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Sample records for magnetohydrodynamic shear instabilities

  1. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  2. Compressibility effect on magnetic-shear-localized ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sangeeta; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    2005-08-15

    Eigenmode analysis of a magnetic-shear-localized ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchange instability in the presence of plasma compressibility indicates the marginal stability criterion (D{sub I}=1/4) is not affected by the compressibility effects. Above the marginal stability criterion, plasma compressibility causes a significant reduction in the growth rate of an ideal interchange instability.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in rotating and precessing sheared flows: An asymptotic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Cambon, C.

    2010-07-01

    Linear magnetohydrodynamic instabilities are studied analytically in the case of unbounded inviscid and electrically conducting flows that are submitted to both rotation and precession with shear in an external magnetic field. For given rotation and precession the possible configurations of the shear and of the magnetic field and their interplay are imposed by the “admissibility” condition (i.e., the base flow must be a solution of the magnetohydrodynamic Euler equations): we show that an “admissible” basic magnetic field must align with the basic absolute vorticity. For these flows with elliptical streamlines due to precession we undertake an analytical stability analysis for the corresponding Floquet system, by using an asymptotic expansion into the small parameter ɛ (ratio of precession to rotation frequencies) by a method first developed in the magnetoelliptical instabilities study by Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]10.1086/420972. The present stability analysis is performed into a suitable frame that is obtained by a systematic change of variables guided by symmetry and the existence of invariants of motion. The obtained Floquet system depends on three parameters: ɛ , η (ratio of the cyclotron frequency to the rotation frequency) and χ=cosα , with α being a characteristic angle which, for circular streamlines, ɛ=0 , identifies with the angle between the wave vector and the axis of the solid body rotation. We look at the various (centrifugal or precessional) resonant couplings between the three present modes: hydrodynamical (inertial), magnetic (Alfvén), and mixed (magnetoinertial) modes by computing analytically to leading order in ɛ the instabilities by estimating their threshold, growth rate, and maximum growth rate and their bandwidths as functions of ɛ , η , and χ . We show that the subharmonic “magnetic” mode appears only for η>5/2 and at large η (≫1) the maximal growth rate of both the

  5. Dynamics of the magnetic shearing instability and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in accretion disks. 1: Vertical magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W.; Diamond, P. H.; Vishniac, E. T.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the magnetic shearing instability (MSI) has been proposed as a dynamical mechanism for angular momentum transport in accretion disks (Balbus & Hawley 1991; Hawley & Balbus 1991). In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics of MSI modes in the presence of a vertical magnetic field B(sub 0) is discussed. In particular, the saturation levels of the fluctuating fields, the angular momentum flux, and the energy dissipation mechanism, are examined in detail. It is shown that MSI induces strong magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a range of wavenumbers 1/H is less than K is less than or equal to Omega/V(sub A)(sub 0)), where H is the thickness, Omega is the rotation frequency of the disk, and V(sub A)(sub 0) is the Alfven velocity. Despite the fact that the linear growth rate of MSI is maximal at small-scale (i.e., k is approximately Omega/V(sub A(sub 0)), angular momentum transport due to MSI turbulence is dominated by the magnetic Reynolds stress driven by large-scale modes (k is approximately 1/H). It is shown that the amplitude of low k(sub r) MSI eddies is limited primarily by subscale shear flow instability. Thus, dominant MSI cells are quasi-isotropic. In a stationary state, the effective Shakura-Sunyaev 'alpha' value is predicted to be of order V(sub A)(sub 0)0/C(sub s). In addition, the veritcal magnetic-field-induced MSI cells convert vertical magnetic field B(sub 0) into azimuthal magnetic field B(sub theta) in the disk. The generation of azimuthal magnetic field in turn introduces new physical processes, such as dynamo activity and azimuthal MSI turbulence. We conclude that it is not possible to decouple vertical MSI saturation from azimuthal MSI evolution. Low-frequency MSI cells are shown to co-exist with high-frequency radial buoyancy or internal waves. We show that modulational interaction between waves on these two frequency ranges is usually weak in the case when mean magnetic field is vertical. Thus, MSI and internal wave dynamics must be

  6. Finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamic analysis of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z pinches with sheared axial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, X. M.; Huang, L.; Jian, G. D.

    2007-03-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z pinches with sheared axial flow (SAF) is analyzed using finite Larmor radius (FLR) magnetohydrodynamic theory, in whose momentum equation the FLR effect (also referred to as the effect of gyroviscosity) is introduced through an anisotropic ion (FLR) stress tensor. A dispersion relation is derived for the linear RT instability. Both analytical and numerical solutions of the dispersion equation are given. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the RT instability can be stabilized by a sufficient FLR, whereas the long-wavelength modes can be stabilized by a sufficient SAF. In the small-wavenumber region, for normalized wavenumber K<2.4, the hybrid RT/KH (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability is shown to be the most difficult to stabilize. However the synergistic effect of the SAF and gyroviscosity can mitigate both the RT instability in the large-wavenumber region (K>2.4) and the hybrid RT/KH instability in the small-wavenumber region. In addition, this synergistic effect can compress the RT instability to a narrow wavenumber region. Even the thorough stabilization of the RT instability in the large-wavenumber region is possible with a sufficient SAF and a sufficient gyroviscosity.

  7. Current-driven magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in sheared fields. [of solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions are sought for the dispersion relation for the MHD stability of magnetized medium in current-driven filamentation modes such as those observed in the solar atmosphere. The magnetic field is assumed to have a self-consistent sheared equilibrium structure. The analysis is carried out in the small wavenumber regime, where shear length is similar to the mode wavelength. Instability is found to depend on the ratio between the thermal and magnetic diffusivities, i.e., the Prandtl number, which identifies the unstable transverse wavenumbers. The instability conditions are expressed in an algebraic equation amenable to numerical solution. Results are provided from use of the model to determine the maximum growth rate and typical scale lengths of instabilities in a precoronal atmosphere and the lower transition region.

  8. Shear-induced instability and arch filament eruption - A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Song, M. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Dryer, M.

    1991-01-01

    A situation wherein a bipolar magnetic field embedded in a stratified solar atmosphere undergoes symmetrical shear motion at the footpoints is investigated via a 2D (nonplanar) MHD simulation. It was found that the vertical plasma flow velocities grow exponentially, leading to a new type of global MHD instability. The growth rate increases almost linearly until it reaches the same order of magnitude as the Alfven speed. Then a nonlinear MHD instability occurs beyond this point. It was found that the central loops are pinched by opposing Lorentz forces, and the outer closed loops stretch upward with the vertically-rising mass flow. The nonlinear dynamical shearing instability is illustrated by a numerical example that is given for three different values of the plasma beta that span several orders of magnitude.

  9. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T. K. M.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2010-01-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth. PMID:20838425

  10. Nonideal high-β magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by the shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity at the subsolar magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Akira

    2003-02-01

    A nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability peculiar to a high-β plasma with a nonuniform pressure is studied for the magnetosheath field due north at the subsolar magnetopause, where the ideal MHD K-H instability driven by the shear in the E × B drift velocity is not operative. This instability is driven by the shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity, which is a nonideal MHD drift in a high-β plasma and is a macroscopic effect not visible at the guiding center level. The two-dimensional stability (k · B0 = 0) of a model subsolar magnetopause is investigated by solving the eigenmode equation for a polygonal ion diamagnetic drift velocity profile with the density ratio across the magnetopause as a parameter. Near the subsolar magnetopause the fastest growing wave or vortex propagates duskward with a phase velocity from 8 km/s to 14 km/s, and the normalized growth rate decreases with an increase in the ratio of the magnetosheath density to the magnetospheric density. The wavelength and period of the fastest growing mode increases with the density ratio. For realistic parameters near the subsolar magnetopause the wave period becomes 750 s to 2000 s and the wavelength becomes 11000 km to 16000 km. The present K-H instability ("diamagnetically driven K-H instability") may cause a plasma transport across the subsolar magnetopause, since the plasma motion is decoupled from that of the magnetic field owing to nonideal MHD. We discuss a possible dawn-dusk asymmetry (caused by the ion diamagnetic drift velocity at the magnetopause) of the K-H instability when the present instability is extended to the dayside magnetopause off the noon meridian, where the tailward E × B drift is no longer negligible. The vortex created by the present instability near the subsolar magnetopause has the same rotational sense as that created by the E × B shear driven K-H instability within the dusk flank boundary but has the opposite rotational sense to that

  11. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  12. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  13. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. P.; Grismayer, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2015-08-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a sheared flow in an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma, not captured by (magneto)hydrodynamics. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroomlike electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. This transverse electron-scale instability may play an important role in relativistic and supersonic sheared flow scenarios, which are stable at the (magneto)hydrodynamic level. Macroscopic (≫c /ωp e ) fields are shown to be generated by this microscopic shear instability, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission, and to seed magnetohydrodynamic processes at long time scales.

  14. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows.

    PubMed

    Alves, E P; Grismayer, T; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-08-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a sheared flow in an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma, not captured by (magneto)hydrodynamics. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroomlike electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. This transverse electron-scale instability may play an important role in relativistic and supersonic sheared flow scenarios, which are stable at the (magneto)hydrodynamic level. Macroscopic (≫c/ωpe) fields are shown to be generated by this microscopic shear instability, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission, and to seed magnetohydrodynamic processes at long time scales. PMID:26382337

  15. Shear instabilities in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, David J.; Glasser, Benjamin J.; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-01

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows.

  16. Shear instabilities in granular flows.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David J; Glasser, Benjamin J; Shinbrot, Troy

    2002-01-17

    Unstable waves have been long studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans, in addition to slipstream stability behind ships, aeroplanes and heat-transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not been previously documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. Here we report that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains flowing on an inclined plane downstream of a splitter plate. Changes in either the shear rate or the angle of incline cause such waves to appear abruptly. We analyse a granular flow model that agrees qualitatively with our experimental data; the model suggests that the waves result from competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed. We propose a dimensionless shear number that governs the transition between steady and wavy flows. PMID:11797003

  17. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-15

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries (δB/B∼10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4}) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas (β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error

  18. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB /B ˜10-3 to 10-4 ) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields at low

  19. Shear Instabilities in Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy

    2003-03-01

    Unstable waves have long been studied in fluid shear layers. These waves affect transport in the atmosphere and oceans as well as slipstream stability behind ships, planes, and heat transfer devices. Corresponding instabilities in granular flows have not previously been documented, despite the importance of these flows in geophysical and industrial systems. We report here that breaking waves can form at the interface between two streams of identical grains downstream of a splitter plate. These waves appear abruptly in flow down an inclined plane as either shear rate or angle of incline is changed, and we analyze a granular flow model that qualitatively agrees with our experimental data. The waves appear from the model to be a manifestation of a competition between shear and extensional strains in the flowing granular bed, and we propose a dimensionless group to govern the transition between steady and wavy flows.

  20. A destabilizing effect of rotation shear on magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J. W.; Hastie, R. J.; Webster, A. J.

    2007-04-15

    The destabilization of ideal magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes at finite rotation shear is demonstrated for the model s-{alpha} equilibrium by exploiting low magnetic shear, s, to simplify the two-dimensional stability problem to a one-dimensional eigenvalue problem. This simpler calculation captures the same features as exhibited by a full two-dimensional treatment, namely that stable values in the s-{alpha} stability diagram become unstable above a critical rotation shear. The first and second stability boundaries at low s are calculated as functions of rotation shear.

  1. Ring current instabilities in the magnetohydrodynamic frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Chen, L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes recent theoretical developments in ring current plasma instabilities in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) frequency range but with the effect of finite Larmor radius, and discusses its relevance to satellite-based observations. Possible instabilities are the bounce resonant instabilities caused by a humped energy distribution, the drift mirror instability caused by an anisotropic pressure and the drift wave type instability caused by a combination of drift-bounce resonance and reduced Alfven frequency due to a high beta loading of the flux tube. Here, beta is proportional to plasma/magnetic pressures. Mechanisms leading to turbulence are also discussed.

  2. Wind Instability and Interaction of Vibrations of a Thin Plate with a Magnetohydrodynamic Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Gorbatenko, B. B.; Mezhonnova, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the resonance effect of a magnetohydrodynamic hypersonic shear flow on an elastic plate placed in it causes the development of wind instability. Plate bending oscillations propagating along the flow are stabilized in the hypersonic flow regime, whereas waves running at an angle to the flow remain unstable. Expression derived for the instability increment allows conclusions about the effect of the magnetic field on the interaction of waves with the flow to be drawn as well as about the feasibility of its suppression in an unstable flow regime.

  3. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Nasraoui, S.

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N3. For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004), 10.1086/420972]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δm=(3√3 /16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N3/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  4. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Nasraoui, S

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N(3). For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δ(m)=(3√[3]/16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N(3)/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes. PMID:24483566

  5. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in cool inhomogeneous atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of magnetic loops to current-driven filamentation instabilities is investigated. The unperturbed atmosphere is assumed to be composed of an (upper) isothermal optically thin low-density portion and a (lower) higher-density portion which is in radiative equilibrium; in both cases, the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium, so that gravitational stratification is taken into account. In order to provide specific equilibrium conditions for evaluation of the dispersion relation, conditions appropriate for the surface of a solar-type star are adopted; i.e., a fairly low temperature (T = 5000 K) appropriate for a 'precoronal' state associated, for example, with magnetic flux emerging from photospheric levels under the action of magnetic buoyancy. A linear stability analysis is performed, and numerical results show that physically plausible current densities, which would be generated by typical loop-footpoint motions, are effective in driving MHD instabilities in such a plasma. The instability growth rates are strongly dependent on the assumed current density distribution and on the density scale height.

  7. Stability of compressible reduced magnetohydrodynamic equilibria-Analogy with magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P. J.; Tassi, E.; Tronko, N.

    2013-04-15

    Stability analyses for equilibria of the compressible reduced magnetohydrodynamics (CRMHD) model are carried out by means of the Energy-Casimir (EC) method. Stability results are compared with those obtained for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) from the classical {delta}W criterion. An identification of the terms in the second variation of the free energy functional for CRMHD with those of {delta}W is made: two destabilizing effects present for CRMHD turn out to correspond to the kink and interchange instabilities in usual MHD, while the stabilizing roles of field line bending and compressibility are also identified in the reduced model. Also, using the EC method, stability conditions in the presence of toroidal flow are obtained. A formal analogy between CRMHD and a reduced incompressible model for magnetized rotating disks, due to Julien and Knobloch [EAS Pub. Series, 21, 81 (2006)], is discovered. In light of this analogy, energy stability analysis shows that the condition for magnetorotational instability (MRI) for the latter model corresponds to the condition for interchange instability in CRMHD, with the Coriolis term and shear velocity playing the roles of the curvature term and pressure gradient, respectively. Using the EC method, stability conditions for the rotating disk model, for a large class of equilibria with possible non-uniform magnetic fields, are obtained. In particular, this shows it is possible for the MRI system to undergo, in addition to the MRI, another instability that is analogous to the kink instability. For vanishing magnetic field, the Rayleigh hydrodynamical stability condition is recovered.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic instability of a two fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1992-02-01

    The stability of a gas cylinder (density ϱ) immersed in a liquid (density ϱ') subjected to capillary, pressure gradient, inertia and electro-magnetic forces has been developed analytically and numerically. A general hydromagnetic eigenvalue relation describing the characteristics of that model is derived based on the linearized perturbation technique. In the absence of a magnetic field, the model is only unstable to axisymmetric disturbances whose wavelength is longer than the circumference of the gas cylinder and stable in all other disturbance states. The instability of the model rapidly decreases with increasing (ϱ'/ϱ) but can never be suppressed, however large the (ϱ'/ϱ) value is. The magnetic field has a strong stabilizing effect on all perturbation modes for all wavelengths. Its influence is to decrease the wavelength at which the capillary instability occurs. The latter could be completely suppressed above a certain value of the applied magnetic field strength, independent of (ϱ'/ϱ) values, then the stability arises. However, in a two-dimensional perturbation ( k = 0, k is the axial wavenumber) it is found that the capillary force remains unaffected by such a magnetic field. The present results coincide with our results [A.E. Radwan, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 72 (1988) 219] if we neglect here the gas inertia force and with some Chandrasekhar's results [S. Chandrasekhar, Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Dover, New York, 1981)] with appropriate choices.

  9. Kinetic effects on the velocity-shear-driven instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z.; Pritchett, P. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison is made between the properties of the low-frequency long-wavelength velocity-shear-driven instability in kinetic theory and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The results show that the removal of adiabaticity along the magnetic field line in kinetic theory leads to modifications in the nature of the instability. Although the threshold for the instability in the two formalisms is the same, the kinetic growth rate and the unstable range in wave-number space can be larger or smaller than the MHD values depending on the ratio between the thermal speed, Alfven speed, and flow speed. When the thermal speed is much larger than the flow speed and the flow speed is larger than the Alfven speed, the kinetic formalism gives a larger maximum growth rate and broader unstable range in wave-number space. In this regime, the normalized wave number for instability can be larger than unity, while in MHD it is always less than unity. The normal mode profile in the kinetic case has a wider spatial extent across the shear layer.

  10. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  11. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is nomore » strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.« less

  12. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of α effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of α, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other. PMID:26651796

  13. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  14. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  15. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. IV. Whistler instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-06-15

    A very large low-frequency whistler mode is excited with magnetic loop antennas in a uniform laboratory plasma. The wave magnetic field exceeds the ambient field causing in one polarity a field reversal, and a magnetic topology resembling that of spheromaks in the other polarity. These propagating ''whistler spheromaks'' strongly accelerate the electrons and create non-Maxwellian distributions in their toroidal current ring. It is observed that the locally energized electrons in the current ring excite new electromagnetic instabilities and emit whistler modes with frequencies unrelated to the applied frequency. Emissions are also observed from electrons excited in X-type neutral lines around the antenna. The properties of the excited waves such as amplitudes, frequency spectra, field topologies, propagation, polarization, growth, and damping have been investigated. The waves remain linear (B{sub wave}<

  16. Radiative instabilities in sheared magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    The structure and growth rate of the radiative instability in a sheared magnetic field B have been calculated analytically using the Braginskii fluid equations. In a shear layer, temperature and density perturbations are linked by the propagation of sound waves parallel to the local magnetic field. As a consequence, density clumping or condensation plays an important role in driving the instability. Parallel thermal conduction localizes the mode to a narrow layer where K(parallel) is small and stabilizes short wavelengths k larger-than(c) where k(c) depends on the local radiation and conduction rates. Thermal coupling to ions also limits the width of the unstable spectrum. It is shown that a broad spectrum of modes is typically unstable in tokamak edge plasmas and it is argued that this instability is sufficiently robust to drive the large-amplitude density fluctuations often measured there.

  17. Observations of the parametric decay instability of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, S.R.; Leckband, J.A.; Cairns, I.H.

    1997-03-01

    One of the most important nonlinear processes for Alfven and fast magnetosonic waves is the decay instability, in which a forward propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave is converted into a forward propagating ion acoustic wave and a backward propagating MHD wave. Despite an extensive theoretical literature and numerous computer simulations of the process, there is minimal experimental or observational evidence for its existence. In this paper we report an extensive search for evidence of the decay instability in the MHD wave field upstream of the Earth`s bow shock. Twenty intervals of spacecraft magnetometer and density data with durations between 21 and 168 min were examined. The observational signature of the decay instability sought was a quasi-monochromatic feature in the density power spectrum, attributable to the daughter ion acoustic wave, at a frequency higher than the main wave features in the magnetic power spectra. Such a feature was in fact observed for the interval in which the theoretically predicted instability growth rate was highest, as well as in a second interval for which the instability was permitted with a slower growth rate. However, the data set also contains three long intervals of data in which the {open_quotes}decay line{close_quotes} signature is not seen, although theoretically permitted. The decay line is also absent in four shorter intervals in which the plasma {beta} is less than unity, and the instability accordingly facilitated. Possible reasons for the absence of the instability in these intervals are discussed, such as a finite bandwidth for the parent wave field and plasma kinetic effects. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Observations of the parametric decay instability of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Leckband, James A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1997-03-01

    One of the most important nonlinear processes for Alfvén and fast magnetosonic waves is the decay instability, in which a forward propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave is converted into a forward propagating ion acoustic wave and a backward propagating MHD wave. Despite an extensive theoretical literature and numerous computer simulations of the process, there is minimal experimental or observational evidence for its existence. In this paper we report an extensive search for evidence of the decay instability in the MHD wave field upstream of the Earth's bow shock. Twenty intervals of spacecraft magnetometer and density data with durations between 21 and 168 min were examined. The observational signature of the decay instability sought was a quasi-monochromatic feature in the density power spectrum, attributable to the daughter ion acoustic wave, at a frequency higher than the main wave features in the magnetic power spectra. Such a feature was in fact observed for the interval in which the theoretically predicted instability growth rate was highest, as well as in a second interval for which the instability was permitted with a slower growth rate. However, the data set also contains three long intervals of data in which the "decay line'' signature is not seen, although theoretically permitted. The decay line is also absent in four shorter intervals in which the plasma β is less than unity, and the instability accordingly facilitated. Possible reasons for the absence of the instability in these intervals are discussed, such as a finite bandwidth for the parent wave field and plasma kinetic effects.

  19. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  20. Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

  1. Rotation-driven Shear Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1996-10-01

    A general treatment of stability is considered for an isentropic flow equilibrium against three-dimensional incompressible perturbations by taking into account the difference in the orientations of the system rotation and flow vorticity. It is shown that the aforementioned orientation difference can indeed generate a coupling that drives instabilities at the expense of the rotational energy. Two types of instability are identified, with one growing algebraically and the other growing exponentially; the parameter regimes for both instabilities are also located. The algebraically growing modes are destabilized more easily than the exponentially growing modes; for example, the former can be unstable when the angle between the rotation axis and the vorticity is beyond 70°.5, whereas the latter becomes unstable when this angle is greater than 90°. In addition, we find that even in the limit of small vorticity, the system may still be unstable algebraically at a considerable strength, in contrast to the case of exact zero vorticity, which is absolutely stable. This finding indicates the existence of structural instability for a rotating fluid. The present analysis is applied also to examination of the problem of shear mixing interior of an accreting white dwarf in the context of nova explosions. In order for the nuclear fuels to be blended deep inside the star and make the explosion, the high angular momentum accreted materials combined with the stellar materials should undergo shear flow instabilities. We find that the shear flow instabilities happen when the disk rotation axis is off by more than 900 from the star rotation axis. The instability has in general an exponential growth, on a timescale much shorter than that of the runaway nuclear burning.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Homogeneous Gyrotropic Ultrarelativistic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, M.; Hau, L.-N.

    2004-08-01

    In some astrophysical systems the ionized gas may be of such high temperature and so strongly magnetized that relativistic effects and pressure anisotropy must be considered in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. This paper gives an overview of the characteristics of linear MHD waves and instabilities in homogeneous ultrarelativistic plasmas with gyrotropic pressure. The energy closure is the double-polytropic laws with two polytropic exponents, γ∥ and γ⊥, and for the adiabatic and monatomic cases, the polytropic values (γ∥, γ⊥) are respectively (3, 2) and (2, 1.5) for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic plasmas. In this formulation, the general dispersion relations can conveniently be reduced to isotropic and/or nonrelativistic limits. Slow waves are found to exhibit some anomalies due to the pressure anisotropy in that they may possess a positive density-magnetic field correlation such as for fast waves and may possibly travel faster than intermediate waves. They may also develop a mirror instability, as well as a new type of compressible fire-hose instability that for a certain parameter regime may grow faster than the standard incompressible fire hose. Both the fire-hose and mirror instability criteria are found to have the same forms of β∥-β⊥>2 and γ∥β∥<β2⊥/(2+γ⊥β⊥), respectively, as for nonrelativistic plasma, although the growth rates may be significantly modified by the relativistic effect.

  3. Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Reconnection Mediated by the Plasmoid Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    It has been established that the Sweet-Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet-Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, a three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of the local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from -2.3 to -2.1, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from -2.5 to -2.3. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich-Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.

  4. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-06-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  5. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  6. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data were obtained for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  7. Global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, M. I.; Shchepetov, S. V.; Nührenberg, C.; Nührenberg, J.

    2015-12-15

    Analysis of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in the L-2M stellarator (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences) is presented. The properties of free-boundary equilibria states are outlined, the stability conditions for small-scale modes are briefly discussed, and the number of trapped particles is estimated. All the magnetic configurations under study are stable against ballooning modes. It is shown that global ideal internal MHD modes can be found reliably only in Mercier unstable plasmas. In plasma that is stable with respect to the Mercier criterion, global unstable modes that are localized in the vicinity of the free plasma boundary and are not associated with any rational magnetic surface inside the plasma (the so-called peeling modes) can be found. The radial structure of all perturbations under study is almost entirely determined by the poloidal coupling of harmonics. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data.

  8. Fast reconnection in relativistic plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamics tearing instability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Papini, E.; Landi, S.; Bugli, M.; Bucciantini, N.

    2016-08-01

    Fast reconnection operating in magnetically dominated plasmas is often invoked in models for magnetar giant flares, for magnetic dissipation in pulsar winds, or to explain the gamma-ray flares observed in the Crab nebula, hence its investigation is of paramount importance in high-energy astrophysics. Here we study, by means of two dimensional numerical simulations, the linear phase and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of the tearing instability within the framework of relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics, as appropriate in situations where the Alfven velocity approaches the speed of light. It is found that the linear phase of the instability closely matches the analysis in classical MHD, where the growth rate scales with the Lundquist number S as S^-1/2, with the only exception of an enhanced inertial term due to the thermal and magnetic energy contributions. In addition, when thin current sheets of inverse aspect ratio scaling as S^-1/3 are considered, the so-called "ideal" tearing regime is retrieved, with modes growing independently on S and extremely fast, on only a few light crossing times of the sheet length. The overall growth of fluctuations is seen to solely depend on the value of the background Alfven velocity. In the fully nonlinear stage we observe an inverse cascade towards the fundamental mode, with Petschek-type supersonic jets propagating at the external Alfven speed from the X-point, and a fast reconnection rate at the predicted value R~(ln S)^-1.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Instabilities in a Simple Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Hawk, Clark W.

    2004-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. To evaluate whether a gasdynamic mirror could indeed confine plasmas in a stable manner for long periods of time, a small scale experimental gasdynamic mirror was built and tested. The objective of this experiment was to determine ranges of mirror ratios and plasma densities over which gasdynamic mirror could maintain stable plasmas. Theoretical analyses indicated that plasma magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were likely to occur during subsonic to supersonic flow transitions in the mirror throat region of the gasdynamic mirror. The experimental evidence based upon data derived from the Langmuir probe measurements seems to confirm this analysis. The assumption that a gasdynamic mirror using a simple mirror geometry could be used as a propulsion system, therefore, appears questionable. Modifications to the simple mirror concept are presented which could mitigate these MHD instabilities.

  10. Shear-induced instabilities in layered liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auernhammer, Günter K.; Brand, Helmut R.; Pleiner, Harald

    2002-12-01

    Motivated by the experimentally observed shear-induced destabilization and reorientation of smectic-A-like systems, we consider an extended formulation of smectic-A hydrodynamics. We include both, the smectic layering (via the layer displacement u and the layer normal pcirc) and the director ncirc of the underlying nematic order in our macroscopic hydrodynamic description and allow both directions to differ in nonequilibrium situations. In an homeotropically aligned sample the nematic director does couple to an applied simple shear, whereas the smectic layering stays unchanged. This difference leads to a finite (but usually small) angle between ncirc and pcirc, which we find to be equivalent to an effective dilatation of the layers. This effective dilatation leads, above a certain threshold, to an undulation instability of the layers. We generalize our earlier approach [G. K. Auernhammer, H. R. Brand, and H. Pleiner, Rheol. Acta 39, 215 (2000)] and include the cross couplings with the velocity field and the order parameters for orientational and positional order and show how the order parameters interact with the undulation instability. We explore the influence of various material parameters on the instability. Comparing our results to recent experiments and molecular dynamic simulations, we find a good qualitative agreement.

  11. Fast reconnection in relativistic plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamics tearing instability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Papini, E.; Landi, S.; Bugli, M.; Bucciantini, N.

    2016-08-01

    Fast reconnection operating in magnetically dominated plasmas is often invoked in models for magnetar giant flares, for magnetic dissipation in pulsar winds, or to explain the gamma-ray flares observed in the Crab nebula; hence, its investigation is of paramount importance in high-energy astrophysics. Here we study, by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations, the linear phase and the subsequent non-linear evolution of the tearing instability within the framework of relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), as appropriate in situations where the Alfvén velocity approaches the speed of light. It is found that the linear phase of the instability closely matches the analysis in classical MHD, where the growth rate scales with the Lundquist number S as S-1/2, with the only exception of an enhanced inertial term due to the thermal and magnetic energy contributions. In addition, when thin current sheets of inverse aspect ratio scaling as S-1/3 are considered, the so-called ideal tearing regime is retrieved, with modes growing independently of S and extremely fast, on only a few light crossing times of the sheet length. The overall growth of fluctuations is seen to solely depend on the value of the background Alfvén velocity. In the fully non-linear stage, we observe an inverse cascade towards the fundamental mode, with Petschek-type supersonic jets propagating at the external Alfvén speed from the X-point, and a fast reconnection rate at the predicted value {R}˜ (ln S)^{-1}.

  12. Edge localized linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in an extended-magnetohydrodynamic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, B. J.; Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Zhu, P.; Snyder, P. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Howell, E. C.

    2010-03-01

    A linear benchmark between the linear ideal MHD stability codes ELITE [H. R. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 1277 (2002)], GATO [L. Bernard et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981)], and the extended nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al.., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is undertaken for edge-localized (MHD) instabilities. Two ballooning-unstable, shifted-circle tokamak equilibria are compared where the stability characteristics are varied by changing the equilibrium plasma profiles. The equilibria model an H-mode plasma with a pedestal pressure profile and parallel edge currents. For both equilibria, NIMROD accurately reproduces the transition to instability (the marginally unstable mode), as well as the ideal growth spectrum for a large range of toroidal modes (n =1-20). The results use the compressible MHD model and depend on a precise representation of "ideal-like" and "vacuumlike" or "halo" regions within the code. The halo region is modeled by the introduction of a Lundquist-value profile that transitions from a large to a small value at a flux surface location outside of the pedestal region. To model an ideal-like MHD response in the core and a vacuumlike response outside the transition, separate criteria on the plasma and halo Lundquist values are required. For the benchmarked equilibria the critical Lundquist values are 108 and 103 for the ideal-like and halo regions, respectively. Notably, this gives a ratio on the order of 105, which is much larger than experimentally measured values using Te values associated with the top of the pedestal and separatrix. Excellent agreement with ELITE and GATO calculations are made when sharp boundary transitions in the resistivity are used and a small amount of physical dissipation is added for conditions very near and below marginal ideal stability.

  13. Weakening of magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities by Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Hassam, A. B.

    2008-02-15

    Alfven waves, made to propagate along an ambient magnetic field and polarized transverse to a gravitational field g, with wave amplitude stratified along g, are shown to reduce the growth rate of interchange instability by increasing the effective inertia by a factor of 1+(B{sub y}{sup '}/B{sub z}k{sub z}){sup 2}, where B{sub z} is the ambient magnetic field, k{sub z} is the wavenumber, and B{sub y}{sup '} is the wave amplitude shear. Appropriately placed Alfven wave power could thus be used to enhance the stability of interchange and ballooning modes in tokamaks and other interchange-limited magnetically confined plasmas.

  14. Plasmoid Instabilities Mediated Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulent Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-min; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    After some introductory remarks on fast reconnection in resistive MHD due to plasmoid instability, oblique tearing modes in 3D, and previous studies on 3D turbulent reconnection, the subject is presented under the following topics: 3D simulation setup, time evolution of the 3D simulation, comparison with Sweet-Parker and 2D plasmoid reconnection, and diagnostics of the turbulent state (decomposition of mean fields and fluctuations, power spectra of energy fluctuations, structure function and eddy anisotropy with respect to local magnetic field). Three primary conclusions were reached: (1) The results suggest that 3D plasmoid instabilities can lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection (evidence of energy cascade and development of inertial range, energy fluctuations preferentially align with the local magnetic field, which is one of the characteristics of MHD turbulence); (2) The turbulence is highly inhomogeneous, due to the presence of magnetic shear and outflow jets (conventional MHD turbulence theories or phenomenologies may not be applicable – e.g. scale-dependent anisotropy as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar is not found); (3) 3D turbulent reconnection is different from 2D plasmoid-dominated reconnection in many aspects. However, in fully developed state, reconnection rates in 2D and 3D are comparable — this result needs to be further checked in higher S.

  15. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  16. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  17. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-01

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  18. Turbulent transport and dynamo in sheared magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a nonuniform magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-08-01

    We investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of velocity and magnetic shear (i.e., with both a large-scale shear flow and a nonuniform magnetic field). By assuming a turbulence driven by an external forcing with both helical and nonhelical spectra, we investigate the combined effect of these two shears on turbulence intensity and turbulent transport represented by turbulent diffusivities (turbulent viscosity, alpha and beta effect) in Reynolds-averaged equations. We show that turbulent transport (turbulent viscosity and diffusivity) is quenched by a strong flow shear and a strong magnetic field. For a weak flow shear, we further show that the magnetic shear increases the turbulence intensity while decreasing the turbulent transport. In the presence of a strong flow shear, the effect of the magnetic shear is found to oppose the effect of flow shear (which reduces turbulence due to shear stabilization) by enhancing turbulence and transport, thereby weakening the strong quenching by flow shear stabilization. In the case of a strong magnetic field (compared to flow shear), magnetic shear increases turbulence intensity and quenches turbulent transport. PMID:19792244

  19. Fluctuation dynamo amplified by intermittent shear bursts in convectively driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Busse, A.; Müller, W.-C.

    2013-09-01

    Intermittent large-scale high-shear flows are found to occur frequently and spontaneously in direct numerical simulations of statistically stationary turbulent Boussinesq magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convection. The energetic steady state of the system is sustained by convective driving of the velocity field and small-scale dynamo action. The intermittent emergence of flow structures with strong velocity and magnetic shearing generates magnetic energy at an elevated rate on time scales that are longer than the characteristic time of the large-scale convective motion. The resilience of magnetic energy amplification suggests that intermittent shear bursts are a significant driver of dynamo action in turbulent magnetoconvection.

  20. Whistler Instability in an Electron-Magnetohydrodynamic Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2007-12-31

    A three-dimensional magnetic vortex, propagating in the whistler mode, has been produced in a laboratory plasma. Its magnetic energy is converted into electron kinetic energy. Non-Maxwellian electron distributions are formed which give rise to kinetic whistler instabilities. The propagating vortex radiates whistler modes along the ambient magnetic field. A new instability mechanism is proposed.

  1. Theory of resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities excited by energetic-trapped particles in large-size tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.; White, R.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is shown that, in present-day large-size tokamaks, finite resistivity modifies qualitatively the stability properties of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities resonantly excited by the unfavorable processional drift of energetic-trapped particles, i.e., the so-called ''fishbone''-type instabilities. Specifically, it is found that (1) the n = 1 energetic-trapped particle-induced internal kink (''fishbone'') instability is strongly stabilized by resistive dissipation and (2) finite resistivity lowers considerably the threshold conditions for resonant excitations of high-n ballooning/interchange modes. The possibility of exciting fishbones by alpha particles in ignition experiments is also considered.

  2. Nonaxisymmetric linear instability of cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Child, Adam; Kersalé, Evy; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    We consider the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability present in Taylor-Couette flow under the application of helical magnetic fields, mainly for magnetic Prandtl numbers close to the inductionless limit, and conduct a full examination of marginal stability in the resulting parameter space. We allow for the azimuthal magnetic field to be generated by a combination of currents in the inner cylinder and fluid itself and introduce a parameter governing the relation between the strength of these currents. A set of governing eigenvalue equations for the nonaxisymmetric modes of instability are derived and solved by spectral collocation with Chebyshev polynomials over the relevant parameter space, with the resulting instabilities examined in detail. We find that by altering the azimuthal magnetic field profiles the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, nonaxisymmetric helical magnetorotational instability, and Tayler instability yield interesting dynamics, such as different preferred mode types and modes with azimuthal wave number m >1 . Finally, a comparison is given to the recent WKB analysis performed by Kirillov et al. [Kirillov, Stefani, and Fukumoto, J. Fluid Mech. 760, 591 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.614] and its validity in the linear regime.

  3. PARAMETRIC INSTABILITY OF WHISTLER WAVES IN THE ELECTRON MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Lu, J. Y. E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.c

    2010-05-01

    Using an electron magnetohydrodynamic model, we investigate the parametric decay among three whistler waves. A nonlinear equation to describe both linear and nonlinear properties of whistler waves is derived. Then we discuss the growth rate of the parametric decay of whistler waves in the long-wavelength region and show that the growth rate for two reverse decay waves is larger than that for two decay waves in the same direction. The nonlinear interaction among the long-wavelength and short-wavelength waves is also studied in this paper. This wave-wave interaction implies that long-wavelength waves can be decayed to short-wavelength waves and then dissipate their energy in the short-wavelength region. The possibility of applying our results to account for the generation of sunward propagating whistler waves is also discussed.

  4. Shear instabilities in a fully compressible polytropic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzke, V.; Silvers, L. J.; Favier, B.

    2015-05-01

    Shear flows have a significant impact on the dynamics in an assortment of different astrophysical objects, including accretion discs and stellar interiors. Investigating shear flow instabilities in a polytropic atmosphere provides a fundamental understanding of the motion in stellar interiors where turbulent motions, mixing processes, and magnetic field generation take place. Here, a linear stability analysis for a fully compressible fluid in a two-dimensional Cartesian geometry is carried out. Our study focuses on determining the critical Richardson number for different Mach numbers and the destabilising effects of high thermal diffusion. We find that there is a deviation in the predicted stability threshold for moderate Mach number flows, along with a significant effect on the growth rate of the linear instability for small Péclet numbers. We show that in addition to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, a Holmboe instability can appear, and we discuss the implication of this in stellar interiors.

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. III. ROTATING RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-09-20

    We have investigated the influence of jet rotation and differential motion on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box. Displacement of the initial helical magnetic field leads to the growth of the CD kink instability. We find that, in accordance with the linear stability theory, the development of the instability depends on the lateral distribution of the poloidal magnetic field. If the poloidal field significantly decreases outward from the axis, then the initial small perturbations grow strongly, and if multiple wavelengths are excited, then nonlinear interaction eventually disrupts the initial cylindrical configuration. When the profile of the poloidal field is shallow, the instability develops slowly and eventually saturates. We briefly discuss implications of our findings for Poynting-dominated jets.

  6. Edge magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongard, Michael W.

    Peeling modes, an instability mechanism underlying deleterious Edge Localized Mode (ELM) activity in fusion-grade plasmas, are observed at the plasma edge in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment under conditions of high edge current density (Jedge(˜ 0.1 MA/m2) and low magnetic field (B ˜0.1 T) present at near-unity aspect ratio. Their macroscopic properties are measured using external Mirnov coil arrays, Langmuir probes, and high-speed visible imaging. The modest edge parameters and short pulse lengths of PEGASUS discharges permit direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure with an insertable array of Hall-effect sensors, providing the current profile and its dynamical evolution on ELM-relevant timescales. Peeling modes generate coherent, edge-localized electromagnetic activity with low toroidal mode numbers n ≤ 3 and high poloidal mode numbers, in agreement with theoretical expectations of a low- n external kink structure. Coherent MHD fluctuation amplitudes are found to be strongly dependent on the experimentally measured J edge/B peeling instability drive, consistent with theory. An equilibrium reconstruction obtained during peeling activity with its current profile constrained by internal Hall measurements is used to test the predictions of analytic peeling stability theory and the ideal MHD stability model. Both approaches are in agreement with experiment, with the latter finding instability to an external kink. Peeling modes nonlinearly generate ELM-like, field-aligned filamentary structures. They detach from the edge and transiently accelerate radially outward, followed by propagation with constant velocity. Time-resolved Jedge measurements demonstrate that the filaments are formed from an initial current-hole perturbation and carry net toroidal currents If ˜ 100--200 A, less than 0.2% of the plasma current. Their constant-velocity radial motions are in qualitative agreement with rates given by electromagnetic blob transport theory.

  7. Linear magnetohydrodynamic Taylor-Couette instability for liquid sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Schultz, Manfred; Shalybkov, Dima

    2003-04-01

    The linear stability of MHD Taylor-Couette flow of infinite vertical extension is considered for liquid sodium with its small magnetic Prandtl number Pm of order 10-5. The calculations are performed for a container with Rout=2Rin, with an axial uniform magnetic field and with boundary conditions for both vacuum and perfect conductions. For resting outer cylinder subcritical excitation in comparison to the hydrodynamical case occurs for large Pm but it disappears for small Pm. For rotating outer cylinder the Rayleigh line plays an exceptional role. The hydromagnetic instability exists with Reynolds numbers exactly scaling with Pm-1/2 so that the moderate values of order 104 (for Pm=10-5) result. For the smallest step beyond the Rayleigh line, however, the Reynolds numbers scale as 1/Pm leading to much higher values of order 106. Then it is the magnetic Reynolds number Rm that directs the excitation of the instability. It results as lower for insulating than for conducting walls. The magnetic Reynolds number has to exceed here values of order 10 leading to frequencies of about 20 Hz for the rotation of the inner cylinder if containers with (say) 10 cm radius are considered. With vacuum boundary conditions the excitation of nonaxisymmetric modes is always more difficult than the excitation of axisymmetric modes. For conducting walls, however, crossovers of the lines of marginal stability exist for both resting and rotating outer cylinders, and this might be essential for future dynamo experiments. In this case the instability also can onset as an overstability.

  8. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  9. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-04-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  10. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-02-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  11. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE POWERED BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN NASCENT PROTONEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a convectively stable layer around the neutrinosphere is simulated by a three-dimensional model of a supernova core. To resolve MRI-unstable modes, a thin layer approximation considering only the radial global stratification is adopted. Our intriguing finding is that the convectively stable layer around the neutrinosphere becomes fully turbulent due to the MRI and its nonlinear penetration into the strongly stratified MRI-stable region. The intensity of the MRI-driven turbulence increases with magnetic flux threading the core, but is limited by the free energy stored in the differential rotation. The turbulent neutrinosphere is a natural consequence of rotating core-collapse and could exert a positive impact on the supernova mechanism.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence Powered by Magnetorotational Instability in Nascent Protoneutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a convectively stable layer around the neutrinosphere is simulated by a three-dimensional model of a supernova core. To resolve MRI-unstable modes, a thin layer approximation considering only the radial global stratification is adopted. Our intriguing finding is that the convectively stable layer around the neutrinosphere becomes fully turbulent due to the MRI and its nonlinear penetration into the strongly stratified MRI-stable region. The intensity of the MRI-driven turbulence increases with magnetic flux threading the core, but is limited by the free energy stored in the differential rotation. The turbulent neutrinosphere is a natural consequence of rotating core-collapse and could exert a positive impact on the supernova mechanism.

  13. Transition from resistive ballooning to neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic pressure-gradient-driven instability

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, D. A.; Shaing, K. C.; Carreras, B. A.; Charlton, L. A.; Callen, J. D.; Garcia, L.

    1988-10-01

    The linearized neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic equations, including perturbed neoclassical flows and currents, have been solved for parameter regimes where the neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven instability becomes important. This instability is driven by the fluctuating bootstrap current term in Ohm's law. It begins to dominate the conventional resistive ballooning mode in the banana-plateau collisionality regime ({mu}{sub e}/{nu}{sub e} approx {radical}{epsilon}/(1 + {nu}{sub *e}) > {epsilon}{sup 2}) and is characterized by a larger radial mode width and higher growth rate. The neoclassical instability persists in the absence of the usual magnetic field curvature drive and is not significantly affected by compressibility. Scalings with respect to {beta}, n (toroidal mode number), and {mu} (neoclassical viscosity) are examined using a large-aspect-ratio, three-dimensional initial-value code that solves linearized equations for the magnetic flux, fluid vorticity, density, and parallel ion flow velocity in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Three-Dimensional Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. I. Instability of a Static Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the nonlinear regime, the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depend moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the nonlinear regime at a later time than the case with constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the nonlinear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the nonlinear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the nonlinear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic instability excited by interplay between a resistive wall mode and stable ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Hirota, M.

    2015-08-15

    In a rotating toroidal plasma surrounded by a resistive wall, it is shown that linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can be excited by interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and stable ideal MHD modes, where the RWM can couple with not only a stable external kink mode but also various stable Alfvén eigenmodes that abound in a toroidal plasma. The RWM growth rate is shown to peak repeatedly as the rotation frequency reaches specific values for which the frequencies of the ideal MHD modes are Doppler-shifted to the small RWM frequency. Such destabilization can be observed even when the RWM in a static plasma is stable. A dispersion relation clarifies that the unstable mode changes from the RWM to the ideal MHD mode destabilized by wall resistivity when the rotation frequency passes through these specific values. The unstable mode is excited at these rotation frequencies even though plasma rotation also tends to stabilize the RWM from the combination of the continuum damping and the ion Landau damping.

  16. Heat release effects on the instability of parallel shear layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hegde, U.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of time-dependent heat addition on the linear instablity of shear layers is of considerable interest in understanding the dynamic behavior of reacting flows and combustion-turbulence interactions. The approach is based upon the Bernoulli enthalpy aeroacoustics theory, which utilizes the specific enthalpy and specific entropy as the primary thermodynamic variables. In addition, velocity oscillations are split into Helmoholtz decomposition theorem.

  17. Shear Instabilities as a Probe of Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Tanja; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-08-01

    Linear wave patterns in Jupiter's clouds with wavelengths strongly clustered around 300 km are commonly observed in the planet's equatorial atmosphere (F. M. Flasar and P. J. Gierasch, 1986, J. Atmos. Sci.43, 2683-2707). We propose that the preferred wavelength is related to the thickness of an unstable shear layer within the clouds (A. P. Ingersoll and D. W. Koerner 1989, Bull. Am. Astron. Soc.21, 943). We numerically analyze the linear stability of wavelike disturbances that have nonzero horizontal phase speeds in Jupiter's atmosphere and find that, if the static stability in the shear layer is very low (but still nonnegative), a deep vertical shear layer like the one measured by the Galileo probe (D. H. Atkinson et al. 1998, J. Geophys. Res.103, 22911-22928) can generate the instabilities. The fastest growing waves grow exponentially within an hour, and their wavelengths match the observations. Close to zero values of static stability that permit the growth of instabilities are within the range of values measured by the Galileo probe in a hot spot (A. Seiff et al. 1998, J. Geophys. Res.103, 22857-22889). Our model probes Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere below the cloud deck and suggests that thick regions of wind shear and low static stability exist outside hot spots.

  18. Linear simulations of the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, A.; Gao, S.; Samtaney, R.; Wheatley, V.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical simulations and analysis indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is suppressed in ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Cartesian slab geometry. Motivated by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion and suppression by means of a magnetic field, we investigate the RMI via linear MHD simulations in cylindrical geometry. The physical setup is that of a Chisnell-type converging shock interacting with a density interface with either axial or azimuthal (2D) perturbations. The linear stability is examined in the context of an initial value problem (with a time-varying base state) wherein the linearized ideal MHD equations are solved with an upwind numerical method. Linear simulations in the absence of a magnetic field indicate that RMI growth rate during the early time period is similar to that observed in Cartesian geometry. However, this RMI phase is short-lived and followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability phase with an accompanied exponential increase in the perturbation amplitude. We examine several strengths of the magnetic field (characterized by β = /2 p Br 2 ) and observe a significant suppression of the instability for β ≤ 4. The suppression of the instability is attributed to the transport of vorticity away from the interface by Alfvén fronts.

  19. Magnetar activity via the density-shear instability in Hall-MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Kondić, Todor; Lyutikov, Maxim; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the density-shear instability in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (Hall-MHD) via numerical simulation of the full non-linear problem in the context of magnetar activity. We confirm the development of the instability of a plane-parallel magnetic field with an appropriate intensity and electron density profile, in accordance with analytic theory. We find that the instability also appears for a monotonically decreasing electron number density and magnetic field, a plane-parallel analogue of an azimuthal or meridional magnetic field in the crust of a magnetar. The growth rate of the instability depends on the Hall properties of the field (magnetic field intensity, electron number density and the corresponding scaleheights), while being insensitive to weak resistivity. Since the Hall effect is the driving process for the evolution of the crustal magnetic field of magnetars, we argue that this instability is critical for systems containing strong meridional or azimuthal fields. We find that this process mediates the formation of localized structures with much stronger magnetic field than the average, which can lead to magnetar activity and accelerate the dissipation of the field and consequently the production of Ohmic heating. Assuming a 5 × 1014 G magnetic field at the base of crust, we anticipate that magnetic field as strong as 1015 G will easily develop in regions of typical size of a few hundred metres, containing magnetic energy of 1043 erg, sufficient to power magnetar bursts. These active regions are more likely to appear in the magnetic equator where the tangential magnetic field is stronger.

  20. The influence of boundary conditions on the excitation of instabilities in magnetohydrodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, C.-V.; Lee, B. R.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2014-08-01

    The recent stage of the magnetohydrodynamic energy principle applied to laboratory and space plasmas is briefly reviewed. In detail, the energy principle is presented for an internally homogeneous pinch in a perfectly conducting wall. The plasma is separated from the wall by a vacuum. The principle is applied to ITER-type and lightning systems. Thereat, a system of mathematical equations of motion for fluid elements is derived using a cylindrical coordinate system. But the obtained equations may be also applied to plasmas with disturbances of non-cylindrical symmetry. From the equations of motion, an analytical relation for the radial displacements of the fluid elements is presented, which describes magnetohydrodynamic waves as e.g. sausage and kink ones. The numerical results here presented are, as a first step, only performed for plasma disturbances with cylindrical symmetry and outer azimuthal magnetic fields directed parallely to the conducting wall. Thus, the dispersion relations for sausage instabilities in ITER-type and lightning plasmas are solved. It is shown for which values of the inner and external magnetic fields of the systems instabilities occur. In case of lightnings, the radial displacements in the plasma are estimated.

  1. Shear secondary instability in a precessing cylinder flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhali, Waleed; Lehner, Thierry; Ater Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    For a certain value of the forcing parameter, cyclones regime has been observed in our experiment involving water in a precessing cylinder. They result from an instability. We propose here to study the nature of this so-called instability. We consider first the mode coupling of two inertial waves with azimuthal wavenumber m =0 and m =1 (mode forced by the precession) in the inviscid regime (at high Re number limit) creates a differential rotation regime which has been observed in the same experiment at small enough Poincaré number ɛ (ratio of the precession to the rotation frequencies). Secondly, the radial profile of the corresponding axial mean flow vorticity shows an inflexion point leading to a localized inflectional secondary instability. We show that when ɛ is increased from low values the forced mode m =0 becomes the most instable in this induced differential rotation, which can be responsible for the observed eruptions of jets from the lateral walls of the cylinder leading to the cyclones formation within the volume from the development of an inviscid secondary shear instability.

  2. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-01

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  3. Measurements of velocity shear and ion viscosity profile in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Hendryx, J.; Wurden, G. A.; Furno, I; Lapenta, G.

    2010-10-15

    Time-dependent, two-dimensional profiles of the axial flow velocity, density, electron temperature, and magnetic field components are measured at two axial locations in a screw pinch plasma column of the reconnection scaling experiment. The results show that the ion momentum flux for a given column radius is dissipated by the ion-ion Coulomb scattering viscosity due to a significant radial shear of the axial velocity. By comparing the terms of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum balance equation, radial profile of ion viscosity is determined. Chord-integrated ion temperature measurements performed at several radial locations using Doppler broadening spectroscopy show ion temperature of about 1 eV. Measured ion viscosity agrees within a factor of 2 with the classical Braginskii expectations.

  4. Viscous shear heating instabilities in a 1-D viscoelastic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homburg, J. M.; Coon, E. T.; Spiegelman, M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2010-12-01

    Viscous shear instabilities may provide a possible mechanism for some intermediate depth earthquakes where high confining pressure makes it difficult to achieve frictional failure. While many studies have explored the feedback between temperature-dependent strain rate and strain-rate dependent shear heating (e.g. Braeck and Podladchikov, 2007), most have used thermal anomalies to initiate a shear instability or have imposed a low viscosity region in their model domain (John et al., 2009). By contrast, Kelemen and Hirth (2007) relied on an initial grain size contrast between a predetermined fine-grained shear zone and coarse grained host rock to initiate an instability. This choice is supported by observations of numerous fine grained ductile shear zones in shallow mantle massifs as well as the possibility that annealed fine grained fault gouge, formed at oceanic transforms, subduction related thrusts and ‘outer rise’ faults, could be carried below the brittle/ductile transition by subduction. Improving upon the work of Kelemen and Hirth (2007), we have developed a 1-D numerical model that describes the behavior of a Maxwell viscoelastic body with the rheology of dry olivine being driven at a constant velocity at its boundary. We include diffusion and dislocation creep, dislocation accommodated grain boundary sliding, and low-temperature plasticity (Peierls mechanism). Initial results suggest that including low-temperature plasticity inhibits the ability of the system to undergo an instability, similar to the results of Kameyama et al. (1999). This is due to increased deformation in the background allowing more shear heating to take place, and thus softening the system prior to reaching the peak stress. However if the applied strain rate is high enough (e.g. greater than 0.5 x 10-11 s-1 for a domain size of 2 km, an 8 m wide shear zone, a background grain size of 1 mm, a shear zone grain size of 150 μm, and an initial temperature of 650°C) dramatic

  5. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  6. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. 1; Instability of a Static Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the non-linear regime the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depends moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and the non-linear regime is reached at a later time than for constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the non-linear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  7. Sheared graphene: Electronic properties shaped by a mechanical instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, Andres; Cheng, Shengfeng; Covaci, Lucian; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    We explore the effects of shearing graphene ribbons on its geometry, and electronic properties. Inspired by macroscopic experiments, we show that spontaneous patterns appear when a wide ribbon is subject to shear. We compared this pattern and different regimes obtained via MD simulations with macroscopic experiments, and find good agreement between them. Beyond the low shear regime a second generation of wrinkles emerge when the system relaxes trying to keep the bond lengths as close to the relaxed length as possible. Remarkably, for all shear ratios the induced superlattice generates a momentum kick when electronic excitations enter the deformed region, an effective pseudo-magnetic superlattice, and a strong Fermi velocity renormalization. These effects modify electronic properties and suggest a simple route to engineer electronic waveguides and switches at the nanoscale. Our proposal is a concrete realization of a quantum device that takes full advantage of an elastic instability that spans from the nano to macro -scales. AC was partially supported by Conicyt Grant 79112004, and Fondecyt under Grant 11130075. LC acknowledges individual support from FWO-Vlaanderen.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  9. Suppression of ionization instability in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma by coupling with a radio-frequency electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    2005-05-09

    We describe the suppression of ionization instability and the control of a magnetohydrodynamic electrical power-generating plasma by coupling with a radio-frequency (rf) electromagnetic field. The rf heating stabilizes the unstable plasma behavior and homogenizes the nonuniform plasma structure, whereby the power-generating performance is significantly improved.

  10. Electrical activity of the Hartmann layers relative to surface viscous shearing in an annular magnetohydrodynamic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, Jules; Davoust, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    As a first step towards two-phase magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), this paper addresses an original analytical coupling between surface rheology, e.g., a gradually oxidizing liquid metal surface, ruled by the Boussinesq number Bo, and a supporting annular MHD flow, ruled by the Hartmann number Ha, in the general layout of a classical annular deep-channel viscometer, as developed by Mannheimer and Schechter [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 32, 195-211 (1970)]. Using a matched asymptotic expansion based on the small parameter 1/Ha, we can express the surface velocity as a coupling variable in the jump momentum balance at the liquid surface. By solving the latter through the determination of the Green's function, the whole flow can be analytically calculated. A modified Boussinesq number, tilde{B_o}, is produced as a new non-dimensional parameter that provides the balance between surface viscous shearing and the Lorentz force. It is shown that the tilde{B_o} number drives the electrical activation of the Hartmann layers, heavily modifying the MHD flow topology and leading to the emergence of the Lorentz force, for which interaction with the flow is not classical. Finally, the evolution laws given in this study allow the determination of scaling laws for an original experimental protocol, which would make it possible to accurately determine the surface shear viscosity of a liquid metal with respect to the quality of the ambient atmosphere.

  11. Low-n magnetohydrodynamic edge instabilities in quiescent H-mode plasmas with a safety-factor plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.

    2013-06-01

    Low-n magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in the quiescent high confinement mode (H-mode) pedestal are investigated in this paper. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. The low collisionality regime is considered, so that a safety-factor plateau arises in the pedestal region because of the strong bootstrap current. The JET-like (Joint European Torus) equilibria of quiescent H-mode discharges are generated numerically using the VMEC code. The stability of this type of equilibria is analysed using the AEGIS code, with subsonic rotation effects taken into account. The current investigation extends the previous studies of n = 1 modes to n = 2 and 3 modes. The numerical results show that the MHD instabilities in this type of equilibria have characteristic features of the infernal mode. We find that this type of mode tends to prevail when the safety-factor value in the shear-free region is slightly larger than an integer. In this case the frequencies (ωn) of modes with toroidal mode number n roughly follow the rule ωn ˜ -nΩp, where Ωp is the local rotation frequency where the infernal harmonic prevails. Since the infernal mode tends to develop near the pedestal top, where pressure driving is strong but magnetic shear stabilization is weak, this local rotation frequency tends to be close to the pedestal top value. These typical mode features bear close resemblance to the edge harmonic oscillations (or outer modes) at the quiescent H-mode discharges observed experimentally.

  12. Sheared flow effects on ballooning instabilities in three-dimensional equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C.C.

    2005-12-15

    The stability of ideal magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes in the presence of sheared flow is investigated for three-dimensional equilibria. Application of ballooning formalism reduces the problem to a partial differential equation in three dimensions that can be solved in the limit of small flow. Analytic calculations demonstrate the stabilizing effect of shear flow. The derived stability criterion generalizes prior work related to axisymmetric equilibrium with sheared toroidal flow.

  13. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  14. On Linear Instability and Stability of the Rayleigh-Taylor Problem in Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fei; Jiang, Song

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the stabilizing effects of the magnetic fields in the linearized magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) problem of a nonhomogeneous incompressible viscous magnetohydrodynamic fluid of zero resistivity in the presence of a uniform gravitational field in a three-dimensional bounded domain, in which the velocity of the fluid is non-slip on the boundary. By adapting a modified variational method and careful deriving a priori estimates, we establish a criterion for the instability/stability of the linearized problem around a magnetic RT equilibrium state. In the criterion, we find a new phenomenon that a sufficiently strong horizontal magnetic field has the same stabilizing effect as that of the vertical magnetic field on growth of the magnetic RT instability. In addition, we further study the corresponding compressible case, i.e., the Parker (or magnetic buoyancy) problem, for which the strength of a horizontal magnetic field decreases with height, and also show the stabilizing effect of a sufficiently large magnetic field.

  15. The effect of compressibility on magnetohydrodynamic jets and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praturi, Divya Sri; Girimaji, Sharath

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility and magnetic field on the evolution of planar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets. These jets are susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability when subjected to an in-plane transverse velocity perturbation. Various linear stability analyses have shown that compressibility and magnetic field along the jet have a stabilizing influence on the KH instability. We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using magneto gas kinetic method (MGKM) to study the effect of the Mach number, Alfvén Mach number, and the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the jet velocity direction on the flow-field evolution. In MGKM, the magnetic effects are added as source terms in the hydrodynamic gas kinetic scheme which also take into account the non-ideal MHD terms for finite plasma conductivity and the Hall effects. An in-depth analysis of linear and nonlinear physics is presented. The first author was supported by Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Study HEEP fellowship.

  16. Linear Stability Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Cyindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Abeer; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations and analysis in Cartesian slab geometry for nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is suppressed in the presence of a magnetic field. An analytical solution of incompressible 2-D MHD RMI of an impulsively accelerated interface was investigated by Wheatley et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005; J. Fluid Mech. 2005) who found that, for a finite magnetic field, although the initial growth rate of the interface is unaffected by the presence of magnetic field, the late-time amplitude of the interface asymptotes to a constant value. In the framework of incompressible MHD, we examine analytically the behavior of an impulsively accelerated interface separating conducting fluids of different densities in cylindrical geometry. We investigate the stability properties of such a system and study the influence of the magnetic field on the growth rate of the interface. In converging cylindrical geometry, the RMI is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase. Our analysis does not account for the RT phase of the instability but is valid for the duration of the RMI phase. We compare results of the incompressible analysis with linear compressible MHD simulations. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  17. Evidence for thermal anisotropy effects on shear modified ion acoustic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, E. E.; Keesee, A. M.; Spangler, R. S.; Koepke, M. E.; Teodorescu, C.; Reynolds, E. W.

    2002-10-01

    Inclusion of thermal anisotropy effects is shown to be required to describe recently reported experimental measurements as shear-modified, ion acoustic instabilities. For the reported experimental conditions, isotropic theory yields no instability growth that depends on the magnitude of the shear in the parallel flow.

  18. Linear Vlasov theory in the shearing sheet approximation with application to the magneto-rotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Tobias; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-09-01

    We derive the conductivity tensor for axisymmetric perturbations of a hot, collisionless, and charge-neutral plasma in the shearing sheet approximation. Our results generalize the well-known linear Vlasov theory for uniform plasmas to differentially rotating plasmas and can be used for wide range of kinetic stability calculations. We apply these results to the linear theory of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in collisionless plasmas. We show analytically and numerically how the general kinetic theory results derived here reduce in appropriate limits to previous results in the literature, including the low-frequency guiding center (or 'kinetic MHD') approximation, Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and the gyro-viscous approximation. We revisit the cold plasma model of the MRI and show that, contrary to previous results, an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma is linearly stable to axisymmetric perturbations in the cold plasma approximation. In addition to their application to astrophysical plasmas, our results provide a useful framework for assessing the linear stability of differentially rotating plasmas in laboratory experiments.

  19. Local magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and the wave-driven dynamo in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.; Diamond, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    We consider the consequences of magnetic buoyancy and the magnetic shearing instability (MSI) on the strength and organization of the magnetic field in a thin accretion disk. We discuss a model in which the wave-driven dynamo growth rate is balanced by the dissipative effects of the MSI. As in earlier work, the net helicity is due to small advective motions driven by nonlinear interactions between internal waves. Assuming a simple model of the internal wave spectrum generated from the primary m = 1 internal waves, we find that the magnetic energy density saturates at about (H/r) exp 4/3 times the local pressure (where H is the disk thickness and r is its radius). On very small scales the shearing instability will produce an isotropic fluctuating field. For a stationary disk this is equivalent to a dimensionless 'viscosity' of about (H/r) exp 4/3. The vertical and radial diffusion coefficients will be comparable to each other. Magnetic buoyancy will be largely suppressed by the turbulence due to the MSI. We present a rough estimate of its effects and find that it removes magnetic flux from the disk at a rate comparable to that caused by turbulent diffusion.

  20. SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS INSTABILITIES IN INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM INCLUDING ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanovic, Tamara; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Balbus, Steven A.; Parrish, Ian J. E-mail: chris@astro.umd.ed E-mail: iparrish@astro.berkeley.ed

    2009-10-10

    We perform a suite of simulations of cooling cores in clusters of galaxies in order to investigate the effect of the recently discovered heat flux buoyancy instability (HBI) on the evolution of cores. Our models follow the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of cooling cluster cores and capture the effects of anisotropic heat conduction along the lines of magnetic field, but do not account for the cosmological setting of clusters or the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our model clusters can be divided into three groups according to their final thermodynamical state: catastrophically collapsing cores, isothermal cores, and an intermediate group whose final state is determined by the initial configuration of magnetic field. Modeled cores that are reminiscent of real cluster cores show evolution toward thermal collapse on a timescale which is prolonged by a factor of approx2-10 compared with the zero-conduction cases. The principal effect of the HBI is to re-orient field lines to be perpendicular to the temperature gradient. Once the field has been wrapped up onto spherical surfaces surrounding the core, the core is insulated from further conductive heating (with the effective thermal conduction suppressed to less than 10{sup -2} of the Spitzer value) and proceeds to collapse. We speculate that, in real clusters, the central AGN and possibly mergers play the role of 'stirrers', periodically disrupting the azimuthal field structure and allowing thermal conduction to sporadically heat the core.

  1. Shear-flow-driven ion cyclotron and ion sound-drift instabilities of cylindrical inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. S.; Chibisov, D. V.

    2007-08-15

    The effects of the shear flow along the magnetic field on the development of the ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities in the radially inhomogeneous cylindrical plasma are studied on the ground of a kinetic approach. It is shown that flow shear not only modifies the frequencies and growth rates of known current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities, but is the source of the development of specific shear-flow-driven ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities. These instabilities are excited at the levels of current along the ambient magnetic field which is below the critical value for the development of the modified by flow shear current driven ion cyclotron, ion sound, and drift instabilities.

  2. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  3. Linear Instability of a Uni-Directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of spanwise-periodic mean-flow distortions (i.e. streamwise-vortex structures) on the evolution of small-amplitude, single-frequency instability waves in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow is investigated. The streamwise-vortex structures are taken to be just weak enough so that the spatially growing instability waves behave (locally) like linear perturbations about a uni-directional transversely sheared mean flow. Numerical solutions are computed and discussed for both the mean flow and the instability waves. The influence of the streamwise-vortex wavelength on the properties of the most rapidly growing instability wave is also discussed.

  4. Modeling Shear Instabilities With Block Sliders: Brittle and Ductile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    Block slider-type models have been succesfully used for almost 35 years to describe the spatio-temporal development of shear instabilities in the brittle crust (Burridge & Knopoff, 1967; Olami et al., 1992). More recently, increasing attention is paid on the extension of the classical Burridge-Knopoff model (based on a pure Mohr-Coulomb rheology) with a viscous component, either to include depth-dependent properties into the model or aiming at a more accurate description of fore- and aftershock sequences of a main earthquake event (e.g. Hainzl et al., 1999). On the other hand, viscous feedback mechanisms of various types have become an increasingly attractive mechanism for the generation of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes in the ductile mantle lithosphere (e.g. Wiens & Snider, 2001). Heat generated during viscous deformation provides a positive feedback to creep and eventually faulting under high pressure (Karato et al., 2001, Bercovici & Karato, 2003). The present paper discusses the specific properties of block slider-type models that are extended with a viscous component and compare their behaviour with the pure brittle ("classical") case. Block slider-type models for ductile instabilities are numerically much less demanding than solutions based on the corresponding, thermal-mechanically coupled, continuum equations. They allow for the inclusion of possible non-equilibrium effects associated with mineral phase transformations in a subducting slab (kinetic overshoot, grainsize reduction, latent heat release) in a straightforward manner. They may therefore serve as an effective tool to study the coupling of viscous heating, temperature-dependent viscosity and brittle stress transfer that are thought to cause the specific spatial-temporal clustering of intermediate-depth and deep-focus eartquakes. References D. Bercovici and S. Karato "Theoretical Analysis of Shear Localization in the Lithosphere", in: Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry 51, eds. S

  5. Hydrodynamic instability and shear layer effects in turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlimpert, S.; Feldhusen, A.; Grimmen, J. H.; Roidl, B.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2016-01-01

    A turbulent premixed plane jet flame is analyzed by large-eddy simulations. The analysis shows that the flame front wrinkling is strongly influenced by the shear layer effect when the gas expansion effects are small leading to larger flame front amplitudes at the flame base than at high gas expansion ratios. However, the hydrodynamic instability effect induces a continuously increasing flame front amplitude which yields an enhanced flame pocket generation at the flame tip. Both phenomena influence the magnitude of the turbulent burning area and burning area rate response through the flame front deflections which are determined by the contribution coefficient. This coefficient represents the mutual interaction between the flame and the flow. At low gas expansion ratios, the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent flame are wider in terms of dominant modes at Strouhal numbers which are linked to the mean flame height oscillations. Thus, at low gas expansion ratios, the vortex-flame interaction is less damped by the flame in the sense that vortices can perturb the flame front stronger. The total heat release rate trend of St-2.2 previously found for a round jet flame is also determined for the current slot jet at realistic gas expansion ratios indicating a general tendency to transfer energy from large to small flame structures. At high gas expansion ratios, an increasing Markstein length leads to an energy transfer between neighboring dominant modes in the low frequency range 1 < St < 10 and the burning area rate response becomes more important for the total heat release rate spectra of the turbulent slot flames which agrees with recent findings for a laminar premixed plane flame.

  6. Cooling Requirements for the Vertical Shear Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical shear instability (VSI) offers a potential hydrodynamic mechanism for angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). The VSI is driven by a weak vertical gradient in the disk’s orbital motion, but must overcome vertical buoyancy, a strongly stabilizing influence in cold disks, where heating is dominated by external irradiation. Rapid radiative cooling reduces the effective buoyancy and allows the VSI to operate. We quantify the cooling timescale tc needed for efficient VSI growth, through a linear analysis of the VSI with cooling in vertically global, radially local disk models. We find the VSI is most vigorous for rapid cooling with {t}{{c}}\\lt {{{Ω }}}{{K}}-1h| q| /(γ -1) in terms of the Keplerian orbital frequency, {{{Ω }}}{{K}}, the disk’s aspect-ratio, h\\ll 1, the radial power-law temperature gradient, q, and the adiabatic index, γ. For longer tc, the VSI is much less effective because growth slows and shifts to smaller length scales, which are more prone to viscous or turbulent decay. We apply our results to PPD models where tc is determined by the opacity of dust grains. We find that the VSI is most effective at intermediate radii, from ∼5 to ∼50 AU with a characteristic growth time of ∼30 local orbital periods. Growth is suppressed by long cooling times both in the opaque inner disk and the optically thin outer disk. Reducing the dust opacity by a factor of 10 increases cooling times enough to quench the VSI at all disk radii. Thus the formation of solid protoplanets, a sink for dust grains, can impede the VSI.

  7. Instabilities in wormlike micelle systems. From shear-banding to elastic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fardin, M-A; Lerouge, S

    2012-09-01

    Shear-banding is ubiquitous in complex fluids. It is related to the organization of the flow into macroscopic bands bearing different viscosities and local shear rates and stacked along the velocity gradient direction. This flow-induced transition towards a heterogeneous flow state has been reported in a variety of systems, including wormlike micellar solutions, telechelic polymers, emulsions, clay suspensions, colloidal gels, star polymers, granular materials, or foams. In the past twenty years, shear-banding flows have been probed by various techniques, such as rheometry, velocimetry and flow birefringence. In wormlike micelle solutions, many of the data collected exhibit unexplained spatio-temporal fluctuations. Different candidates have been identified, the main ones being wall slip, interfacial instability between bands or bulk instability of one of the bands. In this review, we present experimental evidence for a purely elastic instability of the high shear rate band as the main origin for fluctuating shear-banding flows. PMID:23001785

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY WITH A SUB-ALFVENIC JET: TEMPORAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2011-06-10

    We have investigated the influence of a velocity shear surface on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria in three dimensions. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box and concentrate on flows that are sub-Alfvenic on the cylindrical jet's axis. Displacement of the initial force-free helical magnetic field leads to the growth of CD kink instability. We find that helically distorted density structure propagates along the jet with speed and flow structure dependent on the radius of the velocity shear surface relative to the characteristic radius of the helically twisted force-free magnetic field. At small velocity shear surface radius, the plasma flows through the kink with minimal kink propagation speed. The kink propagation speed increases as the velocity shear radius increases and the kink becomes more embedded in the plasma flow. A decreasing magnetic pitch profile and faster flow enhance the influence of velocity shear. Simulations show continuous transverse growth in the nonlinear phase of the instability. The growth rate of the CD kink instability and the nonlinear behavior also depend on the velocity shear surface radius and flow speed, and the magnetic pitch radial profile. Larger velocity shear radius leads to slower linear growth, makes a later transition to the nonlinear stage, and with larger maximum amplitude than that occuring for a static plasma column. However, when the velocity shear radius is much greater than the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, linear and nonlinear development can be similar to the development of a static plasma column.

  9. Azimuthal instability of the interface in a shear banded flow by direct visual observation.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Bécu, L; Greffier, O; Fazel, N

    2010-12-17

    The stability of the shear banded flow of a Maxwellian fluid is studied from an experimental point of view using rheology and flow visualization with polarized light. We show that the one-layer homogeneous flow cannot sustain shear rates corresponding to the end of the stress plateau. The high shear rate branch is not found and the shear stress oscillates at the end of the plateau. An azimuthal instability appears: the shear induced band becomes unstable and the interface between the two bands undulates in time and space with a period τ, a wavelength λ and a wave vector k parallel to the direction of the tangential velocity. PMID:21231629

  10. The stabilizing effect of shear thinning on the onset of purely elastic instabilities in serpentine microflows.

    PubMed

    Casanellas, Laura; Alves, Manuel A; Poole, Robert J; Lerouge, Sandra; Lindner, Anke

    2016-07-20

    We determine both experimentally and numerically the onset of elastic flow instabilities in viscoelastic polymer solutions with different levels of shear thinning. Previous experiments realized in microfluidic serpentine channels using dilute polymeric solutions showed that the onset of elastic instabilities strongly depends on the channel curvature. The scaling dependence is well captured by the general instability scaling criterion proposed by Pakdel and McKinley [Phys. Rev. Lett., 1996, 76, 2459:1-4]. We determine here the influence of fluid shear thinning on the onset of such purely-elastic flow instabilities. By testing a set of polyethylene oxide solutions of high molecular weight at different polymer concentrations in microfluidic serpentine channels we observe that shear thinning has a stabilizing effect on the microfluidic flow. Three-dimensional numerical simulations performed using the White-Metzner model predict similar trends, which are not captured by a simple scaling analysis using the Pakdel-McKinley criterion. PMID:27265240

  11. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Possible Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes and Slow Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2004-12-01

    Localized ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are observed in exposures of Earth's shallow mantle (e.g., Kelemen & Dick JGR 95; Vissers et al. Tectonophys 95) and dredged from oceanic fracture zones (e.g., Jaroslow et al. Tectonophys 96). These are mylonitic (grain size 10 to 100 microns) and record mineral cooling temperatures from 1100 to 600 C. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures can exceed the mantle solidus (e.g., Obata & Karato Tectonophys 95). Simple shear, recrystallization, and grain boundary sliding all decrease the spacing between pyroxenes, so olivine grain growth at lower stress is inhibited; thus, once formed, these shear zones do not "heal" on geological time scales. Reasoning that grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, rather than host rocks (grain size 1 to 10 mm), and inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS 74), we thought these might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. In this view, as elastic stress increases, the shear zone weakens via shear heating; rapid deformation of the weak shear zone releases most stored elastic stress; lower stress and strain rate coupled with diffusion of heat into host rocks leads to cooling and strengthening, after which the cycle repeats. We constructed a simple numerical model incorporating olivine flow laws for dislocation creep, diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, and low T plasticity. We assumed that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. We fixed the velocity along one side of an elastic half space, and calculated stress due to elastic strain. This stress drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control temperature evolution in the shear zone and host rocks. A maximum of 1400 C (where substantial melting of peridotite would occur) is imposed. Grain size evolves during dislocation

  12. Excitation of shear layer instability in flow past a cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, S.

    2005-12-01

    The instability of the separated shear layer for flow past a cylinder, in two dimensions, is investigated for low Reynolds numbers (Re 350). The line of symmetry, downstream of the cylinder, in the wake is forced to be a streamline. This hypothetical situation allows slip of velocity along the wake centreline but prevents any flow normal to it. With this arrangement the flow is completely stable for Re 250. It suppresses the primary instability of the wake that is responsible for the von Karman vortex shedding. Unlike the conventional splitter plate such an arrangement does not have a wake of its own. At Re = 300 and above the wake instability and the shear layer instability are observed. The fluctuations due to the instabilities are intermittent in nature. The shear layer frequency is smaller than the frequency of the von Karman vortex shedding for the regular flow past a cylinder. It is also found that flow past half a cylinder, with symmetry conditions at the wake centreline, at Re = 300 is stable. However, when a secondary cylinder with one-fifth the diameter of the half-cylinder is placed close to it, the vortex shedding from the smaller cylinder again leads to instability of the separated shear layer of the half-cylinder. This suggests that although the separated shear layer is stable, at such low Re, the shear layer instability can be excited by some other disturbances. It is found that even at such low Re, the normalized shear layer frequency follows the Re0.67 power law. All the computations have been carried out using a stabilized finite element formulation.

  13. Shear flow-ballooning instability as a possible mechanism for hydromagnetic fluctuations. [at plasmapause boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A. F.; Madden, T. R.

    1986-01-01

    A unified linear electromagnetic analysis of both the Kelvin-Helmholtz (shear flow) instability and of the ballooning (interchange) instability is carried out on the basis of MHD theory. In the analysis, the concept of the Richardson instability of hydrodynamic flows is extended into the hydromagnetic context by unifying both the shear flow and the ballooning instability. As essential concept of the analysis is the role played by the magnetic buoyancy due to an effective gravity produced by the curvature of the field lines which provides the basic step by which both instabilities could be coupled. The results of the study are applied to the plasmapause to explain the excitation of hydromagnetic waves in that region, including the effect of the hot particles from the plasma sheet.

  14. Electroconvective Instability in Flow-shear-induced Transport Barrier: Threshold for Stable Vortices and Chaotic Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of turbulence and transport by shear flow is a common process in plasma fluid dynamics, while it has been rarely observed in nonionized fluids. Here, we visualize this effect in microfluidic nonionized system with electroconvective instability (EC) initiated by ion concentration polarization on ion selective membrane. The membranes act as the source of both instability and flow shear (wall shear of Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow) simultaneously, fitting the requisite for this shear suppression effect; turbulence in the domain of flow shear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first characterization of flow-shear-induced transport barrier in microfluidics, captured by scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling. Selected by balancing flow shear and velocity fluctuation, which generated by HP flow and vortical EC, the threshold for shear suppression scales by EC thickness dec/ w < 0.618. Stable unidirectional EC occurs under the threshold, while chaotic EC occurs over the threshold by overcoming flow shear. It also has significant implications on the energy saving of electrochemical systems (e . g . electrodialysis) to prevent chaotic turbulences and corresponding energy dissipations. This work was supported by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Grant (DE-AR0000294).

  15. Instability of Stratified Shear Flow: Intermittency and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Odier, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The stability of stratified shear flows which occur in oceanic overflows, wind-driven thermoclines, and atmospheric inversion layers is governed by the Richardson Number Ri , a non-dimensional balance between stabilizing stratification and destabilizing shear. For a shear flow with velocity difference U, density difference Δρ and characteristic length H, one has Ri = g (Δρ / ρ) H /U2 . A more precise definition is the gradient Richardson Number Rig =N2 /S2 where the buoyancy frequency N =√{ (g / ρ) ∂ρ / ∂z } , the mean strain S = ∂U / ∂z with z parallel to gravity and with ensemble or time averages defining the gradients. We explore the stability and mixing properties of a wall-bounded shear flow for 0 . 1 < Rig < 1 using simultaneous measurements of density and velocity fields. The flow, confined from the top by a horizontal boundary, is a lighter alcohol-water mixture injected from a nozzle into quiescent heavier salt-water fluid. The injected flow is turbulent with Taylor Reynolds number about 75. We compare a set of length scales that characterize the mixing properties of our turbulent stratified shear flow including Thorpe Length LT, Ozmidov Length LO, and Ellison Length LE.

  16. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  17. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Newman, William I.

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number MA. We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  18. Experimental and numerical study of the shear layer instability between two counter-rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Doaré, O.; Pasutto, T.; Daube, O.; Rabaud, M.

    2004-05-01

    The shear layer instability in the flow between two counter-rotating disks enclosed by a cylinder is investigated experimentally and numerically, for radius-to-height ratio Gamma {=} R/h between 2 and 21. For sufficiently large rotation ratio, the internal shear layer that separates two regions of opposite azimuthal velocities is prone to an azimuthal symmetry breaking, which is investigated experimentally by means of visualization and particle image velocimetry. The associated pattern is a combination of a sharp-cornered polygonal pattern, as observed by Lopez et al. (2002) for low aspect ratio, surrounded by a set of spiral arms, first described by Gauthier et al. (2002) for high aspect ratio. The spiral arms result from the interaction of the shear layer instability with the Ekman boundary layer over the faster rotating disk. Stability curves and critical modes are experimentally measured for the whole range of aspect ratios, and are found to compare well with numerical simulations of the three-dimensional time-dependent Navier Stokes equations over an extensive range of parameters. Measurements of a local Reynolds number based on the shear layer thickness confirm that a shear layer instability, with only weak curvature effect, is responsible for the observed patterns. This scenario is supported by the observed onset modes, which scale as the shear layer radius, and by the measured phase velocities.

  19. Instability in Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Flows of an Electrically Conducting Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakir, Hussain; Liu, Chan; Zhang, Nianmei; Ni, Mingjiu

    2013-12-01

    The three-dimensional instability of an electrically conducting fluid between two parallel plates affected by an imposed transversal magnetic field is numerically investigated by a Chebyshev collocation method. The QZ method is utilized to obtain neutral curves of the linear instability. The details of instability are analyzed by solving the generalized Orr-Sommerfeld equation. The critical Reynolds number Rec, the stream-wise and span-wise critical wave numbers αc and βc are obtained for a wide range of Hartmann number Ha. The effects of Lorentz force and span-wise perturbation on three-dimensional instability are investigated. The results show that magnetic field would suppress the instability and critical Reynolds number tends to be larger than that for two-dimensional instability.

  20. Inertial ranges and resistive instabilities in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, H.; Pouquet, A.; Sulem, P. L.

    1989-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations of decaying two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flows at Reynolds numbers of several thousand are performed, using resolutions of 1024-squared collocation points. An inertial range extending to about one decade is observed, with spectral properties depending on the velocity-magnetic field correlation. At very small scales, resistive tearing destabilizes current sheets generated by the inertial dynamics and leads to the formation of small-scale magnetic islands, which may then grow and reach the size of inertial scales.

  1. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  2. Experimental Verification of the Shear-Modified Ion-Acoustic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, C.; Reynolds, E. W.; Koepke, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    The predicted shear-induced shift of the wave phase velocity, the essence of the shear-modified ion-acoustic (SMIA) instability mechanism that reduces ion Landau damping for otherwise damped ion-acoustic waves [V. Gavrishchaka et al., 80, 728 (1998)], is verified with direct measurements in a strongly magnetized laboratory plasma. The SMIA growth rate is shown to increase with increasing shear, as predicted. SMIA wave propagation is shown to be possible at both small and large angles to the magnetic field, consistent with space observations of ion-acoustic-like waves.

  3. Study of micro-instabilities in toroidal plasmas with negative magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.Q.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.; Guzdar, P.N.

    1996-03-01

    The micro-instabilities driven by a parallel velocity shear, and a temperature gradient of ions are studied in toroidal plasmas with negative magnetic shear. Both the fluid and the gyro-kinetic formulations are investigated. It is found that for a broad range of parameters, the linear growth rates of the modes are lower, and the threshold temperature gradient {eta}{sub icr} is higher for plasmas with negative magnetic shear compared to plasmas with positive magnetic shear of equal magnitude. The reduction in the growth rate (with negative shear), although not insignificant, does not seem to be enough to account for the dramatic improvement in the confinement observed experimentally. Other possible physical mechanisms for the improved confinement are discussed.

  4. Properties of single shear layer instabilities and vortex-induced excitation mechanisms of thick plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billeter, P.

    2004-04-01

    The basic findings of an experimental investigation of flow-induced vibrations of gate plates with multiple degrees of freedom are presented. The study focused on the fluid dynamic behaviour of the single shear layer separating from a thick rectangular plate. The principal aim of the study was to further the physical understanding of instability-induced excitation mechanisms (IIE) involving shear layer instabilities and vortex generation. It is shown that this type of gate vibration is caused by two dominant excitation mechanisms: cross-flow and streamwise impinging-leading-edge-vortex (ILEV) excitation and streamwise body-resonant leading-edge-vortex-shedding (BR-LEVS) excitation. The first mechanism is caused by the local interaction of the shear layer underneath the gate plate with the trailing edge of the gate lip. The second mechanism is produced by the instability of the shear layer in the tailwater of the gate, with the instability being necessarily triggered by the elastic motion of the flow separation at the leading edge of the gate. Former address. Laboratory of Hydraulics (VAW), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zurich, Switzerland.

  5. Long-wave shear instability of fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniavski, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The earlier oceanographic works largely focused on the case of very large density differences between the two fluids sepa¬rated by an interface. The aim of this investigation is to extend the shear-flow analysis to more wide range of density ratios for the log profile of the "wind". Long wave asymptotic leads to the analytic determination of the stability characteristics of the flow. The present work is originally motivated by a laboratory experiment and can be useful for an astrophysical problem.

  6. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcha, N.; Smolentsev, S.; Abdou, M.; Moreau, R.

    2013-02-01

    We consider magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rectangular duct flows with volumetric heating. The flows are upward, subject to a strong transverse magnetic field perpendicular to the temperature gradient, such that the flow dynamics is quasi-two-dimensional. The internal volumetric heating imitates conditions of a blanket of a fusion power reactor, where a buoyancy-driven flow is imposed on the forced flow. Studies of this mixed-convection flow include analysis for the basic flow, linear stability analysis and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS)-type computations. The parameter range covers the Hartmann number (Ha) up to 500, the Reynolds number (Re) from 1000 to 10 000, and the Grashof number (Gr) from 105 to 5 × 108. The linear stability analysis predicts two primary instability modes: (i) bulk instability associated with the inflection point in the velocity profile near the "hot" wall and (ii) side-wall boundary layer instability. A mixed instability mode is also possible. An equation for the critical Hartmann number has been obtained as a function of Re and Gr. Effects of Ha, Re, and Gr on turbulent flows are addressed via nonlinear computations that demonstrate two characteristic turbulence regimes. In the "weak" turbulence regime, the induced vortices are localized near the inflection point of the basic velocity profile, while the boundary layer at the wall parallel to the magnetic field is slightly disturbed. In the "strong" turbulence regime, the bulk vortices interact with the boundary layer causing its destabilization and formation of secondary vortices that may travel across the flow, even reaching the opposite wall. In this regime, the key phenomena are vortex-wall and various vortex-vortex interactions. Flow and magnetic field effects on heat transfer are also analyzed.

  7. Nonlinear Instability of a Uni-directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a weak cross flow in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow results in a spanwise variation in the mean streamwise velocity profile that can lead to an amplification of certain three-dimensional disturbances through a kind of resonant-interaction mechanism (Goldstein and Wundrow 1994). The spatial evolution of an initially linear, finite-growth-rate, instability wave in such a spanwise-varying shear flow is considered, The base flow, which is governed by the three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations, is initiated by imposing a spanwise- periodic cross-flow velocity on an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow at some fixed streamwise location. The resulting mean-flow distortion initially grows with increasing streamwise distance, reaches a maximum and eventually decays through the action of viscosity. This decay, which coincides with the viscous spread of of the shear layer, means that the local growth rate of the instability wave will eventually decrease as the wave propagates downstream. Nonlinear effects can then become important within a thin spanwise-modulated critical layer once the local instability-wave amplitude and growth rate become sufficiently large and small, respectively. The amplitude equation that describes this stage of evolution is shown to be a generalization of the one obtained by Goldstein and Choi (1989) who considered the related problem of the interaction of two oblique modes in a two-dimensional shear layer.

  8. Effects of a weakly 3-D equilibrium on ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C. C.

    2014-07-15

    The effect of a small three-dimensional equilibrium distortion on an otherwise axisymmetric configuration is shown to be destabilizing to ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes. The calculations assume that the 3-D fields are weak and that shielding physics is present so that no islands appear in the resulting equilibrium. An eigenfunction that has coupled harmonics of different toroidal mode number is constructed using a perturbation approach. The theory is applied to the case of tokamak H-modes with shielded resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) present indicating RMPs can be destabilizing to intermediate-n peeling-ballooning modes.

  9. Interchange and Flow Velocity Shear Instabilities in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. The model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The derived nonlinear equations will be numerically solved by using the code Flute, which was originally developed for High Energy Density applications and modified to describe interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere. The high-resolution simulations will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  10. Magnetorotational instability: nonmodal growth and the relationship of global modes to the shearing box

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-12-10

    We study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using nonmodal stability techniques. Despite the spectral instability of many forms of MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely different region of space. These ideas lead—for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes—to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using nonmodal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite timescales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that nonmodal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence.

  11. Nonlinear shearing modes approach to the diocotron instability of a planar electron strip

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Jo, Younghyun; Lee, Hae June

    2015-09-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the diocotron instability of a planar electron strip is investigated analytically by means of the nonlinear shearing mode for the solution of the initial and boundary value problems. The method is based on the sheared spatial coordinates which account for the motion of electron flow in the electrostatic field of the unstable diocotron modes in addition to the unperturbed sheared motion of the electron flow on the transformed shear coordinates. The time evolutions are studied by the solution of the initial and boundary value problems. The obtained solutions for the perturbed electrostatic potential include two nonlinear effects—the effect of the distortion of the boundaries of the planar electron strip and the effect of the coupling of the sheared nonmodal diocotron modes. It was proved by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation that the developed theory is valid as long as the distortion of the boundaries of the basic shear flow does not change the frequency and growth rate of the linear diocotron instability in the transformed coordinates.

  12. Magnetorotational Instability: Nonmodal Growth and the Relationship of Global Modes to the Shearing Box

    SciTech Connect

    J Squire, A Bhattacharjee

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) (Balbus & Hawley 1998) using non-modal stability techniques.Despite the spectral instability of many forms of the MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very diff erent to the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely di fferent region of space. These ideas lead – for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes – to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary diff erential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using non-modal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite time-scales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that non-modal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence (Squire & Bhattacharjee 2014).

  13. Nonlocal theory of the parallel velocity shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliuolo, S.; Coppi, B.; Sen, A. K.

    1997-11-01

    The stability of a plasma flowing, with a nonuniform velocity, in the direction parallel to the main component of the confining magnetic field is examined in the presence of density gradients^1. We treat the simple sheared slab geometry, where equilibrium quantities (n,v,B) vary in the x-direction and examine both the linear stability of eigenmodes, as well as their nonlinear saturation. The basic nonlinear process consists of coupling the linearly unstable mode with linearly damped radial harmonics^2. Consequences for the radial transport of momentum in magnetically confined plasmas will be discussed. Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy. ^1 S. Migliuolo, W. Daughton, B. Coppi, 1996 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference (Philadelphia, PA). ^2 A. Ponomarev and A. K. Sen, 1997 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference (Madison, WI).

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in the vicinity of an X -type neutral line specified by footpoint shear

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, J.M.; Lau, Y. )

    1991-09-01

    Results pertaining to two-dimensional ({partial derivative}/{partial derivative}{ital z}=0) magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in the presence of an {ital X}-type neutral line are presented. Naive analyses indicate that there may be tangential discontinuities in {bold B}, specifically discontinuities in {ital B}{sub {ital z}} across the separatrix connected to the {ital X} line. However, such analyses indicate an infinite {ital z} component of footpoint displacement (or safety factor {ital q} in the toroidal case) at the separatrix. The solutions presented here allow the specification of footpoint displacement (or safety factor {ital q}) that is finite as the separatrix is approached. These solutions are scale-invariant, or similarity, solutions. They are appropriate near the {ital X} line on length scales intermediate between the boundary layer width because of resistivity (or other nonideal effects) and the macroscopic length scale. Force balance across the separatrix implies identical radial dependence in all four quadrants and continuity of {ital B}{sup 2}{sub {ital z}} across the separatrix. The latter shows that there are two classes of solutions: those with {ital B}{sub {ital z}} continuous across the separatrix and those with {vert bar}{ital B}{sub {ital z}}{vert bar} continuous but with a sign change in {ital B}{sub {ital z}}. The former class has fractional power-law singularities at the separatrix. The latter class has, in addition, a sheet current along the separatrix in the {ital x}-{ital y} plane associated with the jump in {ital B}{sub {ital z}}. Detailed properties of these solutions are explored. In particular, sheetlike one-dimensional solutions are found to be limiting cases of the general solutions. Except for one special case, these sheet solutions cannot have finite footpoint displacement if they are force free, but can in the presence of pressure gradient.

  15. Stick-slip instabilities in sheared granular flow: The role of friction and acoustic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieou, Charles K. C.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.; Langer, James S.; Carlson, Jean M.

    We propose a theory of shear flow in dense granular materials. A key ingredient of the theory is an effective temperature that determines how the material responds to external driving forces such as shear stresses and vibrations. We show that, within our model, friction between grains produces stick-slip behavior at intermediate shear rates, even if the material is rate strengthening at larger rates. In addition, externally generated acoustic vibrations alter the stick-slip amplitude, or suppress stick-slip altogether, depending on the pressure and shear rate. We construct a phase diagram that indicates the parameter regimes for which stick-slip occurs in the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations of a fixed amplitude and frequency. These results connect the microscopic physics to macroscopic dynamics and thus produce useful information about a variety of granular phenomena, including rupture and slip along earthquake faults, the remote triggering of instabilities, and the control of friction in material processing.

  16. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  17. Dynamical instability of shear-free collapsing star in extended teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila

    2015-11-01

    We study the spherically symmetric collapsing star in terms of dynamical instability. We take the framework of extended teleparallel gravity with a non-diagonal tetrad, a power-law form of the model presenting torsion and a matter distribution as a non-dissipative anisotropic fluid. The vanishing shear scalar condition is adopted to gain insight in a collapsing star. We apply a first order linear perturbation scheme to the metric, the matter, and f( T) functions. The dynamical equations are formulated under this perturbation scheme to develop collapsing equation for finding dynamical instability limits in two regimes, such as the Newtonian and the post-Newtonian regime. We obtain a constraint-free solution of a perturbed time dependent part with the help of a vanishing shear scalar. The adiabatic index exhibits the instability ranges through the second dynamical equation which depend on physical quantities such as the density, the pressure components, the perturbed parts of the symmetry of the star, etc. We also develop some constraints on the positivity of these quantities and obtain instability ranges to satisfy the dynamical instability condition.

  18. Wall slip, shear banding, and instability in the flow of a triblock copolymer micellar solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manneville, Sébastien; Colin, Annie; Waton, Gilles; Schosseler, François

    2007-06-01

    The shear flow of a triblock copolymer micellar solution (PEO-PPO-PEO Pluronic P84 in brine) is investigated using simultaneous rheological and velocity profile measurements in the concentric cylinder geometry. We focus on two different temperatures below and above the transition temperature Tc which was previously associated with the apparition of a stress plateau in the flow curve. (i) At T=37.0°CTc , the stress plateau is shown to correspond to stationary shear-banded states characterized by two high shear rate bands close to the walls and a very weakly sheared central band, together with large slip velocities at the rotor. In both cases, the high shear branch of the flow curve is characterized by flow instability. Interpretations of wall slip, three-band structure, and instability are proposed in light of recent theoretical models and experiments.

  19. Flow Instability of Soft Gels from Pluronic F108 Aqueous Solution Under Steady Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanjin; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Ryu, Chang Yeol

    2012-02-01

    Nonionic surfactants of Pluronic tri-block copolymers have received special interest during the past decades because of the temperature dependent self-assembly characteristics that would lead to the formation of hydrogels upon heating. Here, we investigate the gelation behavior of Pluronic F108, (PEO)132-(PPO)50-(PEO)132, aqueous solution with an aim to elucidate how the shear affects the thermo-reversible transitions between micellar liquids and hydrogels. Specifically, we have studied the rheological characteristics of soft gels as an intermediate state between liquid to hard gels. From steady shear experiments, we found that there exists a shear rate window, where the flow instability of soft gels is observed. On the contrary, non-Newtonian behaviors following power-law are still observed at the shear rates above and below the shear rate window showing the flow instability. Small angle x-ray scattering and dynamic light scattering experiments had been performed to reveal how the temperature dependent rheological behavior correlates with the structural changes in the micellar aqueous solutions of F108.

  20. Perturbative analysis of sheared flow Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a weakly relativistic magnetized electron fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Sundar, Sita; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman

    2012-05-15

    In the interaction of intense lasers with matter/plasma, energetic electrons having relativistic energies get created. These energetic electrons can often have sheared flow profiles as they propagate through the plasma medium. In an earlier study [Phys. Plasmas 17, 022101 (2010)], it was shown that a relativistic sheared electron flow modifies the growth rate and threshold condition of the conventional Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. A perturbative analytic treatment for the case of weakly relativistic regime has been provided here. It provides good agreement with the numerical results obtained earlier.

  1. Ion acceleration and coherent structures generated by lower hybrid shear-driven instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, H.; Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that if k = omega(S)/omega(LH) greater than 1 (omega(S) and omega(LH) are the shear and lower hybrid frequencies), a sheared electron cross-field flow excites the electron-ion-hybrid mode, causing significant perpendicular ion acceleration. The electric potential develops coherent structures (vortexlike) longer than the electron Larmor radius, rho(e). For k less than 1, a smooth transition occurs where the wavelength becomes of the order of rho(e), the lower hybrid drift instability dominates, and the formation of vortexlike structures is no longer observed. The results are relevant to laboratory, laser-produced, and space plasmas.

  2. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerfon, Antoine J.

    2016-04-01

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps.

  3. Vortex Dynamics and Shear-Layer Instability in High-Intensity Cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Cerfon, Antoine J

    2016-04-29

    We show that the space-charge dynamics of high-intensity beams in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field in cyclotrons is described by the two-dimensional Euler equations for an incompressible fluid. This analogy with fluid dynamics gives a unified and intuitive framework to explain the beam spiraling and beam breakup behavior observed in experiments and in simulations. Specifically, we demonstrate that beam breakup is the result of a classical instability occurring in fluids subject to a sheared flow. We give scaling laws for the instability and predict the nonlinear evolution of beams subject to it. Our work suggests that cyclotrons may be uniquely suited for the experimental study of shear layers and vortex distributions that are not achievable in Penning-Malmberg traps. PMID:27176525

  4. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-06-15

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  5. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  6. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D; Newman, William I

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number M(A). We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  7. Identifying instability mechanisms in swirling shear flows by using all components of the structural sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juniper, Matthew; Qadri, Ubaid

    2012-11-01

    Four different physical mechanisms can cause or support instability in swirling shear flows (Gallaire and Chomaz 2003, PoF 15(9) 2622-2639). These are: axial shear, inertial waves, centrifugal instabilities, and azimuthal shear. In relatively simple flows, such as a Rankine vortex with plug axial flow, analytical methods can identify the physical mechanisms active in each region of the flow. In more complex flows, such as a vortex breakdown bubble, analytical methods cannot be applied and, in any case, regions of the flow are not easily delineated. When considering the stability of perturbations on top of a base flow, the structural sensitivity quantifies the effect of altering the feedback between the perturbation velocity vector and the perturbation momentum equation. We examine the nine components of this structural sensitivity, firstly for simple flows such as solid body rotation, secondly for complex swirling flows. The first analysis identifies the signature of each physical mechanism, such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Coriolis mechanism. The second analysis compares these signatures with those found in different regions of the complex swirling flows. In this way, we identify the physical mechanisms that are active in each region of the more complex flow. Supported by the European Research Council and by Trinity College Cambridge.

  8. ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY AT DEAD ZONE BOUNDARIES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL GLOBAL MODELS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2012-09-01

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parameterized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the PENCIL CODE to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also triggers the RWI. The magnetized vortex that results should be disrupted by parasitical magneto-elliptic instabilities, yet it subsists in high resolution. This suggests that either the parasitic modes are still numerically damped or that the RWI supplies vorticity faster than they can destroy it. We conclude that the resistive transition between the active and dead zones in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, if sharp enough, can indeed excite vortices via RWI. Our results lend credence to previous works that relied on the alpha-disk approximation, and caution against the use of overly reduced azimuthal coverage on modeling this transition.

  9. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation.

    PubMed

    Koshel, Konstantin V; Ryzhov, Eugene A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system. PMID:27586607

  10. Excitation of instability waves in a two-dimensional shear layer by sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation of instability waves in a plane compressible shear layer by sound waves is studied. The problem is formulated mathematically as an inhomogeneous boundary-value problem. A general solution for abitrary incident sound wave is found by first constructing the Green's function of the problem. Numerical values of the coupling constants between incident sound waves and excited instability waves for a range of flow Mach number are calculated. The effect of the angle of incidence in the case of a beam of acoustic waves is analyzed. It is found that for moderate subsonic Mach numbers a narrow beam aiming at an angle between 50 to 80 deg to the flow direction is most effective in exciting instability waves.

  11. Hybrid simulations of plasma transport by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause: magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa M; Winske, Dan; Gary, S Peter

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions, massless fluid electrons) simulations of the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) for a magnetopause configuration with a magnetic shear across the boundary are carried out to examine how the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere is affected by the shear field. Low magnetic shear conditions where the magnetosheath magnetic field is within 30{sup o} of northward is included in the simulations because KHI is thought to be important for plasma transport only for northward or near-northward interplanetary magnetic field orientations. The simulations show that coherent vortices can grow for these near-northward angles, and that they are sometimes more coherent than for pure northward conditions because the turbulence which breaks-down these vortices is reduced when there are magnetic tension forces. With increasing magnetic shear angle, the growth rate is reduced, and the vortices do not grow to as large of size which reduces the plasma transport. By tracking the individual particle motions diffusion coefficients can be obtained for the system, where the diffusion is not classical in nature but instead has a time dependence resulting from both the increasingly large-scale vortex motion and the small-scale turbulence generated in the break-down of the instabilities. Results indicate that diffusion on the order of 10{sup 9} m{sup 2}/s could possibly be generated by KHI on the flanks of the magnetosphere.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  13. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of magnetohydrodynamic waves propagating on solar surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Chandra, R.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mishonov, T.

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, we study the evolutionary conditions for Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a high-temperature solar surge observed in NOAA AR 11271 using the Solar Dynamics Observatory data on 2011 August 25. The jet with speed of ≈100 km s-1, width of 7 Mm, and electron number density of 4.17×109 cm-3 is assumed to be confined in an untwisted/twisted magnetic flux tube with magnetic field of 10 G. The temperature of the plasma flow is 2×106 K while that of its environment, according to the observational data, is of the order of 106 K. The electron number density of surrounding magnetized plasma is evaluated to be equal to 1.15×109 cm-3. Under these conditions, the Alfvén speed inside the flux tube is 337.6 km s-1, the sound speed is around 166 km s-1, while these characteristic speeds of the environment are ≅719 km s-1 and ≅117 km s-1, respectively. We study the propagation of normal MHD modes in the flux tube considering the two cases, notably of untwisted magnetic flux tube and the twisted one. The numerical solution to the dispersion relation shows that the kink ( m=1) wave traveling in an untwisted flux tube becomes unstable if the jet speed exceeds 1060 km s-1—a speed which is inaccessible for solar surges. A weak twist (the ratio of azimuthal to longitudinal magnetic field component) of the internal magnetic field in the range of 0.025-0.2 does not change substantially the critical flow velocity. Thus, one implies that, in general, the kink mode is stable against the KH instability. It turns out, however, that the m=-2 and m=-3 MHD modes can become unstable when the twist parameter has values between 0.2 and 0.4. Therefore, the corresponding critical jet speed for instability onset lies in the range of 93.5-99.3 km s-1. The instability wave growth rate, depending on the value of the wavelength, is of the order of several dozen inverse milliseconds. It remains to be seen whether these predictions will be observationally validated in

  14. Study on magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with mass transfer through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Awasthi, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    We study the linear analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the interface between two viscous and magnetic fluids in a fully saturated porous medium using viscous potential flow theory, when the fluids are subjected to a constant tangential magnetic field, and when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface. The Darcy-Brinkman model has been used for the investigation. A dispersion relation has been derived and stability is discussed theoretically as well as numerically. The stability criterion is given in terms of a critical value of relative velocity as well as the critical value of applied magnetic field. It has been observed that both tangential magnetic field and vapor fraction have stabilizing effect on the stability of the system while heat and mass transfer destabilizes the interface. Porosity stabilizes the interface while the porous medium has destabilizing effect.

  15. Separated shear-layer instability reproduction by a Reynolds stress model of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakirlic, Suad; Maduta, Robert

    2013-11-01

    A boundary layer separating from a solid wall transforms into a `separated shear layer' exhibiting a broader frequency range. Such a highly-unsteady shear layer separating the mean stream from the flow reversal is dominated by the organized, large-scale coherent structures, influencing to a large extent the overall flow behavior. Unlike in the case of a flat-plate boundary layer separating at a fixed point characterizing a backward-facing step geometry, which can be reasonably well captured by a statistical model of turbulence, the separation process pertinent to continuous curved surfaces as well as some fence- or rib-shaped configurations is beyond the reach of any RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes) model independent of the modeling level. The latter issue motivated the present work, dealing with an appropriate extension of a near-wall Second-Moment Closure (SMC) model towards an instability-sensitive formulation. The production term in the corresponding scale-supplying equation is selectively enhanced through introduction of the ratio of the first to the second derivative of the velocity field, the latter representing the integral part of the von Karman length scale, enabling appropriate capturing of the fluctuating turbulence and accordingly the reproduction of the separated shear-layer instability. The analysis is performed by simulating the flow separated from a fence, an axisymmetric hill and a cylinder configuration.

  16. Numerical simulations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in a poloidal divertor tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchimoto, E.

    1988-03-01

    A new 3-D resistive MHD initial value code RPD has been successfully developed from scratch to study the linear and nonlinear evolution of long wavelength resistive MHD instabilities in a square cross-section tokamak with or without a poloidal divertor. The code numerically advances the full set of compressible resistive MHD equations in a toroidal geometry, with an important option of permitting the divertor separatrix and the region outside it to be in the computational domain. A severe temporal step size restriction for numerical stability imposed by the fast compressional waves was removed by developing and implementing a new, efficient semi-implicit scheme extending one first proposed by Harned and Kerner. As a result, the code typically runs faster than that with a mostly explicit scheme by a factor of about the aspect ratio. The equilibrium input for RPD is generated by a new 2-D code EQPD that is based on the Chodura-Schluter method. The RPD code, as well as the new semi-implicit scheme, has passed very extensive numerical tests in both divertor and divertorless geometries. Linear and nonlinear simulations in a divertorless geometry have reproduced the standard, previously known results. In a geometry with a four-node divertor the m = 2, n = 1 (2/1) tearing mode tends to be linearly stabilized as the q = 2 surface approaches the divertor separatrix. However, the m = 1, n = 1 (1/1) resistive kink mode remains relatively unaffected by the nearness of the q = 1 surface to the divertor separatrix. When plasma current is added to the region outside the divertor separatrix, the 2/1 tearing mode is linearly stabilized not by this current, but by the profile modifications induced near the q = 2 surface and the divertor separatrix. A similar stabilization effect is seen for the 1/1 resistive kink mode, but to a lesser extent.

  17. Three-dimensional flow instability near ion selective membrane under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyukjin J.; Pham, Sang Van; Kim, Bumjoo; Lim, Geunbae; White, Jacob; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-11-01

    Ion transport through ion selective membranes is critically determined by concentration polarization in bulk solutions near the membrane, which is a complicated multiphysics phenomena. For the first time, we report a full experimental and numerical characterization of three-dimensional electrokinetic instability near ion selective membrane under a DC bias and shear flow. A new pattern of instability vortex is found, which was shown to be critically affected by the confinement geometry of the system. It is also found that the onset of over-limiting current and over-limiting resistance can be controlled by geometry of the system, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems. This work is supported by ARPA-E grant (DE-AR0000294), and also by Kuwait-MIT Center for Natural Resources and the Environment (CNRE), which was funded by Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS). V. S. Pham was partially supported by SMAR.

  18. Kinetic shear Alfvén instability in the presence of impurity ions in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Gaimin; Shen, Y.; Xie, T.; He, Zhixiong; He, Hongda; Qi, Longyu; Cui, Shaoyan

    2013-10-15

    The effects of impurity ions on the kinetic shear Alfvén (KSA) instability in tokamak plasmas are investigated by numerically solving the integral equations for the KSA eigenmode in the toroidal geometry. The kinetic effects of hydrogen and impurity ions, including transit motion, finite ion Larmor radius, and finite-orbit-width, are taken into account. Toroidicity induced linear mode coupling is included through the ballooning-mode representation. Here, the effects of carbon, oxygen, and tungsten ions on the KSA instability in toroidal plasmas are investigated. It is found that, depending on the concentration and density profile of the impurity ions, the latter can be either stabilizing or destabilizing for the KSA modes. The results here confirm the importance of impurity ions in tokamak experiments and should be useful for analyzing experimental data as well as for understanding anomalous transport and control of tokamak plasmas.

  19. Sheared Flow Driven Drift Instability and Vortices in Dusty Plasmas with Opposite Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, AttaUllah; Ikram, M.; Clark, R. E. H.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic drift waves are studied in an inhomogeneous dust magnetoplasma containing dust with components of opposite polarity. The drift waves are driven by the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) sheared flows in the presence of electrons and ions. Due to sheared flow in the linear regime, the electrostatic dust drift waves become unstable. The conditions of mode instability, with the effects of dust streaming and opposite polarity, are studied. These are excited modes which gain large amplitudes and exhibit interactions among themselves. The interaction is governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) nonlinear equation with vector nonlinearity. The stationary solutions of the HM equation in the form of a vortex chain and a dipolar vortex, including effects of dust polarity and electron (ion) temperatures, are studied. The relevance of the present work to space and laboratory four component dusty plasmas is noted.

  20. Ion kinetic instabilities and turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of a plasma with hot ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr St.; Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr; Lee, Hae June

    2015-11-01

    The results of the analytical and numerical investigations of the shear flow driven ion kinetic instabilities, excited due to the inverse ion Landau damping in the parallel shearing flow of plasmas with comparable ion and electron temperatures, that is the case relevant to a tokamak and space plasma, are presented. The levels of turbulence and the turbulent heating rates of ions and ion turbulent viscosity, resulted from the development of the electrostatic ion-temperature gradient and electromagnetic drift-Alfven turbulence, are determined and their consequences are discussed. This work was funded by National R&D Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea.Grants NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029878, NRF-2013R1A1A2005758.

  1. The thermal instability in a sheared magnetic field - Filament condensation with anisotropic heat conduction. [solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The condensation-mode growth rate of the thermal instability in an empirically motivated sheared field is shown to depend upon the existence of perpendicular thermal conduction. This typically very small effect (perpendicular conductivity/parallel conductivity less than about 10 to the -10th for the solar corona) increases the spatial-derivative order of the compressible temperature-perturbation equation, and thereby eliminates the singularities which appear when perpendicular conductivity = 0. The resulting growth rate is less than 1.5 times the controlling constant-density radiation rate, and has a clear maximum at a cross-field length of order 100 times and a width of about 0.1 the magnetic shear scale for solar conditions. The profiles of the observable temperature and density perturbations are independent of the thermal conductivity, and thus agree with those found previously. An analytic solution to the short-wavelength incompressible case is also given.

  2. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  3. Inflectional instabilities in the wall region of bounded turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swearingen, Jerry D.; Blackwelder, Ron F.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    The primary thrust of this research was to identify one or more mechanisms responsible for strong turbulence production events in the wall region of bounded turbulent shear flows. Based upon previous work in a transitional boundary layer, it seemed highly probable that the production events were preceded by an inflectional velocity profile which formed on the interface between the low-speed streak and the surrounding fluid. In bounded transitional flows, this unstable profile developed velocity fluctuations in the streamwise direction and in the direction perpendicular to the sheared surface. The rapid growth of these instabilities leads to a breakdown and production of turbulence. Since bounded turbulent flows have many of the same characteristics, they may also experience a similar type of breakdown and turbulence production mechanism.

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  5. Vortex formation in protoplanetary discs induced by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Nelson, Richard P.; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations of idealized protoplanetary discs that examine the formation and evolution of vortices by the vertical shear instability (VSI). In agreement with recent work, we find that discs with radially decreasing temperature profiles and short thermal relaxation time-scales, are subject to the axisymmetric VSI. In three dimensions, the resulting velocity perturbations give rise to quasi-axisymmetric potential vorticity perturbations that break up into discrete vortices, in a manner that is reminiscent of the Rossby wave instability. Discs with very short thermal evolution time-scales (i.e. τ ≤ 0.1 local orbit periods) develop strong vorticity perturbations that roll up into vortices that have small aspect ratios (χ ≤ 2) and short lifetimes (˜ a few orbits). Longer thermal time-scales give rise to vortices with larger aspect ratios (6 ≤ χ ≤ 10), and lifetimes that depend on the entropy gradient. A steeply decreasing entropy profile leads to vortex lifetimes that exceed the simulation run times of hundreds of orbital periods. Vortex lifetimes in discs with positive or weakly decreasing entropy profiles are much shorter, being 10s of orbits at most, suggesting that the subcritical baroclinic instability plays an important role in sustaining vortices against destruction through the elliptical instability. Applied to the outer regions of protoplanetary discs, where the VSI is most likely to occur, our results suggest that vortices formed by the VSI are likely to be short-lived structures.

  6. Experimental verification of the shear-modified ion-acoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, E. W.; Teodorescu, C.; Koepke, M. E.

    2002-11-01

    The shear-modified ion-acoustic instability has been experimentally verified in double-ended Q-machine barium plasma containing shear in the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) ion drift. The ion distribution function f(X,Vz) was measured directly and non-perturbatively with laser induced fluorescence. Measurements of the wave frequency (in the lab frame) and the wave-vector components show that, in the presence of shear, the wave phase velocity (in the ion frame) is greater than the ion-acoustic speed and out of the strong ion landau-damping regime. Measurements of the parallel electron drift yield values lower than the excitation threshold predicted by homogeneous theory but large enough for inverse electron landau damping to provide the free energy for the wave. We emphasize the ramifications on the mode properties of positive and negative values of shear. A quantitative comparison between experimental results and theoretical predictions is presented. Work supported by NASA and NSF. Useful discussions with V. Gavrishchaka and E. Scime are acknowledged.

  7. Shearing instabilities accompanying high-pressure phase transformations and the mechanics of deep earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Green, Harry W.

    2007-01-01

    Deep earthquakes have been a paradox since their discovery in the 1920s. The combined increase of pressure and temperature with depth precludes brittle failure or frictional sliding beyond a few tens of kilometers, yet earthquakes occur continually in subduction zones to ≈700 km. The expected healing effects of pressure and temperature and growing amounts of seismic and experimental data suggest that earthquakes at depth probably represent self-organized failure analogous to, but different from, brittle failure. The only high-pressure shearing instabilities identified by experiment require generation in situ of a small fraction of very weak material differing significantly in density from the parent material. This “fluid” spontaneously forms mode I microcracks or microanticracks that self-organize via the elastic strain fields at their tips, leading to shear failure. Growing evidence suggests that the great majority of subduction zone earthquakes shallower than 400 km are initiated by breakdown of hydrous phases and that deeper ones probably initiate as a shearing instability associated with breakdown of metastable olivine to its higher-pressure polymorphs. In either case, fault propagation could be enhanced by shear heating, just as is sometimes the case with frictional sliding in the crust. Extensive seismological interrogation of the region of the Tonga subduction zone in the southwest Pacific Ocean provides evidence suggesting significant metastable olivine, with implication for its presence in other regions of deep seismicity. If metastable olivine is confirmed, either current thermal models of subducting slabs are too warm or published kinetics of olivine breakdown reactions are too fast. PMID:17468397

  8. Observation and Analysis of Resistive Instabilities in Negative Central Shear in DIII-D Discharges with L-Mode Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Austin, M.E.; Brennan, D.P.; Chu, M.S.; Luce, T.C.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.

    2002-07-01

    In DIII-D plasmas with L-mode edge and negative central shear (q{sub axis}-q{sub min} {approx}0.3 to 0.5), an interchange-like instability has been observed [1]. The instability and a subsequent tearing mode cause reduction of the core electron temperature and plasma rotation, and therefore the instability affects discharge evolution and the desired high performance is not achieved. Stability analyses indicate robust ideal stability, while the Resistive Interchange Mode criterion is marginal and the instability appears to be localized initially. Based on this, we believe that the mode is, most likely, a Resistive Interchange Mode. The amplitude of the instability is correlated with the location of the q{sub min} surface and inversely with the fast-ion pressure. There is indication that the interchange-like instability may be ''seeding'' the tearing mode that sometimes follows the interchange-like instability.

  9. Shear-driven instabilities and shocks in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromang, Sébastien; Leconte, Jeremy; Heng, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Context. General circulation models of the atmosphere of hot Jupiters have shown the existence of a supersonic eastward equatorial jet. These results have been obtained using numerical schemes that filter out vertically propagating sound waves and assume vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, or were acquired with fully compressive codes that use large dissipative coefficients. Aims: We remove these two limitations and investigate the effects of compressibility on the atmospheric dynamics by solving the standard Euler equations. Methods: This was done by means of a series of simulations performed in the framework of the equatorial β-plane approximation using the finite-volume shock-capturing code RAMSES. Results: At low resolution, we recover the classical results described in the literature: we find a strong and steady supersonic equatorial jet of a few km s-1 that displays no signature of shocks. We next show that the jet zonal velocity depends significantly on the grid meridional resolution. When this resolution is fine enough to properly resolve the jet, the latter is subject to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The jet zonal mean velocity displays regular oscillations with a typical timescale of a few days and a significant amplitude of about 15% of the jet velocity. We also find compelling evidence for the development of a vertical shear instability at pressure levels of a few bars. It seems to be responsible for an increased downward kinetic energy flux that significantly affects the temperature of the deep atmosphere and appears to act as a form of drag on the equatorial jet. This instability also creates velocity fluctuations that propagate upward and steepen into weak shocks at pressure levels of a few mbars. Conclusions: We conclude that hot-Jupiter equatorial jets are potentially unstable to both a barotropic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and a vertical shear instability. Upon confirmation using more realistic models, these two instabilities could result in

  10. Linear analysis of the vertical shear instability: outstanding issues and improved solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umurhan, O. M.; Nelson, R. P.; Gressel, O.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The vertical shear instability is one of several known mechanisms that are potentially active in the so-called dead zones of protoplanetary accretion disks. A recent analysis of the instability mechanism indicates that a subset of unstable modes shows unbounded growth - both as resolution is increased and when the nominal lid of the atmosphere is extended. This trend suggests that, possibly, the model system is ill-posed. Aims: This research note both examines the energy content of these modes and questions the legitimacy of assuming separable solutions for a problem whose linear operator is fundamentally inseparable. Methods: The reduced equations governing the instability are revisited and the generated solutions are examined using both the previously assumed separable forms and an improved non-separable solution form that is introduced in this paper. Results: Reconsidering the solutions of the reduced equations by using the separable form shows that, while the low-order body modes have converged eigenvalues and eigenfunctions (for both variations in the model atmosphere's vertical boundaries and radial numerical resolution). It is also confirmed that the corresponding high-order body modes and the surface modes indeed show unbounded growth rates. The energy contained in both the higher order body modes and surface modes diminishes precipitously due to the disk's Gaussian density profile. Most of the energy of the instability is contained in the low-order modes. An inseparable solution form is introduced to filter out the inconsequential surface modes, leaving only body modes (both low- and high-order ones). The analysis predicts a fastest growing mode with a specific radial length scale. The growth rates associated with the fundamental corrugation and breathing modes match the growth and length scales observed in previous nonlinear studies of the instability. Conclusions: Linear stability analysis of the vertical shear instability should be done

  11. The Effects of Contact Conditions on the Onset of Shear Instability in Cold-Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanchao; Aydin, Huseyin; Yue, Stephen; Song, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Using ABAQUS/Explicit, the effects of contact conditions between the particle and substrate, including tangential friction, normal constraint, and contact geometry on the plastic deformation during the cold-spray process are studied. It was found that the onset of shear instability, an event often used to indicate the establishment of bonding, is very sensitive to the choice of contact conditions. This suggests that the onset of shear instability does not serve as an accurate means to identify the plasticity threshold responsible for bonding. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the evolution of the overall equivalent plastic strain (i.e., ) and the overall von Mises stress, being linearly proportional to each other, are both independent of contact conditions. Furthermore, it is shown that an energy value, defined as the product of the and the von Mises stress integrated over all particle elements, can quantitatively represent the energy dissipated via plastic deformation while being independent of contact conditions. The and associated energy value as defined may provide robust tools to assess the plasticity and the consequent bonding during cold-spray.

  12. Turbulent mixing due to Holmboe wave instability in stratified shear flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehipour, Hesam; Caulfield, Colm-Cille; Peltier, W. Richard

    2015-11-01

    We consider numerically the transition to turbulence and associated mixing in parallel stratified shear flows with hyperbolic tangent initial velocity and density distributions. When the characteristic length scale of density variation is sufficiently sharper than that of the velocity variation, this flow is primarily susceptible to Holmboe wave instability (HWI) which perturbs the interface to exhibit characteristic cusped interfacial waves. Unlike previous low- Re experimental and numerical studies, in the high- Re regime in which our DNS analyses are performed, the primary HWI triggers a vigorous yet markedly more long-lived turbulent event compared to its better known relative, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). HWI `scours' the primary density interface, leading to substantial irreversible mixing and vertical transport of density displaced above and below the (robust) primary density interface which is comparable in both absolute terms and relative efficiency to the mixing associated with an equivalent KHI. Our results establish categorically that, provided the Reynolds number is high enough, shear layers with sharp density interfaces and associated locally high values of the gradient Richardson number are sites of substantial and efficient irreversible mixing. H.S. is grateful to the David Crighton Fellowship from DAMTP, University of Cambridge.

  13. Ion-temperature-gradient sensitivity of the hydrodynamic instability caused by shear in the magnetic-field-aligned plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-07-15

    The cross-magnetic-field (i.e., perpendicular) profile of ion temperature and the perpendicular profile of the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) plasma flow are sometimes inhomogeneous for space and laboratory plasma. Instability caused either by a gradient in the ion-temperature profile or by shear in the parallel flow has been discussed extensively in the literature. In this paper, (1) hydrodynamic plasma stability is investigated, (2) real and imaginary frequency are quantified over a range of the shear parameter, the normalized wavenumber, and the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths, and (3) the role of inverse Landau damping is illustrated for the case of combined ion-temperature gradient and parallel-flow shear. We find that increasing the ion-temperature gradient reduces the instability threshold for the hydrodynamic parallel-flow shear instability, also known as the parallel Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the D'Angelo instability. We also find that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled, reinforcing action of both free-energy sources. For the case of comparable electron and ion temperature, we illustrate analytically the transition of the D'Angelo instability to the kinetic instability as (a) the shear parameter, (b) the normalized wavenumber, and (c) the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths are varied and we attribute the changes in stability to changes in the amount of inverse ion Landau damping. We show that near a normalized wavenumber k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} of order unity (i) the real and imaginary values of frequency become comparable and (ii) the imaginary frequency, i.e., the growth rate, peaks.

  14. A powerful local shear instability in weakly magnetized disks. III - Long-term evolution in a shearing sheet. IV - Nonaxisymmetric perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, John F.; Balbus, Steven A.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the recently identified accretion disk magnetic shear instability is investigated through a series of numerical simulations. Finite-difference computations of the equations of compressible MHD are carried out on an axisymmetric shearing sheet system with periodic boundary conditions designed to approximate a local region within an accretion disk. Initial field configurations that include some net vertical component evolve into a nonlinear, exponentially growing solution with large poloidal velocities and magnetic fields with energies comparable to the thermal energy density. The stability of a purely azimuthal field configuration is examined, and it is found that nonaxisymmetric instability is present, but with a growth time measured in tens of orbital periods. In general, the most rapid growth occurs for very small radial and azimuthal wavenumbers, leading to coherent magnetic field structure in planes parallel to the disk. It is suggested that this instability is a key ingredient for the generation of magnetic fields in disks.

  15. Free MHD Shear Layers In The Presence Of Rotation And Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, E. J.; Roach, A. H.; Edlund, E. M.; Sloboda, P.; Ji, H.

    2012-03-20

    We present an experimental and numerical study of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic free shear layers and their stability. We first examine the experimental measurement of globally unstable hydrodynamic shear layers in the presence of rotation, and their range of instability. These are compared to numerical simulations, which are used to explain the modification of the shear layer and thus the critical Rossby number for stability. Magnetic fields are then applied to these scenarios, and globally unstable magnetohydrodynamic shear layers generated. These too are compared to numerical simulations, showing behavior consistent with the hydrodynamic case and previously reported measurements.

  16. Comparison of kinetic and extended magnetohydrodynamics computational models for the linear ion temperature gradient instability in slab geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, D. D.; Cheng, J.; Parker, S. E.; Barnes, D. C.

    2013-06-15

    We perform linear stability studies of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability in unsheared slab geometry using kinetic and extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, in the regime k{sub ∥}/k{sub ⊥}≪1. The ITG is a parallel (to B) sound wave that may be destabilized by finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) effects in the presence of a gradient in the equilibrium ion temperature. The ITG is stable in both ideal and resistive MHD; for a given temperature scale length L{sub Ti0}, instability requires that either k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} or ρ{sub i}/L{sub Ti0} be sufficiently large. Kinetic models capture FLR effects to all orders in either parameter. In the extended MHD model, these effects are captured only to lowest order by means of the Braginskii ion gyro-viscous stress tensor and the ion diamagnetic heat flux. We present the linear electrostatic dispersion relations for the ITG for both kinetic Vlasov and extended MHD (two-fluid) models in the local approximation. In the low frequency fluid regime, these reduce to the same cubic equation for the complex eigenvalue ω=ω{sub r}+iγ. An explicit solution is derived for the growth rate and real frequency in this regime. These are found to depend on a single non-dimensional parameter. We also compute the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions with the extended MHD code NIMROD, and a hybrid kinetic δf code that assumes six-dimensional Vlasov ions and isothermal fluid electrons, as functions of k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} and ρ{sub i}/L{sub Ti0} using a spatially dependent equilibrium. These solutions are compared with each other, and with the predictions of the local kinetic and fluid dispersion relations. Kinetic and fluid calculations agree well at and near the marginal stability point, but diverge as k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} or ρ{sub i}/L{sub Ti0} increases. There is good qualitative agreement between the models for the shape of the unstable global eigenfunction for L{sub Ti0}/ρ{sub i}=30 and 20. The results quantify how far

  17. Inviscid vortex motions in weakly three-dimensional boundary layers and their relation with instabilities in stratified shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas D.; Choudhari, Meelan

    1993-01-01

    We consider the inviscid instability of three-dimensional boundary-layer flows with a small crossflow over locally concave or convex walls, along with the inviscid instability of stratified shear flows. We show how these two problems are closely related through the forms of their governing equations. A proposed definition of a generalized Richardson number for the neutrally stable inviscid vortex motions is given. Implications of the similarity between the two problems are discussed.

  18. Coupling of the Okuda-Dawson model with a shear current-driven wave and the associated instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Saleem, H.; Saleem

    2013-12-01

    It is pointed out that the Okuda-Dawson mode can couple with the newly proposed current-driven wave. It is also shown that the Shukla-Varma mode can couple with these waves if the density inhomogeneity is taken into account in a plasma containing stationary dust particles. A comparison of several low-frequency electrostatic waves and instabilities driven by shear current and shear plasma flow in an electron-ion plasma with and without stationary dust is also presented.

  19. Non-modal theory of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability of plasma shear flows across the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The temporal evolution of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability and of the related anomalous transport of the ion thermal energy of plasma shear flow across the magnetic field is investigated analytically. This instability develops in a steady plasma due to the inverse ion Landau damping and has the growth rate of the order of the frequency when the ion temperature is equal to or above the electron temperature. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal methodology of the shearing modes which are the waves that have a static spatial structure in the frame of the background flow. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the instability experiences the non-modal temporal evolution in the shearing flow during which the unstable perturbation becomes very different from a canonical modal form. It transforms into the non-modal structure with vanishing frequency and growth rate with time. The obtained solution of the nonlinear integral equation, which accounts for the random scattering of the angle of the ion gyro-motion due to the interaction of ions with ensemble of shearing waves, reveals similar but accelerated process of the transformations of the perturbations into the zero frequency structures. It was obtained that in the shear flow the anomalous ion thermal conductivity decays with time. It is a strictly non-modal effect, which originates from the temporal evolution of the shearing modes turbulence.

  20. A hybrid Rayleigh-Taylor-current-driven coupled instability in a magnetohydrodynamically collimated cylindrical plasma with lateral gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    We present an MHD theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the surface of a magnetically confined cylindrical plasma flux rope in a lateral external gravity field. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability that cannot be described by either of the two instabilities alone. The lateral gravity breaks the axisymmetry of the system and couples all azimuthal modes together. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. The theory successfully explains the lateral Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment [Moser and Bellan, Nature 482, 379 (2012)]. Potential applications of the theory include magnetic controlled fusion, solar emerging flux, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections, and other space and astrophysical plasma processes.

  1. Radiation and porosity effects on the magnetohydrodynamic flow near a vertical plate that applies shear stress to the fluid with mass diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arshad; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-06-19

    This article studies the radiation and porosity effects on the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow of an incompressible viscous fluid past an infinite vertical plate that applies a shear stress f(t) to the fluid. Conjugate phenomenon of heat and mass transfer is considered. General solutions of the dimensionless governing equations along with imposed initial and boundary conditions are determined using Laplace transform technique. The solution of velocity is presented as a sum of mechanical and non mechanical parts. These solutions satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some known solutions from the literature as special cases. The results for embedded parameters are shown graphically. Numerical results for skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are computed and presented in tabular forms.

  2. The study of adiabatic shear band instability in a pearlitic 4340 steel using a dynamic punch test

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K. )

    1994-11-01

    At low strain rates and moderate levels of strain, slip and twinning are the most common deformation mechanisms in metals and alloys. Both mechanisms are highly correlated with the crystallography of the material. At higher strain rates and levels of strain, deformation instabilities, such as adiabatic shear bands (ASB), may develop. These bands are planar in nature, and their formation is related more to the specimen geometry, deformation process, and mechanical properties of a material than to its local crystallography. The formation of adiabatic shear band instabilities in a pearlitic 4340 steel using a dynamic punch test has been studied. The dynamic punch-impact test produced white-etching adiabatic shear bands. The average strain of 0.5 was sufficient to produce adiabatic shear bands in this steel at an average strain rate of 18,000 s[sup [minus]1]. Nanohardness variations found across the adiabatic shear at an average strain rate of 18,000 s[sup [minus]1]. Nanohardness variations found across the adiabatic shear band are thought to be caused by the fragmentation and spheriodization of the Fe[sub 3]C and the overall deformation and work hardening of the pearlitic microstructure. The cracks formed at the termination of the adiabatic shear band caused the sample to fracture in a ductile mode.

  3. Earthquakes initiation and thermal shear instability in the Hindu Kush intermediate depth nest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Piero; Prieto, German; Rivera, Efrain; Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Intermediate depth earthquakes often occur along subducting lithosphere, but despite their ubiquity the physical mechanism responsible for promoting brittle or brittle-like failure is not well constrained. Large concentrations of intermediate depth earthquakes have been found to be related to slab break-off, slab drip, and slab tears. The intermediate depth Hindu Kush nest is one of the most seismically active regions in the world and shows the correlation of a weak region associated with ongoing slab detachment process. Here we study relocated seismicity in the nest to constraint the geometry of the shear zone at the top of the detached slab. The analysis of the rupture process of the Mw 7.5 Afghanistan 2015 earthquake and other several well-recorded events over the past 25 years shows an initially slow, highly dissipative rupture, followed by a dramatic dynamic frictional stress reduction and corresponding large energy radiation. These properties are typical of thermal driven rupture processes. We infer that thermal shear instabilities are a leading mechanism for the generation of intermediated-depth earthquakes especially in presence of weak zone subjected to large strain accumulation, due to ongoing detachment process.

  4. Transition to asymmetry in pipe flow of shear-thinning fluids: a linear instability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David; Wen, Chaofan; Poole, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies of shear-thinning fluids in pipe flow discovered that, although the time-averaged velocity profile was axisymmetric when the flow was laminar or fully turbulent, contrary to expectations it was asymmetric in the laminar-turbulent transition regime. We reveal that in fact the asymmetry is not induced by the laminar-turbulent transition process, but is an instability of the laminar state. Furthermore, the transition process is responsible for returning symmetry to the flow (i.e. the opposite to what was previously believed), which explains why the fully turbulent case is axisymmetric. The experiment was performed using an aqueous solution of xanthan gum (0.15%), an essentially inelastic shear-thinning polymer solution. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was used to measure the 3C velocity vectors over the entire circular cross-section of the pipe, 220 pipe diameters downstream of the inlet. The deviation from the axisymmetric laminar state is observed to develop in the form of a supercritical bifurcation with square-root dependence on Reynolds number. The asymmetry is non-hysteretic and reversible, not only having a favoured location, but a preferred route between axisymmetry and asymmetry, which it adheres to regardless of the direction of the transition.

  5. Renormalized theory of ion temperature gradient instability of the magnetic-field-aligned plasma shear flow with hot ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2015-10-15

    The developed kinetic theory for the stability of a magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) shear flow with inhomogeneous ion temperature [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072117 (2014)] predicted that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled reinforcing action of the flow velocity shear and ion temperature gradient in the cases where comparable ion and electron temperatures exist. In the present paper, the nonlinear theory was developed for the instability caused by the combined effects of ion-temperature-gradient and shear-flow (ITG–SF). The level of the electrostatic turbulence is determined for the saturation state of the instability on the basis of the nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for a nonlinear scattering of ions by the developed turbulence in a sheared flow. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the turbulent scattering of ions by ITG–SF driven turbulence, was derived and employed for the estimation of the turbulent ion viscosity, the anomalous ion thermal conductivity, and anomalous ion heating rate at the saturation state of the instability.

  6. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  7. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  8. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code developed by Bauer et al. (1978) for the study of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a plasma in toroidal geometry is extended so that the growth rates of instabilities may be estimated more accurately. The original code, which is based on the variational principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is upgraded by the introduction of a nonlinear formula for the growth rate of an unstable mode which acts as a quantitative measure of instability that is important in estimating numerical errors. The revised code has been applied to the determination of the nonlinear saturation, ballooning modes and beta limits for tokamaks, stellarators and torsatrons.

  9. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  10. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Park, H K; Yun, G S; Nam, Y B; Choe, G H; Lee, W; Jardin, S

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis. PMID:26827320

  11. Separate and combined effects of static stability and shear variation on the baroclinic instability of a two-layer current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Quasi-geostrophic disturbance instability characteristics are studied in light of a linearized, two-layer Eady model in which both the static stability and the zonal current shear are uniform but different in each layer. It is shown that the qualitative character of the instability is determined by the sign of the basic-state potential vorticity gradient at the layer interface, and that there is a qualitative similarity between the effects of Richardson number variations due to changes in static stability and those due to changes in shear. The two-layer model is also used to construct an analog of the Williams (1974) continuous model of generalized Eady waves, the basic state in that case having zero potential vorticity gradient in the interior. The model results are in good agreement with the earlier Williams findings.

  12. Instability of a dissipative restricted non-static axial collapse with shear viscosity in f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Yousaf, Z. E-mail: zeeshan.math@pu.edu.pk

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates stability regions for a non-static restricted class of axially symmetric geometry filled with anisotropic, heat radiating and shearing viscous fluid that collapses non-adiabatically. In this context, dynamical equations as well as collapse equation are constructed through perturbation scheme with f(R) = R+εR{sup 2} model. We then develop dynamical instability regions at Newtonian and post-Newtonian eras. It is concluded that pressure anisotropy and heat dissipation increases the instability regions of the collapsing system while shearing viscosity as well as f(R) dark sourced terms decrease them during collapse. Finally, we calculate our results under constant curvature condition and GR limit, i.e., f(R)→R.

  13. Investigating the Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework ZIF-8: Mechanical Instability Due to Shear Mode Softening.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Aurélie U; Boutin, Anne; Fuchs, Alain H; Coudert, François-Xavier

    2013-06-01

    We provide the first molecular dynamics study of the mechanical instability that is the cause of pressure-induced amorphization of zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8. By measuring the elastic constants of ZIF-8 up to the amorphization pressure, we show that the crystal-to-amorphous transition is triggered by the mechanical instability of ZIF-8 under compression, due to shear mode softening of the material. No similar softening was observed under temperature increase, explaining the absence of temperature-induced amorphization in ZIF-8. We also demonstrate the large impact of the presence of adsorbate in the pores on the mechanical stability and compressibility of the framework, increasing its shear stability. This first molecular dynamics study of ZIF mechanical properties under variations of pressure, temperature, and pore filling opens the way to a more comprehensive understanding of their mechanical stability, structural transitions, and amorphization. PMID:26283122

  14. Experimental study of small-scale instabilities in Rayleigh-Bénard convection driven by a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Valerie; Davaille, Anne; Crambes, Christine

    2003-11-01

    Small-scale convection appears under a cold thermal boundary layer when the local Rayleigh number exceeds a critical value Ra_δ. We have studied experimentally the interaction of this small-scale instabilities with a shear flow. Experiments are performed in a tank heated from one side and cooled from above. Rayleigh numbers are between 10^4 and 10^8, and Prandtl numbers are high (≥ 1000). Fluids are polymer solutions (constant viscosity), sugar or corn syrups (viscosity depending on temperature) or wax (phase transition). Two scales of motion are observed: a large convection cell (whole tank) and, for sufficiently high Rayleigh numbers, small-scale instabilities that remain trapped in the shear zone, following an helicoidal path with axis parallel to the shear. The intermittency of the associated temperature time series has been analyzed. The temporal periodicity scales as τ ˜ Ra-2/3. The presence of these instabilities under the lithosphere could explain some geophysical observations, such as small-wavelength lineations in the terrestrial gravity field.

  15. Influence of the outer-magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide on the reflection of hydromagnetic waves from a shear flow at the magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A. Chuiko, D. A.

    2013-12-15

    The coefficient of reflection of a fast magnetosonic wave incident on the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium with allowance for the transverse inhomogeneity of the magnetosphere and a jump of the plasma parameters at the magnetopause. Three factors decisively affecting the properties of reflection are taken into account: the shear flow of the solar wind plasma relative to the magnetosphere; the presence of a magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide caused by the transverse plasma inhomogeneity; and the presence of an Alfvén resonance deep in the magnetosphere, where the oscillation energy dissipates. If the solar wind velocity exceeds the wave phase velocity along the magnetopause, then the wave energy in the solar wind is negative and such a wave experiences overreflection. In the opposite case, the wave energy is positive and the wave is reflected only partially. The wave reflection has a pronounced resonant character: the reflection coefficient has deep narrow minima or high narrow maxima at the eigenfrequencies of the magnetospheric waveguide. For other frequencies, the reflection coefficient only slightly differs from unity. The wave energy influx into the magnetosphere is positive for waves with both positive and negative energies. For waves with a negative energy, this is a consequence of their overreflection, because the flux of negative energy carried away by the reflected wave exceeds the incident flux of negative energy.

  16. Global large deep-focus earthquakes: Source process and cascading failure of shear instability as a unified physical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wen, Lianxing

    2015-08-01

    We apply a multiple source inversion method to systematically study the source processes of 25 large deep-focus (depth >400 km) earthquakes with Mw > 7.0 from 1994 to 2012, based on waveform modeling of P, pP, SH and sSH wave data. The earthquakes are classified into three categories based on spatial distributions and focal mechanisms of the inferred sub-events: 1) category one, with non-planar distribution and variable focal mechanisms of sub-events, represented by the 1994 Mw 8.2 Bolivia earthquake and the 2013 Mw 8.3 Okhotsk earthquake; 2) category two, with planar distribution but focal mechanisms inconsistent with the plane, including eighteen earthquakes; and 3) category three, with planar distribution and focal mechanisms consistent with the plane, including six earthquakes. We discuss possible physical mechanisms for earthquakes in each category in the context of plane rupture, transformational faulting and shear thermal instability. We suggest that the inferred source processes of large deep-focus earthquakes can be best interpreted by cascading failure of shear thermal instabilities in pre-existing weak zones, with the perturbation of stress generated by a shear instability triggering another and focal mechanisms of the sub-events controlled by orientations of the pre-existing weak zones. The proposed mechanism can also explain the observed great variability of focal mechanisms, the presence of large values of CLVD (Compensated Linear Vector Dipole) and the super-shear rupture of deep-focus earthquakes in the previous studies. In addition, our studies suggest existence of relationships of seismic moment ∼ (source duration)3 and moment ∼ (source dimension)3 in large deep-focus earthquakes.

  17. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak.

    PubMed

    García-Muñoz, M; Fahrbach, H-U; Zohm, H

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)]. PMID:19499603

  18. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-15

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  19. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Muñoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  20. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the magnetopause, magnetohydrodynamic waveguide in the outer magnetosphere, and Alfven resonance deep in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A. Chuiko, D. A.

    2013-06-15

    Oscillations of the 'magnetosphere-solar wind' system are studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium. The properties of oscillations are determined by three phenomena: Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the tangential discontinuity (magnetopause) separating the magnetosphere and the solar wind, the presence of a waveguide for fast magnetosonic waves in the magnetosphere, and the Alfven resonance-a sharp increase in the amplitude of oscillations having the properties of Alfven waves-in the inner magnetosphere. The oscillations of the system form a discrete spectrum of eigenmodes. Analytical expressions are obtained for the frequency and growth rate of instability of each mode, as well as for the functions describing the spatial structure of these modes. All these characteristics of the eigenmodes are shown to depend on the velocity of the solar wind as a parameter. The dependences of the main mode characteristics (such as the instability thresholds, the points of the maximum and minimum growth rate, and the spatial distributions of the oscillation energy) on this parameter are determined for each eigenmode.

  1. Influence of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning instability and edge localized mode crash

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.; Xia, T. Y.

    2012-09-15

    The E Multiplication-Sign B shear flow plays a dual role on peeling-ballooning modes and their subsequently triggered edge localized mode (ELM) crashes. On one hand, the flow shear can stabilize high-n modes and twist the mode in the poloidal direction, constraining the mode's radial extent and reducing the size of the corresponding ELM. On the other hand, the shear flow also introduces the Kelvin-Helmholtz drive, which can destabilize peeling-ballooning modes. The overall effect of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning modes and ELM crashes depends on the competition between these two effects. When the flow shear is either small or very large, it can reduce ELM size. However, for moderate values of flow shear, the destabilizing effect from the Kelvin-Helmholtz term is dominant and leads to larger ELM crashes.

  2. Wall-mode instability in plane shear flow of viscoelastic fluid over a deformable solid.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Paresh; Bhade, Piyush; Kumaran, V

    2015-02-01

    The linear stability analysis of a plane Couette flow of an Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluid past a flexible solid medium is carried out to investigate the role of polymer addition in the stability behavior. The system consists of a viscoelastic fluid layer of thickness R, density ρ, viscosity η, relaxation time λ, and retardation time βλ flowing past a linear elastic solid medium of thickness HR, density ρ, and shear modulus G. The emphasis is on the high-Reynolds-number wall-mode instability, which has recently been shown in experiments to destabilize the laminar flow of Newtonian fluids in soft-walled tubes and channels at a significantly lower Reynolds number than that for flows in rigid conduits. For Newtonian fluids, the linear stability studies have shown that the wall modes become unstable when flow Reynolds number exceeds a certain critical value Re(c) which scales as Σ(3/4), where Reynolds number Re=ρVR/η,V is the top-plate velocity, and dimensionless parameter Σ=ρGR(2)/η(2) characterizes the fluid-solid system. For high-Reynolds-number flow, the addition of polymer tends to decrease the critical Reynolds number in comparison to that for the Newtonian fluid, indicating a destabilizing role for fluid viscoelasticity. Numerical calculations show that the critical Reynolds number could be decreased by up to a factor of 10 by the addition of small amount of polymer. The critical Reynolds number follows the same scaling Re(c)∼Σ(3/4) as the wall modes for a Newtonian fluid for very high Reynolds number. However, for moderate Reynolds number, there exists a narrow region in β-H parametric space, corresponding to very dilute polymer solution (0.9≲β<1) and thin solids (H≲1.1), in which the addition of polymer tends to increase the critical Reynolds number in comparison to the Newtonian fluid. Thus, Reynolds number and polymer properties can be tailored to either increase or decrease the critical Reynolds number for unstable modes, thus providing

  3. Control of ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in reversed field pinches with 2 resistive walls by sensing three components of B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassenberg, Karl; Richardson, Andrew S.; Brennan, Dylan P.; Finn, John M.

    2012-03-01

    Confinement times of fusion plasmas can be greatly enhanced through access to flexible and reliable control of both resistive and ideal plasma modes. Numerical studies are presented of magnetohydrodynamic instability control through sensing and proportional feedback in Reversed Field Pinches (RFPs) with two resistive walls. The feedback signal incorporates all three components of the magnetic field perturbation, each with its own gain factor. This study extends the work of Richardson & Finn (Phys. Plasmas vol. 17, p. 112511 (2010)) and includes an important feature of the RFX-mod experiment, namely two resistive walls with external measurements. In particular, when a single resistive wall scenario is considered, feedback based on sensing the first tangential component (the derivative of the helical flux) inside the wall is found to perform better than when the same component is measured outside the wall. Furthermore, the effect of feedback control on the magnetosonic (MS) mode with two walls is compared to the single resistive wall scenario with the first tangential component measured outside. In the latter case feedback of the second tangential component (the helical field) was found to drive the MS mode unstable.

  4. On magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in magnetic flux tubes. [in plane parallel stellar atmosphere in LTE and hydrostatic equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massaglia, S.; Ferrari, A.; Bodo, G.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of current-driven filamentary modes in magnetic flux tubes embedded in a plane-parallel atmosphere in LTE and in hydrostatic equilibrium is discussed. Within the tube, energy transport by radiation only is considered. The dominant contribution to the opacity is due to H- ions and H atoms (in the Paschen continuum). A region in the parameter space of the equilibrium configuration in which the instability is effective is delimited, and the relevance of this process for the formation of structured coronae in late-type stars and accretion disks is discussed.

  5. Extra dissipation and flow uniformization due to elastic instabilities of shear-thinning polymer solutions in model porous media.

    PubMed

    Machado, Anaïs; Bodiguel, Hugues; Beaumont, Julien; Clisson, Gérald; Colin, Annie

    2016-07-01

    We study flows of hydrolized polyacrylamide solutions in two dimensional porous media made using microfluidics, for which elastic effects are dominant. We focus on semi-dilute solutions (0.1%-0.4%) which exhibit a strong shear thinning behavior. We systematically measure the pressure drop and find that the effective permeability is dramatically higher than predicted when the Weissenberg number is greater than about 10. Observations of the streamlines of the flow reveal that this effect coincides with the onset of elastic instabilities. Moreover, and importantly for applications, we show using local measurements that the mean flow is modified: it appears to be more uniform at high Weissenberg number than for Newtonian fluids. These observations are compared and discussed using pore network simulations, which account for the effect of disorder and shear thinning on the flow properties. PMID:27478522

  6. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  7. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  8. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  9. Shear waves in the diamond-anvil cell reveal pressure-induced instability in (Mg,Fe)O.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Steven D; Spetzler, Hartmut; Reichmann, Hans J; Smyth, Joseph R

    2004-04-20

    The emerging picture of Earth's deep interior from seismic tomography indicates more complexity than previously thought. The presence of lateral anisotropy and heterogeneity in Earth's mantle highlights the need for fully anisotropic elasticity data from mineral physics. A breakthrough in high-frequency (gigahertz) ultrasound has resulted in transmission of pure-mode elastic shear waves into a high-pressure diamond-anvil cell using a P-to-S elastic-wave conversion. The full elastic tensor (c(ij)) of high-pressure minerals or metals can be measured at extreme conditions without optical constraints. Here we report the effects of pressure and composition on shear-wave velocities in the major lower-mantle oxide, magnesiowüstite-(Mg,Fe)O. Magnesiowüstite containing more than approximately 50% iron exhibits pressure-induced c(44) shear-mode softening, indicating an instability in the rocksalt structure. The oxide closer to expected lower-mantle compositions ( approximately 20% iron) shows increasing shear velocities more similar to MgO, indicating that it also should have a wide pressure-stability field. A complete sign reversal in the c(44) pressure derivative points to a change in the topology of the (Mg,Fe)O phase diagram at approximately 50-60% iron. The relative stability of Mg-rich (Mg,Fe)O and the strong compositional dependence of shear-wave velocities (and partial differential c(44)/ partial differential P) in (Mg,Fe)O implies that seismic heterogeneity in Earth's lower mantle may result from compositional variations rather than phase changes in (Mg,Fe)O. PMID:15079080

  10. Shear waves in the diamond-anvil cell reveal pressure-induced instability in (Mg,Fe)O

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Steven D.; Spetzler, Hartmut; Reichmann, Hans J.; Smyth, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging picture of Earth's deep interior from seismic tomography indicates more complexity than previously thought. The presence of lateral anisotropy and heterogeneity in Earth's mantle highlights the need for fully anisotropic elasticity data from mineral physics. A breakthrough in high-frequency (gigahertz) ultrasound has resulted in transmission of pure-mode elastic shear waves into a high-pressure diamond-anvil cell using a P-to-S elastic-wave conversion. The full elastic tensor (cij) of high-pressure minerals or metals can be measured at extreme conditions without optical constraints. Here we report the effects of pressure and composition on shear-wave velocities in the major lower-mantle oxide, magnesiowüstite-(Mg,Fe)O. Magnesiowüstite containing more than ≈50% iron exhibits pressure-induced c44 shear-mode softening, indicating an instability in the rocksalt structure. The oxide closer to expected lower-mantle compositions (≈20% iron) shows increasing shear velocities more similar to MgO, indicating that it also should have a wide pressure-stability field. A complete sign reversal in the c44 pressure derivative points to a change in the topology of the (Mg,Fe)O phase diagram at ≈50–60% iron. The relative stability of Mg-rich (Mg,Fe)O and the strong compositional dependence of shear-wave velocities (and ∂c44/∂P) in (Mg,Fe)O implies that seismic heterogeneity in Earth's lower mantle may result from compositional variations rather than phase changes in (Mg,Fe)O. PMID:15079080

  11. Instability of settling non-spherical particle in a vertical shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei; Koch, Donald; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2010-11-01

    Two mechanisms are attributed to the cross-stream migration when fiber settles in a vertical shear flow. First, a particle may migrate toward streamlines of the imposed shear flow with smaller downward fluid velocities, due to relative translation of the particle and fluid, called the Saffman effect. Second, a non-spherical particle at finite Reynolds number will attempt to rotate with its long body along the horizontal direction due to inertial torque. On the other hand, the torque due to the imposed weak vertical shear flow rotates the non-spherical in the opposite direction. The dynamic balance between the two torques may lead to a small angle between the particle long body and horizontal plane and may drive the particle migrate toward the streamlines of the shear flow with the large downward fluid velocity. The second mechanism was recently proposed by Shin, Koch and Subramanian.A fiber with aspect ratio κ=2, 1.6, 1.2 1.1 and 0 is used to study the lateral migration. It is shown that at a given shear and aspect ratio, fiber lateral migration can be divided into three phases depending on the Reynolds number. The simulation results identified the lateral migration phase diagram and confirm the second mechanism.

  12. Is the Oort A-value a universal growth rate limit for accretion disk shear instabilities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balbus, Steven A.; Hawley, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A weak-field local MHD instability that is of importance to accretion disks is examined. The maximum growth rate of the instability is found to be not only independent of the magnetic field strength but independent of field geometry as well. In particular, all Keplerian disks are unstable in the presence of any weak poloidal field, with the ratio of the maximum growth rate to disk angular velocity given by 3/4. The maximum growth rate of any weak field configuration that is not purely toroidal is given by the local Oort A-value of the disk. The behavior is studied by using a form of the dynamical Hill equations. It is conjectured that the Oort A-value is an upper bound to the growth rate of any instability feeding upon the free energy of differential rotation.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  14. Shear flow instabilities induced by trapped ion modes in collisionless temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Palermo, F.; Garbet, X.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Ghizzo, A.

    2015-04-15

    One important issue in turbulence self-organization is the interplay between the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability and streamers and/or zonal flows. This question has been debated for a long time. The effects of the KH instability and its position in the sequence of events between streamers, turbulence, and zonal flows have been investigated with a reduced gyro-bounce averaged kinetic code devoted to study the primary ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability linked to trapped ion modes (TIM). In toroidal geometry, the specific dynamics of TIM linked to trapped particles becomes important when the frequency of ITG modes falls below the ion bounce frequency, allowing one to average on both the cyclotron and bounce motion fast time scales. This reduction of the number of degrees of freedom leads to a strong reduction of computer resources (memory and computation time). Bounce-averaged gyrokinetic code can be considered as a toy model able to describe basic structures of turbulent transport in tokamak devices. In particular, by means of this code, we have observed that the energy injected in the system by the TIM instability is exchanged between streamers and zonal flows by means of KH vortices that grow along these structures in the nonlinear phase. The energy transfer occurs throughout the relaxation phase of the streamer growth leading to a modification of the KH modes and to the generation of the zonal flows.

  15. Shear flow instabilities induced by trapped ion modes in collisionless temperature gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, F.; Garbet, X.; Ghizzo, A.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.

    2015-04-01

    One important issue in turbulence self-organization is the interplay between the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and streamers and/or zonal flows. This question has been debated for a long time. The effects of the KH instability and its position in the sequence of events between streamers, turbulence, and zonal flows have been investigated with a reduced gyro-bounce averaged kinetic code devoted to study the primary ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability linked to trapped ion modes (TIM). In toroidal geometry, the specific dynamics of TIM linked to trapped particles becomes important when the frequency of ITG modes falls below the ion bounce frequency, allowing one to average on both the cyclotron and bounce motion fast time scales. This reduction of the number of degrees of freedom leads to a strong reduction of computer resources (memory and computation time). Bounce-averaged gyrokinetic code can be considered as a toy model able to describe basic structures of turbulent transport in tokamak devices. In particular, by means of this code, we have observed that the energy injected in the system by the TIM instability is exchanged between streamers and zonal flows by means of KH vortices that grow along these structures in the nonlinear phase. The energy transfer occurs throughout the relaxation phase of the streamer growth leading to a modification of the KH modes and to the generation of the zonal flows.

  16. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  17. Robust control of linear global instability in models of non-parallel shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Bewley, Thomas

    2000-11-01

    The present study investigates the control of self-excited oscillations in spatially developing flows such as jets and wakes using H_∞ control theory on a linear complex Ginzburg Landau model. The coefficients of this 1D model equation, which is known to exhibit a generic hydrodynamic instability behavior, are those scaled by Roussopoulos & Monkewitz ( Physica D, 1996) to display behavior modeling that of the near-wake of a circular cylinder, in which a large pocket of local absolute instability is embedded within a convectively unstable flow. Based on noisy measurements at a point sensor typically located inside the wake, the compensator uses an \\cal H_∞ filter to construct a state estimate. This estimate is then used to compute \\cal H_∞ control feedback at a point actuator location, which is typically located upstream of the sensor. The goal of the control scheme is to stabilize the system by minimizing a weighted average of the ``system response'' and the ``control effort'' (both appropriately defined) while rigorously bounding the response of the controlled system to external disturbances. The application of such modern control rules leads to better performance than the control feedback proposed by previous studies by delaying the Reynolds number at which the onset of global instability appears by a factor of 3 and substantially decreasing the sensitivity of the system to external perturbations.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  19. Baroclinic Critical Layers and the Zombie Vortex Instability (ZVI) in Stratified, Rotating Shear Flows: Where They Form and Why

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Huerre, Patrick; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Pei, Suyang; Rui, Maryann; Marcus, Philip

    2015-11-01

    It has been found recently that baroclinic critical layers are responsible for a new finite-amplitude instability, called the Zombie Vortex Instability (ZVI), in stratified (with Brunt-Väisälä frequency N) flows, rotating with angular velocity Ω and shear σ. ZVI occurs via baroclinic critical layers that create linearly unstable vortex layers, which roll-up into vortices. Those vortices excite new baroclinic critical layers, which form new generations of vortices, resulting in ``vortex self-replication'' that fills the fluid with turbulent vortices. To understand the role of baroclinic critical layers in ZVI, we analyze their structures with matched asymptotic expansions, assuming viscosity determines the magnitude and thickness of the critical layer. We verify our analytically obtained leading order inner and outer layer solutions with numerical simulations. In addition, maps of the control parameter space (Reynolds number, N/ Ω and σ/ Ω) are presented that show two regimes where ZVI occurs, and the physics that determines the boundaries of the two regimes is interpreted. The parameter map and its underlying physics provide guidance for designing practical laboratory experiments in which ZVI could be observed.

  20. Collisionless reversed magnetic shear trapped electron instability and contribution of sidebands to anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.; Singh, Raghvendra

    2005-11-01

    By keeping account of the trapped electron ∇B and curvature drifts, it is found that the spatial decay of the collisionless electron drift wave is governed either by the trapped electron response or by the resonant interaction of ions with the sidebands of the primary oscillation. In the former case, pairs of spatially bounded unstable and damped solutions are obtained for negative magnetic shear (ŝ<0) if, as usual, LTe=1/∂rlnTe<0; there are no bounded solutions if ŝLTe<0. In the latter case, there is either a set of bounded damped solutions if ηi>0 or a set of bounded unstable solutions if ηi<0. The unstable modes have a radiating character and the growth rates are γ ˜(2n+1)√1+2q2 ∣ŝ∣∣LNωe*/qR∣ (n is the Hermite polynomial solution index, q the safety factor, ŝ the magnetic shear parameter, R the major radius, ωe* the electron diamagnetic frequency, LN=1/∂rlnNe, and ηi=LN/LTi).The sidebands are responsible for unusually large ratios Qe/TeΓe, where Qe and Γe are the anomalous electron energy flux and the particle flux. These results may explain the box-type Te profile observed in lower hybrid current drive reversed magnetic shear plasmas on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [H. Ninomiya and the JT-60U Team, Phys. Fluids B 4, 2070 (1992)]. It is finally demonstrated that the ballooning hypothesis generally leads to conflicting requirements: it is thus hardly relevant for the electron drift branch! The "radiating" boundary condition that has formerly been imposed on the slab solution is finally discussed.

  1. Magnetic viscosity by localized shear flow instability in magnetized accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.

    1995-01-01

    Differentially rotating disks are subject to the axisymmetric instability for perfectly conducting plasma in the presence of poloidal magnetic fields. For nonaxisymmetric perturbations, the authors find localized unstable eigenmodes whose eigenfunction is confined between two Alfven singularities at {omega}{sub d} = {+-} {omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub d} is the Doppler-shifted wave frequency, and {omega}{sub A} = k{parallel}v{sub A} is the Alfven frequency. The radial width of the unstable eigenfunction is {Delta}x {approximately} {omega}{sub A}/(Ak{sub y}), where A is the Oort`s constant, and k{sub y} is the azimuthal wave number. The growth rate of the fundamental mode is larger for smaller value of k{sub y}/k{sub z}. The maximum growth rate when k{sub y}/k{sub z} {approximately} 0.1 is {approximately} 0.2{Omega} for the Keplerian disk with local angular velocity {Omega}. It is found that the purely growing mode disappears when k{sub y}/k{sub z} > 0.12. In a perfectly conducting disk, the instability grows even when the seed magnetic field is infinitesimal. Inclusion of the resistivity, however, leads to the appearance of an instability threshold. When the resistivity {eta} depends on the instability-induced turbulent magnetic fields {delta}B as {eta}([{delta}B{sup 2}]), the marginal stability condition self-consistently determines the {alpha} parameter of the angular momentum transport due to the magnetic stress. For fully ionized disks, the magnetic viscosity parameter {alpha}{sub B} is between 0.001 and 1. The authors` three-dimensional MHD simulation confirms these unstable eigenmodes. It also shows that the {alpha} parameter observed in simulation is between 0.01 and 1, in agreement with theory. The observationally required smaller {alpha} in the quiescent phase of accretion disks in dwarf novae may be explained by the decreased ionization due to the temperature drop.

  2. Modeling shear instability and fracture in dynamically deformed Al/W granular composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl; Benson, David; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2012-03-01

    Aluminum/Tungsten granular composites are materials which combine high density and strength with bulk distributed fracture of Al matrix into small particles under impact or shock loading. They are processed using cold and hot isostatic pressing of W particles/rods in the matrix of Al powder. Numerical models were used to elucidate the dynamic behavior of these materials under dynamic conditions simulating low velocity high energy impact in drop weight test (10 m/s). It was demonstrated that arrangement of W components and bonding between Al particles dramatically affect the samples shear localization and mode of fracture of the Al matrix in agreement with experiments.

  3. Localized Density Instabilities Driven By Interface Shear and Their Influence on Removal of Sediment from Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, M.; Strom, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment removal rates from buoyant river discharges are typically scaled with particle settling velocity. However, some field and laboratory data suggest that removal can take place at rates higher than those predicted by individual particle settling. It is possible that these enhanced removal rates could potentially be due, at least in part, to mass settling of fluid and sediment near the fresh and saltwater interface. Fluid shear at the interface can mix the freshwater and sediment with the underlying saltwater and lead to pockets or bands of saltwater and sediment that are more dense than the underlying clear saltwater; resulting in an unstable configuration that can lead to rapid vertical transport of sediment. In this study, we perform laboratory experiments to study the enhancement of sediment removal from buoyant plumes under the effect of shear-driven gravitational instabilities. To do this, we ran a 5 cm deep layer of freshwater with flocculated kaolinite over a 50 cm deep basin of clear saltwater in a 1 m long glass flume under a range of upper layer velocities, concentrations, and initial stratification ratios. A Vectrino profiler is placed such that it constantly records velocity profiles from 2 cm above to 2 cm below the original interface. The velocity of the buoyant layer is controlled using a vertical head pipe at the flume inlet, and the Richardson number is varied from 0.05 to 0.25. The interface is monitored with a digital camera and a laser sheet, and Rhodamine B is added to the buoyant layer for better visualization. Snapshots from the video are used to observe the overall dynamics and developments of instabilities at the interface. The sediment concentration of the inflow and outflow of the system are continuously measured with a pair of OBS sensors, and floc size is measured with a floc imaging system and converted to a floc settling velocity. The difference in sediment concentration between the two OBS sensors is used along with a mass

  4. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Resistive MHD equilibrium, even for small resistivity, differs greatly from ideal equilibrium, as do the dynamical consequences of its instabilities. The requirement, imposed by Faraday`s law, that time independent magnetic fields imply curl-free electric fields, greatly restricts the electric fields allowed inside a finite-resistivity plasma. If there is no flow and the implications of the Ohm`s law are taken into account (and they need not be, for ideal equilibria), the electric field must equal the resistivity times the current density. The vanishing of the divergence of the current density then provides a partial differential equation which, together with boundary conditions, uniquely determines the scalar potential, the electric field, and the current density, for any given resistivity profile. The situation parallels closely that of driven shear flows in hydrodynamics, in that while dissipative steady states are somewhat more complex than ideal ones, there are vastly fewer of them to consider. Seen in this light, the vast majority of ideal MHD equilibria are just irrelevant, incapable of being set up in the first place. The steady state whose stability thresholds and nonlinear behavior needs to be investigated ceases to be an arbitrary ad hoc exercise dependent upon the whim of the investigator, but is determined by boundary conditions and choice of resistivity profile.

  5. Modeling shear instability and fracture in dynamically deformed Al/W granular composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olney, Karl; Benson, David; Nesterenko, Vitali

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum/Tungsten granular composites are materials which combine high density and strength with bulk distributed fracture of Al matrix into small particles under impact or shock loading. They are processed using cold and hot isostatic pressing of W particles/rods in the matrix of Al powder. The presentation will describe modeling of these materials under dynamic conditions simulating low velocity high energy impact in drop weight test (10 m/s) and also behavior following impact with velocities up to 1200 m/s. It will be demonstrated that morphology of W component and bonding between Al particles dramatically affects their strength, shear localization and mode of fracture of Al matrix. The support for this project provided by the Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative Award N00014-07-1-0740 (Program Officer Dr. Clifford Bedford).

  6. Flow Shear Effects in the Onset Physics of Resistive MHD Instabilities in Tokamaks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2013-04-24

    The progress in this research centers around the computational analysis of flow shear effects in the onset of a 3/2 mode driven by a 1/1 mode in DIII-D equilibria. The initial idea was to try and calculate, via nonlinear simulations with NIMROD, the effects of rotation shear on driven 3/2 and 2/1 seed island physics, in experimentally relevant DIIID equilibria. The simulations indicated that very small seed islands were directly driven, as shielding between the sawtooth and the surfaces is significant at the high Lundquist numbers of the experiment. Instead, long after the initial crash the difference in linear stability of the 3/2, which remained prevalent despite the flattening of the core profiles from the sawtooth, contributed to a difference in the eventual seed island evolution. Essentially the seed islands grew or decayed long after the sawtooth crash, and not directly from it. Effectively the dominant 1/1 mode was found to be dragging the coupled modes surrounding it at a high rate through the plasma at their surfaces. The 1/1 mode is locked to the local frame of the plasma in the core, where the flow rate is greatest. The resonant perturbations at the surrounding surfaces propagate in the 'high slip regime' in the language of Fitzpatrick. Peaked flux averaged jxb forces (see Figs. 1 and 2) agree with localized flow modifications at the surfaces in analogy with Ebrahimi, PRL 2007. We track the mode into nonlinear saturation and have found oscillatory states in the evolution. During a visit (11/09) to Tulsa by R.J. LaHaye (GA), it became clear that similar oscillatory states are observed in DIII-D for these types of discharges.

  7. MHD simulation studies of z-pinch shear flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraschiv, I.; Bauer, B. S.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Makhin, V.; Siemon, R. E.

    2003-10-01

    The development of the m=0 instability in a z-pinch in the presence of sheared plasma flows is investigated with the aid of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation code (MHRDR). The linear growth rates are compared to the results obtained by solving the ideal MHD linearized equations [1] and to the results obtained using a 3D hybrid simulation code [2]. The instability development is followed into the nonlinear regime where its growth and saturation are examined. [1] V.I. Sotnikov, I. Paraschiv, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, J.-N. Leboeuf, and J.M. Dawson, "Linear analysis of sheared flow stabilization of global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities based on the Hall fluid mode", Phys. Plasmas 9, 913 (2002). [2] V.I. Sotnikov, V. Makhin, B.S. Bauer, P. Hellinger, P. Travnicek, V. Fiala, J.-N. Leboeuf, "Hybrid Simulations of Current-Carrying Instabilities in Z-pinch Plasmas with Sheared Axial Flow", AIP Conference Proceedings, Volume 651, Dense Z-Pinches: 5th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, edited by J. Davis et al., page 396, June 2002.

  8. Saturation of the magnetorotational instability in the unstratified shearing box with zero net flux: convergence in taller boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Stone, James M.; Huang, Chelsea X.

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies of the non-linear regime of the magnetorotational instability in one particular type of shearing box model - unstratified with no net magnetic flux - find that without explicit dissipation (viscosity and resistivity) the saturation amplitude decreases with increasing numerical resolution. We show that this result is strongly dependent on the vertical aspect ratio of the computational domain Lz/Lx. When Lz/Lx ≲ 1, we recover previous results. However, when the vertical domain is extended Lz/Lx ≳ 2.5, we find the saturation level of the stress is greatly increased (giving a ratio of stress to pressure α ≳ 0.1), and moreover the results are independent of numerical resolution. Consistent with previous results, we find that saturation of the magnetorotational (MRI) in this regime is controlled by a cyclic dynamo which generates patches of strong toroidal field that switches sign on scales of Lx in the vertical direction. We speculate that when Lz/Lx ≲ 1, the dynamo is inhibited by the small size of the vertical domain, leading to the puzzling dependence of saturation amplitude on resolution. We show that previous toy models developed to explain the MRI dynamo are consistent with our results, and that the cyclic pattern of toroidal fields observed in stratified shearing box simulations (leading to the so-called butterfly diagram) may also be related. In tall boxes the saturation amplitude is insensitive to whether or not explicit dissipation is included in the calculations, at least for large magnetic Reynolds and Prandtl number. Finally, we show MRI turbulence in tall domains has a smaller critical Pmc, and an extended lifetime compared to Lz/Lx ≲ 1 boxes.

  9. MHD Instabilities at the Heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, B.; Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.

    2006-09-26

    The heliopause (HP) is the outer edge of the heliosphere which separates the tenuous and hot heliosheath plasma on one side and the relatively dense and cool magnetized interstellar plasma on the other side. As a surface of tangential discontinuity, the HP is subjected to both Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. The coupling between plasma ions and neutral atoms through the process of charge exchange provides an ''effective gravity'' at the HP, while a shear flow exists across it. We derive analytically the linearized dispersion relation for waves propagating along the surface of this discontinuity, which represents a combined RT/KH analysis. We investigate both the purely hydrodynamic, as well as magnetohydrodynamic, cases, and find that interstellar and heliospheric magnetic fields can help stabilize the HP for RT and KH-type instabilities.

  10. Pulling out a peptide chain from -sheet crystallite: Propagation of instability of H-bonds under shear force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changjian; Li, Dechang; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yongwei; Ji, Baohua

    2015-06-01

    Anti-parallel -sheet crystallite as the main component of silk fibroin has attracted much attention due to its superior mechanical properties. In this study, we examine the processes of pulling a peptide chain from -sheet crystallite using steered molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the rupture behavior of the crystallite. We show that the failure of -sheet crystallite was accompanied by a propagation of instability of hydrogen-bonds (H-bonds) in the crystallite. In addition, we find that there is an optimum size of the crystallite at which the H-bonds can work cooperatively to achieve the highest shear strength. In addition, we find that the stiffness of loading device and the loading rates have significant effects on the rupture behavior of -sheet crystallite. The stiff loading device facilitates the rebinding of the H-bond network in the stick-slip motion between the chains, while the soft one suppresses it. Moreover, the rupture force of -sheet crystallites decreases with loading rate. Particularly, when the loading rate decreases to a critical value, the rupture force of the -sheet crystallite becomes independent of the loading rates. This study provides atomistic details of rupture behaviors of -sheet crystallite, and, therefore, sheds valuable light on the underlying mechanism of the superior mechanical properties of silk fibroin.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, F; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even though the model is derived for resistive MHD, it is shown that it is numerically robust even in the high conductivity (ideal MHD) limit. In order to validate the numerical method, test simulations are carried out for both ideal and resistive limits, namely the propagation of Alfvén waves in the ideal MHD and the evolution of current sheets in the resistive regime, where very good agreement is observed comparing to the analytical results. Additionally, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is studied and the effects of different parameters on the reconnection rate are investigated. It is shown that the density ratio has a negligible effect on the magnetic reconnection rate, while an increase in shear velocity decreases the reconnection rate. Additionally, it is found that the reconnection rate is proportional to σ-1/2, σ being the conductivity, which is in agreement with the scaling law of the Sweet-Parker model. Finally, the numerical model is used to study the magnetic reconnection in a stellar flare. Three-dimensional simulation suggests that the reconnection between the background and flux rope magnetic lines in a stellar flare can take place as a result of a shear velocity in the photosphere. PMID:26382548

  12. Lattice Boltzmann model for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, F.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even though the model is derived for resistive MHD, it is shown that it is numerically robust even in the high conductivity (ideal MHD) limit. In order to validate the numerical method, test simulations are carried out for both ideal and resistive limits, namely the propagation of Alfvén waves in the ideal MHD and the evolution of current sheets in the resistive regime, where very good agreement is observed comparing to the analytical results. Additionally, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is studied and the effects of different parameters on the reconnection rate are investigated. It is shown that the density ratio has a negligible effect on the magnetic reconnection rate, while an increase in shear velocity decreases the reconnection rate. Additionally, it is found that the reconnection rate is proportional to σ-1 / 2, σ being the conductivity, which is in agreement with the scaling law of the Sweet-Parker model. Finally, the numerical model is used to study the magnetic reconnection in a stellar flare. Three-dimensional simulation suggests that the reconnection between the background and flux rope magnetic lines in a stellar flare can take place as a result of a shear velocity in the photosphere.

  13. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  14. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders VI : Stiffened Metal Cylinders Subjected to Combined Bending and Transverse Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    This is the sixth of a series of reports covering an investigation of the general instability problem by the California Institute of Technology. The first five reports of this series cover investigations of the general instability problem under the loading conditions of pure bending and were prepared under the sponsorship of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. This report and the succeeding reports of this series cover the work done on other loading conditions under the sponsorship of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. This report summarizes the work that has been carried on in the experimental investigation of the problem of general instability of stiffened metal cylinders subjected to combined bending and transverse shear at the C.I.T. This part of the investigation includes tests on 55 sheet-covered specimens.

  15. Model the nonlinear instability of wall-bounded shear flows as a rare event: a study on two-dimensional Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoliang; Yu, Haijun; Weinan, E.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we study the nonlinear instability of two-dimensional (2D) wall-bounded shear flows from the large deviation point of view. The main idea is to consider the Navier-Stokes equations perturbed by small noise in force and then examine the noise-induced transitions between the two coexisting stable solutions due to the subcritical bifurcation. When the amplitude of the noise goes to zero, the Freidlin-Wentzell (F-W) theory of large deviations defines the most probable transition path in the phase space, which is the minimizer of the F-W action functional and characterizes the development of the nonlinear instability subject to small random perturbations. Based on such a transition path we can define a critical Reynolds number for the nonlinear instability in the probabilistic sense. Then the action-based stability theory is applied to study the 2D Poiseuille flow in a short channel.

  16. On the Role of Ion-Temperature Anisotropy in the Growth and Propagation of the Shear-Modified Ion-Acoustic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, C.; Koepke, M. E.; Reynolds, E. W.

    2002-05-01

    Broadband ion-acoustic waves have been observed in the Earth's ionosphere, where the electron and ion temperatures are equal, propagating obliquely to the magnetic field lines. Explaining these waves with the current-driven ion-acoustic instability in homogeneous plasma requires an unusually large ratio of electron to ion temperature. We investigate in a Q machine oblique ion-acoustic waves, excited by the combination of magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) current and sheared parallel ion flow, at almost equal ion and electron temperatures. Direct measurements of the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular ion drift velocities, electron temperature and parallel electron drift velocity, parallel and perpendicular wavevector components, and mode frequency and growth rate are used to elucidate the shear-modified ion-acoustic instability mechanism and document an observed correlation between ion-temperature anisotropy and wave-propagation angle. Experimental measurements show how anisotropy significantly influences this propagation angle. These results may support the ion-acoustic wave interpretation of broadband waves in the auroral energization region where shear and anisotropy are known to exist. Although the results were obtained from an investigation of shear-modified ion-acoustic waves, our conclusions pertain to the general subject of oblique ion-acoustic waves and thus have ramifications for many space plasmas. * Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  17. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boquist, Carl W.; Marchant, David D.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic-metal composite suitable for use in a high-temperature environment consists of a refractory ceramic matrix containing 10 to 50 volume percent of a continuous high-temperature metal reinforcement. In a specific application of the composite, as an electrode in a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the one surface of the electrode which contacts the MHD fluid may have a layer of varying thickness of nonreinforced refractory ceramic for electrode temperature control. The side walls of the electrode may be coated with a refractory ceramic insulator. Also described is an electrode-insulator system for a MHD channel.

  19. Adaptive wavelets and relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Eric; Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthe; Debuhr, Jackson; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for integrating the relativistic magnetohydrodynamics equations using iterated interpolating wavelets. Such provide an adaptive implementation for simulations in multidimensions. A measure of the local approximation error for the solution is provided by the wavelet coefficients. They place collocation points in locations naturally adapted to the flow while providing expected conservation. We present demanding 1D and 2D tests includingthe Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, we consider an outgoing blast wave that models a GRB outflow.

  20. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  1. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  2. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.

    1978-01-01

    An electrode capable of withstanding high temperatures and suitable for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator consists of a sintered powdered metal base portion, the upper surface of the base being coated with a first layer of nickel aluminide, an intermediate layer of a mixture of nickel aluminide - refractory ceramic on the first layer and a third or outer layer of a refractory ceramic material on the intermediate layer. The sintered powdered metal base resists spalling by the ceramic coatings and permits greater electrode compliance to thermal shock. The density of the powdered metal base can be varied to allow optimization of the thermal conductivity of the electrode and prevent excess heat loss from the channel.

  4. Hitherto unknown shear rupture mechanism as a source of instability in intact hard rocks at highly confined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris G.

    2014-05-01

    Today, frictional shear resistance along pre-existing faults is considered to be the lower limit on rock shear strength for confined conditions corresponding to the seismogenic layer. This paper introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. In the new mechanism, the rock failure associated with consecutive creation of small slabs (known as ‘domino-blocks') from the intact rock in the rupture tip is driven by a fan-shaped domino structure representing the rupture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance, self-sustaining stress intensification, and self-unbalancing conditions. Due to this the failure process caused by the mechanism is very dynamic and violent. This makes it impossible to directly observe and study the mechanism and can explain why the mechanism has not been detected before. This paper provides physical motivation for the mechanism, based upon side effects accompanying the failure process. Physical and mathematical models of the mechanism presented in the paper explain unique and paradoxical features of the mechanism. The new shear rupture mechanism allows a novel point of view for understanding the nature of spontaneous failure processes in hard rocks including earthquakes.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the double current sheet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability driven by a radially antisymmetric shear flow in the double current sheet configuration is numerically investigated based on a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. Simulations reveal different nonlinear fate of the KH instability depending on the amplitude of the shear flow, which restricts the strength of the KH instability. For strong shear flows far above the KH instability threshold, the linear electrostatic-type KH instability saturates and achieves a vortex flow dominated quasi-steady state of the electromagnetic (EM) KH turbulence with large-amplitude zonal flows as well as zonal fields. The magnetic surfaces are twisted significantly due to strong vortices but without the formation of magnetic islands. However, for the shear flow just over the KH instability threshold, a weak EM-type KH instability is saturated and remarkably damped by zonal flows through modifying the equilibrium shear flow. Interestingly, a secondary double tearing mode (DTM) is excited subsequently in highly damped KH turbulence, behaving as a pure DTM in a flowing plasma as described in Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 052304 (2014)]. However, the explosive growth phenomenon is replaced by a gradually growing oscillation due to the extremely twisted islands. As a result, the release of the magnetic energy becomes slow and the global magnetic reconnection tends to be gentle. A complex nonlinear interaction between the EM KH turbulence and the DTMs occurs for the medium shear flows above the KH instability threshold, turbulent EM fluctuations experience oscillatory nonlinear growth of the DTMs, finally achieves a quasi-steady state with the interplay of the fluctuations between the DTMs and the EM KH instability.

  6. Single-fluid stability of stationary plasma equilibria with velocity shear and magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira

    2009-10-15

    By using incompressible single-fluid equations with a generalized Ohm's law neglecting the electron inertia, a linear eigenmode equation for a magnetic field perturbation is derived for stationary equilibria in a slab geometry with velocity and magnetic shears. The general eigenmode equation contains a fourth-order derivative of the perturbation in the highest order and contains Alfven and whistler mode components for a homogeneous plasma. The ratio of the characteristic ion inertia length to the characteristic inhomogeneity scale length is chosen as a small parameter for expansion. Neglecting whistler mode in the lowest order, the eigenmode equation becomes a second-order differential equation similar to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode equation except for the fact that the unperturbed perpendicular velocity contains both electric and ion diamagnetic drifts. A sufficient condition for stability against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity is derived and then applied to tokamaks.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.

    2007-07-01

    The heating of solar atmosphere from chromosphere to corona is one of the key fundamental and yet unresolved questions of modern space and plasma physics. In spite of the multi-fold efforts spanning over half a century including the many superb technological advances and theoretical developments (both analytical and computational) the unveiling of the subtle of coronal heating still remains an exciting job for the 21st century! In the present paper I review the various popular heating mechanisms put forward in the existing extensive literature. The heating processes are, somewhat arbitrarily, classified as hydrodynamic (HD), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or kinetic based on the model medium. These mechanisms are further divided based on the time scales of the ultimate dissipation involved (i.e. AC and DC heating, turbulent heating). In particular, attention is paid to discuss shock dissipation, Landau damping, mode coupling, resonant absorption, phase mixing, and, reconnection. Finally, I briefly review the various observational consequences of the many proposed heating mechanisms and confront them with high-resolution ground-based and satellite data currently available.

  8. DISCO: A 3D Moving-mesh Magnetohydrodynamics Code Designed for the Study of Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the publicly available moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code DISCO. DISCO is efficient and accurate at evolving orbital fluid motion in two and three dimensions, especially at high Mach numbers. DISCO employs a moving-mesh approach utilizing a dynamic cylindrical mesh that can shear azimuthally to follow the orbital motion of the gas. The moving mesh removes diffusive advection errors and allows for longer time-steps than a static grid. MHD is implemented in DISCO using an HLLD Riemann solver and a novel constrained transport (CT) scheme that is compatible with the mesh motion. DISCO is tested against a wide variety of problems, which are designed to test its stability, accuracy, and scalability. In addition, several MHD tests are performed which demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the new CT approach, including two tests of the magneto-rotational instability, one testing the linear growth rate and the other following the instability into the fully turbulent regime.

  9. Dynamically triggered slip and sustained fault gouge instability associated with unique slip behavior under laboratory shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Carmeliet, J.; Savage, H. M.; Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate dynamic-wave triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is comprised of a 3-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a bi-axial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at loads from 3-8 MPa, stick-slip exhibiting a characteristic recurrence time is observed. Under these load conditions, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a brief dynamical wave if the system is in a critical shear-stress state, near failure. Dynamic triggering is only observed when the dynamic wave amplitude exceeds strains of 10^(-7). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in an unstable state for long periods of time as manifest by unique slip characteristics not observed during spontaneous events: the measured physical characteristics—the gouge material strength recovery, the gouge layer thickness, the gouge shear modulus and the stick-slip recurrence time recover over many stick-slip cycles following triggering. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.

  10. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-15

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfven waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  11. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  12. Plasma structuring by the gradient drift instability at high latitudes and comparison with velocity shear driven processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Mackenzie, E.; Basu, S.; Coley, W. R.; Sharber, J. R.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Using results of the in situ measurements made by the DE 2 satellite, the nature of plasma structuring at high latitudes, caused by the gradient drift instability process, is described. Using noon-midnight and dawn-dusk orbits of the DE 2 satellite, it was possible to examine the simultaneous density and electric field spectra of convecting large-scale plasma density enhancements in the polar cap known as 'patches', in directions parallel and perpendicular to their antisunward convection. The results provide evidence for the existence of at least two generic classes of instabilities operating in the high-latitude ionosphere: one driven by large-scale density gradients in a homogeneous convection field with respect to the neutrals, and the other driven by the structured convection field itself in an ambient ionosphere where density fluctuations are ubiquitous.

  13. Self-Similar Wave Produced by Local Perturbation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Shear-Layer Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoepffner, Jérôme; Blumenthal, Ralf; Zaleski, Stéphane

    2011-03-01

    We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability excited by a localized perturbation yields a self-similar wave. The instability of the mixing layer was first conceived by Helmholtz as the inevitable growth of any localized irregularity into a spiral, but the search and uncovering of the resulting self-similar evolution was hindered by the technical success of Kelvin’s wavelike perturbation theory. The identification of a self-similar solution is useful since its specific structure is witness of a subtle nonlinear equilibrium among the forces involved. By simulating numerically the Navier-Stokes equations, we analyze the properties of the wave: growth rate, propagation speed and the dependency of its shape upon the density ratio of the two phases of the mixing layer.

  14. Linear and weakly nonlinear aspects of free shear layer instability, roll-up, subharmonic interaction and wall influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, A. B.; Thompson, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The growth of the momentum thickness and the modal disturbance energies are examined to study the nature and onset of nonlinearity in a temporally growing free shear layer. A shooting technique is used to find solutions to the linearized eigenvalue problem, and pseudospectral weakly nonlinear simulations of this flow are obtained for comparison. The roll-up of a fundamental disturbance follows linear theory predictions even with a 20 percent disturbance amplitude. A weak nonlinear interaction of the disturbance creates a finite-amplitude mean shear stress which dominates the growth of the layer momentum thickness, and the disturbance growth rate changes until the fundamental disturbance dominates. The fundamental then becomes an energy source for the harmonic, resulting in an increase in the growth rate of the subharmonic over the linear prediction even when the fundamental has no energy to give. Also considered are phase relations and the wall influence.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamically generated velocities in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Jorge A. Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2015-04-15

    We investigate by numerical simulation the rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid in which a current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. The computation involves no microscopic instabilities and is purely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described.

  16. Double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability in a quasi-two-dimensional Cartesian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, D. M.; Silvers, L. J.

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic buoyancy, believed to occur in the solar tachocline, is both an important part of large-scale solar dynamo models and the picture of how sunspots are formed. Given that in the tachocline region the ratio of magnetic diffusivity to thermal diffusivity is small it is important, for both the dynamo and sunspot formation pictures, to understand magnetic buoyancy in this regime. Furthermore, the tachocline is a region of strong shear and such investigations must involve structures that become buoyant in the double-diffusive regime which are generated entirely from a shear flow. In a previous study, we have illustrated that shear-generated double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability is possible in the tachocline. However, this study was severely limited due to the computational requirements of running three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations over diffusive time-scales. A more comprehensive investigation is required to fully understand the double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability and its dependency on a number of key parameters; such an investigation requires the consideration of a reduced model. Here we consider a quasi-two-dimensional model where all gradients in the x direction are set to zero. We show how the instability is sensitive to changes in the thermal diffusivity and also show how different initial configurations of the forced shear flow affect the behaviour of the instability. Finally, we conclude that if the tachocline is thinner than currently stated then the double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability can more easily occur.

  17. Quasiperiodicity and Chaos in the Nonlinear Evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability of Supersonic Anisotropic Velocity Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Roy; Brown, Kevin

    2000-11-01

    A nonlinear stability analysis using a multiple scales perturbation procedure is performed for the instability of two layers of strongly anisotropic, magnetized, inviscid, arbitrarily compressible fluids in relative motion. Such configurations are of relevance in a variety of space and astrophysical configurations. For modes near the critical point of the linear neutral curve, the nonlinear evolution is shown to be governed by a complicated nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation. The nonlinear coefficient turns out to be complex which is, to the best of our knowledge, unlike previously considered cases and leads to very different dynamics from that reported earlier. Both the spatially dependent and space-independent versions of this equation are considered to obtain the regimes where the linearly unstable solutions either evolve to final permanent envelope wave patterns resembling the empirically observed interacting vortex ensembles, or are disrupted via nonlinear modulational instability. In particular, the complex nonlinearity allows the existence of quasiperiodic and chaotic wave envelopes unlike in earlier physical models governed by nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations. In addition, a Melnikov function formulation reveals the onset of chaos as a consequence of modulation of the external magnetic field.

  18. Optimization of negative central shear discharges in shaped cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D., Chu, M.S., Taylor, T.S., Casper, T.A., Rice, B.W.; Greene, J.M., Greenfield, C.M., La Haye, R.J., Lao, L.L., Lee, B.J.; Miller, R.L., Ren, C., Strait, E.J., Tritz, K.; Rettig, C.L., Rhodes, T.L.; Sauter, O.

    1996-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analyses of Negative Central Shear (NCS) equilibria have revealed a new understanding of the limiting MHD instabilities in NCS experiments. Ideal stability calculations show a synergistic effect between cross section shape and pressure profile optimization; strong shaping and broader pressure independently lead to moderately higher {Beta} limits, but broadening of the pressure profile in a strongly dee-shaped cross- section leads to a dramatic increase in the ideal {Beta} limit. Localized resistive interchange (RI) modes can be unstable in the negative shear region and are most restrictive for peaked pressure profiles. Resistive global modes can also be destabilized significantly below the ideal P limit. Experiments largely confirm the general trends, and diagnostic measurements and numerical stability calculations are found to be in good qualitative agreement. Observed disruptions in NCS discharges with L-mode edge and strongly peaked pressure, appear to be initiated by interactions between the RI, and the global ideal and resistive modes.

  19. Ion temperature anisotropy effects on the dispersion relation and threshold conditions of a sheared current-driven electrostatic ion-acoustic instability with applications to the collisional high-latitude F-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Patrick J. G.; Noël, J.-M.; St-Maurice, J.-P.; Kabin, K.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma instabilities play a important role in producing small-scale irregularities in the ionosphere. In particular, current-driven electrostatic ion-acoustic (CDEIA) instabilities contribute to high-latitude F-region electrodynamics. Ion temperature anisotropies with enhanced perpendicular temperature often exist in the high-latitude F-region. In addition to temperature anisotropies, ion velocity shears are observed near auroral arc edges, sometimes coexisting with thermal ion upflow processes and field-aligned currents (FAC). We investigated whether ion temperature anisotropy lowers the threshold conditions required for the onset of sheared CDEIA instabilities. We generalised a dispersion relation to include ion thermal anisotropy, finite Larmor radius corrections and collisions. We derived new fluid-like analytical expressions for the threshold conditions required for instability that depend explicitly on ion temperature anisotropy. We studied how the instability threshold conditions vary as a function of the wave vector direction in both fluid and kinetic regimes. We found that, despite the dampening effect of collisions on ion-acoustic waves, ion temperature anisotropy lowers in some cases the threshold drift requirements for a large range of oblique wave vector angles. More importantly, realistic ion temperature anisotropies contribute to reducing the instability threshold velocity shears that are associated with small drift thresholds, for modes propagating almost perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. Small shear thresholds that seem to be sustainable in the ionospheric F-region are obtained for low-frequency waves. Such instabilities could play a role in the direct generation of field-aligned irregularities in the collisional F-region that could be observed with the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) array of high-frequency radars. These modes would be very sensitive to the radar probing direction since they are restricted to very narrow

  20. On the nonlinear three dimensional instability of Stokes layers and other shear layers to pairs of oblique waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xuesong; Lee, Sang Soo; Cowley, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a pair of initially oblique waves in a high Reynolds Number Stokes layer is studied. Attention is focused on times when disturbances of amplitude epsilon have O(epsilon(exp 1/3)R) growth rates, where R is the Reynolds number. The development of a pair of oblique waves is then controlled by nonlinear critical-layer effects. Viscous effects are included by studying the distinguished scaling epsilon = O(R(exp -1)). This leads to a complicated modification of the kernel function in the integro-differential amplitude equation. When viscosity is not too large, solutions to the amplitude equation develop a finite-time singularity, indicating that an explosive growth can be introduced by nonlinear effects; we suggest that such explosive growth can lead to the bursts observed in experiments. Increasing the importance of viscosity generally delays the occurrence of the finite-time singularity, and sufficiently large viscosity may lead to the disturbance decaying exponentially. For the special case when the streamwise and spanwise wavenumbers are equal, the solution can evolve into a periodic oscillation. A link between the unsteady critical-layer approach to high-Reynolds-number flow instability, and the wave vortex approach is identified.

  1. Magnetic effects on the low-T /|W | instability in differentially rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlberger, Curran D.; Nouri, Fatemeh Hossein; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2014-11-01

    Dynamical instabilities in protoneutron stars may produce gravitational waves whose observation could shed light on the physics of core-collapse supernovae. When born with sufficient differential rotation, these stars are susceptible to a shear instability (the "low-T /|W | instability"), but such rotation can also amplify magnetic fields to strengths where they have a considerable impact on the dynamics of the stellar matter. Using a new magnetohydrodynamics module for the Spectral Einstein Code, we have simulated a differentially-rotating neutron star in full 3D to study the effects of magnetic fields on this instability. Though strong toroidal fields were predicted to suppress the low-T /|W | instability, we find that they do so only in a small range of field strengths. Below 4 ×1 013 G , poloidal seed fields do not wind up fast enough to have an effect before the instability saturates, while above 5 ×1 014 G , magnetic instabilities can actually amplify a global quadrupole mode (this threshold may be even lower in reality, as small-scale magnetic instabilities remain difficult to resolve numerically). Thus, the prospects for observing gravitational waves from such systems are not in fact diminished over most of the magnetic parameter space. Additionally, we report that the detailed development of the low-T /|W | instability, including its growth rate, depends strongly on the particular numerical methods used. The high-order methods we employ suggest that growth might be considerably slower than found in some previous simulations.

  2. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  3. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-01

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, vc, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above vc but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  4. A Multiscale Model of Shear flow of Granular Materials with Breakable Particles: Role of Force Chain Instabilities and Implications for Strain Localization and Stability of Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbanna, A. E.; Lieou, C.; Karimi, P.; Carlson, J.; Li, R.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative prediction of the shear response and energy partitioning in granular layers with breakable particles remains a major challenge in earthquake physics. As a first step towards addressing this problem, we use the Shear Transformation Zone theory (STZ) to model irreversible plastic deformations in the gouge due to local rearrangements of the particles. To model grain breakage, we use an energy balance approach to augment the STZ theory with an equation for the grain size reduction as a function of the applied work rate and pressure. Previous numerical and experimental work on grain breakage was inconclusive regarding whether grain breakage was a softening or a hardening mechanism. The outcome depends on the competition between evolving grain angularity and reduced particle size with both processes affecting force chain dynamics. To account for local force chain instabilities, we develop a small scale model for force chain buckling that is integrated within the STZ formulation through variations of the minimum flow stress of the system. We idealize a typical force chain as an array of particles with both translational and rotational degrees of freedom. The relative motion between the particles is resisted by sliding and rolling friction. The sliding friction is provided by a rigid-plastic element. The rolling resistance is modeled by a torsional spring. The deflection of the force chain is resisted by an array of lateral springs representing the effective confinement provided by the rest of the granular medium Our results suggest that there exist a critical grain size below which the buckling stress for the force chain, and hence the flow stress, decreases linearly with the decrease of the particle size. Furthermore, we show that grain breakage is a potential weakening mechanism at high pressures and at strain rates high enough to reduce the grain size below the aforementioned critical limit. Grain breakage also promotes strain localization, particularly in

  5. MHD aspects of fire-hose type instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. J.; Hau, L. N.

    2003-12-01

    In a homogeneous anisotropic plasma the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear Alfvén wave may become unstable for p∥ > p⊥ + B2/μo. Recently, a new type of fire-hose instability was found by Hellinger and Matsumoto [2000] that has maximum growth rate occurring for oblique propagation and may grow faster than the Alfvén mode. This new mode is compressional and may be more efficient at destroying pressure anisotropy than the standard fire hose. This paper examines the fire-hose type (p∥ > p⊥) instabilities based on the linear and nonlinear double-polytropic MHD theory. It is shown that there exist two types of MHD fire-hose instabilities, and with suitable choice of polytropic exponents the linear instability criteria become the same as those based on the Vlasov theory in the hydromagnetic limit. Moreover, the properties of the nonlinear MHD fire-hose instabilities are found to have great similarities with those obtained from the kinetic theory and hybrid simulations. In particular, the classical fire-hose instability evolves toward the linear fire-hose stability threshold, while the nonlinear marginal stability associated with the new fire hose is well below the condition of β∥ - β⊥ = 2 but complies with less stringent linear stability threshold for compressible Alfvén waves.

  6. A theory of MHD instability of an inhomogeneous plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoly S.

    2011-06-01

    A problem of the stability of an inhomogeneous axisymmetric plasma jet in a parallel magnetic field is solved. The jet boundary becomes, under certain conditions, unstable relative to magnetosonic oscillations (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) in the presence of a shear flow at the jet boundary. Because of its internal inhomogeneity the plasma jet has resonance surfaces, where conversion takes place between various modes of plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. Propagating in inhomogeneous plasma, fast magnetosonic waves drive the Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations, tightly localized across the magnetic shells, on the resonance surfaces. MHD oscillation energy is absorbed in the neighbourhood of these resonance surfaces. The resonance surfaces disappear for the eigenmodes of SMS waves propagating in the jet waveguide. The stability of the plasma MHD flow is determined by competition between the mechanisms of shear flow instability on the boundary and wave energy dissipation because of resonant MHD-mode coupling. The problem is solved analytically, in the Wentzel, Kramers, Brillouin (WKB) approximation, for the plasma jet with a boundary in the form of a tangential discontinuity over the radial coordinate. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability develops if plasma flow velocity in the jet exceeds the maximum Alfven speed at the boundary. The stability of the plasma jet with a smooth boundary layer is investigated numerically for the basic modes of MHD oscillations, to which the WKB approximation is inapplicable. A new 'unstable mode of MHD oscillations has been discovered which, unlike the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, exists for any, however weak, plasma flow velocities.

  7. Compressible magnetohydrodynamic sawtooth crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2014-02-01

    In a toroidal magnetically confined plasma at low resistivity, compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) predicts that an m = 1/n = 1 sawtooth has a fast, explosive crash phase with abrupt onset, rate nearly independent of resistivity, and localized temperature redistribution similar to experimental observations. Large scale numerical simulations show that the 1/1 MHD internal kink grows exponentially at a resistive rate until a critical amplitude, when the plasma motion accelerates rapidly, culminating in fast loss of the temperature and magnetic structure inside q < 1, with somewhat slower density redistribution. Nonlinearly, for small effective growth rate the perpendicular momentum rate of change remains small compared to its individual terms ∇p and J × B until the fast crash, so that the compressible growth rate is determined by higher order terms in a large aspect ratio expansion, as in the linear eigenmode. Reduced MHD fails completely to describe the toroidal mode; no Sweet-Parker-like reconnection layer develops. Important differences result from toroidal mode coupling effects. A set of large aspect ratio compressible MHD equations shows that the large aspect ratio expansion also breaks down in typical tokamaks with rq =1/Ro≃1/10 and a /Ro≃1/3. In the large aspect ratio limit, failure extends down to much smaller inverse aspect ratio, at growth rate scalings γ =O(ɛ2). Higher order aspect ratio terms, including B˜ϕ, become important. Nonlinearly, higher toroidal harmonics develop faster and to a greater degree than for large aspect ratio and help to accelerate the fast crash. The perpendicular momentum property applies to other transverse MHD instabilities, including m ≥ 2 magnetic islands and the plasma edge.

  8. Electron Inertia Effects in Hall-Driven Magnetic Field Penetration in Electron-Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Angus, Justin; Swanekamp, Stephen; Schumer, Joseph; Ottinger, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) can be driven by density gradients through the Hall term. Here we describe the effect of electron inertia on simplified one- and two- dimensional models of a magnetic front. Nonlinear effects due to inertia cause the 1D model to develop peaked solitary waves, while in 2D a shear-driven Kelvin-Helholtz like instability causes the front to break into a series of vortices which propagate into the plasma. The combination of these two effects means that in 2D, Hall driven magnetic field penetration will typically happen in the form of complex vortex-dominated penetration, rather than as a transversely-smooth shock front. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generation is a concise summary of MHD theory, history, and future trends. Results of the major international MHD research projects are discussed. Data from MHD research is included. Economics of initial and operating costs are considered.

  10. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  11. Gyroscopic analog for magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The gross features of plasma equilibrium and dynamics in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model can be understood in terms of a dynamical system which closely resembles the equations for a deformable gyroscope.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Bachman, Mark G.

    2004-08-24

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system includes a reagent source containing a reagent fluid and a sample source containing a sample fluid that includes a constituent. A reactor is operatively connected to the supply reagent source and the sample source. MHD pumps utilize a magnetohydrodynamic drive to move the reagent fluid and the sample fluid in a flow such that the reagent fluid and the sample fluid form an interface causing the constituent to be separated from the sample fluid.

  13. The current-driven kink instability in magnetically dominated relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability in relativistic jets, via 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For this purpose, a static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study its influence on the linear and nonlinear stages of the instability. We found that this configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the CD kink instability. Both the linear growth and the nonlinear evolution of this in-stability depend moderately on the radial density profile but are strongly sensitive to the magnetic pitch profile. For decreasing magnetic pitch, kink amplitude growth leads, in the nonlinear regime, to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. Differently, for increasing magnetic pitch, the kink amplitude nearly saturates in the nonlinear regime. We have also investigated the influence of velocity shear on the linear and non-linear development of the instability. We found that helically distorted density structures propagate along the jet with a speed and a flow structure that are dependent on the location of the velocity shear relative to the characteristic radius of the helically twisted force-free magnetic field. At small radius, the plasma flows through the kink. The kink propagation speed increases with the velocity shear radius, and the kink becomes more em-bedded in the plasma flow. Larger velocity shear radius leads to slower linear growth, with a later transition to the nonlinear stage and a larger maximum amplitude than in the case of a static plasma column. However, when the velocity shear radius is much greater than the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, linear and non-linear developments become more similar to those of a static plasma column.

  14. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-11-01

    Although stable operating regimes for cryogenic coaxial injectors have been empirically determined, there is no knowledge of the spray characteristics corresponding to stable operation, or the physical processes which produce the atomization patterns that result in stable or unstable operation. The current engineering method for determining the stable operating regime of a cryogenic coaxial injector is the 'hydrogen temperature ramping' method, however there is no definitive knowledge of whether the hydrogen temperature influences the chamber stability by decreasing the injected gas velocity, by affecting a recirculation region at the base of the LOX Post, or by changing the pressure drop across the injector, allowing chamber pressure oscillations to couple to the fuel feed system. Results for the injector response from a linearized lumped-element model are presented as a function of temperature and frequency. LDV measurements in the recess region at the base of the LOX post show reverse flow indicative of a recirculation region. Finally, Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements of droplet size and velocity distributions are discussed for a coaxial injector element similar to the SSME preburner element operating with water and air at atmospheric pressure and liquid and gaseous nitrogen at 20 bars.

  15. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although stable operating regimes for cryogenic coaxial injectors have been empirically determined, there is no knowledge of the spray characteristics corresponding to stable operation, or the physical processes which produce the atomization patterns that result in stable or unstable operation. The current engineering method for determining the stable operating regime of a cryogenic coaxial injector is the 'hydrogen temperature ramping' method, however there is no definitive knowledge of whether the hydrogen temperature influences the chamber stability by decreasing the injected gas velocity, by affecting a recirculation region at the base of the LOX Post, or by changing the pressure drop across the injector, allowing chamber pressure oscillations to couple to the fuel feed system. Results for the injector response from a linearized lumped-element model are presented as a function of temperature and frequency. LDV measurements in the recess region at the base of the LOX post show reverse flow indicative of a recirculation region. Finally, Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements of droplet size and velocity distributions are discussed for a coaxial injector element similar to the SSME preburner element operating with water and air at atmospheric pressure and liquid and gaseous nitrogen at 20 bars.

  16. Flow of Magnetohydrodynamic Micropolar Fluid Induced by Radially Stretching Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Muhammad; Hendi, Awatif A.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the flow of a micropolar fluid between radial stretching sheets. The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nonlinear problem is treated using the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and the velocity profiles are predicted for the pertinent parameters. The values of skin friction and couple shear stress coefficients are obtained for various values of Reynolds number, Hartman number, and micropolar fluid parameter.

  17. On the nature of magnetic turbulence in rotating, shearing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justin; Lesur, Geoffroy; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2016-03-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to k-2, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence k-3/2. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states - their intensity v0 and their outer scale λ0 satisfy the balance condition v0/λ0 ˜ dΩ/dln r, where dΩ/dln r is the local orbital shearing rate of the flow. Finally, we find no sustained dynamo action in the Pm = 1 zero net-flux case for Reynolds numbers as high as 45 000, casting doubts on the existence of an MRI dynamo in the Pm ≤ 1 regime.

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranov, V.

    1998-08-01

    equations of a plasma in a magnetic field (which will be used further in models of dynamic processes), approaches to the description of three dimensional (3-D) equilibrium are briefly discussed, and the basis of the theory of linear instabilities and the basic types of MHD instabilities, with account taken of ideal resistive modes, are considered. The value of the material of these chapters is that here in a brief form the results of numerous researches in this area are presented, and frequently with a fresh point of view of old results. Chapters 5 to 10 are devoted to the subject of the book, non-linear magnetohydrodynamics. In the introduction to Chapter 5 the author pays attention to the fact that long standing doubts about the feasibility of magnetic thermonuclear reactors because of inevitable instabilities of non-uniform plasmas have been overcome in the last two decades: the plasma in tokamaks is rather well confined, despite the presence of some instabilities. The latter, as a rule, result only in the redistribution of current and plasma pressure profiles and some increase of transport, but can also lead to extremely undesirable effects. In this connection in Chapter 5 the attention of the reader is directed to the physics of the most important plasma instabilities in tokamaks. Models of the development of external and internal kink modes in tokamaks are considered, including the `vacuum bubble' model in shearless plasmas, the evolution of the resistive tearing mode together with saturation of the magnetic islands arising at a tearing instability. The rather long Chapter 6 is devoted to the fundamentals of the magnetic hydrodynamic dissipative process in the magnetic field line reconnection. This process of rapid dissipation of the energy of a magnetic field, having in the simplest case different directions in two adjacent volumes of plasma, underlies the theory of the phenomenon of powerful flares in the solar chromosphere, resulting in the well-known `magnetic

  19. The role of the magnetorotational instability in the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2014-05-20

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ < 53°. Nonaxisymmetric MRI modes grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  20. Interplay between Magnetic Reconnection and the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities in a Magnetized Inhomogeneous Plasma with a Velocity Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Faganello, M.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.

    2008-10-15

    The competition between instabilities in a plasma can lead to qualitatively different configurations that can be observed experimentally. The outcome of this competition gives us important clues about the time development of these instabilities as we can use one to clock the development of the other.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic effects in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Galindo, V.; Kasprzyk, C.; Landgraf, S.; Seilmayer, M.; Starace, M.; Weber, N.; Weier, T.

    2016-07-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) consist of two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt ionic conductor sandwiched between them. The density ratios allow for a stable stratification of the three layers. LMBs were already considered as part of energy conversion systems in the 1960s and have recently received renewed interest for economical large-scale energy storage. In this paper, we concentrate on the magnetohydrodynamic aspects of this cell type with special focus on electro-vortex flows and possible effects of the Tayler instability.

  2. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  3. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  4. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  5. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  6. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-04-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  7. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-07-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of a compound liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.

    1989-10-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stability of a compound nonmiscible fluid jet is discussed. A general eigenvalue relation, for that model which involves the fluid inertia, capillarity and electromagnetic forces, is derived. The model is capillary unstable only for small axisymmetric disturbances and stable for the rest. The magnetic fields interior and exterior to the gas-mantle jet have always a stabilizing influence. The radii ratio of the concentric jets plays an important role in the (instability) stability states and are (decreasing) increasing with increasing magnetic field intensity as the exterior radius is much larger than the interior radius; under some restrictions of the radii ratio and above a certain value of the magnetic field the capillary instability is omitted and completely suppressed and then stability sets in. The latter result is verified analytically and confirmed numerically in the case in which the cylindrical surface of the outer jet is sited at infinity.

  9. Linear growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with an adiabatic cosmic-ray gas

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Kudoh, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    We investigate effects of cosmic rays on the linear growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Cosmic rays are treated as an adiabatic gas and allowed to diffuse along magnetic field lines. We calculated the dispersion relation of the instability for various sets of two free parameters, the ratio of the cosmic-ray pressure to the thermal gas pressure, and the diffusion coefficient. Including cosmic-ray effects, a shear layer is more destabilized and the growth rates can be enhanced in comparison with the ideal magnetohydrodynamical case. Whether the growth rate is effectively enhanced or not depends on the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays. We obtain the criterion for effective enhancement by comparing the growing timescale of the instability with the diffusion timescale of cosmic rays. These results can be applied to various astrophysical phenomena where a velocity shear is present, such as outflows from star-forming galaxies, active galactic nucleus jet, channel flows resulting from the nonlinear development of the magnetorotational instability, and galactic disks.

  10. Spatial growth of the current-driven instability in relativistic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the influence of velocity shear and a radial density profile on the spatial development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability along helically magnetized relativistic jets via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we use a nonperiodic computational box, the jet flow is initially established across the computational grid, and a precessional perturbation at the inlet triggers growth of the kink instability. If the velocity shear radius is located inside the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, a static nonpropagating CD kink is excited as the perturbation propagates down the jet. Temporal growth disrupts the initial flow across the computational grid not too far from the inlet. On the other hand, if the velocity shear radius is outside the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, the kink is advected with the flow and grows spatially down the jet. In this case, flow is maintained to much larger distances from the inlet. The effect of different radial density profiles is more subtle. When the density increases with radius, the kink appears to saturate by the end of the simulation without apparent disruption of the helical twist. This behavior suggests that relativistic jets consisting of a tenuous spine surrounded by a denser medium with a velocity shear radius outside the radius of the maximum toroidal magnetic field have a relatively stable configuration.

  11. Gyrokinetic verification of the persistence of kinetic ballooning modes in the magnetohydrodynamic second stability regime

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) has been shown in previous work to be unstable within the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) region (in s-{alpha} space) of second stability [Hirose et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3993 (2004)]. In this work we verify this result using the gyrokinetic code GS2 [Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)] treating both ions and electrons as kinetic species and retaining the magnetosonic perturbation B{sub parallel}. Growth rates calculated using GS2 differ significantly from the previous differential/shooting code analysis. Calculations without B{sub parallel} find the stability region is preserved, while the addition of B{sub parallel} causes the mode to be more unstable than previously calculated within the region of MHD second stability. The inclusion of parallel ion current and B{sub parallel} into the shooting code does not account for the GS2 results. The evidence presented in this paper leads us to the conclusion that the adiabatic electron approximation employed in previous studies is found to be unsuitable for this type of instability. Based on the findings of this work, the KBM becomes an interesting instability in the context of internal transport barriers, where {alpha} is often large and magnetic shear is small (positive or negative)

  12. The stability of a compressible stratified shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Z.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of a shear layer under the effect of gravity is investigated using the compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including an effective gravity term to represent the curvature effects of the flow and magnetic field line geometry. A general eigenmode equation is derived for a two-dimensional MHD fluid, and an energy-principle analysis to explain the effect of compressibility on the critical Richardson number is presented. For the case of a hyperbolic tangent shear flow and exponential density profile, it was found that, in the Boussinesq approximation, the compressibility raises the critical Richardson number from 1/4 to as much as 1/2, with the exact value depending on the value of the magnetic field at infinity. Under approximation of a strong asymptotic magnetic field, without invoking the Boussinesq approximation, it is shown both analytically and numerically that the density gradient terms cause the shear instability to be dispersive. The long-wavelength stability boundary for the Richardson number J = 0 is characterized by a normalized phase velocity c =

  13. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  14. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  15. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of global accretion disks with vertical magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-04-01

    We report results of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of global accretion disks threaded with weak vertical magnetic fields. We perform the simulations in the spherical coordinates with different temperature profiles and accordingly different rotation profiles. In the cases with a spatially constant temperature, because the rotation frequency is vertically constant in the equilibrium condition, general properties of the turbulence excited by magnetorotational instability are quantitatively similar to those obtained in local shearing box simulations. On the other hand, in the cases with a radially variable temperature profile, the vertical differential rotation, which is inevitable in the equilibrium condition, winds up the magnetic field lines in addition to the usual radial differential rotation. As a result, the coherent wound magnetic fields contribute to the Maxwell stress in the surface regions. We obtain nondimensional density and velocity fluctuations ∼0.1-0.2 at the midplane. The azimuthal power spectra of the magnetic fields show shallower slopes, ∼m {sup 0} – m {sup –1}, than those of velocity and density. The Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence drives intermittent and structured disk winds as well as sound-like waves toward the midplane. The mass accretion mainly occurs near the surfaces, and the gas near the midplane slowly moves outward in the time domain of the present simulations. The vertical magnetic fields are also dragged inward in the surface regions, while they stochastically move outward and inward around the midplane. We also discuss an observational implication of induced spiral structure in the simulated turbulent disks.

  17. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  18. On Lyapunov boundary control of unstable magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tasso, H.; Throumoulopoulos, G. N.

    2013-02-15

    Starting from a simple, marginally stable model considered for Lyapunov based boundary control of flexible mechanical systems, we add a term driving an instability and prove that for an appropriate control condition the system can become Lyapunov stable. A similar approximate extension is found for the general energy principle of linearized magnetohydrodynamics. The implementation of such external instantaneous actions may, however, impose challenging constraints for fusion plasmas.

  19. DISCO: 3-D moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.

    2016-05-01

    DISCO evolves orbital fluid motion in two and three dimensions, especially at high Mach number, for studying astrophysical disks. The software uses a moving-mesh approach with a dynamic cylindrical mesh that can shear azimuthally to follow the orbital motion of the gas, thus removing diffusive advection errors and permitting longer timesteps than a static grid. DISCO uses an HLLD Riemann solver and a constrained transport scheme compatible with the mesh motion to implement magnetohydrodynamics.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  1. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability under Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field conditions at the magnetospheric flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, E.; Nykyri, K.; Otto, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have generated fully three-dimensional, high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) Instability during Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions at the dawnside magnetospheric flank magnetopause. Results of these simulations show that, although the draping of a strong tangential magnetic field component around the magnetopause, tailward of the terminator (due to the Parker-Spiral orientation), tends to stabilize the growth of such instabilities within the shear-flow plane, Kelvin-Helmholtz waves with a k -vector tilted out of this plane may, nonetheless, develop into the nonlinear phase. This result suggests that obliquely propagating KH waves may contribute to the dawn-dusk asymmetries observed in plasma sheet parameters.

  2. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated. PMID:24329368

  3. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  4. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  5. The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Young, Aleida K.; Shen, Chengcai; Lin, Jun; Ni, Lei

    2013-06-15

    Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

  6. The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Young, Aleida K.; Shen, Chengcai; Lin, Jun; Ni, Lei

    2013-06-01

    Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

  7. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchanges in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimin; Goel, Deepak; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-03-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are usually derived under the assumption V{sub A}<instabilities in 'line-tied' slab geometry as well as to centrifugally confined plasmas. It is found that interchange growth rates are reduced by a factor of 1+V{sub A}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, corresponding to a larger effective mass resulting from the extra electromagnetic momentum. Line tying is unaffected.

  8. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  9. Potential vorticity in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; Mace, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A version of Noether's second theorem using Lagrange multipliers is used to investigate fluid relabelling symmetries conservation laws in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We obtain a new generalized potential vorticity type conservation equation for MHD which takes into account entropy gradients and the J × B force on the plasma due to the current J and magnetic induction B. This new conservation law for MHD is derived by using Noether's second theorem in conjunction with a class of fluid relabelling symmetries in which the symmetry generator for the Lagrange label transformations is non-parallel to the magnetic field induction in Lagrange label space. This is associated with an Abelian Lie pseudo algebra and a foliated phase space in Lagrange label space. It contains as a special case Ertel's theorem in ideal fluid mechanics. An independent derivation shows that the new conservation law is also valid for more general physical situations.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic inertial reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelkamp-Baker, Dan; Sebesta, Henry R.; Burkhard, Kevin

    2000-07-01

    Optical platforms increasingly require attitude knowledge and optical instrument pointing at sub-microradian accuracy. No low-cost commercial system exists to provide this level of accuracy for guidance, navigation, and control. The need for small, inexpensive inertial sensors, which may be employed in pointing control systems that are required to satisfy angular line-of-sight stabilization jitter error budgets to levels of 1-3 microradian rms and less, has existed for at least two decades. Innovations and evolutions in small, low-noise inertial angular motion sensor technology and advances in the applications of the global positioning system have converged to allow improvement in acquisition, tracking and pointing solutions for a wide variety of payloads. We are developing a small, inexpensive, and high-performance inertial attitude reference system that uses our innovative magnetohydrodynamic angular rate sensor technology.

  11. Conservation of circulation in magnetohydrodynamics

    PubMed

    Bekenstein; Oron

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate at both the Newtonian and (general) relativistic levels the existence of a generalization of Kelvin's circulation theorem (for pure fluids) that is applicable to perfect magnetohydrodynamics. The argument is based on the least action principle for magnetohydrodynamic flow. Examples of the new conservation law are furnished. The new theorem should be helpful in identifying new kinds of vortex phenomena distinct from magnetic ropes or fluid vortices. PMID:11089118

  12. Three dimensional instabilities of an electron scale current sheet in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2014-06-15

    In collisionless magnetic reconnection, electron current sheets (ECS) with thickness of the order of an electron inertial length form embedded inside ion current sheets with thickness of the order of an ion inertial length. These ECS's are susceptible to a variety of instabilities which have the potential to affect the reconnection rate and/or the structure of reconnection. We carry out a three dimensional linear eigen mode stability analysis of electron shear flow driven instabilities of an electron scale current sheet using an electron-magnetohydrodynamic plasma model. The linear growth rate of the fastest unstable mode was found to drop with the thickness of the ECS. We show how the nature of the instability depends on the thickness of the ECS. As long as the half-thickness of the ECS is close to the electron inertial length, the fastest instability is that of a translational symmetric two-dimensional (no variations along flow direction) tearing mode. For an ECS half thickness sufficiently larger or smaller than the electron inertial length, the fastest mode is not a tearing mode any more and may have finite variations along the flow direction. Therefore, the generation of plasmoids in a nonlinear evolution of ECS is likely only when the half-thickness is close to an electron inertial length.

  13. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  14. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. II. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    We perform global unstratified three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an astrophysical boundary layer (BL)-an interface region between an accretion disk and a weakly magnetized accreting object such as a white dwarf-with the goal of understanding the effects of magnetic field on the BL. We use cylindrical coordinates with an isothermal equation of state and investigate a number of initial field geometries including toroidal, vertical, and vertical with zero net flux. Our initial setup consists of a Keplerian disk attached to a non-rotating star. In a previous work, we found that in hydrodynamical simulations, sound waves excited by shear in the BL were able to efficiently transport angular momentum and drive mass accretion onto the star. Here we confirm that in MHD simulations, waves serve as an efficient means of angular momentum transport in the vicinity of the BL, despite the magnetorotational instability (MRI) operating in the disk. In particular, the angular momentum current due to waves is at times larger than the angular momentum current due to MRI. Our results suggest that angular momentum transport in the BL and its vicinity is a global phenomenon occurring through dissipation of waves and shocks. This point of view is quite different from the standard picture of transport by a local anomalous turbulent viscosity. In addition to angular momentum transport, we also study magnetic field amplification within the BL. We find that the field is indeed amplified in the BL, but only by a factor of a few, and remains subthermal.

  15. Jeans instability in a quantum dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.

    2009-01-15

    Jeans instability in a homogeneous cold quantum dusty plasma in the presence of the ambient magnetic field and the quantum effect arising through the Bohm potential has been examined using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is found that the Jeans instability is significantly reduced by the presence of the dust-lower-hybrid wave and the ion quantum effect. The minimum wavenumber for Jeans stability depends clearly on ion quantum effect and the dust-lower-hybrid frequency also.

  16. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  17. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  19. Stability of negative central magnetic shear discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E.J.; Chu, M.S.; Ferron, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    Discharges with negative central magnetic shear (NCS) hold the promise of enhanced fusion performance in advanced tokamaks. However, stability to long wavelength magnetohydrodynamic modes is needed to take advantage of the improved confinement found in NCS discharges. The stability limits seen in DIII-D experiments depend on the pressure and current density profiles and are in good agreement with stability calculations. Discharges with a strongly peaked pressure profile reach a disruptive limit at low beta, {beta}{sub N} = {beta} (I/aB){sup -1} {le} 2.5 (% m T/MA), caused by an n = 1 ideal internal kink mode or a global resistive instability close to the ideal stability limit. Discharges with a broad pressure profile reach a soft beta limit at significantly higher beta, {beta}{sub N} = 4 to 5, usually caused by instabilities with n > 1 and usually driven near the edge of the plasma. With broad pressure profiles, the experimental stability limit is independent of the magnitude of negative shear but improves with the internal inductance, corresponding to lower current density near the edge of the plasma. Understanding of the stability limits in NCS discharges has led to record DIII-D fusion performance in discharges with a broad pressure profile and low edge current density.

  20. The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Salimullah, M.

    2010-07-15

    The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

  1. Interfacial instability of thin liquid films at the walls of a parallel-plate channel, sheared by pressure-driven gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vécsei, Miklós; Dietzel, Mathias; Hardt, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    Gas flow between liquid films is a commonly used model system for flows in the respiratory system and is also present during flow boiling in microchannels. The emergence of long-wavelength interfacial instabilities due to viscous stresses is a well-known property of these systems. We show that its description is often reducible to two coupled partial differential equations. Thus the characteristic quantities, such as the most unstable wavelength and the marginally stable wavenumber, can be obtained in a straightforward manner from the linear stability analysis. The analysis of the weakly nonlinear equations shows that if the material properties of the liquid films and their undisturbed thicknesses are identical, their interfaces should only be destabilized by the inertial forces. Moreover, for this configuration the emerging patterns on the two interfaces are found to be identical in the long-time limit. A different setup, where the liquid films have identical material properties, but their undisturbed thicknesses differ, is studied numerically. The results show that even for this configuration the interfacial deformations of the two films remain closely correlated for a broad range of parameters.

  2. Heavy Ion Effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability: Hybrid Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.; Lin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is a candidate mechanism for solar wind tansportation into the magnetosphere. The statistical study of Bouhram et al. 2005 has shown that heavy ions could dominate the magnetopause for as much as 30% of the time on the dusk side. Thus the influence of heavy ions in solar wind-magnetosphere coupling should not be neglected. However, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) linear theory for KHI does not include any ion effects, and people working on the heavy ion effects have not come to an agreement either. Whether the heavy ions promote or inhibit the KHI still remains not well addressed. With a two-dimensional hybrid model, we investigated the effects of ion mass number on the KHI growth rate, starting from the simplest case of uniform density and uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the shear flow. It is shown that the growth rate of the KHI is lower with a heavier mass number. We try to to derive the linear theory for the kinetic KHI and compare it with the hybrid simulation results. The linear theory with ion effects considered is going to be further verified with varying heavy ion fractions and finite magnetic shear. More implications for the dawn-dusk asymmetry of KHI on planetary magnetopause are desirable when comparing the results of opposite magnetic field directions relative to the flow vorticity.

  3. Instability mechanisms in swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaire, F.; Chomaz, J.-M.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate the stability of the screened Rankine vortex with added plug flow where the azimuthal velocity decreases abruptly outside the core of the vortex. The jump in circulation is known to induce centrifugal and azimuthal Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Their effect on the stability of the different azimuthal wave number m is discussed using physical considerations associated with asymptotic expansions and numerical computations of the dispersion relation. It is shown that the axial shear and centrifugal instability are active for all m, and that modes with |m|⩾2 are also destabilized by azimuthal shear. In contrast, the bending modes m=±1 are stabilized by a coupling with Kelvin waves in the core. Effects of rotation on the absolute/convective transition are also discussed. The absolute instability of positive helical modes is seen to be promoted by centrifugal instability and azimuthal shear.

  4. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected. the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories. but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  5. Multi-symplectic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-10-01

    A multi-symplectic formulation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed based on the Clebsch variable variational principle in which the Lagrangian consists of the kinetic minus the potential energy of the MHD fluid modified by constraints using Lagrange multipliers that ensure mass conservation, entropy advection with the flow, the Lin constraint, and Faraday's equation (i.e. the magnetic flux is Lie dragged with the flow). The analysis is also carried out using the magnetic vector potential à where α=Ã. d x is Lie dragged with the flow, and B=∇×Ã. The multi-symplectic conservation laws give rise to the Eulerian momentum and energy conservation laws. The symplecticity or structural conservation laws for the multi-symplectic system corresponds to the conservation of phase space. It corresponds to taking derivatives of the momentum and energy conservation laws and combining them to produce n(n-1)/2 extra conservation laws, where n is the number of independent variables. Noether's theorem for the multi-symplectic MHD system is derived, including the case of non-Cartesian space coordinates, where the metric plays a role in the equations.

  6. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T. ); McWilliams, J.C. ); Petviashvili, N. )

    1994-02-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics based on the Elsaesser variables is developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to those based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected, the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. A statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations is given. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories, but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is presented as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected. A statistical calculation in the canonical ensemble and numerical simulations show that a nonzero large-scale magnetic field is statistically favored, and that the preferred shape of this field is a long, thin tube of flux. Possible applications to a variety of physical phenomena are suggested.

  7. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J. C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected, the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories, but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  8. Modeling eruptive coronal magnetohydrodynamic systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.

    In this dissertation I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to directly observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if reconnection is a necessary component of these eruptions. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a metastable confined flux rope theory for coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. My work has demonstrated that some of the observed eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  9. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  10. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  11. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; McWilliams, J. C.; Petviashvili, N.

    1994-02-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics based on the Elsässer variables is developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to those based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected, the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. A statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations is given. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories, but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is presented as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected. A statistical calculation in the canonical ensemble and numerical simulations show that a nonzero large-scale magnetic field is statistically favored, and that the preferred shape of this field is a long, thin tube of flux. Possible applications to a variety of physical phenomena are suggested.

  12. High conductivity magnetic tearing instability. [of neutral plasma sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. A.; Van Hoven, G.

    1976-01-01

    Linearized equations of magnetohydrodynamics are used to investigate the tearing mode, for arbitrary values of the conductivity, through a consideration of the additional effect of the electron-inertia contribution to Ohm's law. A description is provided of the equilibrium and subsequent instability in the magnetohydrodynamic approximation. A method for solving the perturbation equations in the linear approximation is discussed and attention is given to the results in the high conductivity limit.

  13. Impact of MHD shock physics on magnetosheath asymmetry and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyri, K.

    2013-08-01

    We have performed 13 three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field properties for Parker spiral (PS) and ortho-Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations corresponding to a wide range of solar wind plasma conditions. To study the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause, we have performed 26 local two-dimensional MHD simulations, with the initial conditions taken from global simulations on both sides of the velocity shear layer at the dawn-dusk terminator. These simulations indicate that while the MHD physics of the fast shocks does not directly lead to strong asymmetry of the magnetosheath temperature for typical solar wind conditions, the magnetosheath on the quasi-parallel shock side has a smaller tangential magnetic field along the magnetosheath flow which enables faster growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Because the IMF is statistically mostly in the PS orientation, the KHI formation may statistically favor the dawnside flank. For all the 26 simulations, the growth rates of the KHI correlated well with the ratio of the velocity shear and Alfvén speed along the wave vector, k. Dynamics of the KHI may subsequently lead to formation of kinetic Alfvén waves and reconnection in the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices which can lead to particle energization. This may partly help to explain the observed plasma sheet asymmetry of cold-component ions, which are heated more on the dawnside plasma sheet.

  14. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: detection and scaling.

    PubMed

    Uritsky, V M; Pouquet, A; Rosenberg, D; Mininni, P D; Donovan, E F

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 1536³ points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn'old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities. PMID:21230595

  15. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Detection and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Pouquet, A.; Rosenberg, D.; Mininni, P. D.; Donovan, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 15363 points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn’old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities.

  16. Density gradient effects on transverse shear driven lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Ami M.; Thomas, Edward; Amatucci, William E.; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2014-06-15

    Shear driven instabilities are commonly observed in the near-Earth space, particularly in boundary layer plasmas. When the shear scale length (L{sub E}) is much less than the ion gyro-radius (ρ{sub i}) but greater than the electron gyro-radius (ρ{sub e}), the electrons are magnetized in the shear layer, but the ions are effectively un-magnetized. The resulting shear driven instability, the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, is investigated in a new interpenetrating plasma configuration in the Auburn Linear EXperiment for Instability Studies. In order to understand the dynamics of magnetospheric boundary layers, the EIH instability is studied in the presence of a density gradient located at the boundary layer between two plasmas. This paper reports on a recent experiment in which electrostatic lower hybrid waves are identified as the EIH instability, and the effect of a density gradient on the instability properties are investigated.

  17. Local Simulations of the Magnetorotational Instability in Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Sano, Takayoshi

    2012-11-01

    Bearing in mind the application of core-collapse supernovae, we study the nonlinear properties of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of three-dimensional simulations in the framework of a local shearing box approximation. By systematically changing the shear rates that symbolize the degree of differential rotation in nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs), we derive a scaling relation between the turbulent stress sustained by the MRI and the shear-vorticity ratio. Our parametric survey shows a power-law scaling between the turbulent stress (langlangw totrangrang) and the shear-vorticity ratio (gq ) as langlangw totrangrangvpropg δ q with an index of δ ~ 0.5. The MRI-amplified magnetic energy has a similar scaling relative to the turbulent stress, while the Maxwell stress has a slightly smaller power-law index (~0.36). By modeling the effect of viscous heating rates from MRI turbulence, we show that the stronger magnetic fields, or the larger shear rates initially imposed, lead to higher dissipation rates. For a rapidly rotating PNS with a spin period in milliseconds and with strong magnetic fields of 1015 G, the energy dissipation rate is estimated to exceed 1051 erg s-1. Our results suggest that the conventional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is likely to be affected by MRI-driven turbulence, which we speculate, on the one hand, could harm the MHD-driven explosions due to the dissipation of the shear rotational energy at the PNS surface; or, on the other hand, its energy deposition might be potentially favorable for the working of the neutrino-heating mechanism.

  18. A drift model of interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Power, O. A.

    2007-08-15

    A set of asymptotic equations is derived, describing the dynamics of the flute mode in a magnetized plasma with cold ions, under a 'local' approximation (i.e., near a particular point). The asymptotic set is then used to calculate the growth rate of interchange instability in the slab model. It is shown that, unlike the magnetohydrodynamic ordering, the drift one allows instability to occur for either sign of the pressure gradient (i.e., for both 'bad' and 'good' curvature of the magnetic field). It is also demonstrated that finite beta gives rise to an extra instability that does not exist in the small-beta limit.

  19. Magnetic buoyancy instabilities in the presence of magnetic flux pumping at the base of the solar convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Adrian J.; Silvers, Lara J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.; Weiss, Nigel O.

    2012-07-01

    We perform idealized numerical simulations of magnetic buoyancy instabilities in three dimensions, solving the equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics in a model of the solar tachocline. In particular, we study the effects of including a highly simplified model of magnetic flux pumping in an upper layer ('the convection zone') on magnetic buoyancy instabilities in a lower layer ('the upper parts of the radiative interior - including the tachocline'), to study these competing flux transport mechanisms at the base of the convection zone. The results of the inclusion of this effect in numerical simulations of the buoyancy instability of both a preconceived magnetic slab and a shear-generated magnetic layer are presented. In the former, we find that if we are in the regime that the downward pumping velocity is comparable with the Alfvén speed of the magnetic layer, magnetic flux pumping is able to hold back the bulk of the magnetic field, with only small pockets of strong field able to rise into the upper layer. In simulations in which the magnetic layer is generated by shear, we find that the shear velocity is not necessarily required to exceed that of the pumping (therefore the kinetic energy of the shear is not required to exceed that of the overlying convection) for strong localized pockets of magnetic field to be produced which can rise into the upper layer. This is because magnetic flux pumping acts to store the field below the interface, allowing it to be amplified both by the shear and by vortical fluid motions, until pockets of field can achieve sufficient strength to rise into the upper layer. In addition, we find that the interface between the two layers is a natural location for the production of strong vertical gradients in the magnetic field. If these gradients are sufficiently strong to allow the development of magnetic buoyancy instabilities, strong shear is not necessarily required to drive them (cf. previous work by Vasil & Brummell). We find

  20. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  1. Plasma structure and behavior in a disk magnetohydrodynamic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Okuno, Yoshihiro; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    2004-11-15

    We describe the structure and behavior of a nonequilibrium cesium-seeded helium plasma in a disk-shaped magnetohydrodynamic generator. Excellent time-resolved optical measurements clarify the spatial distribution of the electron temperature. A correlation analysis and the visualization of the plasma structure reveal its propagation phenomena from upstream to downstream and the transformation from a homogeneous quasisteady state to a self-consistent periodical state. A linear perturbation analysis suggests that the inhomogeneous plasma structure associated with the unique electron temperature behavior is closely related to ionization instability due to weak seed ionization.

  2. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  3. Pulsar Magnetohydrodynamic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Isao; Sigalo, Friday B.

    2006-12-01

    The acceleration and collimation/decollimation of relativistic magnetocentrifugal winds are discussed concerning a cold plasma from a strongly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron star in a steady axisymmetric state based on ideal magnetohydrodynamics. There exist unipolar inductors associated with the field line angular frequency, α, at the magnetospheric base surface, SB, with a huge potential difference between the poles and the equator, which drive electric current through the pulsar magnetosphere. Any ``current line'' must emanate from one terminal of the unipolar inductor and return to the other, converting the Poynting flux to the kinetic flux of the wind at finite distances. In a plausible field structure satisfying the transfield force-balance equation, the fast surface, SF, must exist somewhere between the subasymptotic and asymptotic domains, i.e., at the innermost point along each field line of the asymptotic domain of \\varpaA2/\\varpi2 ≪ 1, where \\varpiA is the Alfvénic axial distance. The criticality condition at SF yields the Lorentz factor, γF = μ\\varepsilon1/3, and the angular momentum flux, β, as the eigenvalues in terms of the field line angular velocity, α, the mass flux per unit flux tube, η, and one of the Bernoulli integrals, μδ, which are assumed to be specifiable as the boundary conditions at SB. The other Bernoulli integral, μɛ, is related to μδ as μɛ = μδ[1-(α2\\varpiA2/c2)]-1, and both μɛ and \\varpiA2 are eigenvalues to be determined by the criticality condition at SF. Ongoing MHD acceleration is possible in the superfast domain. This fact may be helpful in resolving a discrepancy between the wind theory and the Crab-nebula model. It is argued that the ``anti-collimation theorem'' holds for relativistic winds, based on the curvature of field streamlines determined by the transfield force balance. The ``theorem'' combines with the ``current-closure condition'' as a global condition in the wind zone to produce a

  4. Nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional instabilities of thin and thick electron scale current sheets: Plasmoid formation and current filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2014-07-15

    Nonlinear evolution of three dimensional electron shear flow instabilities of an electron current sheet (ECS) is studied using electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of the evolution on current sheet thickness is examined. For thin current sheets (half thickness =d{sub e}=c/ω{sub pe}), tearing mode instability dominates. In its nonlinear evolution, it leads to the formation of oblique current channels. Magnetic field lines form 3-D magnetic spirals. Even in the absence of initial guide field, the out-of-reconnection-plane magnetic field generated by the tearing instability itself may play the role of guide field in the growth of secondary finite-guide-field instabilities. For thicker current sheets (half thickness ∼5 d{sub e}), both tearing and non-tearing modes grow. Due to the non-tearing mode, current sheet becomes corrugated in the beginning of the evolution. In this case, tearing mode lets the magnetic field reconnect in the corrugated ECS. Later thick ECS develops filamentary structures and turbulence in which reconnection occurs. This evolution of thick ECS provides an example of reconnection in self-generated turbulence. The power spectra for both the thin and thick current sheets are anisotropic with respect to the electron flow direction. The cascade towards shorter scales occurs preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the electron flow.

  5. A cylindrical model for rotational MHD instabilities in aluminum reduction cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, David; Vincent, Alain

    2008-08-01

    Large-scale horizontal vortices associated with deformations of the aluminum-electrolyte interface have been observed in operating aluminum reduction cells as well as in physical and numerical models. To expose their importance, we analyze a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interfacial instabilities which are induced by rotation. As we focus on a single vortex, a cylindrical geometry is preferred. Two analytical models are proposed. In a first model based on the MHD shallow-water approximation, we consider a vortex that has a solid rotation profile to obtain a wave equation and a dispersion relation. A more realistic second model includes a viscous rotation profile and the treatment of the base-state interface deformation. Energetics of the flow gives further insight on how an initial perturbation evolves as an oscillatory or a non-oscillatory instability, depending on the direction of rotation. We find that the mechanism at the very origin of these instabilities is neither due to a shear between the two layers—and are therefore not Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities—nor simply due to magnetic force alone, but rather to the indirect action of the centripetal pressure due to the rotation induced by magnetic force.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic flow at microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragsdale, Steven Ronald

    1998-12-01

    Voltammetric reduction of nitrobenzene (NB) at a 12.5 μm-radius Pt microdisk electrode in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.001/le x NB/le 0.999 is reported (x NB is the mole fraction of NB). The voltammetric response displays a reversible, sigmoidalshape wave, corresponding to the one-electron reduction of NB. The maximum limiting current occurs in solutions containing intermediate redox concentrations, x NB/le0.2. Voltammetric currents are analyzed using the Cullinan-Vignes model to describe the interdiffusion of the redox species and solvent. Mutual diffusivities are corrected for activity effects using isothermal liquid-vapor equilibrium data. Application of the activity-corrected diffusivities in the Cullinan- Vignes model yields reasonably accurate predictions of the dependence of the voltammetric current on solution composition. The influence of an external magnetic field (0-1 Tesla) on the voltammetric response of Pt and Au microdisk electrodes (0.1, 6.4, 12.5 and 25 μm radius) is described. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow within a microscopic volume element adjacent to the microdisk surface results from the magnetic force generated by the flux of electrogenerated ions through the magnetic field. An analytic expression is presented for the magnetic force generated during steady-state voltammetry at a hemispherical microelectrode immersed in a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic volume force, F/bf mag (N/m3), is shown to decrease as r-2 (where r is the distance from the center of the electrode). The dependence of F/bf mag on r-2 confines the MHD flow to small volumes very close to the electrode surface (e.g., ~2×10-9 L for a 12.5 μm-radius electrode). Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to map MHD flows at a 25 μm-radius Pt microdisk electrode during the one-electron reduction of NB. Unidirectional lateral flow is observed when the magnetic field is aligned parallel to the electrode surface; rotational or cyclotron flow is observed when

  7. Layered Systems Under Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenšek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    We discuss and review a generalization of the usual hydrodynamic description of smectic A liquid crystals motivated by the experimentally observed shear-induced destabilization and reorientation of smectic A like systems. We include both the smectic layering (via the layer displacement u and the layer normal hat{p}) and the director hat{n} of the underlying nematic order in our macroscopic hydrodynamic description and allow both directions to differ in non equilibrium situations. In a homeotropically aligned sample the nematic director couples to an applied simple shear, whereas the smectic layering stays unchanged. This difference leads to a finite (but usually small) angle between hat{n} and hat{p}, which we find to be equivalent to an effective dilatation of the layers. This effective dilatation leads, above a certain threshold, to an undulation instability of the layers with a wave vector parallel to the vorticity direction of the shear flow. We include the couplings of the velocity field with the order parameters for orientational and positional order and show how the order parameters interact with the undulation instability. We explore the influence of the magnitude of various material parameters on the instability. Comparing our results to available experimental results and molecular dynamic simulations, we find good qualitative agreement for the first instability. In addition, we discuss pathways to higher instabilities leading to the formation of onions (multilamellar vesicles) via cylindrical structures and/or the break-up of layers via large amplitude undulations.

  8. Viscous, resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability computed by spectral techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Zang, T. A.; Montgomery, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Expansions in Chebyshev polynomials are used to study the linear stability of one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic quasiequilibria, in the presence of finite resistivity and viscosity. The method is modeled on the one used by Orszag in accurate computation of solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Two Reynolds-like numbers involving Alfvén speeds, length scales, kinematic viscosity, and magnetic diffusivity govern the stability boundaries, which are determined by the geometric mean of the two Reynolds-like numbers. Marginal stability curves, growth rates versus Reynolds-like numbers, and growth rates versus parallel wave numbers are exhibited. A numerical result that appears general is that instability has been found to be associated with inflection points in the current profile, though no general analytical proof has emerged. It is possible that nonlinear subcritical three-dimensional instabilities may exist, similar to those in Poiseuille and Couette flow. PMID:16593375

  9. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SIGMOID ERUPTION OF ACTIVE REGION 11283

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2013-07-10

    Current magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the initiation of solar eruptions are still commonly carried out with idealized magnetic field models, whereas the realistic coronal field prior to eruptions can possibly be reconstructed from the observable photospheric field. Using a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation prior to a sigmoid eruption in AR 11283 as the initial condition in an MHD model, we successfully simulate the realistic initiation process of the eruption event, as is confirmed by a remarkable resemblance to the SDO/AIA observations. Analysis of the pre-eruption field reveals that the envelope flux of the sigmoidal core contains a coronal null and furthermore the flux rope is prone to a torus instability. Observations suggest that reconnection at the null cuts overlying tethers and likely triggers the torus instability of the flux rope, which results in the eruption. This kind of simulation demonstrates the capability of modeling the realistic solar eruptions to provide the initiation process.

  10. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzi, Carlo Alessi, E. Figini, L. Galperti, G. Lazzaro, E. Marchetto, C. Nowak, S.; Mosconi, M.

    2014-08-21

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  11. Theory for explosive ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in plasmas.

    PubMed

    Wilson, H R; Cowley, S C

    2004-04-30

    Flux tubes confined in tokamaks are observed to erupt explosively in some plasma disruptions and edge localized modes. Similar eruptions occur in astrophysical plasmas, for example, in solar flares and magnetospheric substorms. A single unifying nonlinear evolution equation describing such behavior in both astrophysical and tokamak plasmas is derived. This theory predicts that flux tubes rise explosively, narrow, and twist to pass through overlying magnetic field lines without reconnection. PMID:15169163

  12. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, Carlo; Alessi, E.; Figini, L.; Galperti, G.; Lazzaro, E.; Marchetto, C.; Mosconi, M.; Nowak, S.

    2014-08-01

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  13. Magneto-hydrodynamically stable axisymmetric mirrorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Berk, H. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Molvik, A. W.; Simonen, T. C.

    2011-09-01

    Making axisymmetric mirrors magnetohydrodynamically (MHD) stable opens up exciting opportunities for using mirror devices as neutron sources, fusion-fission hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors. This is also of interest from a general physics standpoint (as it seemingly contradicts well-established criteria of curvature-driven instabilities). The axial symmetry allows for much simpler and more reliable designs of mirror-based fusion facilities than the well-known quadrupole mirror configurations. In this tutorial, after a summary of classical results, several techniques for achieving MHD stabilization of the axisymmetric mirrors are considered, in particular: (1) employing the favorable field-line curvature in the end tanks; (2) using the line-tying effect; (3) controlling the radial potential distribution; (4) imposing a divertor configuration on the solenoidal magnetic field; and (5) affecting the plasma dynamics by the ponderomotive force. Some illuminative theoretical approaches for understanding axisymmetric mirror stability are described. The applicability of the various stabilization techniques to axisymmetric mirrors as neutron sources, hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors are discussed; and the constraints on the plasma parameters are formulated.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of broad line region clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Martin; Schartmann, Marc; Burkert, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Hydrodynamic stability has been a longstanding issue for the cloud model of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei. We argue that the clouds may be gravitationally bound to the supermassive black hole. If true, stabilization by thermal pressure alone becomes even more difficult. We further argue that if magnetic fields are present in such clouds at a level that could affect the stability properties, they need to be strong enough to compete with the radiation pressure on the cloud. This would imply magnetic field values of a few gauss for a sample of active galactic nuclei we draw from the literature. We then investigate the effect of several magnetic configurations on cloud stability in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For a purely azimuthal magnetic field which provides the dominant pressure support, the cloud first gets compressed by the opposing radiative and gravitational forces. The pressure inside the cloud then increases, and it expands vertically. Kelvin-Helmholtz and column density instabilities lead to a filamentary fragmentation of the cloud. This radiative dispersion continues until the cloud is shredded down to the resolution level. For a helical magnetic field configuration, a much more stable cloud core survives with a stationary density histogram which takes the form of a power law. Our simulated clouds develop sub-Alfvénic internal motions on the level of a few hundred km s-1.

  15. Multiple time scale methods in tokamak magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods are discussed for integrating the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in tokamak systems on other than the fastest time scale. The dynamical grid method for simulating ideal MHD instabilities utilizes a natural nonorthogonal time-dependent coordinate transformation based on the magnetic field lines. The coordinate transformation is chosen to be free of the fast time scale motion itself, and to yield a relatively simple scalar equation for the total pressure, P = p + B/sup 2//2..mu../sub 0/, which can be integrated implicitly to average over the fast time scale oscillations. Two methods are described for the resistive time scale. The zero-mass method uses a reduced set of two-fluid transport equations obtained by expanding in the inverse magnetic Reynolds number, and in the small ratio of perpendicular to parallel mobilities and thermal conductivities. The momentum equation becomes a constraint equation that forces the pressure and magnetic fields and currents to remain in force balance equilibrium as they evolve. The large mass method artificially scales up the ion mass and viscosity, thereby reducing the severe time scale disparity between wavelike and diffusionlike phenomena, but not changing the resistive time scale behavior. Other methods addressing the intermediate time scales are discussed.

  16. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  17. Geometrical influences on neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    1998-02-01

    The influence of geometry on the pressure drives of nonideal magnetohydrodynamic tearing modes is presented. In order to study the effects of elongation, triangularity, and aspect ratio, three different machines are considered to provide a range of tokamak configurations: Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (circular) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)], DIII-D (D-shaped) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159], and Pegasus (extremely low aspect ratio) [Fonck et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41, 1400 (1996)]. For large aspect ratio tokamaks, shaping does very little to influence the pressure gradient drives, while at low aspect ratios, a very strong sensitivity to the profiles is found. In particular, this sensitivity is connected to the strong dependence on the magnetic shear. This suggests that at low aspect ratio it may be possible to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes by a flattening the q profile near low order rational surfaces (e.g., q=2/1) using a combination of shaping and localized current drive, whereas at large aspect ratio it is more difficult.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann formulation for Braginskii magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellar, Paul

    2012-03-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the Braginskii magnetohydrodynamic equations that describe large-scale motions in strongly magnetised plasmas. Fluid quantities, density, velocity and stress, are represented by a finite set of distribution functions associated with particles moving on a square or cubic lattice. Equilibrium distributions are constructed from Hermite moment expansions, so slowly varying solutions of the discrete kinetic equation exactly satisfy the Navier--Stokes or MHD momentum equations. Electromagnetic quantities are represented by a second kinetic equation for a set of vector-valued distribution functions. Maxwell's equations and the resistive MHD induction equation may be recovered from slowly varying solutions using different scalings. The resulting algorithm, comprising only local operations at grid points and data copying between adjacent points, readily lends itself to large-scale parallel computations. We modify the collision operator to apply different relaxation times to components of the stress parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field, simulating a form of the Braginskii MHD equations encountered in astrophysics. Large shears develop in simulations where the fluid velocity perpendicular to the field lines reverses.

  19. Development of anisotropy in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sébastien; Politano, Hélène

    2008-12-01

    We present a set of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of incompressible decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in which we investigate the influence of an external uniform magnetic field B0 . A parametric study in terms of B0 intensity is made where, in particular, we distinguish the shear-from the pseudo-Alfvén waves dynamics. The initial kinetic and magnetic energies are equal with a negligible cross correlation. Both the temporal and spectral effects of B0 are discussed. A subcritical balance is found between the Alfvén and nonlinear times with both a global and a spectral definition. The nonlinear dynamics of strongly magnetized flows is characterized by a different k⊥ spectrum (where B0 defines the parallel direction) if it is plotted at a fixed k∥ (two-dimensional spectrum) or if it is integrated (averaged) over all k∥ (one-dimensional spectrum). In the former case a much wider inertial range is found with a steep power law, closer to the wave turbulence prediction than the Kolmogorov one such as in the latter case. It is believed that the averaging effect may be a source of difficulty to detect the transition towards wave turbulence in natural plasmas. Another important result of this paper is the formation of filaments reported within current and vorticity sheets in strongly magnetized flows, which modifies our classical picture of dissipative sheets in conductive flows.

  20. Nonlinear Shear Instabilities in an Infinite Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepveu, M.

    1982-08-01

    The dynamical evolution of an infinite slab moving in denser and noisy (turbulent) surroundings is investigated with a 2D hydrodynamic code. The applicability of the results to astrophysical jets is discussed. Inviscid beams show internal shocks at regular intervals of a few beamwidths. Kinks are not obvious. In viscous beams shocks are less outspoken, but turbulence is triggered with maximum scales of a few beamwidths. These viscous beams broaden. Linear stability analysis may hold up to a few e-folding times, although the seed disturbance field is not infinitesimal. The computations suggest that viscous astrophysical beams may become blurred quite suddenly and may give rise to sudden change in radiation patterns (NGC 1265).

  1. Experimental and numerical study of electrically driven magnetohydrodynamic flow in a modified cylindrical annulus. I. Base flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Zacharias; Cébron, David; Miralles, Sophie; Vantieghem, Stijn; Noir, Jérôme; Scarfe, Peter; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Shear layers in confined liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow play an important role in geo- and astrophysical bodies as well as in engineering applications. We present an experimental and numerical study of liquid metal MHD flow in a modified cylindrical annulus that is driven by an azimuthal Lorentz force resulting from a forced electric current under an imposed axial magnetic field. Hartmann and Reynolds numbers reach Mmax ≈ 2000 and Remax ≈ 1.3 × 104, respectively, in the steady regime. The peculiarity of our model geometry is the protruding inner disk electrode which gives rise to a free Shercliff layer at its edge. The flow of liquid GaInSn in the experimental device ZUCCHINI (ZUrich Cylindrical CHannel INstability Investigation) is probed with ultrasound Doppler velocimetry. We establish the base flow in ZUCCHINI and study the scaling of velocities and the free Shercliff layer in both experiment and finite element simulations. Experiment and numerics agree well on the mean azimuthal velocity uϕ(r) following the prediction of a large-M theoretical model. The large-M limit, which is equivalent to neglecting inertial effects, appears to be reached for M ≳ 30 in our study. In the numerics, we recover the theoretical scaling of the free Shercliff layer δS ˜ M-1/2 whereas δS appears to be largely independent of M in the experiment.

  2. Representation of Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-01-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ Β = ∇ X (xi X B) ensures that δ B • ∇ ψ = 0 at a resonance, with ψ labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation δ Β = ∇ X αB. These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of δ B • ∇ψ at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in xi to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed

  3. Shoulder Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors Is shoulder instability the same as shoulder dislocation? No. The signs of dislocation and instability might ... the same to you--weakness and pain. However, dislocation occurs when your shoulder goes completely out of place. The shoulder ligaments ...

  4. Shock-induced crystalline instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, Ramon; Holian, Brad Lee; Germann, Timothy C.

    2007-03-01

    Uniaxial deformations of single crystals such as those produced under planar shock loading can produce structural instabilities which compete with defect nucleation mechanisms. In fcc single crystals under (110) shock loading, the resulting body-centered orthorhombic crystal structure develops a long-wavelength dynamical instability associated with tetragonal shear distortions, which occurs at lower strains (pressures) than those predicted by the vanishing of the elastic constants at finite pressure (stiffness coefficients). The criterion for these instabilities is derived and verified by equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations [2]J. Wang, S. Yip, S.R. Phillpot, D. Wolf, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 4182 (1993)

  5. Spatiotemporal Oscillations and Rheochaos in a Simple Model of Shear Banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, S. M.; Olmsted, P. D.

    2004-02-01

    We study a simple model of shear banding in which the flow-induced phase is destabilized by coupling between flow and microstructure (wormlike micellar length). By varying the strength of instability and the applied shear rate, we find a rich variety of oscillatory and chaotic shear banded flows. At low shear and weak instability, the induced phase pulsates next to one wall of the flow cell. For stronger instability, high shear pulses ricochet across the cell. At high shear we see oscillating bands on either side of central defects. We discuss our results in the context of recent experiments.

  6. Spatiotemporal oscillations and rheochaos in a simple model of shear banding.

    PubMed

    Fielding, S M; Olmsted, P D

    2004-02-27

    We study a simple model of shear banding in which the flow-induced phase is destabilized by coupling between flow and microstructure (wormlike micellar length). By varying the strength of instability and the applied shear rate, we find a rich variety of oscillatory and chaotic shear banded flows. At low shear and weak instability, the induced phase pulsates next to one wall of the flow cell. For stronger instability, high shear pulses ricochet across the cell. At high shear we see oscillating bands on either side of central defects. We discuss our results in the context of recent experiments. PMID:14995780

  7. Feathering Instability of Spiral Arms. I. Formulation of the Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Shu, Frank H.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we study the feathering substructures along spiral arms by considering the perturbational gas response to a spiral shock. Feathers are density fluctuations that jut out from the spiral arm to the interarm region at pitch angles given by the quantum numbers of the doubly periodic structure. In a localized asymptotic approximation, related to the shearing sheet except that the inhomogeneities occur in space rather than in time, we derive the linearized perturbation equations for a razor-thin disk with turbulent interstellar gas, frozen-in magnetic field, and gaseous self-gravity. Apart from the modal quantum numbers, the individual normal modes of the system depend on seven dimensionless quantities that characterize the underlying time-independent axisymmetric state plus its steady, nonlinear, two-armed spiral-shock response to a hypothesized background density wave supported by the disk stars of the galaxy. We show that some of these normal modes have positive growth rates. Their overdensity contours in the post-shock region are very reminiscent of observed feathering substructures in full magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The feathering substructures are parasitic instabilities intrinsic to the system; thus, their study not only provides potential diagnostics for important parameters that characterize the interstellar medium of external galaxies, but also yields a deeper understanding of the basic mechanism that drives the formation of the giant molecular clouds and the OB stars that outline observed grand-design spirals.

  8. PHURBAS: AN ADAPTIVE, LAGRANGIAN, MESHLESS, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Maron, Jason L. E-mail: jmaron@amnh.org

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is required to ensure the particles fill the computational volume and gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. We have parallelized the code by adapting the framework provided by GADGET-2. A set of standard test problems, including 10{sup -6} amplitude linear magnetohydrodynamics waves, magnetized shock tubes, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities is presented. Finally, we demonstrate good agreement with analytic predictions of linear growth rates for magnetorotational instability in a cylindrical geometry. This paper documents the Phurbas algorithm as implemented in Phurbas version 1.1.

  9. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  10. Nonlocal stability analysis of the MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a compressible plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, A.; Pritchett, P.L.

    1982-09-01

    A general stability analysis is performed for the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in sheared magnetohydrodynamic flow of finite thickness in a compressible plasma. The analysis allows for arbitrary orientation of the magnetic field B/sub 0/, velocity flow v/sub 0/, and wave vector k in the plane perpendicular to the velocity gradient, and no restrictions are imposed on the sound or Alfven Mach numbers. The stability problem is reduced to the solution of a single-order differential equation, which includes a gravitational term to represent coupling between the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode and the interchange mode. In the incompressible limit it is shown that the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode is completely stabilized for any velocity profile as long as the condition V/sub 0/<2v/sub A/ (kxB/sub 0/)/(kxv/sub 0/) is satisfied, where V/sub 0/ is the total velocity jump across the shear layer. Numerical results are obtained for a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile for the transverse (B/sub 0/perpendicularv/sub 0/) and parallel (B/sub 0/parallelv/sub 0/) flow configurations. Only modes with k..delta..<2 are unstable, where ..delta.. is the scale length of the shear layer. The fastest growing modes occur for k..delta..approx.0.5--1.0. Compressibility and a magnetic field component parallel to the flow are found to be stabilizing effects. For the transverse case, only the fast magnetosonic mode is destabilized, but if the kxB/sub 0/not =0, the instability contains Alfven-mode and slow-mode components as well. The Alfven component gives rise to a field-aligned current inside the shear layer. In the parallel case, both Alfven and slow magnetosonic components are present, with the Alfven mode confined inside the shear layer. The results of the analysis are used to discuss the stability of sheared plasma flow at the magnetopause boundary and in the solar wind. At the magnetopause boundary, the fastest growing Kelvin-Helmholtz mode has a frequency of 0 (V/sub 0//2..delta..), which overlaps with

  11. Direct comparisons of compressible magnetohydrodynamics and reduced magnetohydrodynamics turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitruk, Pablo; Matthaeus, William H.; Oughton, Sean

    2005-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of low Mach number compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (CMHD3D) turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field are compared with simulations of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD). Periodic boundary conditions in the three spatial coordinates are considered. Different sets of initial conditions are chosen to explore the applicability of RMHD and to study how close the solution remains to the full compressible MHD solution as both freely evolve in time. In a first set, the initial state is prepared to satisfy the conditions assumed in the derivation of RMHD, namely, a strong mean magnetic field and plane-polarized fluctuations, varying weakly along the mean magnetic field. In those circumstances, simulations show that RMHD and CMHD3D evolve almost indistinguishably from one another. When some of the conditions are relaxed the agreement worsens but RMHD remains fairly close to CMHD3D, especially when the mean magnetic field is large enough. Moreover, the well-known spectral anisotropy effect promotes the dynamical attainment of the conditions for RMHD applicability. Global quantities (mean energies, mean-square current, and vorticity) and energy spectra from the two solutions are compared and point-to-point separation estimations are computed. The specific results shown here give support to the use of RMHD as a valid approximation of compressible MHD with a mean magnetic field under certain but quite practical conditions.

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a magnetic tangential discontinuity in the presence of flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M. S.

    2015-08-01

    We studied the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability of a magnetohydrodynamic tangential discontinuity in an infinitely conducting incompressible plasma in the presence of flow. We assumed that the flow magnitude is small enough to guarantee that there is no Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In addition, we assumed that there is the magnetic shear, that is, the magnetic field has different directions at the two side of the discontinuity. In this case, only perturbations whose wavelength is greater than the critical one are unstable. As a consequence, the perturbation growth rate is bounded, and the initial-value problem describing their evolution is well posed. We also studied the absolute and convective nature of the MRT instability using the Briggs method. We obtained the necessary and sufficient condition for a perturbation propagating in a given direction to be only convectively unstable but absolutely stable. We also obtained the condition for perturbations propagating in any direction to be only convectively unstable, but absolutely stable. The results of the general analysis were applied to the MRT instability of prominence threads and the heliopause. Similar to previous research, we assumed that the thread disappearance is related to the MRT instability and the thread lifetime is equal to the inverse instability increment. Using this assumption we estimated the angle between the magnetic field inside the thread and in the surrounding plasma and studied how this estimate depends on the magnitude of the flow inside the thread. We found that this dependence is very weak. To apply this to the heliopause stability, we carried out the local analysis and restricted it to the near flanks of the heliopause only where the plasma flow can be considered incompressible. We showed that, for values of the magnetic field magnitude observed by Voyager 1, there is no KH instability. We then studied the MRT instability that can occur when the heliosheath is accelerated

  13. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, D.H.; Thresh, H.R.

    1980-06-24

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is described comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core of a first metal, a tubular sleeve of a second metal, and an outer sheath of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MHD channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core and the second metal of the sleeve strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  14. Magneto-Hydrodynamics Based Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    In microfluidic devices, it is necessary to propel samples and reagents from one part of the device to another, stir fluids, and detect the presence of chemical and biological targets. Given the small size of these devices, the above tasks are far from trivial. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) offers an elegant means to control fluid flow in microdevices without a need for mechanical components. In this paper, we review the theory of MHD for low conductivity fluids and describe various applications of MHD such as fluid pumping, flow control in fluidic networks, fluid stirring and mixing, circular liquid chromatography, thermal reactors, and microcoolers. PMID:20046890

  15. Scaling of (MHD) instabilities in imploding plasma liners

    SciTech Connect

    Hussey, T.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Kloc, D.A.

    1980-03-01

    The dynamics of imploding foil plasmas is considered using first-order theory to model the implosion and to investigate the effects of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities on the structure of the plasma sheath. The effects of the acceleration-produced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Rayleigh-Taylor instability and a wall-associated instability are studied for a variety of plasma implosion times for several pulsed power drivers. The basic physics of these instabilities is identified and models are developed to explain both linear and nonlinear behavior. These models are compared with the results of detailed two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Expressions for linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth are developed showing its dependence on driving current, plasma conductivity, and density gradient scale length. A nonlinear saturation model, based on magnetic field diffusion, is developed. The model for a wall instability involves the interaction of the plasma sheath with the electrode wall and the material ablated from the electrode. The growth of this instability is shown to be limited by field diffusion. Comparison with two-dimensional simulations has been excellent.

  16. On the nature of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2007-02-15

    A novel model of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of a strong external magnetic field is proposed for the explanation of recent numerical results. According to the proposed model, in the presence of the strong external magnetic field, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence becomes nonlocal in the sense that low-frequency modes cause decorrelation of interacting high-frequency modes from the inertial interval. It is shown that the obtained nonlocal spectrum of the inertial range of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence represents an anisotropic analogue of Kraichnan's nonlocal spectrum of hydrodynamic turbulence. Based on the analysis performed in the framework of the weak-coupling approximation, which represents one of the equivalent formulations of the direct interaction approximation, it is shown that incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence could be both local and nonlocal, and therefore anisotropic analogues of both the Kolmogorov and Kraichnan spectra are realizable in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  17. ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY WITH THE EFFECT OF COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Takuhito; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2015-01-10

    We present the results obtained from the linear stability analysis and 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI), including the effects of cosmic rays (CRs). We took into account the CR diffusion along the magnetic field but neglected the cross-field-line diffusion. Two models are considered in this paper: the shearing box model and differentially rotating cylinder model. We studied how MRI is affected by the initial CR pressure (i.e., energy) distribution. In the shearing box model, the initial state is uniform distribution. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI does not depend on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient. In the differentially rotating cylinder model, the initial state is a constant angular momentum polytropic disk threaded by a weak uniform vertical magnetic field. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI becomes larger if the CR diffusion coefficient is larger. Both results are confirmed by MHD simulations. The MHD simulation results show that the outward movement of matter by the growth of MRI is not impeded by the CR pressure gradient, and the centrifugal force that acts on the concentrated matter becomes larger. Consequently, the growth rate of MRI is increased. On the other hand, if the initial CR pressure is uniform, then the growth rate of the MRI barely depends on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient.

  18. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  19. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamics of weakly ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond

    The process of star formation is an integral part of the new field of astrobiology, which studies the origins of life. Since the gas that collapses to form stars and their resulting protoplanetary disks is known to be weakly ionized and contain magnetic fields, star formation is governed by multifluid magnetohydrodynamics. In this thesis we consider two important problems involved in the process of star formation that may have strongly affected the origins of life, with the goal of determining the thermal effects of these flows and modeling the physical conditions of these environments. We first considered the outstanding problem of how primitive bodies, specifically asteroids, were heated in protoplanetary disks early in their lifetime. Reexamining asteroid heating due to the classic unipolar induction heating mechanism described by Sonett et al. (1970), we find that this mechanism contains a subtle conceptual error. As original conceived, heating due to this mechanism is driven by a uniform, supersonic, fully-ionized, magnetized, T Tauri solar wind, which sweeps past an asteroid and causes the asteroid to experience a motional electric field in its rest frame. We point out that this mechanism ignores the interaction between the body surface and the flow, and thus only correctly describes the electric field far away from the asteroid where the plasma streams freely. In a realistic protoplanetary disk environment, we show that the interaction due to friction between the asteroid surface and the flow causes a shear layer to form close to the body, wherein the motional electric field predicted by Sonett et al. decreases and tends to zero at the asteroid surface. We correct this error by using the equations of multifluid magnetohydrodynamics to explicitly treat the shear layer. We calculate the velocity field in the plasma, and the magnetic and electric fields everywhere for two flows over an idealized infinite asteroid with varying magnetic field orientations. We

  20. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  1. Magneto-hydrodynamically stable axisymmetric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    The achievement of high beta (60%) plasma with near classical confinement in a linear axisymmetric magnetic configuration has sparked interest in the Gas Dynamic Trap concept. The significance of these results is that they can be projected directly to a neutron source for materials testing. The possibility of axisymmetric mirrors (AM) being magneto-hydrodynamically (MHD) stable is also of interest from a general physics standpoint (as it seemingly contradicts to well-established criteria of curvature-driven instabilities). The axial symmetry allows for much simpler and more reliable designs of mirror-based fusion facilities than the well-known quadrupole mirror configurations. In this tutorial, after a brief summary of classical results (in particular of the Rosenbluth-Longmire theory and of the energy principle as applied to AM) several approaches towards achieving MHD stabilization of the AM will be considered: 1) Employing the favorable field-line curvature in the end tanks; 2) Using the line-tying effect; 3) Setting the plasma in a slow or fast differential rotation; 4) Imposing a divertor configuration on the solenoidal magnetic field; 5) Controlling the plasma dynamics by the ponderomotive force; 6) Other techniques. Several of these approaches go beyond pure MHD and require accounting for finite Larmor radius effects and trapped particle modes. Some illuminative theoretical approaches for understanding axisymmetric mirror stability will be described. Wherever possible comparison of theoretical and experimental results on AM will be provided. The applicability of the various stabilization techniques to axisymmetric mirrors as neutron sources, hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors will be discussed and the constraints on the plasma parameters will be formulated. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  3. Representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-02-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}(vector sign) Multiplication-Sign B(vector sign)) ensures that {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi}=0 at a resonance, with {psi} labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign {alpha}B(vector sign). These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi} at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in {xi}(vector sign) to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed.

  4. Some Basic Aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.

    1959-01-01

    An appraisal is made of existing solutions of magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equations for stagnation flow and flat-plate flow, and some new solutions are given. Since an exact solution of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics requires complicated simultaneous treatment of the equations of fluid flow and of electromagnetism, certain simplifying assumptions are generally introduced. The full implications of these assumptions have not been brought out properly in several recent papers. It is shown in the present report that for the particular law of deformation which the magnetic lines are assumed to follow in these papers a magnet situated inside the missile nose would not be able to take up any drag forces; to do so it would have to be placed in the flow away from the nose. It is also shown that for the assumption that potential flow is maintained outside the boundary layer, the deformation of the magnetic lines is restricted to small values. The literature contains serious disagreements with regard to reductions in heat-transfer rates due to magnetic action at the nose of a missile, and these disagreements are shown to be mainly due to different interpretations of reentry conditions rather than more complicated effects. In the present paper the magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equation is also expressed in a simple form that is especially convenient for physical interpretation. This is done by adapting methods to magnetic forces which in the past have been used for forces due to gravitational or centrifugal action. The simplified approach is used to develop some new solutions of boundary-layer flow and to reinterpret certain solutions existing in the literature. An asymptotic boundary-layer solution representing a fixed velocity profile and shear is found. Special emphasis is put on estimating skin friction and heat-transfer rates.

  5. Submesoscale baroclinic instability and the Balance Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Ocean submesoscale baroclinic instability is studied in the framework of the Balance Equations. The Balance Equations are an intermediate model that includes balanced ageostrophic effects with higher accuracy than the quasigeostrophic approximation, but rules out unbalanced wave motions; as such, they are particularly suited to the study of baroclinic instability in submesoscale ocean dynamics. The linear baroclinic instability problem is developed in generality and then specialized to the case of constant vertical shear. The primary finding is that at low Richardson numbers the growth rate of some instability modes is increased compared to larger-scale quasigeostrophic dynamics, and that the increase can be attributed to both ageostrophic baroclinic production and shear production of perturbation energy. This suggests that the nonlinear development of submesoscale baroclinic instability will proceed more vigorously than mesoscale/quasigeostrophic, and may include a downscale/forward transfer of kinetic energy.

  6. Contribution of peculiar shear motions to large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueler, Hans-Reinhard; Treumann, Rudolf A.

    1994-01-01

    Self-gravitating shear flow instability simulations in a cold dark matter-dominated expanding Einstein-de Sitter universe have been performed. When the shear flow speed exceeds a certain threshold, self-gravitating Kelvin-Helmoholtz instability occurs, forming density voids and excesses along the shear flow layer which serve as seeds for large-scale structure formation. A possible mechanism for generating shear peculiar motions are velocity fluctuations induced by the density perturbations of the postinflation era. In this scenario, short scales grow earlier than large scales. A model of this kind may contribute to the cellular structure of the luminous mass distribution in the universe.

  7. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of a Streaming Gas Core Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Ahmed E.; Elazab, Samia S.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic instability of a streaming fluid jet (radius R0) ambient with streaming liquid is studied to the axisymmetric (m{=}0) and the non-axisymmetric (m{≥slant}1) disturbances (m is the azimuthal wavenumber). When the surface tension effect is suppressed; the jet is stable to all m{≥slant}0 for all wavelengths. In the absence of the magnetic field; the model is stable to all m{≥slant}1 for all wavelengths and also stable to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is equal to or shorter than 2π R0. While it is unstable only to m{=}0 if the perturbed wavelength is longer than 2π R0. The streaming has a destabilizing effect. If the magnetic fields are sufficiently high, so that the Alfvén wave velocities are greater than the streaming velocities of the two fluids; the jet is stable against all disturbances and vice versa.

  9. A multidimensional numerical scheme for two-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Korolev, Vitaly; Zankovich, Andrey

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes an explicit multidimensional numerical scheme for special relativistic two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics of electron-positron plasma and a suit of test problems. The scheme utilizes Cartesian grid and the third-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory interpolation. Time integration is carried out using the third-order total variation diminishing method of Runge-Kutta type, thus ensuring overall third-order accuracy on smooth solutions. The magnetic field is kept near divergence-free by means of the method of generalized Lagrange multiplier. The test simulations, which include linear and non-linear continuous plasma waves, shock waves, strong explosions and the tearing instability, show that the scheme is sufficiently robust and confirm its accuracy.

  10. Three-dimensional force-free looplike magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John M.; Guzdar, Parvez N.; Usikov, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Computations of three-dimensional force-free magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, del x B = lambdaB with lambda = lambda(sub 0), a constant are presented. These equilibria are determined by boundary conditions on a surface corresponding to the solar photosphere. The specific boundary conditions used correspond to looplike magnetic fields in the corona. It is found that as lambda(sub 0) is increased, the loops of flux become kinked, and for sufficiently large lambda(sub 0), develop knots. The relationship between the kinking and knotting properties of these equilibria and the presence of a kink instability and related loss of equilibrium is explored. Clearly, magnetic reconnection must be involved for an unknotted loop equilibrium to become knotted, and speculations are made about the creation of a closed hyperbolic field line (X-line) about which this reconnection creating knotted field lines is centered.

  11. Development of magnetohydrodynamic modes during sawteeth in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; García-Martínez, P. L.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2013-07-15

    A dynamical analysis applied to a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is shown to explain the chronology of the nonlinear destabilization of modes observed in tokamak sawteeth. A special emphasis is put on the nonlinear self-consistent perturbation of the axisymmetric m = n = 0 mode that manifests through the q-profile evolution. For the very low fusion-relevant resistivity values, the q-profile is shown to remain almost unchanged on the early nonlinear timescale within the central tokamak region, which supports a partial reconnection scenario. Within the resistive region, indications for a local flattening or even a local reversed-shear of the q-profile are given. The impact of this ingredient in the occurrence of the sawtooth crash is discussed.

  12. Development of magnetohydrodynamic modes during sawteeth in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; García-Martínez, P. L.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2013-07-01

    A dynamical analysis applied to a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is shown to explain the chronology of the nonlinear destabilization of modes observed in tokamak sawteeth. A special emphasis is put on the nonlinear self-consistent perturbation of the axisymmetric m = n = 0 mode that manifests through the q-profile evolution. For the very low fusion-relevant resistivity values, the q-profile is shown to remain almost unchanged on the early nonlinear timescale within the central tokamak region, which supports a partial reconnection scenario. Within the resistive region, indications for a local flattening or even a local reversed-shear of the q-profile are given. The impact of this ingredient in the occurrence of the sawtooth crash is discussed.

  13. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic simulation of Tore Supra hollow current profile discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maget, P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Garbet, X.; Ottaviani, M.; Lütjens, H.; Luciani, J.-F.

    2007-05-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity often undermines the realization of fully noninductive plasma discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak [J. Jacquinot, Nucl. Fusion 45, S118 (2005)], by producing large degradation of electron energy confinement in the plasma core and the bifurcation to a regime with permanent MHD activity. The nonlinear evolution of MHD modes in these hollow current density profile discharges is studied with the full-scale three-dimensional MHD code XTOR [K. Lerbinger and J.-F. Luciani, J. Comput. Phys. 97, 444 (1991)] and compared with experimental features. Large confinement degradation is predicted when q(0) is close to 2. This derives either from the full reconnection of an unstable double-tearing mode, or from the coupling between a single tearing mode and adjacent stable modes in a region with reduced magnetic shear.

  14. Superstrings in Sheared Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migler, Kalman

    2000-03-01

    We report the discovery of a droplet-string-ribbon transition in concentrated polymer blends which occurs when the droplet size of the dispersed component becomes comparable to the gap between the boundary plates. Above a critical shear rate (or gap width), dispersed droplets continuously coalescence and breakup; the upper limit on their size is set by the Taylor length. Below this critical shear rate, droplets coalesce into strings and then ribbons in a four stage kinetic process. The mass ratio of string / droplet can be as large as 10^4. The transition is sharp, occurring over a shear interval of 2droplet-string transition is a manifestation of the weakening of the Rayleigh-Tomatika instability which occurs when the system becomes quasi two-dimensional. Possible applications of this technology are ultra-thin materials of high one-dimensional strength, polymer blend wires, and novel polymeric scaffolds.

  15. Solar wind driving of magnetospheric ULF waves: Pulsations driven by velocity shear at the magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Elkington, S. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailward along the magnetopause boundary. The other mode, the inner KH mode, propagates tailward along the inner edge of the boundary layer (IEBL). We find large vortical structures associated with the inner KH mode that are centered on the IEBL. The phase velocities, wavelengths, and frequencies of the two KH modes are computed. The KH waves are found to be fairly monochromatic with well-defined wavelengths. In addition, the inner and magnetopause KH modes are coupled and lead to a coupled oscillation of the low-latitude boundary layer. The boundary layer thickness, d, is computed and we find maximum wave growth for kd = 0.5-1.0, where k is the wave number, consistent with the linear theory of the KH instability. We comment briefly on the effectiveness of these KH waves in the energization and transport of radiation belt electrons.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  17. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, Don H.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core 10 of a first metal, a tubular sleeve 12 of a second metal, and an outer sheath 14, 16, 18 of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket 14. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MDH channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core 10 and the second metal of the sleeve 12 strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate at JSC has researched the physical processes that create planetary magnetic fields through dynamo action since 2007. The "dynamo problem" has existed since 1600, when William Gilbert, physician to Queen Elizabeth I, recognized that the Earth was a giant magnet. In 1919, Joseph Larmor proposed that solar (and by implication, planetary) magnetism was due to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), but full acceptance did not occur until Glatzmaier and Roberts solved the MHD equations numerically and simulated a geomagnetic reversal in 1995. JSC research produced a unique theoretical model in 2012 that provided a novel explanation of these physical observations and computational results as an essential manifestation of broken ergodicity in MHD turbulence. Research is ongoing, and future work is aimed at understanding quantitative details of magnetic dipole alignment in the Earth as well as in Mercury, Jupiter and its moon Ganymede, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the Sun and other stars.

  19. Electron magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: universal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K.

    2015-02-01

    The energy cascade of electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) turbulence is considered. Fractal and multi-fractal models for the energy dissipation field are used to determine the spatial intermittency corrections to the scaling behavior in the high-wavenumber (electron hydrodynamic limit) and low-wavenumber (magnetization limit) asymptotic regimes of the inertial range. Extrapolation of the multi-fractal scaling down to the dissipative microscales confirms in these asymptotic regimes a dissipative anomaly previously indicated by the numerical simulations of EMHD turbulence. Several basic features of the EMHD turbulent system are found to be universal which seem to transcend the existence of the characteristic length scale d e (which is the electron skin depth) in the EMHD problem: equipartition spectrum; Reynolds-number scaling of the dissipative microscales; scaling of the probability distribution function (PDF) of the electron-flow velocity (or magnetic field) gradient (even with intermittency corrections); dissipative anomaly; and critical exponent scaling.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics of chiral relativistic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Alexey; Fröhlich, Jürg; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a plasma of charged relativistic fermions at very high temperature T ≫m , where m is the fermion mass, coupled to the electromagnetic field. In particular, we derive a magnetohydrodynamical description of the evolution of such a plasma. We show that, compared to conventional magnetohydronamics (MHD) for a plasma of nonrelativistic particles, the hydrodynamical description of the relativistic plasma involves new degrees of freedom described by a pseudoscalar field originating in a local asymmetry in the densities of left-handed and right-handed fermions. This field can be interpreted as an effective axion field. Taking into account the chiral anomaly we present dynamical equations for the evolution of this field, as well as of other fields appearing in the MHD description of the plasma. Due to its nonlinear coupling to helical magnetic fields, the axion field significantly affects the dynamics of a magnetized plasma and can give rise to a novel type of inverse cascade.

  1. Scaling laws in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2004-10-15

    We analyze the decay laws of the kinetic and magnetic energies and the evolution of correlation lengths in freely decaying incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Scale invariance of MHD equations assures that, in the case of constant dissipation parameters (i.e., kinematic viscosity and resistivity) and null magnetic helicity, the kinetic and magnetic energies decay in time as E{approx}t{sup -1}, and the correlation lengths evolve as {xi}{approx}t{sup 1/2}. In the helical case, assuming that the magnetic field evolves towards a force-free state, we show that (in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number) the magnetic helicity remains constant, and the kinetic and magnetic energies decay as E{sub v}{approx}t{sup -1} and E{sub B}{approx}t{sup -1/2} respectively, while both the kinetic and magnetic correlation lengths grow as {xi}{approx}t{sup 1/2}.

  2. Anisotropic scaling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Horbury, Timothy S; Forman, Miriam; Oughton, Sean

    2008-10-24

    We present a quantitative estimate of the anisotropic power and scaling of magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, using a novel wavelet technique applied to spacecraft measurements in the solar wind. We show for the first time that, when the local magnetic field direction is parallel to the flow, the spacecraft-frame spectrum has a spectral index near 2. This can be interpreted as the signature of a population of fluctuations in field-parallel wave numbers with a k(-2)_(||) spectrum but is also consistent with the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulent cascade. We also find, in common with previous studies, that most of the power is contained in wave vectors at large angles to the local magnetic field and that this component of the turbulence has a spectral index of 5/3. PMID:18999759

  3. Micromachined magnetohydrodynamic actuators and sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump and microsensor which utilizes micromachining to integrate the electrodes with microchannels and includes a magnet for producing magnetic fields perpendicular to both the electrical current direction and the fluid flow direction. The magnet can also be micromachined and integrated with the micropump using existing technology. The MHD micropump, for example, can generate continuous, reversible flow, with readily controllable flow rates. The flow can be reversed by either reversing the electrical current flow or reversing the magnetic field. By mismatching the electrodes, a swirling vortex flow can be generated for potential mixing applications. No moving parts are necessary and the dead volume is minimal. The micropumps can be placed at any position in a fluidic circuit and a combination of micropumps can generate fluidic plugs and valves.

  4. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  5. The collisionless magnetoviscous-thermal instability

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Tanim

    2014-05-20

    It is likely that nearly all central galactic massive and supermassive black holes are nonradiative: their accretion luminosities are orders of magnitude below what can be explained by efficient black hole accretion within their ambient environments. These objects, of which Sagittarius A* is the best-known example, are also dilute (mildly collisional to highly collisionless) and optically thin. In order for accretion to occur, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities must develop that not only transport angular momentum, but also gravitational energy generated through matter infall, outward. A class of new magnetohydrodynamical fluid instabilities—the magnetoviscous-thermal instability (MVTI)—was found to transport angular momentum and energy along magnetic field lines through large (fluid) viscosities and thermal conductivities. This paper describes the analog to the MVTI, the collisionless MVTI (CMVTI), that similarly transports energy and angular momentum outward, expected to be important in describing the flow properties of hot, dilute, and radiatively inefficient accretion flows around black holes. We construct a local equilibrium for MHD stability analysis in this differentially rotating disk. We then find and characterize specific instabilities expected to be important in describing their flow properties, and show their qualitative similarities to instabilities derived using the fluid formalism. We conclude with further work needed in modeling this class of accretion flow.

  6. Nonmodal growth and the magnetorotational dynamo instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    Unravelling the important dynamo processes in magnetized rotating shear flows remains fundamental in understanding turbulent transport in astrophysical disks. We consider the dynamo of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in its simplest possible form, studying the unstratified shearing box without a mean magnetic field. Despite the lack of spectral instability, sustained turbulence and dynamo is possible in this system, with the non-normality of the linear operator playing an important role. An analysis of the MRI from this non-normal perspective has proved enlightening, illustrating that the fastest growing non-axisymmetric disturbances are very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). With the goal of understanding the core dynamo process, we evolve an statistical ensemble of shear waves in a quasi-linear version of the shearing box system. Among the most interesting ideas resulting from this approach is the existence of a mean field dynamo instability of homogenous background turbulence. The instability saturates at levels consistent with fully nonlinear turbulence simulations and depends strongly on magnetic Prandtl number. This work was supported by Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and U.S. DOE (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  7. On the structure of guide magnetic field in the inertia-driven magnetic reconnection with the presence of shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseinpour, M.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-11-15

    The effect of equilibrium shear flow on the structure of out-of-plane magnetic field is analytically investigated in the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes of the collisionless tearing instability, where the electron inertia breaks the frozen-in condition. Our scaling analysis reveals that the Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic shear flows cannot significantly modify the linear regimes of applicability. In addition, we show that the structure of out-of-plane magnetic field can either be quadrupolar or non-quadrupolar in Hall-MHD regimes. In particular, both types of structures can dominate at β < 1 (β is the ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to the pressure in the magnetic field) depending on the value of the normalized ion inertial skin depth. This conclusion, however, is in contradiction to the claim presented by Rogers et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 108, A3 (2003)], which states that the quadrupolar structure cannot appear at β < 1. The reasons of this disagreement are discussed in our study.

  8. On the maximum magnetic field amplification by the magnetorotational instability in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembiasz, T.; Guilet, J.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.

    2016-08-01

    Whether the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can amplify initially weak magnetic fields to dynamically relevant strengths in core-collapse supernovae is still a matter of active scientific debate. Recent numerical studies have shown that the first phase of MRI growth dominated by channel flows is terminated by parasitic instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type that disrupt MRI channel flows and quench further magnetic field growth. However, it remains to be properly assessed by what factor the initial magnetic field can be amplified and how it depends on the initial field strength and the amplitude of the perturbations. Different termination criteria leading to different estimates of the amplification factor were proposed within the parasitic model. To determine the amplification factor and test which criterion is a better predictor of the MRI termination, we perform three-dimensional shearing-disc and shearing-box simulations of a region close to the surface of a differentially rotating protoneutron star in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics with two different numerical codes. We find that independently of the initial magnetic field strength, the MRI channel modes can amplify the magnetic field by, at most, a factor of 100. Under the conditions found in protoneutron stars, a more realistic value for the magnetic field amplification is of the order of 10. This severely limits the role of the MRI channel modes as an agent amplifying the magnetic field in protoneutron stars starting from small seed fields. A further amplification should therefore rely on other physical processes, such as for example an MRI-driven turbulent dynamo.

  9. 'Reduced' magnetohydrodynamics and minimum dissipation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all solutions of the equations of 'reduced' magnetohydrodynamics approach a uniform-current, zero-flow state for long times, given a constant wall electric field, uniform scalar viscosity and resistivity, and uniform mass density. This state is the state of minimum energy dissipation rate for these boundary conditions. No steady-state turbulence is possible. The result contrasts sharply with results for full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics before the reduction occurs.

  10. Computational Methods for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercher, Andrew D.

    Numerical schemes for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are widely used for modeling space weather and astrophysical flows. They are designed to resolve the different waves that propagate through a magnetohydro fluid, namely, the fast, Alfven, slow, and entropy waves. Numerical schemes for ideal magnetohydrodynamics that are based on the standard finite volume (FV) discretization exhibit pseudo-convergence in which non-regular waves no longer exist only after heavy grid refinement. A method is described for obtaining solutions for coplanar and near coplanar cases that consist of only regular waves, independent of grid refinement. The method, referred to as Compound Wave Modification (CWM), involves removing the flux associated with non-regular structures and can be used for simulations in two- and three-dimensions because it does not require explicitly tracking an Alfven wave. For a near coplanar case, and for grids with 213 points or less, we find root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) that are as much as 6 times smaller. For the coplanar case, in which non-regular structures will exist at all levels of grid refinement for standard FV schemes, the RMSE is as much as 25 times smaller. A multidimensional ideal MHD code has been implemented for simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). Performance measurements were conducted for both the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan and Intel Xeon E5645 processor. The GPU is shown to perform one to two orders of magnitude greater than the CPU when using a single core, and two to three times greater than when run in parallel with OpenMP. Performance comparisons are made for two methods of storing data on the GPU. The first approach stores data as an Array of Structures (AoS), e.g., a point coordinate array of size 3 x n is iterated over. The second approach stores data as a Structure of Arrays (SoA), e.g. three separate arrays of size n are iterated over simultaneously. For an AoS, coalescing does not occur, reducing memory efficiency

  11. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  12. Current layer cascade in collisionless electron-magnetohydrodynamic reconnection and electron compressibility effects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Sarto, D.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear phase of a magnetic field line reconnection instability in a collisionless two-dimensional cold plasma is investigated in the Hall dominated regime, described by the electron-magnetohydrodynamic equations, which corresponds to the frequency range of whistler waves. It is found that the regular pattern of current density layers that forms in the initial nonlinear phase of the reconnection instability is destroyed by the onset of a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability and the formation of current jets that develop into vortex rings. These processes can be interpreted in terms of a Hasegawa-Mima-type regime inside the magnetic island and lead to the creation of magnetic vortices. It is shown that electron compressibility, which is related to charge separation, tends to stabilize these processes.

  13. The Role of the Equation of State in Resistive Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the role of the equation of state in resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics using a newly developed resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code. A number of numerical tests in one dimension and multi-dimensions are carried out in order to check the robustness and accuracy of the new code. The code passes all the tests in situations involving both small and large uniform conductivities. Equations of state that closely approximate the single-component perfect relativistic gas are introduced. Results from selected numerical tests using different equations of state are compared. The main conclusion is that the choice of the equation of state as well as the value of the electric conductivity can result in considerable dynamical differences in simulations involving shocks, instabilities, and magnetic reconnection.

  14. Buoyancy-driven Magnetohydrodynamic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hague, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulent motions close to the visible solar surface may generate low-frequency internal gravity waves (IGWs) that propagate through the lower solar atmosphere. Magnetic activity is ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, so it is expected that the behavior of IGWs is to be affected. In this article we investigate the role of an equilibrium magnetic field on propagating and standing buoyancy oscillations in a gravitationally stratified medium. We assume that this background magnetic field is parallel to the direction of gravitational stratification. It is known that when the equilibrium magnetic field is weak and the background is isothermal, the frequencies of standing IGWs are sensitive to the presence of magnetism. Here, we generalize this result to the case of a slowly varying temperature. To do this, we make use of the Boussinesq approximation. A comparison between the hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic cases allows us to deduce the effects due to a magnetic field. It is shown that the frequency of IGWs may depart significantly from the Brunt–Väisälä frequency, even for a weak magnetic field. The mathematical techniques applied here give a clearer picture of the wave mode identification, which has previously been misinterpreted. An observational test is urged to validate the theoretical findings.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) driven droplet mixer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Miles, Robin R.

    2004-05-11

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system mixes a first substance and a second substance. A first substrate section includes a first flow channel and a first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the first flow channel. A second substrate section includes a second flow channel and a second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the second flow channel. A third substrate section includes a third flow channel and a third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the third flow channel. A magnetic section and a control section are operatively connected to the spaced electrodes. The first substrate section, the second substrate section, the third substrate section, the first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the magnetic section, and the control section are operated to move the first substance through the first flow channel, the second substance through the second flow channel, and both the first substance and the second substance into the third flow channel where they are mixed.

  16. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation. PMID:22463331

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Gabriel I.; Dudley, Scott C.

    2004-10-01

    The cinema industry can sometimes prove to be an ally when searching for material with which to motivate students to learn physics. Consider, for example, the electromagnetic force on a current in the presence of a magnetic field. This phenomenon is at the heart of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion systems. A submarine employing this type of propulsion was immortalized in the movie Hunt for Red October. While mentioning this to students certainly gets their attention, it often elicits comments that it is only fiction and not physically possible. Imagine their surprise when a working system is demonstrated! It is neither difficult nor expensive to construct a working system that can be demonstrated in the front of a classroom.2 In addition, all aspects of the engineering hurdles that must be surmounted and myths concerning this "silent propulsion" system are borne out in a simple apparatus. This paper details how to construct an inexpensive MHD propulsion boat that can be demonstrated for students in the classroom.

  18. The universal instability in general geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Plunk, G. G.

    2015-09-15

    The “universal” instability has recently been revived by Landreman et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 095003 (2015)], who showed that it indeed exists in plasma geometries with straight (but sheared) magnetic field lines. Here, it is demonstrated analytically that this instability can be presented in more general sheared and toroidal geometries. In a torus, the universal instability is shown to be closely related to the trapped-electron mode, although the trapped-electron drive is usually dominant. However, this drive can be weakened or eliminated, as in the case in stellarators with the maximum-J property, leaving the parallel Landau resonance to drive a residual mode, which is identified as the universal instability.

  19. Long-term memory in experiments and numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mininni, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Odier, P.; Pinton, J.-F.; Plihon, N.; Verhille, G.; Volk, R.; Bourgoin, M.

    2014-05-01

    We analyze time series stemming from experiments and direct numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Simulations are done in periodic boxes, but with a volumetric forcing chosen to mimic the geometry of the flow in the experiments, the von Kármán swirling flow between two counterrotating impellers. Parameters in the simulations are chosen to (within computational limitations) allow comparisons between the experiments and the numerical results. Conducting fluids are considered in all cases. Two different configurations are considered: a case with a weak externally imposed magnetic field and a case with self-sustained magnetic fields. Evidence of long-term memory and 1/f noise is observed in experiments and simulations, in the case with weak magnetic field associated with the hydrodynamic behavior of the shear layer in the von Kármán flow, and in the dynamo case associated with slow magnetohydrodynamic behavior of the large-scale magnetic field.

  20. Collisionless Zonal Flow Saturation for Weak Magnetic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhixin; Wang, Weixing; Diamond, Patrick; Ashourvan, Arash; Tynan, George

    2015-11-01

    The damping of the zonal flow, either collisional or collisionless, plays an important role in regulating the drift wave-zonal flow system, and can affect the transport and confinement. The tertiary instability, e.g., a generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability driven by flow shear, has been suggested theoretically as a possible damping mechanism [Rogers 2000 PRL, Diamond 2005 PPCF]. The sensitivity of the tertiary mode to magnetic shear has not been quantified, especially in weak magnetic shear regimes. In this work, parametric scans using gyrokinetic simulation demonstrate that the zonal electric field energy normalized by the turbulence electric field energy decreases as magnetic shear decreases. With ITG drive artificially eliminated, the time evolution of the zonal structure indicates that the zonal electric field damps more rapidly at weak shear. This suggests larger collisionless zonal flow damping or larger effective turbulent viscosity at weak magnetic shear. The effects of the zonal components of specific variables, e.g., the parallel shear flow and the radial electric field, on tertiary instability, are also studied. Quantitative studies on the magnetic shear scaling of tertiary instability excitation and the collisionless zonal flow saturation are ongoing.

  1. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  2. Nonlinear wave interactions in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The rotating magnetohydrodynamic flows of a thin layer of astrophysical and space plasmas with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field are considered in the shallow water approximation. The presence of a vertical external magnetic field changes significantly the dynamics of wave processes in an astrophysical plasma, in contrast to a neutral fluid and a plasma layer in an external toroidal magnetic field. There are three-wave nonlinear interactions in the case under consideration. Using the asymptotic method of multiscale expansions, we have derived nonlinear equations for the interaction of wave packets: three magneto- Poincare waves, three magnetostrophic waves, two magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and two magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. The existence of decay instabilities and parametric amplification is predicted. We show that a magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, a magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, a magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and a magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. There are the following parametric amplification mechanisms: the parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, the parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, the amplification of a magneto-Poincare wave in the field of a magnetostrophic wave, and the amplification of a magnetostrophic wave in the field of a magneto-Poincare wave. The instability growth rates and parametric amplification factors have been found for the corresponding processes.

  3. Neoclassical viscosity effects on resistive magnetohydrodynamic modes in toroidal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.G.; Oh, Y.H.; Choi, D.I. ); Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. )

    1992-03-01

    The flux-surface-averaged linearized resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary-layer equations including the compressibility, diamagnetic drift, and neoclassical viscosity terms are derived in toroidal geometry. These equations describe the resistive layer dynamics of resistive MHD modes over the collisionality regime between the banana plateau and the Pfirsch--Schlueter. From the resulting equations, the effects of neoclassical viscosity on the stability of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes are investigated numerically. Also, a study is given for the problem of how the neoclassical resistive MHD mode is generated as the collisionality is reduced. It is shown that the neoclassical viscosity terms give a significant destabilizing effect for the tearing and resistive ballooning modes. This destabilization comes mainly from the reduction of the stabilizing effect of the parallel ion sound compression by the ion neoclassical viscosity. In the banana-plateau collisionality limit, where the compressibility is negligible, the dispersion relations of the tearing and resistive ballooning modes reduce to the same form, with the threshold value of the driving force given by {Delta}{sub {ital c}}=0. On the other hand, with the finite neoclassical effect it is found that the neoclassical resistive MHD instability is generated in agreement with previous results. Furthermore, it is shown that this later instability can be generated in a wide range of the collisionality including near the Pfirsch--Schlueter regime as well as the banana-plateau regime, suggesting that this mode is a probable cause of anomalous transport.

  4. Stabilization of numerical interchange in spectral-element magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    Auxiliary numerical projections of the divergence of flow velocity and vorticity parallel to magnetic field are developed and tested for the purpose of suppressing unphysical interchange instability in magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The numerical instability arises with equal-order C0 finite- and spectral-element expansions of the flow velocity, magnetic field, and pressure and is sensitive to behavior at the limit of resolution. The auxiliary projections are motivated by physical field-line bending, and coercive responses to the projections are added to the flow-velocity equation. Their incomplete expansions are limited to the highest-order orthogonal polynomial in at least one coordinate of the spectral elements. Cylindrical eigenmode computations show that the projections induce convergence from the stable side with first-order ideal-MHD equations during h-refinement and p-refinement. Hyperbolic and parabolic projections and responses are compared, together with different methods for avoiding magnetic divergence error. The projections are also shown to be effective in linear and nonlinear time-dependent computations with the NIMROD code Sovinec et al. [17], provided that the projections introduce numerical dissipation.

  5. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  6. Collisionless Plasma Turbulence: Insights from Magnetohydrodynamic and Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations and Observations of the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Julia E.

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon that occurs throughout the universe, in both neutral fluids and plasmas. For collisionless plasmas, kinetic effects, which alter the nonlinear dynamics and result in small-scale dissipation, are still not well understood in the context of turbulence. This work uses direct numerical simulations (DNS) and observations of Earth's magnetosphere to study plasma turbulence. Long-time relaxation in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is examined using DNS with particular focus on the role of magnetic and cross helicity and symmetries of the initial configurations. When strong symmetries are absent or broken through perturbations, flows evolve towards states predicted by statistical mechanics with an energy minimization principle, which features two main regimes; one magnetic helicity dominated and one with quasi-equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energy. The role of the Hall effect, which contributes to the dynamics of collisionless plasmas, is also explored numerically. At scales below the ion inertial length, a transition to a magnetically dominated state, associated with advection becoming subdominant to dissipation, occurs. Real-space current, vorticity, and electric fields are examined. Strong current structures are associated with alignment between the current and magnetic field, which may be important in collisionless plasmas where field-aligned currents can be unstable. Turbulence within bursty bulk flow braking events, thought to be associated with near-Earth magnetotail reconnection, are then studied using the THEMIS spacecraft. It is proposed that strong field-aligned currents associated with turbulent intermittency destabilize into double layers, providing a collisionless dissipation mechanism for the turbulence. Plasma waves may also radiate from the region, removing energy from the turbulence and potentially depositing it in the aurora. Finally, evidence for turbulence in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) on the

  7. Turbulent Transport in Tokamak Plasmas with Rotational Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.; Highcock, E. G.; Cowley, S. C.; Roach, C. M.

    2011-04-29

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are conducted to investigate turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas with rotational shear. At sufficiently large flow shears, linear instabilities are suppressed, but transiently growing modes drive subcritical turbulence whose amplitude increases with flow shear. This leads to a local minimum in the heat flux, indicating an optimal ExB shear value for plasma confinement. Local maxima in the momentum fluxes are observed, implying the possibility of bifurcations in the ExB shear. The critical temperature gradient for the onset of turbulence increases with flow shear at low flow shears; at higher flow shears, the dependence of heat flux on temperature gradient becomes less stiff. The turbulent Prandtl number is found to be largely independent of temperature and flow gradients, with a value close to unity.

  8. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Entrainment region phenomena for a large plane shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, S. K.; Klewicki, C. L.; Disimile, P. J.; Lawson, I.; Foss, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The subatmospheric test section of the present free shear layer facility allows the entrainment air to be introduced with a negligible disturbance level. The very low frequency oscillations, which are prominently observed in the entrainment stream and which are present throughout the shear layer, are attributed to an inherent instability in the transition from a boundary layer to a free shear layer state. The basic features of the disturbance field are documented herein.

  10. From the Einstein-Szilard Patent to Modern Magnetohydrodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povh, I. L.; Barinberg, A. D.

    1979-01-01

    Examines present-day and future prospects of the applications of modern magnetohydrodynamics in a number of countries. Explains how the electromagnetic pump, which was invented by Einstein and Leo Szilard, led to the development of applied magnetohydrodynamics. (HM)

  11. Integrating GIS-based geologic mapping, LiDAR-based lineament analysis and site specific rock slope data to delineate a zone of existing and potential rock slope instability located along the grandfather mountain window-Linville Falls shear zone contact, Southern Appalachian Mountains, Watauga County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillon, K.A.; Wooten, R.M.; Latham, R.L.; Witt, A.W.; Douglas, T.J.; Bauer, J.B.; Fuemmeler, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Landslide hazard maps of Watauga County identify >2200 landslides, model debris flow susceptibility, and evaluate a 14km x 0.5km zone of existing and potential rock slope instability (ZEPRSI) near the Town of Boone. The ZEPRSI encompasses west-northwest trending (WNWT) topographic ridges where 14 active/past-active rock/weathered rock slides occur mainly in rocks of the Grandfather Mountain Window (GMW). The north side of this ridgeline is the GMW / Linville Falls Fault (LFF) contact. Sheared rocks of the Linville Falls Shear Zone (LFSZ) occur along the ridge and locally in the valley north of the contact. The valley is underlain principally by layered granitic gneiss comprising the Linville Falls/Beech Mountain/Stone Mountain Thrust Sheet. The integration of ArcGIS??? - format digital geologic and lineament mapping on a 6m LiDAR (Light Detecting and Ranging) digital elevation model (DEM) base, and kinematic analyses of site specific rock slope data (e.g., presence and degree of ductile and brittle deformation fabrics, rock type, rock weathering state) indicate: WNWT lineaments are expressions of a regionally extensive zone of fractures and faults; and ZEPRSI rock slope failures concentrate along excavated, north-facing LFF/LFSZ slopes where brittle fabrics overprint older metamorphic foliations, and other fractures create side and back release surfaces. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  12. MHD Instabilities Occurring Near/AT the Transport Barrier, Including Loss of Confinement in H-Modes

    SciTech Connect

    L. L. Lao

    1999-09-01

    In configurations with transport barriers the improved edge and core confinement leads to large pressure gradient and large edge bootstrap current density which often drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities terminating the discharge or reducing the discharge performance. The edge and the core transport barriers deteriorate or are completely lost. In this presentation, recent experimental and theoretical developments concerning MHD instabilities occurring near/at the edge and the core transport barriers are summarized emphasizing the dominant instabilities and the comparison with theory.

  13. Exponential Growth of Nonlinear Ballooning Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, P.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2009-06-12

    Recent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory predicts that a perturbation evolving from a linear ballooning instability will continue to grow exponentially in the intermediate nonlinear phase at the same linear growth rate. This prediction is confirmed in ideal MHD simulations. When the Lagrangian compression, a measure of the ballooning nonlinearity, becomes of the order of unity, the intermediate nonlinear phase is entered, during which the maximum plasma displacement amplitude as well as the total kinetic energy continues to grow exponentially at the rate of the corresponding linear phase.

  14. Localized stability criterion for kink modes in systems with small shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hastie, R.J.; Johnson, J.L.

    1986-02-01

    A localized magnetohydrodynamic stability criterion for ideal kink instabilities is determined for systems where the safety factor has a local minimum on a rational surface with no pressure gradient. These modes are stable in the cylindrical limit, but toroidal effects can make them unstable. They could provide a partial explanation for the rapid current penetration observed in tokamaks. 7 refs.

  15. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  16. The magnetohydrodynamics of current sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Examples of current sheets are summarized and their formation is described. A universal phenomenon in cosmic plasmas is the creation of sheets off intense current near X-type neutral points (where the magnetic field vanishes). These sheets are important as sites where the magnetic-field energy is converted efficiently into heat and bulk kinetic energy and where particles can be accelerated to high energies. Examples include disruptions in laboratory tokamaks, substorms in the earth's magnetosphere, and flares on the sun. The basic behavior of a one-dimensional sheet is presented, together with an account of the linear tearing-mode instability that can cause the field lines in such a sheet to reconnect. Such reconnection may develop in different ways: it may arise from a spontaneous instability or it may be driven, either from outside by motions or locally by a resistivity enhancement. Various processes are described that may occur during the nonlinear development of tearing, along with the many numerical and laboratory experiments that are aiding our understanding of this intriguing cosmical process.

  17. Generalized magnetofluid connections in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Asenjo, Felipe A; Comisso, Luca

    2015-03-20

    The concept of magnetic connections is extended to nonideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamical plasmas. Adopting a general set of equations for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics including thermal-inertial, thermal electromotive, Hall, and current-inertia effects, we derive a new covariant connection equation showing the existence of generalized magnetofluid connections that are preserved during the dissipationless plasma dynamics. These connections are intimately linked to a general antisymmetric tensor that unifies the electromagnetic and fluid fields, allowing the extension of the magnetic connection notion to a much broader concept. PMID:25839284

  18. New approach to nonrelativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    We provide a novel action principle for nonrelativistic ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the Eulerian scheme exploiting a Clebsch-type parametrisation. Both Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations have been considered. Within the Hamiltonian framework, two complementary approaches have been discussed using Dirac's constraint analysis. In one case the Hamiltonian is canonical involving only physical variables but the brackets have a noncanonical structure, while the other retains the canonical structure of brackets by enlarging the phase space. The special case of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics is also considered where, again, both the approaches are discussed in the Hamiltonian framework. The conservation of the stress tensor reveals interesting aspects of the theory.

  19. Coupling of dust acoustic and shear mode through velocity shear in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garai, S. Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.

    2015-07-15

    In the strongly coupled limit, the generalized hydrodynamic model shows that a dusty plasma, acquiring significant rigidity, is able to support a “shear” like mode. It is being demonstrated here that in presence of velocity shear gradient, this shear like mode gets coupled with the dust acoustic mode which is generated by the compressibility effect of the dust fluid due to the finite temperatures of the dust, electron, and ion fluids. In the local analysis, the dispersion relation shows that velocity shear gradient not only couples the two modes but is also responsible for the instabilities of that coupled mode which is confirmed by nonlocal analysis with numerical techniques.

  20. THERMAL-INSTABILITY-DRIVEN TURBULENT MIXING IN GALACTIC DISKS. I. EFFECTIVE MIXING OF METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Krumholz, Mark

    2012-10-10

    Observations show that radial metallicity gradients in disk galaxies are relatively shallow, if not flat, especially at large galactocentric distances and for galaxies in the high-redshift universe. Given that star formation and metal production are centrally concentrated, this requires a mechanism to redistribute metals. However, the nature of this mechanism is poorly understood, let alone quantified. To address this problem, we conduct magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a local shearing sheet of a thin, thermally unstable, gaseous disk driven by a background stellar spiral potential, including metals modeled as passive scalar fields. Contrary to what a simple {alpha} prescription for the gas disk would suggest, we find that turbulence driven by thermal instability is very efficient at mixing metals, regardless of the presence or absence of stellar spiral potentials or magnetic fields. The timescale for homogenizing randomly distributed metals is comparable to or less than the local orbital time in the disk. This implies that turbulent mixing of metals is a significant process in the history of chemical evolution of disk galaxies.

  1. Evaluating gyro-viscosity in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability by kinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Natsuki; Wada, Yasutaka; Ueno, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, the finite-Larmor-radius (gyro-viscous) term [K. V. Roberts and J. B. Taylor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 8, 197-198 (1962)] is evaluated by using a full kinetic Vlasov simulation result of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). The velocity field and the pressure tensor are calculated from the high-resolution data of the velocity distribution functions obtained by the Vlasov simulation, which are used to approximate the Finite-Larmor-Radius (FLR) term according to Roberts and Taylor [Phys. Rev. Lett. 8, 197-198 (1962)]. The direct comparison between the pressure tensor and the FLR term shows an agreement. It is also shown that the anisotropic pressure gradient enhanced the linear growth of the KHI when the inner product between the vorticity of the primary velocity shear layer and the magnetic field is negative, which is consistent with the previous FLR-magnetohydrodynamic simulation result. This result suggests that it is not sufficient for reproducing the kinetic simulation result by fluid simulations to include the FLR term (or the pressure tensor) only in the equation of motion for fluid.

  2. Variational integration for ideal magnetohydrodynamics with built-in advection equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yao; Burby, J. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Qin, Hong

    2014-10-15

    Newcomb's Lagrangian for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in Lagrangian labeling is discretized using discrete exterior calculus. Variational integrators for ideal MHD are derived thereafter. Besides being symplectic and momentum-preserving, the schemes inherit built-in advection equations from Newcomb's formulation, and therefore avoid solving them and the accompanying error and dissipation. We implement the method in 2D and show that numerical reconnection does not take place when singular current sheets are present. We then apply it to studying the dynamics of the ideal coalescence instability with multiple islands. The relaxed equilibrium state with embedded current sheets is obtained numerically.

  3. Reduced-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of toroidally and poloidally localized edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzl, M.; Guenter, S.; Mueller, W.-C.; Lackner, K.; Krebs, I.; Wenninger, R. P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-08-15

    We use the non-linear reduced-magnetohydrodynamic code JOREK to study edge localized modes (ELMs) in the geometry of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Toroidal mode numbers, poloidal filament sizes, and radial propagation speeds of filaments into the scrape-off layer are in good agreement with observations for type-I ELMs in ASDEX Upgrade. The observed instabilities exhibit a toroidal and poloidal localization of perturbations which is compatible with the 'solitary magnetic perturbations' recently discovered in ASDEX Upgrade [R. Wenninger et al., 'Solitary magnetic perturbations at the ELM onset,' Nucl. Fusion (accepted)]. This localization can only be described in numerical simulations with high toroidal resolution.

  4. A Meshless Method for Magnetohydrodynamics and Applications to Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.

    2012-08-01

    This thesis presents an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. Local, third-order, least-squares, polynomial interpolations (Moving Least Squares interpolations) are calculated from the field values of neighboring particles to obtain field values and spatial derivatives at the particle position. Field values and particle positions are advanced in time with a second order predictor-corrector scheme. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is implemented to ensure the particles fill the computational volume, which gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. Particle addition and deletion is based on a local void and clump detection algorithm. Dynamic artificial viscosity fields provide stability to the integration. The resulting algorithm provides a robust solution for modeling flows that require Lagrangian or adaptive discretizations to resolve. The code has been parallelized by adapting the framework provided by Gadget-2. A set of standard test problems, including one part in a million amplitude linear MHD waves, magnetized shock tubes, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are presented. Finally we demonstrate good agreement with analytic predictions of linear growth rates for magnetorotational instability in a cylindrical geometry. We provide a rigorous methodology for verifying a numerical method on two dimensional Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The test problem was run in the Pencil Code, Athena, Enzo, NDSPHMHD, and Phurbas. A strict comparison, judgment, or ranking, between codes is beyond the scope of this work, although this work provides the mathematical framewor! k needed for such a

  5. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  6. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  7. The Energetics of Centrifugal Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, W. K.; Jiao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A recent study has argued that the California Undercurrent, and poleward eastern boundary currents in general, generate mixing events through centrifugal instability (CI). Conditions favorable for CI are created by the strong horizontal shears developed in turbulent bottom layers of currents flowing in the direction of topographic waves. At points of abrupt topographic change, like promontories and capes, the coastal current separates from the boundary and injects gravitationally stable but dynamically unstable flow into the interior. The resulting finite amplitude development of the instability involves overturnings and diabatic mixing. The purpose of this study is to examine the energetics of CI in order to characterize it as has been done for other instabilities and develop a framework in which to estimate its regional and global impacts. We argue that CI is roughly twice as efficient at mixing as is Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and that roughly 10% of the initial energy in a CUC-like current is lost to either local mixing or the generation of unbalanced flows. The latter probably leads to non-local mixing. Thus centrifugal instability is an effective process by which energy is lost from the balanced flow and spent in mixing neighboring water masses. We argue the importance of the mixing is regional in nature, but of less importance to the global budgets given its regional specificity.

  8. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in the investigation of the solar corona using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Coronal mass ejections (CME) are believed to be the primary cause of nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms and these have been investigated through the use of three-dimensional computer simulation.

  9. On energy conservation in extended magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Keiji; Morrison, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    A systematic study of energy conservation for extended magnetohydrodynamic models that include Hall terms and electron inertia is performed. It is observed that commonly used models do not conserve energy in the ideal limit, i.e., when viscosity and resistivity are neglected. In particular, a term in the momentum equation that is often neglected is seen to be needed for conservation of energy.

  10. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-01-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  11. Solar-driven liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.

    1981-05-01

    A solar oven heated by concentrated solar radiation as the heat source of a liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (LMMHD) power generation system is proposed. The design allows the production of electric power in space, as well as on Earth, at high rates of efficiency. Two types of the solar oven suitable for the system are discussed.

  12. Magnetic shear. IV - Hale regions 16740, 16815, and 16850

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, R. G.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Jones, H. P.; Zirin, H.

    1986-01-01

    Dopplergrams made in C IV 1548 A are studied for evidence of velocity shear near H-alpha dark filaments and for large-scale flow convergent on active regions. The three regions studied support earlier conclusions that shear is a common property of active regions and that active regions may be the foci of converging plasma flow. Flow patterns near filaments show divergence or convergence as well as shear. Also the sense of the shear can be either cyclonic or anticyclonic. No preference is noted for convergence or divergence or for a particular sense of shear, and there appears to be no correlation between the sense of the shear and the sign of the velocity gradient normal to the filament. The close association of H-alpha dark filaments with shear lines leads to the suggestion that the filaments may arise from a cooling instability induced by the Bernoulli effect.

  13. Analytical study of 3-dimensional MHD instability in an MPD thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Fujiwara, T.

    1987-05-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters show serious instability phenomena when the supplied current exceeds a certain threshold value. Several previous explanations for this onset of unsteady nonuniform flows include the anode starvation and the excessive back EMF induced by a strong VxB. In this study, a three-dimensional linear theoretical analysis is given to the instability of one-dimensional flows using magnetohydrodynamic equations. 5 references.

  14. Jeans instability of rotating magnetized quantum plasma: Influence of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, H.; Pensia, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The effect of radiative heat-loss function and rotation on the Jeans instability of quantum plasma is investigated. The basic set of equations for this problem is constructed by considering quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using normal mode analysis, the general dispersion relation is obtained. This dispersion relation is studied in both, longitudinal and transverse direction of propagations. In both case of longitudinal and transverse direction of propagation, the Jeans instability criterion is modified due to presence of radiative heat-loss function and quantum correction.

  15. Instability in electromagnetically driven flows. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissinger, Christophe; Rodriguez Imazio, Paola; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a travelling magnetic field in an annular channel is investigated numerically. For sufficiently large magnetic Reynolds number Rm, or if a large enough pressure gradient is externally applied, the system undergoes an instability in which the flow rate in the channel dramatically drops from synchronism with the wave to much smaller velocities. This transition takes the form of a saddle-node bifurcation for the time-averaged quantities. In this first paper, we characterize the bifurcation and study the stability of the flow as a function of several parameters. We show that the bifurcation of the flow involves a bistability between Poiseuille-like and Hartman-like regimes and relies on magnetic flux expulsion. Based on this observation, new predictions are made for the occurrence of this stalling instability.

  16. Explosive Instability of Prominence Flux Ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O; Fong, R H L; Cowley, S C

    2002-09-04

    The rapid, Alfvenic, time scale of erupting solar-prominences has been an enigma ever since they where first identified. Investigators have proposed a variety of different mechanisms in an effort to account for the abrupt reconfiguration observed. No one mechanism clearly stands out as the single cause of these explosive events. Recent analysis has demonstrated that field lines in the solar atmosphere are metastable to ballooning type instabilities. It has been found previously that in ideal MHD plasmas marginally unstable ballooning modes inevitably become ''explosive'' evolving towards a finite time singularity via a nonlinear 3D instability called ''Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamic Detonation.'' Thus, this mechanism is a good candidate to explain explosive events observed in the solar atmosphere of our star or in others.

  17. Validation of Magnetospheric Magnetohydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Brian

    Magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models are commonly used for both prediction and modeling of Earth's magnetosphere. To date, very little validation has been performed to determine their limits, uncertainties, and differences. In this work, we performed a comprehensive analysis using several commonly used validation techniques in the atmospheric sciences to MHD-based models of Earth's magnetosphere for the first time. The validation techniques of parameter variability/sensitivity analysis and comparison to other models were used on the OpenGGCM, BATS-R-US, and SWMF magnetospheric MHD models to answer several questions about how these models compare. The questions include: (1) the difference between the model's predictions prior to and following to a reversal of Bz in the upstream interplanetary field (IMF) from positive to negative, (2) the influence of the preconditioning duration, and (3) the differences between models under extreme solar wind conditions. A differencing visualization tool was developed and used to address these three questions. We find: (1) For a reversal in IMF Bz from positive to negative, the OpenGGCM magnetopause is closest to Earth as it has the weakest magnetic pressure near-Earth. The differences in magnetopause positions between BATS-R-US and SWMF are explained by the influence of the ring current, which is included in SWMF. Densities are highest for SWMF and lowest for OpenGGCM. The OpenGGCM tail currents differ significantly from BATS-R-US and SWMF; (2) A longer preconditioning time allowed the magnetosphere to relax more, giving different positions for the magnetopause with all three models before the IMF Bz reversal. There were differences greater than 100% for all three models before the IMF Bz reversal. The differences in the current sheet region for the OpenGGCM were small after the IMF Bz reversal. The BATS-R-US and SWMF differences decreased after the IMF Bz reversal to near zero; (3) For extreme conditions in the solar

  18. Nonlinear saturation of non-resonant internal instabilities in a straight spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Jardin, S.C.

    1982-04-01

    An initial value numerical solution of the time dependent nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations demonstrates that spheromak equilibria which are linearly unstable to nonresonant helical internal perturbations saturate at low amplitude without developing singularities. These instabilities thus represent the transition from an axisymmetric to a non-axisymmetric equilibrium state, caused by a peaking of the current density.

  19. The Evolution of a Double Diffusive Magnetic Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvers, Lara J.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Brummell, Nicholas H.; Proctor, Michael R. E.

    2011-08-01

    Recently, Silvers et al. (2009b), using numerical simulations, confirmed the existence of a double diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability of a layer of horizontal magnetic field produced by the interaction of a shear velocity field with a weak vertical field. Here, we demonstrate the longer term nonlinear evolution of such an instability in the simulations. We find that a quasi two-dimensional interchange instability rides (or ``surfs'') on the growing shear-induced background downstream field gradients. The region of activity expands since three-dimensional perturbations remain unstable in the wake of this upward-moving activity front, and so the three-dimensional nature becomes more noticeable with time.

  20. Global modes of flute instability of a rotating cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokina, E. A.

    2009-05-15

    The influence of rotation on the flute instability of a cylindrical gravitating plasma in a straight inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. The dispersion relation and integral expression for the instability growth rate of eigenmodes are derived. It is shown that, in the framework of the given problem, rotation is a destabilizing factor, and the corresponding theorem is proved for the general case. For a linear radial profile of the rotation frequency, the structure of eigenmodes is calculated. The growth rate of these modes is shown to increase with increasing rotation velocity and azimuthal mode number. It is found that plasma rotation in the eigenmode localization region leads to the displacement of perturbation from the rotation region, which results in a decrease in the instability growth rate. The absence of eigenmodes (i.e., exponential instability of the system) for certain profiles of the density and rotation frequency is demonstrated.

  1. Numerical modeling of the Parker instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Brown, Ben; Katz, Noam; Forest, Cary

    2011-10-01

    We study numerically the analogue of the Parker (magnetic buoyancy) instability in a rotating plasma screw pinch confined in a bounded cylinder. The goal of the study is to show the possibility of reaching the Parker instability for the plasma parameters achievable in the Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX). Simulations are performed using the extended magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD for an isothermal compressible plasma model. Both linear and nonlinear regimes of the instability are studied, and the obtained results are compared with analytic results for a slab geometry. It is shown that the effect of plasma rotation in a cylindrical geometry is two-fold: first, centrifugal acceleration acts as analogue of gravity and provides the equilibrium density stratification; second, the presence of Coriolis force results in increase of critical gradient of magnetic field required for the onset of instability.

  2. Impact response of shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Ozgen, Oktar; Kallmann, Marcelo; Allen, Benjamin

    2013-11-01

    Dense suspensions of hard particles such as cornstarch in water exhibit shear thickening, in which the energy dissipation rate under shear dramatically increases with increasing shear rate. Recent work has established that in steady-state shear this phenomena is a result of a dynamic jamming of the particles in suspension. Several dynamic phenomena observed in such suspensions have long been assumed to be a consequence of this shear thickening; strong impact resistance, the ability of a person to run on the fluid surface, fingering and hole instabilities under vibration, and oscillations in the speed of sinking of an object in the fluid. However, I will present results of experiments consisting of an indenter impacting a dense suspension which demonstrate that the strong impact resistance cannot be explained by existing models for steady-state shear thickening. I will show these dynamic phenomena can be reproduced by graphical simulations based on a minimal phenomenological model in which the fluid has a stiffness with a dependence on velocity history. These and other recent results suggest a need for new models to understand the dynamic phenomena associated with shear thickening fluids.

  3. Can conduction induce convection? On the non-linear saturation of buoyancy instabilities in dilute plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCourt, Michael; Parrish, Ian J.; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot

    2011-05-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on low-collisionality, astrophysical plasmas using two- and three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Dilute, weakly magnetized plasmas are buoyantly unstable for either sign of the temperature gradient: the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) operates when the temperature increases with radius while the magnetothermal instability (MTI) operates in the opposite limit. In contrast to previous results, we show that the MTI can drive strong turbulence and operate as an efficient magnetic dynamo, akin to standard, adiabatic convection. Together, the turbulent and magnetic energies may contribute up to ˜10 per cent of the pressure support in the plasma. In addition, the MTI drives a large convective heat flux, up to ˜1.5 per cent ×ρc3s. These findings are robust even in the presence of an external source of strong turbulence. Our results for the non-linear saturation of the HBI are consistent with previous studies but we explain physically why the HBI saturates quiescently, while the MTI saturates by generating sustained turbulence. We also systematically study how an external source of turbulence affects the saturation of the HBI: such turbulence can disrupt the HBI only on scales where the shearing rate of the turbulence is faster than the growth rate of the HBI. The HBI reorients the magnetic field and suppresses the conductive heat flux through the plasma, and our results provide a simple mapping between the level of turbulence in a plasma and the effective isotropic thermal conductivity. We discuss the astrophysical implications of these findings, with a particular focus on the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters.

  4. Control of low-frequency plasma instabilities by a nonuniform radial electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Komori, A.; Watanabe, K.; Kawai, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Flute instability of a magnetoplasma is generated and controlled experimentally by a nonuniform weak radial electric field. Six concentric electrodes, biased separately, are used to change the radial electric field. The instability, which is different from the velocity shear flute instability, is observed in a plasma with well-type potential and hill-type density profiles.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: From fluid to kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Henri, P.; Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP 4229 06304, Nice Cedex 4 ; Cerri, S. S.; Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching ; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Rossi, C.; LPP-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Université Paris VI, Université Paris XI, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau ; Faganello, M. [International Institute for Fusion Science Šebek, O. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II Trávníček, P. M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II Hellinger, P. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II and others

    2013-10-15

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas is typically a multi-scale process, where the energy is injected at large, fluid scales and dissipated at small, kinetic scales. Accurately modelling the global evolution requires to take into account the main micro-scale physical processes of interest. This is why comparison of different plasma models is today an imperative task aiming at understanding cross-scale processes in plasmas. We report here the first comparative study of the evolution of a magnetized shear flow, through a variety of different plasma models by using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall-MHD, two-fluid, hybrid kinetic, and full kinetic codes. Kinetic relaxation effects are discussed to emphasize the need for kinetic equilibriums to study the dynamics of collisionless plasmas in non trivial configurations. Discrepancies between models are studied both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, to highlight the effects of small scale processes on the nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas. We illustrate how the evolution of a magnetized shear flow depends on the relative orientation of the fluid vorticity with respect to the magnetic field direction during the linear evolution when kinetic effects are taken into account. Even if we found that small scale processes differ between the different models, we show that the feedback from small, kinetic scales to large, fluid scales is negligible in the nonlinear regime. This study shows that the kinetic modeling validates the use of a fluid approach at large scales, which encourages the development and use of fluid codes to study the nonlinear evolution of magnetized fluid flows, even in the collisionless regime.

  6. Shear-flow Effects in Open Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2008-11-01

    Interaction between shear flows and plasma instabilities and turbulence in open traps can lead to improved confinement both in experiments and in simulations. Shear flows, driven by biasing end-plates and limiters or by off-axis electron heating, in combination with the finite-larmor-radius (FLR) effects are shown to be efficient in confining plasmas even with unstable flute modes. Interpretation of the observed effects as the ''vortex confinement,'' i.e., confinement of the plasma core in the dead-flow zone of the driven vortex, is shown to agree well with simulations.

  7. 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of SATURN imploding Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Springer, P.T.

    1995-11-06

    Z-pinch implosions driven by the SATURN device at Sandia National Laboratory are modeled with a 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, showing strong growth of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Modeling of the linear and nonlinear development of MRT modes predicts growth of bubble-spike structures that increase the time span of stagnation and the resulting x-ray pulse width. Radiation is important in the pinch dynamics keeping the sheath relatively cool during the run-in and releasing most of the stagnation energy. The calculations give x-ray pulse widths and magnitudes in reasonable agreement with experiments, but predict a radiating region that is too dense and radially localized at stagnation. We also consider peaked initial density profiles with constant imploding sheath velocity that should reduce MRT instability and improve performance. 2D krypton simulations show an output x-ray power > 80 TW for the peaked profile.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulations of broadband fluctuations near interplanetary shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Agim, Y.Z.; Vinas, A.F.; Goldstein, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    We present results of a theoretical study of evolution of a spectrum of finite amplitude right-hand elliptically polarized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The analysis includes use of one-and-a-half-dimensional solutions of the equations that describe compressible MHD together with one-and-a-half-dimensional hybrid simulation of the phenomenon. The motivation of the study is to understand the origin and properties of finite amplitude waves often observed in the vicinity of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. The solutions of the MHD equations are compared with both the results of the hybrid simulations and observations previously reported by Vinas et al. in the vicinity of a quasi-parallel interplanetary shock. The initial conditions of the MHD solutions were constructed to model the observed spectrum of magnetic and velocity fluctuations; plasma parameters were also chosen to replicate the observed parameters. For the typical parameters of {beta} = 0.5, {sigma}B/B{sub 0} = 0.25 and a spectrum of parallel propagating, circularly polarized dispersive waves, initially the density and magnetic energy density correlations grow due to the (nonlinear) ponderomotive effect. The spectral features below the ion cyclotron frequency are established quickly on the Alfvenic timescale but then persist and match closely the observed fluctuations. The parametric decay instabilities that subsequently appear further enhance the density fluctuations and produce a high-frequency magnetic power spectrum consistent with the spacecraft observation. The MHD and hybrid simulations extend the previous picture of wave generation by a beam-driven ion cyclotron instability to the fully nonlinear stage. 64 refs., 24 figs.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic transport equations for high current propagation in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuejun; Wang, Yan; Han, Shensheng

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, it is presented that the full set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations which may be used to study the transport mechanism for the high current relativistic electron beams (current intensity 100˜1000 MA, electron energy ˜ MeV) by the laser in background overdense plasma (1022-1026cm). The transport of intense relativistic electron beams (REB) has two basic characteristics: the first is that the forward current is a giga-ampere and the forward current density is about 10 14 A/cm 2 which exceeds the Alfven current limit [M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057305 (2005)]; the second is the propagation of the intense forward current in the presence of a background overdense plasma which may have very strong MHD instability. The transport problem can be solved by MHD equations that describe the dynamic, self consistent collisional and electromagnetic interaction of REB with overdense hydrogenic plasmas or arbitrary atomic-number plasmas. The full set of equations consists of the REB transport equations which are coupled to Maxwell's equations through the electromagnetic-field terms and two-fluid plasma dynamical equations for the background overdense plasma through the collision term.

  10. THE SIGNATURE OF INITIAL CONDITIONS ON MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, V.; Alexakis, A. E-mail: alexakis@lps.ens.fr

    2014-06-20

    We demonstrate that the initial correlation between velocity and current density fluctuations can lead to the formation of enormous current sheets in freely evolving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. These coherent structures are observed at the peak of the energy dissipation rate and are the carriers of long-range correlations despite all of the nonlinear interactions during the formation of turbulence. The size of these structures spans our computational domain, dominating the scaling of the energy spectrum, which follows a E∝k {sup –2} power law. As the Reynolds number increases, the curling of the current sheets due to Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instabilities and reconnection modifies the scaling of the energy spectrum from k {sup –2} toward k {sup –5/3}. This transition occurs due to the decorrelation of the velocity and the current density which is proportional to Re{sub λ}{sup −3/2}. Finite Reynolds number behavior is observed without reaching a finite asymptote for the energy dissipation rate even for a simulation of Re{sub λ} ≅ 440 with 2048{sup 3} grid points. This behavior demonstrates that even state-of-the-art numerical simulations of the highest Reynolds numbers can be influenced by the choice of initial conditions and consequently they are inadequate to deduce unequivocally the fate of universality in MHD turbulence. Implications for astrophysical observations are discussed.

  11. Cosmos++: Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructured Grids with Local Adaptive Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, P; Fragile, P C; Salmonson, J D

    2005-05-06

    A new code and methodology are introduced for solving the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. it provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threated oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. A number of tests are presented to demonstrate robustness of the numerical algorithms and adaptive mesh framework over a wide spectrum of problems, boosts, and astrophysical applications, including relativistic shock tubes, shock collisions, magnetosonic shocks, Alfven wave propagation, blast waves, magnetized Bondi flow, and the magneto-rotational instability in Kerr black hole spacetimes.

  12. Can non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics solve the magnetic braking catastrophe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, James; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate whether or not the low ionization fractions in molecular cloud cores can solve the `magnetic braking catastrophe', where magnetic fields prevent the formation of circumstellar discs around young stars. We perform three-dimensional smoothed particle non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of the gravitational collapse of one solar mass molecular cloud cores, incorporating the effects of ambipolar diffusion, Ohmic resistivity and the Hall effect alongside a self-consistent calculation of the ionization chemistry assuming 0.1 μm grains. When including only ambipolar diffusion or Ohmic resistivity, discs do not form in the presence of strong magnetic fields, similar to the cases using ideal MHD. With the Hall effect included, disc formation depends on the direction of the magnetic field with respect to the rotation vector of the gas cloud. When the vectors are aligned, strong magnetic braking occurs and no disc is formed. When the vectors are anti-aligned, a disc with radius of 13 au can form even in strong magnetic when all three non-ideal terms are present, and a disc of 38 au can form when only the Hall effect is present; in both cases, a counter-rotating envelope forms around the first hydrostatic core. For weaker, anti-aligned fields, the Hall effect produces massive discs comparable to those produced in the absence of magnetic fields, suggesting that planet formation via gravitational instability may depend on the sign of the magnetic field in the precursor molecular cloud core.

  13. The interaction of a magnetohydrodynamical shock with a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, filamentary cloud. We investigate the effects of various filament lengths and orientations on the interaction using different orientations of the magnetic field, and vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the filament χ, and the plasma beta, in order to determine their effect on the evolution and lifetime of the filament. We find that in a parallel magnetic field filaments have longer lifetimes if they are orientated more `broadside' to the shock front, and that an increase in χ hastens the destruction of the cloud, in terms of the modified cloud-crushing time-scale, tcs. The combination of a mild shock and a perpendicular or oblique field provides the best condition for extending the life of the filament, with some filaments able to survive almost indefinitely since they are cocooned by the magnetic field. A high value for χ does not initiate large turbulent instabilities in either the perpendicular or oblique field cases but rather draws the filament out into long tendrils which may eventually fragment. In addition, flux ropes are only formed in parallel magnetic fields. The length of the filament is, however, not as important for the evolution and destruction of a filament.

  14. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium in a non-symmetric topological torus

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzner, Harold

    2014-02-15

    An alternative representation of an ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is developed. The representation is a variation of one given by A. Salat, Phys. Plasmas 2, 1652 (1995). The system of equations is used to study the possibility of non-symmetric equilibria in a topological torus, here an approximate rectangular parallelopiped, with periodicity in two of the three rectangular coordinates. An expansion is carried out in the deviation of pressure surfaces from planes. Resonances are manifest in the process. Nonetheless, provided the magnetic shear is small, it is shown that it is possible to select the magnetic fields and flux surfaces in such a manner that no singularities appear on resonant surfaces. One boundary surface of the parallelopiped is not arbitrary but is dependent on the equilibrium in question. A comparison of the solution sets of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric equilibria suggests that the latter have a wider class of possible boundary shapes but more restrictive rotational transform profiles. No proof of convergence of the series is given.

  15. The classification of magnetohydrodynamic regimes of thermonuclear combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2014-10-10

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  16. Large-scale magnetic fields in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2013-02-22

    High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of zero-flux large-scale magnetic fields is investigated as a function of the magnetic field strength. For a variety of flow configurations, the energy dissipation rate [symbol: see text] follows the scaling [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(3)/ℓ even when the large-scale magnetic field energy is twenty times larger than the kinetic energy. A further increase of the magnetic energy showed a transition to the [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(2) B(rms)/ℓ scaling implying that magnetic shear becomes more efficient at this point at cascading the energy than the velocity fluctuations. Strongly helical configurations form nonturbulent helicity condensates that deviate from these scalings. Weak turbulence scaling was absent from the investigation. Finally, the magnetic energy spectra support the Kolmogorov spectrum k(-5/3) while kinetic energy spectra are closer to the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum k(-3/2) as observed in the solar wind. PMID:23473153

  17. The Classification of Magnetohydrodynamic Regimes of Thermonuclear Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remming, Ian S.; Khokhlov, Alexei M.

    2014-10-01

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  18. Over-reflection of slow magnetosonic waves by homogeneous shear flow: Analytical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, Z. D.; Maneva, Y. G.; Hristov, T. S.; Mishonov, T. M.

    2011-08-15

    We have analyzed the amplification of slow magnetosonic (or pseudo-Alfvenic) waves (SMW) in incompressible shear flow. As found here, the amplification depends on the component of the wave-vector perpendicular to the direction of the shear flow. Earlier numerical results are consistent with the general analytic solution for the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations, derived here for the model case of pure homogeneous shear (without Coriolis force). An asymptotically exact analytical formula for the amplification coefficient is derived for the case when the amplification is sufficiently large.

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  20. Multi-fluid problems in magnetohydrodynamics with applications to astrophysical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Eric John

    2016-01-01

    I begin this study by presenting an overview of the theory of magnetohydrodynamics and the necessary conditions to justify the fluid treatment of a plasma. Upon establishing the fluid description of a plasma we move on to a discussion of magnetohydrodynamics in both the ideal and Hall regimes. This framework is then extended to include multiple plasmas in order to consider two problems of interest in the field of theoretical space physics. The first is a study on the evolution of a partially ionized plasma, a topic with many applications in space physics. A multi-fluid approach is necessary in this case to account for the motions of an ion fluid, electron fluid and neutral atom fluid; all of which are coupled to one another by collisions and/or electromagnetic forces. The results of this study have direct application towards an open question concerning the cascade of Kolmogorov-like turbulence in the interstellar plasma which we will discuss below. The second application of multi-fluid magnetohydrodynamics that we consider in this thesis concerns the amplification of magnetic field upstream of a collisionless, parallel shock. The relevant fluids here are the ions and electrons comprising the interstellar plasma and the galactic cosmic ray ions. Previous works predict that the streaming of cosmic rays lead to an instability resulting in significant amplification of the interstellar magnetic field at supernova blastwaves. This prediction is routinely invoked to explain the acceleration of galactic cosmic rays up to energies of 1015 eV. I will examine this phenomenon in detail using the multi-fluid framework outlined below. The purpose of this work is to first confirm the existence of an instability using a purely fluid approach with no additional approximations. If confirmed, I will determine the necessary conditions for it to operate.

  1. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of poloidal flows in tokamaks and MHD pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.

    2011-09-15

    Poloidal rotation is routinely observed in present-day tokamak experiments, in particular near the plasma edge and in the high-confinement mode of operation. According to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium theory [R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2439 (2000)], radial discontinuities form when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed (or rather, more correctly, the poloidal magneto-slow speed). Two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that the transonic discontinuities develop on a time scale of a plasma poloidal revolution to form an edge density pedestal and a localized velocity shear layer at the pedestal location. While such an MHD pedestal surrounds the entire core, the outboard side of the pedestal is driven by the transonic discontinuity while the inboard side is caused by a poloidal redistribution of the mass. The MHD simulations use a smooth momentum source to drive the poloidal flow. Soon after the flow exceeds the poloidal sound speed, the density pedestal and the velocity shear layer form and persist into a quasi steady state. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition, the early stages of the pedestal and edge transport barrier formation.

  2. Reduced modeling of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, Ben F.

    2009-06-01

    Accretion describes the process by which matter in an astrophysical disk falls onto a central massive object. Accretion disks are present in many astrophysical situations including binary star systems, young stellar objects, and near black holes at the center of galaxies. Measurements from observations of these disks have shown that viscous processes are unable to transport the necessary levels of angular momentum needed for accretion. Therefore, accretion requires an efficient mechanism of angular momentum transport. Mixing by turbulent processes greatly enhances the level of angular momentum transport in a turbulent fluid. Thus, the generation of turbulence in these disks may provide the mechanism needed for accretion. A classical result of hydrodynamic theory is that typical accretion disks are hydrodynamically stable to shear instabilities, since the specific angular momentum increases outwards. Other processes of generating hydrodynamic turbulence (barotropic instability, baroclinic instability, sound wave, shock waves, finite amplitude instabilities) may be present in these disks, however, none of these mechanisms has been shown to produce the level of angular momentum transport needed for accretion. Hydrodynamical turbulence does not produce enough angular momentum transport to produce the level of accretion observed in astrophysical accretion disks. The leading candidate for the source of turbulence leading to the transport of angular momentum is the magnetorotational instability, a linear axisymmetric instability of electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an imposed magnetic field and shear (or differential rotation). This instability is an efficient mechanism of angular momentum transport generating the level of transport needed for accretion. The level of effective angular momentum transport is determined by the saturated state of sustained turbulence generated by the instability. The mechanism of nonlinear saturation of this instability is not

  3. Multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics with flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, G. R. Dewar, R. L.; Hole, M. J.; Hudson, S. R.

    2014-04-15

    We present an extension of the multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) equilibrium model that includes plasma flow. This new model is a generalization of Woltjer's model of relaxed magnetohydrodynamics equilibria with flow. We prove that as the number of plasma regions becomes infinite, our extension of MRxMHD reduces to ideal MHD with flow. We also prove that some solutions to MRxMHD with flow are not time-independent in the laboratory frame, and instead have 3D structure which rotates in the toroidal direction with fixed angular velocity. This capability gives MRxMHD potential application to describing rotating 3D MHD structures such as 'snakes' and long-lived modes.

  4. Geomagnetic main field modeling using magnetohydrodynamic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of physical constraints are investigated which may be approximately satisfied by the Earth's liquid core on models of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation. A previous report describes the methodology used to incorporate nonlinear equations of constraint into the main field model. The application of that methodology to the GSFC 12/83 field model to test the frozen-flux hypothesis and the usefulness of incorporating magnetohydrodynamic constraints for obtaining improved geomagnetic field models is described.

  5. Coal-burning magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.; Hals, F. )

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, coal-burning magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electric power generation technology is described, and its economic and environmental advantages are discussed. advanced MHD/steam plants can achieve efficiencies of 55%-60% with less environmental intrusion than form conventional coal-burning steam plants. The national program for development of MHD power generation is outlined and the development status of individual components and subsystems is presented.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Chen, Hudong; Martinez, Daniel; Matthaeus, William

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method, based on a discrete Boltzmann equation, is presented for solving the equations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The algorithm provides advantages similar to the cellular automaton method in that it is local and easily adapted to parallel computing environments. Because of much lower noise levels and less stringent requirements on lattice size, the method appears to be more competitive with traditional solution methods. Examples show that the model accurately reproduces both linear and nonlinear MHD phenomena.

  7. Potential vorticity formulation of compressible magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Compressible ideal magnetohydrodynamics is formulated in terms of the time evolution of potential vorticity and magnetic flux per unit mass using a compact Lie bracket notation. It is demonstrated that this simplifies analytic solution in at least one very important situation relevant to magnetic fusion experiments. Potentially important implications for analytic and numerical modelling of both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are also discussed. PMID:23383802

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with incompressible flows: Symmetry approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cicogna, G.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-02-15

    We identify and discuss a family of azimuthally symmetric, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic plasma equilibria with poloidal and toroidal flows in terms of solutions of the Generalized Grad Shafranov (GGS) equation. These solutions are derived by exploiting the incompressibility assumption, in order to rewrite the GGS equation in terms of a different dependent variable, and the continuous Lie symmetry properties of the resulting equation and, in particular, a special type of “weak” symmetries.

  9. Shear fragmentation of unstable flux flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Ivlev, Boris I.; Knight, James M.

    2002-08-01

    When free flux flow is pushed beyond its instability, the homogeneous flow becomes spatially distorted leading to a new class of dynamic phases with steps in resistivity. At high-flux densities B, the relatively incompressible vortex matter fragments into domains of constant shear curvature, leading to a horizontal-sawtooth-shaped current-voltage characteristic. Measurements on Y1Ba2Cu3O7-δ films confirm this behavior and are quantitatively consistent with the model, which has no adjustable parameters.

  10. ZEUS-2D: A Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Code for Astrophysical Flows in Two Space Dimensions. II. The Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithms and Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Norman, Michael L.

    1992-06-01

    In this, the second of a series of three papers, we continue a detailed description of ZEUS-2D, a numerical code for the simulation of fluid dynamical flows in astrophysics including a self-consistent treatment of the effects of magnetic fields and radiation transfer. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) algorithms in ZEUS-2D. The recently developed constrained transport (CT) algorithm is implemented for the numerical evolution of the components of the magnetic field for MHD simulations. This formalism guarantees the numerically evolved field components will satisfy the divergence-free constraint at all times. We find, however, that the method used to compute the electromotive forces must be chosen carefully to propagate accurately all modes of MHD wave families (in particular shear Alfvén waves). A new method of computing the electromotive force is developed using the method of characteristics (MOC). It is demonstrated through the results of an extensive series of MHD test problems that the resulting hybrid MOC-CT method provides for the accurate evolution of all modes of MHD wave families.

  11. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  12. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  13. Instability patterns between counter-rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisy, F.; Pasutto, T.; Rabaud, M.

    The instability patterns in the flow between counter-rotating disks (radius to height ratio R/h from 3.8 to 20.9) are investigated experimentally by means of visualization and Particle Image Velocimetry. We restrict ourselves to the situation where the boundary layers remain stable, focusing on the shear layer instability that occurs only in the counter-rotating regime. The associated pattern is a combination of a circular chain of vortices, as observed by Lopez et al. (2002) at low aspect ratio, surrounded by a set of spiral arms, first described by Gauthier et al. (2002) in the case of high aspect ratio. Stability curve and critical modes are measured for the whole range of aspect ratios. From the measurement of a local Reynolds number based on the shear layer thickness, evidence is given that a free shear layer instability, with only weak curvature effect, is responsible for the observed patterns. Accordingly, the number of vortices is shown to scale as the shear layer radius, which results from the competition between the centrifugal effects of each disk.

  14. Generation of instability waves in flows separating from smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper analyses the coupling between an imposed disturbance and an instability wave that propagates downstream on a shear layer which emanates from a separation point on a smooth surface. Since the wavelengths of the most-amplified instability waves will generally be small compared with the streamwise body dimensions, the analysis is restricted to this 'high-frequency' limit and the solution is obtained by using matched asymptotic expansions. An 'inner' solution, valid near the separation point, is matched onto an outer solution, which represents an instability wave on a slowly diverging mean flow. The analysis relates the amplitude of this instability to that of the imposed disturbance.

  15. Cascade properties of shear Alfven wave turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bondeson, A.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear three-wave interactions of linear normal modes are investigated for two-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamics and the weakly three-dimensional Strauss equations in the case where a strong uniform background field B0 is present. In both systems the only resonant interaction affecting Alfven waves is caused by the shear of the background field plus the zero frequency components of the perturbation. It is shown that the Alfven waves are cascaded in wavenumber space by a mechanism equivalent to the resonant absorption at the Alfven resonance. For large wavenumbers perpendicular to B0, the cascade is described by Hamilton's ray equations, dk/dt = -(first-order) partial derivative of omega with respect to vector r, where omega includes the effects of the zero frequency perturbations.

  16. Conjugate-shear folding: A model for the relationships between foliations, folds and shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerden, Domingo G. A. M.; Sayab, Mohammad; Bouybaouene, Mohamed L.

    2010-08-01

    Microstructural mapping of whole thin sections cut from two samples of micaschist containing cm-scale folds plus garnet porphyroblasts has provided new insight in the relationships between folding, shearing and foliation development. The garnets exhibit coherent inclusion-trail patterns that place important constraints on the kinematic development of both samples, which are shown to be representative of coaxial versus non-coaxial deformation in rocks containing a pre-existing schistosity. A comparison of crenulations-cleavages geometries in both samples and a review of the geometry of natural and experimental multilayer folds leads to the conclusion that folding involves conjugate shearing at different scales. At microscopic scales, crenulation cleavages nucleate as conjugate-kink or shear instabilities and develop further as a function of the macroscopic partitioning of deformation. In fold-hinge domains, bulk-coaxial deformation results in equal development of conjugate crenulations that progressively coalescence into symmetrical crenulation patterns so that, macroscopically, parallelism is achieved between foliation, fold-axial planes and long axes of strain ellipses. Fold-limb domains represent a system of conjugate-shear zones where single sets of crenulation instabilities with synthetic shearing component preferentially develop producing oblique relationships between the aforementioned elements. Cleavage fanning is inferred as a direct consequence of this conjugate-shear origin of folds. The model implies that crenulation cleavages and S-C fabrics in shear zones form by analogous processes, in both cases involving a component of shearing along foliation planes. The development of conjugate sets of foliation planes surrounding porphyroblasts during early, relatively coaxial stages of deformation explains continued "gyrostatic" behaviour during more advanced non-coaxial stages, as indicated by consistently oriented inclusion trails in the studied samples.

  17. Dynamics of vorticity defects in layered stratified shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Roy, A.; Balmforth, N. J.

    2011-11-01

    Layered stratified flows, where relatively deep regions of weak stratification are separated by thinner interfacial layers of substantially stronger density gradient are commonly observed in nature. If such flows are subjected to vertical shear, it is well-known that a wide range of qualitatively different instabilities may develop. For example, the three-layer, two interface case is susceptible to a ``Taylor'' instability which, although superficially similar to the classic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is actually qualitatively different in its growth mechanism. The investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of this instability, and to a lesser extent the single-interface ``Holmboe'' instability, has proved difficult, as the need to resolve the associated sharp density gradients places heavy demands on the required numerical resolutions for simulation. However, we show that it is possible to gain insight into the key nonlinear dynamics of such layered stratified shear flows by generalizing a reduced matched asymptotic ``vorticity defect'' model (N. J. Balmforth et al. J. Fluid Mech. 333, 197 [1997]) to include the dynamical effects of density variations. We particularly focus on investigating the finite amplitude structure of the saturated primary Taylor instability, and the properties of the secondary instabilities to which Taylor and Holmboe instabilities are susceptible.

  18. Excitation of vortex meandering in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröttle, Josef; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Schumann, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of a streamwise aligned columnar vortex with vorticity {\\boldsymbol{ ω }} in an axial background shear of magnitude Ω by means of linear stability analysis and numerical simulations. A long wave mode of vorticity normal to the plane spanned by the background shear vector {\\boldsymbol{ Ω }} and the vorticity of the vortex are excited by an instability. The stationary wave modes of the vertical and lateral vorticity are amplified. In order to form a helical vortex, the lateral and vertical vorticity can be phase shifted by half a wavelength. The linear and nonlinear evolutions of the vortex in the shear flow are studied numerically. Linearized simulations confirm the results of the stability analysis. The nonlinear simulations reveal further evolution of the helix in the shear flow. The linearly excited mode persists in co-existence with evolving smaller scale instabilities until the flow becomes fully turbulent at the time of O(100 {{Ω }-1}). Turbulent mixing dampens the amplifying mode. The described phenomenon of vortex meandering may serve as an alternative explanation for the excitation of wind turbine wake meandering in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  19. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  20. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Shapiro, Charles; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.