is more installed noise reduction at approach and less at take-off compared to that of the isolated nozzles. Moreover, certain AVCs give larger total installed noise benefits at both conditions compared to conventional chevrons. Phased microphone array results show that at approach conditions (large flap deflection, low jet speed and low ambient Mach number), chevrons gain more noise benefit from reducing jetflap interaction noise than they do from quieting the jet plume noise source which is already weak at these low jet speeds. In contrast, at take-off (small flap deflection, high jet speed and high ambient Mach number) chevrons reduce the dominant jet plume noise better than the reduction they create in jet-flap interaction noise source. In addition, fan AVCs with enhanced mixing near the pylon are found to reduce jet-flap interaction noise better than conventional chevrons at take-off.

  13. A viscous-inviscid interaction model of jet entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.; Dash, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interaction model for predicting jet entrainment effects on axisymmetric, nozzle afterbodies at subsonic speeds is presented. The model is based on a displacement thickness correction to the inviscid jet boundary that accounts for mixing-induced streamline deflections in the inviscid region. The displacement correction is shown to be related to the local mass entrainment rate and, for thin mixing layers, the model is shown to be analogous to displacement models used in conventional boundary-layer interaction theory. A method is presented for computing the entrainment rate by an overlaid mixing layer model that accounts for the nonsimilar behavior and pressure gradients occurring in the near field region. An iterative scheme for coupling the model to analyses for the external inviscid flow, the external boundary layer, and the inviscid jet exhaust is also given. Results are presented that illustrate the qualitative behavior of the entrainment interaction under various flow conditions and that demonstrate the validity of the model by comparisons with experiment.

  14. Solar wind interaction with the earth's magnetic field. II - Magnetohydrodynamic bow shock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formisano, V.; Moreno, G.; Palmiotto, F.; Hedgecock, P. C.; Chao, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's bow shock has been investigated as a magnetohydrodynamic discontinuity using the plasma and magnetic data supplied by the European satellite Heos 1. The jumps of the fluid parameters through the shock have been studied as a function of the Mach number and of the geometry of the shock surface. The solar wind specific heat ratio has been found to be equal to 1.75 or 2.25, depending on the presence or absence of upstream waves. Computations of the shock velocity performed for 23 crossings gave an average speed of about 85 km/sec.

  15. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Flow Measurements Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Modern aircraft design often puts the engine exhaust in close proximity to the airframe surfaces. Aircraft noise prediction tools must continue to develop in order to meet the challenges these aircraft present. The Jet-Surface Interaction Tests have been conducted to provide a comprehensive quality set of experimental data suitable for development and validation of these exhaust noise prediction methods. Flow measurements have been acquired using streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating surface pressure data acquired using flush mounted pressure transducers near the surface trailing edge. These data combined with previously reported far-field and phased array noise measurements represent the first step toward the experimental data base. These flow data are particularly applicable to development of noise prediction methods which rely on computational fluid dynamics to uncover the flow physics. A representative sample of the large flow data set acquired is presented here to show how a surface near a jet affects the turbulent kinetic energy in the plume, the spatial relationship between the jet plume and surface needed to generate surface trailing-edge noise, and differences between heated and unheated jet flows with respect to surfaces.

  16. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Greens function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Greens function decreases with increasing source frequency andor jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Greens function in the absence of the surface, and flight effect are also investigated.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic analysis of the interaction of magnetized plasma flow with a perfect-conducting object

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hiroyuki; Abe, Takashi

    2010-05-15

    In this study, a supersonic and super-Alfvenic magnetized plasma flow past a perfect-conducting cylinder was simulated based on single-fluid ideal magnetohydrodynamics to clarify the piling-up process of the magnetic field frozen in the plasma flow. Therefore, the magnetic field is assumed to be perpendicular to both the cylinder axis and the flow direction. Simulation results indicated that the cylinder continuously traps the magnetic field and an unsteady flow field is generated. Even though the drag force exerting on the cylinder is expected to continuously increase with the continuous increase in the trapped magnetic field and the shock layer, the intensity of magnetic flux density at the cylinder surface is saturated at a certain value and the drag force is also saturated. The saturated values are characterized by the Alfven Mach number of the mainstream. Furthermore, on this flow structure the wake flow in which magnetic reconnection plays an important role was found to have a strong influence by using the pseudomagnetic reconnection in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic flow.

  18. POD Analysis of Jet-Plume/Afterbody-Wake Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Nathan E.; Seiner, John M.; Jansen, Bernard J.; Gui, Lichuan; Sockwell, Shuan; Joachim, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    The understanding of the flow physics in the base region of a powered rocket is one of the keys to designing the next generation of reusable launchers. The base flow features affect the aerodynamics and the heat loading at the base of the vehicle. Recent efforts at the National Center for Physical Acoustics at the University of Mississippi have refurbished two models for studying jet-plume/afterbody-wake interactions in the NCPA's 1-foot Tri-Sonic Wind Tunnel Facility. Both models have a 2.5 inch outer diameter with a nominally 0.5 inch diameter centered exhaust nozzle. One of the models is capable of being powered with gaseous H2 and O2 to study the base flow in a fully combusting senario. The second model uses hi-pressure air to drive the exhaust providing an unheated representative flow field. This unheated model was used to acquire PIV data of the base flow. Subsequently, a POD analysis was performed to provide a first look at the large-scale structures present for the interaction between an axisymmetric jet and an axisymmetric afterbody wake. PIV and Schlieren data are presented for a single jet-exhaust to free-stream flow velocity along with the POD analysis of the base flow field.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY WITH A SUB-ALFVENIC JET: TEMPORAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2011-06-10

    We have investigated the influence of a velocity shear surface on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria in three dimensions. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box and concentrate on flows that are sub-Alfvenic on the cylindrical jet's axis. Displacement of the initial force-free helical magnetic field leads to the growth of CD kink instability. We find that helically distorted density structure propagates along the jet with speed and flow structure dependent on the radius of the velocity shear surface relative to the characteristic radius of the helically twisted force-free magnetic field. At small velocity shear surface radius, the plasma flows through the kink with minimal kink propagation speed. The kink propagation speed increases as the velocity shear radius increases and the kink becomes more embedded in the plasma flow. A decreasing magnetic pitch profile and faster flow enhance the influence of velocity shear. Simulations show continuous transverse growth in the nonlinear phase of the instability. The growth rate of the CD kink instability and the nonlinear behavior also depend on the velocity shear surface radius and flow speed, and the magnetic pitch radial profile. Larger velocity shear radius leads to slower linear growth, makes a later transition to the nonlinear stage, and with larger maximum amplitude than that occuring for a static plasma column. However, when the velocity shear radius is much greater than the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, linear and nonlinear development can be similar to the development of a static plasma column.

  20. Jet Surface Interaction Scrubbing Noise from High Aspect-Ratio Rectangular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bozak, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity of the airframe. Distributed propulsion system with exhaust configurations that resemble a high aspect ratio rectangular jet are among geometries of interest. Nearby solid surfaces could provide noise shielding for the purpose of reduced community noise. Interaction of high-speed jet exhaust with structure could also generate new sources of sound as a result of flow scrubbing past the structure, and or scattered noise from sharp edges. The present study provides a theoretical framework to predict the scrubbing noise component from a high aspect ratio rectangular exhaust in proximity of a solid surface. The analysis uses the Greens function (GF) to the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation in a transversely sheared mean flow. Sources of sound are defined as the auto-covariance function of second-rank velocity fluctuations in the jet plume, and are modeled using a RANS-based acoustic analogy approach. Acoustic predictions are presented in an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular exhaust at three subsonic Mach numbers. The effect of nearby surface on the scrubbing noise component is shown on both reflected and shielded sides of the plate.

  1. Oblique Shock Interaction with a Laminar Cylindrical Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    We present an experimental study of a planar shock interaction with an initially cylindrical, diffuse density interface, where the angle α between the plane of the shock and the axis of the cylinder can be zero (planar normal interaction) or non-zero (oblique interaction). The interface is formed by injecting a laminar jet of a heavy gas mixture (sulfure hexafluoride, acetone, nitrogen) into quiescent air. The jet is stabilized by an annular co-flow of air to minimize diffusion. Interaction between the pressure gradient (shock front) and density gradients leads to vorticity deposition, and during the subsequent evolution, the flow undergoes mixing (injected material - air) and eventually transitions to turbulence. Several parameters affect this evolution, including the angle α, the Atwood number (density ratio), and the Mach number of the shock. For quantitative and qualitative characterization of the influence of these parameters, we use flow visualization in two planes that relies on planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in acetone, which forms a part of the injected material. This research is supported by NNSA Grant DE-NA000220.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic oscillation of a gas jet of zero inertia dispersed in a resistive liquid with energy conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical oscillation and instability of a gas cylinder of zero inertia immersed in a resistive liquid is developed for symmetric perturbations. In the absence of the magnetic field the conservation of energy is employed to study the problem for all symmetric and asymmetric perturbations. In the latter it is found that the temporal amplification is much lower than that of the full fluid jet. The model is capillary stable for all short and long wavelengths in the asymmetric perturbation while in the symmetric disturbances it is stabilizing or not according to whether the perturbed wavelength is shorter than the gas-cylinder circumference or not. The resistivity is stabilizing or destabilizing according to restrictions. The electromagnetic body force is stabilizing for all wavelengths in the rotationally-symmetric disturbances. The Lorentz body force for high magnetic-field intensity could be suppressing the destabilizing character of the present model. This may be due to the fact that the acting magnetic field is uniform and that the fluid is considered to be incompressible.

  3. Explosive Nucleosynthesis in Magnetohydrodynamical Jets from Collapsars. II --- Heavy-Element Nucleosynthesis of s, p, r-Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Fujimoto, S.; Kotake, K.; Yamada, S.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis in a massive star of 70 M_{⊙} with solar metallicity in the main sequence stage. The helium core mass after hydrogen burning corresponds to 32 M_{⊙}. Nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed during the stellar evolution and the jetlike supernova explosion of a collapsar model. We focus on the production of elements heavier than iron group nuclei. Nucleosynthesis calculations have been accomplished consistently from hydrostatic to dynamic stages by using large nuclear reaction networks, where the weak s-, p-, and r-processes are taken into account. We confirm that s-elements of 60 < A < 90 are highly overproduced relative to the solar abundances in the hydrostatic nucleosynthesis. During oxygen burning, p-elements of A > 90 are produced via photodisintegrations of seed s-elements. However, the produced p-elements are disintegrated in later stages except for ^{180}Ta. In the explosive nucleosynthesis, elements of 90 < A < 160 are significantly overproduced relative to the solar values owing to the r-process, which is very different from the results of spherical explosion models. Only heavy p-elements (N > 50) are overproduced via the p-process because of the low peak temperatures in the oxygen- and neon-rich layers. Compared with the previous study of r-process nucleosynthesis calculations in the collapsar model of 40 M_{⊙} by Fujimoto et al. [S. Fujimoto, M. Hashimoto, K. Kotake and S. Yamada, Astrophys. J. 656 (2007), 382; S. Fujimoto, N. Nishimura and M. Hashimoto, Astrophys. J. 680 (2008), 1350], our jet model cannot contribute to the third peak of the solar r-elements and intermediate p-elements, which have been much produced because of the distribution of the lowest part of electron fraction in the ejecta. Averaging the overproduction factors over the progenitor masses with the use of Salpeter's IMF, we suggest that the 70 M_{⊙} star could contribute to the solar weak s}-elements of 60 < A < 90 and neutron

  4. Interaction of two-dimensional transverse jet with a supersonic mainstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, G. O.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of a two dimensional sonic jet injected transversely into a confined main flow was studied. The main flow consisted of air at a Mach number of 2.9. The effects of varying the jet parameters on the flow field were examined using surface pressure and composition data. Also, the downstream flow field was examined using static pressure, pitot pressure, and composition profile data. The jet parameters varied were gapwidth, jet static pressure, and injectant species of either helium or nitrogen. The values of the jet parameters used were 0.039, 0.056, and 0.109 cm for the gapwidth and 5, 10, and 20 for the jet to mainstream static pressure ratios. The features of the flow field produced by the mixing and interaction of the jet with the mainstream were related to the jet momentum. The data were used to demonstrate the validity of an existing two dimensional elliptic flow code.

  5. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING FOR A FORMATION PROCESS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: INTERACTION BETWEEN AN EJECTING FLUX ROPE AND AN AMBIENT FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Daikou; Kusano, Kanya; Miyoshi, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We performed a magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a formation process of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), focusing on the interaction (reconnection) between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field. We examined three cases with different ambient fields: one had no ambient field, while the other two had dipole fields with opposite directions, parallel and anti-parallel to that of the flux rope surface. We found that while the flux rope disappears in the anti-parallel case, in the other cases the flux ropes can evolve to CMEs and show different amounts of flux rope rotation. The results imply that the interaction between an ejecting flux rope and its ambient field is an important process for determining CME formation and CME orientation, and also show that the amount and direction of the magnetic flux within the flux rope and the ambient field are key parameters for CME formation. The interaction (reconnection) plays a significant role in the rotation of the flux rope especially with a process similar to 'tilting instability' in a spheromak-type experiment of laboratory plasma.

  6. Vortex/Flame Interactions in Microgravity Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Y.; Hegde, U.; Stocker, D. P.

    2001-01-01

    Significant differences have been observed between the structure of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames under downward, upward, and microgravity conditions. These include flame height, jet shear layer, flame instability, flicker, lift-off height, blow-off Reynolds number, and radiative properties. The primary objective of this investigation is to identify the mechanisms involved in the generation and interaction of large-scale structures in microgravity flames. This involves a study of vortex/flame interactions in a space-flight experiment utilizing a controlled, well-defined set of disturbances imposed on a laminar diffusion flame. The results provide a better understanding of the naturally occurring structures that are an inherent part of microgravity turbulent flames. The paper presents the current progress in this program.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) interaction with power transmission and distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.; Meliopoulos, A.P.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report discusses the effects of the late-time high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electrical transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. This environment, known as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP), is a very slowly varying electric field induced in the earth`s surface, similar to the field induced by a geomagnetic storm. It can result in the flow of a quasi-dc current in grounded power lines and in the subsequent magnetic saturation of transformers. This saturation, in turn, causes 6-Hz harmonic distortion and an increase in the reactive power required by generation facilities. This report analyzes and discusses these phenomena. The MHD-EMP environment is briefly discussed, and a simplified form of the earth-induced electric field is developed for use in a parametric study of transmission line responses. Various field coupling models are described, and calculated results for the responses of both transmission- and distribution-class power lines are presented. These calculated responses are compared with measurements of transformer operation under dc excitation to infer the MHD-EMP response of these power system components. It is found that the MHD-EMP environment would have a marked effect on a power system by inducing up to several hundreds of amperes of quasi-dc current on power lines. These currents will cause transformers to saturate which could result in excessive harmonic generation, voltage swings, and voltage suppression. The design of critical facilities which are required to operate during and after MHD-EMP events will have to be modified in order to mitigate the effects of these abnormal power system conditions.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP) interaction with power transmission and distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Barnes, P.R. ); Meliopoulos, A.P.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-02-01

    This report discusses the effects of the late-time high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electrical transmission and distribution (T D) systems. This environment, known as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP), is a very slowly varying electric field induced in the earth's surface, similar to the field induced by a geomagnetic storm. It can result in the flow of a quasi-dc current in grounded power lines and in the subsequent magnetic saturation of transformers. This saturation, in turn, causes 6-Hz harmonic distortion and an increase in the reactive power required by generation facilities. This report analyzes and discusses these phenomena. The MHD-EMP environment is briefly discussed, and a simplified form of the earth-induced electric field is developed for use in a parametric study of transmission line responses. Various field coupling models are described, and calculated results for the responses of both transmission- and distribution-class power lines are presented. These calculated responses are compared with measurements of transformer operation under dc excitation to infer the MHD-EMP response of these power system components. It is found that the MHD-EMP environment would have a marked effect on a power system by inducing up to several hundreds of amperes of quasi-dc current on power lines. These currents will cause transformers to saturate which could result in excessive harmonic generation, voltage swings, and voltage suppression. The design of critical facilities which are required to operate during and after MHD-EMP events will have to be modified in order to mitigate the effects of these abnormal power system conditions.

  9. Interaction of an argon plasma jet with a silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Max; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Kartaschew, Konstantin; Bibinov, Nikita; Havenith, Martina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A filamentary discharge is ignited in an argon plasma jet under atmospheric pressure conditions. The gas discharge is characterized with voltage-current measurements, optical emission spectroscopy and an ICCD-camera with a high temporal resolution down to 10 ns. In the effluent of the plasma jet, filaments come into contact with the surface of a silicon wafer and modify it, namely etching traces are produced and microcrystals are deposited. These traces are studied with optical and electron microscopes. The material of the deposited microcrystals and the surface modifications of the silicon wafer are analyzed with Raman microspectroscopy. Amorphous silicon is found within the etching traces. The largest part of the deposited microcrystals are composed of nitratine (NaNO3) and some of them are calcite (CaCO3). Analyzing the possible reasons for the silicon wafer modifications we come to the conclusion that plasmoids, which are produced near the substrate surface by interaction with ionization waves, are a plausible explanation for the observed surface modifications of the silicon wafer.

  10. Vortex/Flame Interactions in Microgravity Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Y.; Hegde, U.; Stocker, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of vortex/flame interaction is of fundamental importance to turbulent combustion. These interactions have been studied in normal gravity. It was found that due to the interactions between the imposed disturbances and buoyancy induced instabilities, several overall length scales dominated the flame. The problem of multiple scales does not exist in microgravity for a pulsed laminar flame, since there are no buoyancy induced instabilities. The absence of buoyant convection therefore provides an environment to study the role of vortices interacting with flames in a controlled manner. There are strong similarities between imposed and naturally occurring perturbations, since both can be described by the same spatial instability theory. Hence, imposing a harmonic disturbance on a microgravity laminar flame creates effects similar to those occurring naturally in transitional/turbulent diffusion flames observed in microgravity. In this study, controlled, large-scale, axisymmetric vortices are imposed on a microgravity laminar diffusion flame. The experimental results and predictions from a numerical model of transient jet diffusion flames are presented and the characteristics of pulsed flame are described.

  11. Interactions of radially outgoing jets through gaps between periodically arranged bars in a circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Yukio; Mizushima, Jiro

    2006-09-01

    Mutual interactions of jets radially spouting from gaps between periodically arranged sector-shaped bars in a circle are investigated. Confluences of jets were confirmed by flow visualization and numerical simulation assuming a two-dimensional and incompressible flow field. The jets are independent of each other at small Reynolds numbers, but interact in a complex manner to yield various flow patterns such as confluences of several jets or oscillatory flows synchronized in the same phase between several jets. We found that the confluence of two or three steady jets occurs due to a pitchfork bifurcation and that the synchronized oscillation is a consequence of a Hopf bifurcation. Quasi-periodic oscillation in jets was also found and confirmed to originate from a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation; i.e., a Hopf bifurcation for maps. The critical Reynolds numbers for these bifurcations were determined numerically for various values of the pitch-to-nozzle-width ratio.

  12. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal, and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  13. A wing-jet interaction theory for USB configurations. [Upper Surface Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction between the wing and an inviscid upper-surface blowing (USB) thick jet with Mach number nonuniformity is treated within the framework of a linear inviscid subsonic compressible flow theory. A two-vortex-sheet model for the jet surface is used to represent the induced flowfields inside and outside the jet. Comparison of the predicted results with experimental data shows good agreement in lift, induced drag, and pitching moment. It is shown that the thin jet flap theory is inadequate for USB configurations with thick jet.

  14. Space shuttle orbiter reaction control system jet interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter has forward mounted and rear mounted Reaction Control Systems (RCS) which are used for orbital maneuvering and also provide control during entry and abort maneuvers in the atmosphere. The effects of interaction between the RCS jets and the flow over the vehicle in the atmosphere are studied. Test data obtained in the NASA Langley Research Center 31 inch continuous flow hypersonic tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10.3 is analyzed. The data were obtained with a 0.01 scale force model with aft mounted RCS nozzles mounted on the sting off of the force model balance. The plume simulations were accomplished primarily using air in a cold gas simulation through scaled nozzles, however, various cold gas mixtures of Helium and Argon were also tested. The effect of number of nozzles was tested as were limited tests of combined controls. The data show that RCS nozzle exit momentum ratio is the primary correlating parameter for effects where the plume impinges on an adjacent surface and mass flow ratio is the parameter where the plume interaction is primarily with the external stream. An analytic model of aft mounted RCS units was developed in which the total reaction control moments are the sum of thrust, impingement, interaction, and cross-coupling terms.

  15. Resonant Interaction of a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: an Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Taghavi, Ray

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines a supersonic multi jet interaction problem that we believe is likely to be important for mixing enhancement and noise reduction in supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles. We demonstrate that it is possible to synchronize the screech instability of four rectangular jets by precisely adjusting the inter jet spacing. Our experimental data agrees with a theory that assumes that the phase-locking of adjacent jets occurs through a coupling at the jet lip. Although the synchronization does not change the frequency of the screech tone, its amplitude is augmented by 10 dB. The synchronized multi jets exhibit higher spreading than the unsynchronized jets, with the single jet spreading the least. We compare the nearfield noise of the four jets with synchronized screech to the noise of the sum of four jets operated individually. Our noise measurements reveal that the more rapid mixing of the synchronized multi jets causes the peak jet noise source to move up stream and to radiate noise at larger angles to the flow direction. Based on our results, we believe that screech synchronization is advantageous for noise reduction internal to a mixer-ejector nozzle, since the noise can now be suppressed by a shorter acoustically lined ejector.

  16. Control of shock-wave boundary layer interaction using steady micro-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. B.; Manisankar, C.; Akshara, P.

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to control the amplitude of shock unsteadiness associated with the interaction induced by a cylindrical protuberance on a flat plate in a Mach 2.18 flow. The control was applied in the form of an array of steady micro air-jets of different configurations with variation in pitch and skew angle of the jets. The effect of air-jet supply pressure on control was also studied. Each of the micro-jet configurations was placed 20 boundary layer thicknesses upstream of the leading edge of the cylinder. The overall interaction is seen to get modified for all control configurations and shows a reduction in both separation- and bow-shock strengths and in triple-point height. A significant reduction in the peak rms value is also observed in the intermittent region of separation for each case. For pitched jets placed in a zig-zag configuration, good control effectiveness is achieved at control pressures similar to the stagnation pressure of the freestream. At higher control pressures, however, their obstruction component increases and if these jets are not spaced sufficiently far apart, the effectiveness of their control begins to drop due to the beginning of spanwise jet-to-jet interaction. On the other hand, pitching or skewing the jets to reduces the obstruction component considerably which at lower control pressures shows lower effectiveness. But at higher control pressure, the effectiveness of these configurations continues to increase unlike the pitched jets.

  17. Interaction of Pulsed Vortex Generator Jets with Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, K. R.; Johari, H.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex Generator Jets (VGJ) have been proposed as a means for active control of turbulent boundary layer separation by Johnston footnote AIAA J. 28, 989 (1990). It has been shown that a vortex generator jet can create weak longitudinal vorticity of a single sign when the surface-mounted jets are pitched and skewed with respect to the solid surface. The primary advantages of VGJs when compared to solid vortex generators are their lack of parasitic drag when the jets are off and the ability to rapidly activate and deactivate the jets for dynamic control. Pulsing of the jets is proposed as a way of increasing the turbulent mixing and therefore, improving the performance of vortex generator jets. Initial experiments with jets pitched at 45 deg and skewed at 90 deg degrees in air have indicated that large-scale turbulent structures are formed by the pulsed VGJs. Subsequent flow visualization experiments in a water tunnel suggest that fully-modulated jets embedded in a flat plate boundary layer result in a series of puffs which penetrate through the boundary layer. The influence of jet velocity, diameter, pulsing frequency and duty-cycle will be discussed. * Supported by NSF and PSI.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between interplanetary strong shock and magnetic cloud and its consequent geoeffectiveness: 2. Oblique collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ming; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2006-11-01

    Numerical studies of the interplanetary "shock overtaking magnetic cloud (MC)" event are continued by a 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model in heliospheric meridional plane. Interplanetary direct collision (DC)/oblique collision (OC) between an MC and a shock results from their same/different initial propagation orientations. For radially erupted MC and shock in solar corona, the orientations are only determined respectively by their heliographic locations. OC is investigated in contrast with the results in DC (Xiong, 2006). The shock front behaves as a smooth arc. The cannibalized part of MC is highly compressed by the shock front along its normal. As the shock propagates gradually into the preceding MC body, the most violent interaction is transferred sideways with an accompanying significant narrowing of the MC's angular width. The opposite deflections of MC body and shock aphelion in OC occur simultaneously through the process of the shock penetrating the MC. After the shock's passage, the MC is restored to its oblate morphology. With the decrease of MC-shock commencement interval, the shock front at 1 AU traverses MC body and is responsible for the same change trend of the latitude of the greatest geoeffectiveness of MC-shock compound. Regardless of shock orientation, shock penetration location regarding the maximum geoeffectiveness is right at MC core on the condition of very strong shock intensity. An appropriate angular difference between the initial eruption of an MC and an overtaking shock leads to the maximum deflection of the MC body. The larger the shock intensity is, the greater is the deflection angle. The interaction of MCs with other disturbances could be a cause of deflected propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME).

  19. Jet atomization and cavitation induced by interactions between focused ultrasound and a water surfacea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Atomization of a jet produced by the interaction of 1 MHz focused ultrasound with a water surface was investigated using high-speed photography. Viewing various aspects of jet behavior, threshold conditions were obtained necessary for water surface elevation and jet breakup, including drop separation and spray formation. In addition, the position of drop atomization, where a single drop separates from the tip of a jet without spraying, showed good correlation with the jet Weber number. For a set of specified conditions, multiple beaded water masses were formed, moving upwards to produce a vigorous jet. Cavitation phenomena occurred near the center of the primary drop-shaped water mass produced at the leading part of the jet; this was accompanied by fine droplets at the neck between the primary and secondary drop-shaped water masses, due to the collapse of capillary waves.

  20. Advanced Response Surface Modeling of Ares I Roll Control Jet Aerodynamic Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favaregh, Noah M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I rocket uses roll control jets. These jets have aerodynamic implications as they impinge on the surface and protuberances of the vehicle. The jet interaction on the body can cause an amplification or a reduction of the rolling moment produced by the jet itself, either increasing the jet effectiveness or creating an adverse effect. A design of experiments test was planned and carried out using computation fluid dynamics, and a subsequent response surface analysis ensued on the available data to characterize the jet interaction across the ascent portion of the Ares I flight envelope. Four response surface schemes were compared including a single response surface covering the entire design space, separate sector responses that did not overlap, continuously overlapping surfaces, and recursive weighted response surfaces. These surfaces were evaluated on traditional statistical metrics as well as visual inspection. Validation of the recursive weighted response surface was performed using additionally available data at off-design point locations.

  1. Experimental and computational investigation of supersonic counterflow jet interaction in atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, Oleksandr

    The flow field generated by the interaction of a converging-diverging nozzle (exit diameter, D=26 mm M=1.5) flow and a choked flow from a minor jet (exit diameter, d=2.6 mm) in a counterflow configuration was investigated. During the tests both the main C-D nozzle and the minor jet stagnation pressures were varied as well as the region of interaction. Investigations were made in the near field, at most about 2D distance, and in the far field, where the repeated patterns of shock waves were eliminated by turbulence. Both nozzles exhausted to the atmospheric pressure conditions. The flow physics was studied using Schlieren imaging techniques, Pitot-tube, conical Mach number probe, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) and acoustic measurement methods. During the experiments in the far field the jets interaction was observed as the minor jet flow penetrates into the main jet flow. The resulting shock structure caused by the minor jet's presence was dependent on the stagnation pressure ratio between the two jets. The penetration length of the minor jet into the main jet was also dependent on the stagnation pressure ratio. In the far field, increasing the minor jet stagnation pressure moved the bow shock forward, towards the main jet exit. In the near field, the minor jet flow penetrates into the main jet flow, and in some cases modified the flow pattern generated by the main jet, revealing a new effect of jet flow interaction that was previously unknown. A correlation function between the flow modes and the jet stagnation pressure ratios was experimentally determined. Additionally the flow interaction between the main and minor jets was simulated numerically using FLUENT. The optimal mesh geometry was found and the k-epsilon turbulence model was defined as the best fit. The results of the experimental and computational studies were used to describe the shock attenuation effect as self-sustain oscillations in supersonic flow. The effects described here can be used

  2. Coupling hydrodynamics and radiation calculations for star-jet interactions in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cita, V. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Khangulyan, D.; Perucho, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars and their winds can contribute to the non-thermal emission in extragalactic jets. Because of the complexity of jet-star interactions, the properties of the resulting emission are closely linked to those of the emitting flows. Aims: We simulate the interaction between a stellar wind and a relativistic extragalactic jet and use the hydrodynamic results to compute the non-thermal emission under different conditions. Methods: We performed relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet interacting with a supersonic, non-relativistic stellar wind. We computed the corresponding streamlines out of the simulation results and calculated the injection, evolution, and emission of non-thermal particles accelerated in the jet shock, focusing on electrons or e±-pairs. Several cases were explored, considering different jet-star interaction locations, magnetic fields, and observer lines of sight. The jet luminosity and star properties were fixed, but the results are easily scalable when these parameters are changed. Results: Individual jet-star interactions produce synchrotron and inverse Compton emission that peaks from X-rays to MeV energies (depending on the magnetic field), and at ~100-1000 GeV (depending on the stellar type), respectively. The radiation spectrum is hard in the scenarios explored here as a result of non-radiative cooling dominance, as low-energy electrons are efficiently advected even under relatively high magnetic fields. Interactions of jets with cold stars lead to an even harder inverse Compton spectrum because of the Klein-Nishina effect in the cross section. Doppler boosting has a strong effect on the observer luminosity. Conclusions: The emission levels for individual interactions found here are in the line of previous, more approximate, estimates, strengthening the hypothesis that collective jet-star interactions could significantly contribute at high energies under efficient particle acceleration.

  3. Thermal Interaction Between Molten Metal and Sodium: Examination of the Fragmentation Mechanism of Molten Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Nishimura; Izumi Kinshita; Nobuyuki Ueda; Ken-ichiro Sugiyama; Ryohei Okada

    2002-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of thermal fragmentation of a molten jet dropped into a sodium pool at instantaneous contact interface temperatures below its freezing point, a basic experiment was carried out using molten copper and sodium. Copper was melted in a crucible with an electrical heater and was dropped through a short nozzle into a sodium pool, in the form of a jet column. Thermal fragmentation originating inside the molten copper jet with a solid crust was clearly observed in all runs. It is verified that a small quantity of sodium, which is locally entrained inside the molten jet due to the organized motion between the molten jet and sodium, is vaporized by the sensible heat and the latent heat of molten copper, and the high internal pressure causes the molten jet with a solid crust to fragment. It is also concluded that the thermal fragmentation is more dominant than the hydrodynamic fragmentation, in the present range of Weber number and superheating of molten jet. Furthermore, it can be explained that the thermal fragmentation caused by the molten copper jet - sodium interaction is severer than that caused by the molten uranium alloy jet - sodium interaction, which was reported by Gabor et al., because the latent heat and the thermal diffusivity of molten copper, which are the physical properties that dominate the degree of fragmentation, are much higher than those of molten uranium alloy jets. (authors)

  4. Interaction between a vortex generator and a synthetic jet in a crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, Tyler; Whalen, Edward; Amitay, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of a combined vortex generator and a finite-span synthetic jet, i.e., a hybrid actuator, with a zero pressure gradient laminar boundary layer over a flat plate was explored experimentally using Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV). The free stream velocity was U∞ = 10 m/s corresponding to a Reynolds number based on the local boundary layer thickness Reδ ≈ 2000. The synthetic jet was activated at multiple blowing ratios, and the vortex generator (placed either upstream or downstream of the synthetic jet) had a height of 1.6 times the local boundary layer thickness. When exposed to the crossflow, the pitched and skewed synthetic jet and vortex generator independently produced a single streamwise vortex in the far field. However, when the combined synthetic jet and vortex generator were placed together on the flat plate, the two streamwise vortices, associated with the two devices, did not combine. When the vortex generator was upstream of the synthetic jet, the jet pushed the vortex generator's vortex upward into the free stream. When the vortex generator was placed downstream of the synthetic jet, the vortex associated with it was completely destroyed. Although the presence of the vortex generator did not impact the added enstrophy from the synthetic jet, it resulted in higher velocities near the surface when the vortex generator was upstream of the synthetic jet. It was shown that placing the vortex generator upstream of the synthetic jet was imperative for the performance of the hybrid actuator.

  5. Theoretical aerodynamics of upper-surface-blowing jet-wing interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A linear, inviscid subsonic compressible flow theory is formulated to treat the aerodynamic interaction between the wing and an inviscid upper-surface-blowing (USB) thick jet with Mach number nonuniformity. The predicted results show reasonably good agreement with some available lift and induced-drag data. It was also shown that the thin-jet-flap theory is inadequate for the USB configurations with thick jet. Additional theoretical results show that the lift and induced drag were reduced by increasing jet temperature and increased by increasing jet Mach number. Reducing jet aspect ratio, while holding jet area constant, caused reductions in lift, induced drag, and pitching moment at a given angle of attack but with a minimal change in the curve of lift coefficient against induced-drag coefficient. The jet-deflection effect was shown to be beneficial to cruise performance. The aerodynamic center was shifted forward by adding power or jet-deflection angle. Moving the jet away from the wing surface resulted in rapid changes in lift and induced drag. Reducing the wing span of a rectangular wing by half decreased the jet-circulation lift by only 24 percent at a thrust coefficient of 2.

  6. DECELERATING RELATIVISTIC TWO-COMPONENT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R. E-mail: Rony.Keppens@wis.kuleuven.b

    2009-11-10

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin and launching mechanism, making their effective inertia, magnetization, associated energy flux, and angular momentum content different as well. Their interface will develop differential rotation, where disruptions may occur. Here we investigate the stability of rotating, two-component relativistic outflows typical for jets in radio galaxies. For this purpose, we parametrically explore the long-term evolution of a transverse cross section of radially stratified jets numerically, extending our previous study where a single, purely hydrodynamic evolution was considered. We include cases with poloidally magnetized jet components, covering hydro and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. With grid-adaptive relativistic MHD simulations, augmented with approximate linear stability analysis, we revisit the interaction between the two jet components. We study the influence of dynamically important poloidal magnetic fields, with varying contributions of the inner component jet to the total kinetic energy flux of the jet, on their non-linear azimuthal stability. We demonstrate that two-component jets with high kinetic energy flux and inner jet effective inertia which is higher than the outer jet effective inertia are subject to the development of a relativistically enhanced, rotation-induced Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability. This instability plays a major role in decelerating the inner jet and the overall jet decollimation. This novel deceleration scenario can partly explain the radio source dichotomy, relating it directly to the efficiency of the central engine in launching the inner jet component. The FRII/FRI transition could then occur when the relative kinetic energy flux of the

  7. Theoretical predictions of jet interaction effects for USB and OWB configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A wing jet interaction theory is presented for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of upper surface blowing and over wing blowing configurations. For the latter configurations, a new jet entrainment theory is developed. Comparison of predicted results with some available data showed good agreement. Some applications of the theory are also presented.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boquist, Carl W.; Marchant, David D.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic-metal composite suitable for use in a high-temperature environment consists of a refractory ceramic matrix containing 10 to 50 volume percent of a continuous high-temperature metal reinforcement. In a specific application of the composite, as an electrode in a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the one surface of the electrode which contacts the MHD fluid may have a layer of varying thickness of nonreinforced refractory ceramic for electrode temperature control. The side walls of the electrode may be coated with a refractory ceramic insulator. Also described is an electrode-insulator system for a MHD channel.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  10. Interaction of a round turbulent jet with a thermocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhova, Ekaterina; Cenedese, Claudia; Brandt, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Vertical turbulent jets serve as the models of numerous flows both in nature and industry including convective cloud flows in the atmosphere, effluents from submerged wastewater outfall systems in the ocean, pollutant discharge from industrial chimneys, subglacial discharge. We investigate the dynamics of an axisymmetric vertical turbulent jet in a stratified fluid with two layers of different temperature separated by a thermocline. This configuration is a typical model of the upper thermocline layer of lakes and pycnocline in oceans as well as thermal inversions in the atmosphere. In general, turbulent jets in nature and industry originate from the mixed sources of buoyancy and momentum. However, when the source is located far enough from the pycnocline, the jet mixes effectively with the surrounding fluid and the density of the flow at the pycnocline entrance tends to the density of the lower layer of stratification. Dynamics of such a flow in the pycnocline can be modelled employing a neutrally buoyant turbulent jet with the positive vertical momentum. We study the behaviour of a vertical round turbulent jet in an unconfined stratified environment by means of well-resolved large eddy simulation. We consider two cases: when the thermocline width is small and of the same order with the jet diameter at the thermocline entrance. Mean jet penetration, stratified turbulent entrainment and jet oscillations as well as the generation of internal waves are quantified. The mean jet penetration is predicted well by a simple model based on the conservation of the jet volume, momentum and buoyancy fluxes. The entrainment coefficient for the thin thermocline is consistent with the theoretical model for a two-layer stratification with a sharp interface, while for the thick thermocline entrainment is larger at low Froude numbers. For the thick thermocline we demonstrate the presence of a secondary horizontal flow in the upper thermocline, resulting in the entrainment of fluid

  11. The interaction of an O star wind with a Herbig-Haro jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Herbig-Haro jets ejected from young, low mass stars in the proximity of O/B stars will interact with the more or less isotropic winds from the more massive stars. An example of this are the jets from the stars within the proplyds near θ-Orionis. Aims: In this paper, we consider the interaction of an externally photoionized HH jet with an isotropic wind ejected from the ionizing photon source. We study this problem through numerical simulations, allowing us to obtain predictions of the detailed structure of the flow and predictions of Hα intensity maps. This is a natural extension of a previously developed analytic model for the interaction between a jet and an isotropic stellar wind. Methods: We present 3D simulations of a bipolar HH jet interacting with an isotropic wind from a massive star, assuming that the radiation from the star photoionizes all of the flow. We describe different possible flow configurations, exploring a limited set of jet and stellar wind parameters and orientations of the jet/counterjet ejection. We have computed 6 models, two of which also include a time-variability in the jet velocity. Results: We compare the locus of the computed jet/counterjet systems with the analytic model, and find very good agreement except for cases in which the direction of the jet (or the counterjet) approaches the direction to the wind source (i.e., the O star). For the models with variable ejection velocities, we find that the internal working surfaces follow straighter trajectories (and the inter-working surface segments more curved trajectories) than the equivalent steady jet model.

  12. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions were compared with available data from JET on the threshold unstable MHD activity in toroidal confinement devices. In particular, questions arising as to Hartmans number and the selection of a kinematic viscosity are discussed.

  13. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. II. Wave propagation and wave-wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-04-15

    The propagation of low-frequency whistler modes with wave magnetic field exceeding the ambient field is investigated experimentally. Such nonlinear waves are excited with magnetic loop antennas whose axial field is aligned with the background magnetic field and greatly exceeds its strength. The oscillatory antenna field excites propagating wave packets with field topologies alternating between whistler spheromaks and mirrors. The propagation speed of spheromaks is observed to decrease with amplitude while that of mirrors increases with amplitude. The field distribution varies with amplitude: Spheromaks contract axially while mirrors spread out compared to linear whistlers. Consequently, the peak magnetic field and current densities in spheromaks exceed that of mirrors. Wave-wave interactions of nonlinear whistler modes is also studied. Counterpropagating spheromaks collide inelastically and form a stationary field-reversed configuration. The radius of the toroidal current ring depends on current and can be larger than that of the loop antenna. A tilted field-reversed configuration precesses in the direction of the electron drift. The free magnetic energy is dissipated in the plasma volume and converted into electron heat.

  14. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-07-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  15. Interaction of Sound from Supersonic Jets with Nearby Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenno, C. C., Jr.; Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of sound generated in an ideally expanded supersonic (Mach 2) jet is solved numerically. Two configurations are considered: (1) a free jet and (2) an installed jet with a nearby array of flexible aircraft type panels. In the later case the panels vibrate in response to loading by sound from the jet and the full coupling between the panels and the jet is considered, accounting for panel response and radiation. The long time behavior of the jet is considered. Results for near field and far field disturbance, the far field pressure and the vibration of and radiation from the panels are presented. Panel response crucially depends on the location of the panels. Panels located upstream of the Mach cone are subject to a low level, nearly continuous spectral excitation and consequently exhibit a low level, relatively continuous spectral response. In contrast, panels located within the Mach cone are subject to a significant loading due to the intense Mach wave radiation of sound and exhibit a large, relatively peaked spectral response centered around the peak frequency of sound radiation. The panels radiate in a similar fashion to the sound in the jet, in particular exhibiting a relatively peaked spectral response at approximately the Mach angle from the bounding wall.

  16. Consequences of a possible jet-star interaction in the inner central parsec of Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, C.; Kadler, M.; Mannheim, K.; Perucho, M.; Ojha, R.; Ros, E.; Schulz, R.; Wilms, J.

    The jet-counterjet system of the closest radio-loud active galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) can be studied with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) on unprecedented small linear scales of ~0.018 pc. These high-resolution observations provide essential information on jet emission and propagation within the inner parsec of an AGN jet. We present the results of a kinematic study performed within the framework of the Southern-hemisphere AGN monitoring program TANAMI. Over 3.5 years, the evolution of the central-parsec jet structure of Cen A was monitored with VLBI. These observations reveal complex jet dynamics which are well explained by a spine-sheath structure supported by the downstream acceleration occurring where the jet becomes optically thin. Both moving and stationary jet features are tracked. A persistent local minimum in surface brightness suggests the presence of an obstacle interrupting the jet flow, which can be explained by the interaction of the jet with a star at a distance of ~0.4 pc from the central black hole. We briefly discuss possible implications of such an interaction regarding the expected neutrino and high-energy emission and the effect on a putative planet.

  17. Interaction of a jet with a radiation pressure-dominated atmosphere - The case of SS 433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arav, Nahum; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1993-01-01

    A phenomenological model for the enigmatic object SS 433 is developed in which SS 433 is a neutron star (NS) surrounded by a dense accreted atmosphere. Jets are created close to the neutron star surface by the rapidly spinning NS, toward which matter flows at a super-Eddington rate. This supercritical accretion leads to a quasi-spherical atmosphere around the NS with very high pressure and density close to the surface. The interaction of the jet with the atmosphere as it propagates through it is discussed in detail. A boundary layer (BL) due to radiation viscosity forms between the jet and the surrounding medium. This BL can be visualized as a cocoon of low-density matter around the jet which prevents mass entrainment into the jet. A study of X-ray spectra shows how the radiation-viscous BL can explain the very small Delta v/v that is observed in the jets.

  18. Interaction of Moist Convection with Zonal Jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Huang, Xianglei

    2006-01-01

    Observations suggest that moist convection plays an important role in the large-scale dynamics of Jupiter s and Saturn s atmospheres. Here we use a reduced-gravity quasigeostrophic model, with a parameterization of moist convection that is based on observations, to study the interaction between moist convection and zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn. Stable jets with approximately the same width and strength as observations are generated in the model. The observed zonal jets violate the barotropic stability criterion but the modeled jets do so only if the flow in the deep underlying layer is westward. The model results suggest that a length scale and a velocity scale associated with moist convection control the width and strength of the jets. The length scale and velocity scale offer a possible explanation of why the jets of Saturn are stronger and wider than those of Jupiter.

  19. Associated production of weak bosons and jets by multiple parton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O.; Halzen, F.; Mizukoshi, J.K.

    1998-02-01

    The sources of W+n-jet events in hadron collisions are higher-order QCD processes, but also multiple-parton interactions. A subprocess producing a W+k-jet final state, followed by one producing l jets in the same nucleon-nucleon interaction, will result in a W+n-jet event if k+l=n. In the simplest case a W+2-jet event can be produced by a quark-antiquark annihilation into W and a 2-jet event occurring in the same proton-antiproton interaction. We compute that this happens at the 10{percent} level of the higher-order QCD processes for the type of cuts made by the Fermilab Tevatron experiments. For jet p{sub T} values of order 5{endash}10 GeV, multiple-parton interactions dominate higher-order QCD-processes. The emergence of this new source of W+n-jet events towards lower p{sub T} simulates the running of {alpha}{sub s}; it is imperative to remove these processes from the event sample in order to extract information on the strong coupling constant. Also, BFKL studies of low-p{sub T} jet cross sections are held hostage to a detailed understanding of the multiple-parton interactions. We perform the calculations required to achieve these goals. A detailed experimental analysis of the data may, for the first time, determine the effective areas occupied by quarks and gluons in the nucleon. These are not necessarily identical. We also compute the multiple-parton contribution to Z+n-jet events. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Final Report for "Tech-X Corporation work for the SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM)"

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2013-03-25

    Work carried out by Tech-X Corporation for the DoE SciDAC Center for Simulation of RF Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM; U.S. DoE Office of Science Award Number DE-FC02-06ER54899) is summarized and is shown to fulfil the project objectives. The Tech-X portion of the SWIM work focused on the development of analytic and computational approaches to study neoclassical tearing modes and their interaction with injected electron cyclotron current drive. Using formalism developed by Hegna, Callen, and Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009); Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); Phys. Plasmas 18, 102506 (2011)], analytic approximations for the RF interaction were derived and the numerical methods needed to implement these interactions in the NIMROD extended MHD code were developed. Using the SWIM IPS framework, NIMROD has successfully coupled to GENRAY, an RF ray tracing code; additionally, a numerical control system to trigger the RF injection, adjustment, and shutdown in response to tearing mode activity has been developed. We discuss these accomplishments, as well as prospects for ongoing future research that this work has enabled (which continue in a limited fashion under the SciDAC Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) project and under a baseline theory grant). Associated conference presentations, published articles, and publications in progress are also listed.

  1. Numerical Study of a Continuum Sonic Jet Interacting with a Rarefield Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christoper E.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a numerical study with flow and boundary conditions based on an experiment of a continuum sonic jet interacting with rarefied flow about a sharp leading edge flat plate at zero incidence are presented. Comparisons are made between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solutions which provide an assessment of applying each technique to the flow conditions of the experiment. An analysis of the CFD results revealed a correlation between the interaction interface of the jet continuum breakdown surface and a non-dimensional parameter derived from jet and free stream flow conditions. Using the breakdown surface from the correlation, the continuum jet was uncoupled from the interaction, thus allowing an uncoupled CFD-DSMC solution to be obtained. Also, a nearest neighbor collision algorithm, similar to the subcell technique, was implemented in the DSMC solution technique. The comparison between CFD and DSMC results shows good qualitative agreement in the interaction region and good quantitative agreement elsewhere.

  2. A Numerical Investigation of a Gaseous Jet Interacting with a Supercavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Michael; Moeny, Michael; Krane, Michael; Kirschner, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the interaction between a ventilated supercavity and a jet are examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this context, supercavities are large gaseous cavities that surround a vehicle for drag reduction. Its interaction with a gaseous jet is not well understood, and CFD is used to help understand the physical interactions. A validated CFD model is used, indicating that the CFD qualitatively captures a wide range of interaction regimes. More importantly, for the context of developing physical insight, the CFD seems to capture the correct qualitative trend in the bulk cavity behavior. Using these validated models, a number of novel insights into the physical characteristics of the interaction are developed. These interactions are described by: (1) the jet gas and ventilation gas poorly mix within the cavity, (2) the jet appears to cause additional gas leakage by transitioning the cavity from a recirculating flow to an axial flow, (3) the jet has the ability to lengthen the cavity, and (4) the jet invokes wake instabilities that drive cavity pulsation. These phenomena are to be presented and discussed within the presentation.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between two interplanetary magnetic clouds and its consequent geoeffectiveness: 2. Oblique collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ming; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Shui

    2009-11-01

    The numerical studies of the interplanetary coupling between multiple magnetic clouds (MCs) are continued by a 2.5-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model in the heliospheric meridional plane. The interplanetary direct collision (DC)/oblique collision (OC) between both MCs results from their same/different initial propagation orientations. Here the OC is explored in contrast to the results of the DC. Both the slow MC1 and fast MC2 are consequently injected from the different heliospheric latitudes to form a compound stream during the interplanetary propagation. The MC1 and MC2 undergo contrary deflections during the process of oblique collision. Their deflection angles of ∣δ$\\theta$1∣ and ∣δ$\\theta$2∣ continuously increase until both MC-driven shock fronts are merged into a stronger compound one. The ∣δ$\\theta$1∣, ∣δ$\\theta$2∣, and total deflection angle Δ$\\theta$ (Δ$\\theta$ = ∣δ$\\theta$1∣ + ∣δ$\\theta$2∣) reach their corresponding maxima when the initial eruptions of both MCs are at an appropriate angular difference. Moreover, with the increase of MC2's initial speed, the OC becomes more intense, and the enhancement of δ$\\theta$1 is much more sensitive to δ$\\theta$2. The ∣δ$\\theta$1∣ is generally far less than the ∣δ$\\theta$2∣, and the unusual case of ∣δ$\\theta$1∣ $\\simeq$ ∣δ$\\theta$2∣ only occurs for an extremely violent OC. But because of the elasticity of the MC body to buffer the collision, this deflection would gradually approach an asymptotic degree. As a result, the opposite deflection between the two MCs, together with the inherent magnetic elasticity of each MC, could efficiently relieve the external compression for the OC in the interplanetary space. Such a deflection effect for the OC case is essentially absent for the DC case. Therefore, besides the magnetic elasticity, magnetic helicity, and reciprocal compression, the deflection due to the OC should be considered for the

  4. Inclined Jet in Crossflow Interacting with a Vortex Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Rigby, D .L.; Heidmann, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment is conducted on the effectiveness of a vortex generator in preventing liftoff of a jet in crossflow, with possible relevance to film-cooling applications. The jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20 degreees to the freestream. The effect of a triangular ramp-shaped vortex generator is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flowfield properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the vortex generator and the diameter of the orifice are comparable with the approach boundary-layer thickness. The vortex generator produces a streamwise vortex pair with a vorticity magnitude 3 times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the jet in crossflow alone. Such a vortex generator appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys 10 diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1 < J < 11) show that the vortex generator has a significant effect even at the highest J covered in the experiment. When the vortex generator height is halved, there is a liftoff of the jet. On the other hand, when the height is doubled, the jet core is dissipated due to larger turbulence intensity. Varying the location of the vortex generator, over a distance of three diameters from the orifice, is found to have little impact. Rounding off the edges of the vortex generator with the increasing radius of curvature progressively diminishes its effect. However, allowing for a small radius of curvature may be quite tolerable in practice.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.

    1978-01-01

    An electrode capable of withstanding high temperatures and suitable for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator consists of a sintered powdered metal base portion, the upper surface of the base being coated with a first layer of nickel aluminide, an intermediate layer of a mixture of nickel aluminide - refractory ceramic on the first layer and a third or outer layer of a refractory ceramic material on the intermediate layer. The sintered powdered metal base resists spalling by the ceramic coatings and permits greater electrode compliance to thermal shock. The density of the powdered metal base can be varied to allow optimization of the thermal conductivity of the electrode and prevent excess heat loss from the channel.

  6. Giant Chromospheric Anemone Jet Observed with Hinode and Comparison with Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations: Evidence of Propagating Alfvén Waves and Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Shimizu, M.; Nakamura, T.; Otsuji, K.; Okamoto, T. J.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shibata, K.

    2008-08-01

    Hinode discovered a beautiful giant jet with both cool and hot components at the solar limb on 2007 February 9. Simultaneous observations by the Hinode SOT, XRT, and TRACE 195 Å satellites revealed that hot (~5 × 106 K) and cool (~104 K) jets were located side by side and that the hot jet preceded the associated cool jet (~1-2 minutes). A current-sheet-like structure was seen in optical (Ca II H), EUV (195 Å), and soft X-ray emissions, suggesting that magnetic reconnection is occurring in the transition region or upper chromosphere. Alfvén waves were also observed with Hinode SOT. These propagated along the jet at velocities of ~200 km s-1 with amplitudes (transverse velocity) of ~5-15 km s-1 and a period of ~200 s. We performed two-dimensional MHD simulation of the jets on the basis of the emerging flux-reconnection model, by extending Yokoyama and Shibata's model. We extended the model with a more realistic initial condition (~106 K corona) and compared our model with multiwavelength observations. The improvement of the coronal temperature and density in the simulation model allowed for the first time the reproduction of the structure and evolution of both the cool and hot jets quantitatively, supporting the magnetic reconnection model. The generation and the propagation of Alfvén waves are also reproduced self-consistently in the simulation model.

  7. Interaction of a synthetic jet with a flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampunggoon, Prakit

    The interaction of a 2-dimensional modeled synthetic jet with a flat plate boundary layer is investigated numerically using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. A simple, two-dimensional synthetic jet configuration along with a flat plate, laminar Blasius boundary layer was used in the current study. The oscillating diaphragm of the actuator is modeled in a realistic manner as a moving boundary in an effort to accurately compute the flow inside the jet cavity. The primary focus of the current study is on describing the dynamics of the synthetic jet in the presence of external crossflow. However, in addition, simulations of the jet with quiescent external flow have also been performed. A systematic framework was put forth for characterizing the jet that consists of computing the various moments of the velocity profile along with an integral measure of the profile skewness. A comprehensive parametric study has been carried out where the diaphragm amplitude, external flow Reynolds number, boundary layer thickness, and slot dimensions are varied; and the scaling of the jet characteristics with parameters is examined. The simulations also allow us to extract some interesting flow physics associated with the vortex dynamics of the jet and to elucidate the effect of external cross flow on jet development. In addition, a low-dimensional model for jet velocity profile is proposed and tested. Finally, the so-called "virtual aero-shaping" effect of synthetic jets is examined and the current simulations indicate a simple scaling of this effect with the dynamical characteristics of the jet and external crossflow.

  8. Background Oriented Schlieren Implementation in a Jet-Surface Interaction Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Brown, Clifford A.; Fagan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Many current and future aircraft designs rely on the wing or other aircraft surfaces to shield the engine noise from observers on the ground. However the available data regarding how a planar surface interacts with a jet to shield and/or enhance the jet noise are currently limited. Therefore, the Jet-Surface Interaction Tests supported by NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program's Fixed Wing Project were undertaken to supply experimental data covering a wide range of surface geometries and positions interacting with high-speed jet flows in order to support the development of noise prediction methods. Phase 1 of the Test was conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center and consisted of validating noise prediction schemes for a round nozzle interacting with a planar surface. Phased array data and far-field acoustic data were collected for both the shielded and reflected sides of the surface. Phase 1 results showed that the broadband shock noise was greatly reduced by the surface when the jet was operated at the over-expanded condition, however, it was unclear whether this reduction was due a change in the shock cell structure by the surface. In the present study, Background Oriented Schlieren is implemented in Phase 2 of the Jet-Surface Interaction Tests to investigate whether the planar surface interacts with the high-speed jet ow to change the shock cell structure. Background Oriented Schlieren data are acquired for under-expanded, ideally-expanded, and over-expanded ow regimes for multiple axial and radial positions of the surface at three different plate lengths. These data are analyzed with far-field noise measurements to relate the shock cell structure to the broadband shock noise produced by a jet near a surface.

  9. Interaction of multiple atmospheric-pressure micro-plasma jets in small arrays: He/O2 into humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-02-01

    Arrays of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are being considered as a means to increase the area being treated in surface modification and in plasma medicine in particular. A unique challenge of scaling plasma jet arrays is that individual plasma jets in an array tend to interact with each other, which can lead to quenching of some individual jets. To investigate these potential interactions, a computational study of one-, two- and three-tube arrays of micro-plasma jet arrays was performed. An atmospheric-pressure He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 mixture was flowed through the tubes into humid room air. We found that the jets interact through electrostatic, hydrodynamic and photolytic means. The hydrodynamic interactions result from the merging of individual He channels emerging from individual tubes as air diffuses into the extended gas jets. Ionization waves (IWs) or plasma bullets, which form the jets on the boundaries of an array, encounter higher mole fractions of air earlier compared with the center jet and so are slower or are quenched earlier. The close proximity of the jets produces electrostatic repulsion, which affects the trajectories of the IWs. If the jets are close enough, photoionizing radiation from their neighbors is an additional form of interaction. These interactions are sensitive to the spacing of the jets.

  10. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Cox, L. J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Graham, W. G.; Gans, T.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-01-24

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  11. On the interaction of jet noise with a nearby flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, J. L.; Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1994-01-01

    The model of the interaction of the noise from a spreading subsonic jet with a panel-stringer assembly is studied numerically in two dimensions. The radiation resulting from this flow/acoustic/structure coupling is computed and analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. The jet is initially excited by a pulse-like source inserted into the flow field. The pulse triggers instabilities associated with the inviscid instability of the jet mean flow shear layer. These instabilities in turn generate sound which provides the primary loading for the panels. The resulting structural vibration and radiation depends strongly on their placement relative to the jet/nozzle configuration. Results are obtained for the panel responses as well as the transmitted and incident pressure. The effect of the panels is to act as a narrow filter, converting the relatively broad band forcing, heavily influenced by jet instabilities, into radiation concentrated in narrow spectral bands.

  12. On the interaction of jet noise with a nearby flexible structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGreevy, J. L.; Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1994-06-01

    The model of the interaction of the noise from a spreading subsonic jet with a panel-stringer assembly is studied numerically in two dimensions. The radiation resulting from this flow/acoustic/structure coupling is computed and analyzed in both the time and frequency domains. The jet is initially excited by a pulse-like source inserted into the flow field. The pulse triggers instabilities associated with the inviscid instability of the jet mean flow shear layer. These instabilities in turn generate sound which provides the primary loading for the panels. The resulting structural vibration and radiation depends strongly on their placement relative to the jet/nozzle configuration. Results are obtained for the panel responses as well as the transmitted and incident pressure. The effect of the panels is to act as a narrow filter, converting the relatively broad band forcing, heavily influenced by jet instabilities, into radiation concentrated in narrow spectral bands.

  13. On the nature of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2007-02-15

    A novel model of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of a strong external magnetic field is proposed for the explanation of recent numerical results. According to the proposed model, in the presence of the strong external magnetic field, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence becomes nonlocal in the sense that low-frequency modes cause decorrelation of interacting high-frequency modes from the inertial interval. It is shown that the obtained nonlocal spectrum of the inertial range of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence represents an anisotropic analogue of Kraichnan's nonlocal spectrum of hydrodynamic turbulence. Based on the analysis performed in the framework of the weak-coupling approximation, which represents one of the equivalent formulations of the direct interaction approximation, it is shown that incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence could be both local and nonlocal, and therefore anisotropic analogues of both the Kolmogorov and Kraichnan spectra are realizable in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  14. Jet-Supercavity Interaction: Insights from Physics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, I. N.; Moeny, M. J.; Krane, M. H.; Kinzel, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Various closure conditions of a ventilated cavity enveloping all or part of a high-speed underwater body are introduced, including those involving a propulsion jet. The flow regimes for the latter are described based on Efros-Paryshev theory, which is extended to estimate the efficiency and fundamental limitations of a rocket-type propulsor.

  15. Dust generation at interaction of plasma jet with surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticos, Catalin; Toader, Dorina; Banu, Nicoleta; Scurtu, Adrian; Oane, Mihai

    2013-10-01

    Coatings of W and C with widths of a few microns will be exposed to plasma jet for studying the erosion of the surface and detachment of micron size dust particles. A coaxial plasma gun has been built inside a vacuum chamber for producing supersonic plasma jets. Its design is based on a 50 kJ coaxial plasma gun which has been successfully used for accelerating hypervelocity dust. Initial shots were carried out for a capacitor bank with C = 12 μF and charged up to 2 kV. Currents of tens of amps were measured with a Rogowsky coil and plasma flow speeds of 4 km/s were inferred from high-speed images of jet propagation. An upgrade consisting in adding capacitors in parallel will be performed in order to increase the energy up to 2 kJ. A coil will be installed at the gun muzzle to compress the plasma flow and increase the energy density of the jet on the sample surface. A CCD camera with a maximum recording speed of 100 k fps and a maximum resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels was set for image acquisition of the plasma and dust. A laser system used to illuminate the ejected dust from the surface includes a laser diode emitting at 650 nm with a beam power of 25 mW. The authors acknowledge support from EURATOM WP13-IPH-A03-P2-02-BS22.

  16. An Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Model with Temperature and Nozzle Aspect Ratio Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    An empirical model for jet-surface interaction (JSI) noise produced by a round jet near a flat plate is described and the resulting model evaluated. The model covers unheated and hot jet conditions (1 less than or equal to jet total temperature ratio less than or equal to 2.7) in the subsonic range (0.5 less than or equal to M(sub a) less than or equal to 0.9), surface lengths 0.6 less than or equal to (axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)/nozzle exit diameter) less than or equal to 10, and surface standoff distances (0 less than or equal to (radial distance from jet lipline to surface (inches)/axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)) less than or equal to 1) using only second-order polynomials to provide predictable behavior. The JSI noise model is combined with an existing jet mixing noise model to produce exhaust noise predictions. Fit quality metrics and comparisons to between the predicted and experimental data indicate that the model is suitable for many system level studies. A first-order correction to the JSI source model that accounts for the effect of nozzle aspect ratio is also explored. This correction is based on changes to the potential core length and frequency scaling associated with rectangular nozzles up to 8:1 aspect ratio. However, more work is needed to refine these findings into a formal model.

  17. Interaction of Radio Jets with Magnetic Fields in Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    1997-10-01

    High Faraday rotation measures in the centers of cooling-flow clusters indicate the presence of strong magnetic fields. We examine the effects of these strong fields on the propagation of radio jets emerging from the central cD galaxies of these clusters, and the deformation of the magnetic fields by the fast-propagating jets. We argue that active regions will develop around these radio jets as a result of the violent response of the strong ambient magnetic fields. The magnetic tension can act back on the jets by influencing the development of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability modes, and by exerting a nonaxisymmetric force on the jets. If the jet propagation direction is not along the magnetic field lines, then the jet will be sharply bent by the magnetic tension. Future MHD numerical simulations that will study these effects more quantitatively should be compared directly with specific clusters. If, indeed, some properties of jets expanding from cD galaxies in cooling-flow clusters will turn out to result from interaction with strong magnetic fields in the intracluster medium at the centers of these clusters, then this will strengthen the cooling-flow model, since it will support the presence of inflow.

  18. Interactive phenomena in supersonic jet mixing problems. I Phenomenology and numerical modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    The interactive phenomena that occur in supersonic jet mixing flowfields, and numerical modeling techniques developed to analyze such phenomena are discussed. A spatial marching procedure based on solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes jet mixing equations is presented. This procedure combines shock-capturing methodology for the analysis of supersonic mixing regions with pressure-split methodology for the analysis of subsonic mixing regions. The two regions are coupled at viscous sonic lines utilizing a viscous-characteristic coupling procedure. Specialized techniques for the treatment of jet boundary growth, strong discontinuties (Mach disks), and small embedded subsonic zones (behind Mach disks) are presented. Turbulent processes are represented by two-equation turbulence model formulations. In Part II of this article, numerical studies are presented for a variety of supersonic jet interactive phenomena.

  19. Direct measurement of aeroacoustic source spectrum due to a jet/wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lani, Shane; Krane, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The aeroacoustic source spectrum due to a turbulent jet passing over an obstruction is found experimentally. The model consists of a constriction and planar obstacle in a duct with dimensions commensurate with the those of a human vocal tract. An unsteady jet formed at a constriction interacts with a planar obstruction downstream with the jet normal to the planar surface. The aeroacoustic source spectrum is found both by measuring the unsteady force imparted on the planar obstruction as well as measuring radiated sound outside the duct. A comparison of the force spectrum to the inverse-filtered radiated sound measurements will be presented.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.

    2007-07-01

    The heating of solar atmosphere from chromosphere to corona is one of the key fundamental and yet unresolved questions of modern space and plasma physics. In spite of the multi-fold efforts spanning over half a century including the many superb technological advances and theoretical developments (both analytical and computational) the unveiling of the subtle of coronal heating still remains an exciting job for the 21st century! In the present paper I review the various popular heating mechanisms put forward in the existing extensive literature. The heating processes are, somewhat arbitrarily, classified as hydrodynamic (HD), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or kinetic based on the model medium. These mechanisms are further divided based on the time scales of the ultimate dissipation involved (i.e. AC and DC heating, turbulent heating). In particular, attention is paid to discuss shock dissipation, Landau damping, mode coupling, resonant absorption, phase mixing, and, reconnection. Finally, I briefly review the various observational consequences of the many proposed heating mechanisms and confront them with high-resolution ground-based and satellite data currently available.

  1. Tone Noise and Nearfield Pressure Produced by Jet-Cavity Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Envia, Edmane; Bencic, Timothy J.

    1998-01-01

    Cavity flow resonance can cause numerous problems in aerospace applications. While our long-term goal is to understand cavity flows well enough to devise effective cavity resonance suppression techniques, this paper describes a fundamental study of resonant tones produced by jet-cavity interaction at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Our specific jet-cavity configuration can also be used as a test bed for evaluating active and passive flow resonance control concepts. Two significant findings emerge from this study. 1) Originally, we expected that tones produced by jet-cavity interaction would resemble cavity tones or jet tones or would involve some simple combinations of each. The experimental data do not support these expectations: instead, the jet cavity interaction produce a unique set of tones. We propose simple yet and physically insightful correlations for these tones. Although the pressure patterns on the cavity floor display very complex variations with the Mach number for a length/depth = 8 cavity, the tones correspond to the acoustic modes of the cavity-independent of flow. For a length/ depth = 3 cavity, however, a surprise emerges: the pressure patterns on the cavity floor are not so complex but the tones depend significantly on the flow. Additionally, we examine the role of external feedback unique to jet-cavity interaction. 2) Previous research led us to expect that traditional classifications (open, transitional, or closed) for cavities in an infinite flight stream would be insensitive to small changes in Mach number and would depend primarily on cavity length/depth ratios. Use of the novel high resolution photoluminescent pressure sensitive paint shows that the classifications are actually quite sensitive to jet Mach number for a length/depth = 8 cavity. However, these classifications provide no guidance whatsoever for tone amplitude or frequency. Detailed experimental data and insights presented here will assist researchers who are performing

  2. Effect of Pulsed Plasma Jets on Reflected Shock-Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Benton R.; Clemens, Noel T.; Magari, Patrick; Micka, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation can have many detrimental effects in supersonic inlets including flow instability, fatigue of structural panels, poor pressure recovery, and unstart. Pulsed plasma jets (or ``spark jets''), zero net mass flow jets characterized by high bandwidth and the ability to direct momentum into the flow, are one promising method of reducing shock-induced separation and boundary layer distortion. The current study is focused on investigating the efficacy of pulsed plasma jets to reduce the boundary layer distortion induced by a reflected shock interaction in a Mach 3 flow. A 7° shock generator placed outside the tunnel ceiling boundary layer produces an incident shock on the floor of the tunnel of sufficient strength to induce separation. An array of pulsed plasma jets are placed approximately 2 boundary layer thicknesses upstream of the interaction and pulsed at between 1 kHz and 4 kHz. PIV is used to investigate the effect of the jets on the nature of the separation as well as the boundary layer distortion and pressure recovery downstream of the interaction. Funded through AFRL in collaboration with Creare, Inc.

  3. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, W.P. ); Steiner, D. . Dept. of Nuclear Science)

    1989-07-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code.

  4. Experimental Measurement of RCS Jet Interaction Effects on a Capsule Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Watkins, A. Neal; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Dyakonov, Artem A.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was made in NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel to determine the effects of reaction-control system (RCS) jet interactions on the aft-body of a capsule entry vehicle. The test focused on demonstrating and improving advanced measurement techniques that would aid in the rapid measurement and visualization of jet interaction effects for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle while providing data useful for developing engineering models or validation of computational tools used to assess actual flight environments. Measurements included global surface imaging with pressure and temperature sensitive paints and three-dimensional flow visualization with a scanning planar laser induced fluorescence technique. The wind tunnel model was fabricated with interchangeable parts for two different aft-body configurations. The first, an Apollo-like configuration, was used to focus primarily on the forward facing roll and yaw jet interactions which are known to have significant aft-body heating augmentation. The second, an early Orion Crew Module configuration (4-cluster jets), was tested blowing only out of the most windward yaw jet, which was expected to have the maximum heating augmentation for that configuration. Jet chamber pressures and tunnel flow conditions were chosen to approximate early Apollo wind tunnel test conditions. Maximum heating augmentation values measured for the Apollo-like configuration (>10 for forward facing roll jet and 4 for yaw jet) using temperature sensitive paint were shown to be similar to earlier experimental results (Jones and Hunt, 1965) using a phase change paint technique, but were acquired with much higher surface resolution. Heating results for the windward yaw jet on the Orion configuration had similar augmentation levels, but affected much less surface area. Numerical modeling for the Apollo-like yaw jet configuration with laminar flow and uniform jet outflow conditions showed similar heating patterns

  5. Collective Interaction of a Compressible Periodic Parallel Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1997-01-01

    A linear instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. The disturbance environment is investigated using a two dimensional perturbation of a mean flow. For all cases large temporal growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a disturbance can propagate. The large temporal growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of growth rates are presented for a range of Mach numbers and nozzle spacings corresponding to experimental test conditions where screech synchronized phase locking was observed. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  7. Nozzle Exit Over-Pressure and Vortex Ring Interaction in a Fully-Pulsed Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Gharib, Morteza

    2002-11-01

    Vortex rings formed by a starting jets will stop entraining circulation and pinch off from their generating or "trailing" jet for sufficiently large piston stroke length to jet diameter ratios (L/D) [Gharib et. al., JFM, 1998]. Recent work by the authors has demonstrated that the leading vortex ring contributes more impulse per unit L/D than does the trailing jet, highlighting the significance of vortex ring pinch off for propulsive applications. The impulse advantage of the leading vortex ring is provided by nozzle exit over-pressure resulting from the acceleration of ambient fluid during ring formation. The present work extends these single-pulse results to a periodic series of starting jets, i.e., a fully-pulsed jet. Measurements were made of the time-averaged thrust of fully-pulsed jets generated using a piston-cylinder mechanism for 2 < L/D < 6 and a range of pulsing frequencies. The results indicate that vortex ring formation provides substantial nozzle exit over-pressure (and hence, thrust benefit) in the pulsed case as well, but the benefit tends to diminish with increasing frequency. Various vortex ring interactions contribute to this trend.

  8. Computational Analysis of Ares I Roll Control System Jet Interaction Effects on Rolling Moment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2011-01-01

    The computational flow solver USM3D was used to investigate the jet interaction effects from the roll control system on the rolling moment of the Ares I full protuberance configuration at wind tunnel Reynolds numbers. Solutions were computed at freestream Mach numbers from M = 0.5 to M = 5 at the angle of attack 0deg, at the angle of attack 3.5deg for a roll angle of 120deg, and at the angle of attack 7deg for roll angles of 120deg and 210deg. Results indicate that the RoCS housing provided a beneficial jet interaction effect on vehicle rolling moment for M > or = 0.9. Most of the components downstream of the roll control system housing contributed to jet interaction penalties on vehicle rolling moment.

  9. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper (Brown, C.A., "Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results," ASME paper GT2012-69639, June 2012.) discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  10. Interaction of Highly Underexpanded Jets with Simulated Lunar Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stitt, Leonard E.

    1961-01-01

    Pressure distributions and erosion patterns on simulated lunar surfaces (hard and soft) and interference effects between the surface and two representative lunar vehicles (cylindrical and spherical) were obtained with cold-air jets at various descent heights and nozzle total-pressure ratios up to 288,000. Surface pressure distributions were dependent on both nozzle area ratio and, nozzle contour. Peak pressures obtained with a sonic nozzle agreed closely with those predicted theoretically for a near-sonic jet expanding into a vacuum. Short bell-shaped nozzles gave annular pressure distributions; the low center pressure resulted from the coalescence of shocks that originated within the nozzle. The high surface pressures were contained within a circle whose diameter was about 16 throat diameters, regardless of nozzle area ratio or contour. The peak pressure increased rapidly as the vehicle approached the surface; for example, at a descent height of 40 throat diameters the peak pressure was 0.4 percent of the chamber pressure, but increased to 6 percent at 13 throat diameters. The exhaust jet eroded a circular concave hole in white sand at descent heights from about 200 to 600 throat diameters. The hole diameter was about 225 throat diameters, while the depth was approximately 60 throat diameters. The sand particles, which formed a conical sheet at a semivertex angle of 50 deg, appeared to follow a ballistic trajectory and at no time struck the vehicle. An increase in pressure was measured on the base of the cylindrical lunar vehicle when it approached to within 14 throat diameters of the hard, flat surface. No interference effects were noted between the spherical model and the surface to descent heights as low as 8 throat diameters.

  11. Computational Analysis of the Flow and Acoustic Effects of Jet-Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Thomas, Russell H.; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.; Pao, S. Paul; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Massey, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    Computational simulation and prediction tools were used to understand the jet-pylon interaction effect in a set of bypass-ratio five core/fan nozzles. Results suggest that the pylon acts as a large scale mixing vane that perturbs the jet flow and jump starts the jet mixing process. The enhanced mixing and associated secondary flows from the pylon result in a net increase of noise in the first 10 diameters of the jet s development, but there is a sustained reduction in noise from that point downstream. This is likely the reason the pylon nozzle is quieter overall than the baseline round nozzle in this case. The present work suggests that focused pylon design could lead to advanced pylon shapes and nozzle configurations that take advantage of propulsion-airframe integration to provide additional noise reduction capabilities.

  12. Resonant Interaction of a Rectangular Jet with a Flat-Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Fagan, A. F.; Clem, M. M.; Brown, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    A resonant interaction between a large aspect ratio rectangular jet and a flat-plate is addressed in this experimental study. The plate is placed parallel to but away from the direct path of the jet. At high subsonic conditions and for certain relative locations of the plate, the resonance accompanied by an audible tone is encountered. The trends of the tone frequency variation exhibit some similarities to, but also marked differences from, corresponding trends of the well-known edge-tone phenomenon. Under the resonant condition flow visualization indicates a periodic flapping motion of the jet column. Phase-averaged Mach number data obtained near the plate's trailing edge illustrate that the jet cross-section goes through large contortions within the period of the tone. Farther downstream a clear 'axis switching' takes place. These results suggest that the assumption of two-dimensionality should be viewed with caution in any analysis of the flow.

  13. Investigating the Feedback Path in a Jet-Surface Resonant Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Bridges, James; Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    A resonant interaction between an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet and flat-plates, placed parallel to the jet, is addressed in this study. For certain relative locations of the plates, the resonance takes place with accompanying audible tones. Even when the tone is not audible the sound pressure level spectra is often marked by conspicuous peaks. The frequencies of the spectral peaks, as functions of the streamwise length of the plate and its relative location to the jet as well as the jet Mach number, are explored in an effort of understand the flow mechanism. It is demonstrated that the tones are not due to a simple feedback between the plates trailing edge and the nozzle exit; the leading edge also comes into play in determining the frequency. An acoustic feedback path, involving diffraction from the leading edge, appears to explain the frequencies of some of the spectral peaks.

  14. On triad nonlinear resonant interactions of deep water waves trapped by jet currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrira, Victor; Slunyaev, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    We derive an asymptotic description of weakly nonlinear wave interactions between waves trapped by opposing jet currents by extending the asymptotic modal approach developed in Shrira & Slunyaev (2014). It is widely believed that to the leading order the nonlinear interactions between water waves in deep water are always quartic and potential. We show that for waves trapped on the jet currents it is not true: triad resonant interactions between trapped modes are always allowed. Moreover, the nonlinear evolution of the wave field is to the leading order determined by these triad interactions if the current is sufficiently strong or wave field nonlinearity is appropriately weak. To the leading order the corresponding interaction coefficients are controlled by the background vorticity due to the jet. More specifically, we consider waves upon a longitudinally uniform jet current; the current is assumed to be stationary and without vertical shear. The approximate separation of variables allows us to find the two-dimensional mode structure by means of one-dimensional boundary value problem (BVP) for wave Fourier harmonics along the current. The asymptotic weakly nonlinear theory taking into account quadratic nonlinearity for broad but not necessary weak currents is developed. The evolution equations for three interacting modes are written explicitly, the nonlinear interaction coefficients are computed. The three-wave interactions weaken when the current is weak. When the ratio of the current magnitude to wave celerity is of order of wave steepness the effects of 3-wave and 4-wave resonances appear at the same asymptotic order. These regimes, as well as the identified regimes where triad resonant interactions between trapped waves are dominant, lead to a qualitatively new wave dynamics which remains to be explored yet. V.I. Shrira, A.V. Slunyaev, Trapped waves on jet currents: asymptotic modal approach. J. Fluid Mech. 738, 65-104 (2014).

  15. Orion Exploration Flight Test Reaction Control System Jet Interaction Heating Environment from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Molly E.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Reaction Control System (RCS) is critical to guide the vehicle along the desired trajectory during re-­-entry. However, this system has a significant impact on the convective heating environment to the spacecraft. Heating augmentation from the jet interaction (JI) drives thermal protection system (TPS) material selection and thickness requirements for the spacecraft. This paper describes the heating environment from the RCS on the afterbody of the Orion MPCV during Orion's first flight test, Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1). These jet plumes interact with the wake of the crew capsule and cause an increase in the convective heating environment. Not only is there widespread influence from the jet banks, there may also be very localized effects. The firing history during EFT-1 will be summarized to assess which jet bank interaction was measured during flight. Heating augmentation factors derived from the reconstructed flight data will be presented. Furthermore, flight instrumentation across the afterbody provides the highest spatial resolution of the region of influence of the individual jet banks of any spacecraft yet flown. This distribution of heating augmentation across the afterbody will be derived from the flight data. Additionally, trends with possible correlating parameters will be investigated to assist future designs and ground testing programs. Finally, the challenges of measuring JI, applying this data to future flights and lessons learned will be discussed.

  16. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Auna L. Hsu, Scott C.

    2015-05-15

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex equations of state.

  17. Jets, bulk matter, and their interaction in heavy ion collisions at several TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Karpenko, Iu.; Bleicher, M.; Pierog, T.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss a theoretical scheme that accounts for bulk matter, jets, and the interaction between the two. The aim is a complete description of particle production at all transverse momentum (pt) scales. In this picture, the hard initial scatterings result in mainly longitudinal flux tubes, with transversely moving pieces carrying the pt of the partons from hard scatterings. These flux tubes constitute eventually both bulk matter (which thermalizes and flows) and jets. We introduce a criterion based on parton energy loss to decide whether a given string segment contributes to the bulk or leaves the matter to end up as a jet of hadrons. Essentially low pt segments from inside the volume will constitute the bulk, high pt segments (or segments very close to the surface) contribute to the jets. The latter ones appear after the usual flux tube breaking via q-qbar production (Schwinger mechanism). Interesting is the transition region: Intermediate pt segments produced inside the matter close to the surface but having enough energy to escape, are supposed to pick up q-qbar pairs from the thermal matter rather than creating them via the Schwinger mechanism. This represents a communication between jets and the flowing bulk matter (fluid-jet interaction). Also very important is the interaction between jet hadrons and the soft hadrons from the fluid freeze-out. We employ this picture to investigate Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV. We discuss the centrality and pt dependence of particle production and long-range dihadron correlations at small and large pt.

  18. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  19. Interactions Between Small Arrays of Atmospheric Pressure Micro-Plasma Jets: Gas Dynamic, Radiation and Electrostatic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are widely used devices for biomedical applications. A typical plasma jet consists of a tube through which noble gas or its mixture with a molecular gas flows. The noble gas creates a channel into the ambient air which is eventually dispersed by interdiffusion with the air. Plasma plumes are formed by the propagation of ionization waves (IWs) through the tubes and then through the noble gas phase channel. The IW typically propagates until the mole fraction of the ambient air in the channel increases above a critical values which requires a larger E/N to propagate the IW. By grouping several jets together to form an array of jets, one can in principle increase the area treated by the plume. If the jets are sufficiently far apart, the IWs and resulting plasma plumes are independent. As the spacing between the jets decreases, the plasma jets begin to mutually interact. In this talk, we discuss results from a computational investigation of small arrays of He/O2 micro-plasma jets propagating into ambient air. The model used in this work, nonPDPSIM, is a plasma hydrodynamics model in which continuity, momentum and energy equations are solved for charged and neutral species with solution of Poisson's equation for the electric potential. Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the gas dynamics and radiation transport is addressed using a propagator method. We found that as the spacing between the jets decreases, the He channels from the individual jets tend to merge. The IWs from each channel also merge into regions having the highest He mole fraction and so lowest E/N to sustain the IW. The proximity of the IWs enable other forms of interaction. If the IWs are of the same polarity, electrostatic forces can warp the paths of the IWs. If in sufficient proximity, the photoionization from one IW can influence its neighbors. The synchronization of the voltage pulses of adjacent IWs can also influence its neighbors. With synchronized pulses

  20. Numerical Investigation of the Interaction of Counterflowing Jets and Supersonic Capsule Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Ito, Yasushi; Cheng, Gary; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2011-01-01

    Use of counterflowing jets ejected into supersonic freestreams as a flow control concept to modify the external flowfield has gained renewed interest with regards to potential retropropulsion applications pertinent to entry, descent, and landing investigations. This study describes numerical computations of such a concept for a scaled wind-tunnel capsule model by employing the space-time conservation element solution element viscous flow solver with unstructured meshes. Both steady-state and time-accurate computations are performed for several configurations with different counterflowing jet Mach numbers. Axisymmetric computations exploring the effect of the jet flow rate and jet Mach number on the flow stability, jet interaction with the bow shock and its subsequent impact on the aerodynamic and aerothermal loads on the capsule body are carried out. Similar to previous experimental findings, both long and short penetration modes exist at a windtunnel Mach number of 3.48. It was found that both modes exhibit non-stationary behavior and the former is much more unstable than the latter. It was also found that the unstable long penetration mode only exists in a relatively small range of the jet mass flow rate. Solution-based mesh refinement procedures are used to improve solution accuracy and provide guidelines for a more effective mesh generation procedure for parametric studies. Details of the computed flowfields also serve as a means to broaden the knowledge base for future retropropulsion design studies.

  1. The Interaction of a Vortex Generator Jet with a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixon, Gregory S.; Johari, Hamid

    2000-11-01

    The interaction between a steady vortex generator jet and a turbulent boundary layer has been experimentally investigated using the Digital Particle Image Velocimetry technique. Experiments were conducted over a flat plate in a re-circulating water tunnel. The jet velocity vector had a fixed pitch angle of 45° with respect to the flat plate surface, and a fixed skew angle of 90° with respect to the streamwise direction. Nominal jet-to-freestream velocity ratios of 1, 2, and 3 were examined at four different locations, 5, 10, 20, and 30 d downstream of the jet exit, corresponding to 0.7, 1.4, 2.8, and 4.2 δ. Peak vorticity, circulation, and vortex core trajectory were found to vary linearly with the jet velocity. Peak vorticity and circulation decay exponentially with distance along the plate. This decay rate was found to be much higher than that of solid vortex generators. In the near field, however, the peak vorticity of the high velocity jet was comparable to that of a solid vortex generator.

  2. The interaction of an asymmetrical localised synthetic jet on a side-supported sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findanis, N.; Ahmed, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    A localised synthetic jet offers promise of an optimum and cost-effective practical method of delaying separation and promoting reattachment in fluids with solid body interactions. The asymmetric flow that may result from its use may also be beneficial in improving the aerodynamic performance of a lifting body. There are insufficient studies of synthetic jets, particularly on three-dimensional bluff bodies that are more representative of complex flows in real situations. A comprehensive study on an 80 mm diameter sphere designed with localised synthetic jet orifices was, therefore, conducted in an 18 in×18 in open circuit closed test-section wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 5×104. The coefficient of pressure distribution was measured by continuously varying the location of the synthetic jet and compared with the no synthetic jet condition. The three-dimensional effects on the flow over the sphere body are particularly made apparent through the growth and the effects of the boundary layer and the deviation from potential flow. Overall, the synthetic jet had the effect of delaying the separation point and extending it further downstream on the sphere surface concomitantly producing a significant reduction in drag, providing solid support to the viability of strategically located synthetic jet when higher lift or lower drag is desired. A surprising discovery was the ability of the synthetic jet to improve the flow at the junction of the sting support and sphere. This has promising implications in devising methods to reduce interference drag that are common in many practical applications such as near junctions between wing and the fuselage.

  3. Wind-jet interaction in high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    Jets in high-mass X-ray binaries can strongly interact with the stellar wind from the donor. The interaction leads, in particular, to formation of recollimation shocks. The shocks can then accelerate electrons in the jet and lead to enhanced emission, observable in the radio and gamma-ray bands. DooSoo, Zdziarski & Heinz (2016) have formulated a condition on the maximum jet power (as a function of the jet velocity and wind rate and velocity) at which such shocks form. This criterion can explain the large difference in the radio and gamma-ray loudness between Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3. The orbital modulation of radio emission observed in Cyg X-1 and Cyg X-3 allows a measurement of the location of the height along the jet where the bulk of emission at a given frequency occurs. Strong absorption of X-rays in the wind of Cyg X-3 is required to account for properties of the correlation of the radio emission with soft and hard X-rays. That absorption can also account for the unusual spectral and timing X-ray properties of this source.

  4. Turbulent Deflagrated Flame Interaction with a Fluidic Jet Flow for Deflagration-to-Detonation Flame Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Jessica; McGarry, Joseph; Ahmed, Kareem

    2015-11-01

    Detonation is a high energetic mode of pressure gain combustion. Detonation combustion exploits the pressure rise to augment high flow momentum and thermodynamic cycle efficiencies. The driving mechanism of deflagrated flame acceleration to detonation is turbulence generation and induction. A fluidic jet is an innovative method for the production of turbulence intensities and flame acceleration. Compared to traditional obstacles, the jet reduces the pressure losses and heat soak effects while providing turbulence generation control. The investigation characterizes the turbulent flame-flow interactions. The focus of the study is on classifying the turbulent flame dynamics and the temporal evolution of turbulent flame regime. The turbulent flame-flow interactions are experimentally studied using a LEGO Detonation facility. Advanced high-speed laser diagnostics, particle image velocimetry (PIV), planar laser induced florescence (PLIF), and Schlieren imaging are used in analyzing the physics of the interaction and flame acceleration. Higher turbulence induction is observed within the turbulent flame after contact with the jet, leading to increased flame burning rates. The interaction with the fluidic jet results in turbulent flame transition from the thin reaction zones to the broken reaction regime.

  5. Aerodynamic Interactions of Propulsive Deceleration and Reaction Control System Jets on Mars-Entry Aeroshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkandry, Hicham

    Future missions to Mars, including sample-return and human-exploration missions, may require alternative entry, descent, and landing technologies in order to perform pinpoint landing of heavy vehicles. Two such alternatives are propulsive deceleration (PD) and reaction control systems (RCS). PD can slow the vehicle during Mars atmospheric descent by directing thrusters into the incoming freestream. RCS can provide vehicle control and steering by inducing moments using thrusters on the hack of the entry capsule. The use of these PD and RCS jets, however, involves complex flow interactions that are still not well understood. The fluid interactions induced by PD and RCS jets for Mars-entry vehicles in hypersonic freestream conditions are investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The effects of central and peripheral PD configurations using both sonic and supersonic jets at various thrust conditions are examined in this dissertation. The RCS jet is directed either parallel or transverse to the freestream flow at different thrust conditions in order to examine the effects of the thruster orientation with respect to the center of gravity of the aeroshell. The physical accuracy of the computational method is also assessed by comparing the numerical results with available experimental data. The central PD configuration decreases the drag force acting on the entry capsule due to a shielding effect that prevents mass and momentum in the hypersonic freestream from reaching the aeroshell. The peripheral PD configuration also decreases the drag force by obstructing the flow around the aeroshell and creating low surface pressure regions downstream of the PD nozzles. The Mach number of the PD jets, however, does not have a significant effect on the induced fluid interactions. The reaction control system also alters the flowfield, surface, and aerodynamic properties of the aeroshell, while the jet orientation can have a significant effect on the control effectiveness

  6. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  7. Development and characterization of very dense submillimetric gas jets for laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sylla, F.; Kahaly, S.; Flacco, A.; Malka, V.; Veltcheva, M.

    2012-03-15

    We report on the characterization of recently developed submillimetric He gas jets with peak density higher than 10{sup 21} atoms/cm{sup 3} from cylindrical and slightly conical nozzles of throat diameter of less than 400 {mu}m. Helium gas at pressure 300-400 bar has been developed for this purpose to compensate the nozzle throat diameter reduction that affects the output mass flow rate. The fast-switching electro-valve enables to operate the jet safely for multi-stage vacuum pump assembly. Such gaseous thin targets are particularly suitable for laser-plasma interaction studies in the unexplored near-critical regime.

  8. Development and characterization of very dense submillimetric gas jets for laser-plasma interaction.

    PubMed

    Sylla, F; Veltcheva, M; Kahaly, S; Flacco, A; Malka, V

    2012-03-01

    We report on the characterization of recently developed submillimetric He gas jets with peak density higher than 10(21) atoms/cm(3) from cylindrical and slightly conical nozzles of throat diameter of less than 400 μm. Helium gas at pressure 300-400 bar has been developed for this purpose to compensate the nozzle throat diameter reduction that affects the output mass flow rate. The fast-switching electro-valve enables to operate the jet safely for multi-stage vacuum pump assembly. Such gaseous thin targets are particularly suitable for laser-plasma interaction studies in the unexplored near-critical regime. PMID:22462922

  9. Prediction of nearfield jet entrainment by an interactive mixing/afterburning model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S. M.; Pergament, H. S.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a computational model (BOAT) for calculating nearfield jet entrainment, and its application to the prediction of nozzle boattail pressures, is discussed. BOAT accounts for the detailed turbulence and thermochemical processes occurring in the nearfield shear layers of jet engine (and rocket) exhaust plumes while interfacing with the inviscid exhaust and external flowfield regions in an overlaid, interactive manner. The ability of the model to analyze simple free shear flows is assessed by detailed comparisons with fundamental laboratory data. The overlaid methodology and the entrainment correction employed to yield the effective plume boundary conditions are assessed via application of BOAT in conjunction with the codes comprising the NASA/LRC patched viscous/inviscid model for determining nozzle boattail drag for subsonic/transonic external flows. Comparisons between the predictions and data on underexpanded laboratory cold air jets are presented.

  10. Numerical Study of Rarefied Hypersonic Flow Interacting with a Continuum Jet. Degree awarded by Pennsylvania State Univ., Aug. 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    2000-01-01

    An uncoupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (CFD-DSMC) technique is developed and applied to provide solutions for continuum jets interacting with rarefied external flows. The technique is based on a correlation of the appropriate Bird breakdown parameter for a transitional-rarefied condition that defines a surface within which the continuum solution is unaffected by the external flow-jet interaction. The method is applied to two problems to assess and demonstrate its validity; one of a jet interaction in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the other in the moderately rarefied regime. Results show that the appropriate Bird breakdown surface for uncoupling the continuum and non-continuum solutions is a function of a non-dimensional parameter relating the momentum flux and collisionality between the two interacting flows. The correlation is exploited for the simulation of a jet interaction modeled for an experimental condition in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the validity of the correlation is demonstrated. The uncoupled technique is also applied to an aerobraking flight condition for the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with attitude control system jet interaction. Aerodynamic yawing moment coefficients for cases without and with jet interaction at various angles-of-attack were predicted, and results from the present method compare well with values published previously. The flow field and surface properties are analyzed in some detail to describe the mechanism by which the jet interaction affects the aerodynamics.

  11. Investigating the Feedback Path in a Jet-Surface Resonant Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Fagan, A. F.; Bridges, J. E.; Brown, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    A resonant interaction between an 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jet and flat-plates, placed parallel to the jet, is studied experimentally. For certain locations of the plate relative to the jet, the resonance takes place with a loud accompanying tone. The sound pressure level spectra are often marked by multiple peaks. The frequencies of the spectral peaks are studied as a function of the streamwise length of the plate, its relative location to the jet as well as the jet Mach number. It is demonstrated that the tones are not due to a simple feedback between the plate's trailing edge and the nozzle's exit; the leading edge of the plate also comes into play in the frequency selection. With parametric variation, it is found that there is an order in the most energetic spectral peaks; their frequencies cluster in distinct bands. The 'fundamental', i.e., the lowest frequency band is explained by an acoustic feedback involving diffraction at the plate's leading edge.

  12. Effect of Pulsed Plasma Jets on the Recovering Boundary Layer Downstream of a Reflected Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Benton; Clemens, Noel; Magari, Patrick; Micka, Daniel; Ueckermann, Mattheus

    2015-11-01

    Shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation can have many detrimental effects in supersonic inlets including flow distortion and instability, structural fatigue, poor pressure recovery, and unstart. The current study investigates the effect of pulsed plasma jets on the recovering boundary layer downstream of a reflected shock wave-boundary layer interaction. The effects of pitch and skew angle of the jet as well as the heating parameter and discharge time scale are tested using several pulsing frequencies. In addition, the effect of the plasma jets on the undisturbed boundary layer at 6 mm and 11 mm downstream of the jets is measured. A pitot-static pressure probe is used to measure the velocity profile of the boundary layer 35 mm downstream of the plasma jets, and the degree of boundary layer distortion is compared between the different models and run conditions. Additionally, the effect of each actuator configuration on the shape of the mean separated region is investigated using surface oil flow visualization. Previous studies with lower energy showed a weak effect on the downstream boundary layer. The current investigation will attempt to increase this effect using a higher-energy discharge. Funded by AFRL through and SBIR in collaboration with Creare, LLC.

  13. Star-Jet Interactions and Gamma-Ray Outbursts from 3C454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khangulyan, D. V.; Barkov, M. V.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Aharonian, F. A.; Dorodnitsyn, A. V.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a model to explain the ultra-bright GeV gamma-ray flares observed from the blazar 3C454.3. The model is based on the concept of a relativistic jet interacting with compact gas condensations produced when a star (a red giant) crosses the jet close to the central black hole. The study includes an analytical treatment of the evolution of the envelope lost by the star within the jet, and calculations of the related high-energy radiation. The model readily explains the day-long that varies on timescales of hours, GeV gamma-ray flare from 3C454.3, observed during 2010 November on top of a plateau lasting weeks. In the proposed scenario, the plateau state is caused by a strong wind generated by the heating of the stellar atmosphere due to nonthermal particles accelerated at the jet-star interaction region. The flare itself could be produced by a few clouds of matter lost by the red giant after the initial impact of the jet. In the framework of the proposed scenario, the observations constrain the key model parameters of the source, including the mass of the central black hole: M BH ~= 109 M ⊙, the total jet power: L j ~= 1048 erg s-1, and the Doppler factor of the gamma-ray emitting clouds: δ ~= 20. Whereas we do not specify the particle acceleration mechanisms, the potential gamma-ray production processes are discussed and compared in the context of the proposed model. We argue that synchrotron radiation of protons has certain advantages compared to other radiation channels of directlyaccelerated electrons. An injected proton distribution vpropE -1 or harder below the relevant energies would be favored to alleviate the tight energetic constraints and to avoid the violation of the observational low-energy constraints.

  14. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  15. Three-dimensional interaction of a finite-span synthetic jet in a crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, Tyler; Beyar, Michael; Leong, Chia Min; Amitay, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of flow structures due to the interaction of a finite-span synthetic jet with a zero-pressure gradient laminar boundary layer were experimentally investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. A synthetic jet with three orifice aspect ratios of AR = 6, 12, and 18 was issued into a free-stream velocity of U∞ = 10 m/s (Reδ = 2000) at blowing ratios of Cb = 0.5-1.5. The interaction was found to be associated with two sets of flow structures: (1) a recirculation region downstream of the orifice due to virtual blockage, and (2) a steady streamwise vortex pair farther downstream. These two flow structures were characterized in detail. Tube-like velocity deficits in the free-stream were evident, as well as regions of increased velocity within the boundary layer. Reducing the aspect ratio of the orifice decreased the spacing of the edgewise vortices (generated due to the finite span of the orifice) as well as reducing the virtual blockage of the jet. A control volume analysis of the fluid streamwise momentum indicates that there is a momentum deficit just downstream of the jet orifice and the change in streamwise momentum is proportionally similar for all cases.

  16. Interaction of a finite-span synthetic jet near the tip of a sweptback wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, Joseph D.; Amitay, Michael

    2015-06-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the three-dimensional flow interaction of a finite-span (aspect ratio of 18) synthetic jet located near the tip of a sweptback wing (cross-sectional profile of NACA 4421, aspect ratio of 4, and sweep angle of 30°) at a Reynolds number of 105 and at three angles of attack of 0°, 9°, and 15.5° (covering the range of attached to separated flow in the vicinity of the synthetic jet). Three blowing ratios were considered as 0.8, 1.2, and 2. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry data were collected at multiple 2-D planes in the vicinity of the jet's orifice, which were then used to reconstruct the flow volume, and the effect of the jet's blowing ratio was analyzed using time-averaged and phase-averaged statistics. The study showed that the flow field in the vicinity of the synthetic jet orifice becomes highly three-dimensional and is governed by the streamwise structures that are associated with the finite span of the orifice (edge vortices). Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the baseline flow field that develops over a swept-back configuration (characterized by spanwise and streamwise vorticity components) is responsible for the immediate breakdown of the coherent structures that are introduced by the synthetic jet orifice and for the formation of the secondary flow structures that were seen in the time-averaged flow field. Moreover, the presence of a tip vortex results in the development of a non-uniform (in the spanwise direction) spanwise boundary layer that becomes more pronounced with increasing angle of attack. Consequently, the development of the flow structures is altered. Finally, the present work suggests that the location of the synthetic jet along the span is not as important (as the angle of attack and the blowing ratio) in the overall formation and evolution of the flow structures issued from the jet. However, the size and strength of these structures are affected by the jet's spanwise location.

  17. The Dynamics of Shock Dispersion and Interactions in Supersonic Freestreams with Counterflowing Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Pritchett, Victor E.; Wang, Ten-See; Ota, Dale K.; Blankson, Isaiah M.; Auslender, Aaron H.

    2007-01-01

    An active flow control concept using counterflowing jets to significantly modify the external flowfields and strongly weaken or disperse the shock-waves of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles to reduce the aerothermal loads and wave drag was investigated. Experiments were conducted in a trisonic blow-down wind-tunnel, complemented by pre-test computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a 2.6% scale model of Apollo capsule, with and without counterflowing jets, in Mach 3.48 and 4.0 freestreams, to assess the potential aerothermal and aerodynamic benefits of this concept. The model was instrumented with heat flux gauges, thermocouples and pressure taps, and employed five counterflowing jet nozzles (three sonic and other two supersonic with design Mach numbers of 2.44 and 2.94) and nozzle exit diameters ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 inch. Schlieren data show that at low jet flow rates of 0.05 and 0.1lb(sub m)/sec, the interactions result in a long penetration mode (LPM) jet, while the short penetration mode (SPM) jet is observed at flow rates greater than 0.1 lb(sub m)/sec., consistent with the pre-test CFD predictions. For the LPM, the jet appears to be nearly fully-expanded, resulting in a very unsteady and oscillatory flow structure in which the bow shock becomes highly dispersed such that it is no longer discernable. Higher speed camera Schlieren data reveal the shock to be dispersed into striations of compression waves, which suddenly coalesce to a weaker bow shock with a larger standoff distance as the flow rate reached a critical value. The pronounced shock dispersion could significantly impact the aerodynamic performance (L/D) and heat flux reduction of spacecraft in atmospheric entry and re-entry, and could also attenuate the entropy layer in hypersonic blunt body flows. For heat transfer, the results show significant reduction in heat flux, even giving negative heat flux for some of the SPM interactions, indicating that the flow wetting the model is cooling

  18. Innovative Measurement Diagnostics for Analysis of Jet Interactions in Rotating Flowfields

    SciTech Connect

    AMATUCCI, VINCENT A.; BERESH, STEVEN J.; HENFLING, JOHN F.; ERVEN, ROCKY J.; BOURDON, CHRIS J.

    2002-01-01

    The present document summarizes the experimental efforts of a three-year study funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program of Sandia National Laboratories. The Innovative Diagnostics LDRD project was designed to develop new measurement capabilities to examine the interaction of a propulsive spin jet in a transonic freestream for a model in a wind tunnel. The project motivation was the type of jet/fin interactions commonly occurring during deployment of weapon systems. In particular, the two phenomena of interest were the interaction of the propulsive spin jet with the freestream in the vicinity of the nozzle and the impact of the spin rocket plume and its vortices on the downstream fins. The main thrust of the technical developments was to incorporate small-size, Lagrangian sensors for pressure and roll-rate on a scale model and include data acquisition, transmission, and power circuitry onboard. FY01 was the final year of the three-year LDRD project and the team accomplished much of the project goals including use of micron-scale pressure sensors, an onboard telemetry system for data acquisition and transfer, onboard jet exhaust, and roll-rate measurements. A new wind tunnel model was designed, fabricated, and tested for the program which incorporated the ability to house multiple MEMS-based pressure sensors, interchangeable vehicle fins with pressure instrumentation, an onboard multiple-channel telemetry data package, and a high-pressure jet exhaust simulating a spin rocket motor plume. Experiments were conducted for a variety of MEMS-based pressure sensors to determine performance and sensitivity in order to select pressure transducers for use. The data acquisition and analysis path was most successful by using multiple, 16-channel data processors with telemetry capability to a receiver outside the wind tunnel. The development of the various instrumentation paths led to the fabrication and installation of a new wind tunnel model for

  19. Analysis of jet-airfoil interaction noise sources by using a microphone array technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Davy, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the characterization of jet noise sources and jet-airfoil interaction sources by using microphone array data. The measurements were carried-out in the anechoic open test section wind tunnel of Onera, Cepra19. The microphone array technique relies on the convected, Lighthill's and Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings' acoustic analogy equation. The cross-spectrum of the source term of the analogy equation is sought. It is defined as the optimal solution to a minimal error equation using the measured microphone cross-spectra as reference. This inverse problem is ill-posed yet. A penalty term based on a localization operator is therefore added to improve the recovery of jet noise sources. The analysis of isolated jet noise data in subsonic regime shows the contribution of the conventional mixing noise source in the low frequency range, as expected, and of uniformly distributed, uncorrelated noise sources in the jet flow at higher frequencies. In underexpanded supersonic regime, a shock-associated noise source is clearly identified, too. An additional source is detected in the vicinity of the nozzle exit both in supersonic and subsonic regimes. In the presence of the airfoil, the distribution of the noise sources is deeply modified. In particular, a strong noise source is localized on the flap. For high Strouhal numbers, higher than about 2 (based on the jet mixing velocity and diameter), a significant contribution from the shear-layer near the flap is observed, too. Indications of acoustic reflections on the airfoil are also discerned.

  20. RCS jet-flow field interaction effects on the aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.; Roberge, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the external effects caused by operation of the reaction control system during entry of the space shuttle orbiter. The effects of jet plume-external flow interactions were emphasized. Force data were obtained for the basic airframe characteristics plus induced effects when the reaction control system is operating. Resulting control amplification and/or coupling were derived and their effects on the aerodynamic stability and control of the orbiter and the reaction control system thrust were determined.

  1. Interaction of a Rectangular Jet with a Flat-Plate Placed Parallel to the Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Brown, C. A.; Bridges, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study is carried out addressing the flowfield and radiated noise from the interaction of a large aspect ratio rectangular jet with a flat plate placed parallel to but away from the direct path of the jet. Sound pressure level spectra exhibit an increase in the noise levels for both the 'reflected' and 'shielded' sides of the plate relative to the free-jet case. Detailed cross-sectional distributions of flowfield properties obtained by hot-wire anemometry are documented for a low subsonic condition. Corresponding mean Mach number distributions obtained by Pitot-probe surveys are presented for high subsonic conditions. In the latter flow regime and for certain relative locations of the plate, a flow resonance accompanied by audible tones is encountered. Under the resonant condition the jet cross-section experiences an 'axis-switching' and flow visualization indicates the presence of an organized 'vortex street'. The trends of the resonant frequency variation with flow parameters exhibit some similarities to, but also marked differences with, corresponding trends of the well-known edgetone phenomenon.

  2. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  3. Analysis of some aerodynamic characteristics due to wing-jet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillman, G. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The results of two separate theoretical investigations are presented. A program was used which is capable of predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of both upper-surface blowing (USB) and over-wing blowing (OWB) configurations. A theoretical analysis of the effects of over-wing blowing jets on the induced drag of a 50 deg sweep back wing was developed. Experiments showed net drag reductions associated with the well known lift enhancement due to over-wing blowing. The mechanisms through which this drag reduction is brought about are presented. Both jet entrainment and the so called wing-jet interaction play important roles in this process. The effects of a rectangular upper-surface blowing jet were examined for a wide variety of planforms. The isolated effects of wing taper, sweep, and aspect ratio variations on the incremental lift due to blowing are presented. The effects of wing taper ratio and sweep angle were found to be especially important parameters when considering the relative levels of incremental lift produced by an upper-surface blowing configuration.

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquid covered tissue: touching and not-touching the liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    In the use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biological applications, the plasma-produced charged and neutral species in the plume of the jet often interact with a thin layer of liquid covering the tissue being treated. The plasma-produced reactivity must then penetrate through the liquid layer to reach the tissue. In this computational investigation, a plasma jet created by a single discharge pulse at three different voltages was directed onto a 200 µm water layer covering tissue followed by a 10 s afterglow. The magnitude of the voltage and its pulse length determined if the ionization wave producing the plasma plume reached the surface of the liquid. When the ionization wave touches the surface, significantly more charged species were created in the water layer with H3O+aq, O3-aq, and O2-aq being the dominant terminal species. More aqueous OHaq, H2O2aq, and O3aq were also formed when the plasma plume touches the surface. The single pulse examined here corresponds to a low repetition rate plasma jet where reactive species would be blown out of the volume between pulses and there is not recirculation of flow or turbulence. For these conditions, NxOy species do not accumulate in the volume. As a result, aqueous nitrites, nitrates, and peroxynitrite, and the HNO3aq and HOONOaq, which trace their origin to solvated NxOy, have low densities.

  5. A Self-Consistent Numerical Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Model of Helmet Streamer and Flux-Rope Interactions: Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Guo, W. P.

    1997-01-01

    We present results for an investigation of the interaction of a helmet streamer arcade and a helical flux-rope emerging from the sub-photosphere. These results are obtained by using a three-dimensional axisymmetric, time-dependent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Because of the physical nature of the flux-rope, we investigate two types of flux-ropes; (1) high density flux-rope (i.e. flux-rope without cavity), and (2) low density flux rope (i.e. flux-rope with cavity). When the streamer is disrupted by the flux-rope, it will evolve into a configuration resembling the typical observed loop-like Coronal Mass Ejection (CMES) for both cases. The streamer-flux rope system with cavity is easier to be disrupted and the propagation speed of the CME is faster than the streamer-flux rope system without cavity. Our results demonstrate that magnetic buoyancy force plays an important role in disrupting the streamer.

  6. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 90deg observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10 dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite decorrelation region. Numerical predictions of the sound field, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length and time scales, for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal

  7. A Model for Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Using Physically Realizable Upstream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Z.; Leib, Stewart J.; Bozak, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of previous work in which a generalized Rapid Distortion Theory (RDT) formulation was used to model low-frequency trailing-edge noise. The research was motivated by proposed next-generation aircraft configurations where the exhaust system is tightly integrated with the airframe. Data from recent experiments at NASA on the interaction between high-Reynolds-number subsonic jet flows and an external flat plate showed that the power spectral density (PSD) of the far-field pressure underwent considerable amplification at low frequencies. For example, at the 900 observation angle, the low-frequency noise could be as much as 10dB greater than the jet noise itself. In this paper, we present predictions of the noise generated by the interaction of a rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a semi-infinite flat plate. The calculations are based on a formula for the acoustic spectrum of this noise source derived from an exact formal solution of the linearized Euler equations involving (in this case) one arbitrary convected scalar quantity and a Rayleigh equation Green's function. A low-frequency asymptotic approximation for the Green's function based on a two-dimensional mean flow is used in the calculations along with a physically realizable upstream turbulence spectrum, which includes a finite de-correlation region. Numerical predictions, based on three-dimensional RANS solutions for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets and nozzle aspect ratios are compared with experimental data. Comparisons of the RANS results with flow data are also presented for selected cases. We find that a finite decorrelation region increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low frequency "rolloff") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency thereby producing much closer agreement with noise data for Strouhal numbers less than 0.1. Secondly, the large-aspectratio theory is able to predict the low-frequency amplification due to the jet

  8. Multiscale analyses of inland tropical cylcone--midlatitude jet interactions: Camille (1969) and Danny (1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Matthew S.

    TC Camille (1969) and TC Danny (1997) both interacted with the equatorward entrance region of an upper-tropospheric jet as they traversed the Appalachian Mountains; however, their societal impacts differed. During the 12-h period starting 0000 UTC 20 August 1969, 690 mm of rain fell over Massies Mill, Virginia, as TC Camille traversed the central Appalachian Mountains. On 24 July 1997, TC Danny underwent inland reintensification while moving across the Carolinas. TC Danny's minimum central mean sea level pressure decreased from 1012 hPa to 1000 hPa and its maximum sustained wind speed increased from 20 kt to 40 kt during the 18-h period starting 0000 UTC 24 July. The main objectives of this thesis are to document the synoptic-scale environments and underlying mesoscale processes responsible for each TC--jet interaction, and to document important mechanisms and processes that lead to inland flooding associated with TC--jet interactions and inland reintensifying TCs that interact with midlatitude jets. Multiscale analyses are conducted using ERA-40 and the NCEP CFSR (Climate Forecast System Reanalysis) global gridded datasets, available at 1.125° and 0.5° resolution, for the TC Camille and TC Danny cases. Surface analyses are employed to identify and document the surface environment and significant mesoscale features associated with both storms. Radar data are used to supplement the mesoscale analysis of each case, and a potential vorticity (PV) perspective is employed to facilitate the interpretation of the multiscale analyses. The multiscale analyses reveal that unlike the TC Camille case, synoptic-scale ascent arising from implied positive PV advection and minimized effects of vertical wind shear associated with an upper-tropospheric positive PV anomaly enabled TC Danny to intensify inland. Frontogenetically forced ascent along a lower-tropospheric baroclinic zone and orographic enhancement of rainfall, induced by moist, upslope flow across the Blue Ridge

  9. Numerical investigation of gas-particle interaction in polydisperse volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Bonaventura, Luca; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the problem of underexpanded jet decompression when the injected fluid is a mixture of a gaseous phase and different classes of solid particles. The underexpanded multiphase jet problem is representative of phenomena that can be observed in the first stages of explosive volcanic eruptions. Whereas the case of homogeneous jets has been studied deeply in the literature, both experimentally, theoretically and numerically, the case of multiphase gas--particle jets still presents some open issues. It has been proven theoretically and experimentally that vents with supersonic or sonic velocity and gas pressure greater than the atmospheric one result in a rapid expansion and acceleration of the fluid to high Mach number. A series of expansion waves form and are reflected as compression waves at the flow boundary. The compression waves coealesce to form a standing normal shock wave (Mach disk), across which the fluid is rapidly compressed and decelerated to subsonic speeds. When solid particles are added to the gas flow, new phenomena associated to kinetic and thermal non-equilibrium between gas and particulate phases arise. Such effects are controlled by drag and heat exchange terms in the momentum and energy equations. In the present work we carry out two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations with the multiphase flow model PDAC (Neri et al., J. Geophys. Res, 2003; Carcano et al., Geosci. Mod. Dev., 2013), to identify and quantify non-equilibrium effects related to the interaction between the jet decompression structure and solid particles. We quantify, on a theoretical basis, the expected non-equilibrium effects between the gas and the solid phase in terms of the particle Stokes numer (St), i.e. the ratio between the particle relaxation time and a characteristic time scale of the jet (taken as the formation time of the Mach disk shock), for two sample grain-size distributions of natural events (Mount St. Helens, 1980; Vesuvius, aD 79). The Stokes

  10. D0 results on diphoton direct production and double parton interactions in photon + 3 jet events

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; /Louisiana Tech. U.

    2010-01-01

    We report the measurement of differential diphoton direct production cross sections and a study of photon + 3-jet events with double parton (DP) interactions, based on data taken with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We measure single differential cross sections as a function of the diphoton mass, the transverse momentum of the diphoton system, the azimuthal angle between the photons, and the polar scattering angle of the photons. In addition, we measure double differential cross sections considering the last three kinematic variables in three diphoton mass bins. The results are compared with different perturbative QCD predictions and event generators. We have used a sample of photon + 3-jet events collected by the D0 experiment with an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} to determine the fraction of events with double parton scattering (f{sub DP}) in a single p{bar p} collision at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The DP fraction and effective cross section ({sigma}{sub eff}), a process-independent scale parameter related to the parton density inside the nucleon, are measured in three intervals of the second (ordered in p{sub T}) jet transverse momentum p{sub T}{sup jet2} within the range 15 < p{sub T}{sup jet} < 30 GeV. In this range, f{sub DP} varies between 0.23 < f{sub DP} < 0.47, while {sigma}{sub eff} has the average value {sigma}{sub eff}{sup ave} = 16.4 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 2.3(syst) mb.

  11. Mapping the Interactions between Shocks and Mixing Layers in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ruscher, Christopher; Kan, Pinqing; Tenney, Andrew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Pressure is obtained from an LES calculation of the supersonic jet (Ma1 = 1 . 6) issuing from a rectangular nozzle in a low-subsonic co-flow; a tertiary flow, also rectangular with Ma3 = 1 insulates the primary jet from an aft-deck plate. The developing jet exhibits complex three-dimensional interactions between oblique shocks, multiple mixing layers and corner vortices, which collectively act as a skeleton for the flow. Our study is based on several plane sections through the pressure field, with short signals (0.1 s duration at 80 kHz sampling rate). Using wavelet-based band-pass filtering and cross-correlations, we map the directions of propagation of information among the various ``bones'' in the skeleton. In particular, we identify upstream propagation in some frequency bands, 3-dimensional interactions between the various shear layers, and several key bones from which the pressure signals, when taken as reference, provide dramatic phase-locking for parts of the skeleton. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  12. Interaction of co-propagating jets in the presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Michael; Doyle, Hugo; Brambrink, Erik; Crowston, Robert; Drake, R. Paul; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lamb, Don; Koenig, Michel; Kozlowski, Pawel; Marques, Jean-Raphael; Meinecke, Jena; Pelka, Alexander; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Tzeferacos, Petros; Woosley, Nigel; Gregori, Gianluca; Acsel Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    We observed the interaction of two co-propagating jets in 1 mbar of argon gas in the presence of an external magnetic field at the LULI laser facility. The jets were created by irradiating a 100 μm aluminum foil with two 1.5 ns laser pulses separated by 5 mm, each containing 500 J of 527 nm light. Optical interferometry and schlieren imaging were used to observe the flow of the interacting jets. Additionally, an induction coil was fielded to measure the magnetic field 3 cm from the initiation of the flows. Measurements were made with and without a 0.5 T external magnetic field. Preliminary results and analysis will be presented. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement no. 256973. and by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840.

  13. New observables for multiple-parton interactions measurements using Z +jets processes at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Singh, J. B.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple-parton interactions (MPI) play a vital role in hadron-hadron collisions. This paper presents a study of the MPIs with simulated Z +jets events in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The events are simulated with powheg, followed by hadronization and parton showering using pythia8. The events with dimuon invariant mass in the range of 60 - 120 GeV /c2 are selected for the analysis. The charged particle jets having a minimum transverse momentum of 5 GeV /c and an absolute pseudorapidity less than 2 are used to construct the observables for measurements of the MPIs. The proposed observables and phase-space region presented in this paper are found to have enhanced sensitivity to MPIs. The increased sensitivity to MPIs will lead to precise constraints on the parameters of the MPI models.

  14. Characteristics of the Jet Impact during the Interaction Between a Bubble and a Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Shi-Ping; Zhang, A.-Man

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a toroidal bubble splitting near a rigid wall in an inviscid incompressible fluid is studied in this paper. The boundary integral method is adopted to simulate the bubble motion. After the jet impact, the vortex ring model is used to handle the discontinued potential of the toroidal bubble. When the toroidal bubble is splitting, topology changes are made tear the bubble apart. Then, the vortex ring model is extended to multiple vortex rings to simulate the interaction between two toroidal bubbles. A typical case is discussed in this study. Besides, the velocity fields and pressure contours surrounding the bubble are used to illustrate the numerical results. An annular high pressure region is generated at the splitting location, and the maximum pressure may be much higher than the jet impact. More splits may happen after the first split.

  15. Gamma-ray burst jet dynamics and their interaction with the progenitor star.

    PubMed

    Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2007-05-15

    The association of at least some long gamma-ray bursts with type Ic supernova explosions has been established beyond reasonable doubt. Theoretically, the challenge is to explain the presence of a light hyper-relativistic flow propagating through a massive stellar core without losing those properties. We discuss the role of the jet-star interaction in shaping the properties of the outflow emerging on the surface of the star. We show that the nature of the inner engine is hidden from the observer for most of the evolution, well beyond the time of the jet breakout on the stellar surface. The discussion is based on analytical considerations as well as high resolution numerical simulations. Finally, the observational consequences of the scenario are addressed in light of the present capabilities. PMID:17293331

  16. Star-jet Interactions and Gamma-ray Outbursts from 3C454.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khangulyan, D. V.; Barkov, M. V.; Bosch-Romon, V.; Aharonian, F. A.; Dorodnitsyn, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model to explain the ultra-bright GeV gamma-ray flares observed from the blazar 3C454.3. The model is based on the concept of a relativistic jet interacting with compact gas condensations produced when a star (a red giant) crosses the jet close to the central black hole. The study includes an analytical treatment of the evolution of the envelope lost by the star within the jet, and calculations of the related high-energy radiation. The model readily explains the day-long that varies on timescales of hours, GeV gamma-ray flare from 3C454.3, observed during 2010 November on top of a plateau lasting weeks. In the proposed scenario, the plateau state is caused by a strong wind generated by the heating of the stellar atmosphere due to nonthermal particles accelerated at the jet-star interaction region. The flare itself could be produced by a few clouds of matter lost by the red giant after the initial impact of the jet. In the framework of the proposed scenario, the observations constrain the key model parameters of the source, including the mass of the central black hole: Blackhole Mass is approx. equal to 10(exp 9) Solar Mass, the total jet power: L(j) is approx. equal to 10(exp 48) erg s(exp -1), and the Doppler factor of the gamma-ray emitting clouds: Delta is approx. equal to 20. Whereas we do not specify the particle acceleration mechanisms, the potential gamma-ray production processes are discussed and compared in the context of the proposed model.We argue that synchrotron radiation of protons has certain advantages compared to other radiation channels of directlyaccelerated electrons. An injected proton distribution varies as E(exp -1) or harder below the relevant energies would be favored to alleviate the tight energetic constraints and to avoid the violation of the observational low-energy constraints.

  17. Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets are surrounded by rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense medium inhomogeneities. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. Aims: We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. Methods: We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. Results: The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interactions is potentially enhanced by a factor of ~100 when accounting for the whole surface of the shock induced by the obstacle, instead of just the obstacle section. The observer gamma-ray luminosity, including the effective obstacle size, the flow velocity and Doppler boosting effects, can be ~300 (γj/10)2 times higher than when the emitting flow is assumed at rest and only the obstacle section is considered, where γj is the jet Lorentz factor. For a whole population of red giants inside the jet of an active galactic nucleus, the predicted persistent gamma-ray luminosities may be potentially detectable for a jet pointing approximately to the observer. Conclusions: Obstacles interacting with relativistic outflows, for instance clouds and populations of stars for extragalactic jets, or stellar wind inhomogeneities in microquasar jets and in winds of pulsars in binaries, should be taken into account when

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generation is a concise summary of MHD theory, history, and future trends. Results of the major international MHD research projects are discussed. Data from MHD research is included. Economics of initial and operating costs are considered.

  19. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  20. Gyroscopic analog for magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The gross features of plasma equilibrium and dynamics in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model can be understood in terms of a dynamical system which closely resembles the equations for a deformable gyroscope.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Bachman, Mark G.

    2004-08-24

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system includes a reagent source containing a reagent fluid and a sample source containing a sample fluid that includes a constituent. A reactor is operatively connected to the supply reagent source and the sample source. MHD pumps utilize a magnetohydrodynamic drive to move the reagent fluid and the sample fluid in a flow such that the reagent fluid and the sample fluid form an interface causing the constituent to be separated from the sample fluid.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Columns Found toward the Double Helix Nebulae in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Ogawa, Takayuki

    NANTEN2 observations of the galactic molecular gas revealed that molecular columns surround the double helix nebulae at our Galactic center (Enokiya et al. 2014). In order to study the formation mechanism of the double helix nebulae and molecular columns, we carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of a magnetic tower jet ejected from the galactic center with interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) gas taking into account the interstellar cooling. The HI gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, cold, dense region is formed around the helical magnetic tower jet. These molecular columns can be the evidences of the past activity near the galactic center black hole.

  3. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  4. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  5. Study on the influences of interaction behaviors between multiple combustion-gas jets on expansion characteristics of Taylor cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaochun; Yu, Yonggang; Zhang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate means of controlling the interior ballistic stability of a bulk-loaded propellant gun (BLPG). Experiments on the interaction of twin combustion gas jets and liquid medium in a cylindrical stepped-wall combustion chamber are conducted in detail to obtain time series processes of jet expansion, and a numerical simulation under the same working conditions is also conducted to verify the reliability of the numerical method by comparing numerical results and experimental results. From this, numerical simulations on mutual interference and expansion characteristics of multiple combustion gas jets (four, six, and eight jets) in liquid medium are carried out, and the distribution characteristic of pressure, velocity, temperature, and evolutionary processes of Taylor cavities and streamlines of jet flow field are obtained in detail. The results of numerical simulations show that when different numbers of combustion gas jets expand in liquid medium, there are two different types of vortices in the jet flow field, including corner vortices of liquid phase near the step and backflow vortices of gas phase within Taylor cavities. Because of these two types of vortices, the radial expansion characteristic of the jets is increased, while changing numbers of combustion gas jets can restrain Kelvin-Helmholtz instability to a certain degree in jet expansion processes, which can at last realize the goal of controlling the interior ballistic stability of a BLPG. The optimum method for both suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and promoting radial expansion of Taylor cavities can be determined by analyzing the change of characteristic parameters in a jet flow field.

  6. Aerodynamic Testing of the Orion Launch Abort Tower Separation with Jettison Motor Jet Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Matthew N.; Chan, David T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamic database for the Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) was developed largely from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The LAS contains three solid rocket motors used in various phases of an abort to provide propulsion, steering, and Launch Abort Tower (LAT) jettison from the Crew Module (CM). This paper describes a pair of wind tunnel experiments performed at transonic and supersonic speeds to determine the aerodynamic effects due to proximity and jet interactions during LAT jettison from the CM at the end of an abort. The tests were run using two different scale models at angles of attack from 150deg to 200deg , sideslip angles from -10deg to +10deg , and a range of powered thrust levels from the jettison motors to match various jet simulation parameters with flight values. Separation movements between the CM and LAT included axial and vertical translations as well as relative pitch angle between the two bodies. The paper details aspects of the model design, nozzle scaling methodology, instrumentation, testing procedures, and data reduction. Sample data are shown to highlight trends seen in the results.

  7. Impact of orifice orientation on a finite-span synthetic jet interaction with a crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, Tyler; Leong, Chia Min; Whalen, Edward; Amitay, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of flow structures associated with a finite-span synthetic jet issued into a zero-pressure gradient boundary layer were investigated experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. A synthetic jet with an aspect ratio of AR = 18 was mounted on a flat plate and its interaction with a free stream, having a velocity of U∞ = 10 m/s (Reδ = 2000) at momentum coefficients of Cμ = 0.08, 0.33, and 0.75, was studied. The effect of the orifice pitch (α = 20∘-90∘) and skew (β = 0∘-90∘) angles on vortex formation as well as the global impact of the synthetic jet on the flow field was explored in detail. It was found that the orifice orientation had a significant impact on the steady and unsteady flow structures. Different orifice skew and pitch angles could result in several types of vortical structures downstream, including: no coherent vortex structure, a single (positive or negative) strong vortex, or a symmetric vortex pair. In all cases, the velocity near the wall was increased; however, cases with higher blockage (i.e., more wall-normal, transverse orifice) resulted in a strong velocity deficit in the free stream where orifices with lower pitch angles yielded in an increase in velocity throughout. The analysis is concluded with a summary of quantitative metrics that allude to flow control effectiveness.

  8. Spectroscopic Analysis of High Intensity Laser Beam Jets Interaction Experiments on the Leopard Laser at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, E. E.; Weller, M. E.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyapsteva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; University of Nevada Reno Team

    2013-10-01

    Results of Ar gas-puff experiments performed on the high power Leopard laser at UNR are presented. Flux density of laser radiation in focal spot was up to 2 × 1016 W/cm2 (pulse duration was 0.8 ns and laser wavelength was 1.057 μm). Specifically, spectroscopic analysis of K-shell Ar spectra are investigated and compared as functions of the orientation of the laser beam to linear gas jet. The laser beam axis was positioned either along the jet plane or orthogonal to it at a distance of 1 mm from the nozzle output. The diagnostics used included a time-integrated x-ray spectrometer along with a set of filtered Si diodes with various cutoff energies. In order to identify lines, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) kinetic model was utilized and was also used to determine plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The importance of the spectroscopic study of high intensity laser beam-jets interaction experiments is discussed. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno, and in part by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreements DE-NA0001984 and DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  9. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Collapsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Yamada, S.; Koider, S.; Shipata, K.

    2005-01-01

    We have performed 2.5-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of collapsars including a rotating black hole. Initially, we assume that the core collapse has failed in this star. A rotating black hole of a few solar masses is inserted by hand into the calculation. The simulation results show the formation of a disklike structure and the generation of a jetlike outflow near the central black hole. The jetlike outflow propagates and accelerated mainly by the magnetic field. The total jet velocity is approximately 0.3c. When the rotation of the black hole is faster, the magnetic field is twisted strongly owing to the frame-dragging effect. The magnetic energy stored by the twisting magnetic field is directly converted to kinetic energy of the jet rather than propagating as an Alfven wave. Thus, as the rotation of the black hole becomes faster, the poloidal velocity of the jet becomes faster.

  10. Symmetry transforms for ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria.

    PubMed

    Bogoyavlenskij, Oleg I

    2002-11-01

    A method for constructing ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria is introduced. The method consists of the application of symmetry transforms to any known MHD equilibrium [ O. I. Bogoyavlenskij, Phys. Rev. E. 62, 8616, (2000)]. The transforms break the geometrical symmetries of the field-aligned solutions and produce continuous families of the nonsymmetric MHD equilibria. The method of symmetry transforms also allows to obtain MHD equilibria with current sheets and exact solutions with noncollinear vector fields B and V. A model of the nonsymmetric astrophysical jets outside of their accretion disks is developed. The total magnetic and kinetic energy of the jet is finite in any layer c(1)jet possesses current sheets and is highly collimated in view of a rapid decrease of the magnetic field B in the transverse direction. The method gives also the MHD equilibria that model ball lightning with dynamics of plasma inside the fireball. PMID:12513610

  11. THERMODYNAMIC INTERACTION OF THE PRIMARY PROTON BEAM WITH A MERCURY JET TARGET AT A NEUTRINO FACTORY SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; LUDEWIG,H.; KIRK,H.; THIEBERGER,P.; MCDONALD,K.

    2001-06-18

    This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of an intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target at a neutrino factory or muon collider source, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 1.6e13 protons per pulse and a pulse length of 2 nanosec will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within a 20 Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 microsec, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using an ANSYS code transient analysis, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. The amplitude of the pressure wave reaching the nozzle that ejects the mercury jet into the magnetic field is estimated and the potential for mechanical damage is addressed.

  12. Nonlinear interactions in mixing layers and compressible heated round jets. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrah, Yousef Mohd

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions between a fundamental instability mode and both its harmonics and the changing mean flow are studied using the weakly nonlinear stability theory of Stuart and Watson, and numerical solutions of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. The first part focuses on incompressible cold (or isothermal; constant temperature throughout) mixing layers, and for these, the first and second Landau constants are calculated as functions of wavenumber and Reynolds number. It is found that the dominant contribution to the Landau constants arises from the mean flow changes and not from the higher harmonics. In order to establish the range of validity of the weakly nonlinear theory, the weakly nonlinear and numerical solutions are compared and the limitation of each is discussed. At small amplitudes and at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the two results compare well in describing the saturation of the fundamental, the distortion of the mean flow, and the initial stages of vorticity roll-up. At larger amplitudes, the interaction between the fundamental, second harmonic, and the mean flow is strongly nonlinear and the numerical solution predicts flow oscillations, whereas the weakly nonlinear theory yields saturation. In the second part, the weakly nonlinear theory is extended to heated (or nonisothermal; mean temperature distribution) subsonic round jets where quadratic and cubic nonlinear interactions are present, and the Landau constants also depend on jet temperature ratio, Mach number and azimuthal mode number. Under exponential growth and nonlinear saturation, it is found that heating and compressibility suppress the growth of instability waves, that the first azimuthal mode is the dominant instability mode, and that the weakly nonlinear solution describes the early stages of the roll-up of an axisymmetric shear layer. The receptivity of a typical jet flow to pulse type input disturbance is also studied by solving the initial value problem

  13. Space shuttle orbiter rear mounted reaction control system jet interaction study. [hypersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of interaction between the reaction control system (RCS) jets and the flow over the space shuttle orbiter in the atmosphere was investigated in the NASA Langley 31-inch continuous flow hypersonic tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10.3 and in the AEDC continuous flow hypersonic tunnel B at a nominal Mach number of 6, using 0.01 and .0125 scale force models with aft RCS nozzles mounted both on the model and on the sting of the force model balance. The data show that RCS nozzle exit momentum ratio is the primary correlating parameter for effects where the plume impinges on an adjacent surface and mass flow ratio is the parameter when the plume interaction is primarily with the external stream. An analytic model of aft mounted RCS units was developed in which the total reaction control moments are the sum of thrust, impingement, interaction, and cross-coupling terms.

  14. Parabolized Stability Equations analysis of nonlinear interactions with forced eigenmodes to control subsonic jet instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Itasse, Maxime Brazier, Jean-Philippe Léon, Olivier Casalis, Grégoire

    2015-08-15

    Nonlinear evolution of disturbances in an axisymmetric, high subsonic, high Reynolds number hot jet with forced eigenmodes is studied using the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) approach to understand how modes interact with one another. Both frequency and azimuthal harmonic interactions are analyzed by setting up one or two modes at higher initial amplitudes and various phases. While single mode excitation leads to harmonic growth and jet noise amplification, controlling the evolution of a specific mode has been made possible by forcing two modes (m{sub 1}, n{sub 1}), (m{sub 2}, n{sub 2}), such that the difference in azimuth and in frequency matches the desired “target” mode (m{sub 1} − m{sub 2}, n{sub 1} − n{sub 2}). A careful setup of the initial amplitudes and phases of the forced modes, defined as the “killer” modes, has allowed the minimizing of the initially dominant instability in the near pressure field, as well as its estimated radiated noise with a 15 dB loss. Although an increase of the overall sound pressure has been found in the range of azimuth and frequency analyzed, the present paper reveals the possibility to make the initially dominant instability ineffective acoustically using nonlinear interactions with forced eigenmodes.

  15. Measurement Of Ultrafast Ionisation From Intense Laser Interactions With Gas-Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gizzi, Leonida A.; Galimberti, Marco; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Koester, Petra; Labate, Luca; Tomassini, Paolo; Martin, Philippe; Ceccotti, Tiberio; De Oliveira, Pascal; Monot, Pascal

    2006-04-07

    Interaction of an intense, ultrashort laser pulse with a gas-jet target is investigated through femtosecond optical interferometry to study the dynamics of ionization of the gas. Experimental results are presented in which the propagation of the pulse in the gas and the consequent plasma formation is followed step by step with high temporal and spatial resolution. We demonstrate that, combining the phase shift with the measurable depletion of fringe visibility associated with the transient change of refractive index in the ionizing region and taking into account probe travel time can provide direct information on gas ionization dynamics.

  16. Non-thermal emission from the interaction of extragalactic jets with stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyro, Florencia; Bosch-Ramon, Valenti; Torres-Albà, Núria

    2016-07-01

    The central regions of galaxies are rich environments, often full with stars and medium inhomogeneities. For galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei, the interaction of a relativistic jet with these objects can lead to the formation of shocks, where particles can be accelerated up to relativistic energies. Recent numerical simulations show that the effective surface of the shock induced by the obstacle is higher than the obstacle section, increasing the available non-thermal energy. In this work, we analyze the non-thermal processes in these shocks. First, we make a detailed characterization of the stellar population in the central region of the galaxy, taking into account the evolution of stars with different masses. This allows us to obtain good estimates of the non-thermal energy. Then, we study the transport of relativistic electron accelerated in the shocks, and compute the gamma-ray emission. The interaction of relativistic jets with ambient objects, such as stars and clouds, can contribute significantly to the non-thermal emission from these sources.

  17. Experimental investigation of the interaction of a thrust reverser jet with an external subsonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, J.-M.; Deckers, K.; Wens, G.

    1993-11-01

    An experimental modelization of a door-type thrust reverser is conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel. The geometry of the model is defined in order to simulate both the internal and external flow of a real thrust reverser. Different door configurations are studied for a selected value of the mass flux injection ratio of three. Visualizations illustrate qualitatively the jet interaction, and extensive mean velocity and pressure measurements are conducted in sections perpendicular to the upstream flow direction with a five hole probe. The total pressure losses and the drag force produced by the thrust reverser are deduced from the measurements. As a result, it shows that the smaller opening angle of the door (56 deg), with a becquet deflection of 15 deg gives the larger drag force. In addition to the classical pair of counter rotating vortices observed in jet in cross flow interactions, a second pair of counter rotating vortices below the main pair is found. The vorticity field is described with good agreement by a simple vortex model simulating the two pairs of vortices.

  18. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  19. INTERACTION OF A 24 GEV PROTON BEAM IWHT A MUON COLLIDER MERCURY JET TARGET EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; KIRK,H.; FINFROCK,C.; GREENE,G.; LUDEWIG,H.; MCDONALD,K.; MOKHOV,N.

    2001-11-11

    A muon collider or a neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring require intense beams of muons that can be generated by a 1-4 MW proton beam incident on a moving target inside a 20-T solenoid magnet, with a mercury jet as a preferred example. This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of the intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 16 TP (1 TP = 10{sup 12} protons) per pulse and a pulse length of 2 ns will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within the 20-Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 {micro}s, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using a transient analysis based on finite element modeling, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. Issues associated with the use of a liquid metal jet as a target candidate are addressed. Lastly, some experimental results from the BNL E951 experiment are presented and discussed.

  20. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code developed by Bauer et al. (1978) for the study of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a plasma in toroidal geometry is extended so that the growth rates of instabilities may be estimated more accurately. The original code, which is based on the variational principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is upgraded by the introduction of a nonlinear formula for the growth rate of an unstable mode which acts as a quantitative measure of instability that is important in estimating numerical errors. The revised code has been applied to the determination of the nonlinear saturation, ballooning modes and beta limits for tokamaks, stellarators and torsatrons.

  1. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  2. Numerical simulation of the interaction between a flowfield and chemical reaction on premixed pulsed jet combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishida, Manabu; Hayashi, A. Koichi

    1992-12-01

    Pulsed Jet Combustion (PJC) is numerically simulated using time-dependent, axisymmetric, full Navier-Stokes equations with the mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations for a hydrogen-air mixture. A hydrogen-air reaction mechanism is modeled by nine species and nineteen elementary forward and backward reactions to evaluate the effect of the chemical reactions accurately. A point implicit method with the Harten and Yee's non-MUSCL (Monotone Upstream-centerd Schemes for Conservation Laws) modified-flux type TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) scheme is applied to deal with the stiff partial differential equations. Furthermore, a zonal method making use of the Fortified Solution Algorithm (FSA) is applied to simulate the phenomena in the complicated shape of the sub-chamber. The numerical result shows that flames propagating in the sub-chamber interact with pressure waves and are deformed to be wrinkled like a 'tulip' flame and a jet passed through the orifice changes its mass flux quasi-periodically.

  3. Flaperon Modification Effect on Jet-Flap Interaction Noise Reduction for Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Mengle, Vinod G.; Stoker, Robert W.; Brusniak, Leon; Elkoby, Ronen

    2007-01-01

    Jet-flap interaction (JFI) noise can become an important component of far field noise when a flap is immersed in the engine propulsive stream or is in its entrained region, as in approach conditions for under-the-wing engine configurations. We experimentally study the effect of modifying the flaperon, which is a high speed aileron between the inboard and outboard flaps, at both approach and take-off conditions using scaled models in a free jet. The flaperon modifications were of two types: sawtooth trailing edge and mini vortex generators (vg s). Parametric variations of these two concepts were tested with a round coaxial nozzle and an advanced chevron nozzle, with azimuthally varying fan chevrons, using both far field microphone arrays and phased microphone arrays for source diagnostics purposes. In general, the phased array results corroborated the far field results in the upstream quadrant pointing to JFI near the flaperon trailing edge as the origin of the far field noise changes. Specific sawtooth trailing edges in conjunction with the round nozzle gave marginal reduction in JFI noise at approach, and parallel co-rotating mini-vg s were somewhat more beneficial over a wider range of angles, but both concepts were noisier at take-off conditions. These two concepts had generally an adverse JFI effect when used in conjunction with the advanced chevron nozzle at both approach and take-off conditions.

  4. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  5. Incident Shock-Transverse Jet Interactions at Mach 1.9: Effect of Shock Impingement Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare-Behtash, H.; Lo, K. H.; Erdem, E.; Kontis, K.; Lin, J.; Ukai, T.; Obayashi, S.

    The scramjet engine is an efficient design for high-speed propulsion, requiring injection of fuel into a supersonic flow in a short amount of time. Due to the nature of the flow numerous shock waves exist within the combustor of a scramjet, significantly altering the flow characteristics and performance of the engine as the flow Mach number or attitude is changed. According to Mai et al. [1] the location of impingement of the incident shock, relative to the fuel injection location, has significant impact on the mixing and flame-holding properties. This emphasises the importance of understanding and hence the need for controlling the dynamic interactions that are created. Of course another fertile area where transverse jet injections are studied for their application is the creation of forces and moments for pitch and attitude control [2, 3].

  6. The role of the interaction between polar and subtropical jet in a case of depression rejuvenation over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezerakos, N. G.; Flocas, H. A.; Brikas, D.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to investigate the synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions and dynamic processes leading to the rejuvenation of depressions or cyclogenesis over the Eastern Mediterranean during the cold period of the year. A case study analysis is carried out when the Polar Front Jet (PFJ) is positioned to the south of its normal seasonal position and interacts with the Subtropical Jet Stream (SJS), which is positioned to the north of its normal seasonal position. It was found that the vigorous rejuvenation of a northeastwards moving Atlas mountains depression on 15 March 1998 over Cyprus region is associated with an increase of the hydrodynamic instability due to the juxtaposition of a polar front jet streak to the subtropical jet stream. Furthermore, the rejuvenation is related to the combined effect of the direct and indirect cross vertical circulations appearing on the right side of the entrance of a polar jet streak and the left side of a subtropical jet streak exit, respectively.

  7. Modelling the kinked jet of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignone, A.; Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Ferrari, A.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the dynamical propagation of the South-East jet from the Crab pulsar interacting with supernova ejecta by means of three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations with the PLUTO code. The initial jet structure is set up from the inner regions of the Crab nebula. We study the evolution of hot, relativistic hollow outflows initially carrying a purely azimuthal magnetic field. Our jet models are characterized by different choices of the outflow magnetization (σ parameter) and the bulk Lorentz factor (γj). We show that the jet is heavily affected by the growth of current-driven kink instabilities causing considerable deflection throughout its propagation length. This behaviour is partially stabilized by the combined action of larger flow velocities and/or reduced magnetic field strengths. We find that our best jet models are characterized by relatively large values of σ (≳1) and small values of γj ≃ 2. Our results are in good agreement with the recent X-ray (Chandra) data of the Crab nebula South-East jet indicating that the jet changes direction of propagation on a time-scale of the order of few years. The 3D models presented here may have important implications in the investigation of particle acceleration in relativistic outflows.

  8. An infrared jet in Centaurus A (NGC 5128): Evidence for interaction between the active nucleus and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall; Harvey, P. M.; Tollestrup, E. V.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Hyland, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, higher resolution near infrared images of the visually-obscured central region of Centaurus A were obtained in order to investigate the effects of the active nucleus on the surrounding galaxy. Researchers present J(1.25 microns), H(1.65 microns), and K(2.2 microns) images of the central 40 seconds of the galaxy, taken with the Univ. of Texas InSb array camera on the Anglo Australian 3.9 meter telescope. These images reveal a jet extending approx. 10 arcseconds to the northeast of the nucleus at the same position angle as the x ray and radio jets. The infrared jet is most prominent at the shortest wavelength (1.25 microns), where its brightness surpasses that of the nucleus. The blue appearance of the infrared jet is remarkable considering the heavy obscuration that is evident at visual wavelengths. The amount of reddening in the vicinity of the jet is determined from the measured colors of the stellar core of the galaxy, and this value is used to generate an extinction-corrected energy distribution. In contrast to previously studied optical and infrared jets in active nuclei, the short-wavelength prominence of the Cen A jet indicates that it cannot be attributed to synchrotron emission from a beam of relativistic electrons. The remaining viable mechanisms involve an interaction between the interstellar medium and the active nucleus: the infrared radiation from the jet may be due to emission from interstellar gas that has been entrained and heated by the flow of relativistic particles from the nucleus; alternatively, luminous blue stars may have been created by compression of interstellar material by the relativistic plasma. To investigate these proposed mechanisms, near-infrared spectroscopic studies of Cen A are in progress to look for collisionally excited molecular hydrogen emission lines and recombination lines from ionized gas.

  9. THE HIGHEST RESOLUTION CHANDRA VIEW OF PHOTOIONIZATION AND JET-CLOUD INTERACTION IN THE NUCLEAR REGION OF NGC 4151

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junfeng; Fabbiano, G.; Karovska, M.; Elvis, M.; Risaliti, G.; Zezas, A.; Mundell, C. G. E-mail: gfabbiano@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: elvis@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: azezas@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-10-20

    We report high resolution imaging of the nucleus of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151 obtained with a 50 ks Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC) observation. The HRC image resolves the emission on spatial scales of 0.''5, approx30 pc, showing an extended X-ray morphology overall consistent with the narrow-line region (NLR) seen in optical line emission. Removal of the bright point-like nuclear source and image deconvolution techniques both reveal X-ray enhancements that closely match the substructures seen in the Hubble Space Telescope [O III] image and prominent knots in the radio jet. We find that most of the NLR clouds in NGC 4151 have [O III]/soft X-ray ratio approx10, despite the distance of the clouds from the nucleus. This ratio is consistent with the values observed in NLRs of some Seyfert 2 galaxies, which indicates a uniform ionization parameter even at large radii and a density decreasing as r {sup -2} as expected for a nuclear wind scenario. The [O III]/X-ray ratios at the location of radio knots show an excess of X-ray emission, suggesting shock heating in addition to photoionization. We examine various mechanisms for the X-ray emission and find that, in contrast to jet-related X-ray emission in more powerful active galactic nucleus, the observed jet parameters in NGC 4151 are inconsistent with synchrotron emission, synchrotron self-Compton, inverse Compton of cosmic microwave background photons or galaxy optical light. Instead, our results favor thermal emission from the interaction between radio outflow and NLR gas clouds as the origin for the X-ray emission associated with the jet. This supports previous claims that frequent jet-interstellar medium interaction may explain why jets in Seyfert galaxies appear small, slow, and thermally dominated, distinct from those kpc-scale jets in the radio galaxies.

  10. Measurement of the inclusive cross section of jets in γγ interactions at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashii, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Noguchi, S.; Fujiwara, N.; Abe, T.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Aoki, M.; Awa, S.; Belusevic, R.; Emi, K.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, K.; Fujii, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Fujita, K.; Howell, B.; Iida, N.; Ikeda, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Kajikawa, R.; Kato, S.; Kawabata, S.; Kichimi, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koltick, D.; Levine, I.; Miyabayashi, K.; Muramatsu, K.; Nagai, K.; Nagira, T.; Nakano, E.; Nakabayashi, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ochiai, F.; Ohnishi, Y.; Okuno, H.; Okusawa, T.; Shimozawa, K.; Shinohara, T.; Sugiyama, A.; Sugiyama, N.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Takemoto, M.; Tanimori, T.; Tauchi, T.; Teramae, F.; Teramoto, Y.; Toomi, N.; Toyama, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uno, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Topaz Collaboration

    1993-09-01

    We have investigated the properties of jet production in almost real γγ collisions at √ s=58 GeV with the TOPAZ detector at the TRISTAN e+e- collider. The data were analyzed with a jet-clustering method based on a cone algorithm. The jet rate shows evidence for a hard scattering effect of the hadronic constituents of a photon (resolved photon processes). We have also observed a substantial energy flow in the small-angle region, which is additional evidence for resolved photon processes. We present the transverse momentum dependence of the inclusive jet and two-jet cross sections and compare them with different model predictions.

  11. Effect on a shock wave boundary layer interaction of air jet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souverein, L. J.; Debiève, J.-F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of upstream injection by means of continuous Air Jet Vortex Generators (AJVGs) on a shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is experimentally investigated. The baseline interaction is of the impinging type, with a flow deflection angle of 9.5° , a Mach number Me = 2.3, and a momentum thickness based Reynolds number of 5,000. Considered are the effects of the AJVGs on the upstream boundary layer flow topology and on the spatial and dynamical characteristics of the interaction. To this aim, Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry has been employed, in addition to hot-wire anemometry (HWA) for the investigation of the dynamical characteristics of the reflected shock. It is shown that the AJVGs significantly modify the three-dimensionality of the upstream boundary layer. Overall, the AJVGs cause a reduction of the separation bubble length and height. In addition, the energetic frequency range of the reflected shock is increased by approximately 50%, which is in qualitative agreement with the smaller separation bubble size.

  12. JET TRAILS AND MACH CONES: THE INTERACTION OF MICROQUASARS WITH THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, D.; Morsony, B.; Heinz, S.; Wiersema, K.; Fender, R. P.; Russell, D. M.; Sunyaev, R.

    2011-11-20

    A subset of microquasars exhibits high peculiar velocity with respect to the local standard of rest due to the kicks they receive when being born in supernovae. The interaction between the radio plasma released by microquasar jets from such high-velocity binaries with the interstellar medium must lead to the production of trails and bow shocks similar to what is observed in narrow-angle tailed radio galaxies and pulsar wind nebulae. We present a set of numerical simulations of this interaction that illuminate the long-term dynamical evolution and the observational properties of these microquasar bow-shock nebulae and trails. We find that this interaction always produces a structure that consists of a bow shock, a trailing neck, and an expanding bubble. Using our simulations to model emission, we predict that the shock surrounding the bubble and the neck should be visible in H{sub {alpha}} emission, the interior of the bubble should be visible in synchrotron radio emission, and only the bow shock is likely to be detectable in X-ray emission. We construct an analytic model for the evolution of the neck and bubble shape and compare this model with observations of the X-ray binary SAX J1712.6-3739.

  13. Experimental Study on Thermal Interaction of Ethanol Jets in High Temperature Fluorinert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Rongyuan; Takahashi, Minoru

    As a fundamental study for the direct contact heat exchange which was employed for in-vessel heat exchange in the Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR) and for the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead alloy-cooled fast reactor (LFR), ethanol jet was injected into high temperature fluorinert (FC-3283) as a simulation experiment in order to investigate the jet boiling phenomena just after volatile water contacting with the high temperature continuous lead alloy liquid. Two series of tests (no-boiling and boiling) were initiated to evaluate the ethanol vapor volume which generated around the ethanol jet. From synchronized temperature measurement around ethanol jet, the overview of the boiling behavior showed that jet boiling occurred at bottom part of jet first and developed to the upper part within very narrow area around jet.

  14. Alleviation of Facility/Engine Interactions in an Open-Jet Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Emami, Saied

    2001-01-01

    Results of a series of shakedown tests to eliminate facility/engine interactions in an open-jet scramjet test facility are presented. The tests were conducted with the NASA DFX (Dual-Fuel eXperimental scramjet) engine in the NASA Langley Combustion Heated Scramjet Test Facility (CHSTF) in support of the Hyper-X program, The majority of the tests were conducted at a total enthalpy and pressure corresponding to Mach 5 flight at a dynamic pressure of 734 psf. The DFX is the largest engine ever tested in the CHSTF. Blockage, in terms of the projected engine area relative to the nozzle exit area, is 81% with the engine forebody leading edge aligned with the upper edge of the facility nozzle such that it ingests the nozzle boundary layer. The blockage increases to 95% with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. down in the core flow. Previous engines successfully tested in the CHSTF have had blockages of no more than 51%. Oil flow studies along with facility and engine pressure measurements were used to define flow behavior. These results guided modifications to existing aeroappliances and the design of new aeroappliances. These changes allowed fueled tests to be conducted without facility interaction effects in the data with the engine forebody leading edge positioned to ingest the facility nozzle boundary layer. Interaction effects were also reduced for tests with the engine forebody leading edge positioned 2 in. into the core flow, however some interaction effects were still evident in the engine data. A new shroud and diffuser have been designed with the goal of allowing fueled tests to be conducted with the engine forebody leading edge positioned in the core without facility interaction effects in the data. Evaluation tests of the new shroud and diffuser will be conducted once ongoing fueled engine tests have been completed.

  15. ICRF specific plasma wall interactions in JET with the ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, Vl.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Clever, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Huber, A.; Jacquet, P.; Klepper, C.; Lerche, E.; Maggi, C.; Marcotte, F.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M. L.; McCormick, K.; Meigs, A.; Milanesio, D.; Monakhov, I.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pütterich, Th.; Rimini, F.; Van Rooj, G.; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2013-07-01

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the -90° phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  16. ICRF Specific Plasma Wall Interactions in JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, V.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Clever, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Huber, Alexander; Lerche, E.; Maggi, C.; Marcotte, F.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A. G.; Monakhov, I.; Putterich, Th.; Rimini, F.; Rooj, G. Van; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the 90 phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  17. Jet-Surface Interaction: High Aspect Ratio Nozzle Test, Nozzle Design and Preliminary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford; Dippold, Vance

    2015-01-01

    The Jet-Surface Interaction High Aspect Ratio (JSI-HAR) nozzle test is part of an ongoing effort to measure and predict the noise created when an aircraft engine exhausts close to an airframe surface. The JSI-HAR test is focused on parameters derived from the Turbo-electric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) concept aircraft which include a high-aspect ratio mailslot exhaust nozzle, internal septa, and an aft deck. The size and mass flow rate limits of the test rig also limited the test nozzle to a 16:1 aspect ratio, half the approximately 32:1 on the TeDP concept. Also, unlike the aircraft, the test nozzle must transition from a single round duct on the High Flow Jet Exit Rig, located in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center, to the rectangular shape at the nozzle exit. A parametric nozzle design method was developed to design three low noise round-to-rectangular transitions, with 8:1, 12:1, and 16: aspect ratios, that minimizes flow separations and shocks while providing a flat flow profile at the nozzle exit. These designs validated using the WIND-US CFD code. A preliminary analysis of the test data shows that the actual flow profile is close to that predicted and that the noise results appear consistent with data from previous, smaller scale, tests. The JSI-HAR test is ongoing through October 2015. The results shown in the presentation are intended to provide an overview of the test and a first look at the preliminary results.

  18. The Interaction of a Circular Synthetic Jet with a Cross-Flow Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; R. J. Pink; Jennifer M. Shuster; Douglas R. Smith

    2005-06-01

    The interaction of a circular synthetic jet with a laminar cross-flow boundary layer was investigated experimentally in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction flow facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Two orifice orientations were investigated, straight and inclined. For each orifice, phase-averaged and time-averaged PIV measurements were made at L◦/D◦ = 1.0 and 2.0 with ReU◦ = 250 and r = 1.12. Refractive index matching between the working fluid and the model material permitted experimental measurements of the flow field inside the actuator orifice and cavity simultaneously. At L◦/D◦ = 1.0, the vortex ring formed at the orifice during the expulsion portion of the actuator cycle blocks the boundary layer causing the flow to divert over and around the ring. This vortex ring does not escape the near-vicinity of the orifice and is subsequently re-ingested. At the same stroke, inclining the orifice axis 30◦ downstream leads to a jet comprised of a train of vortex rings that penetrates the cross-flow. At L◦/D◦ = 2.0, both the straight and inclined orifices create large discrete vortex rings that penetrate deep into the cross-flow, and consequently do not affect the boundary layer much beyond the near-field of the orifice.

  19. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  20. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  1. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  2. Fluid-Solid Interactive Methodology for Prognosis of Passenger Jet Structural Damage in Water Crash Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayandor, Javid

    2010-11-01

    Today, crashworthiness studies constitute a major part of modern aerospace design and certification processes. Of important consideration is the assessment of structural damage tolerance in terms of the extent of progressive damage and failure caused by aircraft emergency ditching on soft terrain or on water. Although a certification requirement, full scale crash landings are rarely tested using fully functional prototypes due to their high associated costs. This constraint makes it difficult for all crashworthy features of the design to be identified and fine-tuned before the commencement of the manufacturing phase. The current study presents aspects of a numerical methodology that can drastically subside the dependency of the certification assessments to full scale field trials. Interactive, fully nonlinear, solid-structure and fluid- structure analyses have been proposed using coupled Lagrangian- Eulerian and independent meshless Lagrangian approaches that run on a combined finite element-computational fluid dynamics platform. Detailed analysis of a key landing scenario pertaining to a large passenger jet will be provided to determine the relevance and accuracy of the proposed method. The work further identifies state-of-the-art computational approaches for modeling fluid-solid interactive systems that can help improve aircraft structural responses to soft impact and water ditching.

  3. Interaction of DC Microhollow Cathode Discharge Plasma Micro Jet with Liquid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weidong; Lopez, Jose; Becker, Kurt

    2008-10-01

    There have been different approaches in studying the interaction between plasma and liquid, such as sustained plasmas in contact with liquids and pulsed electric discharge in liquids. Recently, we have discovered that stable plasma can be sustained within a gas cavity maintained inside liquid media. A prototype device with key dimensions in sub-millimeter range were operated successfully in de-ionized water and turbo molecular pump oil with ambient air, pure nitrogen or pure oxygen used as the operating gas. Hydrogen Peroxide production in de-ionized water with ambient air as the working gas is estimated to be about 80 mg/L after 15 minutes plasma jet-water interaction while energy consumption is only about 8-10 W. With the radicals readily generated and directly introduced into the liquid media, it could lead to applications such as in-liquid bio-waste treatment, bio-rich liquid modification, in-situ monitoring/sensing, and filtration of by-products from VOC treatment by plasma.

  4. EDITORIAL: The interaction of radio-frequency fields with fusion plasmas: the JET experience The interaction of radio-frequency fields with fusion plasmas: the JET experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, Jef

    2012-07-01

    The JET Task Force Heating is proud to present this special issue. It is the result of hard and dedicated work by everybody participating in the Task Force over the last four years and gives an overview of the experimental and theoretical results obtained in the period 2008-2010 with radio frequency heating of JET fusion plasmas. Topics studied and reported in this issue are: investigations into the operation of lower hybrid heating accompanied by new modeling results; new experimental results and insights into the physics of various ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating scenarios; progress in studies of intrinsic and ion cyclotron wave-induced plasma rotation and flows; a summary of the developments over the last years in designing an ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRH) system that can cope with the presence of fast load variations in the edge, as e.g. caused by pellets or edge localized modes (ELMs) during H-Mode operation; an overview of the results obtained with the ITER-like antenna operating in H-Mode with a packed array of straps and power densities close to those of the projected ITER ICRH antenna; and, finally, a summary of the results obtained in applying ion cyclotron waves for wall conditioning of the tokamak. This issue would not have been possible without the strong motivation and efforts (sometimes truly heroic) of all colleagues of the JET Task Force Heating. A sincere word of thanks, therefore, to all authors and co-authors involved in the experiments, analysis and compilation of the papers. It was a special privilege to work with all of them during the past very intense years. Thanks also to all other European and non-European scientists who contributed to the JET scientific programme, the operations team of JET and the colleagues of the Close Support Unit in Culham. Thanks also to the editors, Editorial Board and referees of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, together with the publishing staff of IOPP, who have not only

  5. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  6. Mixing augmentation induced by the interaction between the oblique shock wave and a sonic hydrogen jet in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Tan, Jian-guo; Liu, Jun; Yan, Li

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process between the injectant and air is very important for the operation of scramjet engine, and the injectant and air should be mixed sufficiently before entering into the combustor. The three-dimensional Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the SST k-ω turbulence model have been employed to investigate the interaction of the oblique shock wave and the hydrogen jet, and the influence of the wedge angle has been taken into consideration, namely the intensity of the produced oblique shock wave, as well as the jet-to-crossflow pressure ratio. In this paper, the produced oblique shock wave collides with the bottom wall upstream and downstream of the jet orifice with the variance of the wedge angle. The obtained results show that the incident shock wave makes a great difference to the mixing enhancement between the injectant and air, and there exists a critical value of the wedge angle for the scramjet engine with a certain boundary condition. This value is 20° in the range considered in the current study, and the hydrogen is brought into the separation zone upstream of the jet orifice when the wedge angle is 20°. At the same time, the produced oblique shock wave nearly collides with the Mach disk produced by the hydrogen jet.

  7. Hadron production in quark, antiquark, and gluon jets from electron-positron interactions at the Z(0) pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyejoo

    We present production measurements of the charged hadrons pi +/-, K+/- and p/p¯ in e+e- interactions at the Z0 pole. The excellent particle identification capability of the SLC Large Detector (SLD) at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) are used. In addition to studies over a wide momentum range in hadronic Z0 events of all five flavors, we have made the most precise measurements in light (uds), c and b flavor events separately. Unambiguous flavor dependencies have been observed, and the results have been compared with the predictions of several QCD fragmentation models. We have also exploited the unique feature of electron beam polarization in our experiment to compare hadron production separately in quark and antiquark jets. Direct evidence that higher momentum hadrons are more likely to contain the primary quark and antiquark is seen, with precision sufficient to provide new model tests. Finally, we have studied hard gluon jets in detail. We have confirmed that gluon jets have a higher multiplicity of softer particles than light quark jets, and found this enhancement to be the same for pi+/-, K +/- and p/p¯ at the few percent level at all momenta. Any overall difference in the hadron fractions is limited to 0.018 at the 95% confidence level, indicating that there are no differences at the hadronization stage in jet formation between gluons and quarks.

  8. The President's Day cyclone 17-19 February 1979: An analysis of jet streak interactions prior to cyclogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uccellini, L. W.; Kocin, P. J.; Walsh, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The President's Day cyclone, produced record breaking snowfall along the East Coast of the United States in February 1979. Conventional radiosonde data, SMS GOES infrared imagery and LFM 2 model diagnostics were used to analyze the interaction of upper and lower tropospheric jet streaks prior to cyclogenesis. The analysis reveals that a series of complex scale interactive processes is responsible for the development of the intense cyclone. The evolution of the subsynoptic scale mass and momentum fields prior to and during the period of rapid development of the President's Day cyclone utilizing conventional data and SMS GOES imagery is documented. The interaction between upper and lower tropospheric jet streaks which occurred prior to the onset of cyclogenesis is discussed as well as the possible effects of terrain modified airflow within the precyclogenesis environment. Possible deficiencies in the LFM-2 initial wind fields that could have been responsible, in part, for the poor numerical forecast are examined.

  9. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  10. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident-shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  11. Interactions between Oceanic Saharan Air Layer and African Easterly Jet- African Easterly Waves System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols have robust influences on multi-scale climatic systems and variability. Non-linear aerosol-cloud-climate interactions depend on many parameters such as aerosol features, regional atmospheric dynamics and variability. Although there are remarkable modeling studies indicating that aerosols induce robust modifications in cloud properties, circulations and the hydrological cycle, many of the physical and dynamical processes involving in these complex interactions between aerosols and Earth's system are still poorly understood. Better understanding the contribution of aerosols with atmospheric phenomena and their transient changes are crucial for efforts to evaluate climate predictions by next generation climate models. This study provides strong evidence of mechanistic relationships between perturbations of the oceanic Saharan air layer (OSAL) and anomalies of atmospheric circulations over the eastern tropical Atlantic/Africa. These relationships are characterized using an ensemble of daily datasets including the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS), and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWIFS) for the boreal summer season. The study is motivated by previous results suggesting that oceanic dust-induced large-scale to meso-scale climatic adjustments. Our hypothesis is that perturbations in OSAL significantly interact with regional climate variability through African Easterly Jet- African Easterly Waves (AEJ-AEW) system. Passive/ active phases of AEWs in the northern and southern-track wave packets are associated with dipole patterns of thermal/dynamical anomalies correlated with perturbations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in OSAL. Enhanced (suppressed) dust AOD in OSAL are significantly correlated with convective re-circulation within subsidence region of Hadley cell as well as robust mid-level dipole vorticity disturbances downstream of the AEJ core

  12. Coanda effect jet around a cylinder with an interacting adjacent surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Randolph Allen

    The effects of placing a plane solid surface in close proximity to a Coanda effect jet turning over a cylindrical surface are investigated to help judge the possible application of this type of jet to manufacturing line processes. The Coanda jet is proposed as a coating control mechanism for fluidic coatings on sheets or a particulate removal device. A Coanda jet placed close to a surface will develop a strong tangential flow that will shear by viscous effects and pressure gradients. A turbulent k-epsilon finite element model, developed in FIDAP, is presented that studies the effects of cylinder-sheet separation distance and jet-to-gap angular placement of the jet. It is assumed that the operation is isothermal and that the sheet speed is negligible compared to the air jet speed. Unconstrained models and cases with a distant surface were run and compared to published experimental results for an unconstrained Coanda jet to validate the modeling method and optimize the empirical constants in the k-epsilon equations. Best agreement is found if the C(sub 2) parameter in the equations is increased from 1.92 to 3.0. Maximum shear stress and pressure gradient values increased exponentially for a decreasing gap size and physical geometric constraints will be the limiting factor to efficiency. For similar initial jets this study shows that the Coanda jet develops stripping forces about 1/2 as great as the regular air-knife, but has advantages such as directed flow. The Coanda jet is seen as a viable option to air-knives for certain operations.

  13. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially-premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-16

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet withmore » Reynolds number of approximately 13,000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. As a result, the production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1¯-s2¯ plane and orthogonal to s3¯.« less

  14. Experimental study of vorticity-strain rate interaction in turbulent partially premixed jet flames using tomographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriton, Bruno; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2016-02-01

    In turbulent flows, the interaction between vorticity, ω, and strain rate, s, is considered a primary mechanism for the transfer of energy from large to small scales through vortex stretching. The ω-s coupling in turbulent jet flames is investigated using tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). TPIV provides a direct measurement of the three-dimensional velocity field from which ω and s are determined. The effects of combustion and mean shear on the ω-s interaction are investigated in turbulent partially premixed methane/air jet flames with high and low probabilities of localized extinction as well as in a non-reacting isothermal air jet with Reynolds number of approximately 13 000. Results show that combustion causes structures of high vorticity and strain rate to agglomerate in highly correlated, elongated layers that span the height of the probe volume. In the non-reacting jet, these structures have a more varied morphology, greater fragmentation, and are not as well correlated. The enhanced spatiotemporal correlation of vorticity and strain rate in the stable flame results in stronger ω-s interaction characterized by increased enstrophy and strain-rate production rates via vortex stretching and straining, respectively. The probability of preferential local alignment between ω and the eigenvector of the intermediate principal strain rate, s2, which is intrinsic to the ω-s coupling in turbulent flows, is larger in the flames and increases with the flame stability. The larger mean shear in the flame imposes a preferential orientation of ω and s2 tangential to the shear layer. The extensive and compressive principal strain rates, s1 and s3, respectively, are preferentially oriented at approximately 45° with respect to the jet axis. The production rates of strain and vorticity tend to be dominated by instances in which ω is parallel to the s1 ¯-s2 ¯ plane and orthogonal to s3 ¯.

  15. Plasma-surface interaction in the Be/W environment: Conclusions drawn from the JET-ILW for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezinsek, S.

    2015-08-01

    The JET ITER-Like Wall experiment (JET-ILW) provides an ideal test bed to investigate plasma-surface interaction (PSI) and plasma operation with the ITER plasma-facing material selection employing beryllium in the main chamber and tungsten in the divertor. The main PSI processes: material erosion and migration, (b) fuel recycling and retention, (c) impurity concentration and radiation have be1en studied and compared between JET-C and JET-ILW. The current physics understanding of these key processes in the JET-ILW revealed that both interpretation of previously obtained carbon results (JET-C) and predictions to ITER need to be revisited. The impact of the first-wall material on the plasma was underestimated. Main observations are: (a) low primary erosion source in H-mode plasmas and reduction of the material migration from the main chamber to the divertor (factor 7) as well as within the divertor from plasma-facing to remote areas (factor 30 - 50). The energetic threshold for beryllium sputtering minimises the primary erosion source and inhibits multi-step re-erosion in the divertor. The physical sputtering yield of tungsten is low as 10-5 and determined by beryllium ions. (b) Reduction of the long-term fuel retention (factor 10 - 20) in JET-ILW with respect to JET-C. The remaining retention is caused by implantation and co-deposition with beryllium and residual impurities. Outgassing has gained importance and impacts on the recycling properties of beryllium and tungsten. (c) The low effective plasma charge (Zeff = 1.2) and low radiation capability of beryllium reveal the bare deuterium plasma physics. Moderate nitrogen seeding, reaching Zeff = 1.6 , restores in particular the confinement and the L-H threshold behaviour. ITER-compatible divertor conditions with stable semi-detachment were obtained owing to a higher density limit with ILW. Overall JET demonstrated successful plasma operation in the Be/W material combination and confirms its advantageous PSI behaviour

  16. Energy convergence effect and jet phenomenon of shock-heavy spherical bubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, LiYong; Zhai, ZhiGang; Liu, JinHong; Wang, YanPing; Liu, CangLi

    2015-12-01

    We present computational results on the evolution of the shock-accelerated heavy bubbles surrounded by nitrogen with the Atwood number A t = 0.497-0.677 and the emphasis is on the jet phenomenon caused by the shock focusing. The multi-fluid Eulerian equation is solved by a finite volume method based on MUSCL-Hancock approach. Based on the numerical schlieren and the distributions of density and pressure, it is found that there are three typical jet structures (outward jet, no jet, inward jet) for different combinations of gas mixture inside the bubble which determine the position of shock focusing relative to the downstream pole of the heavy bubble (upstream of the pole, at the pole, downstream the pole). Compared with the inward jet, the velocity of outward jet is obviously larger. As A t increases, the moment of jet formation is postponed, and the maximal values and magnifications of pressure and density increase distinctly. Therefore, the energy convergence effects are heavily enhanced with the increase of bubble gas density.

  17. X-ray and Radio Observations of the Jet--environment Interaction in 3C 123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sarah; Evans, D.; Lee, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a 46.7 ks Chandra observation of the hot intracluster gas associated with the radio galaxy 3C 123, in order to study the energetics of the interaction between the large-scale radio jets emitted from the AGN and the gaseous, X-ray-emitting ICM. We observe large-scale asymmetries in the gas distribution out to 100'' together with smaller scale variations on scales of 20-30''. While gas temperatures on the large scale are well-described by an APEC model with temperature 8 keV, temperatures of the small-scale gaseous regions are described by a similar model with temperature 3 keV. We find that the significant overdensities and underdensities of the intracluster gas on large and small scales are caused by different processes. We calculate the "bubble” enthalpy of a small-scale eastern cavity to be 3 × 1059 ergs per bubble evacuated. We observe a corresponding overdense region which has the same enthalpy in pressure equilibrium with this cavity. We also find that the black hole accretion rate required to evacuate this region is R = 0.05Msunyear-1 per bubble. Our results support the interpretation that there is a large-scale disturbance from equilibrium most likely due to "sloshing” of gas caused by the impact of a subcluster merger, whereas on small scales, the radio outbursts from the AGN have created cavities within the X-ray--emitting gas.

  18. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with wet cells: delivery of electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) in plasma medicine have produced encouraging results in wound treatment, surface sterilization, deactivation of bacteria, and treatment of cancer cells. It is known that many of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the APPJ are critical to these processes. Other key components to treatment include the ion and photon fluxes, and the electric fields produced in cells by the ionization wave of the APPJ striking in the vicinity of the cells. These relationships are often complicated by the cells being covered by a thin liquid layer—wet cells. In this paper, results from a computational investigation of the interaction of APPJs with tissue beneath a liquid layer are discussed. The emphasis of this study is the delivery of electric fields by an APPJ sustained in He/O2  =  99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air to cells lying beneath water with thickness of 200 μm. The water layer represents the biological fluid typically covering tissue during treatment. Three voltages were analyzed—two that produce a plasma effluent that touches the surface of the water layer and one that does not touch. The effect of the liquid layer thickness, 50 μm to 1 mm, was also examined. Comparisons were made of the predicted intracellular electric fields to those thresholds used in the field of bioelectronics.

  19. Observations of Shock Diffusion and Interactions in Supersonic Freestreams with Counterflowing Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Pritchett, Victor E.; Wang, Ten-See; Blankson, Isiah M.; Auslender, Aaron H.

    2006-01-01

    One of the technical challenges in long-duration space exploration and interplanetary missions is controlled entry and re-entry into planetary and Earth atmospheres, which requires the dissipation of considerable kinetic energy as the spacecraft decelerates and penetrates the atmosphere. Efficient heat load management of stagnation points and acreage heating remains a technological challenge and poses significant risk, particularly for human missions. An innovative approach using active flow control concept is proposed to significantly modify the external flow field about the spacecraft in planetary atmospheric entry and re-entry in order to mitigate the harsh aerothermal environments, and significantly weaken and disperse the shock-wave system to reduce aerothermal loads and wave drag, as well as improving aerodynamic performance. To explore the potential benefits of this approach, we conducted fundamental experiments in a trisonic blow down wind tunnel to investigate the effects of counterflowing sonic and supersonic jets against supersonic freestreams to gain a better understanding of the flow physics of the interactions of the opposing flows and the resulting shock structure.

  20. Jet-Pylon Interaction of High Bypass Ratio Separate Flow Nozzle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Kinzie, Kevin W.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, 23681-0001 USA An experimental investigation was performed of the acoustic effects of jet-pylon interaction for separate flow and chevron nozzles of both bypass ratio five and eight. The models corresponded to an approximate scale factor of nine. Cycle conditions from approach to takeoff were tested at wind tunnel free jet Mach numbers of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.28. An eight-chevron core nozzle, a sixteen chevron fan nozzle, and a pylon were primary configuration variables. In addition, two orientations of the chevrons relative to each other and to the pylon were tested. The effect of the pylon on the azimuthal directivity was investigated for the baseline nozzles and the chevron nozzles. For the bypass ratio five configuration, the addition of the pylon reduces the noise by approximately 1 EPNdB compared to the baseline case and there is little effect of azimuthal angle. The core chevron produced a 1.8 EPNdB reduction compared to the baseline nozzle. Adding a pylon to the chevron core nozzle produces an effect that depends on the orientation of the chevron relative to the pylon. The azimuthal directivity variation remains low at less than 0.5 EPNdB. For the bypass ratio eight configuration the effect of adding a pylon to the baseline nozzle is to slightly increase the noise at higher cycle points and for the case with a core chevron the pylon has little additional effect. The azimuthal angle effect continues to be very small for the bypass ratio eight configurations. A general impact of the pylon was observed for both fan and core chevrons at both bypass ratios. The pylon reduces the typical low frequency benefit of the chevrons, even eliminating it in some cases, while not impacting the high frequency. On an equal ideal thrust basis, the bypass ratio eight baseline nozzle was about 5 EPNdB lower than the bypass ratio five baseline nozzle at the highest cycle condition, however, with a pylon installed the difference

  1. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  2. Flow-structure interaction effects on a jet emanating from a flexible nozzle

    PubMed Central

    Murugappan, S.; Gutmark, E. J.; Lakhamraju, R. R.; Khosla, S.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a wide variety of applications have been found for the use of pulsed jets in the area of flow control. The goal of the current study was to identify the flow field and mixing characteristics associated with an incompressible elongated jet emitted from a flexible nozzle. The shape of the nozzle was that of a high aspect ratio jet deforming from a fully opened to a completely closed configuration. The jet was characterized by a pulsatile flow that was self-excited by the motion of the flexible tube. The frequency of excitation was found to be between 150 and 175 Hz and the Strouhal number (nondimensional frequency) varied from 0.17 to 0.45. The jet flow was dominated by vortices that were shed from the nozzle with an axis parallel to the major axis. The vortices in the near field were quasi-two-dimensional so that measurements performed at the center plane represented the dynamics of the entire vortex. The nozzle excited two different modes depending on the tension applied to the flexible nozzle and the volumetric flow through it. The first was a flapping mode, which was associated with alternate shedding of vortices. This caused strong steering of the jet to one side or the other. The second mode was a symmetric mode that was associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortex pairs. Turbulence and jet spread in the measured planes were much larger in the first mode than the second one. PMID:19547723

  3. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subsonic jets are relatively simple. The peak noise source location gradually moves upstream toward the nozzle as frequency increases. 2) Supersonic jets are more complicated. The peak noise source location moves downstream as frequency increases through a BBSN hump. 3) In both subsonic and supersonic jets the peak noise source location corresponding to a given frequency of noise moves downstream as jet Mach number increases. 4) The noise generated at a given frequency in a BBSN hump is generated by a small number of shocks, not from all the shocks at the same time. 5) Single microphone spectrum levels decrease when the noise source locations measured with the phased array are blocked by a shielding surface. This consistency validates the phased array data and the stationary monopole source model used to process it. 6) Reflecting surface data illustrate that the law of reflection must be satisfied for noise to reflect off a surface toward an observer. Depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface and the observer only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement. 7) The low frequency noise created when a jet flow impinges on a surface comes primarily from the trailing edge regardless of the axial extent impacted by the flow.

  4. Flow-structure interaction effects on a jet emanating from a flexible nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugappan, S.; Gutmark, E. J.; Lakhamraju, R. R.; Khosla, S.

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, a wide variety of applications have been found for the use of pulsed jets in the area of flow control. The goal of the current study was to identify the flow field and mixing characteristics associated with an incompressible elongated jet emitted from a flexible nozzle. The shape of the nozzle was that of a high aspect ratio jet deforming from a fully opened to a completely closed configuration. The jet was characterized by a pulsatile flow that was self-excited by the motion of the flexible tube. The frequency of excitation was found to be between 150 and 175 Hz and the Strouhal number (nondimensional frequency) varied from 0.17 to 0.45. The jet flow was dominated by vortices that were shed from the nozzle with an axis parallel to the major axis. The vortices in the near field were quasi-two-dimensional so that measurements performed at the center plane represented the dynamics of the entire vortex. The nozzle excited two different modes depending on the tension applied to the flexible nozzle and the volumetric flow through it. The first was a flapping mode, which was associated with alternate shedding of vortices. This caused strong steering of the jet to one side or the other. The second mode was a symmetric mode that was associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortex pairs. Turbulence and jet spread in the measured planes were much larger in the first mode than the second one.

  5. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  6. Plasma Jets Driven by Ultraintense-Laser Interaction with Thin Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Bulanov, S. V.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Liseykina, T. V.; Macchi, A.; Schiavi, A.; Willi, O.

    2008-06-06

    Experimental evidence of plasma jets ejected from the rear side of thin solid targets irradiated by ultraintense (>10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) laser pulses is presented. The jets, detected by transverse interferometric measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions, show collimated expansion lasting for several hundreds of picoseconds and have substantially steep density gradients at their periphery. The role played by radiation pressure of the laser in the jet formation process is highlighted analytically and by extensive two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  7. Simulation of shock wave boundary layer interaction in flat channel with jet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhan, Nurtoleu; Beketaeva, Asel; Naimanova, Altynshash

    2016-08-01

    A multispecies supersonic gas flow in the flat channel with perpendicular jet injection is numerically simulated by using the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with k - ω turbulence model. High order WENO scheme is applied to approximate convective terms. During the investigation of flow physics in detail, the three shock-wave structures are observed: in the region of the jet (barrel, bow, oblique and closing shocks), on the upper boundary layer (reflection, transmitted and reattachment shocks), and new structures behind the jet on the lower boundary layer, which are analogous to the structures on the upper boundary layer.

  8. Recent developments in the simulation of steady and transient transverse jet interactions for missile, rotorcraft, and propulsive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S. M.; York, B. J.; Sinha, N.; Lee, R. A.; Hosangadi, A.; Kenzakowski, D. C.

    1993-11-01

    A review of recent activities focused on the simulation of transverse jet interaction problems using advanced time-asymptotic and time-accurate Navier-Stokes methodology is presented. Missile work has involved the simulation of short-duration control jets issued from solid rocket motor nozzles. For the simulation of time-accurate particle-laden flows, a new Eulerian-based upwind/implicit particle-solver was developed and coupled with the gas-phase solver. Rotorcraft work has involved simulating the interaction of the exhaust plumes with the rotor wake and body aerodynamic flow. Hybrid vortex tracking/Navier-stokes methodology has been implemented with gridding of this complex 3D interactive flow being an issue of primary concern. Propulsive work has emphasized turbulence modeling. For scramjet fuel-injection applications, compressible-dissipation extensions to the k-epsilon turbulence model which provided marked improvements in simulating fundamental high-speed shear layers, have proven to work quite well for transverse jet injection.

  9. Modelling of plasma-edge and plasma-wall interaction physics at JET with the metallic first-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesen, S.; Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Wischmeier, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    An overview is given on the recent progress on edge modelling activities for the JET ITER-like wall using the computational tools like the SOLPS or EDGE2D-EIRENE code. The validation process of these codes on JET with its metallic plasma-facing components is an important step towards predictive studies for ITER and DEMO in relevant divertor operational conditions, i.e., for detached, radiating divertors. With increased quantitative credibility in such codes more reliable input to plasma-wall and plasma-material codes can be warranted, which in turn results in more realistic and physically sound estimates of the life-time expectations and performance of a Be first-wall and a W-divertor, the same materials configuration foreseen for ITER. A brief review is given on the recent achievements in the plasma-wall interaction and material migration studies. Finally, a short summary is given on the availability and development of integrated codes to assess the performance of an JET-ILW baseline scenario also in view of the preparation for a JET DT-campaign.

  10. LACK OF INTERACTION BETWEEN THE DUST GRAINS AND THE ANOMALOUS RADIO JET IN THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, Seppo; Krause, Marita; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S.; Siopis, Christos E-mail: mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.d E-mail: christos.siopis@ulb.ac.b

    2010-10-15

    We obtained Spitzer/IRAC 3.6-8 {mu}m images of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 4258 to study possible interactions between dust and the radio jet. In our analysis, we also included high-resolution radio continuum, H{alpha}, CO, and X-ray data. Our data reveal that the 8 {mu}m emission, believed to originate largely from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and hot dust, is an excellent tracer of the normal spiral structure in NGC 4258, and hence it originates from the galactic plane. We investigated the possibility of dust destruction by the radio jet by calculating correlation coefficients between the 8 {mu}m and radio continuum emissions along the jet in two independent ways, namely, (1) from wavelet-transformed maps of the original images at different spatial scales and (2) from one-dimensional intensity cuts perpendicular to the projected path of the radio jet on the sky. No definitive sign of a correlation (or anticorrelation) was detected on relevant spatial scales with either approach, implying that any dust destruction must take place at spatial scales that are not resolved by our observations.

  11. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated. PMID:24329368

  12. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  13. Supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, V. G.

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of the current state of research in the gas dynamics of jet flows. In particular, attention is given to free supersonic jets and to the interaction of supersonic jets with one another and with obstacles under stationary and nonstationary flow conditions. Papers are presented on a method for calculating a weakly anisotropic supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream; composite supersonic jets; the principal gas-dynamic characteristics of the processes occurring in gas-jet-driven shock-wave generators; and the construction of models for supersonic jet flows. For individual items see A84-16902 to A84-16918

  14. Modeling eruptive coronal magnetohydrodynamic systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.

    In this dissertation I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to directly observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if reconnection is a necessary component of these eruptions. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a metastable confined flux rope theory for coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. My work has demonstrated that some of the observed eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  15. Numerical simulations of interacting surfactant-laden jets in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Garvit; Yang, Junfeng; Cabral, Joao; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    We consider the dynamics of jets of surfactant solution in oil under microfluidic confinement. Previous experimental work has demonstrated the occurrence of ``jetting'' and ``dripping'' flow regimes depending on the choice of oil and water flow rates, viscosity ratio, and surfactant concentration. To take into account the influence of soluble surfactant on the behaviour of the jets, we present a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach which uses the Volume-of-Fluid method capturing the interface topology accurately with minimal mass loss. This approach accounts for sorption kinetics, Marangoni stresses, diffusion, and surface dilation. This method is incorporated into a CFD code to study the jetting and dripping regimes in a microfluidics channel. The modelling results are validated against experimental measurements. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1, and Grant Number EP/J010502/1.

  16. Investigation of the interaction of a turbulent impinging jet and a heated, rotating disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manceau, R.; Perrin, R.; Hadžiabdić, M.; Benhamadouche, S.

    2014-03-01

    The case of a turbulent round jet impinging perpendicularly onto a rotating, heated disc is investigated, in order to understand the mechanisms at the origin of the influence of rotation on the radial wall jet and associated heat transfer. The present study is based on the complementary use of an analysis of the orders of magnitude of the terms of the mean momentum and Reynolds stress transport equations, available experiments, and dedicated Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations with refined turbulence models. The Reynolds number Rej = 14 500, the orifice-to-plate distance H = 5D, where D is the jet-orifice diameter, and the four rotation rates were chosen to match the experiments of Minagawa and Obi ["Development of turbulent impinging jet on a rotating disk," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 25, 759-766 (2004)] and comparisons are made with the Nusselt number distribution measured by Popiel and Boguslawski ["Local heat transfer from a rotating disk in an impinging round jet," J. Heat Transfer 108, 357-364 (1986)], at a higher Reynolds number. The overestimation of turbulent mixing in the free-jet before the impact on the disk is detrimental to the prediction of the impingement region, in particular of the Nusselt number close to the symmetry axis, but the self-similar wall jet developing along the disk is correctly reproduced by the models. The analysis, experiments, and computations show that the rotational effect do not directly affect the outer layer, but only the inner layer of the wall jet. A noteworthy consequence is that entrainment at the outer edge of the wall jet is insensitive to rotation, which explains the dependence of the wall-jet thickness on the inverse of the non-dimensional rotation rate, observed in the experiments and the Reynolds stress model computations, but not reproduced by the eddy-viscosity models, due to the algebraic dependence to the mean flow. The analysis makes moreover possible the identification of a scenario for the appearance of

  17. Interaction of a turbulent-jet noise source with transverse modes in a rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.; Baumeister, K. J.; Ingard, K. U.

    1978-01-01

    A turbulent jet was used to excite transverse acoustic modes in a rectangular duct. The pressure spectrum showed asymmetric singularities (pressure spikes) at the resonant frequencies of the duct modes. This validates previously published theoretical results. These pressure spikes occurred over a range of jet velocities, orientations, and inlet turbulence levels. At the frequency of the spike, the measured transverse pressure shape matched the resonant mode shape.

  18. Interaction between a laminar starting immersed micro-jet and a parallel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleiro, Juan Martin; Laborde, Cecilia; Artana, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we study the starting transient of an immersed micro-jet in close vicinity to a solid wall parallel to its axis. The experiments concern laminar jets (Re < 200) issuing from a 100 μm internal tip diameter glass micro-pipette. The effect of the confinement was studied placing the micro-pipette at different distances from the wall. The characterization of the jet was carried out by visualizations on which the morphology of the vortex head and trajectories was analyzed. Numerical simulations were used as a complementary tool for the analysis. The jet remains stable for very long distances away from the tip allowing for a similarity analysis. The self-similar behavior of the starting jet has been studied in terms of the frontline position with time. A symmetric and a wall dominated regime could be identified. The starting jet in the wall type regime, and in the symmetric regime as well, develops a self-similar behavior that has a relative rapid loss of memory of the preceding condition of the flow. Scaling for both regimes are those that correspond to viscous dominated flows.

  19. The Role of Cohesive Particle Interactions on Solids Uniformity and Mobilization During Jet Mixing: Testing Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Chun, Jaehun; Jenks, Jeromy WJ

    2010-04-01

    Radioactive waste that is currently stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site will be staged in selected double-shell tanks (DSTs) and then transferred to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Before being transferred, the waste will be mixed, sampled, and characterized to determine if the waste composition and meets the waste feed specifications. Washington River Protection Solutions is conducting a Tank Mixing and Sampling Demonstration Program to determine the mixing effectiveness of the current baseline mixing system that uses two jet mixer pumps and the adequacy of the planned sampling method. The overall purpose of the demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risk associated with the mixing and sampling systems meeting the feed certification requirements for transferring waste to the WTP.The purpose of this report is to analyze existing data and evaluate whether scaled mixing tests with cohesive simulants are needed to meet the overall objectives of the small-scale mixing demonstration program. This evaluation will focus on estimating the role of cohesive particle interactions on various physical phenomena that occur in parts of the mixing process. A specific focus of the evaluation will be on the uniformity of suspended solids in the mixed region. Based on the evaluation presented in this report and the absence of definitive studies, the recommendation is to conduct scaled mixing tests with cohesive particles and augment the initial testing with non-cohesive particles. In addition, planning for the quantitative tests would benefit from having test results from some scoping experiments that would provide results on the general behavior when cohesive inter-particle forces are important.

  20. Interaction of in-line twin synthetic jets with a separated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin; Tang, Hui; Duan, Fei

    2016-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out in a water tunnel to investigate the interaction of in-line twin synthetic jets (SJs) with a separated laminar boundary layer over inclined plates. The flow structures induced by the in-line twin SJs at four phase differences and their resulting flow separation delay are examined using dye visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. It is found that, in most of the cases, the heads of hairpin vortices that are produced from the upstream SJ actuator do not change too much, and the vortex legs are highly stretched by the separated shear layer. An exception is the case with 90° phase difference where the combined vortex head appears as a reversed letter "S" and the combined vortex legs are high enough to escape from the influence of the separated flow. Compared to the single SJ, the twin SJs generally exert greater influence on the separated flow regardless of the phase difference. The PIV results in the mid-span plane reveal that the periodic passage of vortex structures influences the separated flow significantly, causing the flapping of the upper edge of the reversed flow region that contributes to the flow separation delay. The delay of separation is also demonstrated by a streak of forward flow protrusion in the wall-parallel PIV results. It is found that the streak varies a lot at different phase differences. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is also conducted and two major types of energetic flow structures in the SJ controlled flow are identified: a strip of back-and-forth fluctuation along the upper edge of the reversed flow, and the vortex structures produced by the twin SJs. It is found that the fluctuation strip is most energetic in the single SJ case and the case with 270° phase difference, whereas the convective mode pair is most energetic in the case with 90° phase difference.

  1. Relativistic MHD simulations of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leismann, T.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Martí, J. M.; Miralles, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    We have performed a comprehensive parameter study of the morphology and dynamics of axisymmetric, magnetized, relativistic jets by means of numerical simulations. The simulations have been performed with an upgraded version of the GENESIS code which is based on a second-order accurate finite volume method involving an approximate Riemann solver suitable for relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamic flows, and a method of lines. Starting from pure hydrodynamic models we consider the effect of a magnetic field of increasing strength (up to β ≡ |b|2/2p ≈ 3.3 times the equipartition value) and different topology (purely toroidal or poloidal). We computed several series of models investigating the dependence of the dynamics on the magnetic field in jets of different beam Lorentz factor and adiabatic index. We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field leads to diverse effects which contrary to Newtonian magnetohydrodynamics models do not always scale linearly with the (relative) strength of the magnetic field. The relativistic models show, however, some clear trends. Axisymmetric jets with toroidal magnetic fields produce a cavity which consists of two parts: an inner one surrounding the beam which is compressed by magnetic forces, and an adjacent outer part which is inflated due to the action of the magnetic field. The outer border of the outer part of the cavity is given by the bow-shock where its interaction with the external medium takes place. Toroidal magnetic fields well below equipartition (β = 0.05) combined with a value of the adiabatic index of 4/3 yield extremely smooth jet cavities and stable beams. Prominent nose cones form when jets are confined by toroidal fields and carry a high Poynting flux (σ≡ |b|2/ρ>0.01 and β≥ 1). In contrast, none of our models possessing a poloidal field develops such a nose cone. The size of the nose cone is correlated with the propagation speed of the Mach disc (the smaller the speed the larger is the size). If two

  2. Exploring Astrophysical Magnetohydrodynamics in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario

    2014-10-01

    Plasma evolution in many astrophysical systems is dominated by magnetohydrodynamics. Specifically of interest to this talk are collimated outflows from accretion systems. Away from the central object, the Euler equations can represent the plasma dynamics well and may be scaled to a laboratory system. We have performed experiments to investigate the effects of a background magnetic field on an otherwise hydrodynamically collimated plasma. Laser-irradiated, cone targets produce hydrodynamically collimated plasma jets and a pulse-powered solenoid provides a constant background magnetic field. The application of this field is shown to completely disrupt the original flow and a new magnetically-collimated, hollow envelope is produced. Results from these experiments and potential implications for their astrophysical analogs will be discussed.

  3. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfv enic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the "diamond-chain" structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  4. Fast magnetic fluctuation diagnostics for Alfvén eigenmode and magnetohydrodynamics studies at the Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeter, R. F.; Fasoli, A. F.; Ali-Arshad, S.; Moret, J. M.

    2000-11-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes and other magnetohydrodynamic phenomena have been studied in tokamak plasmas at the Joint European Torus (JET) using a new eight-channel, 4 s, 1 MHz, 12-bit data acquisition system (KC1F) in conjunction with the JET fast Mirnov magnetic fluctuation pickup coils. To this end, the JET magnetic pickup coils were calibrated in the range 30-460 kHz using a new remote calibration technique which accounts for the presence of the first few LRC circuit resonances. Signal processing software has been developed to implement the calibration via digital filtering. A data analysis program has been written which produces spectrograms of fluctuation amplitude and toroidal mode number versus frequency and time, both interactively and for automatic overnight analyses. Modes with amplitudes δB/B⩾10-8 and toroidal mode numbers |n|<32 are now routinely detected. Since KC1F data are now available for over 4000 JET discharges, a pulse-characterization database has been developed to help select pulses of interest for detailed analysis.

  5. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  6. Potential vorticity in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the J × B force on the plasma due to the current J and magnetic induction B. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjunction with a class of fluid relabelling symmetries in which the symmetry generator for the Lagrange label transformations is non-parallel to the magnetic field induction in Lagrange label space. This is associated with an Abelian Lie pseudo algebra and a foliated phase space in Lagrange label space. It contains as a special case Ertel's theorem in ideal fluid mechanics. An independent derivation shows that the new conservation law is also valid for more general physical situations.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic inertial reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelkamp-Baker, Dan; Sebesta, Henry R.; Burkhard, Kevin

    2000-07-01

    Optical platforms increasingly require attitude knowledge and optical instrument pointing at sub-microradian accuracy. No low-cost commercial system exists to provide this level of accuracy for guidance, navigation, and control. The need for small, inexpensive inertial sensors, which may be employed in pointing control systems that are required to satisfy angular line-of-sight stabilization jitter error budgets to levels of 1-3 microradian rms and less, has existed for at least two decades. Innovations and evolutions in small, low-noise inertial angular motion sensor technology and advances in the applications of the global positioning system have converged to allow improvement in acquisition, tracking and pointing solutions for a wide variety of payloads. We are developing a small, inexpensive, and high-performance inertial attitude reference system that uses our innovative magnetohydrodynamic angular rate sensor technology.

  8. Modeling and experimental analysis of phased array synthetic jet cross-flow interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnain, Zohaib

    Synthetic Jet Actuators (SJAs) are fluidic devices capable of adding momentum to static or non-static bodies of fluid without adding mass. They are therefore categorized as zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) momentum source. In its simplest compact form a SJA consists of an oscillatory surface connected to a cavity with a single exit orifice through which the fluid enters and exits. SJA technology has been utilized in applications ranging from boundary layer control over aerodynamic surfaces to fluidic mixing in dispersion applications. The ZNMF nature of the technology means it is not subject to constraints experienced by traditional momentum sources that require the addition of mass in order to impart momentum. The momentum that can be added by a single SJA is limited by the energy transfer capabilities of the oscillating surface. In modern SJAs this surface usually is a piezoceramic/metal composite subjected to a high voltage AC signal. For applications such as flow control over aerodynamic surfaces, modern SJAs are used in an array configuration and are capable of altering the flow momentum by values ranging from 0.01-10%. While it is possible to build larger actuators to increase this value the benefits associated with the compact size would be lost. It is therefore desirable to tune other parameters associated with SJA arrays to increase this value. The specific motivation for this study comes from the desire to control the momentum addition capacity of a specific SJA array, without having to alter any geometric parameters. In a broader sense this study focuses on understanding the physics of SJA interaction in array configuration through experiments which are then used to guide in the design of modeling technique that predicts SJA array behavior in cross-flows. The first half of the project focused on understanding SJA behavior through modeling. Numerical techniques were initially used to model SJA and SJA arrays in cross-flows. Reduced numerical models were then

  9. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, Robert J.; Link, Dirk D.; Baltrus, John P.; Zandhuis, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

  10. Mach waves produced in the supersonic jet mixing layer by shock/vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel Sen, H.; Seiler, F.; Srulijes, J.; Hruschka, R.

    2016-05-01

    The noise emission of free jets has been extensively investigated for many decades. At subsonic jet velocities, coherent structures of the mixing layer move at subsonic speed and emit sound waves. Free jets blowing at supersonic speeds, however, can emit weak shock waves, called Mach waves. At supersonic speeds, two cases must be distinguished: the structures move either subsonically or supersonically relative to the inside and/or outside speed of sound. In the case of supersonic movement, the Mach waves exist inside as well as outside the jet. At subsonic speeds, no Mach waves appear. Although numerous theories have been established to find the origin of the Mach waves, to the authors' best knowledge, the mechanism of the Mach wave formation has not yet been clearly explained. Recently another theory of Mach waves in supersonic jets was developed, as described herein, which outlines the causes for the Mach wave production and stability as well as their dynamics. The theory's principle is that the Mach waves are initiated by vortices which move downstream at three speeds w, {w}' and {w}'' inside of the mixing layer. These three types of vortices and Mach waves are described in a comprehensive manner by the theory and are called the " w-, {w}'- and {w}''-vortices" and " w-, {w}'- and {w}''-Mach waves," respectively.

  11. Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

  12. Mach waves produced in the supersonic jet mixing layer by shock/vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel Sen, H.; Seiler, F.; Srulijes, J.; Hruschka, R.

    2016-02-01

    The noise emission of free jets has been extensively investigated for many decades. At subsonic jet velocities, coherent structures of the mixing layer move at subsonic speed and emit sound waves. Free jets blowing at supersonic speeds, however, can emit weak shock waves, called Mach waves. At supersonic speeds, two cases must be distinguished: the structures move either subsonically or supersonically relative to the inside and/or outside speed of sound. In the case of supersonic movement, the Mach waves exist inside as well as outside the jet. At subsonic speeds, no Mach waves appear. Although numerous theories have been established to find the origin of the Mach waves, to the authors' best knowledge, the mechanism of the Mach wave formation has not yet been clearly explained. Recently another theory of Mach waves in supersonic jets was developed, as described herein, which outlines the causes for the Mach wave production and stability as well as their dynamics. The theory's principle is that the Mach waves are initiated by vortices which move downstream at three speeds w, {w}' and {w}'' inside of the mixing layer. These three types of vortices and Mach waves are described in a comprehensive manner by the theory and are called the "w-, {w}' - and {w}'' -vortices" and "w-, {w}' - and {w}'' -Mach waves," respectively.

  13. Numerical Simulation of the Interaction Between Supersonic Oxygen Jets and Molten Slag-Metal Bath in Steelmaking BOF Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Mingming; Kuang, Shibo; Zou, Zongshu

    2015-02-01

    The impinging of multiple jets onto the molten bath in the BOF steelmaking process plays a crucial role in reactor performance but is not clearly understood. This paper presents a numerical study of the interaction between the multiple jets and slag-metal bath in a BOF by means of the three-phase volume of fluid model. The validity of the model is first examined by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurement of time-averaged cavity dimensions through a scaled-down water model. The calculated results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. The mathematical model is then used to investigate the primary transport phenomena of the jets-bath interaction inside a 150-ton commercial BOF under steelmaking conditions. The numerical results show that the cavity profile and interface of slag/metal/gas remain unstable as a result of the propagation of surface waves, which, likely as a major factor, governs the generation of metal droplets and their initial spatiotemporal distribution. The total momentum transferred from the jets into the bath is consumed about a half to drive the movement of slag, rather than fully converted as the stirring power for the metal bath. Finally, the effects of operational conditions and fluid properties are quantified. It is shown that compared to viscosity and surface tension of the melts, operating pressure and lance height have a much more significant impact on the slag-metal interface behavior and cavity shape as well as the fluid dynamics in the molten bath.

  14. Effect of reaction control system jet-flow field interactions on a 0.015 scale model space shuttle orbiter aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monta, W. J.; Rausch, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of the reaction control system (RCS) jet-flow field interactions on the space shuttle orbiter system during entry are discussed. The primary objective of the test program was to obtain data for the shuttle orbiter configuration to determine control amplification factors resulting from jet interaction between the RCS plumes and the external flow over the vehicle. A secondary objective was to provide data for comparison and improvement of analytic jet interaction prediction techniques. The test program was divided into two phases; (1) force and moment measurements were made with and without RCS blowing, investigating environment parameters (R sub e, Alpha, Beta), RCS plume parameters (Jet pressure ratio, momentum ratio and thrust level), and geometry parameters (RCS pod locations) on the orbiter model, (2) oil flow visualization tests were conducted on a dummy balance at the end of the test.

  15. Inclusive 1-jet production cross section at small x in QCD: multiple interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, J.; Salvadore, M.; Vacca, G. P.

    2008-06-01

    We study corrections due to two Pomeron exchanges to the inclusive 1-jet production cross section in the Regge limit of perturbative QCD for a finite number of colors. By considering deep inelastic scattering on a weakly bound two-nucleon system, we carefully follow the logic of the AGK cutting rules and show, for the single inclusive cross section, that, due to the reggeization of the gluon, modifications of the AGK cutting rules appear. As our main result, we investigate and calculate the jet production vertex in the presence of a two-Pomeron cut correction. Compared to previous studies, we find a novel structure of the jet vertex which has not been considered before. We discuss a few implications of this new piece.

  16. Experimental Study of an Inclined Jet-In-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Rigby, D. L.; Heidmann, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is conducted on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF), with film-cooling application in mind. The jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20 to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are documented for a specific case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. This combination of VG and JICF produce a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. While most of the data are taken at a jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (J) of 2, limited surveys are done for varying J. The VG is found to have a significant effect even at the highest J (=11) covered in the experiment. Effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. When the VG height is halved there is a lift-off of the jet. On the other hand, when the height is doubled, the jet core is dissipated due to larger turbulence intensities. Varying the location of the VG, over a distance of three diameters from the orifice, is found to have little impact. Rounding off the edges of the VG with increasing radius of curvature progressively diminishes the effect. However, a small radius of curvature may be quite tolerable in practice.

  17. Conservation of circulation in magnetohydrodynamics

    PubMed

    Bekenstein; Oron

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate at both the Newtonian and (general) relativistic levels the existence of a generalization of Kelvin's circulation theorem (for pure fluids) that is applicable to perfect magnetohydrodynamics. The argument is based on the least action principle for magnetohydrodynamic flow. Examples of the new conservation law are furnished. The new theorem should be helpful in identifying new kinds of vortex phenomena distinct from magnetic ropes or fluid vortices. PMID:11089118

  18. Computational model of the interaction of a helium atmospheric-pressure jet with a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. I.; Bradley, J. W.

    2015-11-01

    Using a time-dependent two-dimensional axisymmetric fluid model the interaction of a plasma jet with a dielectric surface has been studied. The model is solved for two consecutive periods of a positive unipolar pulsed waveform. The study concentrates on determining the fluxes of the main oxygen ion species, \\text{O}2+ , \\text{O}2- and the total accumulated charge on the surface. Approaching the dielectric surface, the streamer head is seen to divert its direction of propagation, spreading out radially approximately 0.2 mm above the dielectric surface. For \\text{O}2+ generated near the streamer head, this leads to a maximum in their flux to the surface which moves radially outwards with the streamer propagation, driven by the applied electric field in pulse on-time. In the off-time, the flux of \\text{O}2+ drops by at least two orders of magnitude. As a result, the total number of \\text{O}2+ ions arriving at the surface over one entire pulse period (fluence) has an annular shape limited by the effective contact area of the streamer on the surface. In contrast \\text{O}2- ions generated in the pulse on-time do not reach the surface due to the direction of the applied electric field. In the off-time, \\text{O}2- ions generated at the edges of the deformed streamer are pushed by the accumulated surface charge outwards. As a result, the \\text{O}2- fluence has an annular structure with its maximum being outside the area of the dielectric surface covered by the plasma channel. Solving for the second pulse period shows small changes in the predicted fluences, with largest difference seen with \\text{O}2- . We see that increasing the flow rate (by a factor of three) shifts the position of the maximum fluence of \\text{O}2+ outwards, and decreasing the \\text{O}2- fluence in the second pulse period.

  19. Side Jet/Cross Flow Interaction at Hypersonic Re-entry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, R.; Seiler, F.

    Since decades control jets are commonly used for steering re-entry vehicles, e.g. the Apollo capsules, the Space Shuttles and were also used for the "SpaceShipOne" mission and recently direct to the flight path of missiles.

  20. Collective Interaction in a Linear Array of Supersonic Rectangular Jets: A Linear Spatial Instability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1999-01-01

    A linear spatial instability model for multiple spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets is solved using Floquet-Bloch theory. It is assumed that in the region of interest a coherent wave can propagate. For the case studied large spatial growth rates are found. This work is motivated by an increase in mixing found in experimental measurements of spatially periodic supersonic rectangular jets with phase-locked screech and edge tone feedback locked subsonic jets. The results obtained in this paper suggests that phase-locked screech or edge tones may produce correlated spatially periodic jet flow downstream of the nozzles which creates a large span wise multi-nozzle region where a coherent wave can propagate. The large spatial growth rates for eddies obtained by model calculation herein are related to the increased mixing since eddies are the primary mechanism that transfer energy from the mean flow to the large turbulent structures. Calculations of spacial growth rates will be presented for a set of relative Mach numbers and spacings for which experimental measurements have been made. Calculations of spatial growth rates are presented for relative Mach numbers from 1.25 to 1.75 with ratios of nozzle spacing to nozzle width ratios from s/w(sub N) = 4 to s/w(sub N) = 13.7. The model may be of significant scientific and engineering value in the quest to understand and construct supersonic mixer-ejector nozzles which provide increased mixing and reduced noise.

  1. Experimental characterization of a transition from collisionless to collisional interaction between head-on-merging supersonic plasma jetsa)

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Auna L.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2015-05-01

    We present results from experiments on the head-on merging of two supersonic plasma jets in an initially collisionless regime for the counter-streaming ions [A. L. Moser & S. C. Hsu, Phys. Plasmas, submitted (2014)]. The plasma jets are of either an argon/impurity or hydrogen/impurity mixture and are produced by pulsed-power-driven railguns. Based on time- and space-resolved fast-imaging, multi-chord interferometry, and survey-spectroscopy measurements of the overlapping region between the merging jets, we observe that the jets initially interpenetrate, consistent with calculated inter-jet ion collision lengths, which are long. As the jets interpenetrate, a rising mean-charge state causes a rapid decrease in the inter-jet ion collision length. Finally, the interaction becomes collisional and the jets stagnate, eventually producing structures consistent with collisional shocks. These experimental observations can aid in the validation of plasma collisionality and ionization models for plasmas with complex equations of state.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  3. Formation of plasma channels in the interaction of a nanosecond laser pulse at moderate intensities with helium gas jets.

    PubMed

    De Wispelaere, E; Malka, V; Hüller, S; Amiranoff, F; Baton, S; Bonadio, R; Casanova, M; Dorchies, F; Haroutunian, R; Modena, A

    1999-06-01

    We report on a detailed study of channel formation in the interaction of a nanosecond laser pulse with a He gas jet. A complete set of diagnostics is used in order to characterize the plasma precisely. The evolution of the plasma radius and of the electron density and temperature are measured by Thomson scattering, Schlieren imaging, and Mach-Zehnder interferometry. In gas jets, one observes the formation of a channel with a deep density depletion on axis. Because of ionization-induced defocusing which increases the size of the focal spot and decreases the maximum laser intensity, no channel is observed in the case of a gas-filled chamber. The results obtained in various gas-jet and laser conditions show that the channel radius, as well as the density along the propagation axis, can be adjusted by changing the laser energy and gas-jet pressure. This is a crucial issue when one wants to adapt the channel parameters in order to guide a subsequent high-intensity laser pulse. The experimental results and their comparison with one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations show that the main mechanism for channel formation is the hydrodynamic evolution behind a supersonic electron heat wave propagating radially in the plasma. It is also shown from 2D simulations that a fraction of the long pulse can be self-guided in the channel it creates. The preliminary results and analyses on this subject have been published before [V. Malka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2979 (1997)]. PMID:11969699

  4. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected. the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories. but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  5. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  6. Multi-symplectic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-10-01

    A multi-symplectic formulation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed based on the Clebsch variable variational principle in which the Lagrangian consists of the kinetic minus the potential energy of the MHD fluid modified by constraints using Lagrange multipliers that ensure mass conservation, entropy advection with the flow, the Lin constraint, and Faraday's equation (i.e. the magnetic flux is Lie dragged with the flow). The analysis is also carried out using the magnetic vector potential à where α=Ã. d x is Lie dragged with the flow, and B=∇×Ã. The multi-symplectic conservation laws give rise to the Eulerian momentum and energy conservation laws. The symplecticity or structural conservation laws for the multi-symplectic system corresponds to the conservation of phase space. It corresponds to taking derivatives of the momentum and energy conservation laws and combining them to produce n(n-1)/2 extra conservation laws, where n is the number of independent variables. Noether's theorem for the multi-symplectic MHD system is derived, including the case of non-Cartesian space coordinates, where the metric plays a role in the equations.

  7. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T. ); McWilliams, J.C. ); Petviashvili, N. )

    1994-02-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics based on the Elsaesser variables is developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to those based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected, the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. A statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations is given. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories, but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is presented as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected. A statistical calculation in the canonical ensemble and numerical simulations show that a nonzero large-scale magnetic field is statistically favored, and that the preferred shape of this field is a long, thin tube of flux. Possible applications to a variety of physical phenomena are suggested.

  8. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J. C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected, the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories, but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  9. The interaction of jet/front systems and mountain waves: Implications for lower stratospheric aviation turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, David Russell

    The role of jet streaks and their associated upper-level structures (fronts, troughs, thermal fields, etc.) in enhancing orographically-induced aviation turbulence near and above the tropopause is investigated. The primary hypothesis for this research suggests that there is an optimal configuration for the positioning of upper-level circulations leading to vertically confluent flow and differential thermal advection, forming an intense inversion. Such a configuration may be associated with vertically-intersecting ageostrophic jet circulations or trough-induced differential vertical motions leading to cold air undercutting a warm layer aloft, and compression of the warm layer in the presence of jet-induced shear. This structure is then perturbed by mountain waves, leading to a downscale cascade of kinetic energy, eventually leading to potential aviation turbulence. Two cases of clear-air turbulence (CAT) are examined using mesoscale numerical simulations. The first case involved a DC-8 attempting to cross the Colorado Front Range when it encountered extreme CAT resulting in loss of part of one wing and an engine. In this case the superposition of two distinct jet features was hypothesized to have established an unusually strong tropopause which allowed strong buoyancy-driven motions to enhance the horizontal shear and turbulent eddies, eventually leading to the turbulent downburst hypothesized to have played a role in damaging the aircraft. The second study used data from the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) and examined a turbulent wave-breaking event recorded by a research aircraft in the lower stratosphere. A different jet regime was found in this case, with a strong upstream trough and decreasing cyclonic curvature with height above the tropopause and a strong lower stratospheric inversion. The vertical variation of static stability in the lower stratosphere was found to create a favorable environment for amplification and breaking of the mountain wave

  10. Investigation of impingement region and wall jets formed by the interaction of high aspect ratio lift jets and a ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Flow characteristics of impinging jets emanating from rectangular exit area converging nozzles of exit area aspect ratio four, six, and eight were investigated. Azimuthal distributions of wall jet radial momentum flux in the ground plane were strongly directional and sensitive to rectangular nozzle exit area aspect ratio, jet impingement angle, and height above ground, H/D. Effects of jet exit velocity profile nonuniformities were also investigated. Data from the single nozzle rectangular jet impringement investigations were incorporated into an existing VTOL aircraft ground flow field computer program. It is suggested that this program together with the Douglas Neumann program modified for V/STOL applications may be used for the analysis and prediction of flow fields and resulting forces and moments on multijet V/STOL aircraft hovering in ground effect.

  11. NASA Jet Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The presentation highlights jet-noise research conducted in the Subsonic Fixed Wing, Supersonics, and Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program at NASA. The research efforts discussed include NASA's updated Aircraft NOise Prediction Program (ANOPP2), acoustic-analogy-based prediction tools, jet-surface-interaction studies, plasma-actuator investigations, N+2 Supersonics Validation studies, rectangular-jet experiments, twin-jet experiments, and Hybrid Wind Body (HWB) activities.

  12. IR diagnostics of embedded jets: velocity resolved observations of the HH34 and HH1 jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Lopez, R.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Eislöffel, J.; Bacciotti, F.; Podio, L.

    2008-09-01

    Context: We present VLT-ISAAC medium resolution spectroscopy of the HH34 and HH1 jets, driven by young Class 0/I sources. Aims: Our aim is to derive the kinematics and the physical parameters associated with infrared jets, and to study how they vary with jet velocity. Methods: We use several important diagnostic lines covered by our spectral range, such as [Fe II] 1.644~μm, 1.600~μm and H2 2.122~μm, to probe both the atomic and the molecular jet components. Results: In the inner jet region of HH34, we find that both the atomic and molecular gas present two components at high and low velocity (the so-called HVC and LVC), as reported by previous studies. The [Fe II] LVC in HH34 is detected up to large distances from the source (>1000 AU), at variance with TTauri jets where the LVC is usually confined within 200 AU from the star. In H2 2.122~μm, the LVC and HVC are spatially separated, with an abrupt transition from low- to high-velocity emission at ~1.5 arcsec. We moreover detect, for the first time, the fainter red-shifted counterpart down to the central source. This lobe shows several emission knots displaced symmetrically with respect to the corresponding blue-shifted gas. In HH1, we trace the jet down to ~1 arcsec from the VLA1 driving source: the kinematics of this inner region is again characterised by the presence of two velocity components, one blue-shifted and one red-shifted with respect to the source LSR velocity. We interpret this double component as arising from the interaction of two different jets. We suggest that the red-shifted component could be part of the HH501 jet. Electron densities and mass fluxes have been measured separately for the different velocity components in the HH34 and HH1 jets. In the inner HH34 jet region, ne increases with decreasing velocity, with an average value of ~1 × 104 cm-3 in the HVC and ~2.2 × 104 cm-3 in the LVC. Up to ~10 arcsec from the driving source, and along the whole HH1 jet an opposite behaviour is

  13. Jet-gas interactions and hotspots in FR I/II transition sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Diana; Birkinshaw, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Sources with intermediate FR I/II morphologies, and with powers in the decade straddling the FR I/II boundary, provide an opportunity to understand triggers responsible for the different workings of the two classes. Illustrated by deep Chandra observations of several sources, this presentation will show evidence that the physics changes within the transition range, and the work done in driving shocks can exceed that in evacuating the cavities common in FR I sources. Hotspots can be absent, seen only on one side (jet-side or counter-jet-side), or both, in which case X-ray/radio correspondence can be very different on the two sides. Evidence will be shown for radio-emitting plasma running along boundaries between gas of different temperature, apparently lubricating the gas flows and inhibiting heat transfer.

  14. ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM CENTAURUS A: JET INTERACTION WITH GASEOUS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal-Krishna; Biermann, Peter L.; De Souza, Vitor; Wiita, Paul J.

    2010-09-10

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with energies above {approx}6 x 10{sup 19} eV, seem to show a weak correlation with the distribution of matter relatively near to us in the universe. It has earlier been proposed that UHECRs could be accelerated in either the nucleus or the outer lobes of the nearby radio galaxy Cen A. We show that UHECR production at a spatially intermediate location about 15 kpc northeast from the nucleus, where the jet emerging from the nucleus is observed to strike a large star-forming shell of gas, is a plausible alternative. A relativistic jet is capable of accelerating lower energy heavy seed cosmic rays (CRs) to UHECRs on timescales comparable to the time it takes the jet to pierce the large gaseous cloud. In this model, many CRs arising from a starburst, with a composition enhanced in heavy elements near the knee region around PeV, are boosted to ultra-high energies by the relativistic shock of a newly oriented jet. This model matches the overall spectrum shown by the Auger data and also makes a prediction for the chemical composition as a function of particle energy. We thus predict an observable anisotropy in the composition at high energy in the sense that lighter nuclei should preferentially be seen toward the general direction of Cen A. Taking into consideration the magnetic field models for the Galactic disk and a Galactic magnetic wind, this scenario may resolve the discrepancy between HiRes and Auger results concerning the chemical composition of UHECRs.

  15. A study on aerodynamic sound generated by interaction of jet and plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsuchi, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kawazoe, H.

    1993-07-01

    A simple experimental equipment is devised, where a low sound noise wind tunnel is provided, and the representative flow velocity is fixed to 20 m/s. A flow tone is generated by inserting a plate with a knife edge, or a round edge, perpendicularly to the axisymmetric jet axis. A generated sound varies with the location and shape of the plate edge in the flow field. A drastic sound with a distinct peak of frequency is generated when the knife edge is placed in the shear layer of jet. The aim of this research is to seek the relation between flow and sound from experimental data, and to clarify the essential mechanism of generating this flow tone. In this study, it is made clear that the sound intensity depends on the distance from the edge to the point at which velocity fluctuations normal 10 the jet axis are large. Furthermore, the flow was observed to have the same frequency peak in this region as a distinct peak of sound. Thus, it is confirmed that normal velocity fluctuations to primary axial velocity have a significant role in generating aerodynamic sound.

  16. High energy electrons from interaction with a 10 mm gas-jet at FLAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grittani, G. M.; Anania, M. P.; Gatti, G.; Giulietti, D.; Kando, M.; Krus, M.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Oishi, Y.; Rossi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the spectra of the electrons produced in the laser-plasma acceleration experiment at FLAME. Here a <30 fs laser pulse is focused via an f/10 parabola in a focal spot of 10 μm diameter into a 1.2 mm by 10 mm rectangular Helium gas-jets at a backing pressure ranging from 5 to 15 bar. The intensity achieved exceeds 1019 Wcm -2. In our experiment the laser is set to propagate in the gas-jet along the longitudinal axis to use the 10 mm gas-jet length and to evaluate the role of density gradients. The propagation of the laser pulse in the gas is monitored by means of a Thomson scattering optical imaging. Accelerated electrons are set to propagate for 47,5 cm before being detected by a scintillating screen to evaluate bunch divergence and pointing. Alternatively, electrons are set to propagate in the field of a magnetic dipole before reaching the scintillating screen in order to evaluate their energy spectrum. Our experimental data show highly collimated bunches (<1 mrad) with a relatively stable pointing direction (<10 mrad). Typical bunch electron energy ranges between 50 and 200 MeV with occasional exceptional events of higher energy up to 1GeV.

  17. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet with Shock Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    NASA and Industry are performing vehicle studies of configurations with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern configuration designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty in the aft signatures with often greater boundary layer effects and nozzle jet pressures. Wind tunnel testing at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than in flight and without inlet and nozzle jet pressures make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 1.6 to 2.0 will be used to assess the effects of shocks from components passing through nozzle jet plumes on the sonic boom pressure signature and provide datasets for comparison with CFD codes. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of wind tunnel test models with a variety of shock generators that simulate horizontal tails and aft decks have been studied to provide suitable models for sonic boom pressure measurements using a minimally intrusive pressure rail in the wind tunnel. The computational results are presented and the evolution of candidate wind tunnel models is summarized and discussed in this paper.

  18. MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) thermal hydraulic analysis of three-dimensional liquid metal flows in fusion blanket ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, T. A.; Picologlou, B. F.; Reed, C. B.; Walker, J. S.

    1988-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals in thin conducting ducts of various geometries in the presence of strong nonuniform transverse magnetic fields are examined. The interaction parameter and Hartmann number are assumed to be large, whereas the magnetic Reynolds number is assumed to be small. Under these assumptions, viscous and inertial effects are confined in very thin boundary layers adjacent to the walls. At walls parallel to the magnetic field lines, as at the side walls of a rectangular duct, the boundary layers (side layers) carry a significant fraction of the volumetric flow rate in the form of high velocity jets. The presence of these jets strongly enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, heat transfer can be further improved by guiding the flow toward a heated wall by proper variation of wall thicknesses, duct cross sectional dimensions and/or shape. Flows in nonconducting circular ducts are also examined. Experimental results obtained from the ALEX experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory are used to validate the numerical predictions.

  19. MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) thermal hydraulic analysis of three-dimensional liquid metal flows in fusion blanket ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.A.; Picologlou, B.F.; Reed, C.B.; Walker, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows of liquid metals in thin conducting ducts of various geometries in the presence of strong nonuniform transverse magnetic fields are examined. The interaction parameter and Hartmann number are assumed to be large, whereas the magnetic Reynolds number is assumed to be small. Under these assumptions, viscous and inertial effects are confined in very thin boundary layers adjacent to the walls. At walls parallel to the magnetic field lines, as at the side walls of a rectangular duct, the boundary layers (side layers) carry a significant fraction of the volumetric flow rate in the form of high velocity jets. The presence of these jets strongly enhances heat transfer performance. In addition, heat transfer can be further improved by guiding the flow toward a heated wall by proper variation of wall thicknesses, duct cross sectional dimensions and/or shape. Flows in nonconducting circular ducts are also examined. Experimental results obtained from the ALEX experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory are used to validate the numerical predictions. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  1. Compressible magnetohydrodynamic sawtooth crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2014-02-01

    In a toroidal magnetically confined plasma at low resistivity, compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) predicts that an m = 1/n = 1 sawtooth has a fast, explosive crash phase with abrupt onset, rate nearly independent of resistivity, and localized temperature redistribution similar to experimental observations. Large scale numerical simulations show that the 1/1 MHD internal kink grows exponentially at a resistive rate until a critical amplitude, when the plasma motion accelerates rapidly, culminating in fast loss of the temperature and magnetic structure inside q < 1, with somewhat slower density redistribution. Nonlinearly, for small effective growth rate the perpendicular momentum rate of change remains small compared to its individual terms ∇p and J × B until the fast crash, so that the compressible growth rate is determined by higher order terms in a large aspect ratio expansion, as in the linear eigenmode. Reduced MHD fails completely to describe the toroidal mode; no Sweet-Parker-like reconnection layer develops. Important differences result from toroidal mode coupling effects. A set of large aspect ratio compressible MHD equations shows that the large aspect ratio expansion also breaks down in typical tokamaks with rq =1/Ro≃1/10 and a /Ro≃1/3. In the large aspect ratio limit, failure extends down to much smaller inverse aspect ratio, at growth rate scalings γ =O(ɛ2). Higher order aspect ratio terms, including B˜ϕ, become important. Nonlinearly, higher toroidal harmonics develop faster and to a greater degree than for large aspect ratio and help to accelerate the fast crash. The perpendicular momentum property applies to other transverse MHD instabilities, including m ≥ 2 magnetic islands and the plasma edge.

  2. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Petviashvili, N.

    1994-02-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics based on the Elsässer variables is developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to those based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected, the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. A statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations is given. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories, but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is presented as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected. A statistical calculation in the canonical ensemble and numerical simulations show that a nonzero large-scale magnetic field is statistically favored, and that the preferred shape of this field is a long, thin tube of flux. Possible applications to a variety of physical phenomena are suggested.

  3. Results of test MA22 in the NASA/LaRC 31-inch CFHT on an 0.010-scale model (32-0) of the space shuttle configuration 3 to determine RCS jet flow field interaction, volume 1. [wind tunnel tests for interactions of aerodynamic heating on jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanipe, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the Langley Research Center 31-inch Continuous Flow Hypersonic Wind Tunnel from May 6, 1975 through June 3, 1975. The primary objectives of this test were the following: (1) to study the ability of the wind tunnel to repeat, on a run-to-run basis, data taken for identical configurations to determine if errors in repeatability could have a significant effect on jet interaction data, (2) to determine the effect of aerodynamic heating of the scale model on jet interaction, (3) to investigate the effects of elevon and body flap deflections on jet interaction, (4) to determine if the effects from jets fired separately along different axes can be added to equal the effects of the jets fired simultaneously (super position effects), (5) to study multiple jet effects, and (6) to investigate area ratio effects, i.e., the effect on jet interaction measurements of using wind tunnel nozzles with different area ratios in the same location. The model used in the test was a .010-scale model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Configuration 3. The test was conducted at Mach 10.3 and a dynamic pressure of 150 psf. RCS chamber pressure was varied to simulate free flight dynamic pressures of 5, 7.5, 10, and 20 psf.

  4. Channel Formation in Long Laser Pulse Interaction with a Helium Gas Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, V.; De Wispelaere, E.; Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S.; Bonadio, R.; Coulaud, C.; Haroutunian, R.; Modena, A.; Puissant, D.; Stenz, C.; Hueller, S.; Casanova, M.

    1997-10-01

    Experimental realization of an electron density channel created by a low intensity laser in a helium gas jet is presented. The long (2.5mm) plasma channel is fully ionized and thus prevents undesirable refraction effects for propagation and guiding of a subsequent high intensity laser pulse. The channel parameters are easily controlled and well suited for laser guiding. The radial plasma expansion and the temperature evolution have been measured and compared to hydrodynamic simulations which show that the plasma expansion is governed by a thermal wave during the laser pulse. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  6. Pulsar Magnetohydrodynamic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Isao; Sigalo, Friday B.

    2006-12-01

    The acceleration and collimation/decollimation of relativistic magnetocentrifugal winds are discussed concerning a cold plasma from a strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron star in a steady axisymmetric state based on ideal magnetohydrodynamics. There exist unipolar inductors associated with the field line angular frequency, α, at the magnetospheric base surface, SB, with a huge potential difference between the poles and the equator, which drive electric current through the pulsar magnetosphere. Any ``current line'' must emanate from one terminal of the unipolar inductor and return to the other, converting the Poynting flux to the kinetic flux of the wind at finite distances. In a plausible field structure satisfying the transfield force-balance equation, the fast surface, SF, must exist somewhere between the subasymptotic and asymptotic domains, i.e., at the innermost point along each field line of the asymptotic domain of \\varpaA2/\\varpi2 ≪ 1, where \\varpiA is the Alfvénic axial distance. The criticality condition at SF yields the Lorentz factor, γF = μ\\varepsilon1/3, and the angular momentum flux, β, as the eigenvalues in terms of the field line angular velocity, α, the mass flux per unit flux tube, η, and one of the Bernoulli integrals, μδ, which are assumed to be specifiable as the boundary conditions at SB. The other Bernoulli integral, μɛ, is related to μδ as μɛ = μδ[1-(α2\\varpiA2/c2)]-1, and both μɛ and \\varpiA2 are eigenvalues to be determined by the criticality condition at SF. Ongoing MHD acceleration is possible in the superfast domain. This fact may be helpful in resolving a discrepancy between the wind theory and the Crab-nebula model. It is argued that the ``anti-collimation theorem'' holds for relativistic winds, based on the curvature of field streamlines determined by the transfield force balance. The ``theorem'' combines with the ``current-closure condition'' as a global condition in the wind zone to produce a

  7. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  8. Mass spectrometric gas composition measurements associated with jet interaction tests in a high-enthalpy wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Brown, K. G.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Puster, R. L.; Paulin, P. A.; Fishel, C. E.; Ellerbe, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of test gas composition is important in wind-tunnel experiments measuring aerothermodynamic interactions. This paper describes measurements made by sampling the top of the test section during runs of the Langley 7-Inch High-Temperature Tunnel. The tests were conducted to determine the mixing of gas injected from a flat-plate model into a combustion-heated hypervelocity test stream and to monitor the CO2 produced in the combustion. The Mass Spectrometric (MS) measurements yield the mole fraction of N2 or He and CO2 reaching the sample inlets. The data obtained for several tunnel run conditions are related to the pressures measured in the tunnel test section and at the MS ionizer inlet. The apparent distributions of injected gas species and tunnel gas (CO2) are discussed relative to the sampling techniques. The measurements provided significant real-time data for the distribution of injected gases in the test section. The jet N2 diffused readily from the test stream, but the jet He was mostly entrained. The amounts of CO2 and Ar diffusing upward in the test section for several run conditions indicated the variability of the combustion-gas test-stream composition.

  9. GRMHD/RMHD Simulations and Stability of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    A new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD ) code "RAISHIN" used to simulate jet generation by rotating and non-rotating black holes with a geometrically thin Keplarian accretion disk finds that the jet develops a spine-sheath structure in the rotating black hole case. Spine-sheath structure and strong magnetic fields significantly modify the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven instability. The RAISHIN code has been used in its relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) configuration to study the effects of strong magnetic fields and weakly relativistic sheath motion, cl2, on the KH instability associated with a relativistic, Y = 2.5, jet spine-sheath interaction. In the simulations sound speeds up to ? c/3 and Alfven wave speeds up to ? 0.56 c are considered. Numerical simulation results are compared to theoretical predictions from a new normal mode analysis of the RMHD equations. Increased stability of a weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and stabilization of a strongly magnetized system resulting from d 2 sheath speeds is found.

  10. Emergence of high peaks in the axial velocity for an ideal magnetohydrodynamic disk configuration.

    PubMed

    Montani, Giovanni; Carlevaro, Nakia

    2010-08-01

    We study the profile of a thin disk configuration as described by an axisymmetric ideal magnetohydrodynamics steady equilibrium. We consider the disk like a differentially rotating system dominated by the Keplerian term, but allowing for a nonzero radial and vertical matter flux. As a result, the steady state allows for the existence of local peaks for the vertical velocity of the plasma particles, though it prevents the radial matter accretion rate. This ideal magnetohydrodynamics scheme is therefore unable to solve the angular momentum-transport problem, but we suggest that it provides a mechanism for the generation of matter-jet seeds. PMID:20866868

  11. Interaction between low-level jet and sea surface temperature gradient in the Carolina Capes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, L.; Pietrafesa, L.J.; Raman, S.

    1994-12-31

    The continental shelf off the Carolina coast is a preferred region of formation of low-level jet, coastal fronts and cyclones. During winter, the sharp contrast between the warm and moist air over the coastal waters and the cold and dry air over the continent forms an intense baroclinic zone along the coast. This baroclinic zone is often enhanced by a cold-air damming to the east of the Appalachian mountains. On the other hand, coastal waters, particularly the inner- and mid-shelf waters in the Carolina Capes are strongly affected by winds and surface cooling. According to these studies, the most energetic subtidal variance of midshelf circulation occurs between 2 and 10 days which coincide with the energy peaks of local surface winds. A fundamental question is whether or not mesoscale atmospheric systems are effectively coupled to the ocean circulation and frontal features over the shelf. This question will be the focus of this study.

  12. Interactions of aromatic heterocycles with water: the driving force from free-jet rotational spectroscopy and model electrostatic calculations.

    PubMed

    Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Miazzi, Marta; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2008-06-23

    The interaction of isolated aromatic nitrogen atoms with water is explored within free jets by using rotational spectroscopy. To the existing data on diazines, we add the case of the 1:1 complex of 1,3,5-triazine and water (where water donates a proton to one of the nitrogen heterocyclic atoms to form a planar adduct). An electrostatic model based on distributed multipoles accurately reproduces the structures of the four azine-water complexes and allows us to understand the forces that stabilize these structures. The applied intermolecular potential allows us to estimate the changes in the thermodynamic functions of the complexes-compared to the separated constituents-and evaluate the temperature at which the complexes are stable under standard conditions. PMID:18470857

  13. Analysis of Performance of Jet Engine from Characteristics of Components II : Interaction of Components as Determined from Engine Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Alpert, Sumner; Beede, William; Kovach, Karl

    1949-01-01

    In order to understand the operation and the interaction of jet-engine components during engine operation and to determine how component characteristics may be used to compute engine performance, a method to analyze and to estimate performance of such engines was devised and applied to the study of the characteristics of a research turbojet engine built for this investigation. An attempt was made to correlate turbine performance obtained from engine experiments with that obtained by the simpler procedure of separately calibrating the turbine with cold air as a driving fluid in order to investigate the applicability of component calibration. The system of analysis was also applied to prediction of the engine and component performance with assumed modifications of the burner and bearing characteristics, to prediction of component and engine operation during engine acceleration, and to estimates of the performance of the engine and the components when the exhaust gas was used to drive a power turbine.

  14. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations on multiple GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Un-Hong; Wong, Hon-Cheng; Ma, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models play the major role in investigating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. However, the huge computation requirement in global MHD simulations is also the main problem that needs to be solved. With the recent development of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), it is possible to perform global MHD simulations in a more efficient manner. In this paper, we present a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulator on multiple GPUs using CUDA 4.0 with GPUDirect 2.0. Our implementation is based on the modified leapfrog scheme, which is a combination of the leapfrog scheme and the two-step Lax-Wendroff scheme. GPUDirect 2.0 is used in our implementation to drive multiple GPUs. All data transferring and kernel processing are managed with CUDA 4.0 API instead of using MPI or OpenMP. Performance measurements are made on a multi-GPU system with eight NVIDIA Tesla M2050 (Fermi architecture) graphics cards. These measurements show that our multi-GPU implementation achieves a peak performance of 97.36 GFLOPS in double precision.

  15. Analytical study of magnetohydrodynamic propulsion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi, M. Y.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper an analytical solution for the stability of the fully developed flow drive in a magneto-hydro-dynamic pump with pulsating transverse Eletro-magnetic fields is presented. To do this, a theoretical model of the flow is developed and the analytical results are obtained for both the cylindrical and Cartesian configurations that are proper to use in the propulsion of marine vessels. The governing parabolic momentum PDEs are transformed into an ordinary differential equation using approximate velocity distribution. The numerical results are obtained and asymptotic analyses are built to discover the mathematical behavior of the solutions. The maximum velocity in a magneto-hydro-dynamic pump versus time for various values of the Stuart number, electro-magnetic interaction number, Reynolds number, aspect ratio, as well as the magnetic and electrical angular frequency and the shift of the phase angle is presented. Results show that for a high Stuart number there is a frequency limit for stability of the fluid flow in a certain direction of the flow. This stability frequency is dependent on the geometric parameters of a channel.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic flow at microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragsdale, Steven Ronald

    1998-12-01

    Voltammetric reduction of nitrobenzene (NB) at a 12.5 μm-radius Pt microdisk electrode in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.001/le x NB/le 0.999 is reported (x NB is the mole fraction of NB). The voltammetric response displays a reversible, sigmoidalshape wave, corresponding to the one-electron reduction of NB. The maximum limiting current occurs in solutions containing intermediate redox concentrations, x NB/le0.2. Voltammetric currents are analyzed using the Cullinan-Vignes model to describe the interdiffusion of the redox species and solvent. Mutual diffusivities are corrected for activity effects using isothermal liquid-vapor equilibrium data. Application of the activity-corrected diffusivities in the Cullinan- Vignes model yields reasonably accurate predictions of the dependence of the voltammetric current on solution composition. The influence of an external magnetic field (0-1 Tesla) on the voltammetric response of Pt and Au microdisk electrodes (0.1, 6.4, 12.5 and 25 μm radius) is described. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow within a microscopic volume element adjacent to the microdisk surface results from the magnetic force generated by the flux of electrogenerated ions through the magnetic field. An analytic expression is presented for the magnetic force generated during steady-state voltammetry at a hemispherical microelectrode immersed in a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic volume force, F/bf mag (N/m3), is shown to decrease as r-2 (where r is the distance from the center of the electrode). The dependence of F/bf mag on r-2 confines the MHD flow to small volumes very close to the electrode surface (e.g., ~2×10-9 L for a 12.5 μm-radius electrode). Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to map MHD flows at a 25 μm-radius Pt microdisk electrode during the one-electron reduction of NB. Unidirectional lateral flow is observed when the magnetic field is aligned parallel to the electrode surface; rotational or cyclotron flow is observed when

  17. Study of fast electron jet produced from interaction of intense laser beam with solid target at oblique incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Arora, Vipul; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2012-11-15

    Fast electrons generated along target normal direction from the interaction of intense ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses ({lambda}{sub 0} = 800 nm) with planar copper target at 45 Degree-Sign incidence angle have been experimentally studied under different interaction conditions. Angular spread and energy spectrum of the fast electrons was measured for both p- and s-polarized laser irradiation at intensities in the range 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16}- 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} (for a fixed pulse duration of 45 fs) and for pulse duration in the range 45 fs-1.2 ps (for a fixed laser fluence of 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} J/cm{sup 2}). The fast electrons were observed consistently along the target normal direction over the entire range of interaction conditions in the form of a collimated jet, within a half cone angle of 20 Degree-Sign . The fast electrons have continuous energy spectrum with effective temperature 290 keV and 160 keV, respectively, for p- and s-polarized 45 fs laser pulse irradiation at intensity 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. Scaling laws for temperature of fast electrons with laser intensity and pulse duration were obtained. The experimental results have been explained on the basis of laser absorption and fast electron generation through the resonance absorption mechanism.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of outflows from accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Romanova, M. M.; Chechetkin, V. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic simulations have been made of the formation of outflows from a Keplerian disk threaded by a magnetic field. The disk is treated as a boundary condition, where matter is ejected with Keplerian azimuthal speed and poloidal speed less than the slow magnetosonic velocity, and where boundary conditions on the magnetic field correspond to a highly conducting disk. Initially, the space above the disk, the corona, is filled with high specific entropy plasma in thermal equilibrium in the gravitational potential of the central object. The initial magnetic field is poloidal and is represented by a superposition of monopoles located below the plane of the disk. The rotation of the disk twists the initial poloidal magnetic field, and this twist propagates into the corona pushing and collimating matter into jetlike outflow in a cylindrical region. Matter outflowing from the disk flows and accelerates in the z-direction owing to both the magnetic and pressure gradient forces. The flow accelerates through the slow magnetosonic and Alfven surfaces and at larger distances through the fast magnetosonic surface. The flow velocity of the jet is approximately parallel to the z-axis, and the collimation results from the pinching force of the toroidal magnetic field. For a nonrotating disk no collimation is observed.

  19. Jet-medium interactions at NLO in a weakly-coupled quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiglieri, Jacopo; Moore, Guy D.; Teaney, Derek

    2016-03-01

    We present an extension to next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant g of the AMY effective kinetic approach to the energy loss of high momentum particles in the quark-gluon plasma. At leading order, the transport of jet-like particles is determined by elastic scattering with the thermal constituents, and by inelastic collinear splittings induced by the medium. We reorganize this description into collinear splittings, high-momentum-transfer scatterings, drag and diffusion, and particle conversions (momentum-preserving identity-changing processes). We show that this reorganized description remains valid to NLO in g, and compute the appropriate modifications of the drag, diffusion, particle conversion, and inelastic splitting coefficients. In addition, a new kinematic regime opens at NLO for wider-angle collinear bremsstrahlung. These semi-collinear emissions smoothly interpolate between the leading order high-momentum-transfer scatterings and collinear splittings. To organize the calculation, we introduce a set of Wilson line operators on the light-cone which determine the diffusion and identity changing coefficients, and we show how to evaluate these operators at NLO.

  20. Imaging Spectrophotometry of the Jet/ISM Interaction in IC5063

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, G.; Schuft, B.; Morse, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2004-01-01

    IC5063 is a somewhat dusty z=0.0110 S0 galaxy with a Seyfert 2 nucleus. It has a triple radio source that spans 3 arcsec, mostly blueshifted H I absorption that spans 700 km/s, and ionization cones that extend for more than 2 arcmins. We obtained fully sampled [O III]\\lambda5007 grids at 0."9 and 70 km/s FWHM resolution using the Rutgers Fabry-Perot system on the Blanco 4m telescope. Complementary long-slit spectra using the RC spectrograph on the Blanco, and Taurus Tunable Filter spectral images in H\\alpha and [N II]\\lambda6583, were also obtained to assess gaseous ionization conditions. We present the results of our analysis, and correlate spectral structures to those visible in archival WFPC2 images. We find that, in the region near the radio triple, gaseous ionization and line velocity width is tightly correlated, in excellent quantitative agreement with the high-velocity shock regime in the diagnostic emission-line ratio diagrams of Dopita & Sutherland. We separate kinematically gas in normal disk rotation that is illuminated by the AGN in the ionization cones from that agitated mechanically by the jet, and assess the energy input from both processes.

  1. Bottom-quark production from muon-jet and dimuon events in p{bar p}-interactions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Huehn, T.; D0 Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Bottom quark production in p{bar p}-interactions has been measured in the rapidity range {vert_bar} y{sup b} {vert_bar} < 1 with the DO detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The cross section is determined from events containing a muon and jets as well as from dimuon events. Preliminary results are presented based on 197 nb{sup {minus}1} and 6.4 pb{sup {minus}1} of data for the muon-jets and dimuon analysis, respectively, and are compared to next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The measurements are consistent within errors and are in reasonable agreement with QCD predictions.

  2. Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as seen in Joint URBAN 2003 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K

    2005-07-13

    The nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) is a well-documented phenomenon world-wide, especially in the southern Great Plains of the United States (Bonner 1968, Whiteman et al. 1997, Banta et al., 2002) where it contributes to severe weather. In the canonical rural case, the nocturnal LLJ forms as the release of daytime convective turbulent stresses allow nighttime winds above a stable boundary layer to accelerate to supergeostrophic wind speeds. In situations with surface winds of less than 5 m/s, wind speeds at altitudes of 100m due to the nocturnal LLJ can be greater than 20 m/s. The turbulence generated by this wind shear can induce nocturnal mixing events and control surface-atmosphere exchange, thereby affecting atmospheric transport and dispersion. The Joint URBAN 2003 urban dispersion dataset, collected in Oklahoma City in July, 2003, includes several occurrences of strong LLJs, thereby providing a unique opportunity to document how the LLJ interacts with the complexity of urban geometries and to explore the significance of LLJs for transport and dispersion in urban environments. Based on this dataset, we will answer the following questions: (1) How often do LLJs occur during the experiment? (2) How does the increase in surface roughness represented by the city center, as compared to the rural environment, affect the altitude and speed of the jet, based on data from upwind and downwind wind profiles? (3) How often do LLJs contribute to nocturnal mixing events within the Oklahoma City urban area, as observed in profiles of turbulence quantities at an 80m pseudo-tower located 750m downwind of Oklahoma City center? (4) Can the effect of these LLJ-induced mixing events be identified in the dispersion datasets?

  3. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  4. Representation of Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-01-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ Β = ∇ X (xi X B) ensures that δ B • ∇ ψ = 0 at a resonance, with ψ labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation δ Β = ∇ X αB. These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of δ B • ∇ψ at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in xi to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranov, V.

    1998-08-01

    Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics by Dieter Biskamp is a thorough introduction to the physics of the most impressive non-linear phenomena that occur in conducting magnetoplasmas. The basic systems, in which non-trivial dynamic processes are observed, accompanied by changes of geometry of the magnetic field and the effects of energy transformation (magnetic energy into kinetic energy or the opposite effect in magnetic dynamos), are the plasma magnetic confinement systems for nuclear fusion and space plasmas, mainly the solar plasma. A significant number of the examples of the dynamic processes considered are taken from laboratory plasmas, for which an experimental check of the theory is possible. Therefore, though the book is intended for researchers and students interested in both laboratory, including nuclear fusion, and astrophysical plasmas, it is most probably closer to the first category of reader. In the Introduction the author notes that unlike the hydrodynamics of non-conducting fluids, where the phenomena caused by rapid fluid motions are the most interesting, for plasmas in a strong magnetic field the quasi-static configurations inside which the local dynamic processes occur are often the most important. Therefore, the reader will also find in this book rather traditional material on the theory of plasma equilibrium and stability in magnetic fields. In addition, it is notable that, as opposed to a linear theory, the non-linear theory, as a rule, cannot give quite definite explanations or predictions of phenomena, and consequently there are in the book many results obtained by consideration of numerical models with the use of supercomputers. The treatment of non-linear dynamics is preceded by Chapters 2 to 4, in which the basics of MHD theory are presented with an emphasis on the role of integral invariants of the magnetic helicity type, a derivation of the reduced MHD equations is given, together with examples of the exact solutions of the equilibrium

  6. Dynamo Effect in the Kraichnan Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arponen, Heikki; Horvai, Peter

    2007-10-01

    The existence of a dynamo effect in a simplified magnetohydrodynamic model of turbulence is considered when the magnetic Prandtl number approaches zero or infinity. The magnetic field is interacting with an incompressible Kraichnan-Kazantsev model velocity field which incorporates also a viscous cutoff scale. An approximate system of equations in the different scaling ranges can be formulated and solved, so that the solution tends to the exact one when the viscous and magnetic-diffusive cutoffs approach zero. In this approximation we are able to determine analytically the conditions for the existence of a dynamo effect and give an estimate of the dynamo growth rate. Among other things we show that in the large magnetic Prandtl number case the dynamo effect is always present. Our analytical estimates are in good agreement with previous numerical studies of the Kraichnan-Kazantsev dynamo by Vincenzi (J. Stat. Phys. 106:1073-1091, 2002).

  7. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    The solar chromospheric jet is one of the most characteristic structures near the solar surface. The quantitative understanding of chromospheric jets is of substantial importance for not only the partially ionized phenomena in the chromosphere but also the energy input and dissipation processes in the corona. In this dissertation, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated using the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We newly develop a numerical code for the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the comprehensive modeling of solar atmosphere. Because the solar chromosphere is highly nonlinear, magnetic pressure dominated, and turbulent, a robust and high-resolution numerical scheme is required. In Chapter 2, we propose a new algorithm for the simulation of magnetohydrodynamics. Through the test problems and accuracy analyses, the proposed scheme is proved to satisfy the requirements. In Chapter 3, the effect of the non-local radiation energy transport, Spitzer-type thermal conduction, latent heat of partial ionization and molecule formation, and gravity are implemented to the magnetohydrodynamic code. The numerical schemes for the radiation transport and thermal conduction is carefully chosen in a view of the efficiency and compatibility with the parallel computation. Based on the developed radiation magnetohydrodynamic code, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated. In Chapter 4, we investigate the dependence of chromospheric jets on the coronal temperature in the two-dimensional simulations. Various scale of chromospheric jets with the parabolic trajectory are found with the maximum height of 2–8 Mm, lifetime of 2–7 min, maximum upward velocity of 10– 50 km/s, and deceleration of 100–350 m/s2. We find that chromospheric jets are more elongated under the cool corona and shorter under the hot corona. We also find that the pressure gradient force caused by the periodic shock waves accelerates

  8. Calculation of lateral-directional stability derivatives for wing-body combinations with and without jet-interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for predicting the lateral-directional stability derivatives of wing-body combinations with or without the blowing jet effect. The fuselage effect is accounted for by the axial distribution of vortex multiplets. Comparison of the predicted results with experiments and other theoretical methods show good agreement for configurations without the blowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  9. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle θ≈(π)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  10. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  11. On the reverse flow ceiling jet in pool fire-ventilation crossflow interactions in a simulated aircraft cabin interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwack, E. Y.; Bankston, C. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of the reverse flow ceiling jet against the ventilation flow from 0.58 to 0.87 m/s was investigated in a 1/3 scale model of a wide body aircraft interior. For all tests, strong reverse-flow ceiling jets of hot gases were detected well upstream of the fire. Both thicknesses of the reverse-flow ceiling jet and the smoke layer increased with the fire-crossflow parameter. The thickness of the smoke layer where the smoke flows along the main flow below the reverse-flow ceiling jet was almost twice that of the reverse-flow ceiling jet. Detailed spatial and time-varying temperatures of the gas in the test section were measured, and velocity profiles were also measured using a temperature compensated hot film.

  12. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  13. Relativistic Jets in Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqun; Woosley, S. E.; MacFadyen, A. I.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the propagation of two-dimensional relativistic jets through the stellar progenitor in the collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the jet is collimated by its passage. Moreover, interaction of the jet with the star causes mixing that sporadically decelerates the jet, leading to a highly variable Lorentz factor. The jet that finally emerges has a moderate Lorentz factor, but a very large internal energy loading. In a second series of calculations we follow the emergence of such enegy-loaded jets from the star. For the initial conditions chosen, conversion of the remaining internal energy gives a terminal Lorentz factor of approximately 150. Implications of our calculations for GRB light curves, the luminosity-variability relation, and the GRB-supernova association are discussed.

  14. Thermal interaction between an impinging hot jet and a conducting solid surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeloff, P. A.; Dougherty, F. C.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Powered-lift aircraft may produce severe high-temperature environments which are potentially damaging to a landing surface or the aircraft. The interaction betweean the high temperature flow field and a nonadiabatic landing surface is analyzed with a coupled computational fluid dynamics/solid thermal conduction computer code, HOTJET. The HOTJET code couples time-accurate, implicit, factored solution schemes for the governing fluid dynamics equations (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations) to the unsteady thermal conduction equation, which governs heat flux within a solid. HOTJET is validated against exact solutions to the thermal conduction and Navier-Stokes equations. First-of-a-kind results are included which show the impact of surface material properties on the fluid physics and the coupled fluid/material thermal fields.

  15. Direct comparisons of compressible magnetohydrodynamics and reduced magnetohydrodynamics turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitruk, Pablo; Matthaeus, William H.; Oughton, Sean

    2005-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of low Mach number compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (CMHD3D) turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field are compared with simulations of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD). Periodic boundary conditions in the three spatial coordinates are considered. Different sets of initial conditions are chosen to explore the applicability of RMHD and to study how close the solution remains to the full compressible MHD solution as both freely evolve in time. In a first set, the initial state is prepared to satisfy the conditions assumed in the derivation of RMHD, namely, a strong mean magnetic field and plane-polarized fluctuations, varying weakly along the mean magnetic field. In those circumstances, simulations show that RMHD and CMHD3D evolve almost indistinguishably from one another. When some of the conditions are relaxed the agreement worsens but RMHD remains fairly close to CMHD3D, especially when the mean magnetic field is large enough. Moreover, the well-known spectral anisotropy effect promotes the dynamical attainment of the conditions for RMHD applicability. Global quantities (mean energies, mean-square current, and vorticity) and energy spectra from the two solutions are compared and point-to-point separation estimations are computed. The specific results shown here give support to the use of RMHD as a valid approximation of compressible MHD with a mean magnetic field under certain but quite practical conditions.

  16. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, D.H.; Thresh, H.R.

    1980-06-24

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is described comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core of a first metal, a tubular sleeve of a second metal, and an outer sheath of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MHD channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core and the second metal of the sleeve strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  17. Adaptive wavelets and relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Eric; Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthe; Debuhr, Jackson; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for integrating the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics equations using iterated interpolating wavelets. Such provide an adaptive implementation for simulations in multidimensions. A measure of the local approximation error for the solution is provided by the wavelet coefficients. They place collocation points in locations naturally adapted to the flow while providing expected conservation. We present demanding 1D and 2D tests includingthe Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, we consider an outgoing blast wave that models a GRB outflow.

  18. Magneto-Hydrodynamics Based Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    In microfluidic devices, it is necessary to propel samples and reagents from one part of the device to another, stir fluids, and detect the presence of chemical and biological targets. Given the small size of these devices, the above tasks are far from trivial. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) offers an elegant means to control fluid flow in microdevices without a need for mechanical components. In this paper, we review the theory of MHD for low conductivity fluids and describe various applications of MHD such as fluid pumping, flow control in fluidic networks, fluid stirring and mixing, circular liquid chromatography, thermal reactors, and microcoolers. PMID:20046890

  19. Wing surface-jet interaction characteristics of an upper-surface blown model with rectangular exhaust nozzles and a radius flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, A. M.; Hohlweg, W. C.; Sleeman, W. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The wing surface jet interaction characteristics of an upper surface blown transport configuration were investigated in the Langley V/STOL tunnel. Velocity profiles at the inboard engine center line were measured for several chordwise locations, and chordwise pressure distributions on the flap were obtained. The model represented a four engine arrangement having relatively high aspect ratio rectangular spread, exhaust nozzles and a simple trailing edge radius flap.

  20. Revisiting argon cluster formation in a planar gas jet for high-intensity laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; van der Weide, E. T. A.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the size of argon clusters generated with a planar nozzle, based on the optical measurements in conjunction with theoretical modelling. Using a quasi-one dimensional model for the moments of the cluster size distribution, we determine the influence of critical physical assumptions. These refer to the surface tension depending on the presence of thermal equilibrium, the mass density of clusters, and different methods to model the growth rate of the cluster radius. We show that, despite strong variation in the predicted cluster size, , the liquid mass ratio, g, can be determined with high trustworthiness, because g is predicted as being almost independent of the specific model assumptions. Exploiting this observation, we use the calculated value for g to retrieve the cluster size from optical measurements, i.e., calibrated Rayleigh scattering and interferometry. Based on the measurements of the cluster size vs. the nozzle stagnation pressure, we provide a new power law for the prediction of the cluster size in experiments with higher values of the Hagena parameter (Γ*>104 ) . This range is of relevance for experiments on high-intensity laser matter interactions.

  1. Numerical simulation of the interaction of a transverse jet with a supersonic flow using different turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, K. N.; Emelyanov, V. N.; Yakovchuk, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of the flow resulting from transverse jet injection into a supersonic flow through a slot nozzle at different pressures in the injected jet and the crossflow. Calculations on grids with different resolutions use the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, the k- ɛ model, the k- ω model, and the SST model. Based on a comparison of the calculated and experimental data on the wall pressure distribution, the length of the recirculation area, and the depth of jet penetration into the supersonic flow, conclusions are made on the accuracy of the calculation results for the different turbulence models and the applicability of these models to similar problems.

  2. Simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with application to plasma-assisted supersonic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Kenji

    Plasma assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising alternative to hold or ignite a fuel and air mixture in a supersonic environment. Efficient supersonic combustion is of primary importance for SCRAMJET technology. The advantages of PAC is the addition of large amounts of energy to specific regions of the SCRAMJET flow-field for short periods of time, and as a result accelerate the fuel/air kinetic rates to achieve a self-sustaining condition. Moreover, the promise of enhancement of fuel-air mixing by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow control offers significant improvement of combustion performance. The development of a numerical tool for investigating high-temperature chemistry and plasmadynamic effects of a discharge arc is desired to gain understanding of PAC technology and the potential improvement of the operational efficiency of SCRAMJET engines. The main objective of this research is to develop a comprehensive model with the capability of modeling both high Reynolds number and high magnetic Reynolds number turbulent flow for application to supersonic combustor. The development of this model can be divided into three categories: first, the development of a self-consistent MHD numerical model capable of modeling magnetic turbulence in high magnetic Reynolds number applications. Second, the development of a gas discharge model which models the interaction of externally applied fields in conductive medium. Third, the development of models necessary for studying supersonic combustion applications with plasma-assistance such the extension of chemical kinetics models to extremely high temperature and non-equilibrium phenomenon. Finally, these models are combined and utilized to model plasma assisted combustion in a SCRAMJET. Two types of plasmas are investigated: an equilibrium electrical discharge (arc) and a non-equilibrium plasma jet. It is shown that both plasmas significantly increase the concentration of radicals such as O, OH and H, and both have positive impact

  3. Interaction between jet flow and motion of two consecutive membranes in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Olivier; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    Pressure oscillations induced by combustion in a rocket motor generate coherent turbulence, which excites the structure of the rocket. In particular, it leads to the vibration of inhibitors, which endangers the mechanical integrity of the rocket. To model the phenomenon, the following facility has been set up: a blower followed by a settling chamber from where the flow exits into a cylindrical pipe; at the middle a membrane is inserted with a centered hole; another membrane is installed at the end of the pipe. The main purposes are to find how the shape of the membrane hole affects the nature of the outlet flow and how two consecutive membranes interact. In addition to experimental measurements, numerical simulations of the membrane influence on the flow have been performed. Unsteady and steady CFD models have been used to analyze the influence of the hole shape. A hot wire system and a laser gave experimental data that allow us to explain phenomena observed with flow visualizations. An amplification of the amplitude of the vibrations from the first to the second membrane was observed principally through visualizations. It also appears that the vibration mode of the membranes is different from one to another for the same excitation frequency. The study of oscillation amplitude performed with the laser has showed that the membrane, which vibrates less, is the one with a circular hole. It has also detected a difference in amplitude between the long and the small edges of the rectangular hole membrane. Moreover unsteady simulations run with Fluent have described the influence of hole shape on vortex time evolution.

  4. Progress in Development of C60 Nanoparticle Plasma Jet for Diagnostic of Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction and Disruption Mitigation Study for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Thompson, J. R.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    We produced a C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) with uniquely fast response-to-delivery time (~ 1 - 2 ms) and unprecedentedly high momentum (~ 0 . 6 g .km/s). The C60 NPPJ was obtained by using a solid state TiH2/C60 pulsed power cartridge producing ~180 mg of C60 molecular gas by sublimation and by electromagnetic acceleration of the C60 plasma in a coaxial gun (~35 cm length, 96 kJ energy) with the output of a high-density (>1023 m-3) hyper-velocity (>4 km/s) plasma jet. The ~ 75 mg C60/C plasma jet has the potential to rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to significantly increase electron density (to ne ~ 2 . 4 ×1021 m-3, i.e. ~ 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value, ne 0 ~ 4 ×1019 m-3), and to modify the 'critical electric field' and the runaway electrons (REs) collisional drag during different phases of REs dynamics. The C60 NPPJ, as a novel injection technique, allows RE beam-plasma interaction diagnostic by quantitative spectroscopy of C ions visible/UV line intensity. The system is scalable to ~ 1 - 2 g C60/C plasma jet output and technology is adaptable to ITER acceptable materials (BN and Be) for disruption mitigation. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-08ER85196 grant.

  5. X-rays associated with the jet-cloud-interacting radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A): implications for energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.; Young, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery with Chandra of X-ray-emitting gas associated with the jet-cloud interaction in the radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A), a source that falls in the most important power range for radio-mode feedback in the Universe. This hot gas, heated by the jet, dominates the mass of the cloud which is responsible for an extreme projected deflection of the kpc-scale radio jet. Highly absorbed X-ray emission from the nucleus of 3C 277.3 confirms that the jet lies close to the plane of the sky and so has a large intrinsic deflection. We detect group gas on the scale of the radio lobes, and see X-ray cavities coincident with the brightest radio emission, with the lobes embraced by X-ray enhancements that we argue are the result of shocks. The anti-correlation between the locations of X-ray arms and H α-emitting filaments that are believed to have originated from a merger with one or more gas-rich galaxies suggests that shocks advancing around the lobe are inhibited by the dense colder material. Synchrotron X-ray emission is detected from the upstream edge of a second bright radio knot. X-rays are also detected from the location where an undetected counterjet enters the northern radio hotspot. We suggest that these X-rays are synchrotron radiation from a shock in a small-scale sub-structure.

  6. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  7. Representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-02-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}(vector sign) Multiplication-Sign B(vector sign)) ensures that {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi}=0 at a resonance, with {psi} labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign {alpha}B(vector sign). These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi} at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in {xi}(vector sign) to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed.

  8. XTROEM-FV: a new code for computational astrophysics based on very high order finite-volume methods - II. Relativistic hydro- and magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-de la Rosa, Jonatan; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-04-01

    In this work we discuss the extension of the XTROEM-FV code to relativistic hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics. XTROEM-FV is a simulation package for computational astrophysics based on very high order finite-volume methods on Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary spatial high order of accuracy is achieved with a WENO reconstruction operator, and the time evolution is carried out with a strong-stability preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. In XTROEM-FV has been implemented a cheap, robust, and accurate shock capturing strategy for handling complex shock waves problems, typical in an astrophysical environment. The divergence constraint of the magnetic field is tackled with the generalized Lagrange multiplier divergence cleaning approach. Numerical computations of smooth flows for the relativistic hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics equations are performed and confirm the high order accuracy of the main reconstruction algorithm for such kind of flows. XTROEM-FV has been subject to a comprehensive numerical benchmark, especially for complex flows configurations within an astrophysical context. Computations of problems with shocks with very high order reconstruction operators up to seventh order are reported. For instance, one-dimensional shock tubes problems for relativistic hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, as well as two-dimensional flows like the relativistic double Mach reflection problem, the interaction of a shock wave with a bubble, the relativistic Orszag-Tang vortex, the cylindrical blast wave problem, the rotor problem, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and an astrophysical slab jet. XTROEM-FV represents a new attempt to simulate astrophysical flow phenomena with very high order numerical methods.

  9. XTROEM-FV: a new code for computational astrophysics based on very high order finite-volume methods - II. Relativistic hydro- and magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-de la Rosa, Jonatan; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we discuss the extension of the XTROEM-FV code to relativistic hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics. XTROEM-FV is a simulation package for computational astrophysics based on very high order finite-volume methods on Cartesian coordinates. Arbitrary spatial high order of accuracy is achieved with a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction operator, and the time evolution is carried out with a strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. In XTROEM-FV has been implemented a cheap, robust, and accurate shock-capturing strategy for handling complex shock waves problems, typical in an astrophysical environment. The divergence constraint of the magnetic field is tackled with the generalized Lagrange multiplier divergence cleaning approach. Numerical computations of smooth flows for the relativistic hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics equations are performed and confirm the high-order accuracy of the main reconstruction algorithm for such kind of flows. XTROEM-FV has been subject to a comprehensive numerical benchmark, especially for complex flows configurations within an astrophysical context. Computations of problems with shocks with very high order reconstruction operators up to seventh order are reported. For instance, one-dimensional shock tubes problems for relativistic hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, as well as two-dimensional flows like the relativistic double Mach reflection problem, the interaction of a shock wave with a bubble, the relativistic Orszag-Tang vortex, the cylindrical blast wave problem, the rotor problem, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and an astrophysical slab jet. XTROEM-FV represents a new attempt to simulate astrophysical flow phenomena with very high order numerical methods.

  10. Double parton interactions in photon+3 jet events in ppbar collisions sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2009-12-01

    We have used a sample of photon+3 jets events collected by the D0 experiment with an integrated luminosity of about 1 fb{sup -1} to determine the fraction of events with double parton scattering (f{sub DP}) in a single ppbar collision at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The DP fraction and effective cross section (sigma{sub eff}), a process-independent scale parameter related to the parton density inside the nucleon, are measured in three intervals of the second (ordered in p{sub T}) jet transverse momentum pT{sub jet2} within the range 15 < pT{sub jet2} < 30 GeV. In this range, f{sub DP} varies between 0.23 < f{sub DP} < 0.47, while sigma{sub eff} has the average value sigma{sub effave} = 16.4 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 2.3(syst) mb.

  11. A Global Magnetohydrodynamic Model of Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Sharber, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a new global magnetohydrodynamic model of the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with the solar wind. Observations from 28 orbits of Jupiter by Galileo along with those from previous spacecraft at Jupiter, Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager I and 2 and Ulysses, have revealed that the Jovian magnetosphere is a vast, complicated system. The Jovian aurora also has been monitored for several years. Like auroral observations at Earth, these measurements provide us with a global picture of magnetospheric dynamics. Despite this wide range of observations, we have limited quantitative understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere and how it interacts with the solar wind. For the past several years we have been working toward a quantitative understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind by employing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations to model the magnetosphere. Our model has been an explicit MHD code (previously used to model the Earth's magnetosphere) to study Jupiter's magnetosphere. We continue to obtain important insights with this code, but it suffers from some severe limitations. In particular with this code we are limited to considering the region outside of 15RJ, with cell sizes of about 1.5R(sub J). The problem arises because of the presence of widely separated time scales throughout the magnetosphere. The numerical stability criterion for explicit MHD codes is the CFL limit and is given by C(sub max)(Delta)t/(Delta)x less than 1 where C(sub max) is the maximum group velocity in a given cell, (Delta)x is the grid spacing and (Delta)t is the time step. If the maximum wave velocity is C(sub w) and the flow speed is C(sub f), C(sub max) = C(sub w) + C(sub f). Near Jupiter the Alfven wave speed becomes very large (it approaches the speed of light at one Jovian radius). Operating with this time step makes the calculation essentially intractable. Therefore under this funding we have been designing a

  12. A Global Magnetohydrodynamic Model of Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond J.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a new global magnetohydrodynamic model of the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with the solar wind. Observations from 28 orbits of Jupiter by Galileo along with those from previous spacecraft at Jupiter, Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager I and 2 and Ulysses, have revealed that the Jovian magnetosphere is a vast, complicated system. The Jovian aurora also has been monitored for several years. Like auroral observations at Earth, these measurements provide us with a global picture of magnetospheric dynamics. Despite this wide range of observations, we have limited quantitative understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere and how it interacts with the solar wind. For the past several years we have been working toward a quantitative understanding of the Jovian magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind by employing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations to model the magnetosphere. Our model has been an explicit MHD code (previously used to model the Earth's magnetosphere) to study Jupiter's magnetosphere. We continue to obtain important insights with this code, but it suffers from some severe limitations. In particular with this code we are limited to considering the region outside of 15RJ, with cell sizes of about 1.5RJ. The problem arises because of the presence of widely separated time scales throughout the magnetosphere. The numerical stability criterion for explicit MHD codes is the CFL limit and is given by Cmax)(Delta)t/(Deltax less than 1 where Cmax is the maximum group velocity in a given cell, (Delta)x is the grid spacing and (Delta)t is the time step. If the maximum wave velocity is Cw and the flow speed is Cf, Cmax = Cw + Cf. Near Jupiter the Alfven wave speed becomes very large (it approaches the speed of light at one Jovian radius). Operating with this time step makes the calculation essentially intractable. Therefore under this funding we have been designing a new MHD model that will be able to compute

  13. Dynamics of the flowfield generated by the interaction of twin inclined jets of variable temperatures with an oncoming crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhouane, A.; Mahjoub Saïd, N.; Mhiri, H.; Bournot, H.; Le Palec, G.

    2014-02-01

    The present paper examines the common configuration of "twin inclined jets in crossflow" that is widely present in several industrial and academic, small and large-scale applications. It is particularly found in aerodynamic and engineering applications like VTOL aircrafts, the combustion mixing process and other chemical chambers. It can also be found in some domestic applications like chimney stacks or water discharge piping systems in rivers and seas. The twin jets considered in this work are elliptic as inclined with a 60° angle and arranged inline with the oncoming crossflow according to a jet spacing of three diameters. They are examined experimentally in a wind tunnel. The corresponding data is tracked by means of the particle image velocimetry technique in order to obtain the different instantaneous and mean dynamic features (different velocity components, vortices, etc.). The same case is numerically reproduced by the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations by means of the finite volume method together with the Reynolds stress model second order turbulent closure model. A non-uniform mesh system tightened close to the emitting nozzles is also adopted. The comparison of the measured and calculated data gave a satisfying agreement. Further assumptions are adopted later in order to improve the examined configuration: a non-reactive fume is injected within the discharged jets and the jets' temperature is varied with reference to a constant mainstream temperature. Our aim is to evaluate precisely the impact of this temperature difference on the flow field, particularly on the dynamics of the jets in a crossflow. This parameter, namely the temperature difference, proved mainly to accelerate the discharged jet plumes in the direction of the main flow, which enhanced the mixing, particularly in the longitudinal direction. The mixing in the other directions was also increased due to the weaker density of the jets, which enabled them to progress relatively

  14. Strong and Electroweak Corrections to the Production of a Higgs Boson+2 Jets via Weak Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccolini, M.; Denner, A.; Dittmaier, S.

    2007-10-19

    Radiative corrections of strong and electroweak interactions are presented at next-to-leading order for the production of a Higgs boson plus two hard jets via weak interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The calculation includes all weak-boson fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation diagrams as well as the corresponding interferences. The electroweak corrections, which are discussed here for the first time, reduce the cross sections by 5% and thus are of the same order of magnitude as the QCD corrections.

  15. Tidal disruption and magnetic flux capture: powering a jet from a quiescent black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-12-01

    The transient Swift J1644+57 is believed to have been produced by an unlucky star wandering too close to a supermassive black hole (BH) leading to a tidal disruption event. This unusual flare displayed highly super-Eddington X-ray emission which likely originated in a relativistic, collimated jet. This presents challenges to modern accretion and jet theory as upper limits of prior BH activity, which we obtain from the radio afterglow of this event, imply that both the pre-disruption BH and stellar magnetic fluxes fall many orders of magnitude short of what is required to power the observed X-ray luminosity. We argue that a pre-existing, `fossil' accretion disc can contain a sufficient reservoir of magnetic flux and that the stellar debris stream is capable of dragging this flux into the BH. To demonstrate this, we perform local, 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the disc-stream interaction and demonstrate that the interface between the two is unstable to mixing. This mixing entrains a sufficient amount of fossil disc magnetic flux into the infalling stellar debris to power the jet. We argue that the interaction with the fossil disc can have a pronounced effect on the structure and dynamics of mass fallback and likely the resulting transient. Finally, we describe possible ramifications of these interactions on unresolved problems in tidal disruption dynamics, in particular, the efficiency of debris circularization, and effects of the disruption on the pre-existing BH system.

  16. Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as seen in Joint URBAN 2003 Data

    SciTech Connect

    K.Lundquist, J; D.Mirocha, J

    2006-09-06

    As accurate modeling of atmospheric flows in urban environments requires sophisticated representation of complex urban geometries, much work has been devoted to treatment of the urban surface. However, the importance of the larger-scale flow impinging upon the urban complex to the flow, transport and dispersion within it and downwind has received less attention. Building-resolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are commonly employed to investigate interactions between the flow and three-dimensional structures comprising the urban environment, however such models are typically forced with simplified boundary conditions that fail to include important regional-scale phenomena that can strongly influence the flow within the urban complex and downwind. This paper investigates the interaction of an important and frequently occurring regional-scale phenomenon, the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ), with urban-scale turbulence and dispersion in Oklahoma City using data from the Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003) field experiment. Two simulations of nocturnal tracer release experiments from JU2003 using Lawrence Livermore National laboratory's FEM3MP CFD model yield differing levels of agreement with the observations in wind speed, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and concentration profiles in the urban wake, approximately 750m downwind of the central business district. Profiles of several observed turbulence parameters at this location indicate characteristics of both bottom-up and top-down boundary layers during each of the experiments. These data are consistent with turbulence production due to at least two sources, the complex flow structures of the urban area and the region of strong vertical wind shear occurring beneath the LLJs present each night. While strong LLJs occurred each night, their structures varied considerably, resulting in significant differences in the magnitudes of the turbulence parameters observed during the two experiments. As FEM3MP was forced only

  17. Magnetized and collimated millimeter scale plasma jets with astrophysical relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Parrish C.; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Valanju, Prashant M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-01-15

    Magnetized collimated plasma jets are created in the laboratory to extend our understanding of plasma jet acceleration and collimation mechanisms with particular connection to astrophysical jets. In this study, plasma collimated jets are formed from supersonic unmagnetized flows, mimicking a stellar wind, subject to currents and magnetohydrodynamic forces. It is found that an external poloidal magnetic field, like the ones found anchored to accretion disks, is essential to stabilize the jets against current-driven instabilities. The maximum jet length before instabilities develop is proportional to the field strength and the length threshold agrees well with Kruskal-Shafranov theory. The plasma evolution is modeled qualitatively using MHD theory of current-carrying flux tubes showing that jet acceleration and collimation arise as a result of electromagnetic forces.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  19. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, Don H.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core 10 of a first metal, a tubular sleeve 12 of a second metal, and an outer sheath 14, 16, 18 of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket 14. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MDH channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core 10 and the second metal of the sleeve 12 strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate at JSC has researched the physical processes that create planetary magnetic fields through dynamo action since 2007. The "dynamo problem" has existed since 1600, when William Gilbert, physician to Queen Elizabeth I, recognized that the Earth was a giant magnet. In 1919, Joseph Larmor proposed that solar (and by implication, planetary) magnetism was due to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), but full acceptance did not occur until Glatzmaier and Roberts solved the MHD equations numerically and simulated a geomagnetic reversal in 1995. JSC research produced a unique theoretical model in 2012 that provided a novel explanation of these physical observations and computational results as an essential manifestation of broken ergodicity in MHD turbulence. Research is ongoing, and future work is aimed at understanding quantitative details of magnetic dipole alignment in the Earth as well as in Mercury, Jupiter and its moon Ganymede, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the Sun and other stars.

  1. Electron magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: universal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K.

    2015-02-01

    The energy cascade of electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) turbulence is considered. Fractal and multi-fractal models for the energy dissipation field are used to determine the spatial intermittency corrections to the scaling behavior in the high-wavenumber (electron hydrodynamic limit) and low-wavenumber (magnetization limit) asymptotic regimes of the inertial range. Extrapolation of the multi-fractal scaling down to the dissipative microscales confirms in these asymptotic regimes a dissipative anomaly previously indicated by the numerical simulations of EMHD turbulence. Several basic features of the EMHD turbulent system are found to be universal which seem to transcend the existence of the characteristic length scale d e (which is the electron skin depth) in the EMHD problem: equipartition spectrum; Reynolds-number scaling of the dissipative microscales; scaling of the probability distribution function (PDF) of the electron-flow velocity (or magnetic field) gradient (even with intermittency corrections); dissipative anomaly; and critical exponent scaling.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamics of chiral relativistic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Fröhlich, Jürg; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a plasma of charged relativistic fermions at very high temperature T ≫m , where m is the fermion mass, coupled to the electromagnetic field. In particular, we derive a magnetohydrodynamical description of the evolution of such a plasma. We show that, compared to conventional magnetohydronamics (MHD) for a plasma of nonrelativistic particles, the hydrodynamical description of the relativistic plasma involves new degrees of freedom described by a pseudoscalar field originating in a local asymmetry in the densities of left-handed and right-handed fermions. This field can be interpreted as an effective axion field. Taking into account the chiral anomaly we present dynamical equations for the evolution of this field, as well as of other fields appearing in the MHD description of the plasma. Due to its nonlinear coupling to helical magnetic fields, the axion field significantly affects the dynamics of a magnetized plasma and can give rise to a novel type of inverse cascade.

  3. Scaling laws in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2004-10-15

    We analyze the decay laws of the kinetic and magnetic energies and the evolution of correlation lengths in freely decaying incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Scale invariance of MHD equations assures that, in the case of constant dissipation parameters (i.e., kinematic viscosity and resistivity) and null magnetic helicity, the kinetic and magnetic energies decay in time as E{approx}t{sup -1}, and the correlation lengths evolve as {xi}{approx}t{sup 1/2}. In the helical case, assuming that the magnetic field evolves towards a force-free state, we show that (in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number) the magnetic helicity remains constant, and the kinetic and magnetic energies decay as E{sub v}{approx}t{sup -1} and E{sub B}{approx}t{sup -1/2} respectively, while both the kinetic and magnetic correlation lengths grow as {xi}{approx}t{sup 1/2}.

  4. Anisotropic scaling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Horbury, Timothy S; Forman, Miriam; Oughton, Sean

    2008-10-24

    We present a quantitative estimate of the anisotropic power and scaling of magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, using a novel wavelet technique applied to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the spacecraft-frame spectrum has a spectral index near 2. This can be interpreted as the signature of a population of fluctuations in field-parallel wave numbers with a k(-2)_(||) spectrum but is also consistent with the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulent cascade. We also find, in common with previous studies, that most of the power is contained in wave vectors at large angles to the local magnetic field and that this component of the turbulence has a spectral index of 5/3. PMID:18999759

  5. Micromachined magnetohydrodynamic actuators and sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump and microsensor which utilizes micromachining to integrate the electrodes with microchannels and includes a magnet for producing magnetic fields perpendicular to both the electrical current direction and the fluid flow direction. The magnet can also be micromachined and integrated with the micropump using existing technology. The MHD micropump, for example, can generate continuous, reversible flow, with readily controllable flow rates. The flow can be reversed by either reversing the electrical current flow or reversing the magnetic field. By mismatching the electrodes, a swirling vortex flow can be generated for potential mixing applications. No moving parts are necessary and the dead volume is minimal. The micropumps can be placed at any position in a fluidic circuit and a combination of micropumps can generate fluidic plugs and valves.

  6. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  7. Quantification of Mixing of a Sonic Jet in Supersonic Crossflow due to Thick Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossmann, Tobias; Pizzaia, Adam

    2013-11-01

    The upstream injection surface boundary layer is shown to have a significant effect on the mixing characteristics of a sonic jet in supersonic cross flow. A circular, high-pressure, sonic jet is injected into a M =3.5 supersonic crossflow through different boundary layer thickness (δ/D = 7.5 and 1), with variable injection angles (-20 to +20 degrees), and variable momentum ratios (J = 2, 5, and 10). Planar Laser Mie Scattering of condensed ethanol droplets is used to quantitatively image the injected fluid concentration in both the side and end views. Jet fluid concentrations PDFs are constructed to better understand the mixing dynamics. These PDFs are integrated to create mixed fluid fraction profiles that are then reduced to mixing efficiency. Mixing efficiency values are computed from different two-dimensional planes to determine if centerline mixing efficiencies are characteristic of the entire three-dimensional flow. Through these analyses, it is seen that thick boundary layers tend to marginally alter jet penetration and spread, but significantly worsen jet mixing capabilities, regardless of momentum ratio or injection angle.

  8. Evidence for a Parsec-scale Jet from the Galactic Center Black Hole: Interaction with Local Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Morris, Mark R.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2013-12-01

    Despite strong physical reasons that they should exist and decades of searching, jets from the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*, have not yet been convincingly detected. Based on high-resolution Very Large Array images and ultra-deep imaging-spectroscopic data produced by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we report new evidence for the existence of a parsec-scale jet from Sgr A*, by associating a linear feature G359.944-0.052, previously identified in X-ray images of the Galactic center, with a radio shock front on the Eastern Arm of the Sgr A West H II region. We show that the shock front can be explained in terms of the impact of a jet having a sharp momentum peak along the Galaxy's rotation axis, whereas G359.944-0.052, a quasi-steady feature with a power-law spectrum, can be understood as synchrotron radiation from shock-induced ultra-relativistic electrons cooling in a finite post-shock region downstream along the jet path. Several interesting implications of the jet properties are discussed.

  9. Fundamental Study of a Jet-in-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Rigby, David; Heidmann, James

    2009-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF). The study is pertinent to film-cooling applications and its relevance to NASA programs is first briefly discussed. In the experiment, the jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20deg to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular, ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. The VG produces a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1jet. On the other hand, when the height is doubled, the jet core is dissipated due to larger turbulence intensity. Varying the location of the VG, over a distance of three diameters from the orifice, is found to have little impact.

  10. Jets from magnetized accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Ryoji

    When an accretion disk is threaded by large scale poloidal magnetic fields, the injection of magnetic helicity from the accretion disk drives bipolar outflows. We present the results of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of jet formation from a torus initially threaded by vertical magnetic fields. After the torsional Alfvén waves generated by the injected magnetic twists propagate along the large-scale magnetic field lines, magnetically driven jets emanate from the surface of the torus. Due to the magnetic pinch effect, the jets are collimated along the rotation axis. Since the jet formation process extracts angular momentum from the disk, it enhances the accretion rate of the disk material. Through three-dimensional (3D) global MHD simulations, we confirmed previous 2D results that the magnetically braked surface of the disk accretes like an avalanche. Owing to the growth of non-axisymmetric perturbations, the avalanche flow breaks up into spiral channels. Helical structure also appears inside the jet. When magnetic helicity is injected into closed magnetic loops connecting the central object and the accretion disk, it drives recurrent magnetic reconnection and outflows.

  11. 'Reduced' magnetohydrodynamics and minimum dissipation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all solutions of the equations of 'reduced' magnetohydrodynamics approach a uniform-current, zero-flow state for long times, given a constant wall electric field, uniform scalar viscosity and resistivity, and uniform mass density. This state is the state of minimum energy dissipation rate for these boundary conditions. No steady-state turbulence is possible. The result contrasts sharply with results for full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics before the reduction occurs.

  12. Imbalanced relativistic force-free magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jungyeon; Lazarian, A.

    2014-01-01

    When magnetic energy density is much larger than that of matter, as in pulsar/black hole magnetospheres, the medium becomes force-free and we need relativity to describe it. As in non-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), Alfvénic MHD turbulence in the relativistic limit can be described by interactions of counter-traveling wave packets. In this paper, we numerically study strong imbalanced MHD turbulence in such environments. Here, imbalanced turbulence means the waves traveling in one direction (dominant waves) have higher amplitudes than the opposite-traveling waves (sub-dominant waves). We find that (1) spectrum of the dominant waves is steeper than that of sub-dominant waves, (2) the anisotropy of the dominant waves is weaker than that of sub-dominant waves, and (3) the dependence of the ratio of magnetic energy densities of dominant and sub-dominant waves on the ratio of energy injection rates is steeper than quadratic (i.e., b{sub +}{sup 2}/b{sub −}{sup 2}∝(ϵ{sub +}/ϵ{sub −}){sup n} with n > 2). These results are consistent with those obtained for imbalanced non-relativistic Alfvénic turbulence. This corresponds well to the earlier reported similarity of the relativistic and non-relativistic balanced magnetic turbulence.

  13. Computational Methods for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercher, Andrew D.

    Numerical schemes for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are widely used for modeling space weather and astrophysical flows. They are designed to resolve the different waves that propagate through a magnetohydro fluid, namely, the fast, Alfven, slow, and entropy waves. Numerical schemes for ideal magnetohydrodynamics that are based on the standard finite volume (FV) discretization exhibit pseudo-convergence in which non-regular waves no longer exist only after heavy grid refinement. A method is described for obtaining solutions for coplanar and near coplanar cases that consist of only regular waves, independent of grid refinement. The method, referred to as Compound Wave Modification (CWM), involves removing the flux associated with non-regular structures and can be used for simulations in two- and three-dimensions because it does not require explicitly tracking an Alfven wave. For a near coplanar case, and for grids with 213 points or less, we find root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) that are as much as 6 times smaller. For the coplanar case, in which non-regular structures will exist at all levels of grid refinement for standard FV schemes, the RMSE is as much as 25 times smaller. A multidimensional ideal MHD code has been implemented for simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). Performance measurements were conducted for both the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan and Intel Xeon E5645 processor. The GPU is shown to perform one to two orders of magnitude greater than the CPU when using a single core, and two to three times greater than when run in parallel with OpenMP. Performance comparisons are made for two methods of storing data on the GPU. The first approach stores data as an Array of Structures (AoS), e.g., a point coordinate array of size 3 x n is iterated over. The second approach stores data as a Structure of Arrays (SoA), e.g. three separate arrays of size n are iterated over simultaneously. For an AoS, coalescing does not occur, reducing memory efficiency

  14. Energy transfers in shell models for magnetohydrodynamics turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Verma, Mahendra K

    2009-06-01

    A systematic procedure to derive shell models for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is proposed. It takes into account the conservation of ideal quadratic invariants such as the total energy, the cross helicity, and the magnetic helicity, as well as the conservation of the magnetic energy by the advection term in the induction equation. This approach also leads to simple expressions for the energy exchanges as well as to unambiguous definitions for the energy fluxes. When applied to the existing shell models with nonlinear interactions limited to the nearest-neighbor shells, this procedure reproduces well-known models but suggests a reinterpretation of the energy fluxes. PMID:19658594

  15. ACCELERATION AND COLLIMATION OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC DISK WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian E-mail: fendt@mpia.d

    2010-02-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. Newtonian gravity is added to the relativistic treatment in order to establish the physical boundary condition of an underlying accretion disk in centrifugal and pressure equilibrium. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Substantial effort has been made to implement a current-free, numerical outflow boundary condition in order to avoid artificial collimation present in the standard outflow conditions. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100 x 200 inner disk radii. The simulations evolve from an initial state in hydrostatic equilibrium and an initially force-free magnetic field configuration. Two options for the initial field geometries are applied-an hourglass-shaped potential magnetic field and a split monopole field. Most of our parameter runs evolve into a steady state solution which can be further analyzed concerning the physical mechanism at work. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed with Lorentz factors up to 6 and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 deg. The split-monopole initial setup usually results in less collimated outflows. The light surface of the outflow magnetosphere tends to align vertically-implying three relativistically distinct regimes in the flow-an inner subrelativistic domain close to the jet axis, a (rather narrow) relativistic jet and a surrounding subrelativistic outflow launched from the outer disk surface-similar to the spine-sheath structure currently

  16. Buoyancy-driven Magnetohydrodynamic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hague, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulent motions close to the visible solar surface may generate low-frequency internal gravity waves (IGWs) that propagate through the lower solar atmosphere. Magnetic activity is ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, so it is expected that the behavior of IGWs is to be affected. In this article we investigate the role of an equilibrium magnetic field on propagating and standing buoyancy oscillations in a gravitationally stratified medium. We assume that this background magnetic field is parallel to the direction of gravitational stratification. It is known that when the equilibrium magnetic field is weak and the background is isothermal, the frequencies of standing IGWs are sensitive to the presence of magnetism. Here, we generalize this result to the case of a slowly varying temperature. To do this, we make use of the Boussinesq approximation. A comparison between the hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic cases allows us to deduce the effects due to a magnetic field. It is shown that the frequency of IGWs may depart significantly from the Brunt–Väisälä frequency, even for a weak magnetic field. The mathematical techniques applied here give a clearer picture of the wave mode identification, which has previously been misinterpreted. An observational test is urged to validate the theoretical findings.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) driven droplet mixer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Miles, Robin R.

    2004-05-11

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system mixes a first substance and a second substance. A first substrate section includes a first flow channel and a first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the first flow channel. A second substrate section includes a second flow channel and a second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the second flow channel. A third substrate section includes a third flow channel and a third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the third flow channel. A magnetic section and a control section are operatively connected to the spaced electrodes. The first substrate section, the second substrate section, the third substrate section, the first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the magnetic section, and the control section are operated to move the first substance through the first flow channel, the second substance through the second flow channel, and both the first substance and the second substance into the third flow channel where they are mixed.

  19. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation. PMID:22463331

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Gabriel I.; Dudley, Scott C.

    2004-10-01

    The cinema industry can sometimes prove to be an ally when searching for material with which to motivate students to learn physics. Consider, for example, the electromagnetic force on a current in the presence of a magnetic field. This phenomenon is at the heart of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion systems. A submarine employing this type of propulsion was immortalized in the movie Hunt for Red October. While mentioning this to students certainly gets their attention, it often elicits comments that it is only fiction and not physically possible. Imagine their surprise when a working system is demonstrated! It is neither difficult nor expensive to construct a working system that can be demonstrated in the front of a classroom.2 In addition, all aspects of the engineering hurdles that must be surmounted and myths concerning this "silent propulsion" system are borne out in a simple apparatus. This paper details how to construct an inexpensive MHD propulsion boat that can be demonstrated for students in the classroom.

  1. eRMHD simulations of jets with helical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Sogorb, M.; Perucho, M.; Gómez, J. L.; Martí, J. M.; Antón, L.; Aloy, M. A.; Agudo, I.

    We present numerical magnetohydrodynamic and emission (eRMHD) simulations of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei. We focus our study on the role played by the magnetic field in the dynamics of the jet, analyzing the balance of the main driving forces which determine the jet evolution. Overpressured jets with different magnetizations are considered in order to study their influence in the jet collimation, confinement and overall stability. Computation of the synchrotron emission from these models allows a direct comparison with actual sources. We find that the relative brightness of the knots associated with the recollimation shocks decreases with increasing magnetization, suggesting that overpressured jets presenting stationary components may have a relatively weak magnetization, with magnetic fields of the order of equipartition or below.

  2. SIMULATING PROTOSTELLAR JETS SIMULTANEOUSLY AT LAUNCHING AND OBSERVATIONAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Jon P.; Clarke, David A.

    2011-02-10

    We present the first 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of protostellar jets that include both the region in which the jet is launched magnetocentrifugally at scale lengths <0.1 AU and where the propagating jet is observed at scale lengths >10{sup 3} AU. These simulations, performed with the new adaptive mesh refinement MHD code AZEuS, reveal interesting relationships between conditions at the disk surface, such as the magnetic field strength, and direct observables such as proper motion, jet rotation, jet radius, and mass flux. By comparing these quantities with observed values, we present direct numerical evidence that the magnetocentrifugal launching mechanism is capable, by itself, of launching realistic protostellar jets.

  3. On the interaction of a sound pulse with the shear layer of an axisymmetric jet. Part 3: Nonlinear effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The fluctuating field of a jet excited by transient mass injection is simulated numerically. The model is developed by expanding the state vector as a mean state plus a fluctuating state. Nonlinear terms are not neglected, and the effect of nonlinearity was studied. A high order numerical method is used to compute the solution. The results show a significant spectral broadening in the flow field due to the nonlinearity. In addition, large scale structures are broken down into smaller scales.

  4. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  5. From the Einstein-Szilard Patent to Modern Magnetohydrodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povh, I. L.; Barinberg, A. D.

    1979-01-01

    Examines present-day and future prospects of the applications of modern magnetohydrodynamics in a number of countries. Explains how the electromagnetic pump, which was invented by Einstein and Leo Szilard, led to the development of applied magnetohydrodynamics. (HM)

  6. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-07-18

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb⁻¹. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp̄→jjjj) as a function of the masses of themore » hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.« less

  7. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.

    2013-07-18

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb⁻¹. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp̄→jjjj) as a function of the masses of the hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.

  8. Search for pair production of strongly interacting particles decaying to pairs of jets in pp collisions at √s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Albin, E; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; De Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-07-19

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √[s]=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb(-1). We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp[over ¯]→jjjj) as a function of the masses of the hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived. PMID:23909308

  9. Relativistic and non-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic flows around compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobarry, Clark Matthew

    A set of theoretical tools are developed for studying the magnetized accretion disks and astrophysical jets in active galaxies. A general theory is developed for the steady axisymmetric flow of an ideal general-relativistic fluid around a Schwarzschild black hole. The theory leads to a second-order partial differential equation, a Grad-Shafranov equation, for the magnetic flux function psi(R, theta). The magnetic surface functions of the Grad-Shafranov method are shown to be the Lagrange multipliers of an energy principle. Thus, the magnetic surface functions are not arbitrary functions, but must be chosen consistent with physically stable equilibria. From the energy principle, a numerical artificial friction method is developed to solve the general relativistic Grad-Shafranov equation with fluid flow. This method is suited for the internal boundaries between elliptic and hyperbolic behavior present in magnetospheres with fluid flow. The friction method is shown to be compatible with a theory for the slow dissipative evolution of a nearly ideal MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) fluid. A virial theorem is derived from the basic equations of general relativistic MHD. It is used to obtain an upper bound on the total energy in the electromagnetic field in terms of the total gravitational binding energy between the black hole and the matter (and energy) outside it. An analysis is made of the motion of a charged test particle in the electromagnetic field of a magnetized accretion disk surrounding a black hole. The results are consistent with stable orbits close to the event horizon. A semi-analytical model is developed for the evolution and dissipation of narrow magnetized jets from an active galaxy. This model exhibits the acceleration and expansion of the jets with increasing axial distance from the central object.

  10. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  11. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  12. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-01

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  13. Relativistic MHD Simulations of Collision-induced Magnetic Dissipation in Poynting-flux-dominated Jets/outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei; Li, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Li, Shengtai

    2015-06-01

    We perform 3D relativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations to study the collisions between high-σ (Poynting-flux-dominated (PFD)) blobs which contain both poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components. This is meant to mimic the interactions inside a highly variable PFD jet. We discover a significant electromagnetic field (EMF) energy dissipation with an Alfvénic rate with the efficiency around 35%. Detailed analyses show that this dissipation is mostly facilitated by the collision-induced magnetic reconnection. Additional resolution and parameter studies show a robust result that the relative EMF energy dissipation efficiency is nearly independent of the numerical resolution or most physical parameters in the relevant parameter range. The reconnection outflows in our simulation can potentially form the multi-orientation relativistic mini jets as needed for several analytical models. We also find a linear relationship between the σ values before and after the major EMF energy dissipation process. Our results give support to the proposed astrophysical models that invoke significant magnetic energy dissipation in PFD jets, such as the internal collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence model for gamma-ray bursts, and reconnection triggered mini jets model for active galactic nuclei. The simulation movies are shown in http://www.physics.unlv.edu/∼deng/simulation1.html.

  14. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamics of weakly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond

    The process of star formation is an integral part of the new field of astrobiology, which studies the origins of life. Since the gas that collapses to form stars and their resulting protoplanetary disks is known to be weakly ionized and contain magnetic fields, star formation is governed by multifluid magnetohydrodynamics. In this thesis we consider two important problems involved in the process of star formation that may have strongly affected the origins of life, with the goal of determining the thermal effects of these flows and modeling the physical conditions of these environments. We first considered the outstanding problem of how primitive bodies, specifically asteroids, were heated in protoplanetary disks early in their lifetime. Reexamining asteroid heating due to the classic unipolar induction heating mechanism described by Sonett et al. (1970), we find that this mechanism contains a subtle conceptual error. As original conceived, heating due to this mechanism is driven by a uniform, supersonic, fully-ionized, magnetized, T Tauri solar wind, which sweeps past an asteroid and causes the asteroid to experience a motional electric field in its rest frame. We point out that this mechanism ignores the interaction between the body surface and the flow, and thus only correctly describes the electric field far away from the asteroid where the plasma streams freely. In a realistic protoplanetary disk environment, we show that the interaction due to friction between the asteroid surface and the flow causes a shear layer to form close to the body, wherein the motional electric field predicted by Sonett et al. decreases and tends to zero at the asteroid surface. We correct this error by using the equations of multifluid magnetohydrodynamics to explicitly treat the shear layer. We calculate the velocity field in the plasma, and the magnetic and electric fields everywhere for two flows over an idealized infinite asteroid with varying magnetic field orientations. We

  15. Numerical studies of solar chromospheric jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    The solar chromospheric jet is one of the most characteristic structures near the solar surface. The quantitative understanding of chromospheric jets is of substantial importance for not only the partially ionized phenomena in the chromosphere but also the energy input and dissipation processes in the corona. In this dissertation, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated using the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We newly develop a numerical code for the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the comprehensive modeling of solar atmosphere. Because the solar chromosphere is highly nonlinear, magnetic pressure dominated, and turbulent, a robust and high-resolution numerical scheme is required. In Chapter 2, we propose a new algorithm for the simulation of magnetohydrodynamics. Through the test problems and accuracy analyses, the proposed scheme is proved to satisfy the requirements. In Chapter 3, the effect of the non-local radiation energy transport, Spitzer-type thermal conduction, latent heat of partial ionization and molecule formation, and gravity are implemented to the magnetohydrodynamic code. The numerical schemes for the radiation transport and thermal conduction is carefully chosen in a view of the efficiency and compatibility with the parallel computation. Based on the developed radiation magnetohydrodynamic code, the formation and dynamics of chromospheric jets are investigated. In Chapter 4, we investigate the dependence of chromospheric jets on the coronal temperature in the two-dimensional simulations. Various scale of chromospheric jets with the parabolic trajectory are found with the maximum height of 2-8 Mm, lifetime of 2-7 min, maximum upward velocity of 10-50 km/s, and deceleration of 100-350 m/s2. We find that chromospheric jets are more elongated under the cool corona and shorter under the hot corona. We also find that the pressure gradient force caused by the periodic shock waves accelerates some of the

  16. Interaction of ICRF Fields with the Plasma Boundary in AUG and JET and Guidelines for Antenna Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V.; Bilato, R.; Braun, F.; Colas, L.; Dux, R.; Van Eester, D.; Giannone, L.; Goniche, M.; Herrmann, A.; Jacquet, P.; Kallenbach, A.; Krivska, A.; Lerche, E.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Milanesio, D.; Monakhov, I.; Müller, H. W.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pütterich, Th.; Rohde, V.

    2009-11-01

    W sputtering during ICRF on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and temperature rise on JET A2 antenna septa are considered in connection with plasma conditions at the antenna plasma facing components and E‖ near-fields. Large antenna-plasma clearance, high gas puff and low light impurity content are favorable to reduce W sputtering in AUG. The spatial distribution of spectroscopically measured effective W sputtering yields clearly points to the existence of strong E‖ fields at the antenna box ("feeder fields") which dominate over the fields in front of the antenna straps. The picture of E‖ fields, obtained by HFSS code, corroborates the dominant role of E‖ at the antenna box on the formation of sheath-driving RF voltages for AUG. Large antenna-plasma clearance and low gas puff are favorable to reduce septum temperature of JET A2 antennas. Assuming a linear relation between the septum temperature and the sheath driving RF voltage calculated by HFSS, the changes of the temperature with dipole phasing (00ππ, 0ππ0 or 0π0π) are well described by the related changes of the RF voltages. Similarly to the AUG antenna, the strongest E‖ are found at the limiters of the JET A2 antenna for all used dipole phasings and at the septum for the phasings different from 0π0π. A simple general rule can be used to minimize E‖ at the antenna: image currents can be allowed only at the surfaces which do not intersect magnetic field lines at large angles of incidence. Possible antenna modifications generally rely either on a reduction of the image currents, on their short-circuiting by introducing additional conducting surfaces or on imposing the E‖ = 0 boundary condition. On the example of AUG antenna, possible options to minimize the sheath driving voltages are presented.

  17. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamically generated velocities in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Jorge A. Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2015-04-15

    We investigate by numerical simulation the rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid in which a current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. The computation involves no microscopic instabilities and is purely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described.

  19. Generalized magnetofluid connections in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Asenjo, Felipe A; Comisso, Luca

    2015-03-20

    The concept of magnetic connections is extended to nonideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamical plasmas. Adopting a general set of equations for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics including thermal-inertial, thermal electromotive, Hall, and current-inertia effects, we derive a new covariant connection equation showing the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved during the dissipationless plasma dynamics. These connections are intimately linked to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields, allowing the extension of the magnetic connection notion to a much broader concept. PMID:25839284

  20. New approach to nonrelativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    We provide a novel action principle for nonrelativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the Eulerian scheme exploiting a Clebsch-type parametrisation. Both Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations have been considered. Within the Hamiltonian framework, two complementary approaches have been discussed using Dirac's constraint analysis. In one case the Hamiltonian is canonical involving only physical variables but the brackets have a noncanonical structure, while the other retains the canonical structure of brackets by enlarging the phase space. The special case of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics is also considered where, again, both the approaches are discussed in the Hamiltonian framework. The conservation of the stress tensor reveals interesting aspects of the theory.

  1. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  2. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of quiescent H-modes in tokamak systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Duval, B. P.; Sauter, O.; Faustin, J. M.; Kleiner, A.; Lanthaler, S.; Patten, H.; Raghunathan, M.; Tran, T.-M.; Chapman, I. T.; Ham, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    Three dimensional free boundary magnetohydrodynamic equilibria that recover saturated ideal kink/peeling structures are obtained numerically. Simulations that model the JET tokamak at fixed < β > =1.7% with a large edge bootstrap current that flattens the q-profile near the plasma boundary demonstrate that a radial parallel current density ribbon with a dominant m /n  =  5/1 Fourier component at {{I}\\text{t}}=2.2 MA develops into a broadband spectrum when the toroidal current I t is increased to 2.5 MA.

  3. Theory of energetic/alpha particle effects on magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rewoldt, G.; Colestock, P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Chen, Y.P.; Ke, F.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Bussac, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of energetic particles is shown to qualitatively modify the stability properties of ideal as well as resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in tokamaks. Specifically, we demonstrate that, consistent with highpower ICRF heating experiments in JET, high energy trapped particles can effectively stabilize the sawtooth mode, providing a possible route to stable high current tokamak operation. An alternative stabilization scheme employing barely circulating energetic particles is also proposed. Finally, we present analytical and numerical studies on the excitations of high-n MHD modes via transit resonances with circulating alpha particles. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Stellar and galactic jets - Theoretical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, A.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical issues pertaining to the modelling of jets in young stellar objects and in active galactic nuclei are reviewed. The strong morphological similarities between these two types of sources are emphasized, and observational constraints on the basic physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the jet phenomenon are outlined. Particular attention is given to the 'momentum-discharge problem' in molecular-cloud outflows and to its possible resolution in terms of a centrifugally driven magnetohydrodynamic wind from an accretion disk. In addition, various propagation effects are discussed, and the relevance to stellar jets of the de Laval collimation mechanism and of the accelerated-clump model for emission knots is assessed. The review concludes with a brief list of potentially useful observational tests.

  5. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets: Interaction with plasmid DNA and tailored electron heating using dual-frequency excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, K.; O'Neill, C.; Cox, L. J.; Waskoenig, J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Currell, F. J.; Graham, W. G.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2012-05-01

    Recent progress in plasma science and technology has enabled the development of a new generation of stable cold non-equilibrium plasmas operating at ambient atmospheric pressure. This opens horizons for new plasma technologies, in particular in the emerging field of plasma medicine. These non-equilibrium plasmas are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. The effect of a cold radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks. Plasma manipulation techniques for controlled energy delivery are highly desirable. Numerical simulations are employed for detailed investigations of the electron dynamics, which determines the generation of reactive species. New concepts based on nonlinear power dissipation promise superior strategies to control energy transport for tailored technological exploitations.

  6. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets: Interaction with plasmid DNA and tailored electron heating using dual-frequency excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Neill, C.; Cox, L. J.; Waskoenig, J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Currell, F. J.; Graham, W. G.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2012-05-25

    Recent progress in plasma science and technology has enabled the development of a new generation of stable cold non-equilibrium plasmas operating at ambient atmospheric pressure. This opens horizons for new plasma technologies, in particular in the emerging field of plasma medicine. These non-equilibrium plasmas are very efficient sources for energy transport through reactive neutral particles (radicals and metastables), charged particles (ions and electrons), UV radiation, and electro-magnetic fields. The effect of a cold radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks. Plasma manipulation techniques for controlled energy delivery are highly desirable. Numerical simulations are employed for detailed investigations of the electron dynamics, which determines the generation of reactive species. New concepts based on nonlinear power dissipation promise superior strategies to control energy transport for tailored technological exploitations.

  7. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  8. Dissipationless decay of Jovian jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirraglia, J. A.

    1989-05-01

    IRIS data have been taken as the bases of windshear calculations whose results imply a decrease of the Jovian planet's zonal jets with altitude. The simplified dynamical model developed to furnish a mechanism accounting for the decay involves a highly truncated set of dissipationless equations simulating the upper-tropospheric and stratospheric flow. While the model's lower boundary is constrained as a latitudinally periodic set of alternating jets, the upper boundary constraint maintains a constant potential temperature. The small perturbations to which the imposed zonal jets are unstable grow and interact nonlinearly, generating a zonal flow that opposes the imposed one and thereby leading to the apparent decrease of the jets with altitude.

  9. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  10. Unconditional jetting.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2008-08-01

    Capillary jetting of a fluid dispersed into another immiscible phase is usually limited by a critical capillary number, a function of the Reynolds number and the fluid property ratios. Critical conditions are set when the minimum spreading velocity of small perturbations v_{-};{*} along the jet (marginal stability velocity) is zero. Here we identify and describe parametric regions of high technological relevance, where v_{-};{*}>0 and the jet flow is always supercritical independently of the dispersed liquid flow rate; within these relatively broad regions, the jet does not undergo the usual dripping-jetting transition, so that either the jet can be made arbitrarily thin (yielding droplets of any imaginably small size), or the issuing flow rate can be made arbitrarily small. In this work, we provide illustrative analytical studies of asymptotic cases for both negligible and dominant inertia forces. In this latter case, requiring a nonzero jet surface velocity, axisymmetric perturbation waves "surf" downstream for all given wave numbers, while the liquid bulk can remain static. In the former case (implying small Reynolds flow) we found that the jet profile small slope is limited by a critical value; different published experiments support our predictions. PMID:18850933

  11. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in the investigation of the solar corona using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Coronal mass ejections (CME) are believed to be the primary cause of nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms and these have been investigated through the use of three-dimensional computer simulation.

  12. On energy conservation in extended magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    A systematic study of energy conservation for extended magnetohydrodynamic models that include Hall terms and electron inertia is performed. It is observed that commonly used models do not conserve energy in the ideal limit, i.e., when viscosity and resistivity are neglected. In particular, a term in the momentum equation that is often neglected is seen to be needed for conservation of energy.

  13. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  14. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-05-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  15. 2013 Problem 8: Jet and Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Pei; Chen, Lan; Zhu, Kejing

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we investigate the interaction between the water jet and soap film under different jet speeds and incident angles. We consider two different phenomena- penetrating and non-penetrating, and their corresponding conditions. In the case of penetration, we seek for the relationship between the parameters of incident jet and emergent jet, calculate the shape of the film under specific occasions. In the case of non-penetration the jet may adhere to the surface of the film or bounce off the film several times. Depending on the incident angle and velocity of the jet, the film will be found in stable and unstable patterns. We calculate the shape of the jet and the film under different conditions and found the patterns in experimental observations. Finally we portrait a `phase diagram' illustrating the conditions for different forms of jet and film interaction.

  16. Research studies on magnetohydrodynamic systems and modeling solar dynamical behavior. Final report July 1981-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    Research involving magnetohydrodynamic systems and solar dynamical behavior is presented. The reported research is divided into seven major sections: Section I. Laser Beam Matter Interactions, Section II. Ion Beam Matter Interactions, Section III. Energy Loss of Fast Particles to an Electron Plasma, Section IV. Solar Magnetic Flux Transport, Section V. Solar Magnetic Flux Emergence, Section VI. Coronal Bullets and Section VII. Solar Flares and Preflare Studies.

  17. Experimental investigation of the magnetohydrodynamic parachute effect in a hypersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. P.; Yadrenkin, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    New data on experimental implementation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) parachute configuration in an air flow with Mach number M = 6 about a flat plate are considered. It is shown that MHD interaction near a flat plate may transform an attached oblique shock wave into a normal detached one, which considerably extends the area of body-incoming flow interaction. This effect can be employed in optimizing return space vehicle deceleration conditions in the upper atmosphere.

  18. Lagrangian Frequency Spectrum as a Diagnostic for Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, Angela; Mueller, Wolf-Christian; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2010-12-03

    For the phenomenological description of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence competing models exist, e.g., Boldyrev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 115002 (2006)] and Gogoberidze [Phys. Plasmas 14, 022304 (2007)], which predict the same Eulerian inertial-range scaling of the turbulent energy spectrum although they employ fundamentally different basic interaction mechanisms. A relation is found that links the Lagrangian frequency spectrum with the autocorrelation time scale of the turbulent fluctuations {tau}{sub ac} and the associated cascade time scale {tau}{sub cas}. Thus, the Lagrangian energy spectrum can serve to identify weak ({tau}{sub ac}<<{tau}{sub cas}) and strong ({tau}{sub ac{approx}{tau}cas}) interaction mechanisms providing insight into the turbulent energy cascade. The new approach is illustrated by results from direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional incompressible MHD turbulence.

  19. PARAMETRIC INSTABILITY OF WHISTLER WAVES IN THE ELECTRON MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Lu, J. Y. E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.c

    2010-05-01

    Using an electron magnetohydrodynamic model, we investigate the parametric decay among three whistler waves. A nonlinear equation to describe both linear and nonlinear properties of whistler waves is derived. Then we discuss the growth rate of the parametric decay of whistler waves in the long-wavelength region and show that the growth rate for two reverse decay waves is larger than that for two decay waves in the same direction. The nonlinear interaction among the long-wavelength and short-wavelength waves is also studied in this paper. This wave-wave interaction implies that long-wavelength waves can be decayed to short-wavelength waves and then dissipate their energy in the short-wavelength region. The possibility of applying our results to account for the generation of sunward propagating whistler waves is also discussed.

  20. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF SOLAR SYSTEM PROCESSES ON GEODESIC GRIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Guo, X.; Balsara, D. S.; Meyer, C.

    2013-04-01

    This report describes a new magnetohydrodynamic numerical model based on a hexagonal spherical geodesic grid. The model is designed to simulate astrophysical flows of partially ionized plasmas around a central compact object, such as a star or a planet with a magnetic field. The geodesic grid, produced by a recursive subdivision of a base platonic solid (an icosahedron), is free from control volume singularities inherent in spherical polar grids. Multiple populations of plasma and neutral particles, coupled via charge-exchange interactions, can be simulated simultaneously with this model. Our numerical scheme uses piecewise linear reconstruction on a surface of a sphere in a local two-dimensional 'Cartesian' frame. The code employs Haarten-Lax-van-Leer-type approximate Riemann solvers and includes facilities to control the divergence of the magnetic field and maintain pressure positivity. Several test solutions are discussed, including a problem of an interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium, and a simulation of Earth's magnetosphere.

  1. Protostellar jets in the NIR: interaction with the ISM and correlation with the exciting source evolutionary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, Alessio

    2006-03-01

    I present an in-depth near-IR (NIR) analysis of a sample of H2 jets from young embedded sources to compare the physical, kinematical properties and cooling mechanisms of the different flows. The sample comprises 23 outflows driven by Class 0 and I sources having low-intermediate solar luminosity (1-600 L(sun)). For such an analysis, I have utilized narrow band images centered on the H2 (2.12 micron) and [FeII] (1.64 micron) spectral lines, low resolution spectra (R~600) in the range 1-2.5 micron and high resolution spectra (R~10000) centered on H2 (2.12 micron) and [FeII] (1.64 micron) lines. At NIR wavelengths these two tracers (H2,[FeII]) are the main coolants of the gas, that is excited by strong radiative shocks. Narrow band images have been used to detect such shocked regions in both ionic and molecular components. [FeII] have been observed in ~74% of the outflows which in some cases indicate the presence of embedded Herbig Haro (HH) like objects. H2 line ratios have been used to estimate the visual extinction and the average temperature of the molecular gas. A(V) values range from ~2 to ~15 mag, while average temperatures range between ~2000 and ~4000 K. In several knots, however, a stratification of temperatures is found with maximum values up to 5000 K. Such a stratification is more commonly observed in those knots which also show [FeII] emission, while a thermalized gas at a single temperature is generally found in knots emitting only in molecular lines. Combining narrow band imaging with the parameters derived from the spectroscopic analysis, it was possible to measure the total luminosity of the H2 and [FeII] shocked regions (L(H2) and L([FeII])) in each flow. H2 is the major NIR coolant with an average L(H2)/L([FeII]) ratio of ~10^2. About 83% of the sources have a L(H2)/L(bol) ratio ~0.04, irrespective of the Class of the driving source, while a smaller group of sources (mostly Class I) have L(H2)/L(bol) an order of magnitude smaller. Such a separation

  2. The interactive role of subsynoptic scale jet streak and planetary boundary layer processes in organizing an isolated convective complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Coats, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analyses and numerical simulation sensitivity studies are compared in order to determine the role played by deep, well-mixed, and well-heated boundary layers in perturbing a weak jet streak in proximity to the development of an isolated but intense convective complex associated with the Grand Island, Nebraska tornado outbreak of June 3-4, 1980. A brief description of the case is first presented, emphasizing three-hourly surface analyses, radar, and satellite data. The results of numerical experiments comparing differences in the runs with and without diurnal surface sensible heating are discussed and related to observations. The dynamical processes responsible for these simulation differences are discussed, and the significance of these differences are considered in terms of their effect on the preconvective environment.

  3. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  4. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  5. Validation of Magnetospheric Magnetohydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Brian

    Magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models are commonly used for both prediction and modeling of Earth's magnetosphere. To date, very little validation has been performed to determine their limits, uncertainties, and differences. In this work, we performed a comprehensive analysis using several commonly used validation techniques in the atmospheric sciences to MHD-based models of Earth's magnetosphere for the first time. The validation techniques of parameter variability/sensitivity analysis and comparison to other models were used on the OpenGGCM, BATS-R-US, and SWMF magnetospheric MHD models to answer several questions about how these models compare. The questions include: (1) the difference between the model's predictions prior to and following to a reversal of Bz in the upstream interplanetary field (IMF) from positive to negative, (2) the influence of the preconditioning duration, and (3) the differences between models under extreme solar wind conditions. A differencing visualization tool was developed and used to address these three questions. We find: (1) For a reversal in IMF Bz from positive to negative, the OpenGGCM magnetopause is closest to Earth as it has the weakest magnetic pressure near-Earth. The differences in magnetopause positions between BATS-R-US and SWMF are explained by the influence of the ring current, which is included in SWMF. Densities are highest for SWMF and lowest for OpenGGCM. The OpenGGCM tail currents differ significantly from BATS-R-US and SWMF; (2) A longer preconditioning time allowed the magnetosphere to relax more, giving different positions for the magnetopause with all three models before the IMF Bz reversal. There were differences greater than 100% for all three models before the IMF Bz reversal. The differences in the current sheet region for the OpenGGCM were small after the IMF Bz reversal. The BATS-R-US and SWMF differences decreased after the IMF Bz reversal to near zero; (3) For extreme conditions in the solar

  6. Unlocking the Keys to Vortex/Flame Interactions in Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames--Dynamic Behavior Explored on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Dennis P.

    1999-01-01

    Most combustion processes in industrial applications (e.g., furnaces and engines) and in nature (e.g., forest fires) are turbulent. A better understanding of turbulent combustion could lead to improved combustor design, with enhanced efficiency and reduced emissions. Despite its importance, turbulent combustion is poorly understood because of its complexity. The rapidly changing and random behavior of such flames currently prevents detailed analysis, whether experimentally or computationally. However, it is possible to learn about the fundamental behavior of turbulent flames by exploring the controlled interaction of steady laminar flames and artificially induced flow vortices. These interactions are an inherent part of turbulent flames, and understanding them is essential to the characterization of turbulent combustion. Well-controlled and defined experiments of vortex interaction with laminar flames are not possible in normal gravity because of the interference of buoyancy- (i.e., gravity) induced vortices. Therefore, a joint microgravity study was established by researchers from the Science and Technology Development Corp. and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The experimental study culminated in the conduct of the Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames (TGDF) Experiment on the STS-87 space shuttle mission in November 1997. The fully automated hardware, shown in photo, was designed and built at Lewis. During the mission, the experiment was housed in a Get Away Special (GAS) canister in the cargo bay.

  7. Fast reconnection in relativistic plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamics tearing instability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Papini, E.; Landi, S.; Bugli, M.; Bucciantini, N.

    2016-08-01

    Fast reconnection operating in magnetically dominated plasmas is often invoked in models for magnetar giant flares, for magnetic dissipation in pulsar winds, or to explain the gamma-ray flares observed in the Crab nebula, hence its investigation is of paramount importance in high-energy astrophysics. Here we study, by means of two dimensional numerical simulations, the linear phase and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of the tearing instability within the framework of relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics, as appropriate in situations where the Alfven velocity approaches the speed of light. It is found that the linear phase of the instability closely matches the analysis in classical MHD, where the growth rate scales with the Lundquist number S as S^-1/2, with the only exception of an enhanced inertial term due to the thermal and magnetic energy contributions. In addition, when thin current sheets of inverse aspect ratio scaling as S^-1/3 are considered, the so-called "ideal" tearing regime is retrieved, with modes growing independently on S and extremely fast, on only a few light crossing times of the sheet length. The overall growth of fluctuations is seen to solely depend on the value of the background Alfven velocity. In the fully nonlinear stage we observe an inverse cascade towards the fundamental mode, with Petschek-type supersonic jets propagating at the external Alfven speed from the X-point, and a fast reconnection rate at the predicted value R~(ln S)^-1.

  8. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Showman, A. P. E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-02-10

    We present the first three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the atmosphere of HD 209458b which self-consistently include reduction of winds due to the Lorentz force and Ohmic heating. We find overall wind structures similar to that seen in previous models of hot Jupiter atmospheres, with strong equatorial jets and meridional flows poleward near the day side and equatorward near the night side. Inclusion of magnetic fields slows those winds and leads to Ohmic dissipation. We find wind slowing ranging from 10%-40% for reasonable field strengths. We find Ohmic dissipation rates ∼10{sup 17} W at 100 bar, orders of magnitude too small to explain the inflated radius of this planet. Faster wind speeds, not achievable in these anelastic calculations, may be able to increase this value somewhat, but likely will not be able to close the gap necessary to explain the inflated radius. We demonstrate that the discrepancy between the simulations presented here and previous models is due to inadequate treatment of magnetic field geometry and evolution. Induced poloidal fields become much larger than those imposed, highlighting the need for a self-consistent MHD treatment of these hot atmospheres.

  9. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a

  10. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction

  11. Effects of reaction control system jet flow field interactions on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.010-scale space shuttle orbiter model in the Langley Research Center 31 inch CFHT (OA85)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daileda, J. J.; Marroquin, J.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain detailed effects on supersonic vehicle hypersonic aerodynamic and stability and control characteristics of reaction control system jet flow field interactions with the local vehicle flow field. A 0.010-scale model was used. Six-component force data and wing, elevon, and body flap surface pressure data were obtained through an angle-of-attack range of -10 to +35 degrees with 0 deg angle of sideslip. The test was conducted with yaw, pitch and roll jet simulation at a free-stream Mach number of 10.3 and reaction control system plume simulation of flight dynamic pressures of 5, 10 and 20 PSF.

  12. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  13. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  14. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  15. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, G. R. Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J.; Hudson, S. R.

    2014-04-15

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  16. Jets in black-hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    I will review selected aspects of observations and theory of jets in black-hole binaries. The radio and gamma-ray emission of jets differs significantly between the low and high-mass X-ray binaries, which appears to be due jet-wind interaction (in particular, formation of recollimation shocks) in the latter. Also, both radio and X-ray emission of the jets can be significantly absorbed in the stellar wind of the donors in high-mass binaries. I will also review the theory of radiative processes in jets, their contributions to broad-band spectra, estimates of the jet power, the role of black-hole spin in powering jets, and the possibility that the base of the jet is the main source of X-ray emission (the lamppost model).

  17. A robust high-order ideal magnetohydrodynamic solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, David; Christlieb, Andrew; Feng, Xiao; Tang, Qi

    In this work we present a robust high-order numerical method for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. Our method is single-stage and single-step, and hence amenable to adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) technology. The numerical robustness of the scheme is realized by accomplishing a total of two unrelated tasks: we retain positivity of the density and pressure by limiting fluxes similar to what happens in a flux corrected transport method, and we obtain divergence free magnetic fields by implementing an unstaggered transport method for the evolution of the magnetic potential. We present numerical results in two and three dimensions that indicate the utility of the scheme. These results include several classical test problems such as Orzag-Tang, cloud shock interactions and blast wave problems.

  18. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  19. Coal-burning magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.; Hals, F. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, coal-burning magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electric power generation technology is described, and its economic and environmental advantages are discussed. advanced MHD/steam plants can achieve efficiencies of 55%-60% with less environmental intrusion than form conventional coal-burning steam plants. The national program for development of MHD power generation is outlined and the development status of individual components and subsystems is presented.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Martinez, Daniel; Matthaeus, William

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method, based on a discrete Boltzmann equation, is presented for solving the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The algorithm provides advantages similar to the cellular automaton method in that it is local and easily adapted to parallel computing environments. Because of much lower noise levels and less stringent requirements on lattice size, the method appears to be more competitive with traditional solution methods. Examples show that the model accurately reproduces both linear and nonlinear MHD phenomena.

  1. Potential vorticity formulation of compressible magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Compressible ideal magnetohydrodynamics is formulated in terms of the time evolution of potential vorticity and magnetic flux per unit mass using a compact Lie bracket notation. It is demonstrated that this simplifies analytic solution in at least one very important situation relevant to magnetic fusion experiments. Potentially important implications for analytic and numerical modelling of both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are also discussed. PMID:23383802

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  3. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  4. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  5. Impact of Interactive Aerosol on the African Easterly Jet in the NASA GEOS-5 Global Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, K. M.; da Silva, A.

    2010-01-01

    The real-time treatment of interactive realistically varying aerosol in a global operational forecasting system, as opposed to prescribed (fixed or climatologically varying) aerosols, is a very difficult challenge that only recently begins to be addressed. Experiment results from a recent version of the NASA GEOS-5 forecasting system, inclusive of interactive aerosol treatment, are presented in this work. Four sets of 30 5-day forecasts are initialized from a high quality set of analyses previously produced and documented to cover the period from 15 August to 16 September 2006, which corresponds to the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (NAMMA) observing campaign. The four forecast sets are at two different horizontal resolutions and with and without interactive aerosol treatment. The net impact of aerosol, at times in which there is a strong dust outbreak, is a temperature increase at the dust level and decrease in the near-surface levels, in complete agreement with previous observational and modeling studies. Moreover, forecasts in which interactive aerosols are included depict an African Easterly (AEJ) at slightly higher elevation, and slightly displace northward, with respect to the forecasts in which aerosols are not include. The shift in the AEJ position goes in the direction of observations and agrees with previous results.

  6. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  7. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  8. Impulsive magnetic pulsations and electrojets in the loop footpoint driven by the fast reconnection jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, M.

    2009-11-15

    It is well known that magnetic pulsations of long periods impulsively occur in accordance with the sudden onset of geomagnetic substorms and drastic enhancement of electrojets in the ionosphere. On the basis of the spontaneous fast reconnection model, the present paper examines the physical mechanism by which both magnetic pulsations and strong electrojets are impulsively driven by the fast (Alfvenic) reconnection jet. When a large-scale plasmoid [or traveling compression region (TCR)], directly caused by the fast reconnection jet, collides with the magnetic loop footpoint, strong electrojets are impulsively driven in a finite extent in the loop footpoint in accordance with the evolution of the current wedge and the generator current circuit. Simultaneously, magnetohydrodynamic (Alfven) waves, accompanied by the TCR, are reflected from the electrojet layer, leading to impulsive magnetic pulsations ahead of the loop footpoint because of the interaction (or resonance) between the reflected waves and the waves traveling toward the footpoint. The pulsations propagate outward in all directions from the source region of the wave reflection, and the pulsation periods are typically estimated to be of several tens of seconds.

  9. Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Reconnection Mediated by the Plasmoid Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    It has been established that the Sweet-Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet-Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, a three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of the local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from -2.3 to -2.1, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from -2.5 to -2.3. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich-Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.

  10. The Role of Magnetic Fields in Relativistic Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Newman, W. I.

    2012-05-01

    We explore, analytically and by numerical simulation, the evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a relativistic magnetized astrophysical jet. Our results successfully reproduce numerous magnetohydrodynamic features observed in relativistic astrophysical environments. The KH instability arises from a variation in flow speed orthogonal to the flow. Many astrophysical jets are relativistic, evidenced by apparent superluminal motion, and are likely collimated by a magnetic field, according to commonly accepted models. We find convergence of our numerical results between the hydrodynamic, magnetohydrodynamic, relativistic hydrodynamic, and relativistic magnetohydrodynamic regimes. We observe complementarity between fluid flow and magnetic field behavior. The early nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of large vortices connected by a dual filamentary structure reminiscent of the cosmic double helix in the extragalactic jet 3C 273. These vortices are disrupted by the field, followed by a complex turbulent regime, and then an approach to an equilibrium configuration consisting of flow-aligned filaments. For stronger fields, this process occurs more rapidly, and sufficiently strong fields suppress vortices entirely. The jet also widens and decelerates by an amount depending on field strength. These results are in qualitative agreement with observations of numerous jets, including NGC 5128, 3C 273, and HH 30. Relativistic flows break synchronicity between longitudinal and transverse motions, thereby destabilizing the system, and enhancing the complexity of vortex disruption and turbulent breakdown. This desynchronization also causes early numerical breakdown at high Lorentz factors, a long-standing problem. Using a uniform-flow model, we provide the first mathematical analysis showing that for sufficiently high Lorentz factors, artificial diffusion not only fails to suppress numerical instability, but introduces growing modes which destabilize the

  11. A theory of MHD instability of an inhomogeneous plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoly S.

    2011-06-01

    A problem of the stability of an inhomogeneous axisymmetric plasma jet in a parallel magnetic field is solved. The jet boundary becomes, under certain conditions, unstable relative to magnetosonic oscillations (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) in the presence of a shear flow at the jet boundary. Because of its internal inhomogeneity the plasma jet has resonance surfaces, where conversion takes place between various modes of plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. Propagating in inhomogeneous plasma, fast magnetosonic waves drive the Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations, tightly localized across the magnetic shells, on the resonance surfaces. MHD oscillation energy is absorbed in the neighbourhood of these resonance surfaces. The resonance surfaces disappear for the eigenmodes of SMS waves propagating in the jet waveguide. The stability of the plasma MHD flow is determined by competition between the mechanisms of shear flow instability on the boundary and wave energy dissipation because of resonant MHD-mode coupling. The problem is solved analytically, in the Wentzel, Kramers, Brillouin (WKB) approximation, for the plasma jet with a boundary in the form of a tangential discontinuity over the radial coordinate. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability develops if plasma flow velocity in the jet exceeds the maximum Alfven speed at the boundary. The stability of the plasma jet with a smooth boundary layer is investigated numerically for the basic modes of MHD oscillations, to which the WKB approximation is inapplicable. A new 'unstable mode of MHD oscillations has been discovered which, unlike the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, exists for any, however weak, plasma flow velocities.

  12. The size of the jet launching region in M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Agol, Eric

    2012-04-01

    The supermassive black hole candidate at the centre of M87 drives an ultra-relativistic jet visible on kiloparsec scales, and its large mass and relative proximity allow for event horizon scale imaging with very long baseline interferometry at millimetre wavelengths (mm-VLBI). Recently, relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of black hole accretion flows have proven capable of launching magnetically dominated jets. We construct time-dependent disc/jet models of the innermost portion of the M87 nucleus by performing relativistic radiative transfer calculations from one such simulation. We identify two types of models, jet-dominated or disc/jet, that can explain the spectral properties of M87, and use them to make predictions for current and future mm-VLBI observations. The Gaussian source size for the favoured sky orientation and inclination from observations of the large-scale jet is ?as (≃4-6 Schwarzschild radii) on current mm-VLBI telescopes, very similar to existing observations of Sgr A*. The black hole shadow, direct evidence for an event horizon, should be visible in future measurements using baselines between Hawaii and Mexico. Both models exhibit variability at millimetre wavelengths with factor of ≃2 amplitudes on year time-scales. For the low inclination of M87, the counter-jet dominates the event horizon scale millimetre wavelength emission from the jet-forming region.

  13. Numerical Simulations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wenlong

    An approximate Riemann solver needed in a high -order Godunov-type scheme for ideal MHD is developed in this thesis. The Riemann solver consists of the initial guess, the calculation of the two fast shock speeds and post-shock states, the performance of two possible rotations, the calculation of the two slow shock speeds and post-shock states, and the improvement of the initial guess. The Riemann solver includes all the discontinuities in ideal MHD. The extension of the Piecewise Parabolic Method in ideal MHD is presented based on the Riemann solver. The code starts from a set of normal physical variables. A cubic polynomial is used to interpolate each of Riemann invariants. The values of those physical variables at edges of computational zones are obtained through the interpolated Riemann invariants. The monotonicity constraint is applied to those point values of physical variables. A parabola is used for the internal structure of a zone. The set of time-averaged fluxes is calculated by the Riemann solver. The conserved quantities are updated by adding the net flux advected into each zone. After the dynamical step in a Lagrangian grid, the conserved quantities are mapped onto a fixed Eulerian grid. The two-dimensional scheme is built upon the technique of dimension splitting. The scheme is applied to wave steepening, propagation of shocks, various shock tube problems, the penetration of a solar wind filament, and MHD shock interactions with a cloud. The results of these applications show that the scheme has the principal advantages of a Godunov-type scheme, i.e., the robust operation in the presence of very strong discontinuities, thin shock fronts with little attendant noise generation, and thin contact and tangential discontinuities.

  14. The infinite interface limit of multiple-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, G. R.; Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J.; Hudson, S. R.

    2013-03-15

    We show the stepped-pressure equilibria that are obtained from a generalization of Taylor relaxation known as multi-region, relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRXMHD) are also generalizations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (ideal MHD). We show this by proving that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, MRXMHD reduces to ideal MHD. Numerical convergence studies illustrating this limit are presented.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic modelling of exploding foil initiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, William

    2015-06-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes are currently being developed, and used, to predict the behaviour of electrically-driven flyer-plates. These codes are of particular interest to the design of exploding foil initiator (EFI) detonators but there is a distinct lack of comparison with high-fidelity experimental data. This study aims to compare a MHD code with a collection of temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics including PDV, dual-axis imaging and streak imaging. The results show the code's excellent representation of the flyer-plate launch and highlight features within the experiment that the model fails to capture.

  16. Lithium-sulfur hexafluoride magnetohydrodynamic power system

    SciTech Connect

    Dobran, F.

    1987-02-24

    A method is described to operate a two-phase flow magnetohydrodynamic electric power generation system with liquid lithium and gaseous sulfur-hexafluoride flowing through a diverging channel, with side electrodes to remove the electric current generated in the flowing liquid lithium, across the applied magnetic field that is perpendicular to both the flow velocity and electrodes. Sulfur-hexafluoride is dispersed in the form of small bubbles and reacts with liquid lithium that forms a continuous phase to conduct the current between the electrodes so as to produce a near isothermal two-phase flow mixture and provides for an expansion of lithium across the magnetic field in the generator.

  17. Thermoelectric Magnetohydrodynamic Stirring of Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Gray, T. K.; Antonelli, M.; Kim, J. J.; Lau, C. Y.; Lee, M. B.; Neumann, M. J.; Xu, W.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-03-01

    The direct observation of a thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) flow has been achieved and is reported here. The origin of the flow is identified based on a series of qualitative tests and corresponds, quantitatively, with a swirling flow TEMHD model. A theory for determining the dominant driver of a free-surface flow, TEMHD or thermocapillary (TC), is found to be consistent with the experimental results. The use of the analytical form for an open geometry develops a new dimensionless parameter describing the ratio of TEMHD to TC generated flows.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic effects in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Galindo, V.; Kasprzyk, C.; Landgraf, S.; Seilmayer, M.; Starace, M.; Weber, N.; Weier, T.

    2016-07-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) consist of two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt ionic conductor sandwiched between them. The density ratios allow for a stable stratification of the three layers. LMBs were already considered as part of energy conversion systems in the 1960s and have recently received renewed interest for economical large-scale energy storage. In this paper, we concentrate on the magnetohydrodynamic aspects of this cell type with special focus on electro-vortex flows and possible effects of the Tayler instability.

  19. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum. PMID:23215195

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1995-01-01

    The fluctuations in magnetic field and plasma velocity in solar wind, which possess many features of fully developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, are discussed. Direct spacecraft observations from 0.3 to over 20 AU, remote sensing radio scintillation observations, numerical simulations, and various models provide complementary methods that show that the fluctuations in the wind parameters undergo significant dynamical evolution independent of whatever turbulence might exist in the solar photosphere and corona. The Cluster mission, with high time resolution particle and field measurements and its variable separation strategies, should be able to provide data for answering many questions on MHD turbulence.