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Sample records for magnetoresistive heat switch

  1. A Magnetoresistive Heat Switch for the Continuous ADR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, E. R.; Dipirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Panek, J.; Shirron, P. J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Krebs, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In compensated elemental metals at low temperature, a several Tesla field can suppress electronic heat conduction so thoroughly that heat is effectively carried by phonons alone. In approximately one mm diameter single crystal samples with impurity concentrations low enough that electron conduction is limited by surface scattering, the ratio of zerofield to high-field thermal conductivity can exceed ten thousand. We have used this phenomenon to build a compact, solid-state heat switch with no moving parts and no enclosed fluids. The time scale for switching states is limited by time scale for charging the magnet that supplies the controlling field. Our design and fabrication techniques overcome the difficulties associated with manufacturing and assembling parts from single crystal tungsten. A clear disadvantage of the magnetoresistive switch is the mass and complexity of the magnet system for the controlling field. We have discovered a technique of minimizing this mass and complexity, applicable to the continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  2. Performance of a fast response miniature Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator using a single crystal tungsten magnetoresistive heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, J.; Hardy, G.; Hepburn, I. D.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of a fast thermal response miniature Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator (ADR) is presented. The miniature ADR is comprised of a fast thermal response Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill, two superconducting magnets and unconventionally, a single crystal tungsten magnetoresistive (MR) heat switch. The development of this ADR is a result of the ongoing development of a continuously operating millikelvin cryocooler (mKCC), which will use only magnetoresistive heat switches. The design and performance of the MR heat switch developed for the mKCC and used in the miniature ADR is presented in this paper; the heat switch has a measured Residual Resistivity Ratio of 32,000 ± 3000 and an estimated switching ratio (on thermal conductivity divided by the off thermal conductivity) of 15,200 at 3.6 K and 38,800 at 0.2 K when using a 3 T magnetic field. The performance of the miniature ADR operating from a 3.6 K bath is presented, demonstrating that a complete cycle (magnetisation, cooling to the bath and demagnetisation) can be accomplished in 82 s. A magnet current step test, conducted when the ADR is cold and fully demagnetised, has shown the thermal response of the ADR to be sub-second. The measured hold times of the ADR with just parasitic heat load are given, ranging from 3 min at 0.2 K with 13.14 μW of parasitics, to 924 min at 3 K with 4.55 μW of parasitics. The cooling power has been measured for operating temperatures in the range 0.25-3 K by applying an additional heat load to the ADR via a heater, in order to reduce the hold time to 3 min (i.e. approximately double the recycle time); the maximum cooling power of the miniature ADR (in addition to parasitic load) when operating at 250 mK is 20 μW, which increases to 45 μW at 300 mK and continues to increase linearly to nearly 1.1 mW at 3 K. To conclude, the predicted performance of a tandem continuous ADR utilising two of the miniature ADRs is presented.

  3. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  4. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  5. Heat pipe thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, D. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A thermal switch for controlling the dissipation of heat between a body is described. The thermal switch is comprised of a flexible bellows defining an expansible vapor chamber for a working fluid located between an evaporation and condensation chamber. Inside the bellows is located a coiled retaining spring and four axial metal mesh wicks, two of which have their central portions located inside of the spring while the other two have their central portions located between the spring and the side wall of the bellows. The wicks are terminated and are attached to the inner surfaces of the outer end walls of evaporation and condensation chambers respectively located adjacent to the heat source and heat sink. The inner surfaces of the end walls furthermore include grooves to provide flow channels of the working fluid to and from the wick ends. The evaporation and condensation chambers are connected by turnbuckles and tension springs to provide a set point adjustment for setting the gap between an interface plate on the condensation chamber and the heat sink.

  6. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  7. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping E-mail: moli@umn.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: moli@umn.edu

    2015-09-07

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  8. Gas adsorption/absorption heat switch, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The service life and/or reliability of far-infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is presently limited by the cryocooler. The life and/or reliability, however, can be extended by using redundant cryocoolers. To reduce parasitic heat leak, each stage of the inactive redundant cryocooler must be thermally isolated from the optical system, while each stage of the active cryocooler must be thermally connected to the system. The thermal break or the thermal contact can be controlled by heat switches. Among different physical mechanisms for heat switching, mechanically activated heat switches tend to have low reliability and, furthermore, require a large contact force. Magnetoresistive heat switches are, except at very low temperatures, of very low efficiency. Heat switches operated by the heat pipe principle usually require a long response time. A sealed gas gap heat switch operated by an adsorption pump has no mechanical motion and should provide the reliability and long lifetime required in long-term space missions. Another potential application of a heat switch is the thermal isolation of the optical plane during decontamination.

  9. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  10. Resistive switching and voltage induced modulation of tunneling magnetoresistance in nanosized perpendicular organic spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Müller, Alexander; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional perpendicular organic spin valves have been fabricated. The devices based on an La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/Alq3/Co trilayer show resistive switching of up to 4-5 orders of magnitude and magnetoresistance as high as -70% the latter even changing sign when voltage pulses are applied. This combination of phenomena is typically observed in multiferroic tunnel junctions where it is attributed to magnetoelectric coupling between a ferromagnet and a ferroelectric material. Modeling indicates that here the switching originates from a modification of the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 surface. This modification influences the tunneling of charge carriers and thus both the electrical resistance and the tunneling magnetoresistance which occurs at pinholes in the organic layer.

  11. A piezoelectric cryogenic heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios of about 100-200 at lowest and highest measures temperature were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N, respectively. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an ideal PZHS.

  12. A piezoelectric cryogenic heat switch.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Amir E; Sullivan, Dan F

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios of about 100-200 at lowest and highest measures temperature were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N, respectively. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an ideal PZHS. PMID:24985863

  13. Realization of resistive switching and magnetoresistance in ZnO/ZnO-Co composite materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Jia, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Bai, Yuhao; Li, Jie; Shi, Yana; Wang, Lanfang; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Combining resistive switching and magnetoresistance in a system exhibits great potential for application in multibit nonvolatile data storage. It is in significance and difficulty to seek a material with resistances that can be stably switched at different resistance states modulated by an electrical field and a magnetic field. In this paper, we propose a novel electrode/ZnO/ZnO-Co/electrode device in which the storage layer combines a nanostructured ZnO-Co layer and a ZnO layer. The device exhibits bipolar resistive switching characteristics, which can be explained by the accumulation of oxygen vacancies due to the migration of oxygen ions by external electrical stimuli and the contribution of Co particles in the ZnO-Co layer. Moreover, the magnetoresistance effect at room temperature can be observed in the device at high and low resistance states. Therefore, through electrical and magnetic control, four resistance states are achieved in this system, presenting a new possibility towards enhancing data densities by many folds. PMID:27585644

  14. Realization of resistive switching and magnetoresistance in ZnO/ZnO-Co composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Jia, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Bai, Yuhao; Li, Jie; Shi, Yana; Wang, Lanfang; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Combining resistive switching and magnetoresistance in a system exhibits great potential for application in multibit nonvolatile data storage. It is in significance and difficulty to seek a material with resistances that can be stably switched at different resistance states modulated by an electrical field and a magnetic field. In this paper, we propose a novel electrode/ZnO/ZnO-Co/electrode device in which the storage layer combines a nanostructured ZnO-Co layer and a ZnO layer. The device exhibits bipolar resistive switching characteristics, which can be explained by the accumulation of oxygen vacancies due to the migration of oxygen ions by external electrical stimuli and the contribution of Co particles in the ZnO-Co layer. Moreover, the magnetoresistance effect at room temperature can be observed in the device at high and low resistance states. Therefore, through electrical and magnetic control, four resistance states are achieved in this system, presenting a new possibility towards enhancing data densities by many folds. PMID:27585644

  15. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices.

  16. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  17. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  18. Magnetoresistance of conductive filament in Ni/HfO2/Pt resistive switching memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Shintaro; Hamada, Yoshifumi; Ito, Daisuke; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso

    2015-05-01

    Ferromagnetic conductive filaments (CFs) were formed in a conductive-bridge random access memory (CBRAM) with a Ni electrode using high current compliances during a set process. We investigated CFs in a Ni/HfO2/Pt CBRAM using the current compliance dependences of the set process, low-temperature characteristics, and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Set processes occurred when a positive bias was applied to the Ni electrode only; therefore, the switching phenomena showed polarity. The resistance of the ON state (low resistance state) was dependent on the current compliance between 2 and 5 mA. The ON state of the device showed a metallic conduction property, suggested by the temperature dependence of resistance. When a high current compliance (5 mA) was used for programming, the ON state showed AMR, which was direct evidence of ferromagnetic CF formation. This suggests that the formation of a ferromagnetic CF is associated with the accumulation of Ni ions that diffused from the Ni electrode. The OFF-state (high resistance state) resistance slightly increased with decreasing temperature and AMR was not observed.

  19. A heat-switch-based electrocaloric cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. D.; Smullin, S. J.; Sheridan, M. J.; Wang, Q.; Eldershaw, C.; Schwartz, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    A heat-switch-based electrocaloric cooler is reported in this letter. The device consists of two silicon heat switches and an electrocaloric module based on BaTO3 multilayer capacitors (MLCs). To operate the cooler, the heat switches are actuated synchronously with the application of electric fields across the MLCs. Heat flux versus temperature lift is fully characterized. With an electric field strength of 277 kV/cm, the system achieves a maximum heat flux of 36 mW and maximum temperature lift of greater than 0.3 °C, close to the expected MLC adiabatic temperature change of 0.5 °C. The cooler is shown to work reliably over thousands of actuation cycles.

  20. 3He gas gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catarino, I.; Paine, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal control at 1 K is still demanding for heat switches development. A gas gap heat switch using 3He gas as the heat-transfer fluid was tested and characterized. The switch is actuated by a sorption pump, whose triggering temperatures were also characterized. Switching times were recorded for different thermalizations of the sorption pump. This paper presents the conductance results of such switch. The temperature scanning of the actuator is also presented. The effect of filling pressure is discussed as well as the thermalization of the sorption pump. About 60 μW/K OFF-state conductance and 100 mW/K ON-state conductance were obtained at 1.7 K. The actuation temperature is slightly adjustable upon the charging pressure of the working gas. Thermalization of the sorption pump at about 8-10 K is enough for producing an OFF state - it can be comfortably linked to a 4 K stage. Temperatures of 15-20 K at the sorption pump are required for reaching the viscous range for maximum ON conduction. Switching time dependence on the thermalization of the sorption pump is discarded.

  1. Integrated Heat Switch/Oxide Sorption Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Thermally-driven, nonmechanical compressor uses container filled with compressed praseodymium cerium oxide powder (PrCeOx) to provide high-pressure flow of oxygen gas for driving closed-cycle Joule-Thomson-expansion refrigeration unit. Integrated heat switch/oxide sorption compressor has no moving parts except check valves, which control flow of oxygen gas between compressor and closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigeration system. Oxygen expelled from sorbent at high pressure by evacuating heat-switch gap and turning on heater.

  2. Magnetoresistance effect of heat generation in a single-molecular spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng; Yan, Yonghong; Wang, Shikuan; Yan, Yijing

    2016-02-01

    Based on non-equilibrium Green's functions' theory and small polaron transformation's technology, we study the heat generation by current through a single-molecular spin-valve. Numerical results indicate that the variation of spin polarization degree can change heat generation effectively, the spin-valve effect happens not only in electrical current but also in heat generation when Coulomb repulsion in quantum dot is smaller than phonon frequency and interestingly, when Coulomb repulsion is larger than phonon frequency, the inverse spin-valve effect appears by sweeping gate voltage and is enlarged with bias increasing. The inverse spin-valve effect will induce the unique heat magnetoresistance effect, which can be modulated from heat-resistance to heat-gain by gate voltage easily.

  3. Improved heat switch for gas sorption compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal conductivities of the charcoal bed and the copper matrix for the gas adsorption compressor were measured by the concentric-cylinder method. The presence of the copper matrix in the charcoal bed enhanced the bed conductance by at least an order of magnitude. Thermal capacities of the adsorbent cell and the heat leaks to two compressor designs were measured by the transient method. The new gas adsorption compressor had a heat switch that could transfer eight times more heat than the previous one. The cycle time for the new prototype compressor is also improved by a factor of eight to within the minute range.

  4. Significant positive magnetoresistance of graphene/carbon composite films prepared by electrospraying and subsequent heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. Q.; Liu, X.; Chen, J. T.; Zhang, Z. C.; Li, J. L.; Wang, L. J.; Jiang, W.

    2012-03-01

    Graphene/carbon composite films were prepared by electrospraying a graphene/polyacrylonitrile composite solution on SiO2-coated silicon substrates and subsequent heat treatment. The as-produced graphene/carbon composite films had a porous structure comprising graphene layers. With a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the sample, an unexpectedly significant positive magnetoresistance attributed to e-e interaction and weak localization has been observed, which constantly increases with the magnetic field in the temperature range of 300-50 K from 0 to 80 kOe.

  5. Passive gas-gap heat switch for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); Di Pirro, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A passive gas-gap heat switch for use with a multi-stage continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The passive gas-gap heat switch turns on automatically when the temperature of either side of the switch rises above a threshold value and turns off when the temperature on either side of the switch falls below this threshold value. One of the heat switches in this multistage process must be conductive in the 0.25? K to 0.3? K range. All of the heat switches must be capable of switching off in a short period of time (1-2 minutes), and when off to have a very low thermal conductance. This arrangement allows cyclic cooling cycles to be used without the need for separate heat switch controls.

  6. Electrocaloric devices based on thini-film heat switches

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Malloy, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new approach to refrigeration and electrical generation that exploits the attractive properties of thin films of electrocaloric materials. Layers of electrocaloric material coupled with thin-film heat switches can work as either refrigerators or electrical generators, depending on the phasing of the applied voltages and heat switching. With heat switches based on thin layers of liquid crystals, the efficiency of these thin-film heat engines can be at least as high as that of current thermoelectric devices. Advanced heat switches would enable thin-film heat engines to outperform conventional vaporcompression devices.

  7. Tunnel magnetoresistance and spin torque switching in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions with a Co/Ni multilayer electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro; Gudmundsen, Theodore J.; Huang, Pinshane Y.; Liu, Luqiao; Muller, David A.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.

    2010-08-01

    We have fabricated MgO-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a Co/Ni switching layer to reduce the demagnetizing field via interface anisotropy. With a fcc-(111) oriented Co/Ni multilayer combined with an FeCoB insertion layer, the demagnetizing field is 2 kOe and the tunnel magnetoresistance can be as high as 106%. Room-temperature measurements of spin-torque switching are in good agreement with predictions for a reduced critical current associated with the small demagnetization for antiparallel-to-parallel switching. For parallel-to-antiparallel switching the small demagnetization field causes spatially nonuniform reversal nucleated at the sample ends, with a low energy barrier but a higher switching current.

  8. Possible magnetic-polaron-switched positive and negative magnetoresistance in the GdSi single crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Haifeng; Xiao, Yinguo; Schmitz, Berthold; Persson, Jörg; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Meuffels, Paul; Roth, Georg; Brückel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) has attracted tremendous attention for possible technological applications. Understanding the role of magnetism in manipulating MR may in turn steer the searching for new applicable MR materials. Here we show that antiferromagnetic (AFM) GdSi metal displays an anisotropic positive MR value (PMRV), up to ~415%, accompanied by a large negative thermal volume expansion (NTVE). Around T(N) the PMRV translates to negative, down to ~-10.5%. Their theory-breaking magnetic-field dependencies [PMRV: dominantly linear; negative MR value (NMRV): quadratic] and the unusual NTVE indicate that PMRV is induced by the formation of magnetic polarons in 5d bands, whereas NMRV is possibly due to abated electron-spin scattering resulting from magnetic-field-aligned local 4f spins. Our results may open up a new avenue of searching for giant MR materials by suppressing the AFM transition temperature, opposite the case in manganites, and provide a promising approach to novel magnetic and electric devices. PMID:23087815

  9. Possible magnetic-polaron-switched positive and negative magnetoresistance in the GdSi single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haifeng; Xiao, Yinguo; Schmitz, Berthold; Persson, Jörg; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Meuffels, Paul; Roth, Georg; Brückel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) has attracted tremendous attention for possible technological applications. Understanding the role of magnetism in manipulating MR may in turn steer the searching for new applicable MR materials. Here we show that antiferromagnetic (AFM) GdSi metal displays an anisotropic positive MR value (PMRV), up to ~415%, accompanied by a large negative thermal volume expansion (NTVE). Around TN the PMRV translates to negative, down to ~−10.5%. Their theory-breaking magnetic-field dependencies [PMRV: dominantly linear; negative MR value (NMRV): quadratic] and the unusual NTVE indicate that PMRV is induced by the formation of magnetic polarons in 5d bands, whereas NMRV is possibly due to abated electron-spin scattering resulting from magnetic-field-aligned local 4f spins. Our results may open up a new avenue of searching for giant MR materials by suppressing the AFM transition temperature, opposite the case in manganites, and provide a promising approach to novel magnetic and electric devices. PMID:23087815

  10. Magnetoelectric assisted 180° magnetization switching for electric field addressable writing in magnetoresistive random-access memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yaojin; Li, Yanxi; Luo, Haosu; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight

    2014-08-26

    Magnetization-based memories, e.g., hard drive and magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM), use bistable magnetic domains in patterned nanomagnets for information recording. Electric field (E) tunable magnetic anisotropy can lower the energy barrier between two distinct magnetic states, promising reduced power consumption and increased recording density. However, integration of magnetoelectric heterostructure into MRAM is a highly challenging task owing to the particular architecture requirements of each component. Here, we show an epitaxial growth of self-assembled CoFe2O4 nanostripes with bistable in-plane magnetizations on Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates, where the magnetic switching can be triggered by E-induced elastic strain effect. An unprecedented magnetic coercive field change of up to 600 Oe was observed with increasing E. A near 180° magnetization rotation can be activated by E in the vicinity of the magnetic coercive field. These findings might help to solve the 1/2-selection problem in traditional MRAM by providing reduced magnetic coercive field in E field selected memory cells. PMID:25093903

  11. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  12. Bistable Magnetoresistance Switching in Exchange-Coupled CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices by Self-Assembly and Thermal Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J; Ye, XC; Oh, SJ; Kikkawa, JM; Kagan, CR; Murray, CB

    2013-02-01

    Self-assembly of multicomponent nanocrystal superlattices provides a modular approach to the design of metamaterials by choosing constituent nanocrystal building blocks with desired physical properties and engineering the interparticle coupling. In this work, we report the self-assembly of binary nanocrystal superlattices composed of magnetically hard CoFe2O4 nanocrystals and magnetically soft Fe3O4 nanocrystals. Both NaZn13- and MgZn2-type CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 binary nanocrystal superlattices have been formed by the liquid-air interfacial assembly approach. Exchange coupling is achieved in both types of binary superlattices after thermal annealing under vacuum at 400 degrees C. The exchange-coupled CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 binary nanocrystal superlattices show single-phase magnetization switching behavior and magnetoresistance switching behavior below 200 K. The NaZn13-type CoFe2O4-Fe3O4 binary nanocrystal superlattices annealed at 500 degrees C even exhibit bistable magnetoresistance switching behavior at room temperature constituting a simple nonvolatile memory function.

  13. Soft Switching SEPP High Frequency Inverter for Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a novel circuit topology to attain soft switching operation of a high frequency inverter. Its output power is regulated over a wide range using a PWM control technique by connecting an auxiliary resonant circuit to the conventional single ended push pull (SEPP) high frequency inverter for induction heating. All switching devices in the proposed inverter are operated soft switching mode. This paper describes its circuit constitution and obtained experimental results from a practical point of view.

  14. Electro-mechanical heat switch for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    van den Berg, Marcel L.; Batteux, Jan D.; Labov, Simon E.

    2003-01-01

    A heat switch includes two symmetric jaws. Each jaw is comprised of a link connected at a translatable joint to a flexible arm. Each arm rotates about a fixed pivot, and has an articulated end including a thermal contact pad connected to a heat sink. The links are joined together at a translatable main joint. To close the heat switch, a closing solenoid is actuated and forces the main joint to an over-center position. This movement rotates the arms about their pivots, respectively, forces each of them into a stressed configuration, and forces the thermal contact pads towards each other and into compressive contact with a cold finger. The closing solenoid is then deactivated. The heat switch remains closed due to a restoring force generated by the stressed configuration of each arm, until actuation of an opening solenoid returns the main joint to its starting open-switch position.

  15. Design and application of gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Gas-gap heat switches can serve as an effective means of thermally disconnecting a standby cryocooler when the primary (operating) cooler is connected and vice versa. The final phase of the development and test of a cryogenic heat switch designed for loads ranging from 2 watts at 8 K, to 100 watts at 80 K are described. Achieved heat-switch on/off conductance ratio ranged from 11,000 at 8 K to 2200 at 80 K. A particularly challenging element of heat-switch design is achieving satisfactory operation when large temperatures differentials exist across the switch. A special series of tests and analyses was conducted and used in this Phase-2 activity to evaluate the developed switches for temperature differentials ranging up to 200 K. Problems encountered at the maximum levels are described and analyzed, and means of avoiding the problems in the future are presented. A comprehensive summary of the overall heat-switch design methodology is also presented with special emphasis on lessons learned over the course of the 4-year development effort.

  16. Note: Cryogenic heat switch with stepper motor actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, B. S.; Timbie, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical cryogenic heat switch has been developed using a commercially available stepper motor and control electronics. The motor requires 4 leads, each carrying a maximum, pulsed current of 0.5 A. With slight modifications of the stepper motor, the switch functions reliably in vacuum at temperatures between 300 K and 4 K. The switch generates a clamping force of 262 N at room temperature. At 4 K it achieves an "on state" thermal conductance of 5.04 mW/K and no conductance in the "off state." The switch is optimized for cycling an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  17. Note: Cryogenic heat switch with stepper motor actuator.

    PubMed

    Melcher, B S; Timbie, P T

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical cryogenic heat switch has been developed using a commercially available stepper motor and control electronics. The motor requires 4 leads, each carrying a maximum, pulsed current of 0.5 A. With slight modifications of the stepper motor, the switch functions reliably in vacuum at temperatures between 300 K and 4 K. The switch generates a clamping force of 262 N at room temperature. At 4 K it achieves an "on state" thermal conductance of 5.04 mW/K and no conductance in the "off state." The switch is optimized for cycling an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. PMID:26724093

  18. Note: Cryogenic heat switch with stepper motor actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, B. S. Timbie, P. T.

    2015-12-15

    A mechanical cryogenic heat switch has been developed using a commercially available stepper motor and control electronics. The motor requires 4 leads, each carrying a maximum, pulsed current of 0.5 A. With slight modifications of the stepper motor, the switch functions reliably in vacuum at temperatures between 300 K and 4 K. The switch generates a clamping force of 262 N at room temperature. At 4 K it achieves an “on state” thermal conductance of 5.04 mW/K and no conductance in the “off state.” The switch is optimized for cycling an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  19. Self-actuating heat switches for redundant refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Chung K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A dual refrigeration system for cooling a sink device is described, which automatically thermally couples the cold refrigerator to the sink device while thermally isolating the warm refrigerator from the sink device. The system includes two gas gap heat switches that each thermally couples one of the refrigerators to the sink device, and a pair of sorption pumps that are coupled through tubes to the heat switches. When the first refrigerator is operated and therefore cold, the first pump which is thermally coupled to it is also cooled and adsorbs gas to withdraw it from the second heat switch, to thereby thermally isolate the sink device from the warm second refrigerator. With the second refrigerator being warm, the second pump is also warm and desorbs gas, so the gas lies in the first switch, to close that switch and therefore thermally couple the cold first refrigerator to the sink device. Thus, the heat switches are automatically switched according to the temperature of the corresponding refrigerator.

  20. A High Conductance Detachable Heat Switch for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, C. Y.; Wong, Y.; Rodenbush, A. J.; Joshi, C. H.; Shirron, P. J.

    2004-06-01

    Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs) are being increasingly considered for instrumentation and detector cooling on space missions such as Constellation-X. A multistage ADR is presently under development to operate between 6 K and the detector temperature of 50 mK. Energen, Inc. has developed and demonstrated a high conductance detachable thermal link (the heat switch) for operation at sub-Kelvin temperatures using a high-force cryogenic magnetostrictive actuator. A more efficient detachable thermal link decreases the number of cooling stages, thereby reducing the weight, cost and complexity of the cooling system. This heat switch uses KelvinAll, a magnetostrictive material developed by Energen, as the active element. Unlike other magnetostrictive materials, KelvinAll operates over a broad temperature range. At cryogenic temperatures it delivers a long stroke allowing a large separation gap between the contacting surfaces when the switch is disengaged. This makes alignment and operation of the heat switch simple.

  1. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  2. A Passive, Adaptive and Autonomous Gas Gap heat Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Colijn, Bram; Vermeer, Cris; Holland, Harry; Tirolien, Thierry; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    We report on the development of a heat switch for autonomous temperature control of electronic components in a satellite. A heat switch can modulate when needed between roles of a good thermal conductor and a good thermal insulator. Electronic boxes on a satellite should be maintained within a typical optimum temperature range of 260 to 310 K. The heat sinking is usually by means of a radiator. When the operating temperature of the electronic box increases beyond 310 K, a good contact to the radiator is desired for maximum cooling. On the other hand, when the satellite is in a cold dormant state, the electronics box should be heated by the onboard batteries. In this state a weak thermal contact is desired between the electronic box and the heat sink. In the present study, we are developing a gas gap heat switch in which the sorber material is thermally anchored to the electronic box. A temperature change of the electronic box triggers the (de-)sorption of gas from the sorber material and subsequently the gas pressure in the gas gap. This paper describes the physical principles and the current status of this technology. This approach can be extended to cryogenic temperature range.

  3. Electric switch of magnetoresistance in the Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3/(La0.67Ca0.33)MnO3 heterostructure film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Yong-Chao; Pan, Dan-Feng; Zhou, Hao; Xu, Guo-Min; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3/(La0.67Ca0.33)MnO3 heterostructure film is deposited on the Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si wafer. The dominant transport is the inelastic hopping conduction. Due to the interaction between ferroelectric domain and magnetic polaron, film still exhibits weak ferromagnetism above the Curie temperature. Under lower bias voltage, the non-zero sequential magnetoresistance occurs on the magnetic granular junction. As soon as bias voltage exceeds the coercive voltage, the ferroelectric domain is aligned, consequently the magnetoresistance tends to vanish. Such electric switch of magnetoresistance is potential for the electric-write magnetic-read storage device.

  4. Co/Nb/Co trilayers as efficient cryogenic spin valves and supercurrent switches: the relevance to the standard giant and tunnel magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.; Lagogiannis, A.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, Ferromagnetic/Superconducting/Ferromagnetic trilayers (FM/SC/FM TLs) are intensively studied. Here, based on (CoO-)Co/Nb/Co TLs of thin Nb interlayer (below 30 nm) we introduce two classes of low-T c SC-based cryogenic devices, depending on the thickness of the Co outer layers and the presence of a CoO underlayer. An extended range of Co thickness (from 10 to 80 nm) was investigated and an underlayer of CoO was selectively employed, practically aiming to control in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization processes through utilization of shape anisotropy and exchange bias. To this effect magnetic force microscopy, magnetization and magnetoresistance data are presented. Ancillary atomic force microscopy and Rutherford back scattering data are presented, as well. CoO-Co/Nb/Co TLs of the first class have thin Co outer layers (10-30 nm) and are further assisted by the presence of a CoO underlayer to behave as efficient spin valves (ΔR/Rnor = 1.5% and ΔR/Rmin = 2.4%) under the action of the FMs in-plane exchange fields; the effect is termed superconducting Spin-Valve Effect (sSVE). Co/Nb/Co TLs of the second class have thick Co outer layers (50-80 nm) and without the need of a CoO underlayer act as almost absolute supercurrent switches (ΔR/Rnor = 97.7% and ΔR/Rmin = 28000%) under the action of FMs out-of-plane stray fields; the effect is termed superconducting Magneto-Resistance Effect (sMRE). The properties of these (CoO-)Co/Nb/Co TLs resemble the behavior of standard FM/normal-metal/FM and FM/insulator/FM TLs that exhibit the effects giant (GMR) and tunnel (TMR) magnetoresistance, respectively. Aiming to utilize the FM/SC/FM TLs studied here into cryogenic applications we thoroughly surveyed their operational H-T phase diagram and discuss how can be used to realize binary (‘0’-‘1’) elemental devices for information management in both read heads and memory units. The underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the sSVE and sMRE observed in the two

  5. Two-jump magnetic switching in ultrathin Co(0 0 1) films probed by giant magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Bland, J. A. C.

    2006-12-01

    Ultrathin epitaxial FCC-Co films, which form part of a spin-valve structure, were found to undergo one- or two-jump magnetic switching, in GMR and MOKE measurements depending upon the field orientation. The transitions are mediated by the propagation of 180° or 90° domain walls. The Co two-jump spin switching in the spin-valve structure has contributed to the formation of three stable GMR states: parallel, antiparallel and a new intermediate state.

  6. Joule heating-induced coexisted spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance in the platinum/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Wang, S. H.; Zou, L. K.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, J. R. E-mail: sun-zg@whut.edu.cn; Sun, Z. G.

    2014-11-03

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) are observed simultaneously in the Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} hybrid structure when thermal gradient is produced by Joule heating. According to their dependences on applied current, these two effects can be separated. Their dependence on heating power and magnetic field is systematically studied. With the increase of heating power, the SSE enhances linearly, whereas the SMR decreases slowly. The origin of the spin currents is further analyzed. The heating power dependences of the spin currents associated with the SSE and the SMR are found to be different.

  7. Wax-actuated heat switch for Mars surface applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunada, Eric; Lankford, Kurt; Pauken, Mike; Novak, Keith S.; Birur, Gajanana

    2002-01-01

    Missions to the surface of Mars pose unique thermal control challenges to rover and lander systems. With diurnal temperature changes greater than 100 °C, the presence of a Mars atmosphere, and limited power for night time heating the thermal control engineer is faced with a fundamental problem: how to successfully keep components above their survival or operating temperatures at night while managing higher environmental temperatures and dissipation rates during the day. Payload and avionics elements, among others, must be well insulated to survive night conditions at the risk of overheating during the day. This problem will be magnified in future missions as higher demand on electrical components will result in increased dissipations. One solution is a heat switch that changes thermal conductance to reject excess heat during the day and conserve heat during the night. .

  8. Design and Test of Passively Operated Heat Switches for 0.2 to 15 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; Francis, J. J.; Tuttle, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Heat switches have many uses in cryogenics, from regulating heat flow between refrigeration stages to thermally isolating components once they have cooled to low temperature. Among the techniques one can use for thermal switching, the gas-gap technique has the advantages of wide operating temperature range, high switching ratio, and no moving parts. The traditional gas-gap switch uses copper conductors separated by a small gap and an external getter. The switch is activated by heating and cooling the getter by moving gas into and out of the gap, turning the switch on and off. We have designed, built and tested heat switches that use an internal getter to passively turn off at temperatures between 0.2 and 15 K. The getter is thermally anchored to one side of the switch, and when that side of the switch cools through a transition region, gas adsorbs onto the getter and the switch turns off. The challenges are to make the transition region very narrow and tailorable to a wide range of applications, and to achieve high gas conductance when the switch is on. We have made switches using He-3, He-4, hydrogen, and neon gas, and have used charcoal and various metal substrates as getters. Switching ratios range from 1000 to over 10,000. Design and performance of these switches will be discussed in detail.

  9. Magnetization reversal in individual Py and CoFeB nanotubes locally probed via anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertl, K.; Heimbach, F.; Maendl, S.; Rueffer, D.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.

    2016-03-01

    Using anisotropic magnetoresistance in a multi-probe configuration and local heating with a scanning laser, we investigate the magnetization reversal of individual permalloy (Py) and CoFeB nanotubes with spatial resolution. Nanocrystalline Py and amorphous CoFeB nanotubes are found to reverse via domain wall movement and chirality switching, respectively. Our experiments provide an understanding of the role of microstructure and magnetic anisotropy in the switching of ferromagnetic nanotubes at room temperature.

  10. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D.

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  11. Quick-Response Thermal Actuator for Use as a Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan

    2010-01-01

    This work improves the performance of a heat switch, or a thermal actuator, by delivering heat to the actuator in a more efficient manner. The method uses a heat pipe as the plunger or plug instead of just using a solid piece of metal. The heat pipe could be one tailored for fast transient thermal response.

  12. Quantum magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Abrikosov, A.A.

    1998-08-01

    An explanation is proposed of the unusual magnetoresistance, linear in magnetic field and positive, observed recently in nonstoichiometric silver chalcogenides. The idea is based on the assumption that these substances are basically gapless semiconductors with a linear energy spectrum. Most of the excess silver atoms form metallic clusters which are doping the remaining material to a very small carrier concentration, so that even in a magnetic field as low as 10 Oe, only one Landau band participates in the conductivity. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Development of Superconducting Magnetic Heat Switches for an Ideal Integrating Bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. C.; Canavan, E.; De Alba, R.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing an ideal integrating bolometer (IIB), a novel detector for far-infrared applications. An IIB consists of a dissipationless temperature sensor weakly coupled to a thermal bath through a heat switch. If the heat switch's thermal conductance in the "off" state is much smaller than its conductance in the "on" state, the thermometer temperature will depend linearly on integrated incident power, until the bolometer temperature is reset by changing the conductance to the "on" state. A key component of an IIB is the heat switch, the subject of this paper. We have fabricated and tested prototype IIB devices designed to demonstrate a superconducting magnetic heat switch on both solid substrates and membranes. In this work, we will present details on the design, fabrication, and experimental performance of our prototype IIB devices.

  14. Assessment of Zr-Fe-V getter alloy for gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prina, M.; Kulleck, J. G.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A commercial Zr-V-Fe alloy (i.e., SAES Getters trade name alloy St-172) has been assessed as reversible hydrogen storage material for use in actuators of gas gap heat switches. Two prototype actuators containing the SAES St-172 material were built and operated for several thousand cycles to evaluate performance of the metal hydride system under conditions simulating heat switch operation.

  15. MW-scale ICRF plasma heating using IGBT switches in a multi-pulse scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Kogan, K.; Seemann, O.

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state silicon switches are cheap and reliable option for 1-10 MHz RF power sources, required for plasma ion cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). The large `on' resistance of MOSFET and similar devices limits their power delivery to a few tens of kW per switch. Low resistivity devices, such as IGBT, suffer from large `off' switching time, which limits their useful frequency range and increases the power dissipated in the switch. Here we demonstrate more than 0.8 MW circulated RF power at 2 MHz using only three high voltage IGBT switches. The circuit uses the fast `on' switching capability of the IGBTs to generate high-Q pulse train. This operation mode also simplifies the measurement of RF coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  16. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krielaart, M. A. R.; Vermeer, C. H.; Vanapalli, S.

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K.

  17. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Krielaart, M A R; Vermeer, C H; Vanapalli, S

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K. PMID:26628181

  18. Low-power, fast-response active gas-gap heat switches for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore T.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.

    2015-12-01

    Heat switches are critical to many low temperature applications, where control of heat flow and selective thermal isolation are required. Their designs tend to be driven by the need for the lowest possible off-state conductance, while meeting requirements for on-state conduction. As a result, heat switches tend to be designed as close as possible to the limits of material strength and machinability, using materials that have the lowest thermal conductivity to strength ratio. In addition, switching speed is important for many applications, and many designs and switch types require a compromise between the power used for actuation and on/off transition times. We present a design for an active gas-gap heat switch, developed for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Japanese Astro-H mission, that requires less than 0.5 mW of power to operate, has on/off transition times of < 1 minute, and that achieves a conductance of > 50 mW/K at 1 K with a heat leak of < 0.5 μW from 1 K to very low temperature. Details of the design and performance will be presented.

  19. Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin-Transfer-Torque Switching in Polycrystalline Co2FeAl Full-Heusler-Alloy Magnetic Tunnel Junctions on Amorphous Si /SiO2 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhenchao; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Kasai, Shinya; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    We study polycrystalline B2-type Co2FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler-alloy-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) fabricated on a Si /SiO2 amorphous substrate. Polycrystalline CFA films with a (001) orientation, a high B2 ordering, and a flat surface are achieved by using a MgO buffer layer. A tunnel magnetoresistance ratio up to 175% is obtained for a MTJ with a CFA /MgO/CoFe structure on a 7.5-nm-thick MgO buffer. Spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetization switching is achieved in the MTJs with a 2-nm-thick polycrystalline CFA film as a switching layer. By using a thermal activation model, the intrinsic critical current density (Jc0) is determined to be 8.2×106 A /cm2, which is lower than 2.9×107 A /cm2, the value for epitaxial CFA MTJs [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 182403 (2012), 10.1063/1.4710521]. We find that the Gilbert damping constant (α) evaluated by using ferromagnetic resonance measurements for the polycrystalline CFA film is approximately 0.015 and is almost independent of the CFA thickness (2-18 nm). The low Jc0 for the polycrystalline MTJ is mainly attributed to the low α of the CFA layer compared with the value in the epitaxial one (approximately 0.04).

  20. Giant Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Wen, Z. C.; Wei, H. X.; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the Coulomb blockade voltage can be made to depend strongly on the electron spin in a thin magnetic granular layer inserted in the middle of an insulating layer of a tunnel junction. This strong spin dependence is predicted from the spin-dependent inter-granular conductance through any of the following effects within the granular layer, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), or GMR through a polymer spacer. The resulting Coulomb blockade magnetoresistance (CBMR) ratio can exceed the magnetoresistance ratio of the granular layer itself by orders of magnitude. Unlike other magenetoresistance effects, the CBMR effect does not require magnetic electrodes.

  1. Passive Gas-Gap Heat Switches for Use in Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; DiPirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Panek, J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a gas gap heat switch that works passively, without the need for a separate, thermally activated getter. This switch uses He-3 condensed as a thin film on alternating plates of copper. The switch is thermally conductive at temperatures above about 0.2 K, and is insulating if either end of the switch is below about 0.15 K. The "on" conductance (7 mW/K at 0.25K) is limited by the surface area and gap between the copper leaves, the saturated vapor pressure of the He-3, and the Kapitza boundary resistance between the He-3 and the copper. The "off" conductance is determined by the helium containment shell which physically supports the two conductive ends. We have also designed and are building passive gas gap heat switches which will passively turn off near 1 K and 4 K. For these switches we rely on the rapidly changing vapor pressure of He-4 above neon or copper substrates, respectively, when the coverage is less than one monolayer. The different binding energies of the He-4 to the neon or copper give rise to the different temperatures where the switches transition between the on and off states.

  2. Methane cryogenic heat pipe for space use with a liquid trap for on-off switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Israel; Bugby, David

    2012-06-01

    A methane cryogenic heat pipe with a liquid trap for on-off actuation was developed by ATK for use on Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Space Interferometer Mission Lite (SIM Lite) pre-Phase A hardware technology demonstration tests. The cryogenic heat pipe coupled to a cold radiator at 160K provides cooling to the Charged Coupled Device camera focal planes. The heat pipe was designed for a transport capacity of 15 W across a 1.5 m span through a near room-temperature spacecraft environment. A key and driving requirement for the heat pipe was the need for switching the heat pipe on and off needed to support low power decontamination cycles to near room temperature of the cryogenic focal planes. The cryogenic heat pipe is turned off by removing the methane working fluid from the heat pipe and storing in the liquid trap. The heat pipe is turned-on by simply reintroducing the working fluid from the liquid trap. This on-off switching capability is a key requirement for cryogenic heat pipes used with passive or active cryocoolers for cooling focal planes or optics. This switching capability provides a means to decouple a cold focal plane or optics from a redundant stand-by cryocooler or a passive cooler when in need for a decontamination cycle.

  3. Comparison of specific heat and magneto-resistance measurements in the same SmFeAsO1-xFx crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeski, Stanislaw; Moll, Philip; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Batlogg, Bertram; Physics of New Materials Team

    2014-03-01

    We have performed resistivity and specific heat measurements in the same sub-microgram single crystals of an iron-based superconductor SmFeAsO1-xFx (Tc ~ 50K). This allowed for the first direct comparison of Hc2 curves from thermodynamic measurements with estimates from the magneto-resistance at commonly used criteria (10, 50, 90% ϱN) . A criterion of 40-50% ϱN well describes Hc2(T) for both in and out of plane fields. We attribute the low field dependence of the criterion to filamentary superconductivity. The challenging heat capacity measurement on microscopic crystals (50 μm in diameter, 10 μm thick) was done using a commercially available gas-nanocalorimeter. The thermodynamic data was in good agreement with previous experiments performed on crystals from the same batch by other groups. Hc2 slopes of 1.6 T/K for fields parallel to the c-axis and 12.3 T/K in the ab-plane were found yielding a ξ anisotropy γ ~ 7. This demonstrates that our experimental technique is both relatively fast to set up and furthermore reliable in fields up to 6T.

  4. Building a Thinner Gap in a Gas-Gap Heat Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, J.; Galinhas, B.; Sousa, P. Borges de; Martins, D.; Catarino, I.; Bonfait, G.

    A gas-gap heat switch (GGHS) reaches its highest conductance state when the gap between two exchange surfaces is filled with a conducting gas in a viscous regime. The broader the surface and the thinner the gap, the higher the ON conductance achieved. In this paper we describe a very thin cold gas-gap heat switchreached upon the use of the differential thermal expansion of the construction materials. Such technique overcomes the intricacies of the manufacturing process of the switch. We designed built and tested a prototype of a very thin gap heat switch using our new methodology. The high conductance was measured with both helium and nitrogen, at temperatures ranging from 20 K (He) or 75 K (N2) up to room temperature. The inferred gap opening at low temperature (≈ 17 μm) has shown to be slightly above the expected, which allowed us to reinterpret the design calculations. The switch was also characterized along its extreme conductance states while using a sorption pump, and its performance was compared with a previously developed model. Lessons learned from the first prototype led us to build a second one with better performance. Our experiments suggest that the proposed design allows for the development of a customized cryogenic switch with improved ON conductance while keeping the assembly very simple and sturdy, hence widening the scope of applicability of these devices.

  5. Modeling of heat transfer effects in ferroelectric domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang J.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper we study on the effects of heat generated from a moving domain boundary during polarization reversals in ferroelectrics. According to the one-dimensional model of ferroelectrics proposed by Kim (1999), there are two heat sources associated with a moving domain boundary: one is from dissipation mechanism on the domain boundary and the other from the entropy difference between two variants across the domain boundary. In order to investigate the effects of heat generation and transfer during polarization reversals we utilize the finite difference algorithm shown in Kim and Abeyaratne (1995). The results of calculation show that it is possible for the specimen temperature to reach as high temperatures as observed in experiments.

  6. High speed magneto-resistive random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high speed read MRAM memory element is configured from a sandwich of magnetizable, ferromagnetic film surrounding a magneto-resistive film which may be ferromagnetic or not. One outer ferromagnetic film has a higher coercive force than the other and therefore remains magnetized in one sense while the other may be switched in sense by a switching magnetic field. The magneto-resistive film is therefore sensitive to the amplitude of the resultant field between the outer ferromagnetic films and may be constructed of a high resistivity, high magneto-resistive material capable of higher sensing currents. This permits higher read voltages and therefore faster read operations. Alternate embodiments with perpendicular anisotropy, and in-plane anisotropy are shown, including an embodiment which uses high permeability guides to direct the closing flux path through the magneto-resistive material. High density, high speed, radiation hard, memory matrices may be constructed from these memory elements.

  7. Operation of an ADR using helium exchange gas as a substitute for a failed heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 × 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  8. Operation of an ADR Using Helium Exchange Gas as a Substitute for a Failed Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  9. Heating power lowering by downscaling the cell dimensions in nanoscale filamentary resistive switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qiaonan; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Xu, Bo; Yin, Jiang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate the size dependence of the heat process in thermochemical filamentary resistive switching memories of crossbar structure. The equivalent heat resistance of the system increases with the device dimensions scaled down because of the size-dependent electric and thermal conductivity and geometry configurations. The higher equivalent heat resistance by diminishing the cell sizes induces an enhanced self-heating effect of the filament. It promises lower operation voltage and heating power to trigger the thermally activated dissolution of the filament in RESET process. These results strengthen the advantage of filamentary memories in lateral and longitudinal scaling down technologies where less power consumption has long been urged. Our results also show the opposite dependence of the driven electric field on the linewidth and thickness of the device.

  10. Design and development of a shape memory alloy activated heat pipe-based thermal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Notardonato, W. U.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-10-01

    This work reports on the design, fabrication and testing of a thermal switch wherein the open and closed states were actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) elements while heat was transferred by a two-phase heat pipe. The motivation for such a switch comes from NASA’s need for thermal management in advanced spaceport applications associated with future lunar and Mars missions. As the temperature can approximately vary between -233 and 127 ° C during lunar day/night cycles, the switch was designed to reject heat from a cryogen tank into space during the night cycle while providing thermal isolation during the day cycle. A Ni47.1Ti49.6Fe3.3 (at.%) alloy that exhibited a reversible phase transformation between a trigonal R-phase and a cubic austenite phase was used as the sensing and actuating elements. Thermomechanical actuation, accomplished through an antagonistic spring system, resulted in strokes up to 7 mm against bias forces of up to 45 N. The actuation system was tested for more than thirty cycles, equivalent to one year of operation. The thermal performance, accomplished via a variable length, closed two-phase heat pipe, was evaluated, resulting in heat transfer rates of 13 W using pentane and 10 W using R-134a as working fluids. Experimental data were also compared to theoretical predictions where possible. Direct comparisons between different design approaches of SMA helical actuators, highlighting the effects of the helix angle, were carried out to give a layout of more accurate design methodologies.

  11. A (He-3)-gap heat switch for use below 2 K in zero g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Helvensteijn, Ben P. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have designed and tested a compact heat switch that has a simple design and a very large ON/OFF ratio. The design uses concentric cylinders of copper that can be fabricated with higher precision and with thinner web thickness than other designs. It is assembled with a technique that carefully controls the narrow gap between adjacent segments. These features allow a very large surface area for conduction to be fitted into a small volume. The conduction medium is liquid or gaseous He-3, which is put into or taken out of the switch by a small nearby charcoal pump in order to avoid an external mechanical pump and a long pump line. Measurements of its performance down to 1 K show an ON/OFF conduction ratio of about 4000.

  12. A He-3-gap heat switch for use below 2 K in zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Helvensteijn, Ben P. M.

    1991-01-01

    We have designed and tested a compact heat switch that has a simple design and a very large ON/OFF ratio. The design uses concentric cylinders of copper that can be fabricated with higher precision and with thinner web thickness than other designs. It is assembled with a technique that carefully controls the narrow gap between adjacent segments. These features allow a very large surface area for conduction to be fitted into a small volume. The conduction medium is liquid or gaseous He-3 which is put into or taken out of the switch by a small nearby charcoal pump in order to avoid an external mechanical pump and a long pump line. Measurements of its performance down to 1 K show an ON/OFF conduction ratio of about 4000.

  13. Magnetization reversal in permalloy ferromagnetic nanowires investigated with magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. B.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2008-07-01

    The magnetization reversal process in single Permalloy (Ni81Fe19) nanowires has been investigated by magnetoresistance measurements as a function of the angle between the applied field and the wire direction. The Permalloy nanostructures fabricated on an ultrathin film by atomic force microscopy consist of two large rectangular pads connected by a nanowire with the shape of a long thin narrow tape. For each field direction in the plane of the film the dependence of the magnetoresistance on the field value exhibits two main contributions: one from the pads and one from the nanowire. The contribution from the pads is due to a usual anisotropic magnetoresistance characteristic of coherent magnetization rotation, whereas the contribution from the nanowire is an abrupt transition at the switching field. The dependence of the switching field on the in-plane field angle is quantitatively described by a model of nucleation field with the buckling magnetization rotation mode.

  14. Magnetoresistive system with concentric ferromagnetic asymmetric nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, J. I. Tumelero, M. A.; Pasa, A. A.; Viegas, A. D. C.

    2015-03-14

    A structure consisting of two concentric asymmetric nanorings, each displaying vortex remanent states, is studied with micromagnetic calculations. By orienting in suitable directions, both the asymmetry of the rings and a uniform magnetic field, the vortices chiralities can be switched from parallel to antiparallel, obtaining in this way the analogue of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations found in bar magnets pairs. Conditions on the thickness of single rings to obtain vortex states, as well as formulas for their remanent magnetization are given. The concentric ring structure enables the creation of magnetoresistive systems comprising the qualities of magnetic nanorings, such as low stray fields and high stability. A possible application is as contacts in spin injection in semiconductors, and estimations obtained here of magnetoresistance change for a cylindrical spin injection based device show significant variations comparable to linear geometries.

  15. Influence of local anisotropic magnetoresistance on the total magnetoresistance of mesoscopic NiFe rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntinx, Dieter; Volodin, Alexander; van Haesendonck, Chris

    2004-12-01

    The magnetoresistance of mesoscopic NiFe rings is studied by low temperature magnetotransport measurements and numerical simulations. In order not to disturb the magnetic states in the electrical transport measurements, nonmagnetic gold wires are attached to individual rings. The simulations compute the change in resistance that is caused by the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect and are based on a combination of magnetostatics for the magnetic domain configuration and electrostatics for the current distribution. Measurements as well as simulations reveal the presence of two stable “onion” states at remanence and a stable “vortex” state near the switching fields. Moreover, a quantitative comparison between experiment and simulation is possible without the use of any free fitting parameters. Apart from the AMR effect, no additional domain wall resistance has to be introduced for the onion state. In the switching region, experiment and simulation reveal the presence of a “stressed vortex” configuration which plays a key role in the quantitative description of the magnetoresistance. The switching behavior of the NiFe rings can be modified by introducing a wedge shaped notch at the expected position of one of the domain walls in the onion state of the rings.

  16. Heat switch effect in an antiferromagnetic insulator Co3V2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Wu, J. C.; Zhao, Z. Y.; He, Z. Z.; Song, J. D.; Zhao, J. Y.; Liu, X. G.; Sun, X. F.; Li, X. G.

    2016-06-01

    We report a heat switch effect in single crystals of an antiferromagnet Co3V2O8, that is, the thermal conductivity (κ) can be changed with magnetic field in an extremely large scale. Due to successive magnetic phase transitions at 12-6 K, the zero-field κ(T ) displays a deep minimum at 6.7 K and rather small magnitude at low temperatures. Both the temperature and field dependencies of κ demonstrate that the phonons are strongly scattered at the regime of magnetic phase transitions. Magnetic field can suppress magnetic scattering effect and significantly recover the phonon thermal conductivity. In particular, a 14 T field along the a axis increases the κ at 7.5 K up to 100 times. For H ∥c , the magnitude of κ can be suppressed down to ˜8% at some field-induced transition and can be enhanced up to 20 times at 14 T. The present results demonstrate that it is possible to design a kind of heat switch in the family of magnetic materials.

  17. Thermal analysis of an indirectly heat pulsed non-volatile phase change material microwave switch

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Robert M. El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Borodulin, Pavel; Wagner, Brian P.; King, Matthew R.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Lee, Michael J.

    2014-08-07

    We show the finite element simulation of the melt/quench process in a phase change material (GeTe, germanium telluride) used for a radio frequency switch. The device is thermally activated by an independent NiCrSi (nickel chrome silicon) thin film heating element beneath a dielectric separating it electrically from the phase change layer. A comparison is made between the predicted and experimental minimum power to amorphize (MPA) for various thermal pulse powers and pulse time lengths. By including both the specific heat and latent heat of fusion for GeTe, we find that the MPA and the minimum power to crystallize follow the form of a hyperbola on the power time effect plot. We also find that the simulated time at which the entire center GeTe layer achieves melting accurately matches the MPA curve for pulse durations ranging from 75–1500 ns and pulse powers from 1.6–4 W.

  18. Use of Hydroxyapatite Doping to Enhance Responsiveness of Heat-Inducible Gene Switches to Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fabiilli, Mario L; Phanse, Rahul A; Moncion, Alexander; Fowlkes, J Brian; Franceschi, Renny T

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that ultrasound-based hyperthermia can activate cells containing a heat-activated and ligand-inducible gene switch in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. These engineered cells can be incorporated into hydrogel scaffolds (e.g., fibrin) for in vivo implantation, where ultrasound can be used to non-invasively pattern transgene expression. Due to their high water content, the acoustic attenuation of fibrin scaffolds is low. Thus, long ultrasound exposures and high acoustic intensities are needed to generate sufficient hyperthermia for gene activation. Here, we demonstrate that the attenuation of fibrin scaffolds and the resulting hyperthermia achievable with ultrasound can be increased significantly by doping the fibrin with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder. The attenuation of a 1% (w/v) fibrin scaffold with 5% (w/v) HA was similar to soft tissue. Transgene activation of cells harboring the gene switch occurred at lower acoustic intensities and shorter exposures when the cells were encapsulated in HA-doped fibrin scaffolds versus undoped scaffolds. Inclusion of HA in the fibrin scaffold did not affect the viability of the encapsulated cells. PMID:26712417

  19. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  20. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  1. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  2. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  3. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  4. Low-current-density spin-transfer switching in Gd{sub 22}Fe{sub 78}-MgO magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Kinjo, Hidekazu Machida, Kenji; Aoshima, Ken-ichi; Kato, Daisuke; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Matsui, Koichi

    2014-05-28

    Magnetization switching of a relatively thick (9 nm) Gd-Fe free layer was achieved with a low spin injection current density of 1.0 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} using MgO based magnetic tunnel junction devices, fabricated for light modulators. At about 560 × 560 nm{sup 2} in size, the devices exhibited a tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of 7%. This low-current switching is mainly attributed to thermally assisted spin-transfer switching in consequence of its thermal magnetic behavior arising from Joule heating.

  5. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent ‘on’ and ‘off’, thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  6. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers

    PubMed Central

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent ‘on’ and ‘off’, thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis. PMID:26306543

  7. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers.

    PubMed

    Stamopoulos, D; Aristomenopoulou, E

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent 'on' and 'off', thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis. PMID:26306543

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy for laterally resolved measurements of magnetoresistance through a point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlström, Erik; Bručas, Rimantas; Hanson, Maj

    2006-03-01

    Using a scanning tunneling microscope for point contact measurements, we obtained laterally resolved information of the magnetoresistive properties of nanostructured spin-valve elements. A good correlation is found between magnetization and magnetoresistance curves of single-domain elliptical elements (450nm by 150nm), for magnetic fields applied along their long and short axes. In ring-shaped elements (inner and outer diameters 1.8 and 2.2μm), different magnetoresistance curves are acquired as different points around the ring are probed. The observed switching can be related to the onion state of the rings, and it clearly demonstrates a lateral resolution ⩽100nm.

  9. Gas gap heat switch for a cryogen-free magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, J.; Borges de Sousa, P.; Martins, D.; Kar, S.; Bonfait, G.; Catarino, I.

    2015-12-01

    Cryogen-free superconducting magnet systems (CFMS) have become popular over the last two decades for the simple reason that the use of liquid helium is rather cumbersome and that helium is a scarce resource. Some available CFMS use a mechanical cryocooler as the magnet's cold source. However, the variable temperature insert (VTI) for some existing CFMS are not strictly cryogen-free as they are still based on helium gas circulation through the sample space. We designed a prototype of a gas gap heat switch (GGHS) that allows a thermal management of a completely cryogen-free magnet system, with no helium losses. The idea relies on a parallel cooling path to a variable temperature insert (VTI) of a magnetic properties measurement system under development at Inter-University Accelerator Centre. A Gifford-McMahon cryocooler (1.5 W @ 4.2 K) would serve primarily as the cold source of the superconducting magnet, dedicating 1 W to this cooling, under quite conservative safety factors. The remaining cooling power (0.5 W) is to be diverted towards a VTI through a controlled GGHS that was designed and built with a 80 μm gap width. The built GGHS thermal performance was measured at 4 K, using helium as the exchange gas, and its conductance is compared both with a previously developed analytical model and a finite element method. Lessons learned lead to a new and more functional prototype yet to be reported.

  10. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer in a switched reluctance generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, Marvin Eugene, Jr.

    This research is an experimental investigation of the convective film coefficients on the unique pole faces of a high speed rotor operating within a generator. The specific geometry studied is that of a switched reluctance generator under development by the United States Air Force for use on jet aircraft as an integrated power unit (IPU) to provide auxiliary and emergency power to the aircraft's electrical system. The generator consists of a four pole rotor, nominally 4.30 inches in diameter, housed within a stator assembly. The clearance gap between the rotor pole tip and the stator wall is nominally 0.020 inches. The rotor is designed to rotate at 55,000 rpm. Rotor cooling is achieved by convection to air flowing axially through the rotor cavities. The convective film coefficient for each unique pole face, as well as an overall film coefficient for the four pole faces are inferred from the rate at which insulated test rates cool when subjected to various rates of rotor rotational speed and axial airflows. The high velocity of the rotor tips in close proximity to the stator wall results in aerodynamic heating of the air in the gap region. Convective film coefficients associated with high speed flow must be referenced to the adiabatic wall temperature to account for the effects of viscous heating. An estimate of the adiabatic wall temperature in the rotor gap region is developed analytically starting with the fundamental case of high-speed, wall-driven flow. These analytical results for wall-driven flow are verified experimentally using a smooth poled rotor. The analytically predicted film coefficients are within 10% of the experimental results. Experiments are conducted for rotor speeds ranging from 5,000 to 30,000 rpm and axial airflows ranging from 0.036 to 0.073 kg/s (0.08 to 0.16 lbm/s). The convective film coefficients for each pole face as well as average values representing heat loss from the combined faces are presented in terms of Stanton and Nusselt

  11. Magnetoresistive chip cytometer.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, J; Andrade, P Z; Cardoso, S; da Silva, C L; Cabral, J M; Freitas, P P

    2011-07-01

    Although conventional state-of-the-art flow cytometry systems provide rapid and reliable analytical capacities, they are bulky, expensive and complex. To overcome these drawbacks modern flow cytometers have been developed with enhanced portability for on-site measurements. Unlike external fluorescent/optical detectors, magnetoresistive sensors are micro-fabricated, can be integrated within microfluidic channels, and can detect magnetically labelled cells. This work describes the real-time detection of single magnetically labelled cells with a magnetoresistive based cell cytometer. For Kg1-a cells magnetically labelled with 50 nm CD34 microbeads (Milteny) flowing through a 150 μm wide, 14 μm high microchannel, with speeds around 1 cm s(-1), bipolar signals with an average amplitude of 10-20 μV were observed corresponding to cell events. The number of cells counted by the spin valve cytometer has been compared with that obtained with a hemocytometer. Both methods agree within the respective error bars. PMID:21562656

  12. Support of NASA ADR/ Cross-Enterprise NRA Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10K to 50mK, Development of a Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical heat switches are used in conjunction with sorption refrigerators, adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators and for other cryogenic tasks including the pre-cooling cryogenic systems. They use a mechanical actuator which closes Au plated Cu jaws on an Au plated Cu bar. The thermal conductance in the closed position is essentially independent of the area of the jaws and proportional to the force applied. It varies linearly with T. It is approximately 10mW/K for 200 N at 1.5K. In some applications, the heat switch can be driven from outside the cryostat by a rotating rod and a screw. Such heat switches are available commercially from several sources. In other applications, including systems for space, it is desirable to drive the switch using a cold linear motor, or solenoid. Superconducting windings are used at temperatures s 4.2K to minimize power dissipation, but are not appropriate for pre-cooling a system at higher temperatures. This project was intended to improve the design of solenoid activated mechanical heat switches and to provide such switches as required to support the development of Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10 K to 50 mK at GSFC. By the time funding began in 5/1/01, the immediate need for mechanical heat switches at GSFC had subsided but, at the same time, the opportunity had arisen to improve the design of mechanical heat switching by incorporating a "latching solenoid". In this device, the solenoid current is required only for changing the state of the switch and not during the whole time that the switch is closed.

  13. Voltage-controlled oxide barriers in organic/hybrid spin valves based on tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünewald, M.; Homonnay, N.; Kleinlein, J.; Schmidt, G.

    2014-11-01

    Resistive switching, i.e., the remanent (reversible) change of a device's resistance, is a widely investigated phenomenon as it holds the prospect for realizing high density memory devices. Resistive switching has also been observed in organic semiconductors; however, a clear understanding of the underlying physics could not yet be obtained. Possible options are for example interface effects at the electrodes or the formation and destruction of filaments. Here we present resistive switching in an organic spin valve based on tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. Similar to experiments in conventional spin-valve devices with two ferromagnetic electrodes we observe a modulation of the magnetoresistance by the electrical switching. However, as the magnetoresistance effect's origin is unambiguously clear, which is not always the case for effects in conventional structures, it can be exploited to prove that a tunnel barrier exists at the interface between the ferromagnetic oxide electrode and the organic semiconductor. Furthermore our experiments reveal that this barrier is reversibly modified during the switching, which causes both the change in magnetoresistance and total device resistance. Quantitative analysis indicates that the barrier is situated in the oxide layer. A phenomenological model provides a full description of the microscopic processes involved in the resistive switching.

  14. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  15. Anomalous oscillatory magnetoresistance in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Dean, Charles L.; Ivlev, Boris I.

    2016-08-01

    We report oscillatory magnetoresistance in various superconducting films, with a magnetic-field period Δ B ˜0.1 T that is essentially independent of sample dimensions, temperature, transport current, and the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic field, including magnetic fields oriented parallel to the film plane. The characteristics of these oscillations seem hard to reconcile with previously established mechanisms for oscillations in magnetoresistance, suggesting the possibility of another type of physical origin.

  16. Evaluation of Magnetoresistive RAM for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is a non-volatile memory that exploits electronic spin, rather than charge, to store data. Instead of moving charge on and off a floating gate to alter the threshold voltage of a CMOS transistor (creating different bit states), MRAM uses magnetic fields to flip the polarization of a ferromagnetic material thus switching its resistance and bit state. These polarized states are immune to radiation-induced upset, thus making MRAM very attractive for space application. These magnetic memory elements also have infinite data retention and erase/program endurance. Presented here are results of reliability testing of two space-qualified MRAM products from Aeroflex and Honeywell.

  17. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K.; Neto, Antonio H. Castro; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen–Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications. PMID:26388149

  18. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  19. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 2. Biomarkers of exposure.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) was conducted, and subjects' experience with the products was followed for 24 weeks. Differences in biomarkers of tobacco exposure between smokers and never smokers at baseline and among groups relative to each other and over time were assessed. Results indicated reduced exposure to many potentially harmful constituents found in cigarette smoke following product switching. Findings support differences in exposure from the use of various tobacco products and are relevant to the understanding of a risk continuum among tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26554277

  20. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 2. Biomarkers of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) was conducted, and subjects’ experience with the products was followed for 24 weeks. Differences in biomarkers of tobacco exposure between smokers and never smokers at baseline and among groups relative to each other and over time were assessed. Results indicated reduced exposure to many potentially harmful constituents found in cigarette smoke following product switching. Findings support differences in exposure from the use of various tobacco products and are relevant to the understanding of a risk continuum among tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26554277

  1. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance at La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, L. C.; Lombardo, A.; Ghidini, M.; Yan, W.; Kar-Narayan, S.; Hämäläinen, S. J.; Barbone, M.; Milana, S.; van Dijken, S.; Ferrari, A. C.; Mathur, N. D.

    2016-03-01

    Using ferromagnetic La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 electrodes bridged by single-layer graphene, we observe magnetoresistive changes of ˜32-35 MΩ at 5 K. Magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy at the same temperature reveals that the magnetoresistance arises from in-plane reorientations of electrode magnetization, evidencing tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance at the La0.67Sr0.33MnO3-graphene interfaces. Large resistance switching without spin transport through the non-magnetic channel could be attractive for graphene-based magnetic-sensing applications.

  2. Case studies of mental models in home heat control: searching for feedback, valve, timer and switch theories.

    PubMed

    Revell, Kirsten M A; Stanton, Neville A

    2014-05-01

    An intergroup case study was undertaken to determine if: 1) There exist distinct mental models of home heating function, that differ significantly from the actual functioning of UK heating systems; and 2) Mental models of thermostat function can be categorized according to Kempton's (1986) valve and feedback shared theories, and others from the literature. Distinct, inaccurate mental models of the heating system, as well as thermostat devices in isolation, were described. It was possible to categorise thermostat models by Kempton's (1986) feedback shared theory, but other theories proved ambiguous. Alternate control devices could be categorized by Timer (Norman, 2002) and Switch (Peffer et al., 2011) theories. The need to consider the mental models of the heating system in terms of an integrated set of control devices, and to consider user's goals and expectations of the system benefit, was highlighted. The value of discovering shared theories, and understanding user mental models, of home heating, are discussed with reference to their present day relevance for reducing energy consumption. PMID:23731626

  3. 360 degree domain walls monitored by anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Chunghee; Ross, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the electrical observation of the formation of a 360° magnetic domain wall (360DW) in an elliptical Co ring structure. Because the 360DW consists of two 180° domain walls, a decrease in resistance is observed in the switching process due to anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Certain AMR measurements exhibit an increase in the resistance in the switching process, indicating that a flux-closure vortex state is formed without first forming a 360DW state. The difference between the 360DW and vortex state in the switching process reflects differences in the DW depinning mechanism from the onion state. The minor loop of the AMR measurements is also dependent on the initial magnetic configuration between the 360DW and the vortex state.

  4. Magnetoresistive smart fluid (marsonpol) and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, John; Suresh, G.; Narayanadas, D. J.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetorheological fluid, Electrorheological fluid and ferro fluids are the smart fluids known today. These fluids are either electrically conductive or non conductive. They do not exhibit variable electrical resistance or switching behavior. Of recent interest to researchers has been the development of new types of magnetoresistive materials. Such materials can be of large practical importance, as they will change their electrical resistance in the presence of a magnetic field. However, most materials only exhibit appreciable magnetoresistance under extreme conditions, such as high magnetic fields or low temperatures. A smart fluid whose electrical resistance can be varied by several orders of magnitude under nominal level of magnetic field is reported in this paper (designated MARSONPOL). In the absence of a magnetic field the fluid is an insulator having electrical resistance in the order of 108 ohm-meter and in the presence of a magnetic field the resistance of the material reduces to less than 1 ohm-meter, at room temperature of 30°C. The sharp and reversible change in resistivity makes the material transform from an insulator to conductor, rendering properties characteristic of either state, within a fraction of a second. Fluids with such characteristics are not reported in the literature making this development a breakthrough and opening up potentials for the development of several smart devices. One such device is the magnetic field sensor probe currently under development at NPOL. A capsule of MARSONPOL forms the basic sensor element. Depending on the strength of the Magnetic field, the electrical resistivity of the capsule undergoes changes. The present paper will discuss details of the smart fluid as well as features of the magnetic field sensor.

  5. Photoinduced local heating in silica photonic crystals for fast and reversible switching.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2012-12-01

    Fast and reversible photonic-bandgap tunability is achieved in silica artificial opals by local heating. The effect is fully reversible as heat rapidly dissipates through the non-irradiated structure without active cooling and water is readsorbed. The performance is strongly enhanced by decreasing the photoirradiated opal volume, allowing bandgap shifts of 12 nm and response times of 20 ms. PMID:22976241

  6. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  7. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 1. Study design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study was conducted to assess potential improvement in health status measures, as well as changes in biomarkers of tobacco exposure and biomarkers of biological effect, in current adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) evaluated over 24 weeks. Study design, conduct and methodology are presented here along with subjects’ disposition, characteristics, compliance and safety results. This design and methodology, evaluating generally healthy adult smokers over a relatively short duration, proved feasible. Findings from this randomized study provide generalized knowledge of the risk continuum among various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525849

  8. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  9. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 1. Study design and methodology.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study was conducted to assess potential improvement in health status measures, as well as changes in biomarkers of tobacco exposure and biomarkers of biological effect, in current adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) evaluated over 24 weeks. Study design, conduct and methodology are presented here along with subjects' disposition, characteristics, compliance and safety results. This design and methodology, evaluating generally healthy adult smokers over a relatively short duration, proved feasible. Findings from this randomized study provide generalized knowledge of the risk continuum among various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525849

  10. Switch mode power supply for microwave heating based on the Boucherot effect.

    PubMed

    Georghiou, G E; Meredith, R; Metaxas, A C; Gurwicz, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new self-resonating switch-mode power-supply for driving CW magnetrons, based on the Boucherot effect. A detailed circuit analysis is given and its performance is evaluated for an 800 W/2450 MHz magnetron, whilst work at high power driving a magnetron up to 40 kW is reported. A comparison of the supply with the conventional power-supply used in microwave ovens is made and the principal features of the new design are found to be: low energy dissipation under short-circuit conditions, low ripple current and voltage waveforms that result in more precise control in the range 20-100% of rated power, high efficiencies and small size and weight. PMID:10687152

  11. Interference-induced thermoelectric switching and heat rectification in quantum Hall junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucci, Luca; Ronetti, Flavio; Dolcetto, Giacomo; Carrega, Matteo; Sassetti, Maura

    2015-08-01

    Interference represents one of the most striking manifestations of quantum physics in low-dimensional systems. Despite evidence of quantum interference in charge transport having been known for a long time, signatures of interference-induced thermal properties have been reported only recently, paving the way for the phase-coherent manipulation of heat in mesoscopic devices. In this work we show that anomalous thermoelectric properties and efficient heat rectification can be achieved by exploiting the phase-coherent edge states of quantum Hall systems. By considering a tunneling geometry with multiple quantum point contacts, we demonstrate that the interference paths effectively break the electron-hole symmetry, allowing for a thermoelectric charge current flowing either from hot to cold or vice versa, depending on the details of the tunnel junction. Correspondingly, an interference-induced heat current is predicted, and we are able to explain these results in terms of an intuitive physical picture. Moreover, we show that heat rectification can be achieved by coupling two quantum Hall systems with different filling factors, and that this effect can be enhanced by exploiting the interference properties of the tunnel junction.

  12. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  13. Giant magnetoresistance in nanogranular magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Beloborodov, I. S.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-05-01

    We study the giant magnetoresistance of nanogranular magnets in the presence of an external magnetic field and finite temperature. We show that the magnetization of arrays of nanogranular magnets has hysteretic behavior at low temperatures leading to a double peak in the magnetoresistance which coalesces at high temperatures into a single peak. We numerically calculate the magnetization of magnetic domains and the motion of domain walls in this system using a combined mean-field approach and a model for an elastic membrane moving in a random medium, respectively. From the obtained results, we calculate the electric resistivity as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Our findings show excellent agreement with various experimental data.

  14. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas H.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities ( σ M / σ S ); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio ( σ M / σ S ) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene

  15. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas; Kusmartsev, Feodor

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities (σ M/σ S); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio (σ M/σ S) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene) along

  16. Heat-Treatment-Induced Switching of Magnetic States in the Doped Polar Semiconductor Ge1-xMnxTe.

    PubMed

    Kriener, M; Nakajima, T; Kaneko, Y; Kikkawa, A; Yu, X Z; Endo, N; Kato, K; Takata, M; Arima, T; Tokura, Y; Taguchi, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) - is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures Tc of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum Tc ≈ 180 K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-Tc phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change-memory functionality. PMID:27160657

  17. Heat-Treatment-Induced Switching of Magnetic States in the Doped Polar Semiconductor Ge1‑xMnxTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriener, M.; Nakajima, T.; Kaneko, Y.; Kikkawa, A.; Yu, X. Z.; Endo, N.; Kato, K.; Takata, M.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) – is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures Tc of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum Tc ≈ 180 K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-Tc phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change-memory functionality.

  18. Heat-Treatment-Induced Switching of Magnetic States in the Doped Polar Semiconductor Ge1−xMnxTe

    PubMed Central

    Kriener, M.; Nakajima, T.; Kaneko, Y.; Kikkawa, A.; Yu, X. Z.; Endo, N.; Kato, K.; Takata, M.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) – is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures Tc of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum Tc ≈ 180 K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-Tc phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change-memory functionality. PMID:27160657

  19. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance State Space of Permalloy Nanowires with Domain Wall Pinning Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Corte-León, Héctor; Nabaei, Vahid; Manzin, Alessandra; Fletcher, Jonathan; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Schumacher, Hans W.; Kazakova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The domain wall-related change in the anisotropic magnetoresistance in L-shaped permalloy nanowires is measured as a function of the magnitude and orientation of the applied magnetic field. The magnetoresistance curves, compiled into so-called domain wall magnetoresistance state space maps, are used to identify highly reproducible transitions between domain states. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic modelling are correlated with the transport measurements of the devices in order to identify different magnetization states. Analysis allows to determine the optimal working parameters for specific devices, such as the minimal field required to switch magnetization or the most appropriate angle for maximal separation of the pinning/depinning fields. Moreover, the complete state space maps can be used to predict evolution of nanodevices in magnetic field without a need of additional electrical measurements and for repayable initialization of magnetic sensors into a well-specified state. PMID:25116470

  20. Surface plasmon enhanced heating of gold nanoparticles: A plasmonic optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip G.

    Recent work by Lereu et al. (Appl. Phys. Lett. Vol. 86, 154101, 2005) demonstrates a method of all-optical transfer of modulation signals using surface plasmon excitation on thin gold films. Localized heating of the film, resulting from surface plasmon decay, alter the optical properties of the device. A similar optical modulation method is now presented using gold nanoparticles. Computational models are used to generate realistic values of the thermo-optical response of gold and the thermal dynamics of a hot nanoparticle-substrate device. Differential pump-probe reflectivity measurements were perferomed and demonstrate modulation frequencies of upto 10kHz, an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the thin-film device. Sample fabrication techniques using physical vapor deposition and interference lithography, and heat transport on the nanoscale are also discussed.

  1. Magnetoresistive magnetometer for space science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Beek, T.; Carr, C.; O'Brien, H.; Cupido, E.; Oddy, T.; Horbury, T. S.

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of the in situ dc magnetic field on space science missions is most commonly achieved using instruments based on fluxgate sensors. Fluxgates are robust, reliable and have considerable space heritage; however, their mass and volume are not optimized for deployment on nano or picosats. We describe a new magnetometer design demonstrating science measurement capability featuring significantly lower mass, volume and to a lesser extent power than a typical fluxgate. The instrument employs a sensor based on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) achieving a noise floor of less than 50 pT Hz-1/2 above 1 Hz on a 5 V bridge bias. The instrument range is scalable up to ±50 000 nT and the three-axis sensor mass and volume are less than 10 g and 10 cm3, respectively. The ability to switch the polarization of the sensor's easy axis and apply magnetic feedback is used to build a driven first harmonic closed loop system featuring improved linearity, gain stability and compensation of the sensor offset. A number of potential geospace applications based on the initial instrument results are discussed including attitude control systems and scientific measurement of waves and structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. A flight version of the AMR magnetometer will fly on the TRIO-CINEMA mission due to be launched in 2012.

  2. Oscillating Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, S. Walter

    1991-01-01

    Proposed heat switch transfers heat from source to sink in regular cycles. Self-sustaining; actuated by transferred heat, contains no moving parts, and needs no external heaters or electronic circuitry to synchronize heat-transfer periods or control heat-transfer rates. Intended for use in gas-sorption refrigerator.

  3. Optofluidic guiding, valving, switching and mixing based on plasmonic heating in a random gold nanoisland substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajie; Kang, Zhiwen; Wang, Guanghui; Loo, Jacky Fong Chuen; Kong, Siu Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2015-06-01

    We present a versatile optofluidic flow manipulation scheme based on plasmonic heating in a random gold nanoisland substrate (Au-NIS). With its highly efficient conversion of optical power to hydrodynamic actuation, the reported substrate is used for laser-controlled optofluidic manipulation. It is the first time that microfluidic flow guiding, valving, and mixing within the same functional substrate has been realised. Plasmonic heating provides power for guiding the sample flow inside a microfluidic channel at controlled speed and transport of small particles or living cells is demonstrated. We have also made a laser-actuated microfluidic valve through controlling the surface wettability of the sample/Au-NIS interface. When the laser power density is sufficiently high to generate a bubble, localized convection around the bubble can lead to efficient sample mixing within a microfluidic chamber. The reported Au-NIS scheme practically offers a programmable functional surface on which users have the freedom to control the wetting characteristics with a focused laser beam. We have verified that this optofluidic approach induces insignificant degradation in cell viability. The reported scheme therefore offers a wide range of application possibilities in microfluidics and biomedical engineering, particularly those operated under a low Reynolds number. PMID:25963226

  4. Amplification effect of low-field magnetoresistance in silicon dual p - n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dezheng; Wang, Tao; Si, Mingsu; Wang, Fangcong; Zhou, Shiming; Xue, Desheng

    Nonmagnetic semiconductors with large magnetoresistance are identified as promising feature for the development of magnetoelectronics. However, to manipulate the magnetoresistance require the magnetic field of several Tesla. In this work, we realized an amplification effect of low-field magnetoresistance based on an elementary electronic building block: dual p - n junction. Analogous to the electrical amplification effect of transistor p - n -p junction, where the coupling current between p - n and n - p junctions is tuned by base current, in a silicon p + - n - n + device we demonstrate that the coupling strength of p + - n and n - n + junctions can be tuned by magnetic field. Owing to the amplification effect of magnetic-field-manipulated coupling, at a small magnetic field from 0 to 0.1 T the device is directly switched from conducting state ''on'' (10000 ohms) to blocking state ''off'' (5 megohm), yielding an magnetoresistance of 50,000 per cent and magnetic field sensitivity as high as 50 per cent Oe-1. Such a combination of magnetoresistance and high sensitivity not only makes the semiconductor device available in the magnetic field sensing industry, but also permits a new kind of magnetic-field-manipulated semiconductor electronics.

  5. Metal-insulator transition upon heating and negative-differential-resistive-switching induced by self-heating in BaCo{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}S{sub 1.8}

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Genossar, J.; Chashka, K. B.; Patlagan, L.; Reisner, G. M.

    2014-04-14

    The layered compound BaCo{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}S{sub 2−y} (0.05 < x < 0.2 and 0.05 < y < 0.2) exhibits an unusual first-order structural and electronic phase transition from a low-T monoclinic paramagnetic metal to a high-T tetragonal antiferromagnetic insulator around 200 K with huge hysteresis (∼40 K) and large volume change (∼0.01). Here, we report on unusual voltage-controlled resistive switching followed by current-controlled resistive switching induced by self-heating in polycrystalline BaCo{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}S{sub 2−y} (nominal x = 0.1 and y = 0.2). These were due to the steep metal to insulator transition upon heating followed by the activated behavior of the resistivity above the transition. The major role of Joule heating in switching is supported by the absence of nonlinearity in the current as function of voltage, I(V), obtained in pulsed measurements, in the range of electric fields relevant to d.c. measurements. The voltage-controlled negative differential resistance around the threshold for switching was explained by a simple model of self-heating. The main difficulty in modeling I(V) from the samples resistance as function of temperature R(T) was the progressive increase of R(T), and to a lesser extend the decrease of the resistance jumps at the transitions, caused by the damage induced by cycling through the transitions by heating or self-heating. This was dealt with by following systematically R(T) over many cycles and by using the data of R(T) in the heating cycle closest to that of the self-heating one.

  6. Dual magnetoresistive heads for high-density magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, Isabel Maria Goncalves

    2000-11-01

    In this thesis, novel magnetoresistive heads were developed and tested. The head designs had been proposed and analyzed with 3-D micromagnetic simulations. The dual magnetoresistive heads were of technological interest because they could provide higher linear resolution than conventional magnetoresistive heads, with less micro- fabrication complexity. As the demands for higher storage capacity and higher data rate increase, it is important to investigate alternative transducer designs that can provide suitable signal to noise ratio at smaller bits (smaller track-widths, narrower separation between tracks and smaller bit lengths). Dual magnetoresistive heads with track-widths of 2 microns and gap lengths of 80 nm were fabricated by micro-fabrication techniques. Thin film materials incorporating magnetic materials, metals and insulators were developed and prepared by sputtering. Optical lithography processes were developed and used to pattern the films with lateral dimensions of the order of a micron. Read-elements on wafers were characterized by Kerr microscope imaging and magnetoresistance measurements. The characterization involved single domain state stabilization, antiparallel magnetic state and electrical and magnetic mismatch between the two permalloy stripes of the dual magnetoresistive read- elements. The read-elements were built into nano-sliders and tested on spin stands with either two arm actuators (one for the read head, another for the write head) or a commercial Gukiz spin stand provided with one actuator for two separate heads. The time-domain response, spectral response, cross track-profile, off-track response and adjacent track interference were tested and the experimental results compared to theoretical models. The head performance on longitudinal medium with an areal magnetic product of Mrδ = 0-5 memu/cm2 and Mr δ = 1 memu/cm2 indicate that the head operated mainly in a linear regime, with a signal output amplitude directly proportional to the

  7. Measurements of current-voltage-induced heating in the Al/SrTiO3-xNy/Al memristor during electroformation and resistance switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkabko, A.; Aguirre, M. H.; Marozau, I.; Lippert, T.; Weidenkaff, A.

    2009-10-01

    Heating of the Al/SrTiO3-xNy/Al memristor is characterized during electroformation and switching of the resistances. The electrode with the higher voltage potential is heated to higher temperatures than the electrode with the lower potential, suggesting a reversible (nonstable) displacement of the anions in a low voltage region (|V|<±3 V). Application of a threshold voltage appropriate for resistance switching (|V|≥±3 V) facilitates migration of anions to the anode interface and increases the local anode temperature to a maximum of 285 °C. The hysteretic I-V curves are discussed taking into account tunnel barrier formation/break and inhomogeneous Schottky barrier modification at the anode interface.

  8. Evaluation of Biomarkers of Exposure in Smokers Switching to a Carbon-Heated Tobacco Product: A Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label 5-Day Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Christelle; Weitkunat, Rolf; Magnette, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco harm reduction aims to provide reduced risk alternatives to adult smokers who would otherwise continue smoking combustible cigarettes (CCs). This randomized, open-label, three-arm, parallel-group, single-center, short-term confinement study aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to selected harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) of cigarette smoke in adult smokers who switched to a carbon-heated tobacco product (CHTP) compared with adult smokers who continued to smoke CCs and those who abstained from smoking for 5 days. Methods: Biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs, including nicotine and urinary excretion of mutagenic material, were measured in 24-hour urine and blood samples in 112 male and female Caucasian smokers switching from CCs to the CHTP ad libitum use. Puffing topography was assessed during product use. Results: Switching to the CHTP or smoking abstinence (SA) resulted in marked decreases from baseline to Day 5 in all biomarkers of exposure measured, including carboxyhemoglobin (43% and 55% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). The urinary excretion of mutagenic material was also markedly decreased on Day 5 compared with baseline (89% and 87% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). No changes in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs or urinary mutagenic material were observed between baseline and Day 5 in the CC group. Conclusions: Our results provide clear evidence supporting a reduction in the level of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in smokers who switch to CHTP under controlled conditions, similar to that observed in SA. Implications: The reductions observed in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in this short-term study could potentially also reduce the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in those smokers who switch to a heated tobacco product. PMID:26817490

  9. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  10. Unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/normal metal bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gabureac, Mihai; Alvarado, Santos F.; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Magnetoresistive effects are usually invariant on inversion of the magnetization direction. In non-centrosymmetric conductors, however, nonlinear resistive terms can give rise to a current dependence that is quadratic in the applied voltage and linear in the magnetization. Here we demonstrate that such conditions are realized in simple bilayer metal films where the spin-orbit interaction and spin-dependent scattering couple the current-induced spin accumulation to the electrical conductivity. We show that the longitudinal resistance of Ta|Co and Pt|Co bilayers changes when reversing the polarity of the current or the sign of the magnetization. This unidirectional magnetoresistance scales linearly with current density and has opposite sign in Ta and Pt, which we associate with the modification of the interface scattering potential induced by the spin Hall effect in these materials. Our results suggest a route to control the resistance and detect magnetization switching in spintronic devices using a two-terminal geometry, which applies also to heterostructures including topological insulators.

  11. Magnetoresistance Anisotropy in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoutam, Laxman Raju; Wang, Yonglei; Xiao, Zhili; Das, Saptarshi; Luican Mayer, Adina; Divan, Ralu; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai Kwong

    We report the angle dependence of the magnetoresistance in WTe2. Being a layered material, WTe2 is considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Our results demonstrate that it is in fact 3D with an anisotropy of effective mass as small as 2. We measured the magnetic field dependence of the sample resistance R(H) at various angles between the applied magnetic field with respect to the c-axis of the crystal and found that they can be scaled based on the mass anisotropy, which changes from ~2 to ~5 with decreasing temperature in the Fermi liquid state. We will also discuss the origin of the turn-on temperature behavior in this material.

  12. Magnetoresistance behavior of elliptical ring nanomagnets in close proximity with magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) responses of the pseudospin valve elliptical rings in close proximity with individual magnetic elements. Significant modifications of the GMR responses were observed due to the effects of magnetostatic coupling between the rings and the magnetic elements. We observed that the vortex state stability is significantly sensitive to the position, orientation of the magnetic elements, and the direction of the applied field. We also investigated the switching field reproducibility of the rings for onion→vortex and vortex→onion transitions and observed that the ring with asymmetrically placed magnetic elements shows the most reproducible switching states.

  13. Competing Mechanisms in Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    2013-03-01

    A surprisingly large ``organic magnetoresistance'' (OMAR) has been found in both polymers and small molecule organic semiconductors at relatively small applied magnetic fields (~ 5 mT) and at room temperature. Unlike spin-injection devices, where the occurrence of a finite spin polarization of the current is essential for measuring a finite magnetoresistance, OMAR is generally considered to be due to spin correlations between spin carrying particles in the organic material. Although the microscopic mechanisms of hyperfine field induced spin mixing are relatively well understood, it is still intensively debated which particles are involved and how they can affect the current in such a drastic manner. In this presentation recent developments and new insights as to the underlying physics are discussed. Quantitative models will be introduced, based on different pairs of particles and mechanisms, and giving rise to effects at a variety of field scales. It will be discussed how specific device physics causes a non-trivial relation between microscopic spin-dependent reactions and macroscopic device behaviour. Finally, it will be shown how comprehensive studies on especially engineered organic systems, including polymer-fullerene blends and molecular doping, can be used to pinpoint the relevance of different mechanisms in the complementary regimes. The experimentally observed linewidth, sign and amplitude of both ``high-field'' (>100 mT) and ``low-field'' (~ 5 mT) effects, as well as their bias voltage dependence display very pronounced features as a function of fullerene doping. They provide unique fingerprints for which mechanism is of relevance. After careful analysis, this allows for identification of three earlier proposed mechanisms, involving exciton-charge, electron-hole and bipolaron (polarons of like charge) reactions. Present activities are aiming at using this insight for tailoring OMAR response by design.

  14. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  15. Impurity-Assisted Tunneling Magnetoresistance under a Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E.; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation.

  16. Impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance under a weak magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation. PMID:25325651

  17. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  18. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  19. Magnetoresistance in Boron Carbide junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Ellen; Sokolov, A.; Baruth, A.; Robertson, B. W.; Adenwalla, S.

    2007-03-01

    The properties of thin insulator layers are crucial to the performance of magnetic tunnel junctions. Commercial requirements are a device with a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) with low cost and high stability. At present the vast majority of barriers are made from amorphous Al2O3 and crystalline MgO. The TMR value depends not only on the spin-dependent electronic structure of the electrodes, but on the metal-insulator interface. Oxide-type barriers may suffer from local vacancies and other type of defects, resulting in oxygen diffusion, making the TMR value unstable with time. We present TMR results obtained on a non-oxide barrier, boron carbide (B10C2) for applications in magnetic tunnel junctions. This low Z inorganic material can be grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) without pinholes in the ultra thin film regime. PECVD grown boron carbide is an excellent dielectric with resistivities in the range of 10^7 ohm-cm, with a band gap that can be adjusted from 0.7 eV to 1.9 eV by altering the boron to carbon ratio and to band gap values well above 2.7 eV by adding phosphorus. This creates a unique opportunity for experimental study of a broad spectrum of phenomena, related to the dielectric properties of the barrier.

  20. Tunneling magnetoresistive heads for magnetic data storage.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sining

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics is emerging to be a new form of nanotechnologies, which utilizes not only the charge but also spin degree of freedom of electrons. Spin-dependent tunneling transport is one of the many kinds of physical phenomena involving spintronics, which has already found industrial applications. In this paper, we first provide a brief review on the basic physics and materials for magnetic tunnel junctions, followed more importantly by a detailed coverage on the application of magnetic tunneling devices in magnetic data storage. The use of tunneling magnetoresistive reading heads has helped to maintain a fast growth of areal density, which is one of the key advantages of hard disk drives as compared to solid-state memories. This review is focused on the first commercial tunneling magnetoresistive heads in the industry at an areal density of 80 approximately 100 Gbit/in2 for both laptop and desktop Seagate hard disk drive products using longitudinal media. The first generation tunneling magnetoresistive products utilized a bottom stack of tunnel junctions and an abutted hard bias design. The output signal amplitude of these heads was 3 times larger than that of comparable giant magnetoresistive devices, resulting in a 0.6 decade bit error rate gain over the latter. This has enabled high component and drive yields. Due to the improved thermal dissipation of vertical geometry, the tunneling magnetoresistive head runs cooler with a better lifetime performance, and has demonstrated similar electrical-static-discharge robustness as the giant magnetoresistive devices. It has also demonstrated equivalent or better process and wafer yields compared to the latter. The tunneling magnetoresistive heads are proven to be a mature and capable reader technology. Using the same head design in conjunction with perpendicular recording media, an areal density of 274 Gbit/in2 has been demonstrated, and advanced tunneling magnetoresistive heads can reach 311 Gbit/in2. Today, the

  1. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  2. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  3. Large magnetoresistance in the antiferromagnetic semimetal NdSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeham, N.; Bauer, E. D.; Neupane, M.; Ronning, F.

    2016-05-01

    There has been considerable interest in topological semimetals that exhibit extreme magnetoresistance (XMR). These have included materials lacking inversion symmetry such as TaAs, as well Dirac semimetals such as Cd3As2 . However, it was reported recently that LaSb and LaBi also exhibit XMR, even though the rocksalt structure of these materials has inversion symmetry, and the band-structure calculations do not show a Dirac dispersion in the bulk. Here, we present magnetoresistance and specific-heat measurements on NdSb, which is isostructural with LaSb. NdSb has an antiferromagnetic ground state and, in analogy with the lanthanum monopnictides, is expected to be a topologically nontrivial semimetal. We show that NdSb has an XMR of ˜104% , even within the antiferromagnetic state, illustrating that XMR can occur independently of the absence of time-reversal symmetry breaking in zero magnetic field. The persistence of XMR in a magnetic system offers the promise of new functionality when combining topological matter with electronic correlations. We also find that in an applied magnetic field below the Néel temperature there is a first-order transition, consistent with evidence from previous neutron scattering work.

  4. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, D.; Grobis, M.; Albrecht, M.

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) — a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique — will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L10 FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses.

  5. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Mitin, D; Grobis, M; Albrecht, M

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) - a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique - will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L1(0) FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses. PMID:26931856

  6. Distortion of Magnetic Domain Wall Measured by Magneto-Resistance Changes in a Co Nanoring.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-01-01

    The electrical anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) measurements were performed to see the formation of a 360 degree magnetic domain wall (360 DW) and distortion of the magnetic moments in a Co nanoring structure. Since the 360 DW is consisted of two 180 degree DWs, a decrease of the resistance was found in the switching process from the vortex to reverse onion state by the AMR effects, which is consistent with micromagnetic simulations. In addition, a decrease of the resistance in the switching process from the onion to vortex state was observed by the distortion of the local magnetic moments due to an applied magnetic field. The stochastic behavior in the switching process is caused by thermally induced magnetic moments changes. PMID:26328364

  7. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)–Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS–Ag–CFAS–IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  8. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  9. Magnetoresistance of single Permalloy circular rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavassori, P.; Busato, A.; Chiapatti, A.; di Bona, A.; Valeri, S.; Metlushko, V.; Ilic, B.

    2007-09-01

    We have measured magnetoresistance in single, 1 μm external diameter, Permalloy (Ni 80Fe 20) circular rings with varied inner hole diameter of 150, 300, and 600 nm and film thickness of 25 nm. The Permalloy ring structures and the 10-nm-thick, 250-nm-wide Au nanocontacts were fabricated on a SiO 2/Si substrate using e-beam lithography. Using a four contact geometry we studied the dependence of the magnetoresistance on the direction of the applied field. The experimental data are explained by considering only the conventional anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Numerical simulations of the current distribution within the samples combined with micromagnetic simulations of the field dependent magnetization profile, yield good agreement with the experimental data. Upon increasing the inner hole diameter (viz. decreasing the ring width) the magnetoresistance measurements show a transition of the reversal process from the "vortex nucleation-displacement-annihilation" sequence to the "onion state-reversed onion state" sequence, typical of narrow nanorings.

  10. Data center coolant switch

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  11. Magnetoresistance of a Low-k Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Brian Thomas

    Low-k dielectrics have been incorporated into advanced computer chip technologies as a part of the continuous effort to improve computer chip performance. One drawback associated with the implementation of low-k dielectrics is the large leakage current which conducts through the material, relative to silica. Another drawback is that the breakdown voltage of low-k dielectrics is low, relative to silica [1]. This low breakdown voltage makes accurate reliability assessment of the failure mode time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) in low-k dielectrics critical for the successful implementation of these materials. The accuracy with which one can assess this reliability is currently a topic of debate. These material drawbacks have motivated the present work which aims both to contribute to the understanding of electronic conduction mechanisms in low-k dielectrics, and to improve the ability to experimentally characterize changes which occur within the material prior to TDDB failure. What follows is a study of the influence of an applied magnetic field on the conductivity of a low-k dielectric, or in other words, a study of the material's magnetoresistance. This study shows that low-k dielectrics used as intra-level dielectrics exhibit a relatively large negative magnetoresistance effect (˜2%) at room temperature and with modest applied magnetic fields (˜100 Oe). The magnetoresistance is attributed to the spin dependence of trapping electrons from the conduction band into localized electronic sites. Mixing of two-electron spin states via interactions between electron spins and the the spins of hydrogen nuclei is suppressed by an applied magnetic field. As a result, the rate of trapping is reduced, and the conductivity of the material increases. This study further demonstrates that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance changes as a function of time subjected to electrical bias and temperature stress. The rate that the magnetoresistance changes correlates to the

  12. Multi-mode to single-mode switching caused by self-heating in bottom-emitting intra-cavity contacted 960 nm VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Sergey A.; Maleev, Nikolai A.; Kuzmenkov, Alexander G.; Lott, James A.; Kulagina, Marina M.; Zadiranov, Yurii M.; Gladyshev, Andrey G.; Nadtochiy, Alexey M.; Nikitina, Ekaterina V.; Tikhomirov, Vladimir G.; Ledentsov, Nikolai N.; Ustinov, Viktor M.

    2012-03-01

    Detailed investigation of anomalous modal behavior in fabricated bottom-emitting intra-cavity contacted 960 nm range vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) have been performed. At low currents the broad-aperture VCSELs show multi-mode operation at 945 nm via whispering gallery-like modes. Subsequent increase of pump current results in rapid increase of fundamental mode intensity and switching to a pure single transverse mode lasing regime at 960 nm with the higher slope efficiency. As a result record single transverse mode output power of 15 mW with a side-mode-suppressionratio (SMSR) above 30 dB was achieved. The observed phenomena cannot be explained by oxide-index guiding or changes in current pumping. 2D heat transport simulations show a strong temperature gradient inside the microcavity due to an effective lateral heat-sinking. This creates an effective waveguide and results in lower optical losses for the fundamental mode. At fixed pump current in pulsed regime (pulse width < 400 ns) high-order modes dominate, however the subsequent increase of pulse width leads to a rapid rise of optical power for the fundamental mode and SMSR increasing. Thus the self-heating phenomena play a crucial role in observed VCSEL unusual modal behavior.

  13. Magnetization reversal of submicrometer Co rings with uniaxial anisotropy via scanning magnetoresistance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyong; Mazumdar, D.; Schrag, B. D.; Shen, W.; Xiao, Gang

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated the magnetization reversal mechanism of narrow submicrometer Co rings using scanning magnetoresistance microscopy. Thermal annealing in a magnetic field introduced a uniaxial anisotropy and significant structural changes in the samples. We have observed a complicated multidomain state at intermediate field ranges, and onion states at saturation, for samples annealed in a field. This observation is in contrast to the flux-closed vortex state for unannealed rings. Micromagnetic simulations have shown that the switching occurs through a gradual noncoherent buckling-like reversal process followed by coherent rotation.

  14. Negative tunneling magneto-resistance in quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungju; Serra, Llorenç; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2015-06-01

    We consider a two-dimensional magnetic tunnel junction of the FM/I/QW(FM+SO)/I/N structure, where FM, I and QW(FM+SO) stand for a ferromagnet, an insulator and a quantum wire with both magnetic ordering and Rashba spin-orbit (SOC), respectively. The tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) exhibits strong anisotropy and switches sign as the polarization direction varies relative to the quantum-wire axis, due to interplay among the one-dimensionality, the magnetic ordering, and the strong SOC of the quantum wire.

  15. Switching time in laser pulse heat-assisted magnetic recording using L1{sub 0}-FePt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lyberatos, A.; Weller, D.; Parker, G. J.

    2015-04-07

    Atomistic spin model simulations using Langevin dynamics are performed to study the factors that determine the thermomagnetic recording time window in FePt media. The onset of thermomagnetic writing occurs at a temperature T{sub o} larger than the Curie temperature T{sub c} as a result of the finite time of relaxation of the magnetization by the linear reversal mode. The Bloch relaxation rate of magnetization growth during cooling below T{sub c} is independent on the write field, provided the field is stronger than some threshold value. Application of a strong write field reduces switching time through better spin alignment in the paramagnetic regime. Finite size effects on the probability distribution of freezing temperatures T{sub f} and the free energy provide insight on the thermomagnetic reversal mechanism. Constraints on the “pulse-mode” of recording when the head field reverses direction during cooling are also considered.

  16. Modifying magnetic switching in permalloy film nanostructures using the native oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojem, A.; Bassett, D.; Wesenberg, D.; Mason, S. J.; Avery, A. D.; Zink, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    Thin films of nickel-iron alloys of the nominal concentration near 80% Ni, are very commonly used in applications and in fundamental studies of spin, charge and heat transport in nanomagnetic systems. These permalloy (Py) films are straightforward to grow by various techniques and typically produce predictable, controllable and repeatable magnetic properties, including small coercivity, low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and low magnetostriction. We have found that greater complexity can be added to the switching behavior of thin films of permalloy by oxidation of thin (~4 nm) layers followed by subsequent growth of Py. Under some circumstances, this can cause apparent negative coercivity in the switching observed in anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of micromachined strips with an expected shape anisotropy. Here we will present results on growth and AMR measurements of the effects in various oxidized Py-Py layered samples. It is not yet clear if the effects are reproducible enough to be used for intentional manipulation of switching behavior in Py nanostructures. We acknowledge support from the NSF CAREER award (DMR-0847796).

  17. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb₂

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 10⁵% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 10⁶% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb₂. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed tomore » the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.« less

  18. Dirac State in Giant Magnetoresistive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Jo, N. H.; Ochi, M.; Huang, L.; Mou, D.; Kong, T.; Mun, E.; Wang, L.; Lee, Y.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, N.; Arito, R.; Kaminski, A.

    We use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of materials that recently were discovered to display titanic magnetoresistance. We find that that several of these materials have Dirac-like features in their band structure. In some materials those features are ``ordinary'' Dirac cones, while in others the linear Dirac dispersion of two crossing bands forms a linear object in 3D momentum space. Our observation poses an important question about the role of Dirac dispersion in the unusually high, non-saturating magnetoresistance of these materials. Research was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation EPiQS Initiative (Grant No. GBMF4411); CEM, a NSF MRSEC, under Grant No. DMR-1420451.

  19. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  20. Electrical Resistivity and Negative Magnetoresistance in (SNBry)x Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Sasa, Shigehiko; Yoshino, Katsumi; Inuishi, Yoshio

    1980-11-01

    Electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and their temperature dependences in (SNBry)x are measured for various quantity of y. By bromination, negative magnetoresistance is enhanced at 4.2 K and also appears even at 77 K, at which temperature negative magnetoresistance is not observed in undoped (SN)x. These features are remarkable for the samples heavily doped and just after doping, and are abated by pumping bromine from (SNBry)x for a few days. The possible origins for the anomalous negative magnetoresistance are discussed taking the surface state of fiber bundles or crystal due to adsorped bromine into consideration.

  1. Magnetic switching fluctuations from sidewall oxides in MgO/FeCoB magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Read, J. C.

    2011-08-01

    Sharp magnetic switching distributions with coupling to magnetic sidewall oxides in FeCoB/MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) are revealed by magneto-resistance first order reversal curve (MR-FORC) measurements. Tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) and FORC data in units of % TMR/mT2 are shown for two identical devices that differ only by the annealing. The annealed sample has much larger TMR and correspondingly higher switching density ρ. In both cases, the MR-FORC data exhibit a prominent "checkerboard" pattern that implies coupling to magnetic oxides on the MTJ sidewalls.

  2. Effect of electronic reconstruction on cuprate-manganite spin switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Visani, C.; Nemes, N. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Zhu, L. Y.; Tornos, J.; Zhernenkov, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Leon, C.; Santamaria, J.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the anomalous inverse spin switch behavior in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}(LCMO)/YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO)/LCMO trilayers by combined transport studies and polarized neutron reflectometry. Measuring magnetization profiles and magnetoresistance in an in-plane rotating magnetic field, we prove that, contrary to many accepted theoretical scenarios, the relative orientation between the two LCMO's magnetizations is not sufficient to determine the magnetoresistance. Rather the field dependence of magnetoresistance is explained by the interplay between the applied magnetic field and the (exponential tail of the) induced exchange field in YBCO, the latter originating from the electronic reconstruction at the LCMO/YBCO interfaces.

  3. First Order Colossal Magnetoresistance Transitions in the Two-Orbital Model for Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Cengiz; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Monte Carlo simulation results for the two-orbital model for manganites, including Jahn- Teller lattice distortions, are presented here. At hole density x 1=4 and in the vicinity of the region of competition between the ferromagnetic metallic and spin-charge-orbital ordered insulating phases, the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) phenomenon is observed with a magnetoresistance ratio 10 000%. Our main result is that this CMR transition is found to be of first order in some portions of the phase diagram, in agreement with early results from neutron scattering, specific heat, and magnetization, thus solving a notorious discrepancy between experiments and previous theoretical studies. The first order characteristics of the transition survive, and are actually enhanced, when weak quenched disorder is introduced.

  4. Magnetic and magnetoresistance behaviors of particulate iron/vinyl ester resin nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhanhu; Hahn, H. Thomas; Lin, Hongfei; Karki, Amar B.; Young, David P.

    2008-07-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) behavior of vinyl ester monomer stabilized iron nanoparticles and heat-treated vinyl ester resin nanocomposites reinforced with iron nanoparticles were investigated. Vinyl ester monomer serves as a coupling agent with one side covalently bound onto the nanoparticle surface by a displacement reaction and the other end copolymerized with extra vinyl ester resin to form a robust entity. The particle loading and type of material (polymer or carbonized polymer) have a significant effect on the magnetic and MR properties. The heat-treated nanocomposites follow a tunneling conduction. After reduction annealing, the obtained nanocomposites possess a room temperature MR of 8.3 % at a field of 90 kOe.

  5. Switch wear leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  6. Hall effect and magnetoresistivity in the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Hall coefficient and magnetoresistance of sputtered films of Cu(x)Mo6S8 and PbMo6S8 have been measured, as well as the magnetoresistance in sintered samples of the same materials. Assuming a single band model, net carrier densities and mean mobilities are determined

  7. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~105%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2. PMID:27228908

  8. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y B; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~10(5)%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2. PMID:27228908

  9. A phenomenological Landauer-type theory on colossal magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Tian, G.-S.; Lin, T.-H.

    1996-12-01

    A two-dimensional interacting magnetic domains model is examined to explain the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) recently observed in manganese-oxides. Electrons transport properties were studied by using Landauer's multichannel transport theory and recursive Green's function technique. Colossal magnetoresistance shows up in this system. The temperature dependence of system's MR is also studied.

  10. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~105%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2.

  11. Sign control of magnetoresistance through chemically engineered interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ciudad, David; Gobbi, Marco; Kinane, Christy J; Eich, Marius; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Hueso, Luis E

    2014-12-01

    Chemically engineered interfaces are shown to produce inversions of the magnetoresistance in spintronic devices including lithium fluoride interlayers. This behavior is explained by the formation of anti-ferromagnetic difluoride layers. By changing the order of deposition of the different materials, the sign of the magnetoresistance can be deterministically controlled both in organic spin valves and in inorganic magnetic tunnel junctions. PMID:25339373

  12. Electrically tuned magnetic order and magnetoresistance in a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Guo, Minghua; Li, Kang; Zhang, Jinsong; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Wang, Lili; Chen, Xi; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Wang, Yayu

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between topological protection and broken time reversal symmetry in topological insulators may lead to highly unconventional magnetoresistance behaviour that can find unique applications in magnetic sensing and data storage. However, the magnetoresistance of topological insulators with spontaneously broken time reversal symmetry is still poorly understood. In this work, we investigate the transport properties of a ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film fabricated into a field effect transistor device. We observe a complex evolution of gate-tuned magnetoresistance, which is positive when the Fermi level lies close to the Dirac point but becomes negative at higher energies. This trend is opposite to that expected from the Berry phase picture, but is intimately correlated with the gate-tuned magnetic order. The underlying physics is the competition between the topology-induced weak antilocalization and magnetism-induced negative magnetoresistance. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and magnetoresistance facilitates future topological insulator based spintronic devices. PMID:25222696

  13. Magnetoresistance in single crystalline chromium sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. D.; Won, C. J.; Song, K. M.; Hur, N.

    2011-03-01

    We studied the anisotropic magnetic and magnetotransport properties of Cr2S3 single crystals grown by using the vapor transport method. Large magnetoresistance of ˜ 46% was observed in 9 T magnetic field applied perpendicular to the c axis near the Néel temperature TN ≈ 118 K. Comparison of electric and magnetic properties of Cr2S3 crystals with different sulfur deficiencies suggested that the electron doping by the sulfur deficiency does not contribute to weak ferromagnetism. The correlation between the field-dependent magnetization and resistivity was analyzed by the polaron hopping model of magnetotransport in Cr2S3.

  14. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Da-Li; Yin, Lifeng; Sun, Chengjun; Guo, Hangwen; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Ward, Thomas Z; Cheng, Zhaohua; Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial diffusion between magnetic electrodes and organic spacer layers is a serious problem in the organic spintronics which complicates attempts to understand the spin-dependent transport mechanism and hurts the achievement of a desirably high magnetoresistance (MR). We deposit nanodots instead of atoms onto the organic layer using buffer layer assist growth. Spin valves using this method exhibit a sharper interface and a giant MR of up to {approx}300%. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicates that the spin-dependent carrier injection correlates with the observed MR.

  15. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  16. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  17. Magnetoresistive nanosensors: controlling magnetism at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Diana C; Silva, Ana V; Paz, Elvira; Ferreira, Ricardo; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P

    2016-01-29

    The ability to detect the magnetic fields that surround us has promoted vast technological advances in sensing techniques. Among those, magnetoresistive sensors display an unpaired spatial resolution. Here, we successfully control the linear range of nanometric sensors using an interfacial exchange bias sensing layer coupling. An effective matching of material properties and sensor geometry improves the nanosensor performance, with top sensitivities of 3.7% mT(-1). The experimental results are well supported by 3D micromagnetic and magneto-transport simulations. PMID:26658286

  18. Magnetoresistive nanosensors: controlling magnetism at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitao, Diana C.; Silva, Ana V.; Paz, Elvira; Ferreira, Ricardo; Cardoso, Susana; Freitas, Paulo P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect the magnetic fields that surround us has promoted vast technological advances in sensing techniques. Among those, magnetoresistive sensors display an unpaired spatial resolution. Here, we successfully control the linear range of nanometric sensors using an interfacial exchange bias sensing layer coupling. An effective matching of material properties and sensor geometry improves the nanosensor performance, with top sensitivities of 3.7% mT-1. The experimental results are well supported by 3D micromagnetic and magneto-transport simulations.

  19. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  20. Magnetoresistance reversal in antiperovskite compound Mn{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}N

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Yuan, Q.; Han, J. C.; Zhang, Z. H.; Jian, J. K.; Zhao, J. G. E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn; Song, B. E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn

    2014-03-28

    We report detailed investigations of the structure, magnetic properties, electronic transport, and specific heat in Mn-based antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}N. Most strikingly, there are several fascinating features: (i) The magnetoresistance at 30 kOe (40 kOe) exceeds ∼1% (∼2%) over a temperature span of ∼70 K (∼25 K) from 5 to 140 K; (ii) magnetoresistance fluctuates at temperatures of 100–200 K, including an obvious sign reversal from negative to positive at ∼140 K. Analysis of the specific heat reveals that the magnetoresistance reversal may originate from the reconstruction of the Fermi surface accompanying an antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition.

  1. Spin Seebeck measurements of current-induced switching in YIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartell, Jason; Jermain, Colin; Aradhya, Sriharsha; Wang, Hailong; Buhrman, Robert; Yang, Fengyuan; Ralph, Daniel; Fuchs, Gregory

    Quantifying spin torques generated at the interface between a normal metal (NM) and a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) is an important step in understanding the spin hall effect without charge transport. Measuring magnetization in NM/FI devices is challenging, however, because both magnetoresistive and magneto-optical signals are tiny in thin-film bilayers. We show that a promising alternative measurement approach is the use of picosecond thermal gradients to study spin torques in Pt/Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) bilayers. Recently, we demonstrated the application of heat to stroboscopically transduce a local magnetic moment into an electrical signal via the time resolved anomalous Nernst effect (TRANE) in ferromagnetic metals. Using a similar geometry the spin Seebeck effect of YIG combined with the inverse spin Hall effect of Pt enables measurement of local magnetization. Here we describe our study using this technique to study current-induced switching in Pt/YIG with sub-10 nm thick YIG films We acknowledge support from AFOSR.

  2. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  3. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  4. Advanced giant magnetoresistance technology for measurement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Roland; Mattheis, Roland; Reiss, Günter

    2013-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors are considered one of the first real applications of nanotechnology. They consist of nm-thick layered structures where ferromagnetic metals are sandwiched by nonmagnetic metals. Such multilayered films produce a large change in resistance (typically 10 to 20%) when subjected to a magnetic field, compared with a maximum change of a few per cent for other types of magnetic sensors. This technology has been intensively used in read heads for hard disk drives and now increasingly finds applications due to the high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally these sensors are compatible with miniaturization and thus offer a high spatial resolution combined with a frequency range up to the 100 MHz regime and simple electronic conditioning. In this review, we first discuss the basics of the underlying magnetoresistance effects in layered structures and then present three prominent examples for future applications: in the field of current sensing the new GMR sensors offer high bandwidth and good accuracy in a space-saving open loop measurement configuration. In rotating systems they can be used for multiturn angle measurements, and in biotechnology the detection of magnetic particles enables the quantitative measurement of biomolecule concentrations.

  5. Nonlocal Magnetoresistance Mediated by Spin Superfluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-10-01

    The electrical response of two diffusive metals is studied when they are linked by a magnetic insulator hosting a topologically stable (superfluid) spin current. We discuss how charge currents in the metals induce a spin supercurrent state, which in turn generates a magnetoresistance that depends on the topology of the electrical circuit. This magnetoresistance relies on phase coherence over the entire magnet and gives direct evidence for spin superfluidity. We show that driving the magnet with an ac current allows coherent spin transport even in the presence of U(1)-breaking magnetic anisotropy that can preclude dc superfluid transport. Spin transmission in the ac regime shows a series of resonance peaks as a function of frequency. The peak locations, heights, and widths can be used to extract static interfacial properties, e.g., the spin-mixing conductance and effective spin Hall angle, and to probe dynamic properties such as the spin-wave dispersion. Thus, ac transport may provide a simpler route to realizing nonequilbrium coherent spin transport and a useful way to characterize the magnetic system, serving as a precursor to the realization of dc superfluid spin transport.

  6. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  7. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  8. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  9. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  10. Magnetic behavior of Eu(3)Ni(4)Ga(4): antiferromagnetic order and large magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Anupam; Geibel, C; Hossain, Z

    2012-08-15

    The results of the magnetic susceptibility, isothermal magnetization, heat capacity, electrical resistivity and magnetoresistance measurements on polycrystalline Eu(3)Ni(4)Ga(4) are presented. Eu(3)Ni(4)Ga(4) forms in Na(3)Pt(4)Ge(4)-type cubic crystal structure (space group [Formula: see text]). The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of Eu(3)Ni(4)Ga(4) confirms the divalent state (Eu(2+)) of Eu ions with an effective magnetic moment μ(eff) = 7.98 μ(B). At low fields, e.g. at 0.01 T, a magnetic phase transition to an antiferromagnetically ordered state occurs at T(N) = 10.9 K, which is further confirmed by the temperature dependence of the heat capacity and electrical resistivity. The field dependence of isothermal magnetization at 2 K reveals the presence of two field induced metamagnetic transitions at H(c1) and H(c2) = 0.55 and 1.2 T, respectively and a polarized phase above H(PO) = 1.7 T. The reduced jump in the heat capacity at the transition temperature, ΔC|(T(N)) = 13.48 J/mol-Eu K would indicate an amplitude modulated (AM) antiferromagnetic structure. An interesting feature is that a large negative magnetoresistance, MR = [ρ(H) - ρ(0)]/ρ(0), is observed in the vicinity of magnetic transition even up to 2T(N). Similar large magnetoresistance has been observed in the paramagnetic state in some Gd and Eu based alloys and has been attributed to the magneto-polaronic effect. PMID:22785157

  11. Magnetoresistance in magnetic and nonmagnetic rare earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, E.; Maikis, M.; Bauer, E.; Nowotny, H.

    1995-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance Δρ/ ρ of selected magnetic and nonmagnetic RE compounds in fields up to 10 T has been measured. The discussion of the positive magnetoresistance is based on Kohler's rule. It was found that deviations from Kohler's rule at low temperatures depend on the magnitude of the individual residual resistivity. Ferromagnetic compounds exhibit negative values and a minimum in the vicinity of the Curie temperature in accordance to a model calculation of Yamada and Takada. The positive Δρ/ ρ contribution in the low temperature region, observed in all magnetic compounds, is due to the dominating classical magnetoresistance in this temperature range.

  12. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    PubMed

    Pletikosić, I; Ali, Mazhar N; Fedorov, A V; Cava, R J; Valla, T

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered nonmagnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at low temperatures, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe2 was identified. PMID:25479512

  13. Electronic Structure Basis for the Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered nonmagnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at low temperatures, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe2 was identified.

  14. Anisotropic magnetoresistance dominant in a three terminal Hanle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malec, Christopher; Miller, Michael M.; Johnson, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Experiments are performed on mesoscopic nonlocal lateral spin valves with aluminum channels and Permalloy electrodes. Four-terminal magnetoresistance and Hanle measurements characterize the spin accumulation with results that compare well with published work. Three-terminal Hanle measurements of the Permalloy/aluminum (Py/Al) interfaces show bell-shaped curves that can be fit to Lorentzians. These curves are three orders of magnitude larger than the spin accumulation. Using anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements of individual Permalloy electrodes, we demonstrate that the three-terminal measurements are dominated by anisotropic magnetoresistance effects unrelated to spin accumulation.

  15. Femtosecond switching of magnetism via strongly correlated spin-charge quantum excitations.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianqi; Patz, Aaron; Mouchliadis, Leonidas; Yan, Jiaqiang; Lograsso, Thomas A; Perakis, Ilias E; Wang, Jigang

    2013-04-01

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz (10(9) hertz) switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory and logic devices into the terahertz (10(12) hertz) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi-functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation. By analogy to femtosecond chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics--in which photoproducts of chemical and biochemical reactions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states--femtosecond-laser-excited coherence between electronic states can switch magnetic order by 'suddenly' breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials: for example, manganites exhibiting colossal magneto-resistance suitable for applications. Here we show femtosecond (10(-15) seconds) photo-induced switching from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, by observing the establishment (within about 120 femtoseconds) of a huge temperature-dependent magnetization with photo-excitation threshold behaviour absent in the optical reflectivity. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the femtosecond laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, distinguished from the picosecond (10(-12) seconds) lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation without threshold behaviour. Our simulations reproduce the nonlinear femtosecond spin generation and underpin fast quantum spin-flip fluctuations correlated with coherent superpositions of electronic states to initiate local ferromagnetic correlations. These results merge two fields, femtosecond magnetism in metals and band insulators, and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, in which local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders. PMID:23552945

  16. Permalloy and Co50Pd50 as ferromagnetic contacts for magnetoresistance measurements in carbon nanotube-based transport structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Caitlin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on carbon nanotube (CNT) 2-terminal spin-valve devices are presented. Results from samples with both permalloy (Py) and CoPd contacts show repeatable MR switching. In performing gate-dependent MR measurements on the Py-contacted CNTs, two distinct transport regimes are identified, and their transport behavior is discussed with respect to optimizing MR. Results from the first CoPd-contacted CNTs indicate a stable magnetic response with a higher magnitude than that of a Py-contacted nanotube in the same transport regime.

  17. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  18. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors for DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are developed for a DNA microarray. Compared with the conventional fluorescent sensors, GMR sensors are cheaper, more sensitive, can generate fully electronic signals, and can be easily integrated with electronics and microfluidics. The GMR sensor used in this work has a bottom spin valve structure with an MR ratio of 12%. The single-strand target DNA detected has a length of 20 bases. Assays with DNA concentrations down to 10 pM were performed, with a dynamic range of 3 logs. A double modulation technique was used in signal detection to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor while circumventing electromagnetic interference. The logarithmic relationship between the magnetic signal and the target DNA concentration can be described by the Temkin isotherm. Furthermore, GMR sensors integrated with microfluidics has great potential of improving the sensitivity to 1 pM or below, and the total assay time can be reduced to less than 1 hour. PMID:20824116

  19. Magnetocardiography with sensors based on giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Parkkonen, L.; Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Polovy, H.; Fermon, C.; Fowley, C.

    2011-04-01

    Biomagnetic signals, mostly due to the electrical activity in the body, are very weak and they can only be detected by the most sensitive magnetometers, such as Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). We report here biomagnetic recordings with hybrid sensors based on Giant MagnetoResistance (GMR). We recorded magnetic signatures of the electric activity of the human heart (magnetocardiography) in healthy volunteers. The P-wave and QRS complex, known from the corresponding electric recordings, are clearly visible in the recordings after an averaging time of about 1 min. Multiple recordings at different locations over the chest yielded a dipolar magnetic field map and allowed localizing the underlying current sources. The sensitivity of the GMR-based sensors is now approaching that of SQUIDs and paves way for spin electronics devices for functional imaging of the body.

  20. Magnetoresistance of an Anderson insulator of bosons.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Anirban; Galitski, Victor; Müller, Markus

    2013-07-12

    We study the magnetoresistance of two-dimensional bosonic Anderson insulators. We describe the change in spatial decay of localized excitations in response to a magnetic field, which is given by an interference sum over alternative tunneling trajectories. The excitations become more localized with increasing field (in sharp contrast to generic fermionic excitations which get weakly delocalized): the localization length ξ(B) is found to change as ξ(-1)(B)-ξ(-1)(0)~B(4/5). The quantum interference problem maps onto the classical statistical mechanics of directed polymers in random media (DPRM). We explain the observed scaling using a simplified droplet model which incorporates the nontrivial DPRM exponents. Our results have implications for a variety of experiments on magnetic-field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator transitions observed in disordered films, granular superconductors, and Josephson junction arrays, as well as for cold atoms in artificial gauge fields. PMID:23889427

  1. Nonlocal ordinary magnetoresistance in indium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pan.; Yuan, Zhonghui.; Wu, Hao.; Ali, S. S.; Wan, Caihua.; Ban, Shiliang.

    2015-07-01

    Deflection of carriers by Lorentz force results in an ordinary magnetoresistance (OMR) of (μB)2 at low field. Here we demonstrate that the OMR in high mobility semiconductor InAs could be enhanced by measurement geometry where two probes of voltmeter were both placed on one outer side of two probes of current source. The nonlocal OMR was 3.6 times as large as the local one, reaching 1.8×104% at 5 T. The slope of the linear field dependence of the nonlocal OMR was improved from 12.6 T-1 to 45.3 T-1. The improvement was ascribed to polarity-conserved charges accumulating on boundaries in nonlocal region due to Hall effect. This InAs device with nonlocal geometry could be competitive in B-sensors due to its high OMR ratio, linear field dependence and simple structure.

  2. Magnetoresistance and localization in bosonic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus

    2013-06-01

    We study the strong localization of hard-core bosons. Using a locator expansion we find that in the insulator, unlike for typical fermion problems, nearly all low-energy scattering paths come with positive amplitudes and hence interfere constructively. As a consequence, the localization length of bosonic excitations shrinks when the constructive interference is suppressed by a magnetic field, entailing an exponentially large positive magnetoresistance, opposite to and significantly stronger than the analogous effect in fermions. Within the forward-scattering approximation, we find that the lowest-energy excitations are the most delocalized. A similar analysis applied to random field Ising models suggests that the ordering transition is due to a delocalization initiated at zero energy rather than due to the closure of a mobility gap in the paramagnet.

  3. Low field magnetoresistance of gadolinium nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2014-02-07

    We report low field (μ{sub 0}H < 0.2 T) magnetoresistance (MR) studies on a single Gd nanowire patterned from a nano-structured film (average grain size ∼ 35 nm) by focused ion beam. For comparison, we did similar MR measurements on a polycrystalline sample with large crystallographic grains (∼4 μm). It is observed that in the low field region where the MR is due to motion of magnetic domains, the MR in the large grained sample shows a close relation to the characteristic temperature dependent magnetocrystalline anisotropy including a sharp rise in MR at the spin reorientation transition at 235 K. In stark contrast, in the nanowire, the MR shows complete suppression of the above behaviours and it shows predominance of the grain boundary and spin disorder controlling the domain response.

  4. Spin Hall Magnetoresistance in Metallic Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junyeon; Sheng, Peng; Takahashi, Saburo; Mitani, Seiji; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is studied in metallic bilayers that consist of a heavy metal (HM) layer and a ferromagnetic metal (FM) layer. We find a nearly tenfold increase of SMR in W /CoFeB compared to previously studied HM/ferromagnetic insulator systems. The SMR increases with decreasing temperature despite the negligible change in the W layer resistivity. A model is developed to account for the absorption of the longitudinal spin current to the FM layer, one of the key characteristics of a metallic ferromagnet. We find that the model not only quantitatively describes the HM layer thickness dependence of SMR, allowing accurate estimation of the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length of the HM layer, but also can account for the temperature dependence of SMR by assuming a temperature dependent spin polarization of the FM layer. These results illustrate the unique role a metallic ferromagnetic layer plays in defining spin transmission across the HM /FM interface.

  5. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-07

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |k{sub z}|. The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  6. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of magnetotransport in colossal magnetoresistive manganite thin films and hybrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietambaram, Srinivas V.

    The continually increasing demand for magnetic information storage and retrieval has driven a significant worldwide effort to improve the performance of relevant hard ware components. As the areal density continues to increase, more sensitive materials and innovative structures will be required to detect the decreasing fringe fields emanating from the media. Doped manganites in thin film form are being examined as a possible next generation magnetoresistance sensor material. The magnetoresistance of these doped manganite thin films is of unprecedented magnitude; however, these large resistance changes are achieved only in a strong field in the Tesla range, thus severely limiting their practical utility. This dissertation addresses some of the critical parameters, which influence the properties and efforts to reduce the field scale necessary to observe high magnetoresistance ratios in these films. The primary deposition technique used in this work is pulsed laser deposition. Initial work was concentrated on the optimization of various process parameters to obtain high quality thin films of manganites. Systematic post deposition heat treatments in oxygen and argon ambient at elevated temperatures revealed that transition temperature is related to the Mn-O fraction and uniform distribution of oxygen across the films rather than just the oxygen content of the films as proposed by others. MR ratio is improved by the improvement in the microstructure (recrystallization and grain growth) of the films after annealing; however vacancies created on the lanthanum site by the high temperature anneal also seem to be an important factor in the determination of the MR ratio. Self-doped, mixed doped and external doped lanthanum manganite thin films, where the external dopant is Ca, have shown different transition temperature and MR ratios. The variation in the insulator-to-metal transition could be explained on the basis of Mn4+ content while the MR property seemed to be related

  8. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling). PMID:26569263

  9. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling). PMID:26569263

  10. The suppression of the large magnetoresistance in thin WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Woods, John; Cha, Judy

    The layered nature of WTe2 suggests the possibility of making a single layer WTe2 memory device that exploits the recently observed large magnetoresistance. Presently, the origin of the magnetoresistance is attributed to the charge balance between the electron and hole carriers, yet the exact underlying physical mechanism is unclear. Here we show a systematic suppression of the large magnetoresistance, as well as turn-on temperature, with decreasing thickness of WTe2. We attribute the thickness-dependent transport properties to undesirable parasitic effects that become dominant in thin films of WTe2. Our results highlight the increasing importance of characterizing the parasitic effects for 2D layered materials in a single- to a few-layer thick limit. Finally, our observations support the hypothesis that the origin of the large magnetoresistance may be due to the charge balance between the electron and the hole carriers.

  11. Giant negative magnetoresistance in Manganese-substituted Zinc Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. L.; Shao, Q.; Zhuravlyova, A.; He, M.; Yi, Y.; Lortz, R.; Wang, J. N.; Ruotolo, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large negative magnetoresistance in Manganese-substituted Zinc Oxide thin films. This anomalous effect was found to appear in oxygen-deficient films and to increase with the concentration of Manganese. By combining magnetoresistive measurements with magneto-photoluminescence, we demonstrate that the effect can be explained as the result of a magnetically induced transition from hopping to band conduction where the activation energy is caused by the sp-d exchange interaction. PMID:25783664

  12. Chiral anomaly and classical negative magnetoresistance of Weyl metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, D. T.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-01

    We consider the classical magnetoresistance of a Weyl metal in which the electron Fermi surface possesses nonzero fluxes of the Berry curvature. Such a system may exhibit large negative magnetoresistance with unusual anisotropy as a function of the angle between the electric and magnetic fields. In this case the system can support an additional type of plasma wave. These phenomena are consequences of the chiral anomaly in electron transport theory.

  13. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  14. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  15. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mazhar N; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D; Schoop, Leslie M; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-10-01

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity. PMID:25219849

  16. Large, non-saturating magnetoresistance in WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar N.; Xiong, Jun; Flynn, Steven; Tao, Jing; Gibson, Quinn D.; Schoop, Leslie M.; Liang, Tian; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Hirschberger, Max; Ong, N. P.; Cava, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetoresistance is the change in a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field. Materials with large magnetoresistance have found use as magnetic sensors, in magnetic memory, and in hard drives at room temperature, and their rarity has motivated many fundamental studies in materials physics at low temperatures. Here we report the observation of an extremely large positive magnetoresistance at low temperatures in the non-magnetic layered transition-metal dichalcogenide WTe2: 452,700 per cent at 4.5 kelvins in a magnetic field of 14.7 teslas, and 13 million per cent at 0.53 kelvins in a magnetic field of 60 teslas. In contrast with other materials, there is no saturation of the magnetoresistance value even at very high applied fields. Determination of the origin and consequences of this effect, and the fabrication of thin films, nanostructures and devices based on the extremely large positive magnetoresistance of WTe2, will represent a significant new direction in the study of magnetoresistivity.

  17. Large, Tunable Magnetoresistance in Nonmagnetic III-V Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Sichao; Luo, Wei; Gu, Jiangjiang; Cheng, Xiang; Ye, Peide D; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance, the modulation of resistance by magnetic fields, has been adopted and continues to evolve in many device applications including hard-disk, memory, and sensors. Magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic semiconductors has recently raised much attention and shows great potential due to its large magnitude that is comparable or even larger than magnetic materials. However, most of the previous work focus on two terminal devices with large dimensions, typically of micrometer scales, which severely limit their performance potential and more importantly, scalability in commercial applications. Here, we investigate magnetoresistance in the impact ionization region in InGaAs nanowires with 20 nm diameter and 40 nm gate length. The deeply scaled dimensions of these nanowires enable high sensibility with less power consumption. Moreover, in these three terminal devices, the magnitude of magnetoresistance can be tuned by the transverse electric field controlled by gate voltage. Large magnetoresistance between 100% at room temperature and 2000% at 4.3 K can be achieved at 2.5 T. These nanoscale devices with large magnetoresistance offer excellent opportunity for future high-density large-scale magneto-electric devices using top-down fabrication approaches, which are compatible with commercial silicon platform. PMID:26561728

  18. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  19. Magnetoresistive polyaniline-silicon carbide metacomposites: plasma frequency determination and high magnetic field sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongbo; Guo, Jiang; Khan, Mojammel Alam; Young, David P; Shen, T D; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-07-20

    The Drude model modified by Debye relaxation time was introduced to determine the plasma frequency (ωp) in the surface initiated polymerization (SIP) synthesized β-silicon carbide (β-SiC)/polyaniline (PANI) metacomposites. The calculated plasma frequency for these metacomposites with different loadings of β-SiC nanoparticles was ranging from 6.11 × 10(4) to 1.53 × 10(5) rad s(-1). The relationship between the negative permittivity and plasma frequency indicates the existence of switching frequency, at which the permittivity was changed from negative to positive. More interestingly, the synthesized non-magnetic metacomposites, observed to follow the 3-dimensional (3-D) Mott variable range hopping (VRH) electrical conduction mechanism, demonstrated high positive magnetoresistance (MR) values of up to 57.48% and high MR sensitivity at low magnetic field regimes. PMID:27386820

  20. Soft magnetic lithography and giant magnetoresistance in superconducting/ferromagnetic hybrids.

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.; Imre, A.; Rosenmann, D.; Pearson, J.; Kwok, W. K.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach to create a tunable pinning potential in a superconducting/ferromagnetic (SC/FM) hybrid, allowing the switching of their electronic properties through the application of a small magnetic field. Using direct magneto-optical imaging, macroscopic transport, and magnetic measurements, we show that the alignment of stripe domains in the ferromagnet provides a remarkable directionality for the superconducting vortex motion. An analysis of the anisotropic flux motion demonstrates a substantial critical current anisotropy in the superconductor. The possibility of aligning stable lattices of stripe domains in select directions using in-plane magnetic fields allows the realization of soft magnetic lithography for efficient manipulation of supercurrent flow in SC/FM bilayers. Furthermore, in our samples we observed a pronounced magnetoresistance effect yielding 4 orders of magnitude resistivity change in a few millitesla in-plane field.

  1. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  2. Optimization of magnetoresistive sensor current for on-chip magnetic bead detection using the sensor self-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the self-heating of magnetoresistive sensors used for measurements on magnetic beads in magnetic biosensors. The signal from magnetic beads magnetized by the field due to the sensor bias current is proportional to the bias current squared. Therefore, we aim to maximize the bias current while limiting the sensor self-heating. We systematically characterize and model the Joule heating of magnetoresistive sensors with different sensor geometries and stack compositions. The sensor heating is determined using the increase of the sensor resistance as function of the bias current. The measured temperature increase is in good agreement with a finite element model and a simple analytical thermal model. The heat conductance of our system is limited by the 1 μm thick electrically insulating silicon dioxide layer between the sensor stack and the underlying silicon wafer, thus the heat conductance is proportional to the sensor area and inversely proportional to the oxide thickness. This simple heat conductance determines the relationship between bias current and sensor temperature, and we show that 25 μm wide sensor on a 1 μm oxide can sustain a bias current of 30 mA for an allowed temperature increase of 5 °C. The method and models used are generally applicable for thin film sensor systems. Further, the consequences for biosensor applications of the present sensor designs and the impact on future sensor designs are discussed.

  3. A theoretical study of magnetoelectronic and switching properties of molecular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soti, V.; Ravan, B. Abedi

    2016-01-01

    Electronic transport and switching properties of molecule-based magnetic tunnel junctions are investigated using the first-principles density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green function methods. As a result of being sandwiched between the ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-polarization is induced in the nonmagnetic organic atoms. Magnitudes of the spin-polarizations in the trans-polyacetylene, cis-polyacetylene, terphenyl and pentacene chains are calculated and it is suggested that among these the pentacene molecules, because of showing a relatively higher magnetization can theoretically be more appropriate for utilization in spintronic devices. Furthermore, electrical switching capabilities of the junctions are studied and the results reveal that the pentacene junction due to having a larger ON/OFF ratio shows a better switching behavior. Finally, magnetoresistive properties are studied and it is shown that applying torsion can be an effective method to enhance and also adjust magnitudes of the magnetoresistances of the junctions.

  4. Resistivity dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the dependence of magnetoresistance effect on resistivity (ρ) in Co/ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering at different sputtering pressures with different ZnO contents. The magnitude of the resistivity reflects different carrier transport regimes ranging from metallic to hopping behaviors. Large room-temperature magnetoresistance greater than 8% is obtained in the resistivity range from 0.08 to 0.5 Ω · cm. The magnetoresistance value decreases markedly when the resistivity of the films is less than 0.08 Ω · cm or greater than 0.5 Ω · cm. When 0.08 Ω · cm < ρ < 0.5 Ω · cm, the conduction contains two channels: the spin-dependent tunneling channel and the spin-independent second-order hopping (N = 2). The former gives rise to a high room-temperature magnetoresistance effect. When ρ > 0.5 Ω · cm, the spin-independent higher-order hopping (N > 2) comes into play and decreases the tunneling magnetoresistance value. For the samples with ρ < 0.08 Ω · cm, reduced magnetoresistance is mainly ascribed to the formation of percolation paths through interconnected elongated metallic Co particles. This observation is significant for the improvement of room-temperature magnetoresistance value for future spintronic devices. PMID:24393445

  5. Effects of Cigarette Smoke, Cessation, and Switching to Two Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Products on Lung Lipid Metabolism in C57BL/6 and Apoe-/- Mice-An Integrative Systems Toxicology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Titz, Bjoern; Boué, Stéphanie; Phillips, Blaine; Talikka, Marja; Vihervaara, Terhi; Schneider, Thomas; Nury, Catherine; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Peck, Michael J; Schlage, Walter K; Cabanski, Maciej; Leroy, Patrice; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Veljkovic, Emilija; Ekroos, Kim; Laaksonen, Reijo; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-02-01

    The impact of cigarette smoke (CS), a major cause of lung diseases, on the composition and metabolism of lung lipids is incompletely understood. Here, we integrated quantitative lipidomics and proteomics to investigate exposure effects on lung lipid metabolism in a C57BL/6 and an Apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mouse study. In these studies, mice were exposed to high concentrations of 3R4F reference CS, aerosol from potential modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) or filtered air (Sham) for up to 8 months. The 2 assessed MRTPs, the prototypical MRTP for C57BL/6 mice and the Tobacco Heating System 2.2 for Apoe(-/-) mice, utilize "heat-not-burn" technologies and were each matched in nicotine concentrations to the 3R4F CS. After 2 months of CS exposure, some groups were either switched to the MRTP or underwent cessation. In both mouse strains, CS strongly affected several categories of lung lipids and lipid-related proteins. Candidate surfactant lipids, surfactant proteins, and surfactant metabolizing proteins were increased. Inflammatory eicosanoids, their metabolic enzymes, and several ceramide classes were elevated. Overall, CS induced a coordinated lipid response controlled by transcription regulators such as SREBP proteins and supported by other metabolic adaptations. In contrast, most of these changes were absent in the mice exposed to the potential MRTPs, in the cessation group, and the switching group. Our findings demonstrate the complex biological response of the lungs to CS exposure and support the benefits of cessation or switching to a heat-not-burn product using a design such as those employed in this study. PMID:26582801

  6. Effects of Cigarette Smoke, Cessation, and Switching to Two Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Products on Lung Lipid Metabolism in C57BL/6 and Apoe−/− Mice—An Integrative Systems Toxicology Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Boué, Stéphanie; Phillips, Blaine; Talikka, Marja; Vihervaara, Terhi; Schneider, Thomas; Nury, Catherine; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Peck, Michael J.; Schlage, Walter K.; Cabanski, Maciej; Leroy, Patrice; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Veljkovic, Emilija; Ekroos, Kim; Laaksonen, Reijo; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The impact of cigarette smoke (CS), a major cause of lung diseases, on the composition and metabolism of lung lipids is incompletely understood. Here, we integrated quantitative lipidomics and proteomics to investigate exposure effects on lung lipid metabolism in a C57BL/6 and an Apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe−/−) mouse study. In these studies, mice were exposed to high concentrations of 3R4F reference CS, aerosol from potential modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) or filtered air (Sham) for up to 8 months. The 2 assessed MRTPs, the prototypical MRTP for C57BL/6 mice and the Tobacco Heating System 2.2 for Apoe−/− mice, utilize “heat-not-burn” technologies and were each matched in nicotine concentrations to the 3R4F CS. After 2 months of CS exposure, some groups were either switched to the MRTP or underwent cessation. In both mouse strains, CS strongly affected several categories of lung lipids and lipid-related proteins. Candidate surfactant lipids, surfactant proteins, and surfactant metabolizing proteins were increased. Inflammatory eicosanoids, their metabolic enzymes, and several ceramide classes were elevated. Overall, CS induced a coordinated lipid response controlled by transcription regulators such as SREBP proteins and supported by other metabolic adaptations. In contrast, most of these changes were absent in the mice exposed to the potential MRTPs, in the cessation group, and the switching group. Our findings demonstrate the complex biological response of the lungs to CS exposure and support the benefits of cessation or switching to a heat-not-burn product using a design such as those employed in this study. PMID:26582801

  7. Planar Hall magnetoresistive aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B; Ramulu, T S; Kim, K W; Venu, R; Lee, J J; Kim, C G

    2014-09-15

    The use of aptamer-based assays is an emerging and attractive approach in disease research and clinical diagnostics. A sensitive aptamer-based sandwich-type sensor is presented to detect human thrombin using a planar Hall magnetoresistive (PHR) sensor in cooperation with superparamagnetic labels. A PHR sensor has the great advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio, a small offset voltage and linear response in the low-field region, allowing it to act as a high-resolution biosensor. In the system presented here, the sensor has an active area of 50 µm × 50 µm with a 10-nm gold layer deposited onto the sensor surface prior to the binding of thiolated DNA primary aptamer. A polydimethylsiloxane well of 600-µm radius and 1-mm height was prepared around the sensor surface to maintain the same specific area and volume for each sensor. The sensor response was traced in real time upon the addition of streptavidin-functionalized magnetic labels on the sensor. A linear response to the thrombin concentration in the range of 86 pM-8.6 µM and a lower detection limit down to 86 pM was achieved by the proposed present method with a sample volume consumption of 2 µl. The proposed aptasensor has a strong potential for application in clinical diagnosis. PMID:24727201

  8. Noncontact vibration measurements using magnetoresistive sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.

    2016-06-01

    Contactless instrumentations is more and more used in turbomachinery testing thanks to the non-intrusive character and the possibility to monitor all the components of the machine at the same time. Performances of blade tip timing (BTT) measurement systems, used for noncontact turbine blade vibration measurements, in terms of uncertainty and resolution are strongly affected by sensor characteristics and processing methods. The sensors used for BTT generate pulses, used for precise measurements of turbine blades time of arrival. Nowadays proximity sensors used in this application are based on optical, capacitive, eddy current and microwave measuring principle. Pressure sensors has been also tried. This paper summarizes the results achieved using a novel instrumentation based on the magnetoresistive sensing elements. The characterization of the novel probe has been already published. The measurement system was validated in test benches and in a real jet-engine comparing different sensor technologies. The whole instrumentation was improved. The work presented in this paper focuses on the current developments. In particular, attention is given to the data processing software and new sensor configurations.

  9. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  10. Spin Hall Magnetoresistance in Metallic Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junyeon; Sheng, Peng; Takahashi, Saburo; Mitani, Seiji; Hayashi, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) is studied in metallic bilayers that consist of a heavy metal (HM) layer and a ferromagnetic metal (FM) layer. We find a nearly tenfold increase of SMR in W/CoFeB compared to previously studied HM/ferromagnetic insulator systems. The SMR increases with decreasing temperature despite the negligible change in the W layer resistivity. A model is developed to account for the absorption of the longitudinal spin current to the FM layer, one of the key characteristics of a metallic ferromagnet. We find that the model not only quantitatively describes the HM layer thickness dependence of SMR, allowing accurate estimation of the spin Hall angle and the spin diffusion length of the HM layer, but also can account for the temperature dependence of SMR by assuming a temperature dependent spin polarization of the FM layer. These results illustrate the unique role a metallic ferromagnetic layer plays in defining spin transmission across the HM/FM interface. PMID:26991195

  11. Giant magnetoresistance of copper/permalloy multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holody, P.; Chiang, W. C.; Loloee, R.; Bass, J.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Schroeder, P. A.

    1998-11-01

    Current perpendicular (CPP) and current in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistances (MR) have been measured on sputtered Cu/Py (Py=Permalloy) multilayers at 4.2 K. The CPP-MR is several times larger than the CIP-MR. For fixed Py layer thickness, tPy=1.5 nm, both the CPP and CIP MR's show oscillations with increasing tCu with a period similar to that previously reported for the CIP-MR. The CPP data for Cu thicknesses large enough that exchange interactions between Py layers are small are analyzed using the two spin-current model for both infinite and finite spin-diffusion length in Py. The very low coercive field of Py leads to a larger than usual uncertainty in the derived parameters, because of the uncertainty in the degree of antiparallel alignment required for the analysis. Three alternative analyses give bulk and interface spin-dependent anisotropy parameters, β, and γ, of comparable size, so that both must be considered in determining the CPP-MR. Our preferred values, based upon an assumed IPysf=5.5+/-1 nm, are β=0.65+/-0.1 and γ=0.76+/-0.1. These values produce good fits to the CPP-MR's of Co/Cu/Py/Cu multilayers.

  12. Giant magnetoresistance materials for magnetic recording technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Adams, C.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work focused on a class of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca, Ba, or Sr) that exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition near a ferromagnetic phase transition temperature. This yields a very large magnetoresistance; thus these materials may have important uses as magnetic sensors in a variety of applications, ranging from automobiles to read heads for magnetic storage. In addition, the transport current in the ferromagnetic state is likely to be very highly polarized, which means that additional device applications using the phenomena of spin-polarized tunneling can be envisioned. Use of these materials as magnetic sensors depends upon learning to control the synthesis parameters (principally temperature, pressure and composition) to achieve a specific carrier concentration and/or mobility. A second challenge is the high magnetic fields ({ge}1 Tesla) currently required to achieve a large change in resistance. The authors began an investigation of two novel approaches to this field-sensitivity problem, involving the development of multilayer structures of the TMO materials. Finally, they began to explore the use of epitaxial strain as a means of changing the transport properties in thin-film multilayers.

  13. Colossal magnetoresistance in topological Kondo insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slieptsov, Igor O.; Karnaukhov, Igor N.

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal electronic properties of complex systems require new ideas concerning explanation of their behavior and possibility of realization. In this acticle we show that a colossal magnetoresistance is realized in the state of the topological Kondo insulator, that is similar to the Kondo insulator state in the Kondo lattice. The mechanism of the phenomenon is the following: in the spin gapless phase an external magnetic field induces the gap in the spectrum of spin excitations, the gap in the spectrum of fermions is opened due to a hybridization between spin and fermion subsystems at half-filling, as the result the magnetic field leads to metal–insulator (or bad metal–insulator) phase transition. A model of the topological Kondo lattice defined on a honeycomb lattice is studied for the case when spinless fermion bands are half-filled. It is shown that the hybridization between local moments and itinerant fermions should be understood as the hybridization between corresponding Majorana fermions of the spin and charge sectors. The system is a topological insulator, single fermion and spin excitations at low energies are massive. We will show that a spin gap induces a gap in the charge channel, it leads to an appearance of a topological insulator state with chiral gapless edge modes and the Chern number one or two depending on the exchange integrals’ values. The relevance of this to the traditional Kondo insulator state is discussed.

  14. Classical and quantum routes to linear magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingshi; Rosenbaum, T F

    2008-09-01

    The hallmark of materials science is the ability to tailor the microstructure of a given material to provide a desired response. Carbon mixed with iron provides the steel of buildings and bridges; impurities sprinkled in silicon single crystals form the raw materials of the electronics revolution; pinning centres in superconductors let them become powerful magnets. Here, we show that either adding a few parts per million of the proper chemical impurities to indium antimonide, a well-known semiconductor, or redesigning the material's structure on the micrometre scale, can transform its response to an applied magnetic field. The former approach is purely quantum mechanical; the latter a classical outgrowth of disorder, turned to advantage. In both cases, the magnetoresistive response--at the heart of magnetic sensor technology--can be converted to a simple, large and linear function of field that does not saturate. Harnessing the effects of disorder has the further advantage of extending the useful applications range of such a magnetic sensor to very high temperatures by circumventing the usual limitations imposed by phonon scattering. PMID:18719705

  15. Lateral flow immunoassay using magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taton, Kristin; Johnson, Diane; Guire, Patrick; Lange, Erik; Tondra, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic particles have been adapted for use as labels in biochemical lateral flow strip tests. Standard gold particle lateral flow assays are generally qualitative; however, with magnetic particles, quantitative results can be obtained by using electronic detection systems with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. As described here, these small integrated sensor chips can detect the presence of magnetic labels in capture spots whose volume is approximately 150 μm×150 μm×150 μm. The range of linear detection is better than two orders of magnitude; the total range is up to four orders of magnitude. The system was demonstrated with both indirect and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for protein detection of rabbit IgG and interferon-γ, respectively, achieving detection of 12 pg/ml protein. Ultimately, the goal is for the detector to be fully integrated into the lateral flow strip backing to form a single consumable item that is interrogated by a handheld electronic reader.

  16. Linear unsaturating magnetoresistance in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ying Tong; Lara, Silvia; Love, Cameron; Ramakrishnan, Navneeth; Adam, Shaffique

    Theoretical works have shown that disordered systems exhibit classical magnetoresistance (MR). In this talk, we examine a variety of experimental systems that observe linear MR at high magnetic fields, including silver chalcogenides, graphene, graphite and Weyl semimetals. We show that a careful analysis of the magnitude of the MR, as well as the field strength at which the MR changes from quadratic to linear, reveal important properties of the system, such as the ratio of the root-mean-square fluctuations in the carrier density and the average carrier density. By looking at other properties such as the zero-field mobility, we show that this carrier density inhomogeneity is consistent with what is known about the microscopic impurities in these experiments. The application of this disorder-induced MR to a variety of different experimental scenarios underline the universality of these theoretical models. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant Number R-607-265-01312.

  17. Nodal Quasiparticle in Pseudogapped Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mannella, N.

    2010-06-02

    A characteristic feature of the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors is the dichotomy between the electronic excitations along the nodal (diagonal) and antinodal (parallel to the Cu-O bonds) directions in momentum space, generally assumed to be linked to the d-wave symmetry of the superconducting state. Angle-resolved photoemission measurements in the superconducting state have revealed a quasiparticle spectrum with a d-wave gap structure that exhibits a maximum along the antinodal direction and vanishes along the nodal direction. Subsequent measurements have shown that, at low doping levels, this gap structure persists even in the high-temperature metallic state, although the nodal points of the superconducting state spread out in finite Fermi arcs. This is the so-called pseudogap phase, and it has been assumed that it is closely linked to the superconducting state, either by assigning it to fluctuating superconductivity or by invoking orders which are natural competitors of d-wave superconductors. Here we report experimental evidence that a very similar pseudogap state with a nodal-antinodal dichotomous character exists in a system that is markedly different from a superconductor: the ferromagnetic metallic groundstate of the colossal magnetoresistive bilayer manganite La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Our findings therefore cast doubt on the assumption that the pseudogap state in the copper oxides and the nodal-antinodal dichotomy are hallmarks of the superconductivity state.

  18. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  19. Magnetoresistance of heavy and light metal/ferromagnet bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Mendil, Johannes; Ghosh, Abhijit; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gabureac, Mihai; Trassin, Morgan; Fiebig, Manfred; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-11-09

    We studied the magnetoresistance of normal metal (NM)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers in the linear and nonlinear (current-dependent) regimes and compared it with the amplitude of the spin-orbit torques and thermally induced electric fields. Our experiments reveal that the magnetoresistance of the heavy NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ta, W, and Pt) is phenomenologically similar to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of YIG/Pt, but has a much larger anisotropy of the order of 0.5%, which increases with the atomic number of the NM. This SMR-like behavior is absent in light NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ti and Cu), which present the standard anisotropic magnetoresistance expected from polycrystalline FM layers. In the Ta, W, and Pt/Co bilayers, we find an additional magnetoresistance directly proportional to the current and to the transverse component of the magnetization. This so-called unidirectional SMR, of the order of 0.005%, is largest in W and correlates with the amplitude of the antidamping spin-orbit torque. The unidirectional SMR is below the accuracy of our measurements in YIG/Pt.

  20. The Effects of Fringe Fields on Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Macià, Ferran; Wang, Fujian; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Kent, Andrew; Flatté, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The importance of random hyperfine fields is now widely acknowledged as a vital ingredient for the phenomena of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR). Recent experiments (Phys. Rev. X 2 021013 (2012)) have shown that another type of random field - fringe fields due to a nearby ferromagnet - can also dramatically affect magnetoconductivity. A theoretical analysis of the fringe field OMAR is challenging due to the different properties of the fringe fields when compared to the hyperfine fields. For instance, the range of fringe field strengths is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the hyperfine couplings. The correlation length between fringe fields is also larger by the same degree. We use a recent theory of OMAR that is well-suited to numerically calculate the magnetoresistance with both hyperfine and fringe fields present. We find agreement with key features of experimental fringe-field magnetoresistance dependences on applied magnetic field, including the field values of extrema of the magnetoresistance, the region of large magnetoresistance effects from the fringe fields, and the sign of the effect. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.

  1. Stability of standing spin wave in permalloy thin film studied by anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, K.; Yokotani, Y.; Cui, X.; Yakata, S.; Kimura, T.

    2015-12-21

    We have investigated the stability for the resonant spin precession under the strong microwave magnetic field by a specially developed detection method using the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. The electrically separated excitation and detection circuits enable us to investigate the influence of the heating effect and the nonuniform spin dynamics independently. The large detecting current is found to induce the field shift of the resonant spectra because of the Joule heating. From the microwave power dependence, we found that the linear response regime for the standing spin wave is larger than that for the ferromagnetic resonance. This robust characteristic of the standing spin wave is an important advantage for the high power operation of the spin-wave device.

  2. Effect of interface-induced exchange fields on cuprate-manganite spin switches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaohua; Visani, C; Nemes, N M; Fitzsimmons, M R; Zhu, L Y; Tornos, J; Garcia-Hernandez, M; Zhernenkov, M; Hoffmann, A; Leon, C; Santamaria, J; te Velthuis, S G E

    2012-05-18

    We examine the anomalous inverse spin switch behavior in La0.7Ca0.3MnO3(LCMO)/YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO)/LCMO trilayers by combined transport studies and polarized neutron reflectometry. Measuring magnetization profiles and magnetoresistance in an in-plane rotating magnetic field, we prove that, contrary to many accepted theoretical scenarios, the relative orientation between the two LCMO's magnetizations is not sufficient to determine the magnetoresistance. Rather the field dependence of magnetoresistance is explained by the interplay between the applied magnetic field and the (exponential tail of the) induced exchange field in YBCO, the latter originating from the electronic reconstruction at the LCMO/YBCO interfaces. PMID:23003184

  3. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  4. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on

  5. Ballistic Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Single-Atom Contacts.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, J; Otte, F; Néel, N; Weismann, A; Mokrousov, Y; Kröger, J; Berndt, R; Heinze, S

    2016-02-10

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance, that is, the sensitivity of the electrical resistance of magnetic materials on the magnetization direction, is expected to be strongly enhanced in ballistic transport through nanoscale junctions. However, unambiguous experimental evidence of this effect is difficult to achieve. We utilize single-atom junctions to measure this ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Single Co and Ir atoms are deposited on domains and domain walls of ferromagnetic Fe layers on W(110) to control their magnetization directions. They are contacted with nonmagnetic tips in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to measure the junction conductances. Large changes of the magnetoresistance occur from the tunneling to the ballistic regime due to the competition of localized and delocalized d-orbitals, which are differently affected by spin-orbit coupling. This work shows that engineering the AMR at the single atom level is feasible. PMID:26783634

  6. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  7. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-06-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  8. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior ofmore » the magnetoresistance in WTe₂ was identified.« less

  9. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  10. Nanoscale dissipation and magnetoresistive 1/f noise in spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Zhu; Nowak, E. R.; Haughey, K. M.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2011-09-01

    Spatial correlations of 1/f noise in yoke-shaped, giant magnetoresistance spin valve sensors are reported. An upper bound of 135 nm, corresponding to a magnetic volume of <105 nm3, is determined for the lateral size of the magnetic fluctuators responsible for the magnetoresistive 1/f noise in regions where the resistance susceptibility is large. The normalized noise power is found to scale inversely with the separation between voltage taps along the arm of the yoke, also consistent with a local noise mechanism. The magnetoresistive 1/f noise is associated with quasiequilibrium fluctuations in the micromagnetic structure having a length scale set by the disorder formed during the deposition and processing of the materials stack.