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Sample records for magnetospheric radio emissions

  1. Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, T. D.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Jupiter has now been observed over 24 octaves of the radio spectrum, from about 0.01 MHz to 300,000 MHz. Its radio emissions fill the entire spectral region where interplanetary electromagnetic propagation is possible at wavelengths longer than infrared. Three distinct types of radiation are responsible for this radio spectrum. Thermal emission from the atmosphere accounts for virtually all the radiation at the high frequency end. Synchrotron emission from the trapped high-energy particle belt deep within the inner magnetosphere is the dominant spectral component from about 4000 to 40 MHz. The third class of radiation consists of several distinct components of sporadic low frequency emission below 40 MHz. The decimeter wavelength emission is considered, taking into account the discovery of synchrotron emission, radiation by high-energy electrons in a magnetic field, and the present status of Jovian synchrotron phenomenology. Attention is also given to the decameter and hectometer wavelength emission, and emissions at kilometric wavelengths.

  2. Theories of radio emissions and plasma waves. [in Jupiter magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The complex region of Jupiter's radio emissions at decameter wavelengths, the so-called DAM, is considered, taking into account the basic theoretical ideas which underly both the older and newer theories and models. Linear theories are examined, giving attention to direct emission mechanisms, parallel propagation, perpendicular propagation, and indirect emission mechanisms. An investigation of nonlinear theories is also conducted. Three-wave interactions are discussed along with decay instabilities, and three-wave up-conversio. Aspects of the Io and plasma torus interaction are studied, and a mechanism by which Io can accelerate electrons is reviewed.

  3. Radio emission observed by Galileo in the inner Jovian magnetosphere during orbit A-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. Douglas; Gurnett, Donald A.; Groene, Joseph B.

    2005-10-01

    The Galileo spacecraft encountered the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter on its way to a flyby of Amalthea on November 5, 2002. During this encounter, the spacecraft observed distinct spin modulation of plasma wave emissions. The modulations occurred in the frequency range from a few hundred hertz to a few hundred kilohertz and probably include at least two distinct wave modes. Assuming transverse EM radiation, we have used the swept-frequency receivers of the electric dipole antenna to determine the direction to the source of these emissions. Additionally, with knowledge of the magnetic field some constraints are placed on the wave mode of the emission based on a comparative analysis of the wave power versus spin phase of the different emissions. The emission appears in several bands separated by attenuation lanes. The analysis indicates that the lanes are probably due to blockage of the freely propagating emission by high density regions of the Io torus near the magnetic equator. Radio emission at lower frequencies (<40 kHz) appears to emanate from sources at high latitude and is not attenuated. Emission at f>80kHz is consistent with O-mode and Z-mode. Lower frequency emissions could be a mixture of O-mode, Z-mode and whistler mode. Emission for f<5kHz shows bands that are similar to upper hybrid resonance bands observed near the terrestrial plasmapause, and also elsewhere in Jovian magnetosphere. Based on the observations and knowledge of similar terrestrial emissions, we hypothesize that radio emission results from mode conversion near the strong density gradient of the inner radius of the cold plasma torus, similar to the generation of nKOM and continuum emission observed in the outer Jovian magnetosphere and in the terrestrial magnetosphere from source regions near the plasmapause.

  4. ORIGIN OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER INDUCED RADIO EMISSIONS AT ULTRACOOL DWARFS: MAGNETOSPHERE-IONOSPHERE COUPLING CURRENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, J. D.; Burleigh, M. R.; Casewell, S. L.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Wynn, G. A.; Clarke, J. T.; West, A. A.

    2012-11-20

    A number of ultracool dwarfs emit circularly polarized radio waves generated by the electron cyclotron maser instability. In the solar system such radio is emitted from regions of strong auroral magnetic-field-aligned currents. We thus apply ideas developed for Jupiter's magnetosphere, being a well-studied rotationally dominated analog in our solar system, to the case of fast-rotating UCDs. We explain the properties of the radio emission from UCDs by showing that it would arise from the electric currents resulting from an angular velocity shear in the fast-rotating magnetic field and plasma, i.e., by an extremely powerful analog of the process that causes Jupiter's auroras. Such a velocity gradient indicates that these bodies interact significantly with their space environment, resulting in intense auroral emissions. These results strongly suggest that auroras occur on bodies outside our solar system.

  5. On the Methods of Determining the Radio Emission Geometry in Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyks, J.; Rudak, B.; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We present a modification of the relativistic phase shift method of determining the radio emission geometry from pulsar magnetospheres proposed by Gangadhara & Gupta (2001). Our modification provides a method of determining radio emission altitudes which does not depend on the viewing geometry and does not require polarization measurements. We suggest application of the method to the outer edges of averaged radio pulse profiles to identify magnetic field lines associated with'the edges of the pulse and, thereby, to test the geometric method based on the measurement of the pulse width at the lowest intensity level. We show that another relativistic method proposed by Blaskiewicz et al. (1991) provides upper limits for emission altitudes associated with the outer edges of pulse profiles. A comparison of these limits with the altitudes determined with the geometric method may be used to probe the importance of rotational distortions of magnetic field and refraction effects in the pulsar magnetosphere. We provide a comprehensive discussion of the assumptions used in the relativistic methods.

  6. Observations of low-frequency radio emissions in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filbert, Paul C.; Kellogg, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation in the earth's magnetosphere was investigated for the frequency range between 10 kHz and 80 kHz, using data from the Minnesota Plasma Wave Experiment aboard the IMP 6 spacecraft. Two types of radio emissions were examined, the first being the nonthermal continuum radiation, and the second, much more impulsive, is the radiation which lies between 10 and 60 kHz. The first type of radiation was found to correlate with the enhancements of the magnetic substorm index AE and to follow the onset of the negative bay feature of the AU index by about 20 min. The second radiation was found to correlate with auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) on a time scale of about 1 min; this radiation was found to have a source direction very near that of the coincident AKR.

  7. Multi-instrument study of the Jovian radio emissions triggered by solar wind shocks and inferred magnetospheric subcorotation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Echer, E.; Zarka, P.; Lamy, L.; Delamere, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of solar wind conditions on the Jovian auroral radio emissions has long been debated, mostly because it has always been difficult to get accurate solar wind and radio observations at the same time. We present here a study of Jupiter's radio emissions compared to solar wind conditions using radio (RPWS) and magnetic (MAG) data from the Cassini spacecraft from October to December 2000, just before its flyby of Jupiter. The spacecraft was then in the solar wind and could record both the radio emissions coming from the Jovian magnetosphere and the solar wind magnetic field (IMF). With these data, we found a good correspondence between the arrival of interplanetary shocks at Jupiter and the occurrence of radio storms. Our results confirm those from the previous studies showing that fast forward shocks (FFS) trigger mostly dusk emissions, whereas fast reverse shocks (FRS) trigger both dawn and dusk emissions. FFS-triggered emissions are found to occur 10-30 h after the shock arrival when the IMF is weak (below 2 nT), and quasi-immediately after shock arrival when the IMF is strong (above 2 nT). FRS-triggered emissions are found to occur quasi-immediately even when the IMF is weak. We show and discuss in depth the characteristic morphologies of the radio emissions related to each type of shock and their implications. We also used simultaneous radio observations from the ground-based Nançay decameter array and from the Galileo radio instrument (PWS). From the comparison of these measurements with Cassini's, we deduce the regions where the radio storms occur, as well as the radio source subcorotation rates. We show that FFS-triggered emissions onset happens in a sector of local time centered around 15:00 LT, and that all the shock-triggered radio sources sub-corotate with a subcorotation rate of ~50% when the IMF is below 2 nT and of ~80% when it is above 2 nT. These rates could correspond to the extended and compressed states of the Jovian magnetosphere.

  8. Magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research - 1987-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    This review covers research performed in the area of magnetospheric plasma waves and wave-particle interactions as well as magnetospheric radio emissions. The report focuses on the near-completion of the discovery phase of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres with the successful completion of the Voyager 2 encounters of Neptune and Uranus. Consideration is given to the advances made in detailed studies and theoretical investigations of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere or in magnetospheric plasmas in general.

  9. The implication for the presence of a magnetosphere on Uranus in the relationship of EUV and radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Smith, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A report by Kaiser and Desch (1985) indicates that nonthermal radio emissions from Uranus were not detectable from the Voyager spacecraft at a range of less than 0.7 AU. This observation suggests that the planet may have significantly different magnetospheric characteristics than Jupiter and Saturn. The ratio of atomic to molecular emission in the hydrogenic atmospheres of the outer planets varies over a wide range depending on the nature of the exciting process and the altitude of the sources. The importance of the ratio of atomic to molecular emission is discussed along with the escape of atomic hydrogen. On the basis of an evaluation of the observations, the possibility is raised that the strong EUV radiation from Uranus may not be auroral in origin.

  10. Radio wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.; Lyubarskii, Yu. E.

    Pulsar magnetospheres are known to contain an ultrarelativistic highly magnetized plasma which streams along the open magnetic lines. The radio emission observed from pulsars is believed to originate sufficiently deep in the open field line tube, so that the characteristics of outgoing waves can be influenced by propagation in the magnetospheric plasma. Refraction of radio waves in pulsar magnetospheres appears to be efficient. The effect not only influences the observed pulse width and its frequency dependency. It can alter the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region which can be derived from the observations of pulsar interstellar scintillations. Transverse ray separation versus pulse longitude calculated allowing for magnetospheric refraction appears to be in qualitative agreement with that observed. In particular, the nonmonotonic character of the curve can be attributed to nonmonotonic distribution of the plasma number density across the open field line tube which makes the rays emitted at different spatial locations deviate in the opposite directions. Proceeding from the frequency dependence of refraction some predictions are made about the frequency evolution of the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region. Magnetospheric refraction can also determine the profile shape giving rise to ray grouping into separate components. It will be demonstrated that the salient features of profile morphology can be explained within the frame of a primordial hollow-cone emission model taking into account refraction of rays in pulsar plasma. Then the frequency evolution of profile structure is naturally interpreted as a consequence of frequency dependence of refraction. As the waves propagate in the magnetospheric plasma their polarization also evolves essentially. In the vicinity of the emission region normal waves are linearly polarized and propagate independently, with the polarization plane following the orientation of the local magnetic field. As

  11. Radio imaging of Jupiter's magnetosphere with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter emits intense decameter radio waves, detectable from the ground in the range ~10 to 40 MHz. They are produced by energetic electron precipitations in its auroral regions, as well as near the magnetic footprints of the galilean satellite Io. Radio imaging imaging of these decameter emissions with arcsecond angular resolution and millisecond time resolution should give access to: - an improved mapping of the surface planetary magnetic field, deduced from the highest frequency of radio emission coming from a given point above the ionosphere (emission is produced at the local electron cyclotron frequency, proportional to the magnetic field amplitude) ; - detailed information on the Io-Jupiter electrodynamic interaction: imaging will allow to measure the angle between the field line instantaneously threading through Io and the one(s) emitting radio waves at that time, which is a strong constraint of the interaction mechanism (current circuit or Alfvèn waves) ; when performed at millisecond time resolution, imaging should allow to "see" the electron bunches thought to be at the origin of the sporadic drifting decameter bursts, and to follow them along magnetic field lines, measuring thus their speed and energy, and revealing possible electric potential drops along magnetic field lines ; - correlation of radio images with ultraviolet and infrared images of the aurora as well as of the galilean satellite footprints will provide complementary information on the precipitated energy and an interesting input to magnetospheric dynamics ; - imaging of decameter radio sources through the Io plasma torus will allow to probe for the first time the torus electron density as a function of longitude through analysis of the Faraday rotation of decameter waves crossing the torus ; diffraction effects that may be at the origin of observed fringe patterns could also be studied. Very fast imaging should be allowed by the very high intensity of Jovian decameter bursts, up to

  12. Excitation of a magnetospheric maser through modification of the Earth's ionosphere by high-power HF radio emission from a ground-based transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, G. A. Belov, A. S.; Frolov, V. L.; Rapoport, V. O.; Parrot, M.

    2010-01-15

    A method for controlled excitation of a magnetospheric maser through the production of artificial density ducts by high-power HF radio emission from the Earth's surface has been proposed and implemented in an in-situ experiment. Artificial density ducts allow one to affect the maser resonator system and the excitation and propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in a disturbed magnetic flux tube. The experimental data presented here were obtained at the mid-latitude Sura heating facility. The characteristics of electromagnetic and plasma disturbances at outer-ionosphere altitudes were measured using the onboard equipment of the DEMETER satellite as it passed through the magnetic flux tube rested on the region of intense generation of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  13. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time-varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the mid-frequency range (100-1,000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise by a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise has been detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the Earth during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place. ""Magnetospheric lightning'' can be invoked to explain the spectral shape of the observed spectra.

  14. Triggered Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    Certain Jovian radio emissions seem to be triggered from outside, by much weaker radio waves from the sun. Recently found in the Voyager observations near Jupiter, such triggering occurs at hectometric wavelengths during the arrival of solar radio bursts, with the triggered emissions lasting sometimes more than an hour as they slowly drifted toward higher frequencies. Like the previous discovery of similar triggered emissions at the earth, this suggests that Jupiter's emissions might also originate from natural radio lasers.

  15. Magnetospherically driven optical and radio aurorae at the end of the stellar main sequence.

    PubMed

    Hallinan, G; Littlefair, S P; Cotter, G; Bourke, S; Harding, L K; Pineda, J S; Butler, R P; Golden, A; Basri, G; Doyle, J G; Kao, M M; Berdyugina, S V; Kuznetsov, A; Rupen, M P; Antonova, A

    2015-07-30

    Aurorae are detected from all the magnetized planets in our Solar System, including Earth. They are powered by magnetospheric current systems that lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons into the high-latitude regions of the upper atmosphere. In the case of the gas-giant planets, these aurorae include highly polarized radio emission at kilohertz and megahertz frequencies produced by the precipitating electrons, as well as continuum and line emission in the infrared, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray parts of the spectrum, associated with the collisional excitation and heating of the hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. Here we report simultaneous radio and optical spectroscopic observations of an object at the end of the stellar main sequence, located right at the boundary between stars and brown dwarfs, from which we have detected radio and optical auroral emissions both powered by magnetospheric currents. Whereas the magnetic activity of stars like our Sun is powered by processes that occur in their lower atmospheres, these aurorae are powered by processes originating much further out in the magnetosphere of the dwarf star that couple energy into the lower atmosphere. The dissipated power is at least four orders of magnitude larger than what is produced in the Jovian magnetosphere, revealing aurorae to be a potentially ubiquitous signature of large-scale magnetospheres that can scale to luminosities far greater than those observed in our Solar System. These magnetospheric current systems may also play a part in powering some of the weather phenomena reported on brown dwarfs. PMID:26223623

  16. Synchronous x-ray and radio mode switches: a rapid global transformation of the pulsar magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, W; Hessels, J W T; Kuiper, L; van Leeuwen, J; Mitra, D; de Plaa, J; Rankin, J M; Stappers, B W; Wright, G A E; Basu, R; Alexov, A; Coenen, T; Grießmeier, J-M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Serylak, M; Pilia, M; Sobey, C; Weltevrede, P; Zagkouris, K; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Batejat, F; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Orrú, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rawlings, S; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schoenmakers, A; Shulevski, A; Sluman, J; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; ter Veen, S; Vermeulen, R; van de Brink, R H; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2013-01-25

    Pulsars emit from low-frequency radio waves up to high-energy gamma-rays, generated anywhere from the stellar surface out to the edge of the magnetosphere. Detecting correlated mode changes across the electromagnetic spectrum is therefore key to understanding the physical relationship among the emission sites. Through simultaneous observations, we detected synchronous switching in the radio and x-ray emission properties of PSR B0943+10. When the pulsar is in a sustained radio-"bright" mode, the x-rays show only an unpulsed, nonthermal component. Conversely, when the pulsar is in a radio-"quiet" mode, the x-ray luminosity more than doubles and a 100% pulsed thermal component is observed along with the nonthermal component. This indicates rapid, global changes to the conditions in the magnetosphere, which challenge all proposed pulsar emission theories. PMID:23349288

  17. Modeling of radio emissions from Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Curran, D. B.

    We have developed a plasma model of the Neptunian magnetosphere that includes a density cavity centered on the L=6 magnetic field line. Assuming the O8 magnetic field model, we have performed ray tracing of smooth radio emission from Neptune, and the results generally support the findings of Ladreiter et al. (1991), but differ in details of the source locations. In addition, we have examined source locations of bursty radio emission that are consistent with propagation at small wave normal angles as hypothesized for the temperature anisotropic beam instability (TABI) (Winglee et al., 1992). The source locations are adjacent (complementary) to the sources of the smooth radio emission. Using previously developed plasma and magnetic field models for Uranus, we have performed a similar study of bursty radio emissions. Again the source locations appear to be adjacent to the source regions of smooth radio emission, consistent with the TABI.

  18. Wave emissions from planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1989-01-01

    An important development in the Earth magnetosphere was the discovery of the boundary of the plasma sheet and its apparent role in the dynamics of the magnetotails. Three instabilities (negative energy mode, counterstreaming, and the Buneman instability) were investigated through analytical and numerical studies of their frequency and growth rate as a function of the angle of propagation.

  19. Plasma Density and Radio Echoes in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1995-01-01

    This project provided a opportunity to study a variety of interesting topics related to radio sounding in the magnetosphere. The results of this study are reported in two papers which have been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research and Radio Science, and various aspects of this study were also reported at meetings of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) at Baltimore, Maryland and the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI) at Boulder, Colorado. The major results of this study were also summarized during a one-day symposium on this topic sponsored by Marshall Space Flight Center in December 1994. The purpose of the study was to examine the density structure of the plasmasphere and determine the relevant mechanisms for producing radio echoes which can be detected by a radio sounder in the magnetosphere. Under this study we have examined density irregularities, biteouts, and outliers of the plasmasphere, studied focusing, specular reflection, ducting, and scattering by the density structures expected to occur in the magnetosphere, and predicted the echoes which can be detected by a magnetospheric radio sounder.

  20. AN EMISSION MECHANISM EXPLAINING OFF-PULSE EMISSION ORIGINATING IN THE OUTER MAGNETOSPHERE OF PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rahul; Mitra, Dipanjan; Melikidze, George I. E-mail: dmitra@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2013-08-01

    We have examined the cyclotron resonance instability developing in the relativistic outflowing plasma in the pulsar magnetosphere. The instability condition leads to radio emission in the subgigahertz frequency regime which is likely to be seen as off-pulse emission. Recent studies have shown the presence of off-pulse emission in long period pulsars, and we demonstrate this plasma process to be an energetically viable mechanism.

  1. Cyclotron side band emissions from magnetospheric electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1975-01-01

    Very low frequency emissions with subharmonic cyclotron frequency from magnetospheric electrons were detected by the S(3)-A satellite (Explorer 45) whose orbit is close to the magnetic equatorial plane where the wave-particle interaction is most efficient. These emissions were observed during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm in the nightside of the magnetosphere outside of the plasmasphere. During the event of these side-band emissions, the pitch angle distributions of high energy electrons (greater than 50 keV) and of energetic protons (greater than 100 keV) showed remarkable changes with time, whereas those of low energy electrons and protons remained approximately isotropic. In this type of event, emissions consist essentially of two bands, the one below the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and the other above. The emissions below are whistler mode, and the emissions above are electrostatic mode.

  2. Stellar radio emission (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelezniakov, V. V.

    The current understanding of the radio-emission characteristics of 'ordinary' main sequence stars as well as giants and supergiants is examined. Particular consideration is given to radio emission from supergiants, Young T Tauri stars, magnetic Ap stars, flare stars of UV Ceti type, Alpha Sco, and RS CVn objects. It is noted that the study of stellar radio emission is in its initial stage. Further progress in this area depends on successes in finding new radio sources, associated, for example, with magnetic stars, and on an intensified investigation of the frequency spectra and polarization of already-discovered radio stars. It is also noted that, although the current knowledge of solar physics can help in understanding stellar radio emission, models and ideas developed for solar conditions should not be mechanically transferred to other stars by a simple change in scale.

  3. Radio emission physics in the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, Jean A.; Hankins, Timothy H.

    2016-06-01

    We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and -ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of time scales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as the source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in its dynamic spectrum. The most promising models are based on analogies with solar zebra bands, but they require unusual plasma structures which are not part of our standard picture of the magnetosphere. We argue that radio observations can reveal much about the upper magnetosphere, but work is required before the models can address all of the data.

  4. Radio emission physics in the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilek, Jean A.; Hankins, Timothy H.

    2016-06-01

    > We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and -ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of time scales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as the source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in its dynamic spectrum. The most promising models are based on analogies with solar zebra bands, but they require unusual plasma structures which are not part of our standard picture of the magnetosphere. We argue that radio observations can reveal much about the upper magnetosphere, but work is required before the models can address all of the data.

  5. Magnetospheric Radio Tomography: Observables, Algorithms, and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported research towards developing magnetospheric electron density and magnetic field remote sensing techniques via multistatic radio propagation and tomographic image reconstruction. This work was motivated by the need to better develop the basic technique of magnetospheric radio tomography, which holds substantial promise as a technology uniquely capable of imaging magnetic field and electron density in the magnetosphere on large scales with rapid cadence. Such images would provide an unprecedented and needed view into magnetospheric processes. By highlighting the systems-level interconnectedness of different regions, our understanding of space weather processes and ability to predict them would be dramatically enhanced. Three peer-reviewed publications and 5 conference presentations have resulted from this work, which supported 1 PhD student and 1 postdoctoral researcher. One more paper is in progress and will be submitted shortly. Because the main results of this research have been published or are soon to be published in refereed journal articles listed in the reference section of this document, we provide here an overview of the research and accomplishments without describing all of the details that are contained in the articles.

  6. Decimetric radio dot emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Sawant, H. S.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We study a rare type of solar radio bursts called decimetric dot emissions. Aims: In the period 1999-2001, 20 events of decimetric dot emissions observed by the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) in the frequency range 950-2640 MHz are investigated statistically and compared with radio fine structures of zebras and fibers. Methods: For the study of the spectral characteristics of the dot emissions we use specially developed Interactive Data Language (IDL) software called BSSView and basic statistical methods. Results: We have found that the dm dot emissions, contrary to the fine structures of the type IV bursts (i.e. zebras, fibers, lace bursts, spikes), are not superimposed on any background burst emission. In the radio spectrum, in most cases the dot emissions form chains that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. Because some zebras and fibers, especially those observed with high time and high spectral resolutions, also show emission dots (but superimposed on the background burst emission), we compared the spectral parameters of the dot emissions with the dots being the fine structure of zebras and fibers. For both these dots, similar spectral characteristics were found. Some similarities of the dot emissions can be found also with the lace bursts and spikes. For some events the dot emissions show structural evolution from patterns resembling fibers to patterns resembling zebras and vice versa, or they evolve into fully chaotic patterns. Conclusions: For the first time, we present decimetric dot emissions that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. We propose that these emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism at the locations in the solar atmosphere where the double resonance condition is fulfilled.

  7. Stellar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, Jay A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the various radiation mechanisms believed to play a role in stellar radio emission. The radio emission from most stars is nonthermal and is generally due to mildly relativistic electrons with energies from a few keV to over 10 MeV. Magnetic fields play a crucial role both in accelerating the electrons to the requisite energies and in mediating the emission mechanism. They also play a fundamental role in creating the velocity anisotropies that are necessary for the operation of some of the coherent emission mechanisms. Coherent emission is seen most commonly on the M dwarfs, rarely on the RS CVns, and has yet to be detected for any other class of star. These coherent processes are best studied by means of their dynamic spectra; such studies are now just getting underway.

  8. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  9. Control of Jovian Radio Emission by Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Groene, J. B.

    1998-01-01

    Galileo has been in orbit around Jupiter since December 1995. We present the results of a survey of the data for the frequency range 3.2 MHz to 5.6 MHz, the low-frequency decametric (DAM) emissions. While the control of a portion of the radio emission by the moon Io is well-known, we report that a small but significant portion of low-frequency DAM emission is seen to be correlated with the orbital phase of Ganymede. This result is in agreement with other recent results indicating a significant interaction of the magnetosphere of Ganymede with that of Jupiter.

  10. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  11. Possible radio emission mechanism for pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalev, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented and discussed as a possible mechanism to describe radio emission from pulsars. The model determines that the magnetic field in the neutron proton electron (npe) layer of a neutron star results from a quasistationary eddy current of superconducting and normal protons relative to normal electrons, which generates radio emission by the Josephson effect. The radiation propagates in the magnetically active medium, from the optically thick npe layer to the magnetosphere through breaks in the crust. As a result, hot radio spots form on the surface of the star, and a radiation pattern forms near the magnetic poles, the cross section of which gives the observed pulse structure. Due to the specific properties of the mechanism, variations of the quasistationary current are converted to amplitude frequency variations of the radiation spectrum. Variations of the fine structure of the spectrum pulse amplitude and spectral index, as well as their correlation are discussed.

  12. Detection of the Magnetospheric Emissions from Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, J.

    2014-12-01

    Planetary-scale magnetic fields are a window to a planet's interior and provide shielding of the planet's atmosphere. The Earth, Mercury, Ganymede, and the giant planets of the solar system all contain internal dynamo currents that generate planetary-scale magnetic fields. These internal dynamo currents arise from differential rotation, convection, compositional dynamics, or a combination of these. If coupled to an energy source, such as the incident kinetic or magnetic energy from the solar wind, a planet's magnetic field can produce electron cyclotron masers in its magnetic polar regions. The most well known example of this process is the Jovian decametric emission, but all of the giant planets and the Earth contain similar electron cyclotron masers within their magnetospheres. Extrapolated to extrasolar planets, the remote detection of the magnetic field of an extrasolar planet would provide a means of obtaining constraints on the thermal state, composition, and dynamics of its interior as well as improved understanding of the basic planetary dynamo process. The magnetospheric emissions from solar system planets and the discovery of extrasolar planets have motivated both theoretical and observational work on magnetospheric emissions from extrasolar planets. Stimulated by these advances, the W.M. Keck Institute for Space Studies hosted a workshop entitled "Planetary Magnetic Fields: Planetary Interiors and Habitability." I summarize the current observational status of searches for magnetospheric emissions from extrasolar planets, based on observations from a number of ground-based radio telescopes, and future prospects for ground-based studies. Using the solar system planetary magnetic fields as a guide, future space-based missions will be required to study planets with magnetic field strengths lower than that of Jupiter. I summarize mission concepts identified in the KISS workshop, with a focus on the detection of planetary electron cyclotron maser emission. The

  13. Whistler emissions in the magnetosphere - satellite observations and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chum, J.; Jiricek, F.; Shklyar, D. R.

    The investigation of ionospheric and magnetospheric wave phenomena related to lightning strokes began from classical research by Eckersley (Nature, Lond., 135, 104, 1935) and Storey (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond., A246, 908, 113-141, 1953) among others, and it has continued up to the present. VLF spectrograms from the MAGION 4 and MAGION 5 satellites contain most of the known types of VLF emissions, as well as some new ones not discussed previously. A partial list of the observed emissions involving nonducted propagation includes: magnetospherically reflected (MR) whistlers (and their subclass, Nu whistlers) predicted by Kimura (Radio Sci., 1, 3, 269-283, 1966) and then found by Smith and Angerami in the spectrograms of wave data from OGO 1 and 3 (J. Geophys. Res., 73, 1, 1-20, 1968); lower hybrid resonance (LHR) noise bands; LHR whistlers and LHR spherics; and oblique noise bands above the local LHR frequency. Recently, a new line of investigation was initiated by numerical modeling of VLF spectrograms of nonducted emissions caused by lightning. For such emissions, as observed by a satellite in the magnetosphere, the spectrograms depend on several factors: the properties of the source, the geomagnetic field structure and the cold plasma distribution which jointly influence the wave propagation, and the resonant interactions of the waves with energetic particles. Therefore, numerical modeling of spectrograms and comparing them with real ones may serve as an indirect tool for investigating the factors mentioned above and any other processes that affect the spectrograms. This tool is especially effective when the source of the emission is known, in particular with lightning-induced emissions. The main features of our numerical method for modeling spectrograms include: a) representation of the wave field as the sum of wave packets treatable by geometrical optics; b) construction of a frequency-time plot based on the notion of a group front; c) calculation of the

  14. Control of Jovian Radio Emission by Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Christopher, I.

    2001-01-01

    Galileo has been in orbit around Jupiter since December 1995 and a large database has been collected. We present the results of a survey of the plasma wave data for the frequency range 2.0 MHz to 5.6 MHz, the low frequency decametric (DAM) emissions. While the control of a portion of the radio emission by the moon lo is well known, and Ganymede control has been more recently indicated, we report that a small but significant portion of DAM emission is seen to be correlated with the orbital phase of Callisto. While the occurrence rate of emission controlled by Ganymede and Callisto is considerably less than for lo, the power levels can be nearly the same. We estimate the power of the Callisto-dependent emission to be approx. 70% of the Io-dependent radio emission and about the same as the Ganymede-dependent radio emission. This result indicates an Alfven current system associated with Callisto, and thus a significant interaction of the magnetosphere of Callisto with that of Jupiter as is believed to exist for both lo and Ganymede.

  15. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millon, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch. Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws (Busse's and Curtis Ness') with the radiometric law to yield "Bode's"-type laws governing planetary radio emission. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power output of Neptune to be about 1.6×107W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  16. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Million, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch (1984). Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws with the radiometric law to yield 'Bode's'-type laws governing planetary radio emissions. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power otuput of Neptune to be about 1.6 x 10 to the 7th W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  17. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  18. Magnetospheric Geometry in Pulsar B1929+10 from Radio/X-ray Phase Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somer, A. L.; Backer, D. C.; Halpern, J. P.; Wang, F. Y.-H.

    1998-05-01

    We have conducted a study of two rotation-powered pulsars that emit at both radio and x-ray wavelengths, PSR B0531+21 and PSR B1929+10. Using absolute phase information, we have phase-aligned x-ray and radio profiles from these pulsars. Observations were done using the Green Bank 140ft telescope, and ASCA. The 0531+21 x-ray profile is sharp and lines up well with the radio profile confirming that the x-ray emission from this pulsar is magnetospheric in origin. The 1929+10 profile is approximately sinusoidal (Wang & Halpern, ApJ 4 82, L159) with the peak of the emission arriving 67+/- 23 degrees after the maximum in the radio emission. The controversy to which the PSR B1929+10 result adds fuel, is whether this ``inter"-pulsar, is an ``aligned" or ``orthogonal" rotator - describing the alignment of the magnetic axis to the rotation axis. Do the two peaks in the radio profile (the pulse and interpulse) come from a double crossing of a thin hollow cone nearly aligned with rotation axis (as in Lyne & Manchester, 1988, MNRAS, 234, 477; Phillips, 1990, ApJL, 361, L57; Blaskiewicz et al, 1991, ApJ 370, 643), or alternatively (as in Rankin and Rathnasree, 1998 preprint) do they come from from opposite poles of an ``orthogonal" rotator where the spin axis is perpendicular to the magnetic axis? The radio to x-ray alignment we find favors the former explanation: if the x-ray hot spot is the result of return currents to the surface from the outward current that generates radio emission, then in the ``double-crossing" model, the hot spot phase is expected to lie between the main pulse and interpulse as observed.

  19. Perturbations of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling by powerful VLF emissions from ground-based transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A. S. Markov, G. A.; Ryabov, A. O.; Parrot, M.

    2012-12-15

    The characteristics of the plasma-wave disturbances stimulated in the near-Earth plasma by powerful VLF radiation from ground-based transmitters are investigated. Radio communication VLF transmitters of about 1 MW in power are shown to produce artificial plasma-wave channels (density ducts) in the near-Earth space that originate in the lower ionosphere above the disturbing emission source and extend through the entire ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth along the magnetic field lines. Measurements with the onboard equipment of the DEMETER satellite have revealed that under the action of emission from the NWC transmitter, which is one of the most powerful VLF radio transmitters, the generation of quasi-electrostatic (plasma) waves is observed on most of the satellite trajectory along the disturbed magnetic flux tube. This may probably be indicative of stimulated emission of a magnetospheric maser.

  20. On the detection of magnetospheric radio bursts from Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Maggs, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn are sources of intense but sporadic bursts of electromagnetic radiation or magnetospheric radio bursts (MRB). The similarity of the differential power flux spectra of the MRB from all three planets is examined. The intensity of the MRB is scaled for the solar wind power input into a planetary magnetosphere. The possibility of detecting MRB from Uranus and Neptune is considered.

  1. Multi-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, Benjamin; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini; Krupp, Norbert; Grodent, Denis; Kurth, William S.; Yates, Japheth N.

    2016-04-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes which differ from the rotation period. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emission brightness. We made a 10-year survey of the quasi-periodic 1-hour energetic electron injections observed in the Saturn's outer magnetosphere by the Low-Energy Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini. The signature of these injections is pulsations in the electron fluxes at energies between a hundred keV up to several MeV. We investigated the topology and the morphology of these pulsations, as well as the signatures of the electron injections in the radio emissions and the magnetic field, respectively, measured by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) on board Cassini. The morphology of the pulsations (interpulse period, number of pulsations per event, growth and decay time) shows a weak local time dependence, which suggests a high-latitude source for the pulsed energetic electrons. This suggestion is reinforced by the observation of strong radio bursts in the auroral hiss coincident with the electron pulsations and by the higher growth rate and decay rate magnitudes at high latitudes. Moreover, since the morphological properties of the pulsations are similar at the various locations where the electron injections are observed, the acceleration mechanism of the electrons is likely common for all the events and may be directly or indirectly involving magnetic reconnection. The auroral emissions, which display the ionospheric response to magnetospheric dynamics, exhibit some quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations as well. Some pulsed auroral brightenings are observed while Cassini detects several electron

  2. CONSTRAINING RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Dib, R.; Champion, D. J.; Hessels, J. W. T.

    2012-01-10

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits of L{sub 1950} {approx}< 1.60 mJy kpc{sup 2} for periodic emission and L{sub 1950,single} {approx}< 7.6 Jy kpc{sup 2} for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  3. Amalthea's Modulation of Jovian Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhypov, Oleksiy V.

    2006-08-01

    Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv, Ukraine Amalthea is the largest body after Galilean satellites near Jupiter. An anomaly in Jovian synchrotron radiation has been found just on the Amalthea magnetic shell (de Pater, Schulz & Brecht 1997). It has been suggested that Amalthea's motion through Jupiter's magnetic field induces Alfvén or whistler wings or electrostatic high-frequency waves which lead to the pitch angle scattering. It is reasonable to search for another effect of these processes: magnetospheric inhomogeneities which could be found via scattering of Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). Such scattering on field-aligned inhomogeneities in the Io plasma torus is known as "modulation lanes" in DAM dynamic spectra. To search for analogous Amalthea's modulation, the positions and frequency drift of about 600 lanes are measured on the UFRO spectra of DAM. The special 3D algorithm is used for localization of field-aligned magnetospheric inhomogeneities by the frequency drift of modulation lanes. It is found that about 4% of the lanes are clustered near Amalthea's magnetic shell. There are two such clusters near longitudes of 123°≤λ[III]≤140° and 284°≤λ[III]≤305°, which coincide with the regions of maximum compression of fresh plasma due to rotating magnetic field of Jupiter (where ∂(B^2)/∂λ[III]) is maximal). The Amalthea modulation could explain the enigmatic "hf-lanes" (Genova, Aubier & Lecacheux 1981). The found magnetospheric formations are a new argument for the ice nature of Amalthea which has the density less than that of water (Anderson et al. 2005). Anderson J.D. et al. 2005, Science, 308, 5726, pp. 1291-1293. de Pater I., Schulz M., Brecht S.H. 1997, J. Geophys. Res., 102, A10, pp. 22043-22064. Genova F., Aubier M.G., Lecacheux A. 1981, Astron. and Astrophys. 104, 2, pp. 229-239.

  4. Zebra spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rošker, S.; Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Brazhenko, A. I.

    2015-10-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radiation in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of complicated interactions between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moon Io. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from a few MHz up to 40 MHz. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAM exhibits different complex spectral structures. Recent observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) enabled the detection of fine spectral structures, specifically zebra stripe-like patterns, never reported before in the Jovian decametric wavelength regime (Figure 1). In this presentation we describe and analyse these new observations by investigating the characteristics of the Jovian decametric zebra patterns. On basis of these findings the possible mechanism of wave generation is discussed and in particular the value of the determination of local plasma densities within the Jovian magnetosphere by remote radio sensing is emphasized.

  5. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  6. Laboratory Reproduction of Auroral Magnetospheric Radio Wave Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald, K.; Speirs, D. C.; McConville, S. L.; Gillespie, K. M.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; He, W.; Bingham, R.; Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.

    2008-10-15

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation, AKR, occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emissions and radiation is emitted in the X-mode. In the laboratory a 75-85kV electron beam of 5-40A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids. Results are presented for an electron beam gyrating at cyclotron frequencies of 4.42GHz and 11.7GHz resonating with near cut-off TE01 and TE03 modes respectively. Measurements of the electron transport combined with numerical simulations demonstrated that a horseshoe distribution function was formed in electron velocity space. Analysis of the experimental measurements allowed the inference of the 1D number density as a function of the electron beam pitch angle. The total power emitted experimentally was {approx}19-35 kW with a maximum RF emission efficiency of {approx}2%. These results were compared to those obtained numerically using a 2D PiC code KARAT with a maximum efficiency of 2% predicted for the same mode and frequency, consistent with astrophysical and theoretical results.

  7. Laboratory Reproduction of Auroral Magnetospheric Radio Wave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronald, K.; Speirs, D. C.; McConville, S. L.; Gillespie, K. M.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Bingham, R.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.; He, W.

    2008-10-01

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation, AKR, occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emissions and radiation is emitted in the X-mode. In the laboratory a 75-85kV electron beam of 5-40A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids. Results are presented for an electron beam gyrating at cyclotron frequencies of 4.42GHz and 11.7GHz resonating with near cut-off TE01 and TE03 modes respectively. Measurements of the electron transport combined with numerical simulations demonstrated that a horseshoe distribution function was formed in electron velocity space. Analysis of the experimental measurements allowed the inference of the 1D number density as a function of the electron beam pitch angle. The total power emitted experimentally was ~19-35 kW with a maximum RF emission efficiency of ~2%. These results were compared to those obtained numerically using a 2D PiC code KARAT with a maximum efficiency of 2% predicted for the same mode and frequency, consistent with astrophysical and theoretical results.

  8. Discussing the processes constraining the Jovian synchrotron radio emission's features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Costa, Daniel; Bolton, Scott J.

    2008-03-01

    Our recent analysis and understanding of the Jovian synchrotron radio emission with a radiation-belt model is presented. In this work, the electron population is determined by solving the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation and considering different physical processes. The results of the modeling are first compared to in situ particle data, brightness distributions, radio spectrum, and beaming curves to verify the simulated particle distributions. The dynamics of high-energy electrons in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere and their related radio emission are then examined. The results demonstrate that the Jovian moons set the extension and intensity of the synchrotron emission's brightness distribution along the magnetic equator. Simulations show that moons and dust both control the transport toward the planet by significantly reducing the abundance of particles constrained to populate, near the equator and inside 1.8 Jovian radii, the innermost region of the magnetosphere. Due to interactions with dust and synchrotron mechanism, radiation-belt electrons are moved along field lines, between Metis (1.79 Jovian radii) and Amalthea (2.54 Jovian radii), toward high latitudes. The quantity of particles transported away from the equator is sufficient to produce measurable secondary radio emissions. Among all the phenomena acting in the inner magnetosphere, the moons (Amalthea and Thebe) are the primary moderator for the radiation's intensity at high latitudes. Moon losses also affect the characteristics of the total radio flux with longitude. The sweeping effect amplifies the 10-h modulation of the beaming curve's amplitude while energy resonances occurring near Amalthea and Thebe belong to phenomena adjusting it to the right level. Interactions with dust do not significantly constrain radio spectrum features. Resonances near Amalthea and Thebe are responsible for the Jovian radio spectrum's particular slope.

  9. Fast radio imaging of Jupiter's magnetosphere at low-frequencies with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter emits intense decameter (DAM) radio waves, detectable from the ground in the range ˜10-40 MHz. They are produced by energetic electron precipitations in its auroral regions (auroral-DAM), as well as near the magnetic footprints of the Galilean satellite Io (Io-DAM). Radio imaging of these decameter emissions with arcsecond angular resolution and millisecond time resolution should provide: an improved mapping of the surface planetary magnetic field, via imaging of instantaneous cyclotron sources of highest frequency; measurements of the beaming angle of the radiation relative to the local magnetic field, as a function of frequency; detailed information on the Io-Jupiter electrodynamic interaction, in particular the lead angle between the Io flux tube and the radio emitting field line; direct information on the origin of the sporadic drifting decameter S-bursts, thought to be electron bunches propagating along magnetic field lines, and possibly revealing electric potential drops along these field lines; direct observation of DAM emission possibly related to the Ganymede-Jupiter, Europa-Jupiter and/or Callisto-Jupiter interactions, and their energetics; information on the magnetospheric dynamics, via correlation of radio images with ultraviolet and infrared images of the aurora as well as of the Galilean satellite footprints, and study of their temporal variations; an improved mapping of the Jovian plasma environment (especially the Io torus) via the propagation effects that it induces on the radio waves propagating through it (Faraday rotation, diffraction fringes, etc.); possibly on the long-term a better accuracy on the determination of Jupiter's rotation period. Fast imaging should be permitted by the very high intensity of Jovian decameter bursts. LOFAR's capability to measure the full polarization of the incoming waves will be exploited. The main limitation will come from the maximum angular resolution reachable. We discuss several approaches for

  10. Pulsars Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timokhin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    Current density determines the plasma flow regime. Cascades are non-stationary. ALWAYS. All flow regimes look different: multiple components (?) Return current regions should have particle accelerating zones in the outer magnetosphere: y-ray pulsars (?) Plasma oscillations in discharges: direct radio emission (?)

  11. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  12. Escaping radio emission from pulsars: Possible role of velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M. |; Machabeli, G.Z.; Rogava, A.D. |

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the velocity shear, intrinsic to the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} plasma present in the pulsar magnetosphere, can efficiently convert the nonescaping longitudinal Langmuir waves (produced by some kind of a beam or stream instability) into propagating (escaping) electromagnetic waves. It is suggested that this shear induced transformation may be the basic mechanism needed for the eventual generation of the observed pulsar radio emission.

  13. Magnetospheric electrostatic emissions and cold plasma densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A synoptic study of electric wave, magnetometer, and plasma data from IMP-6 was carried out for times when banded electrostatic waves are observed between harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency in the earth's outer magnetosphere. Four separate classes of such waves were previously identified. The spatial and temporal occurrences of waves in each class are summarized here, as are correlations of occurrence with geomagnetic activity. Most importantly, associations between the observations of waves of different classes and the relative portions of cold and hot electrons present at the position of the spacecraft are established. Finally, evidence for the signature of the loss cone is sought in the plasma data.

  14. On Io's control of Jovian decametric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Io's control of Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM) has been attributed to Io distorting the electron distribution in the inner Jovian magnetosphere. Observations of Faraday rotation in DAM are used to determine the properties of the electron distribution before and after its interaction with Io. It is shown that there is an enhancement in the density of the energetic component in the Io plasma torus correlated with certain Jovian longitude. Io's interaction with this energetic component can produce heating of this component. The Io-controlled emission is attributed to enhanced emission from the heated electrons moving down the field lines to Jupiter.

  15. Stellar wind-magnetosphere interaction at exoplanets: computations of auroral radio powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present calculations of the auroral radio powers expected from exoplanets with magnetospheres driven by an Earth-like magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. Specifically, we compute the twin cell-vortical ionospheric flows, currents, and resulting radio powers resulting from a Dungey cycle process driven by dayside and nightside magnetic reconnection, as a function of planetary orbital distance and magnetic field strength. We include saturation of the magnetospheric convection, as observed at the terrestrial magnetosphere, and we present power-law approximations for the convection potentials, radio powers and spectral flux densities. We specifically consider a solar-age system and a young (1 Gyr) system. We show that the radio power increases with magnetic field strength for magnetospheres with saturated convection potential, and broadly decreases with increasing orbital distance. We show that the magnetospheric convection at hot Jupiters will be saturated, and thus unable to dissipate the full available incident Poynting flux, such that the magnetic Radiometric Bode's Law (RBL) presents a substantial overestimation of the radio powers for hot Jupiters. Our radio powers for hot Jupiters are ˜5-1300 TW for hot Jupiters with field strengths of 0.1-10 BJ orbiting a Sun-like star, while we find that competing effects yield essentially identical powers for hot Jupiters orbiting a young Sun-like star. However, in particular, for planets with weaker magnetic fields, our powers are higher at larger orbital distances than given by the RBL, and there are many configurations of planet that are expected to be detectable using SKA.

  16. Venus - Global surface radio emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, P. G.; Pettengill, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of thermal radio emission from the surface of Venus, made by the Pioneer Venus radar mapper at a wavelength of 17 cm, show variations that are dominated by changes in surface emissivity. The regions of lowest emissivity (0.54 + or - 0.05 for the highland areas of Aphrodite Terra and Theia Mons) correspond closely to regions of high radar reflectivity reported earlier. These results support the inference of inclusions of material with high electrical conductivity in the surface rock of these areas.

  17. ON THE ORIGIN OF RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz

    2015-02-10

    Magnetars are the most magnetized objects in the known universe. Powered by the magnetic energy, and not by the rotational energy as in the case of radio pulsars, they have long been regarded as a completely different class of neutron stars. The discovery of pulsed radio emission from a few magnetars weakened the idea of a clean separation between magnetars and normal pulsars. We use the partially screened gap (PSG) model to explain radio emission of magnetars. The PSG model requires that the temperature of the polar cap is equal to the so-called critical value, i.e., the temperature at which the thermal ions outflowing from the stellar surface screen the acceleration gap. We show that a magnetar has to fulfill the temperature, power, and visibility conditions in order to emit radio waves. First, in order to form PSG, the residual temperature of the surface has to be lower than the critical value. Second, since the radio emission is powered by the rotational energy, it has to be high enough to enable heating of the polar cap by backstreaming particles to the critical temperature. Finally, the structure of the magnetic field has to be altered by magnetospheric currents in order to widen a radio beam and increase the probability of detection. Our approach allows us to predict whether a magnetar can emit radio waves using only its rotational period, period derivative, and surface temperature in the quiescent mode.

  18. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  19. High Energy Emission from Pulsar Magnetospheres and Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    Recent gamma-ray observations of pulsars and their nebulae suggest an important role played by magnetic reconnection in determining the structure of the magnetosphere and the wind and in the acceleration of particles that lead to the high energy emission. Strong current sheets that are susceptible to magnetic dissipation are found near the light cylinder of the pulsar and persist throughout the wind. This proposal investigates the processes that occur in these current sheets, and determines their structure and particle acceleration properties. A suite of relativistic MHD and particle-in-cell kinetic simulations will be used to obtain the global 3D geometry of the magnetosphere, flow geometry in the current sheet, and calculate the dissipation of the current both near the pulsar and in the termination shock of the pulsar wind. The results will be applied to modeling the beaming in pulsar gamma-ray light curves, and to understanding particle acceleration in broadband and flaring nebular emission.

  20. Physics of radio emission in gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    > Propagation of radio emission in a pulsar magnetosphere is reviewed. The effects of polarization transfer, induced scattering and reprocessing to high energies are analysed with a special emphasis on the implications for the gamma-ray pulsars. The possibilities of the pulsar plasma diagnostics based on the observed radio pulse characteristics are also outlined. As an example, the plasma number density profiles obtained from the polarization data for the Vela and the gamma-ray millisecond pulsars J1446-4701, J1939+2134 and J1744-1134 are presented. The number densities derived tend to be the highest/lowest when the radio pulse leads/lags the gamma-ray peak. In the PSR J1939+2134, the plasma density profiles for the main pulse and interpulse appear to fit exactly the same curve, testifying to the origin of both radio components above the same magnetic pole and their propagation through the same plasma flow in opposite directions. The millisecond radio pulse components exhibiting flat position angle curves are suggested to result from the induced scattering of the main pulse by the same particles that generate gamma rays. This is believed to underlie the wide-sense radio/gamma-ray correlation in the millisecond pulsars. The radio quietness of young gamma-ray pulsars is attributed to resonant absorption, whereas the radio loudness to the radio beam escape through the periphery of the open field line tube.

  1. High Energy Emission in Pulsar Magnetospheres: Modeling in the FERMI Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Brambilla, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Our study of pulsar high-energy emission in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres provides meaningful constraints on the macroscopic parameters of the global pulsar magnetosphere solutions through the extensive comparison of model light curves and their spectra with those provided by multi-wavelength observations of real pulsars. These state-of-the-art solutions, by their nature, provide both the field geometry, and the necessary particle accelerating electric fields. Using these solutions, we generate model gamma-ray light curves by calculating the trajectories and the Lorentz factors of the radiating particles, under the influence of both the accelerating electric components and curvature radiation-reaction. I will show how this study leads to the construction of model magnetospheres that successfully reproduce the observed light-curve phenomenology as depicted in the radio-lag vs peak-separation diagram obtained by Fermi. These models allow the calculation of phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra and the total gamma-ray luminosities as well. I will show that the corresponding photon cut-off energies and total gamma-ray luminosities are within the observed ranges for both standard and millisecond pulsars. A direct and detailed comparison with the Fermi data reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin down rate, constraining the physical mechanisms underlying the observed pulsar high-energy emission.

  2. Detection of 610-MHz radio emission from hot magnetic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, P.; Wade, G. A.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Oberoi, D.; Grunhut, J. H.; ud-Doula, A.; Petit, V.; Cohen, D. H.; Oksala, M. E.; David-Uraz, A.

    2015-09-01

    We have carried out a study of radio emission from a small sample of magnetic O- and B-type stars using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, with the goal of investigating their magnetospheres at low frequencies. These are the lowest frequency radio measurements ever obtained of hot magnetic stars. The observations were taken at random rotational phases in the 1390 and the 610 MHz bands. Out of the eight stars, we detect five B-type stars in both the 1390 and the 610 MHz bands. The three O-type stars were observed only in the 1390 MHz band, and no detections were obtained. We explain this result as a consequence of free-free absorption by the free-flowing stellar wind exterior to the confined magnetosphere. We also study the variability of individual stars. One star - HD 133880 - exhibits remarkably strong and rapid variability of its low-frequency flux density. We discuss the possibility of this emission being coherent emission as reported for CU Vir by Trigilio et al.

  3. Ionosphere-magnetosphere studies using ground based VLF radio propagation technique: an Indian example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Subhas

    Since IGY period (1957-58), natural and artificially produced Very Low Frequency (VLF) elec-tromagnetic radiations are being recorded at large number of ground stations all over the world and on-board satellites to study various radio wave-thermal/energetic plasma interactive pro-cesses related to earth's ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere environment. The terrestrial propagation of these VLF radio waves are primarily enabled through the earth ionosphere wave guide (EIWG) mode to long horizontal distances around the globe and ducted along the ge-omagnetic field lines into the conjugate hemisphere through the plasmasphere-magnetosphere regions. The time frequency spectra of the received signals indicate presence of dispersion (wave/group velocities changing with frequency) and various cut-off frequencies based on the width of the EIWG, electron gyro and plasma frequencies etc., providing several types of received signals like whistlers, chorus, tweeks, hiss and hisslers which can be heard on loud-speakers/earphones with distinguishing audio structures. While the VLF technique has been a very effective tool for studying middle and high latitude phenomena, the importance of the similar and anomalous observations over the Indian low latitude stations provide potentially new challenges for their scientific interpretation and modelling. The ducted and non-ducted magnetospheric propagation, pro-longitudinal (PL) mode, low latitude TRIMPI/TLE (Tran-sient Luminous Emissions) or other effects of wave-particle/wave-wave interactions, effects due to ionospheric irregularities and electric fields, full wave solutions to D-region ionisation per-turbations due to solar and stellar energetic X-and γ ray emissions during normal and flaring conditions are a few problems which have been addressed in these low latitude studies over India. Since the conjugate points of Indian stations lie over the Indian oceanic region, the VLF propagation effects would be relatively free from

  4. Radio emission from AM Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Dulk, G. A.; Chanmugam, G.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the quiescent microwave emission of the magnetic cataclysmic variable AM Herculis are presented. The emission, which declined from a mean value of 0.58 mJy at 4.9 GHz to about 0.3 mJy, in rough coincidence with the entry of AM Herculis into an optical low state (mid-1983), is explained in terms of optically thick gyrosynchrotron emission. It is noted that the observation of a coherent outburst at 4.9 GHz, interpreted as the result of a cyclotron maser on the red dwarf secondary, indicates that the secondary is magnetized. Possible implications are briefly explored. Comparisons between this system and other stellar continuum radio sources are made.

  5. X-ray and radio core emission in radio quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kembhavi, A.; Feigelson, E. D.; Singh, K. P.

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate the physical relationship between X-ray and radio core emission in radio-selected quasars, 35 radio quasars have been observed with the VLA at 6 and 20 cm. The sample was chosen from a list of radio quasars with known X-ray luminosity but poorly known radio properties. Including data gathered from the literature, radio core detections or upper limits at 6 cm have been obtained for 127 radio quasars which have published Einstein X-ray data. A statistical association is sought between radio core luminosity and X-ray luminosity, and it is found that there is a strong correlation. The slope of the relation of L(x) to L(Gamma)-alpha is alpha = 0.71 + or - 0.07 for unresolved quasars with flat radio spectra. The slope decreases as quasars with extended radio regions are considered. This is traced to the presence of radio emission which is unrelated to the X-ray emission, in the presently unresolved cores of quasars.

  6. Multi-parameter Correlation of Jovian Radio Emissions with Solar Wind and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Golla, T.; Reiner, M. J.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    Variability of the numerous varieties of Jovian radio emission has been associated with aspects of solar wind (SW) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parameters outside the magnetosphere. Here we demonstrate multiple-parameter correlations that relate each of several Jovian emissions, including bKOM and quasi-periodic bursts, to the SW and IMF impacting the Jovian magnetosphere. The data used are from the Ulysses spacecraft with radio data from the Unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) instrument, which provides high-quality remote radio observations of the Jovian emissions. The URAP observations are correlated with SW and IMF data from the relevant instruments on Ulysses, propagated to the nose of the Jovian magnetosphere with a sophisticated code. Because the aphelion of the Ulysses orbit was at the Jovian distance from the Sun, Ulysses spent ample time near Jupiter in 1991-1992 and 2003-2004, which are the intervals analyzed. Our results can be inverted such that radio observations by a Jovian orbiter, such as Cassini or Juno, are able to identify SW/IMF changes based on the behavior of the radio emissions.

  7. Controlled stimulation of magnetospheric electrons by radio waves Experimental model for lightning effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Curtis, S. A.; Barcus, J. R.; Siefring, C. L.; Kelley, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetospheric electrons precipitated by ground-based coded very low frequency radio transmissions have been detected by rocket measurement of bremsstrahlung X-rays, caused by impact of the electrons with the upper atmosphere. The direct correlations obtained between the very low frequency signals and the X-rays demonstrate the limits of sensitivity required and indicate that this remote sensing technique would be useful for future study of very low frequency effects induced by single lightning strokes.

  8. Controlled stimulation of magnetospheric electrons by radio waves: experimental model for lightning effects.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R A; Curtis, S A; Barcus, J R; Siefring, C L; Kelley, M C

    1983-03-18

    Magnetospheric electrons precipitated by ground-based coded very low frequency radio transmissions have been detected by rocket measurement of bremsstrahlung x-rays, caused by impact of the electrons with the upper atmosphere. The direct correlations obtained between the very low frequency signals and the x-rays demonstrate the limits of sensitivity required and indicate that this remote sensing technique would be useful for future study of very low frequency effects induced by single lightning strokes. PMID:17735612

  9. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  10. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  11. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  12. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  13. On the origin of radio emission in radio quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laor, Ari; Behar, Ehud

    The radio emission in radio loud quasars (RLQs) originates in a jet carrying relativistic electrons. In radio quiet quasars (RQQs) the radio emission is ˜ 103 times weaker, relative to other bands. Its origin is not clearly established yet, but it is often speculated to arise from a weak jet. Here we show that there is a tight relation between L_R and L_X for RQQs, with L_R/L_X˜ 10-5, based on the optically selected Palomar-Green (PG) quasars, with nearly complete X-ray and radio detections (avoiding biases and selection effects). Coronally active stars also show a tight relation between L_R and L_X with L_R/L_X˜ 10-5 (the Güdel & Benz relation), which together with correlated variability indicates that stellar coronae are magnetically heated. The X-ray emission of quasars most likely originates from a hot accretion disk corona, and since RQQs follow the Güdel & Benz relation, it is natural to associate their radio emission with coronal emission as well. The tight relation between L_R and L_X may simply reflect the equality of accretion disk coronal heating by magnetically generated relativistic electrons (producing L_R), and coronal cooling by Compton scattering (producing L_X). This suggestion can be tested by looking for correlated X-ray and radio variability patterns, such as the Neupert effect, displayed by stellar coronae.

  14. Radio emissions from RHESSI TGFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, Andrey; Østgaard, Nikolai; Gjesteland, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Kjetil; Cummer, Steven

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of bursts of energetic photons coming out to space from the Earth's atmosphere, referred to as terrsetrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), has stimulated research activity investigating different aspects of the TGF generation and accompanying processes. Two models of the TGF production are nowadays competing to explain the observations of the TGFs and related phenomena. One of the models involves the feedback mechanism enhancing the production rate of the runaway electrons in the ambient electric field of a thundercloud. Another model considers runaway electrons accelerated in the strong local electric field in front of the upward propagating negative leader of the +IC. We performed a detailed analysis of RHESSI TGFs detected between August 2004 and September 2015. It was reported that the RHESSI satellite clock has a systematic error of ˜ 1.8 ms, but the exact value remained unknown, also it was unclear if this systematic clock error is changing with time or not. We compared RHESSI TGFs with the world wide lightning location network (WWLLN) database and found the distribution of the time delays between the TGF peak times and associated WWLLN detections. This distribution allowed us to find the value of the RHESSI systematic clock offset with the microsecond accuracy level. Also we found that this offset experienced two changes: in August 2005 and in October 2013, which was confirmed by two independent ways. We found that in case of double TGFs WWLLN detection corresponds to the second TGF of the pair. VLF magnetic field recordings from the Duke University also attribute radio sferics to the second TGF, exhibiting no detectable radio emission during the first TGFs of the TGF pairs. We have proposed a possible scenario that is consistent with the observations. This scenario supports the leader-based model of the TGF generation. Spectral characteristics of 77 sferics recorded by the Duke University VLF sensors and related to the RHEESI TGFs show that maximal

  15. AURORAL RADIO EMISSION FROM STARS: THE CASE OF CU VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Trigilio, Corrado; Leto, Paolo; Umana, Grazia; Buemi, Carla S.; Leone, Francesco

    2011-09-20

    CU Virginis is a rapidly rotating Magnetic Chemically Peculiar star with at present unique characteristics as a radio emitter. The most intriguing one is the presence of intense, 100% circularly polarized radiation ascribed to a cyclotron maser. Each time the star rotates, this highly beamed emission points two times toward the Earth, like a pulsar. We observed CU Vir in 2010 April with the Expanded Very Large Array in two bands centered at 1450 and 1850 MHz. We covered nearly the whole rotational period, confirming the presence of the two pulses at a flux density up to 20 mJy. Dynamical spectra, obtained with unprecedented spectral and temporal sensitivity, allow us to clearly see the different time delays as a function of frequency. We interpret this behavior as a propagation effect of the radiation inside the stellar magnetosphere. The emerging scenario suggests interesting similarities with the auroral radio emission from planets, in particular with the Auroral Kilometric Radiation from Earth, which originates at few terrestrial radii above the magnetic poles and was only recently discovered to be highly beamed. We conclude that the magnetospheres of CU Vir, Earth, and other planets, maybe also exoplanets, could have similar geometrical and physical characteristics in the regions where the cyclotron maser is generated. In addition, the pulses are perfect 'markers' of the rotation period. This has given us for the first time the possibility to measure with extraordinary accuracy the spin-down of a star on or near the main sequence.

  16. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, M.D.; Rucker, H.O.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field. 10 references.

  17. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Rucker, H. O.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field.

  18. Models of Uranium continuum radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romig, Joseph H.; Evans, David R.; Sawyer, Constance B.; Schweitzer, Andrea E.; Warwick, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium continuum radio emission detected by the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment during the January 1986 encounter is considered. The continuum emissions comprised four components (equatorial emissions, anomaly emissions, strong nightside emissions, and weak nightside emissions) associated with different sources. The equatorial emissions appeared most prominently during the days before closest approach and extended from 40 kHz or below to about 120 kHz. The anomaly emissions were seen about 12 hours before closest approach and extended to about 250 kHz. The agreement found between Miranda's phase and strong radio emission at 20.4 kHz, just after closest approach, suggests intense dynamic activity on the Miranda L shell.

  19. Non-thermal radio emission from Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Direct, strong evidence for non-thermal radio emission from Saturn exists in the hectometric data observed by Imp 6. The planet has been tentatively identified as a decametric source, but the most sensitive and most recent data fail to confirm this. At metric or decimetric wavelengths Saturn has no non-thermal emission like Jupiter's synchrotron sources. Finally, a comparative study of Earth and Jupiter radio emissions suggests lightning discharges.

  20. Backward Wave Cyclotron-Maser Emission in the Auroral Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speirs, D. C.; Bingham, R.; Cairns, R. A.; Vorgul, I.; Kellett, B. J.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Ronald, K.

    2014-10-01

    In this Letter, we present theory and particle-in-cell simulations describing cyclotron radio emission from Earth's auroral region and similar phenomena in other astrophysical environments. In particular, we find that the radiation, generated by a down-going electron horseshoe distribution is due to a backward-wave cyclotron-maser emission process. The backward wave nature of the radiation contributes to upward refraction of the radiation that is also enhanced by a density inhomogeneity. We also show that the radiation is preferentially amplified along the auroral oval rather than transversely. The results are in agreement with recent Cluster observations.

  1. Backward wave cyclotron-maser emission in the auroral magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Speirs, D C; Bingham, R; Cairns, R A; Vorgul, I; Kellett, B J; Phelps, A D R; Ronald, K

    2014-10-10

    In this Letter, we present theory and particle-in-cell simulations describing cyclotron radio emission from Earth's auroral region and similar phenomena in other astrophysical environments. In particular, we find that the radiation, generated by a down-going electron horseshoe distribution is due to a backward-wave cyclotron-maser emission process. The backward wave nature of the radiation contributes to upward refraction of the radiation that is also enhanced by a density inhomogeneity. We also show that the radiation is preferentially amplified along the auroral oval rather than transversely. The results are in agreement with recent Cluster observations. PMID:25375713

  2. Coherent emission in fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2014-05-01

    The fast (ms) radio bursts reported by Lorimer et al. Science 318, 777 (2007) and Thornton et al. Science 341, 53 (2013) have extremely high brightness temperatures if at the inferred cosmological distances. This implies coherent emission by "bunches" of charges. Fast radio bursts, like the giant pulses of the Crab pulsar, display banded spectra that may be harmonics of plasma frequency emission by plasma turbulence and are inconsistent with emission by charge distributions moving relativistically. We model the emission region as a screen of half-wave dipole radiators resonant around the frequencies of observation, the maximally bright emission mechanism of nonrelativistic charges, and calculate the implied charge bunching. From this we infer the minimum electron energy required to overcome electrostatic repulsion. If fast radio bursts are the counterparts of Galactic events, their Galactic counterparts may be detected from any direction above the horizon by radio telescopes in their far sidelobes or by small arrays of dipoles.

  3. Radio emission from AM Herculis-type binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanmugam, G.; Dulk, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A VLA search for 4.9 GHz radiation from the magnetic cataclysmic variable AM Her, along with the similar EF Eri binary, has led to the discovery of AM Her radio emission having a flux density of 0.67 + or - 0.052 mJy, where 1 mJy is equal to 10 to the -29th W/sq m per Hz. Neither AM Her circular polarization nor EF Eri were detected. The AM Her data are shown to be consistent with a model in which radiation is due to geosynchrotron emission from electrons of energies of a few hundred keV, which are trapped in the magnetosphere of the white dwarf element of the cataclysmic variable.

  4. Roles Played by Electrostatic Waves in Producing Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    Processes in which electromagnetic radiation is produced directly or indirectly via intermediate waves are reviewed. It is shown that strict theoretical constraints exist for electrons to produce nonthermal levels of radiation directly by the Cerenkov or cyclotron resonances. In contrast, indirect emission processes in which intermediary plasma waves are converted into radiation are often favored on general and specific grounds. Four classes of mechanisms involving the conversion of electrostatic waves into radiation are linear mode conversion, hybrid linear/nonlinear mechanisms, nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle processes, and radiation from localized wave packets. These processes are reviewed theoretically and observational evidence summarized for their occurrence. Strong evidence exists that specific nonlinear wave processes and mode conversion can explain quantitatively phenomena involving type III solar radio bursts and ionospheric emissions. On the other hand, no convincing evidence exists that magnetospheric continuum radiation is produced by mode conversion instead of nonlinear wave processes. Further research on these processes is needed.

  5. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  6. Gamma-ray emission in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres: from theory to Fermi observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-10-01

    We compute the patterns of γ-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed γ-ray light curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near-force-free. Using these solutions, we generate model γ-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase lags between the radio and γ-ray emission on the γ-ray peak separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag versus peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity, specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the γ-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light curve phenomenology. Additionally, they also produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

  7. Pair Production and Gamma-Ray Emission in the Outer Magnetospheres of Rapidly Spinning Young Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin; Chen, Kaiyou

    1997-01-01

    Electron-positron pair production and acceleration in the outer magnetosphere may be crucial for a young rapidly spinning canonical pulsar to be a strong Gamma-ray emitter. Collision between curvature radiated GeV photons and soft X-ray photons seems to be the only efficient pair production mechanism. For Crib-like pulsars, the magnetic field near the light cylinder is so strong, such that the synchrotron radiation of secondary pairs will be in the needed X-ray range. However, for majority of the known Gamma-ray pulsars, surface emitted X-rays seem to work as the matches and fuels for a gamma-ray generation fireball in the outer magnetosphere. The needed X-rays could come from thermal emission of a cooling neutron star or could be the heat generated by bombardment of the polar cap by energetic particles generated in the outer magnetosphere. With detection of more Gamma-ray pulsars, it is becoming evident that the neutron star's intrisic geometry (the inclination angle between the rotation and magnetic axes) and observational geometry (the viewing angle with respect to the rotation axis) are crucial to the understanding of varieties of observational properties exhibited by these pulsars. Inclination angles for many known high energy Gamma-ray pulsars appear to be large and the distribution seems to be consistent with random orientation. However, all of them except Geminga are pre-selected from known radio pulsars. The viewing angles are thus limited to be around the respective inclination angles for beamed radio emission, which may induce strong selection effect. The viewing angles as well as the inclination angles of PSR 1509-58 and PSB 0656+14 may be small such that most of the high energy Gamma-rays produced in the outer accelerators may not reach the observer's direction. The observed Gamma-rays below 5 MeV from this pulsar may be synchrotron radiation of secondary electron-positron pairs produced outside the accelerating regions.

  8. Quasar emission lines, radio structures and radio unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal; Browne, I. W. A.

    2013-02-01

    Unified schemes of radio sources, which account for different types of radio active galactic nucleus in terms of anisotropic radio and optical emission, together with different orientations of the ejection axis to the line of sight, have been invoked for many years. Recently, large samples of optical quasars, mainly from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), together with large radio samples, such as Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST), have become available. These hold the promise of providing more stringent tests of unified schemes but, compared to previous samples, lack high-resolution radio maps. Nevertheless, they have been used to investigate unified schemes, in some cases yielding results which appear inconsistent with such theories. Here we investigate using simulations how the selection effects to which such investigations are subject can influence the conclusions drawn. In particular, we find that the effects of limited resolution do not allow core-dominated radio sources to be fully represented in the samples, that the effects of limited sensitivity systematically exclude some classes of sources and the lack of deep radio data make it difficult to decide to what extent closely separated radio sources are associated. Nevertheless, we conclude that relativistic unified schemes are entirely compatible with the current observational data. For a sample selected from SDSS and FIRST which includes weak-cored triples we find that the equivalent width of the [O III] emission line decreases as core dominance increases, as expected, and also that core-dominated quasars are optically brighter than weak-cored quasars.

  9. Solar emission levels at low radio frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solar radio emission could seriously interfere with observations made by a low frequency (1 to 10 MHz) array in space. International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) radio data were used to determine solar emission level. The results indicate that solar emission should seriously disturb less than ten percent of the data, even during the years of solar maximum. Thus it appears that solar emission should not cause a disastrous loss of data. The information needed to design procedures to excise solar interference from the data produced by any low-frequency array is provided.

  10. Transient pulsed radio emission from a magnetar.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Fernando; Ransom, Scott M; Halpern, Jules P; Reynolds, John; Helfand, David J; Zimmerman, Neil; Sarkissian, John

    2006-08-24

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slowly rotating neutron stars with very bright and highly variable X-ray emission that are believed to be powered by ultra-strong magnetic fields of >10(14) G, according to the 'magnetar' model. The radio pulsations that have been observed from more than 1,700 neutron stars with weaker magnetic fields have never been detected from any of the dozen known magnetars. The X-ray pulsar XTE J1810-197 was revealed (in 2003) as the first AXP with transient emission when its luminosity increased 100-fold from the quiescent level; a coincident radio source of unknown origin was detected one year later. Here we show that XTE J1810-197 emits bright, narrow, highly linearly polarized radio pulses, observed at every rotation, thereby establishing that magnetars can be radio pulsars. There is no evidence of radio emission before the 2003 X-ray outburst (unlike ordinary pulsars, which emit radio pulses all the time), and the flux varies from day to day. The flux at all radio frequencies is approximately equal--and at >20 GHz XTE J1810-197 is currently the brightest neutron star known. These observations link magnetars to ordinary radio pulsars, rule out alternative accretion models for AXPs, and provide a new window into the coronae of magnetars. PMID:16929292

  11. Radio emissions and the heliospheric termination shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Cairns, I. H.; Donohue, D. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1994-01-01

    With the Voyager spacecrafts' discovery of low-frequency radio emissions from the depths of the outer heliosphere has come the realization that the boundaries between our heliosphere and the local interstellar medium have been detected. A model is presented here that can account for the observed radio emissions, based upon a termination shock modified by the dynamical effect of galactic and anomalous cosmic rays. Frequency and time domain properties of both continuum and transient radio events are explained, and new estimates for the distance to the termination shock (approximately 60-70 astronomical units) and the heliopause (less than or approximately 90 AU) are given.

  12. Radio Sounding Techniques for the Galilean Icy Moons and their Jovian Magnetospheric Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Markus, Thursten; Fung, Shing F.; Benson, Robert F.; Reinich, Bodo W.; Song, Paul; Gogineni, S. Prasad; Cooper, John F.; Taylor, William W. L.; Garcia, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's topside ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to Jupiter's icy moons and the surrounding Jovian magnetosphere will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the surfaces of the moons vary in response to magnetic-field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans and from the plasma flows and ionospheric currents themselves. Radio sounding from 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide the global electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. While radio sounding requires high transmitter power for subsurface sounding, little power is needed to probe the electron density and magnetic field intensity near the spacecraft. For subsurface sounding, reflections occur at changes in the dielectric index, e.g., at the interfaces between two different phases of water or between water and soil. Variations in sub-surface conductivity of the icy moons can be investigated by radio sounding in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 50 MHz, allowing the determination of the presence of density and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts. The detection of subsurface oceans underneath the icy crusts of the Jovian moons is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. Preliminary modeling results show that return signals are clearly distinguishable be&een an ice crust with a thickness of

  13. Control of Jupiter's Radio Emission and Aurorae by the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Bolton, S. J.; Desch, . D.; Farrell, W. W.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Radio emissions from Jupiter provided the first evidence that this giant planet has a strong magnetic field and a large magnetosphere. Jupiter also has polar aurorae, which are similar in many respects to Earth's aurorae. The radio emissions are believed to be generated along the high-latitude magnetic field lines by the same electrons that produce the aurorae, and both the radio emission in the hectometric frequency range and the aurorae vary considerably. The origin of the variability, however, has been poorly understood. Here we report simultaneous observations using the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft of hectometric radio emissions and extreme ultraviolet auroral emissions from Jupiter. Our results show that both of these emissions are triggered by interplanetary shocks propagating outward from the Sun. When such a shock arrives at Jupiter, it seems to cause a major compression and reconfiguration of the magnetosphere, which produces strong electric fields and therefore electron acceleration along the auroral field lines, similar to the processes that occur during geomagnetic storms at the Earth.

  14. Understanding pulsar magnetospheres with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karastergiou, A.; Johnston, S.; Karastergiou, A.; Johnston, S.; Andersson, N.; Breton, R.; Brook, P.; Gwinn, C.; Lewandowska, N.; Keane, E.; Kramer, M.; Macquart, J. P.; Serylak, M.; Shannon, R.; Stappers, B.; van Leeuwen, J.; Verbiest, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wright, G.

    The SKA will discover tens of thousands of pulsars and provide unprecedented data quality on these, as well as the currently known population, due to its unrivalled sensitivity. Here, we outline the state of the art of our understanding of magnetospheric radio emission from pulsars and how we will use the SKA to solve the open problems in pulsar magnetospheric physics.

  15. The propagation of radio waves: The theory of radio waves of low power in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, K. G.

    The effect of the ionized regions of the earth's atmosphere on radio wave propagation is comprehensively treated. After an introductory consideration of the terrestrial ionosphere and magnetosphere, wave propagation in ion plasmas, and their disturbances, attention is given to basic equations for the consideration of propagation effects, such constitutive relations as the Lorentz polarization term and the Debye length, the roles of polarization and refractive index in magnetoionic theory, rays and group velocity, the Booker quartic in stratified media, and the 'WKB' solutions. Further topics encompass the Airy integral function and the Stokes phenomenon, ray tracing in a loss-free stratified medium, ray theory and full wave solution results for an isotropic ionosphere, and full wave methods for anisotropic stratified media and their applications.

  16. Possible radio emission from Uranus at 0.5 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. W.

    1976-01-01

    Radio emission from the direction of Uranus has been detected in data from the Goddard radio astronomy experiment on the IMP-6 spacecraft. Previously, emission from the direction of Jupiter and Saturn had been observed by IMP-6 at a number of frequencies near 1 MHz and were identified through an analysis of the phase of the observed modulated signal detected from the spinning dipole antenna. This technique was applied to the direction of Uranus with possible positive results. Over the approximately 500 days of data, three to six bursts with unique spectral characteristics have been found. The events persisted less than 3 minutes and are strongest in intensity near 0.5 MHz. Identification with Uranus is confused by the likely presence of low-level terrestrial and solar emission. Because of the unfavorable angular separation of earth and Uranus, there is a possibility that the bursts are atypical terrestrial magnetospheric phenomena, although the uniqueness of the set of events indicates the probable detection of radiation from Uranus.

  17. On the elliptical polarization of Jupiter's decametric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the 100 percent elliptical polarization of Jupiter's decametric radio emission is investigated. The transfer of polarized radiation when coupling of the Stokes parameters is important is studied, and it is found, in agreement with earlier authors, that the density in and near the source region must be so low that the polarization remains fixed along the ray path. The polarization of the cyclotron maser radiation in these circumstances is determined, and it is found that the dispersion relation of the rarefied plasma composed of energetic, anisotropic electrons is like that in the vacuum. It is also found that the growth rate is sufficient to saturate the maser and account for the observed brightness temperature. Possible sources of plasma in and near the source region in Jupiter's inner, polar magnetosphere are considered.

  18. Nonthermal Radio Emission and the HR Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Perhaps the most reliable indicator of non-radiative heating/momentum in a stellar atmosphere is the presence of nonthermal radio emission. To date, 77 normal stellar objects have been detected and identified as nonthermal sources. These stellar objects are tabulated herein. It is apparent that non-thermal radio emission is not ubiquitous across the HR diagram. This is clearly the case for the single stars; it is not as clear for the binaries unless the radio emission is associated with their late-type components. Choosing to make this association, the single stars and the late-type components are plotted together. The following picture emerges: (1) there are four locations on the HR diagram where non-thermal radio stars are found; (2) the peak incoherent 5 GHz luminosities show a suprisingly small range for stars within each class; (3) the fraction of stellar energy that escapes as radio emission can be estimated by comparing the integrated maximum radio luminosity to the bolometric luminosity; (4) there are no apparent differences in L sub R between binaries with two cool components, binaries with one hot and one cool component, and single stars for classes C and D; and (5) The late-type stars (classes B, C, and D) are located in parts of the HR diagram where there is reason to suspect that the surfaces of the stars are being braked with respect to their interiors.

  19. Search for Radio Emission from HD80606b: a Highly Eccentric Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, M.; Winterhalter, D.; Lazio, J.; Majid, W.; Kuiper, T.; Farrell, W. M.; Spitler, L.

    2014-12-01

    Exoplanetary radio emission is a potential goldmine of information about a wider sample of planetary interiors, dynamos, and magnetospheres than our solar system provides. To date, however, radio searches for exoplanetary radio emission have been unsuccessful likely because the observing frequencies are too high. Using the relatively new Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), we present analyses of observations of the highly eccentric Jovian exoplanet HD80606b during five epochs before and after the planet's periastron. All of the gas giants in the solar system, as well as the Earth, exhibit magnetospheric radio emission due to the electron cyclotron maser instability. The power of this emission is modulated by the solar wind intensity. HD80606b is in a highly eccentric (e=0.93) orbit with a 111 day period. As the planet passes from apastron (0.88 AU) to periastron (0.03 AU), it experiences widely varying stellar wind conditions which should lead to variable radio emission with the highest power corresponding to periastron passage. HD80606b has been observed previously with the VLA at 325 MHz and 1425 MHz by Lazio et. al (2010), but LOFAR's lower frequency range (30-75 MHz) and high sensitivity is better suited to Jovian-type radio emissions. The LOFAR observations were made 48 hours and 18 hours pre-periastron, plus 18 and 48 hours post-periastron to capture the predicted strongest emission, and near apastron to provide a baseline level. The data are analyzed for both time-dependent and frequency dependent emission at each of the five observation epochs. This work presents the ongoing analysis of the data. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Io control of Jovian radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of Io controlling Jovian decametric radio emission, particularly in the region below 22 MHz, is discussed. Results of a two-year survey at 26.3 at 26.3 MHz are presented which demonstrate the control of Io over a high-intensity storm component of the radio emission and the independence of a weak radio component from the phase of Io, as was observed at lower frequencies. It is thus hypothesized that Io control is a flux-dependent rather than a frequency-dependent phenomenon, and results of analyses at 18 and 10 MHz which support this hypothesis are presented. The apparent correlation between frequency and Io control is thus shown to result from a selection effect due to the increase of non-Io emission with decreasing frequency and relative antenna detection threshold. This result implies a contiguous Io-controlled source region extending out several Jovian radii along the Io flux tube.

  1. Physical Analysis of the Jovian Synchrotron Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Costa, D.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S. M.; Thorne, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    We present results of our recent investigation of the Jovian synchrotron emission based on a particle transport code. The features of the two-dimensional brightness distributions, radio spectra and beaming curves are correlated to the different phenomena driven the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. The adiabatic invariant theory was used for performing this analysis work. The theoretical approach first enabled us to describe the electron radiation belts by modeling the interactions between high-energy trapped particles and plasmas, neutrals, moons, dust and magnetic field. Then radio observations were used to discuss the computed particle distributions in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The simulated brightness mappings were compared with VLA observations made at two wavelengths (20 and 6 cm). The beaming curve comparisons at 13-cm wavelength were performed for different epochs in order to evaluate the dependence of the model to the geometric factor De. The computed radio spectra were discussed with measurements made in the [0.5-20] GHz radio band. The simulation results match the different remote observations very well and thus allowed us to study the phenomenology of the Jovian synchrotron radio emission. The analysis of the Jovian synchrotron emission demonstrates that during the inward particle transport, local losses associated with the Jovian moons set the extension and intensity of the synchrotron radiation along the magnetic equator. Close to the planet, trapped electrons suffer from the interactions with dust and magnetic field, resulting in the transport of particles toward the high latitudes. The quantity of particles transported away from the equator is sufficient to produce the measurable secondary radio emissions. The simulations show that the moon sweeping effect controls both the transport toward the planet and at high latitudes by reducing the abundance of particles constrained to populate the regions out of the equator. Among the

  2. Radio emission from chemically peculiar stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Drake, Stephen A.; Bastian, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    In five VLA observing runs the initial survey of radio emission from magnetic Bp-Ap stars by Drake et al. is extended to include a total of 16 sources detected at 6 cm out of 61 observed, giving a detection rate of 26 percent. Of these stars, three are also detected at 2 cm, four at 3.6 cm, and five at 20 cm. The 11 new stars detected as radio sources have spectral types B5-A0 and are He-weak and Si-strong. No classical (SrCrEu-type) Ap stars have yet been detected. The 16 detected sources show a wide range of radio luminosities with the early-B He-S stars on average 20 times more radio luminous than the late-B He-W stars and 1000 times more luminous than Theta Aurigae. Multifrequency observations indicate flat spectra in all cases. Four stars have a detectable degree of circular polarization at one or more frequencies. It is argued that the radio-emitting CP (chemically peculiar) stars form a distinct class of radio stars that differs from both the hot star wind sources and the active late-type stars. The observed properties of radio emission from these stars may be understood in terms of optically thick gyrosynchrotron emission from a nonthermal distribution of electrons produced in a current sheet far from the star. In this model the electrons travel along magnetic fields to smaller radii and higher magnetic latitudes where they mirror and radiate microwave radiation.

  3. Detection of radio continuum emission from Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Simon, Theodore; Brown, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    We have detected the F5 IV-V star Procyon as a weak and variable 3.6 cm radio continuum source using the VLA. The inferred radio luminosity is similar to, though some-what higher than, the X-band luminosity of the active and flaring sun. The 33 micro-Jy flux density level at which we detected Procyon on four of five occasions is close to the 36 micro-Jy radio flux density expected from a model in which the radio emission consists of two components: optically thick 'stellar disk' emission with a 3.6 cm brightness temperature of 20,000 K that is 50 percent larger than the solar value, and optically thin coronal emission with an emission measure the same as that indicated by Einstein and EXOSAT X-ray flux measurements in 1981 and 1983. The maximum mass-loss rate of a warm stellar wind is less than 2 x 10 exp -11 solar mass/yr. An elevated flux density of 115 micro-Jy observed on a single occasion provides circumstantial evidence for the existence of highly localized magnetic fields on the surface of Procyon.

  4. A search for radio emission from the 'nonmagnetic' chemically peculiar stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, S. A.; Linsky, J. L.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have observed 23 members of the Am and HgMn subclasses of chemically peculiar (CP) stars with the Very Large Array (VLA) to search for nonthermal radio emission at levels comparable to those found for the Si and He peculiar subclasses of the CP stars by Linsky et al. (1992). This study was motivated by recent claims that magnetic fields of kilogauss strength are present in at least some of the Am and HgMn stars, contrary to previous beliefs, which would indicate that radio-emitting magnetospheres could be present in these stars. We detected none of the Am and HgMn stars as radio emitters with upper limits typically less than 0.20 mJy. Applying a correlation between radio luminosity, surface magnetic field, and effective temperature derived from previous radio studies of the Si and He peculiar CP stars, we find that the predicted radio luminosities of alpha And (an HgMn star) and Sirius (a hot Am star) are more than an order of magnitude larger than the observed upper limits, indicating that these stars lack magnetospheres, and, by inference, surface magnetic fields.

  5. Elliptically polarized bursty radio emissions from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Manning, R.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1995-01-01

    We report a new component of Jovian radio emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft when Ulysses was at high Jovigraphic latitudes (greater than or approximately = 30 deg north or south of the Jovian magnetic equator). This bursty high-latitude emission is elliptically polarized in the right-hand sense when observed from northern latitudes and in the left-hand sense when observed from southern latitudes, consistent with extraordinary mode. The orientation of the polarization ellipse is observed to systematically vary with time relative to the observer. It is argued that the elliptically-polarized nature of the emission is intrinsic to the source region.

  6. PSR J0737-3039B: A PROBE OF RADIO PULSAR EMISSION HEIGHTS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, B. B. P.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lomiashvili, D.; Gourgouliatos, K. N.; Lyutikov, M.

    2012-05-10

    In the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B, the strong wind produced by pulsar A distorts the magnetosphere of pulsar B. The influence of these distortions on the orbital-dependent emission properties of pulsar B can be used to determine the location of the coherent radio emission generation region in the pulsar magnetosphere. Using a model of the wind-distorted magnetosphere of pulsar B and the well-defined geometrical parameters of the system, we determine the minimum emission height to be {approx}20R{sub NS} in the two bright orbital longitude regions. We can determine the maximum emission height by accounting for the amount of deflection of the polar field line with respect to the magnetic axis using the analytical magnetic reconnection model of Dungey and the semi-empirical numerical model of Tsyganenko. Both of these models estimate the maximum emission height to be {approx}2500R{sub NS}. The minimum and maximum emission heights we calculate are consistent with those estimated for normal isolated pulsars.

  7. Calculation of the radio emission from EAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, H. R.; Sun, M. P.; Crannell, C. J.; Hough, J. H.; Shutie, P. F.

    1975-01-01

    Time-varying features of an electron-photon cascade are considered, particularly those associated with radio emission. The cosmic ray shower is represented as a superposition of collinear 10 GeV electron-photon cascades launched at different heights in the atmosphere. Actual simulations are performed for only 10 cascades at each of 40 heights and the results are scaled to represent the total number of cascades required. The apparent angular motions of the cascade particles as detected by antennas located at various positions up to 300 m from the shower axis are simulated. The radio pulse waveform and the corresponding frequency spectrum are obtained from these motions.

  8. Cross-Correlations in Quasar Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey

    The main factors forming the complex evolution of the accretive astrophysical systems are nonlinearity, intermittency, nonstationarity and also collective phenomena. To discover the dynamic processes in these objects and to detain understanding their properties we need to use all the applicable analyzing methods. Here we use the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) as a phenomenological approach to analyzing and parameterizing the auto- and cross-correlations in time series of astrophysical objects dynamics. As an example we consider the quasar flux radio spectral density at frequencies 2.7 GHz and 8.1 GHz. Data have been observed by Dr. N. Tanizuka (Laboratory for Complex Systems Analysis, Osaka Prefecture University) in a period of 1979 to 1988 (3 309 days). According to mental habits quasar is a very energetic and distant active galactic nucleus containing a supermassive black hole by size 10-10,000 times the Schwarzschild radius. The quasar is powered by an accretion disc around the black hole. The accretion disc material layers, moving around the black hole, are under the influence of gravitational and frictional forces. It results in raising the high temperature and arising the resonant and collective phenomena reflected in quasar emission dynamics. Radio emission dynamics of the quasar 0215p015 is characterized by three quasi-periodic processes, which are prevalent in considering dynamics. By contrast the 1641p399's emission dynamics have not any distinguish processes. It means the presence of high intermittency in accretive modes. The second difference moment allows comparing the degree of manifesting of resonant and chaotic components in initial time series of the quasar radio emission. The comparative analysis shows the dominating of chaotic part of 1641p399's dynamics whereas the radio emission of 0215p015 has the predominance of resonant component. Analyzing the collective features of the quasar radio emission intensity demonstrates the significant

  9. Electrostatic and electromagnetic gyroharmonic emissions due to energetic electrons in magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Wu, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper derives the growth rates and growth lengths of the electrostatic emission for spatially homogeneous and inhomogeneous energetic electrons, and numerically evaluates the growth rate and growth length spectra for several parameter sets representative of magnetospheric plasmas. In addition, the growth rates are derived for the case of electromagnetic emission modeled by the ordinary mode. The numerical results of the electromagnetic and electrostatic cases are compared with observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetosphere. It is concluded that the electrostatic gyroharmonic excitation is possible without the cold composition of plasma which is often postulated in the existing literature.

  10. Electromagnetic and electrostatic emissions at the cusp-magnetosphere interface during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Wu, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    Strongly peaked electrostatic emissions near 10.0 kHz and electromagnetic emissions near 0.56 kHz have been observed by the VLF wave detector on board Imp 6 on crossings from the earth's magnetosphere into the polar cusp during the occurrence of large magnetospheric substorms. The electrostatic emissions were observed to be closely confined to the cusp-magnetosphere interface. The electromagnetic emissions were of somewhat broader spatial extent and were seen on higher-latitude field lines within the cusp. Using these plasma wave observations and additional information provided by plasma, magnetometer and particle measurements made simultaneously on Imp 6, theories are constructed to explain each of the two classes of emission. The electromagnetic waves are modeled as whistlers, and the electrostatic waves as electron-cyclotron harmonics. The resulting growth rates predict power spectra similar to those observed for both emission classes. The electrostatic waves may play a significant role via enhanced diffusion in the relaxation of the sharp substorm time cusp-magnetosphere boundary to a more diffuse quiet time boundary.

  11. Steady-State Models of X-ray Emission from Massive-Star Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Christopher; Townsend, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    In the subset of OB stars with large-scale, organized magnetic fields, the stellar wind is forced to flow along magnetic field lines and is trapped within a magnetosphere corotating with its host star. As the wind turns on itself, shocks heat the plasma to millions of degrees and produce X-ray emission. Such magnetospheres are typically classified with the "wind magnetic confinement parameter", a simplified ratio between the magnetic energy density and the wind kinetic energy density. This parameter is often used to estimate magnetosphere properties, such as size, mass-loss rate, and spin-down time. Unfortunately, the strong magnetic fields in magnetospheres (polar strength: 100 G - 10 kG) and resulting Alfven velocities make magnetohydrodynamics simulations computationally difficult due to very small timesteps. To get around this issue, we approximate a massive-star magnetosphere as a series of one-dimensional flows along magnetic dipole field lines and develop a steady-state model from the resulting hydrodynamic equations. With this model, we derive scaling relations for the stellar mass-loss rate as a function of surface colatitude and find agreement with previous scaling results derived from simulations. These relations are further extended to include the effects of rigid-body rotation within the magnetosphere. Additionally, we develop an X-ray emission model from this steady-state analysis and compare it against both the "XADM" model for X-ray emission from massive star magnetospheres and observations of massive magnetic stars. Finally, we discuss improvements to the traditional wind magnetic confinement parameter to take into account the effect of a magnetic field on the wind kinetic energy density.

  12. DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 754

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.in

    2009-07-10

    We present a low-frequency study of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster A754. We present a new 150 MHz image of the galaxy cluster A754 made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and discuss the detection of four diffuse features. We compare the 150 MHz image with the images at 74, 330, and 1363 MHz; one new diffuse feature is detected. The flux density upper limits at 330 and 1363 MHz imply a synchrotron spectral index, {alpha}>2 (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup -{alpha}}), for the new feature. The 'west relic' detected at 74 MHz is not detected at 150 MHz and is thus consistent with its nondetection at 1363 MHz and 330 MHz. Integrated spectra of all the diffuse features are presented. The fourth diffuse feature is located along the proposed merger axis in A754 and 0.7 Mpc away from the peak of X-ray emission; we refer to it as a relic. We have made use of the framework of the adiabatic compression model to obtain spectra. We show that the spectrum of the fourth diffuse feature is consistent with that of a cocoon of a radio galaxy lurking for about 9 x 10{sup 7} yr; no shock compression is required. The other three diffuse emission have spectra steeper than 1.5 and could be cocoons lurking for longer time. We discuss other possibilities such as shocks and turbulent reacceleration being responsible for the diffuse emission in A754.

  13. Radio Emissions from the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    For nearly fifteen years the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft have been detecting an unusual radio emission in the outer heliosphere in the frequency range from about 2 to 3 kHz. Two major events have been observed, the first in 1983-84 and the second in 1992-93. In both cases the onset of the radio emission occurred about 400 days after a period of intense solar activity, the first in mid-July 1982, and the second in May-June 1991. These two periods of solar activity produced the two deepest cosmic ray Forbush decreases ever observed. Forbush decreases are indicative of a system of strong shocks and associated disturbances propagating outward through the heliosphere. The radio emission is believed to have been produced when this system of shocks and disturbances interacted with one of the outer boundaries of the heliosphere, most likely in the vicinity of the the heliopause. The emission is believed to be generated by the shock-driven Langmuir-wave mode conversion mechanism, which produces radiation at the plasma frequency (f(sub p)) and at twice the plasma frequency (2f(sub p)). From the 400-day travel time and the known speed of the shocks, the distance to the interaction region can be computed, and is estimated to be in the range from about 110 to 160 AU.

  14. Models of Neptune's smooth recurrent radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Constance

    1993-01-01

    The quantitative response of the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) instrument to a wave with polarization ellipse of arbitrary shape and orientation, arriving at the antennas from any direction, can be determined. This capability is used to model the time variation of intensity and circular polarization over a range of radio frequencies for proposed radio-source locations and emission characteristics at Neptune. At frequencies below 400 kHz the observed variation of intensity, polarization, and phase are closely simulated in an offset tilted dipole magnetic field by conjugate sources at midlatitude with filled emission cones. The phase of emission at higher frequencies is reproduced by sources at lower latitude. Modeled wide-cone emission does not reach the spacecraft at the observed phase nor have the polarization sense observed before closest approach. Source-surface maps of apparent polarization for the period before closest approach when instrumental response is especially sensitive to source location is presented. The method is capable of extension to more realistic models of the magnetic field.

  15. AGN coronal emission models - I. The predicted radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raginski, I.; Laor, Ari

    2016-06-01

    Accretion discs in active galactic nucleus (AGN) may be associated with coronal gas, as suggested by their X-ray emission. Stellar coronal emission includes radio emission, and AGN corona may also be a significant source for radio emission in radio quiet (RQ) AGN. We calculate the coronal properties required to produce the observed radio emission in RQ AGN, either from synchrotron emission of power-law (PL) electrons, or from cyclosynchrotron emission of hot mildly relativistic thermal electrons. We find that a flat spectrum, as observed in about half of RQ AGN, can be produced by corona with a disc or a spherical configuration, which extends from the innermost regions out to a pc scale. A spectral break to an optically thin power-law emission is expected around 300-1000 GHz, as the innermost corona becomes optically thin. In the case of thermal electrons, a sharp spectral cut-off is expected above the break. The position of the break can be measured with very long baseline interferometry observations, which exclude the cold dust emission, and it can be used to probe the properties of the innermost corona. Assuming equipartition of the coronal thermal energy density, the PL electrons energy density, and the magnetic field, we find that the energy density in a disc corona should scale as ˜R-1.3, to get a flat spectrum. In the spherical case the energy density scales as ˜R-2, and is ˜4 × 10-4 of the AGN radiation energy density. In Paper II we derive additional constraints on the coronal parameters from the Gudel-Benz relation, Lradio/LX-ray ˜ 10- 5, which RQ AGN follow.

  16. Amalthea's modulation of Jovian decametric radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhypov, O. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    2007-05-01

    Most modulation lanes in dynamic spectra of Jovian decametric emission (DAM) are formed by radiation scattering on field-aligned inhomogeneities in the Io plasma torus. The positions and frequency drift of hundreds of lanes have been measured on the DAM spectra from UFRO archives. A special 3D algorithm is used for localization of field-aligned magnetospheric inhomogeneities by the frequency drift of modulation lanes. It is found that some lanes are formed near the magnetic shell of the satellite Amalthea mainly at longitudes of 123°≤λ_III≤140° (north) and 284°≤λ_III≤305° (south). These disturbances coincide with regions of plasma compression by the rotating magnetic field of Jupiter. Such modulations are found at other longitudes too (189° to 236°) with higher sensitivity. Amalthea's plasma torus could be another argument for the ice nature of the satellite, which has a density less than that of water.

  17. Amalthea's modulation of Jovian decametric radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhypov, O. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    2007-08-01

    Most modulation lanes in dynamic spectra of Jovian decametric emission (DAM) are formed by radiation scattering on field-aligned inhomogeneities in the Io plasma torus. The positions and frequency drift of hundreds of lanes have been measured on the DAM spectra from UFRO archives. A special 3D algorithm is used for localization of field-aligned magnetospheric inhomogeneities by the frequency drift of modulation lanes. It is found that some lanes are formed near the magnetic shell of the satellite Amalthea mainly at longitudes of 123 to 140 deg. (north; III 1965 system) and 284 to 305 deg. (south). These disturbances coincide with regions of plasma compression by the rotating magnetic field of Jupiter. Such modulations are found at other longitudes too (189 to 236 deg.) with higher sensitivity. Amalthea's plasma torus could be another argument for the ice nature of the satellite, which has a density less than that of water.

  18. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  19. Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have important connections to various types of radio emissions from the Sun. The persistent noise storm radiation (type I storm at metric wavelengths, type III storms at longer wavelengths) can be clearly interrupted by the occurrence of a CME in the active region that produces the storm. Sometimes the noise storm completely disappears and other times, it reappears in the active region. Long-lasting type III bursts are associated with CME eruption, thought to be due to the reconnection process taking place beneath the erupting CME. Type II bursts are indicative of electron acceleration in the CME-driven shocks and hence considered to be the direct response of the CME propagation in the corona and interplanetary medium. Finally type IV bursts indicate large-scale post-eruption arcades containing trapped electrons that produce radio emission. This paper summarizes some key results that connect CMEs to various types of radio emission and what we can learn about particle acceleration in the corona) and interplanetary medium. Particular emphasis will be placed on type If bursts because of their connection to interplanetary shocks detected in situ.

  20. Polarization model applied to Uranian radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. B.; Neal, K. L.; Warwick, J. W.

    1991-04-01

    The total power and the degree of circular polarization as measured by the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiments on the Voyager spacecraft are modeled. For a source near the electron cyclotron frequency, the degree of circular polarization is determined by the angle between the wave vector and the field. It is shown that the observed strong circular polarization of Uranian smooth low-frequency (SLF) can be modeled as emission that is beamed along the direction of the magnetic field in a filled cone. The main observational constraints of SLF emission from Uranus are met by conjugate sources at about 21 deg from the magnetic equator.

  1. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE 2) flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 0.31 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emission, based on the integrated intensity of emission from the Galactic plane instead of cross-correlations with the thermal dust spatial morphology. The Galactic plane intensity measured by ARCADE 2 is fainter than predicted by models without spinning dust, and is consistent with spinning dust contributing 0.4 +/- 0.1 of the Galactic plane emission at 23 GHz.

  2. Time monitoring of radio jets and magnetospheres in the nearby young stellar cluster R Coronae Australis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Yan, Chi-Hung; Karr, Jennifer; Chou, Mei-Yin; Ho, Paul T.-P.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Costigan, Gráinne; Manara, Carlo Felice; Forbrich, Jan; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-10

    We report Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 8-10 GHz (λ = 3.0-3.7 cm) monitoring observations toward the young stellar object (YSO) cluster R Coronae Australis (R CrA), taken from 2012 March 15 to 2012 September 12. These observations were planned to measure the radio flux variabilities in timescales from 0.5 hr to several days, to tens of days, and up to ∼200 days. We found that among the YSOs detectable in individual epochs, in general, the most reddened objects in the Spitzer observations show the highest mean 3.5 cm Stokes I emission, and the lowest fractional variabilities on <200 day timescales. The brightest radio flux emitters in our observations are the two reddest sources IRS7W and IRS7E. In addition, by comparing our observations with observations taken from 1996 to 1998 and 2005, we found that the radio fluxes of these two sources have increased by a factor of ∼1.5. The mean 3.5 cm fluxes of the three Class I/II sources, IRSI, IRS2, and IRS6, appear to be correlated with their accretion rates derived by a previous near-infrared line survey. The weakly accreting Class I/II YSOs, or those in later evolutionary stages, present radio flux variability on <0.5 hr timescales. Some YSOs were detected only during occasional flaring events. The source R CrA went below our detection limit during a few fading events.

  3. Discovery of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    SciTech Connect

    Bookbinder, J.A.; Lamb, D.Q.

    1987-12-01

    VLA 1.4-GHz and 4.9-GHz observations of six DQ Her cataclysmic variables, obtained in the C/D hybrid configuration with 50-MHz bandwidth, 7-sec time resolution, and limiting flux density about 200 microJy on July 21, 1984, are reported. Variable radio emission with time scale less than 5 min, circular polarization less than 15 percent, and flux density 3-5 mJy at 1.4 GHz and 8-16 mJy at 4.9 GHz is detected from AE Aqr. This emission is tentatively attributed to synchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons, powered by the MHD torque coupling the magnetic white dwarf to either (1) a secondary with a strong magnetic field or (2) an accretion disk. 20 references.

  4. Discovery of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, J. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    VLA 1.4-GHz and 4.9-GHz observations of six DQ Her cataclysmic variables, obtained in the C/D hybrid configuration with 50-MHz bandwidth, 7-sec time resolution, and limiting flux density about 200 microJy on July 21, 1984, are reported. Variable radio emission with time scale less than 5 min, circular polarization less than 15 percent, and flux density 3-5 mJy at 1.4 GHz and 8-16 mJy at 4.9 GHz is detected from AE Aqr. This emission is tentatively attributed to synchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons, powered by the MHD torque coupling the magnetic white dwarf to either (1) a secondary with a strong magnetic field or (2) an accretion disk.

  5. DETECTION OF RADIO EMISSION FROM FIREBALLS

    SciTech Connect

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Dowell, J.; Henning, P. A.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K.; Hartman, J. M.; Ellingson, S. W.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Wilson, T. L.; Kavic, M.; Simonetti, J. H.

    2014-06-20

    We present the findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager, a back end correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, which has recorded over 11,000 hr of all-sky images at frequencies between 25 and 75 MHz. In a search of this data for radio transients, we have found 49 long-duration (10 s of seconds) transients. Ten of these transients correlate both spatially and temporally with large meteors (fireballs), and their signatures suggest that fireballs emit a previously undiscovered low frequency, non-thermal pulse. This emission provides a new probe into the physics of meteors and identifies a new form of naturally occurring radio transient foreground.

  6. Updated modeling of Io and non-Io Radio Auroral Emissions of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, C.; Lamy, L.; Zarka, P.; Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.

    2015-10-01

    The radio auroral emissions produced by the Jupiter's magnetosphere between a few kHz and 40MHz, the most intense of our Solar System, are known since half a century, but they still drive many questions, and their deepened study is one of the main aim of the JUNO missions (arrival in July 2016). Jovian auroral radio emissions are thought to be produced through the Cyclotron Maser Instability (CMI), from non-maxwellian weakly relativistic electrons gyrating along high-latitude magnetic fields lines (Zarka, 1998). These emissions divide in different spectral components, driven or not by the moon Io. The origin and the relationship between kilometric, hectometric and decametric non-Io emissions in particular remains poorly understood. To investigate these emissions, we simulated numerical dynamic spectra with the most recent version of the ExPRES code - Exoplanetary and Planetary Radio Emission Simulator, available at http://maser.obspm.fr - already used to successfully model Io decametric and Saturn's kilometric arcshaped emissions (Hess et al., 2008, Lamy et al., 2008) and predict exoplanetary radio emissions (Hess et al., 2011). Such simulations bring direct constraints on the locus of active magnetic field lines and on the nature of CMI-unstable electrons (Hess et al., submitted). We validated the new theoretical calculation of the beaming angle used by ExPRES, which now includes refraction at the source. We then built updated simulations of Io and non-Io emissions which were compared to the radio observations acquired by the Cassini spacecraft (Jupiter flyby in 2000) and the Nançay decameter array (routines observations of Jupiter).

  7. Modelling auroral currents at hot Jupiters: implications for auroral radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Milan, S. E.

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the radio emissions of exoplanets have come under focus due to the commencement of observations using new radio telescopes such as LOFAR. A class of planet which has attracted significant attention in this respect is the close-orbiting 'hot Jupiter', several of which, according to previous estimates, may produce detectable radio emissions driven by stellar windmagnetosphere interactions. However, this expectation rests on the accuracy over many orders of magnitude of the 'Radiometric Bode's Law', an empirical relation between the solar wind energy input and radio power output of a variety of bodies in the solar system, some of which (e.g. Jupiter) are known to be dominated instead by internal processes such as planetary rotation. In this presentation we calculate the expected radio luminosity generated by a Dungey cycle-like stellar wind interaction with a hot Jupiter's magnetosphere. Specifically, we adapt the Milan (2013) model of the terrestrial twin-vortical ionospheric plasma flow and resulting field-aligned currents to the case of hot Jupiters, and we compute the total auroral and radio luminosities for various parameters and compare with previous empirical estimates.

  8. Electrostatic emissions between electron gyroharmonics in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. F.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    A scheme was constructed and a theoretical model was developed to classify electrostatic emissions. All of the emissions appear to be generated by the same basic mechanism: an unstable electron plasma distribution consisting of cold electrons (less than 100 eV) and hot loss cone electrons (about 1 keV). Each emission class is associated with a particular range of model parameters; the wide band electric field data can thus be used to infer the density and temperature of the cold plasma component. The model predicts that gyroharmonic emissions near the plasma frequency require large cold plasma densities.

  9. Study of sub-auroral radio emissions observed by ICE experiment onboard DEMETER satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Mogilevski, M. M.; Sawas, S.; Blecki, J.; Berthelier, J. J.; Voller, W.

    2012-04-01

    We report on the terrestrial kilometric and hectometric radio emissions recorded by the DEMETER/ICE (Instrument Champ Electrique) experiment. This instrument measures the electric field components of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves in the frequency range from DC to 3.25 MHz. Despite the limited satellite invariant latitude (data acquisition below about 65°), specific events have been observed, close to the sub-auroral region, in the frequency range from 100 kHz to about 1 MHz. This range covers the well-known auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), the terrestrial kilometric continuum, and the sub-auroral terrestrial emission at higher frequency up to 3 MHz. The high spectral capability of the experiment leads us to distinguish between the bursty and the continuum emissions. Selected events have been found to principally occur in the late evening and early morning sectors of the magnetosphere (22 MLT - 02 MLT) but others have been observed on the dayside. Our first results are compared to previous radio observations performed on board INTERBALL-1 (Kuril'chik et al, Cosmic Research, 43, 2005) and GEOTAIL (Hashimoto et al., JGR, 104, 1999) satellites. We also discuss the common and different features of the Earth and Jovian radio emissions. We emphasis on the observational parameters: the occurrence probability, the emission beam and the spectral emission types. We show that the physical interpretation of the auroral phenomena needs a good knowledge of the geometric configuration of the source and observer and the reception system (antenna beam and receivers).

  10. Source of O mode radio emissions from the dayside of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Curran, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    During the inbound trajectory toward Uranus, the Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument on Voyager 2 observed narrow-band smooth (n-smooth) emission at frequencies centered near 60 kHz and O-mode emission (the dayside source) in a frequency range narrowly confined around 160 kHz. Assuming empirical models of the plasma density for the dayside magnetosphere of Uranus, and using cold plasma theory together with observational constraints, ray-tracing calculations are performed to determine the source location of the O-mode emission. The dayside source appears to originate along magnetic field lines with a footprint near the north magnetic pole. Sources of nightside high-frequency broadband smooth (b-smooth) emission observed by Voyager after encounter are believed to exist near the conjugate footprint of these same field lines. This would indicate that the particle population supplying the free energy source has energies at least as high as a few keV.

  11. Frequency band broadening of magnetospheric VLF emissions near the equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Lin, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    The broadening of the whistler mode VLF emission band has frequently been observed by the equatorially orbiting S3-A (Explorer 45) satellite outside the midnight sector of the plasmasphere, during periods of geomagnetic disturbance. Prior to the broadening, the band of this emission is narrow with a sharp gap at the half electron gyrofrequency. The gradual broadening of the emission band on the low-frequency side is associated with the simultaneously observed spreading of the anisotropy of the ring current electrons to higher and wider energy ranges. Using the modeled distribution function, the linear growth rates of the cyclotron instability are calculated numerically. The results suggest that broadening of the VLF emission band near the plasmasphere can be caused by spreading of the ring current electron anisotropy toward higher energies.

  12. Equatorial Emissions Events in the Inner Magnetosphere from THEMIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Chen, R.; Tam, W. Y.; Chen, L.; Jan, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Two specific emission events near equator are found by analyzing wave data from SCM (Search Coil Magnetometer) and EFI (Electric Field Instrument) of THEMIS mission in the local afternoon sector for the year of 2008. These events are both with emissions of frequencies at about 70Hz and 110Hz, between the local proton gyrofrequency fcH+ and the lower hybrid frequency flhr, around 5RE. The analyzed wave vectors are shown to be nearly perpendicular to the ambient geomagnetic fields. The observed ion velocity distributions at the same time exhibit ring features at about 3600 km/sec in perpendicular velocity, which is larger than the local Alfvén velocity. Wave growth rates over different frequencies are calculated to compare with the emission intensity at different frequencies based on dispersion relation of magnetosonic waves.

  13. The Radio Wave Emission from Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaklini, Pedro Paulo Bonetti

    2008-10-01

    SgrA* is a compact radio source, with radius smaller than 1 AU. Its position is coincident with the dynamic center of a star cluster that orbits the 4 million solar mass supermassive black hole found in the center of the Milky Way. SgrA* is surrounded by a complex of HII regions, with complex morphology, named SgrA. The variability of the SgrA* emission was observed at different wavelengths, as radio, infrared and X-rays, with timescales that range from hours to months. Recent observations using interferometric techniques have detected a quasiperiodicity in the radio light curve from SgrA*. In our work, we present the result of 43 GHz observations obtained with the Itapetinga radiotelescope, located in Atibaia, which aimed to detect this variability and verify the existence of a periodicity. Sgr B2, an HII complex near SgrA*, was used as a calibrator to eliminate any extrinsic variability. The obtained light curve is consistent with previous results reported in the literature, confirming the increase in the amplitude of the variability with frequency. Particularly, daily variability was found that is compatible with what was reported at 7 mm using VLBI techniques. The expected 106 days periodicity was not found in our data by the Jurkevich statistic method, which instead indicated the existence of a 90 day period. However, the superposition of the 7 mm data on a 106 day look similar to what was found from the 1.3 cm observations. Considering that the observations at 7 mm do not cover all the phases in the full cycle, more observations are needed to confirm the existence of a periodicity in the light curve.

  14. A multidisciplinary study of planetary, solar and astrophysical radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Calvert, W.; Fielder, R.; Goertz, C.; Grabbe, C.; Kurth, W.; Mutel, R.; Sheerin, J.; Mellott, M.; Spangler, S.

    1986-01-01

    Combination of the related fields of planetary, solar, and astrophysical radio emissions was attempted in order to more fully understand the radio emission processes. Topics addressed include: remote sensing of astrophysical plasma turbulence; Alfven waves; astrophysical shock waves; surface waves; very long base interferometry results; very large array observations; solar magnetic flux; and magnetohydrodynamic waves as a tool for solar corona diagnostics.

  15. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  16. A parametric study of the propagation of auroral radio emissions through auroral cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, A.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation is the radio counterpart of the Earth's auroral radiations, observed in a large domain of wavelength, from Infrared to UV and obviously in visible. It is generated at high latitude (~70°), mostly along the nightside magnetic field lines connecting to the Earth's magnetospheric tail. In-situ observations by numerous spacecraft show that the radio sources are embedded inside depleted cavities. The auroral cavities contain a hot tenuous plasma (ne~1 cm-3, Te~5 keV) in a strong ambient magnetic field (fp/fc < 0.1). The mechanism of emission, the Cyclotron Maser Instability (CMI), predicts an intense X mode emission near gyromagnetic frequency preferentially perpendicular to the local magnetic field. But as the radio waves are generated inside a depleted cavity, they are refracted. The apparent beaming of the source is different from that predicted by the CMI. The characteristics of the apparent beaming of the source outside of the cavity depends on several geometrical and physical parameters of the surrounding medium, as well as the frequency of the radio wave. A ray tracing code (ARTEMIS-P), which computes the trajectories of electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma, is use to compute the path of radio ray from the source inside the hot tenuous plasma of the cavity to the outside. We model a cylindrical plasma cavity characterized by a few parameters (width, edge and parallel gradients) and we study the effect of the cavity geometry on the beaming of AKR for several frequencies. We draw conclusions about the deterministic nature of the beaming angle of the radio emissions generated in cavities. We then extend our study to emissions from giant planets.

  17. U. radio emission from quiescent filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    Full-disk Very Large Array (VLA) synthesis maps of the quiet Sun indicate that filaments can be seen in emission at 91.6 cm wavelength; they are detected in absorption at shorter microwave wavelengths. The 91.6 cm emission has a brightness temperature of T sub B = 3 x 10(exp 5) K. It is hotter, wider and longer than the underlying filament detected at H alpha wavelengths, but the similarity between the shape, position, elongation and orientation of the radio and optical features suggests their close association. The 91.6 cm emission is attributed to the thermal-bremsstrahlung of a hot transition sheath that envelopes the H alpha filament and acts as an interface between the cool, dense H alpha filament and the hotter, rarefied corona. The transition sheath is seen in emission because of the lower optical depth of the corona at 90 cm wavelength, and the width of this sheet is 10(exp 9) cm. A power law gradient in pressure provides a better match to the observations than a constant pressure model; definitive tests of theoretical models await simultaneous multi-wavelength studies of filaments at different observing angles. When the thermal bremsstrahlung is optically thin, the magnetic field strength in the transition sheath can be inferred from the observed circular polarization. Variable physical parameters of the sheath, such as width, electron density, and electron temperature, can explain controversial reports of the detection of, or the failure to detect, the meter-wavelength counterpart of H alpha filaments.

  18. Continuum radiation in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    With the completion of the Voyager tour of the outer planets, radio and plasma wave instruments have executed the first survey of the wave spectra of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One of the most notable conclusions of this survey is that there is a great deal of qualitative similarity in both the plasma wave and radio wave spectra from one magnetosphere to the next. In particular, in spite of detailed differences, most of the radio emissions at each of the planets have been tentatively classified into two primary categories. First, the most intense emissions are generally associated with the cyclotron maser instability. Second, a class of weaker emissions can be found at each of the magnetospheres which appears to be the result of conversion from intense electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid resonance frequency into (primarily) ordinary mode radio emission. It is this second category, often referred to as nonthermal continuum radiation, which we will discuss in this review. We review the characteristics of the continuum spectrum at each of the planets, discuss the source region and direct observations of the generation of the emissions where available, and briefly describe the theories for the generation of the emissions. Over the past few years evidence has increased that the linear mode conversion of electrostatic waves into the ordinary mode can account for at least some of the continuum radiation observed. There is no definitive evidence which precludes the possibility that a nonlinear mechanism may also be important.

  19. Uranus as a radio source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Leblanc, Y.; Aubier, M.; Ortega-Molina, A.

    1991-01-01

    The complex nature of the Uranus radio emissions, both magnetospheric and atmospheric, is reviewed, with emphasis on the identification of distinct components and the determination of their source locations. Seven radii components were discovered in addition to the RF signature of lightning in the planet's atmosphere. Six of the seven magnetospheric components are freely propagating emissions; one component, the nonthermal continuum, is trapped in the density cavity between the magnetopause and the dense inner magnetosphere. The radio components are divided into two types according to their emission signature: bursty emission and smooth emission. The inferred source location for the dominant nightside emission is above the nightside magnetic pole, largely overlapping the UV auroral region and the magnetic polar cap. The N-burst component appears to be associated with solar-wind enhancements at Uranus, consistent with the idea that the solar wind was triggering magnetospheric substormlike activity during the encounter.

  20. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  1. The Annular Gap: Gamma-Ray & Radio Emission of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, G. J.; Du, Y. J.; Han, J. L.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars have been found more than 40 years. Observations from radio to gamma-rays present abundant information. However, the radiation mechanism is still an open question. It is found that the annular gap could be formed in the magnetosphere of pulsars (neutron stars or quark stars), which combines the advantages of the polar cap, slot gap and outer gap models. It is emphasized that observations of some radio pulsars, normal and millisecond gamma-ray pulsars (MSGPs) show that the annular gap would play a very important role. Here we show some observational and theoretical evidences about the annular gap. For example, bi-drifting sub-pulses; radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars and so on.

  2. Solar wind control of Jupiter's hectometric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Desch, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Radio, plasma, and magnetic field data obtained by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were used to examine the manner in which the Jovian hectometric radio emission (HOM) is controlled by the solar wind. Using the method of superposed epochs, it was found that the higher energy HOM is correlated with the IMF as well as with the solar wind density and pressure. However, unlike the Io-independent decametric radio emission (Non-Io DAM), the HOM displayed no correlation with the solar wind velocity, although this radio component appear to be also influenced by the IMF. The results suggest separate HOM amd Non-Io DAM sources.

  3. Magnetospheric Science Objectives of the Juno Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Adriani, A.; Allegrini, F.; Bolton, S. J.; Bonfond, B.; Bunce, E. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Ebert, R. W.; Gladstone, G. R.; Hansen, C. J.; Kurth, W. S.; Levin, S. M.; Mauk, B. H.; McComas, D. J.; Paranicas, C. P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Thorne, R. M.; Valek, P.; Waite, J. H.; Zarka, P.

    2014-02-01

    In July 2016, NASA's Juno mission becomes the first spacecraft to enter polar orbit of Jupiter and venture deep into unexplored polar territories of the magnetosphere. Focusing on these polar regions, we review current understanding of the structure and dynamics of the magnetosphere and summarize the outstanding issues. The Juno mission profile involves (a) a several-week approach from the dawn side of Jupiter's magnetosphere, with an orbit-insertion maneuver on July 6, 2016; (b) a 107-day capture orbit, also on the dawn flank; and (c) a series of thirty 11-day science orbits with the spacecraft flying over Jupiter's poles and ducking under the radiation belts. We show how Juno's view of the magnetosphere evolves over the year of science orbits. The Juno spacecraft carries a range of instruments that take particles and fields measurements, remote sensing observations of auroral emissions at UV, visible, IR and radio wavelengths, and detect microwave emission from Jupiter's radiation belts. We summarize how these Juno measurements address issues of auroral processes, microphysical plasma physics, ionosphere-magnetosphere and satellite-magnetosphere coupling, sources and sinks of plasma, the radiation belts, and the dynamics of the outer magnetosphere. To reach Jupiter, the Juno spacecraft passed close to the Earth on October 9, 2013, gaining the necessary energy to get to Jupiter. The Earth flyby provided an opportunity to test Juno's instrumentation as well as take scientific data in the terrestrial magnetosphere, in conjunction with ground-based and Earth-orbiting assets.

  4. RADIO AND GAMMA-RAY PULSED EMISSION FROM MILLISECOND PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. J.; Chen, D.; Qiao, G. J.

    2013-01-20

    Pulsed {gamma}-ray emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs) has been detected by the sensitive Fermi space telescope, which sheds light on studies of the emission region and its mechanism. In particular, the specific patterns of radio and {gamma}-ray emission from PSR J0101-6422 challenge the popular pulsar models, e.g., outer gap and two-pole caustic models. Using the three-dimensional annular gap model, we have jointly simulated radio and {gamma}-ray light curves for three representative MSPs (PSR J0034-0534, PSR J0101-6422, and PSR J0437-4715) with distinct radio phase lags, and present the best simulated results for these MSPs, particularly for PSR J0101-6422 with complex radio and {gamma}-ray pulse profiles, and for PSR J0437-4715 with a radio interpulse. We have found that both the {gamma}-ray and radio emission originate from the annular gap region located in only one magnetic pole, and the radio emission region is not primarily lower than the {gamma}-ray region in most cases. In addition, the annular gap model with a small magnetic inclination angle instead of an 'orthogonal rotator' can account for the MSPs' radio interpulse with a large phase separation from the main pulse. The annular gap model is a self-consistent model not only for young pulsars but also MSPs, and multi-wavelength light curves can be fundamentally explained using this model.

  5. On the proposed triggering of Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1985-09-01

    Calvert (1985) has proposed that solar type III radio bursts can trigger the onset of certain Jovian hectometer wavelength emissions. The authors show, using the data obtained by the Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment, that this triggering hypothesis is not supported statistically. Furthermore, the authors question the causality of this proposed triggering because much of the Jovian hectometer emission is due to a quasi-continuous radio source rotating, in lighthouse fashion, with Jupiter. Thus, an observed "onset" of emission is simply a function of the observer's position in local time around Jupiter.

  6. On the proposed triggering of Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Calvert (1985) has proposed that a solar type III radio bursts can trigger the onset of certain Jovian hectometer wavelength emissions. It is shown, using the data obtained by the Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment, that this triggering hypothesis is not supported statistically. Furthermore, the causality of this proposed triggering is questioned because much of the Jovian hectometer emission is due to a quasi-continuous radio source rotating, in lighthouse fashion, with Jupiter. Thus, an observed 'onset' of emission is simply a function of the observer's position in local time around Jupiter.

  7. Correlation of radio and gamma emissions in lightning initiation.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Thu, W M; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2013-10-18

    The results of simultaneous radio and gamma emission measurements during thunderstorms are presented. A gamma detector situated at the height 3840 m and two radio detectors of Tien-Shan Mountain Scientific Station (altitude 3340 m) registered intensive gamma flashes and radio pulses during the time of lightning initiation. The radio-gamma correlation grows abruptly at the initial moment (a few hundred microseconds), and the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9-0.95. The gamma-energy spectrum measured during lightning initiation is close to the characteristic spectrum of runaway breakdown. Radio pulses observed at the same time have highest amplitudes. Combined observation of gamma and radio emissions confirm the conception of lightning initiation due to multiple simultaneous electric discharges at hydrometeors stimulated and synchronized by low-energy electrons generated in the runaway breakdown process. PMID:24182272

  8. Fossil shell emission in dying radio loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, M.; Ito, H.; Kawakatu, N.; Orienti, M.; Nagai, H.; Wajima, K.; Itoh, R.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate shell emission associated with dying radio loud AGNs. First, based on our recent work by Ito et al. (2015), we describe the dynamical and spectral evolution of shells after stopping the jet energy injection. We find that the shell emission overwhelms that of the radio lobes soon after stopping the jet energy injection because fresh electrons are continuously supplied into the shell via the forward shock, while the radio lobes rapidly fade out without jet energy injection. We find that such fossil shells can be a new class of target sources for SKA telescope. Next, we apply the model to the nearby radio source 3C84. Then, we find that the fossil shell emission in 3C84 is less luminous in the radio band while it is bright in the TeV γ-ray band and can be detectable by CTA. Data from STELLA

  9. A search for geographic control on the occurrence of magnetospheric ELF emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Church, S. R.; Thorne, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Search coil magnetometer data obtained in the magnetosphere on Ogo 5 and Ogo 6 were studied for evidence of man-induced stimulation of the two dominant electromagnetic emissions, chorus and plasmaspheric hiss. Variability of chorus with geographic longitude and enhancements, onsets, and quantum jumps in chorus emissions at frequencies related to harmonics of the earth's transmission lines are discussed. The enhancement of weak emissions in the 340-360 deg dipole longitude region during quiet geomagnetic conditions is present only when ELF hiss is weak, and will not contribute to the non-adiabatic dynamics of radiation belt electrons. It is concluded that the data analyzed is consistent with a predominantly natural origin for chorus and plasmaspheric hiss, and that triggered waves do not play a major role in the non-adiabatic dynamics of geomagnetically trapped electrons.

  10. Analysis of Jovian decamteric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Arias, T. A.; Garnavich, P. N.; Hammerschlag, R.

    1986-01-01

    This research effort involved careful examination of Jovian radio emission data below 40 MHz, with emphasis on the informative observations of the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment (PRA) on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The work is divided into three sections, decametric arcs, decametric V bursts, and hectometric modulated spectral activity (MSA).

  11. Radio emissions from terrestrial planets around white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willes, A. J.; Wu, K.

    2005-03-01

    Terrestrial planets in close orbits around magnetic white dwarf stars are potential electron-cyclotron maser sources, by analogy to planetary radio emissions generated from the electrodynamic interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. We present predictions of radio flux densities and the number of detectable white-dwarf/terrestrial-planet systems, and discuss a scenario for their formation.

  12. Neptune radio emission in dipole and multipole magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, C. B.; King, N. V.; Romig, J. H.; Warwick, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    We study Neptune's smooth radio emission in two ways: we simulate the observations and we then consider the radio effects of Neptune's magnetic multipoles. A procedure to deduce the characteristics of radio sources observed by the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment minimizes limiting assumptions and maximizes use of the data, including quantitative measurement of circular polarization. Study of specific sources simulates time variation of intensity and apparent polarization of their integrated emission over an extended time period. The method is applied to Neptune smooth recurrent emission (SRE). Time series are modeled with both broad and beamed emission patterns, and at two frequencies which exhibit different time variation of polarization. These dipole-based results are overturned by consideration of more complex models of Neptune's magnetic field. Any smooth emission from the anticipated auroral radio source is weak and briefly observed. Dominant SRE originates complex fields at midlatitude. Possible SRE source locations overlap that of 'high-latitude' emission (HLE) between +(out) and -(in) quadrupoles. This is the first identification of multipolar magnetic structure with a major source of planetary radio emission.

  13. Satellite Emission Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying (SERIES). [astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    Existing satellite radio emissions of the global positioning system were exploited as a resource for cost effective high accuracy geodetic measurements. System applications were directed toward crustal dynamics and earthquake research.

  14. Evidence for solar wind control of Saturn radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Using data collected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in 1980 and 1981, strong evidence is presented for a direct correlation between variations in the solar wind at Saturn and the level of activity of Saturn's nonthermal radio emission. Correlation coefficients of 57 to 58% are reached at lag times of 0 to 1 days between the arrival at Saturn of high pressure solar wind streams and the onset of increased radio emission. The radio emission exhibits a long-term periodicity of 25 days, identical to the periodicity seen in the solar wind at this time and consistent with the solar rotation period. The energy coupling efficiency between the solar wind with the Saturn radio emission is estimated and compared with that for Earth.

  15. Near Earth space sporadic radio emission busts occurring during sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudnik, A. V.; Zaljubovsky, I. I.; Kartashev, V. M.; Lasarev, A. V.; Shmatko, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    During the period of low solar activity at sunrise the effect of sporadic high frequency near Earth space radio emission was experimentally discovered at middle latitudes. The possible mechanism of its origin is discussed.

  16. Evidence for extended radio emission surrounding RX Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Oliversen, R. J.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence for an approximately 1-arcsec extended structure in 6 cm continuum emission emanating from the symbiotic star system RX Puppis is reported. Hourly continuum flux changes were not detected as suggested in previous radio experiments by others. The observations indicate that the predominant nature of the radio emission is thermal and consistent with an optically thick stellar wind emanating from the symbiotic star system. The results presented here are discussed with regard to other similar stellar binary systems.

  17. The Radio Emission Of Radio Quiet Quasars - A New Working Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laor, Ari; Behar, E.

    2009-12-01

    What is the origin of radio emission in radio quiet Active Galactic Nuclei? In radio loud AGN the answer is clear, jet emission. In RQ AGN, which are 103 times weaker, the answer is not established yet, but it is commonly thought to originate in a weak jet. RQ AGN display a significant correlation between the radio luminosity (LR) and X-ray luminosity (LX), with LR 10-5 LX. A very similar correlation, known as the Guedel-Benz relation, holds for coronally active stars. The Guedel-Benz relation strongly suggests that stellar coronae are magnetically heated. In AGN the X-ray emission is also thought to originate in a magnetically heated corona, and thus it is natural to associate their radio emission with coronal activity as well. The radio emission may thus serve as a probe for physical processes in AGN coronae, as it does in stellar coronae. I will discuss some predictions, based on this hypothesis, on the likely radio spectrum, its variability, and its relation to the X-ray variability.

  18. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: A Case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Kerr, M.; Pancrazi, B.; Livingstone, M.; Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Harding, A. K.; Camilo, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gargano, F.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Noutsos, A.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nancay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival RXTE and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence (approx. 4(sigma)) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034..0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission pro les suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

  19. Characterizing the radio continuum emission from intense starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. J.; Seymour, N.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Marvil, J.; Drouart, G.; Symeonidis, M.; Huynh, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic thermal (free-free) and non-thermal (synchrotron) emission components that comprise the radio continuum of galaxies represent unique, dust-free measures of star formation rates (SFR). Such high SFR galaxies will dominate the deepest current and future radio surveys. We disentangle the thermal and non-thermal emission components of the radio continuum of six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LFIR > 1012.5 L⊙) at redshifts of 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 0.5 and 22 IR selected galaxies. Radio data over a wide frequency range (0.8 < ν < 10 GHz) are fitted with a star-forming galaxy model comprising of thermal and non-thermal components. The luminosities of both radio continuum components are strongly correlated to the 60 μm luminosity across many orders of magnitude (consistent with the far-IR to radio correlation). We demonstrate that the spectral index of the radio continuum spectral energy distribution is a useful proxy for the thermal fraction. We also find that there is an increase in mean and scatter of the thermal fraction with FIR to radio luminosity ratio which could be influenced by different time-scales of the thermal and non-thermal emission mechanisms.

  20. Analysis of Jovian decametric data: Study of radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Arias, T. A.; Garnavich, P. M.; Rosenkranz, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy Experiments (PRA) have produced the finest set of Jovian decametric radio emission data ever obtained. Jovian decametric L-burst and S-burst arcs were characterized and the data reconciled with models for the radio emission geometry and mechanisms. The first major results involve comparisons of the distribution of arc separations with longitudes. The identification and analyses of systematic variations in the PRA data have yielded interesting results, but only the most obvious features of the data were examined. Analyses of the PRA data were extended with the use of new 6-Sec formats that are more sensitive to the S-bursts.

  1. Observations of a low-frequency cutoff in magnetospheric radio noise received on Imp 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Frankel, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    The quasi-continuous component of the magnetospheric noise observed by Imp 6, lying between 30 and 110 kHz, often exhibits a low-frequency cutoff when the spacecraft is in the interplanetary medium or the magnetosheath. A hypothesis is considered in which this low-frequency cutoff, f-co, is caused by overdense plasma situated somewhere along the noise-source-to-satellite path. The plasma is assumed to have a plasma frequency approximately equal to f-co, thus cutting off propagation below f-co.

  2. The role of the magnetosphere in satellite and radio-star scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    A theory is developed to account for the scintillation phenomenon observed in equatorial regions when using communications satellites in the SHF band. The same theory is also used qualitatively to explain strong scintillations in the VHF band. Instead of confining irregularities to a narrow interval of height in the F-region and assuming that they are strong, the alternative hypothesis is used that the irregularities are weak but extend from the F-region upwards into the magnetosphere. It is suggested that the irregularities are field-aligned and extend at least up to an L-shell of 1.3 and possibly up to 2 or more.

  3. Diffuse Radio Emission in the Galaxy Cluster Abell 754

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a low frequency (<1.4GHz) study of the diffuse radio halo and relic emission in the galaxy cluster Abell 0754. Images at 150 MHz made using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) revealed 4 diffuse features; 3 of which are new. Images at 330 and 1363 MHz were created using archival data from the GMRT and the VLA respectively. These yield synchrotron spectral indices, α (S ∝ν-α), steeper than 2 for the new features. Adiabatic compression of fossil radio galaxy cocoon by shocks can lead to the formation of radio relics (Ensslin & Gopal-Krishna, 2001). In the framework of this model we find that the relic in A754 can be explained as a lurking cocoon of a radio galaxy; no shock compression is required to produce this emission. The implications of this result to the merger scenario in A754 are discussed.

  4. Affirmation of triggered Jovian radio emissions and their attribution to corotating radio lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    It is argued that the original statistical evidence for the existence of triggered radio emissions and corotating radio lasers on Jupiter remains valid notwithstanding the critique of Desch and Kaiser (1985). The Voyager radio spectrograms used to identify the triggered emissions are analyzed and the results are discussed. It is shown that the critique by Desch and Kaiser is unjustified because it is not based on the original event criteria, i.e., the correlation between the occurrence of Jovian auroral kilometric radiation and fast-drift type III solar bursts in the same frequency.

  5. On the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laor, Ari; Behar, Ehud

    2008-10-01

    The radio emission in radio-loud quasars originates in a jet carrying relativistic electrons. In radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) the relative radio emission is ~103 times weaker, and its origin is not established yet. We show here that there is a strong correlation between the radio luminosity (LR) and X-ray luminosity (LX) with LR ~ 10-5 LX, for the radio-quiet Palomar-Green (PG) quasar sample. The sample is optically selected, with nearly complete radio and X-ray detections, and thus this correlation cannot be due to direct selection biases. The PG quasars lie on an extension of a similar correlation noted by Panessa et al., for a small sample of nearby low-luminosity type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN). A remarkably similar correlation, known as the Güdel-Benz relation, where LR/LX ~ 10-5, holds for coronally active stars. The Güdel-Benz relation, together with correlated stellar X-ray and radio variability, implies that the coronae are magnetically heated. We therefore raise the possibility that AGN coronae are also magnetically heated, and that the radio emission in RQQ also originates in coronal activity. If correct, then RQQ should generally display compact flat cores at a few GHz due to synchrotron self-absorption, while at a few hundred GHz we should be able to see directly the X-ray emitting corona, and relatively rapid and large amplitude variability, correlated with the X-ray variability, is likely to be seen. We also discuss possible evidence that the radio and X-ray emission in ultraluminous X-ray sources and Galactic black holes may be of coronal origin as well.

  6. X-RAY EMISSION FROM OPTICALLY SELECTED RADIO-INTERMEDIATE AND RADIO-LOUD QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Wu Jianfeng; Gibson, R. R.; Steffen, A. T. E-mail: niel@astro.psu.edu E-mail: jfwu@astro.psu.edu E-mail: rgibson@astro.washington.edu

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the X-ray properties of radio-intermediate and radio-loud quasars (RIQs and RLQs, respectively). We combine large, modern optical (e.g., SDSS) and radio (e.g., FIRST) surveys with archival X-ray data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT to generate an optically selected sample that includes 188 RIQs and 603 RLQs. This sample is constructed independently of X-ray properties but has a high X-ray detection rate (85%); it provides broad and dense coverage of the l-z plane, including at high redshifts (22% of objects have z = 2-5), and it extends to high radio-loudness values (33% of objects have R* = 3-5, using logarithmic units). We measure the 'excess' X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs relative to radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) as a function of radio loudness and luminosity, and parameterize the X-ray luminosity of RIQs and RLQs both as a function of optical/UV luminosity and also as a joint function of optical/UV and radio luminosity. RIQs are only modestly X-ray bright relative to RQQs; it is only at high values of radio loudness (R* {approx}> 3.5) and radio luminosity that RLQs become strongly X-ray bright. We find no evidence for evolution in the X-ray properties of RIQs and RLQs with redshift (implying jet-linked IC/CMB emission does not contribute substantially to the nuclear X-ray continuum). Finally, we consider a model in which the nuclear X-ray emission contains both disk/corona-linked and jet-linked components and demonstrate that the X-ray jet-linked emission is likely beamed but to a lesser degree than applies to the radio jet. This model is used to investigate the increasing dominance of jet-linked X-ray emission at low inclinations.

  7. Magnetospheric Imaging of EUV Emissions at 83.4 and 30.4 NM Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Dante Espino

    Magnetospheric images are constructed from resonant scattering of emissions by He^+ 30.4-nm and O^+ 83.4-nm ions from different spatial locations to study the structure of the intensities and its relation to the distribution of He ^+ and O^+ ions around the Earth. The image intensities at these EUV wavelengths were obtained from a knowledge of ion scattering rates and available data on ion densities. This particular approach is called forward modelling and consists of the calculation of simulated EUV images of the magnetosphere. Different regions in the magnetosphere have been considered in this study to determine the dependence of the image intensities on ion energies and ion drift speeds with respect to the Sun-Earth line. Hot O^+ ions in the energy range from 1 keV to 50 keV are present in the plasma sheet with typical densities of the order of 0.1 ions cm^{-3} arising during disturbed times. Image intensities of the order of a few millirayleighs were obtained in our simulations for these densities. During quiet times the densities are of the order of 0.05 ions cm^{-3}. The reduction of the image intensities as a result of Doppler shifts caused by ion motion relative to the Sun-Earth line is discussed in detail and the effects of ion dynamics (particle acceleration) in the polar cap on the image intensities have also been analyzed for both He^+ and O^+ ions. The possibility of detecting polar outflows may also depend on the location of the imager. Simulated images of the plasmasphere and trough regions in both 30.4-nm and 83.4-nm wavelengths have been obtained to reflect the relative abundance of the ions in these regions. Photometric intensities of He^+ at 30.4 nm were obtained from a spinning rocket at an altitude of 435 km. The different viewing angles covered a wide range of regions in the magnetosphere, and this particular rocket geometry offered the possibility of obtaining the He^+ ion distribution from the measured intensities. This method (forward

  8. Spontaneous Radio Frequency Emissions from Natural Aurora. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, J.

    2009-01-01

    At high latitudes, suitably sensitive radio experiments tuned below 5 MHz detect up to three types of spontaneous radio emissions from the Earth s ionosphere. In recent years, ground-based and rocket-borne experiments have provided strong evidence for theoretical explanations of the generation mechanism of some of these emissions, but others remain unexplained. Achieving a thorough understanding of these ionospheric emissions, accessible to ground-based experiments, will not only bring a deeper understanding of Earth s radio environment and the interactions between waves and particles in the ionosphere but also shed light on similar spontaneous emissions occurring elsewhere in Earth s environment as well as other planetary and stellar atmospheres.

  9. Compositional Impact of Io Volcanic Emissions on Jupiter's Magnetosphere and the Icy Galilean Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Fegley, Bruce; Lipatov, Alexander; Richardson, John; Sittler, Edward

    2011-01-01

    measured throughout the jovian magnetosphere and in the local moon environments can act as tracers if we know from direct measurements and models the distributions at the mostly likely sources, i.e. at IO. However, our knowledge of these abundances are very limited from earlier in-situ and remote measurements, mainly confined to major (S, O) and some minor (Na, K, Cl) species with abundances at or above a few percent relative to O. Future in-situ plasma measurements by the planned Jupiter Europa Orbiter and Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter missions should extend the abundance coverage to minor and even trace elemental species. For Europa astrobiological investigations it is also important to specify iogenic inputs and surface processing of isotopic species. We discuss the range of abundance distributions arising from models for IO hot volcanic emissions, and from the subsequent dynamics of ion injection, magnetospheric transport, and icy moon surface bombardment.

  10. The Far-Infrared Emission of Radio Loud and Radio Quiet Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polletta, M.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Wilkes, B. J.; Hooper, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Continuum observations at radio, millimeter, infrared and soft X-ray energies are presented for a sample of 22 quasars, consisting of flat and steep spectrum radio loud, radio intermediate and radio quiet objects. The primary observational distinctions, among the different kinds of quasars in the radio and IR energy domains are studied using large observational datasets provided by ISOPHOT on board the Infrared Space Observatory, by the IRAM interferometer, by the sub-millimetre array SCUBA on JCMT, and by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) facilities IRAC1 on the 2.2 m telescope and SEST. The spectral energy distributions of all quasars from radio to IR energies are analyzed and modeled with non-thermal and thermal spectral components. The dominant mechanism emitting in the far/mid-IR is thermal dust emission in all quasars, with the exception of flat spectrum radio loud quasars for which the presence of thermal IR emission remains rather uncertain, since it is difficult to separate it from the bright non-thermal component. The dust is predominantly heated by the optical/ultraviolet radiation emitted from the external components of the AGN. A starburst contributes to the IR emission at different levels, but always less than the AGN (<= 27%). The distribution of temperatures, sizes, masses, and luminosities of the emitting dust are independent of the quasar type.

  11. Dynamic Spectra Predicted for 2-3 Khz Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Jeremy J.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.

    Radio emissions observed at 2-3 kHz by the Voyager spacecraft occur when global merged interaction regions (GMIRs) reach the heliopause. The radiation is thought to occur when a GMIR enters a region close to the heliopause where the electron speed distribution is primed with a superthermal tail produced by lower hybrid drive. Previously this priming mechanism was combined with a theory for type II solar radio bursts to predict the flux of radio emission in the outer heliosphere. Here this theory is extended in two ways. First theoretical arguments regarding the availability of Langmuir and ion sound waves are used to determine whether emission occurs via three wave processes or processes involving wave scattering off thermal ions (STI). New expressions for conversion efficiencies into radio emission associated with STI are then implemented where appropriate. Second dynamic spectra are calculated for the radio emission generated by shock from the inner solar wind to beyond the heliopause. The results are then compared with existing Voyager observations.

  12. On Polarization of the Zebra Pattern in Solar Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Altyntsev, A. T.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of strong polarization of the zebra-type fine structure in solar radio emission is discussed. In the framework of the plasma mechanism of radiation at the levels of the double plasma resonance, the polarization of the observed radio emission may be due to a difference in rates of plasma wave conversion into ordinary and extraordinary waves or different conditions of escaping of these waves from the source. In a weakly anisotropic plasma which is a source of the zebra-pattern with rather large harmonic numbers, the degree of polarization of the radio emission at twice the plasma frequency originating from the coalescence of two plasma waves is proportional to the ratio of the electron gyrofrequency to the plasma frequency, which is a small number and is negligible. Noticeable polarization can therefore arise only if the observed radio emission is a result of plasma wave scattering by ions (including induced scattering) or their coalescence with low-frequency waves. In this case, the ordinary mode freely leaves the source, but the extraordinary mode gets into the decay zone and does not exit from the source. As a result, the outgoing radio emission can be strongly polarized as the ordinary mode. Possible reasons for the polarization of the zebra pattern in the microwave region are discussed.

  13. RESISTIVE SOLUTIONS FOR PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2012-02-10

    The current state of the art in the modeling of pulsar magnetospheres invokes either the vacuum or force-free limits for the magnetospheric plasma. Neither of these limits can simultaneously account for both the plasma currents and the accelerating electric fields that are needed to explain the morphology and spectra of high-energy emission from pulsars. To better understand the structure of such magnetospheres, we combine accelerating fields and force-free solutions by considering models of magnetospheres filled with resistive plasma. We formulate Ohm's law in the minimal velocity fluid frame and construct a family of resistive solutions that smoothly bridges the gap between the vacuum and the force-free magnetosphere solutions. The spin-down luminosity, open field line potential drop, and the fraction of open field lines all transition between the vacuum and force-free values as the plasma conductivity varies from zero to infinity. For fixed inclination angle, we find that the spin-down luminosity depends linearly on the open field line potential drop. We consider the implications of our resistive solutions for the spin-down of intermittent pulsars and sub-pulse drift phenomena in radio pulsars.

  14. E.l.f./v.l.f. emissions observed on Ariel 4. [wave-particle phenomena in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullough, K.; Denby, M.; Gibbons, W.; Hughes, A. R. W.; Kaiser, T. R.; Tatnall, A. R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel 4 satellite was designed to study wave-particle phenomena in the magnetosphere by measuring the electromagnetic wave fields over a wide frequency range and the fluxes and pitch angle distributions of energetic particles. We describe here the results of a preliminary study of the various v.l.f./e.l.f. electromagnetic wave phenomena which are observed. These include man-made signals from v.l.f. transmitters, impulsive noise originating in thunderstorms and emissions arising from magnetospheric energetic charged particles.

  15. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  16. The relation between infrared and radio emission in spiral galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helou, George

    1991-01-01

    A remarkable correlation between the far infrared and the radio continuum emission of star forming galaxies was one of the early results based on IRAS data, and has remained one of the most intriguing. Recent work has extended the correlation to early type galaxies, revealing a slightly different ratio in lenticulars. When radio and infrared maps of disk galaxies are compared, the radio disks appear systematically more diffuse. This has been interpreted as a manifestation of the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons, and has allowed a fresh look at the behavior of magnetic fields and cosmic rays in spiral galaxies, and at their relation to the rest of the interstellar medium.

  17. Source localization of Jupiter's Io dependent radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubier, Monique G.; Genova, Francoise; Calvert, Wynne

    1988-01-01

    The peak frequencies of the Io-dependent part of the Jovian emissions are compared with the surface gyrofrequency determined from Jovian magnetic models in order to localize the source of Jovian radio emissions. The bulk of the Io-controlled emissions was found to be delayed by up to 70 deg of equatorial longitude from the predicted instantaneous position of the Io flux tube, with the L and S emissions both displaying this same unexpected behavior. It is suggested that the source of these emissions is delayed substantially with respect to Io either as an Alfven-wave delay or because of errors in the magnetic field models.

  18. Analysis of Uranian radio emissions, Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1991-01-01

    Progress under this grant has included identifying certain new radio emission components and determining the source location of both these and the two major Uranian radio emission (the SHF and bursty components) by a unique new statistical minimization technique. This new source location technique has subsequently also been applied at Neptune, with considerable success. New radio spectrograms have been prepared to clarify the behavior of such emissions, using both the usual 48-second, log-averaged data and the original 6-second PRA data, the latter showing a number of interesting new features. Also, a plasmasphere was discovered at Uranus, auroral plasma cavities were discovered at both Uranus and Neptune, and it was found that the currently-accepted rotation period for Uranus is in error by a small amount.

  19. A model for radio emission from solar coronal shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Solar coronal shocks are very common phenomena in the solar atmosphere and are believed to be the drivers of solar type II radio bursts. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open question. This paper proposes that electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is responsible for the generation of radiation from the coronal shocks. In the present model, an energetic ion beam accelerated by the shock first excites the Alfvén wave (AW), then the excited AW leads to the formation of a density-depleted duct along the foreshock boundary of the shock. In this density-depleted duct, the energetic electron beam produced via the shock acceleration can effectively excite radio emission by ECM instability. Our results show that this model may potentially be applied to solar type II radio bursts.

  20. Possible radio emission from Uranus at 0.5 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    Radio emission from the direction of Uranus was detected in data from the radio astronomy experiment on the IMP-6 spacecraft. Previously, emission from the direction of Jupiter and Saturn was observed by the IMP-6 at a number of frequencies near 1 MHz during the period April 1971 to October 1972. These radio bursts were identified in the IMP-6 data through an analysis of the phase of the observed modulated signal detected from the spinning dipole antenna. This technique was applied to the direction of the planet Uranus with possible positive results. Over the approximately 500 days of data, three to six bursts with unique spectral characteristics were found. Identification with Uranus is confused by the likely presence of low level terrestrial and solar emission. The observed events persisted less than three minutes and are strongest in intensity near 0.5 MHz.

  1. STEADY AND TRANSIENT RADIO EMISSION FROM ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Osten, Rachel A.; Phan-Bao, N.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Reid, I. Neill; Ojha, Roopesh E-mail: pbngoc@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw E-mail: inr@stsci.edu

    2009-08-01

    We present the results of multi-frequency radio observing campaigns designed to elucidate the nature of radio emission from very low mass stars. We detect radio emission in an additional two epochs of the ultracool dwarf binary LP 349-25, finding that the observed emission is broad band and steady on timescales between 10 s and 10.7 hr, as well as on timescales of 0.6 and 1.6 years. This system is unusual for ultracool dwarfs with detectable radio emission, in exhibiting a lack of any large-scale variability, particularly the bursting (periodic or aperiodic) behavior exhibited by the other objects with detectable levels of radio emission. We explore the constraints that the lack of variability on long- and short-timescales, and flat spectral index, imply about the radio-emitting structures and mechanism. The temporal constraints argue for a high latitude emitting region with a large inclination so that it is always in view, and survives for at least 0.6 years. Temporal constraints also limit the plasma conditions, implying that the electron density be n{sub e} < 4 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} and B< 130 G in order not to see time variations due to collisional or radiative losses from high-energy particles. The observations and constraints provided by them are most compatible with a nonthermal radio emission mechanism, likely gyrosynchrotron emission from a spatially homogeneous or inhomogeneous source. This indicates that, similar to behaviors noted for chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasmas in ultracool dwarfs, the magnetic activity patterns observed in active higher mass stars can survive to the substellar boundary. We also present new epochs of multi-frequency radio observations for the ultracool dwarfs 2MASS 05233822-140322 and 2MASS14563831-2809473(=LHS 3003); each has been detected in at least one previous epoch but are not detected in the epochs reported here. The results here suggest that magnetic configurations in ultracool dwarfs can be long

  2. 3D modelling of stellar auroral radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cerrigone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed in some ultracool dwarfs with spectral type earlier than M7. Coherent events of this kind resemble auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the Solar system. In this article, we present a three-dimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool with which to understand the auroral radio emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of coherent pulses and to learn more about the detectability of such pulsed radio emission.

  3. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  4. Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Noyola, J. P.; Satyal, S.; Musielak, Z. E. E-mail: ssatyal@uta.edu

    2014-08-10

    In the Jupiter-Io system, the moon's motion produces currents along the field lines that connect it to Jupiter's polar regions. The currents generate and modulate radio emissions along their paths via the electron-cyclotron maser instability. Based on this process, we suggest that such modulation of planetary radio emissions may reveal the presence of exomoons around giant planets in exoplanetary systems. A model explaining the modulation mechanism in the Jupiter-Io system is extrapolated and used to define criteria for exomoon detectability. A cautiously optimistic scenario of the possible detection of such exomoons around Epsilon Eridani b and Gliese 876 b is provided.

  5. Radio Emissions from Plasma with Electron Kappa-Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, G. D.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Gregory Fleishman (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA)Alexey Kuznetsov (Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk, Russia), Currently there is a concern about the ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasisteady-state plasma in the solar atmosphere, including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remotely detecting these kappa distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa-distribution, and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth τ for kappa-distribution. This property has a remarkable consequence allowing a straightforward observational test: the GR radio emission from the non-Maxwellian distributions is supposed to be noticeably polarized even in the optically thick case, where the emission would have strictly zero polarization in the case of Maxwellian plasma. This offers a way of remote probing the plasma distribution in astrophysical sources, including solar active regions as a vivid example. In this report, we present analytical formulae and computer codes to calculate the emission parameters. We simulate the gyroresonance emission under the conditions typical of the solar active regions and compare the results for different electron distributions. We discuss the implications of our findings for interpretation of radio observations. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-1250374 and AGS-1262772, NASA grant NNX14AC87G to New Jersey Institute of Technology

  6. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  7. Source of O mode radio emissions from the dayside of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Menietti, J.D.; Curran, D.B. )

    1990-09-01

    During the inbound trajectory toward Uranus the Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument on board the Voyager 2 spacecraft observed narrowband smooth (n-smooth) emission at frequencies centered near 60 kHz and O mode emission (the dayside source) in a frequency range narrowly confined around 160 kHz. By assuming empirical models of the plasma density for the dayside magnetosphere of Uranus, and by using cold plasma theory together with observational constraints, the authors have performed ray-tracing calculations to determine the source lcoation of the O mode emission. The dayside source appears to originate along magnetic field lines with a footprint near the north magnetic pole. Sources of nightside, high-frequency, broadband smooth (b-smooth) emission observed by Voyager after encounter are believed to exist near the conjugate footprint of these same field lines. This would indicate that the particle population supplying the free energy source has energies at least as high as a few keV and the density in the source region satisfies the condition 0.3 < f{sub p}/f{sub ce} < 1.0 where f{sub p} and f{sub ce} are the electron plasma frequency and gyrofrequency, respectively.

  8. Magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Connerney, J.E.P.

    1987-04-01

    The results published by U.S. scientists during 1983-1986 from studies related to the magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus are discussed. Consideration is given to the magnetic fields of these planets, charged particle environments, the interactions between the planetary rings and planetary satellites, the solar wind interactions, radio emissions, and auroras. Special attention is given to observations of (1) a small flux of energetic electrons and protons in the otherwise radiation-free environment in the magnetosphere under the rings of Saturn (interpreted as interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with the rings), (2) spokes, and (3) Saturn ring erosion.

  9. Magnetospheric structure of rotation powered pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Arons, J. California Univ., Livermore, CA . Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics)

    1991-01-07

    I survey recent theoretical work on the structure of the magnetospheres of rotation powered pulsars, within the observational constraints set by their observed spindown, their ability to power synchrotron nebulae and their ability to produce beamed collective radio emission, while putting only a small fraction of their energy into incoherent X- and gamma radiation. I find no single theory has yet given a consistent description of the magnetosphere, but I conclude that models based on a dense outflow of pairs from the polar caps, permeated by a lower density flow of heavy ions, are the most promising avenue for future research. 106 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Helium Emission from Classical T Tauri Stars: Dual Origin in Magnetospheric Infall and Hot Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Georgina; Edwards, Suzan; Kwan, John

    2001-04-01

    High-resolution emission-line profiles of He I and He II in 31 classical T Tauri stars are analyzed with the aim of probing the environs of the star-disk interface in accreting low-mass young stars. The diagnostic power of the helium lines lies in their high-excitation potentials, which restrict their formation to a region either of high temperature or close proximity to a source of ionizing radiation. The He I profiles are decomposed into kinematic components that support the paradigm of magnetically controlled accretion from the disk onto the stellar surface but also require a significant contribution from a hot wind. A narrow component, seen in 28/31 stars, is characterized by relatively uniform line widths and centroid velocities among all the helium lines. Our analysis supports previous conclusions that this feature is consistent with formation in the decelerating postshock gas at the magnetosphere footpoint. A broad component, seen in 22/31 stars, displays a diversity of kinematic properties. Our analysis suggests that in many stars the He I broad component is itself composite. At one extreme are stars where the broad component is redshifted in excess of 8 km s-1, as would occur if helium emission arises primarily from polar angles less than 54.7d in the funnel flow. At the other extreme are stars where the broad component is blueshifted in excess of -30 km s-1, requiring an origin in outflowing gas. The additional occurrence of maximum blue wing velocities exceeding -200 km s-1 in 14 stars leads us to argue that hot winds are present in about half of our sample. The relation between the narrow component and the optical veiling differs between the stars with or without a hot helium wind, suggesting that when the hot wind is present the luminosity and temperature of the accretion shock are reduced. A comparison of broad component helium emission with standard outflow indicators leads us to suggest that there are two sources of inner wind in T Tauri accretion

  11. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Saturn Kilometric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) is the auroral radio emission of Saturn, which has been observed by Voyager 1 & 2, Cassini, and Ulysses. Ulysses is able to detect the intense intervals of SKR from distances up to 10 AU, because of its long antennas (72 m tip-to-tip) and sensitive radio receivers. Studies of SKR by A. Lecacheux gave the surprising result that the periodicity of SKR varied with time; it was not locked to a planetary rotation of Saturn. This result has been confirmed by Cassini radio observations. Here, we compare Ulysses and Cassini observations of SKR to constrain a mode! for the SKR emission geometry. SpecifIcally, we examine the question - are the brighter sources of 5KR fixed in Saturn longitude or local time? The results have significant consequences for our understanding of SKR and its varying periodicity

  12. CURVATURE-DRIFT INSTABILITY FAILS TO GENERATE PULSAR RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-10-01

    The curvature-drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing the propagation of short electromagnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity; therefore, this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctuations.

  13. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE CORES OF RADIO SOURCES AND THEIR EXTENDED RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zunli; Wang Jiancheng

    2012-01-10

    The work in this paper aims at determining the evolution and possible co-evolution of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and their cores via their radio luminosity functions (i.e., total and core RLFs, respectively). Using a large combined sample of 1063 radio-loud AGNs selected at low radio frequency, we investigate the RLF at 408 MHz of steep-spectrum radio sources. Our results support a luminosity-dependent evolution. Using core flux density data of the complete sample 3CRR, we investigate the core RLF at 5.0 GHz. Based on the combined sample with incomplete core flux data, we also estimate the core RLF using a modified factor of completeness. Both results are consistent and show that the comoving number density of radio cores displays a persistent decline with redshift, implying a negative density evolution. We find that the core RLF is obviously different from the total RLF at the 408 MHz band which is mainly contributed by extended lobes, implying that the cores and extended lobes could not be co-evolving at radio emission.

  14. On the Evolution of the Cores of Radio Sources and Their Extended Radio Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zunli; Wang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    The work in this paper aims at determining the evolution and possible co-evolution of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and their cores via their radio luminosity functions (i.e., total and core RLFs, respectively). Using a large combined sample of 1063 radio-loud AGNs selected at low radio frequency, we investigate the RLF at 408 MHz of steep-spectrum radio sources. Our results support a luminosity-dependent evolution. Using core flux density data of the complete sample 3CRR, we investigate the core RLF at 5.0 GHz. Based on the combined sample with incomplete core flux data, we also estimate the core RLF using a modified factor of completeness. Both results are consistent and show that the comoving number density of radio cores displays a persistent decline with redshift, implying a negative density evolution. We find that the core RLF is obviously different from the total RLF at the 408 MHz band which is mainly contributed by extended lobes, implying that the cores and extended lobes could not be co-evolving at radio emission.

  15. Coincident bursts of auroral kilometric radiation and VLF emissions associted with a type 3 solar radio noise event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, T. J.; Singh, S.; Wu, C. S.; Labelle, J.; Treumann, R. A.; Inan, U. S.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines an isolated magnetospheric VLF/radio noise event that is highly suggestive of the triggering of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) bu solar type III radio emission and of a close relation between AKR and broadband hiss. The solar type III burst was measured on polar HF riometers and was coincident with local dayside VLF/LF noise emission bursts at South Pole station. It was also coincident with AKR bursts detected onthe AMPTE/IRM satellite, at the same magnetic local time as South Pole. On the basis of the close association of AKR and VLF bursts, and from geometric considerations relating to wave propagation, it is likely that the AKR source was on the dayside and on field lines near South Pole station. The general level of geomagnetic activity was very low. However, an isolated magnetic impulse event (MIE) accompanied by a riometer absorption pulse was in progress when all of the VLF/radio noise bursts occurred. The very close association of the typew III burst at HF with the AKR is consistent with external stimulation of the AKR, is different, more immediate,triggering process than that implied by Calvert (1981) is invoked. It is suggested here that some of the HF solar radiant energy may decay into waves with frequences comparable to those of the AKR by paraetric excitation or some other process, thus providing the few background photons required for the generation of AKR by the WU and Lee (1979) cyclotron maser instability. The AKR, perhaps by modifying the magnetospheric electron velocity distribution, might have produced the observed VLF emissions. Alternatively, the VLF emissions may have arisen from the same anisotropic and unstable electron distribution function responsible for the AKR.

  16. Young gamma-ray pulsar: from modeling the gamma-ray emission to the particle-in-cell simulations of the global magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantions; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-04-01

    Accelerated charged particles flowing in the magnetosphere produce pulsar gamma-ray emission. Pair creation processes produce an electron-positron plasma that populates the magnetosphere, in which the plasma is very close to force-free. However, it is unknown how and where the plasma departs from the ideal force-free condition, which consequently inhibits the understanding of the emission generation. We found that a dissipative magnetosphere outside the light cylinder effectively reproduces many aspects of the young gamma-ray pulsar emission as seen by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and through particle-in-cell simulations (PIC), we started explaining this configuration self-consistently. These findings show that, together, a magnetic field structure close to force-free and the assumption of gamma-ray curvature radiation as the emission mechanism are strongly compatible with the observations. Two main issues from the previously used models that our work addresses are the inability to explain luminosity, spectra, and light curve features at the same time and the inconsistency of the electrodynamics. Moreover, using the PIC simulations, we explore the effects of different pair multiplicities on the magnetosphere configurations and the locations of the accelerating regions. Our work aims for a self-consistent modeling of the magnetosphere, connecting the microphysics of the pair-plasma to the global magnetosphere macroscopic quantities. This direction will lead to a greater understanding of pulsar emission at all wavelengths, as well as to concrete insights into the physics of the magnetosphere.

  17. Quasar feedback and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.

    2014-07-01

    We analyse Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra of 568 obscured luminous quasars. The [O III] λ5007 Å emission line shows blueshifts and blue excess, indicating that some of the narrow-line gas is undergoing an organized outflow. The velocity width containing 90 per cent of line power ranges from 370 to 4780 km s-1, suggesting outflow velocities up to ˜2000 km s-1, and is strongly correlated with the radio luminosity among the radio-quiet quasars. We propose that radio emission in radio-quiet quasars is due to relativistic particles accelerated in the shocks within the quasar-driven outflows; star formation in quasar hosts is insufficient to explain the observed radio emission. The median radio luminosity of the sample of νLν[1.4 GHz] = 1040 erg s-1 suggests a median kinetic luminosity of the quasar-driven wind of Lwind = 3 × 1044 erg s-1, or about 4 per cent of the estimated median bolometric luminosity Lbol = 8 × 1045 erg s-1. Furthermore, the velocity width of [O III] is positively correlated with mid-infrared luminosity, which suggests that outflows are ultimately driven by the radiative output of the quasar. Emission lines characteristic of shocks in quasi-neutral medium increase with the velocity of the outflow, which we take as evidence of quasar-driven winds propagating into the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Quasar feedback appears to operate above the threshold luminosity of Lbol ˜ 3 × 1045 erg s-1.

  18. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Marissa; Gyalay, Szilard; Withers, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is often said to be rotationally driven, with strong centrifugal stresses due to large spatial scales and a rapid planetary rotation period. For example, the main auroral emission at Jupiter is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction but is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma. Additionally, processes like tail reconnection are also thought to be driven, at least in part, by processes internal to the magnetosphere. While the solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. We will report on the results of a comprehensive, quantitative study of the influence of the solar wind on various magnetospheric data sets measured by the Galileo mission from 1996 to 2003. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter, we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure. We can use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration, which in turn will affect the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission. We also consider whether there is evidence that reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions or that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the magnetic field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  19. Non-dipolar magnetic field models and patterns of radio emission: Uranus and Neptune compared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic field geometries of Uranus and Neptune are superficially similar, and are similarly unlike those of other planets: the field strengths are similar, and they contain extraordinarily large non-dipolar components. As a corollary, the best dipolar field models of each of the two planets comprises a dipole that is considerably offset from the planetary center and tilted away from the rotational axis. However, in other respects the best field models of the two planets are quite different. Uranus has a quadrupole model in which all the terms are well determined and in which none of the higher order terms is determined. To represent the magnetometer data acquired during Voyager's Neptune encounter requires a model of order 8 (instead of Uranus' order 2), yet many of the coefficients are poorly determined. A second model, an octupole model comprising the terms up to order three of the order 8 model, has been suggested by the magnetometer team as being useful; its use, however, is limited only to the region outside of about 2R(exp N), whereas planetary radio emissions have their sources well inside this surface. Computer code has been written that permits an analysis of the detailed motion of low energy charged particles moving in general planetary magnetic fields. At Uranus, this code reveals the existence of an isolated region of the inner magnetosphere above the day side in which particles may be trapped, separate from the more general magnetospheric trapping. An examination of the so-call ordinary mode uranian radio emissions leads us to believe that these emissions are in fact extraordinary mode emissions coming from particles trapped in this isolated region. A similar attempt to discover trapping regions at Neptune has proved, unfortunately, to be impossible. This arises from three factors: (1) the computation needed to track particles in an eighth order field is more than an order of magnitude greater than that needed to perform a similar calculation in a

  20. New observations of the low frequency interplanetary radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent Voyager 1 observations reveal reoccurrences of the low frequency interplanetary radio emissions. Three of the new events are weak transient events which rise in frequency from the range of 2-2.5 kHz to about 3 kHz with drift rates of approximately 1.5 kHz/year. The first of the transient events begins in mid-1989 and the more recent pair of events both were first detected in late 1991. In addition, there is an apparent onset of a 2-kHz component of the emission beginning near day 70 of 1991. The new transient emissions are barely detectable on Voyager 1 and are below the threshold of detectability on Voyager 2, which is less sensitive than Voyager 1. The new activity provides new opportunities to test various theories of the triggering, generation, and propagation of the outer heliospheric radio emissions and may signal a response of the source of the radio emissions to the increased solar activity associated with the recent peak in the solar cycle.

  1. Radio emission from AM Herculis - The quiescent component and an outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Bastian, T. S.; Chanmugam, G.

    1983-01-01

    The VLA has been used to search for radio emission from the AM Her-type binaries VV Pup, EF Eri, PG 1550 + 191, CW 1103 + 354, and AN UMa, at 4.9 GHz. A remarkable 10-min outburst was detected from AM Her at 4.9 GHz, which was about 20 times more intense than the quiescent emission and was essentially 100 percent circularly polarized. It is suggested that the quiescent emission of AM Her can be accounted for by 500-keV electrons trapped in the magnetosphere of the white dwarf, provided that the electron energy spectrum is quite hard and that the spectral hardness or number density of energetic electrons increases with radius, while the outburst is probably due to an electron-cyclotron maser operating near the surface of the red dwarf companion. The implied existence of a 1000-gauss localized magnetic field and a corona on the red dwarf has consequences for mass transfer, field line interactions, and variable activity.

  2. Merger Activity and Radio Emission Within A2061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Avery; Sarazin, Craig L.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Chatzikos, Marios; Hogge, Taylor; Wik, Daniel R.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Farnsworth, Damon; Van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brown, Shea

    2015-01-01

    Abell 2061 is a galaxy cluster located in the Corona Borealis Supercluster that boasts radio and X-ray structures indicative of a merger. A2061 is located at a redshift z = .0784, contains two brightest cluster galaxies, and has another cluster (A2067) about 2.5 Mpc to the NE, falling towards it. Within A2061, there exists an elongated structure of soft X-ray emission extending to the NE of cluster's center (referred to as the 'Plume') along with a hard X-ray shock region (the 'Shock') located just NE of the cluster's center. Previous observations in the radio have indicated the presence of a extended, central radio halo/relic accompanying the cluster's main X-ray emission but with slight NE displacement and further NE extension. Also emitting in the radio, to the SW of A2061, is a radio relic. The X-ray structures of A2061 were previously examined in 2009 by a Chandra observation. Here we present the results of an August 2013 XMM-Newton observation of the cluster. This XMM-Newton observation, imaged by three detectors, covers a greater field of view with a longer exposure (48.6 ks) than the previous Chandra observation. We will present images and spectra of various regions of the cluster. In addition, we will discuss the dynamics of the cluster, the nature of the Plume, Shock and other features, and origin of the central diffuse radio halo/relic and SW radio relic. These X-ray observations will also be compared to a numerical simulation from the Simulation Library of Astrophysics cluster Mergers (SLAM).

  3. Analysis of Jovian low frequency radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The density of ions in the Io plasma torus and the scattering of these ions by low frequency electromagnetic emissions detected by Voyager 1 were studied. The ion density profile was investigated using whistler dispersion measurements provided by the Voyager plasma instrument. The scale height and absolute density of H+ ions in the vicinity of the plasma torus were determined by combining the measured plasma densities with the whistler dispersion measurements. A theoretical analysis of the modes of propagation of low frequency electromagnetic emissions in the torus was undertaken. Polarization reversal effects and rough estimates of the ion diffusion coefficient were utilized. Numerical evaluation of the ion diffusion coefficients in the torus were made using the observed Voyager 1 wave intensities. Results show that the observed wave intensities produce significant ion diffusion effects in the ion torus.

  4. Shocks in nova outflows. II. Synchrotron radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Andrey; Vurm, Indrek; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of GeV gamma-rays from classical novae indicates that shocks and relativistic particle acceleration are energetically key in these events. Further evidence for shocks comes from thermal keV X-ray emission and an early peak in the radio light curve on a timescale of months with a brightness temperature which is too high to result from freely expanding photo-ionized gas. Paper I developed a one dimensional model for the thermal emission from nova shocks. This work concluded that the shock-powered radio peak cannot be thermal if line cooling operates in the post-shock gas at the rate determined by collisional ionization equilibrium. Here we extend this calculation to include non-thermal synchrotron emission. Applying our model to three classical novae, we constrain the amplification of the magnetic field ɛB and the efficiency ɛe of accelerating relativistic electrons of characteristic Lorentz factor γ ˜ 100. If the shocks are radiative (low velocity v_sh ≲ 1000 km s-1) and cover a large solid angle of the nova outflow, as likely characterize those producing gamma-rays, then values of ɛe ˜ 0.01 - 0.1 are required to achieve the peak radio brightness for ɛB = 10-2. Such high efficiencies exclude secondary pairs from pion decay as the source of the radio-emitting particles, instead favoring the direct acceleration of electrons at the shock. If the radio-emitting shocks are instead adiabatic (high velocity), as likely characterize those responsible for the thermal X-rays, then much higher brightness temperatures are possible, allowing the radio-emitting shocks to cover a smaller outflow solid angle.

  5. Virtual observatory tools and amateur radio observations supporting scientific analysis of Jupiter radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Hess, Sebastien; Le Sidaner, Pierre; Savalle, Renaud; Stéphane, Erard; Coffre, Andrée; Thétas, Emmanuel; André, Nicolas; Génot, Vincent; Thieman, Jim; Typinski, Dave; Sky, Jim; Higgins, Chuck; Imai, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol, as well as data from the Iitate Low Frquency Radio Antenna, in Japan. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. The attached figure shows data from those three providers. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  6. Source characteristics of Jovian narrow-band kilometric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Manning, R.; Zarka, P.; Pedersen, B.-M.

    1993-07-01

    New observations of Jovian narrow-band kilometric (nKOM) radio emissions were made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. These observations have demonstrated the unique capability of the URAP instrument for determining both the direction and polarization of nKOM radio sources. An important result is the discovery that nKOM radio emission originates from a number of distinct sources located at different Jovian longitudes and at the inner and outermost regions of the Io plasma torus. These sources have been tracked for several Jovian rotations, yielding their corotational lags, their spatial and temporal evolution, and their radiation characteristics at both low latitudes far from Jupiter and at high latitudes near the planet. Both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized nKOM sources were observed. The polarizations observed for sources in the outermost regions of the torus seem to favor extraordinary mode emission.

  7. Scientists Detect Radio Emission from Rapidly Rotating Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Astronomers have made the first tentative observations of a long-speculated, but never before detected, source of natural radio waves in interstellar space. Data from the National Science Foundation's 140 Foot Radio Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va., show the faint, tell-tale signals of what appear to be dust grains spinning billions of times each second. This discovery eventually could yield a powerful new tool for understanding the interstellar medium - the immense clouds of gas and dust that populate interstellar space. The NRAO 140 Foot Radio Telescope The NRAO 140-Foot Radio Telescope "What we believe we have found," said Douglas P. Finkbeiner of Princeton University's Department of Astrophysics, "is the first hard evidence for electric dipole emission from rapidly rotating dust grains. If our studies are confirmed, it will be the first new source of continuum emission to be conclusively identified in the interstellar medium in nearly the past 20 years." Finkbeiner believes that these emissions have the potential in the future of revealing new and exciting information about the interstellar medium; they also may help to refine future studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The results from this study, which took place in spring 1999, were accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. Other contributors to this paper include David J. Schlegel, department of astrophysics, Princeton University; Curtis Frank, department of astronomy, University of Maryland; and Carl Heiles, department of astronomy, University of California at Berkeley. "The idea of dust grains emitting radiation by rotating is not new," comments Finkbeiner, "but to date it has been somewhat speculative." Scientists first proposed in 1957 that dust grains could emit radio signals, if they were caused to rotate rapidly enough. It was believed, however, that these radio emissions would be negligibly small - too weak to be of any impact to

  8. Radio emission from magnetic exoplanets: GMRT observations and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, W.; Winterhalter, D.; Kuiper, T.; Lazio, J.

    2011-10-01

    Massive extrasolar planets are expected to emit, in analogy with Jupiter and Saturn, detectable radio emission at low frequencies. We have carried out a series of observations of known extrasolar planetary systems at 150 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in both interferometric and phased array modes. We will describe our observing campaign, target list, and preliminary results from studies of dynamic spectra. As low frequency observations are plagued with RFI, we will focus on observing strategies and analysis techniques to minimize, identify and remove RFI effects from dynamic spectra. We will also briefly discuss prospects for similar searches with future instruments such as LOFAR, the LWA, and the SKA instruments.

  9. RFID Transponders' Radio Frequency Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiated emissions in aircraft communication and navigation bands are measured from several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design and operations. They may also operate in different frequency bands. The process for measuring the emissions is discussed, and includes tag interrogation, reverberation chamber testing, and instrument settings selection. The measurement results are described and compared against aircraft emission limits. In addition, interference path loss for the cargo bays of passenger aircraft is measured. Cargo bay path loss is more appropriate for RFID tags than passenger cabin path loss. The path loss data are reported for several aircraft radio systems on a Boeing 747 and an Airbus A320.

  10. ELECTRON-BEAM-INDUCED RADIO EMISSION FROM ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Doyle, J. G.; Kuznetsov, A.; Hallinan, G.; Antonova, A.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Golden, A.

    2012-06-10

    We present the numerical simulations for an electron-beam-driven and loss-cone-driven electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) with different plasma parameters and different magnetic field strengths for a relatively small region and short timescale in an attempt to interpret the recent discovered intense radio emission from ultracool dwarfs. We find that a large amount of electromagnetic (EM) field energy can be effectively released from the beam-driven ECM, which rapidly heats the surrounding plasma. A rapidly developed high-energy tail of electrons in velocity space (resulting from the heating process of the ECM) may produce the radio continuum depending on the initial strength of the external magnetic field and the electron beam current. Both significant linear polarization and circular polarization of EM waves can be obtained from the simulations. The spectral energy distributions of the simulated radio waves show that harmonics may appear from 10 to 70{nu}{sub pe} ({nu}{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency) in the non-relativistic case and from 10 to 600{nu}{sub pe} in the relativistic case, which makes it difficult to find the fundamental cyclotron frequency in the observed radio frequencies. A wide frequency band should therefore be covered by future radio observations.

  11. Unknown radio emission at about 3 MHz recorded in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, T.; Blanc, E.; Strand, E.

    2012-04-01

    A wideband electric field antenna has been installed in Norway (at Hessdalen, 62°41' North and 11°12' East). A signal of 50 ms is automatically recorded every 5 s in order to monitor the spectral variations from 1 kHz to 5 MHz. Signals have been acquired during more than one year from September 2010 to December 2011. The measured electromagnetic spectrum is very similar to other spectra commonly measured in other places in the World. It shows emissions in numerous bands at fixed frequencies corresponding to radio transmissions in VLF, LF, MF and HF bands. However, one emission is quite different and arouses our curiosity. We find a quasi-continuous radio emission at a frequency varying from 2.7 to more than 3.4 MHz with a mean value of 3.0 MHz. The bandwidth is quite large (about 40 kHz) while it is about 9 kHz for all the other radio emissions at frequencies higher than 100 kHz. During the night, the frequency is relatively stable at about 3.1 MHz while during day-time a frequency shift of 200-300 kHz is often observed. These variations can be quick (few tens of minutes) or slow (several hours). Moreover, the emission disappears during day-time, the disappearance duration depending on the daylight duration. From November to the end of March, there is almost no disappearance while in April disappearances are more frequent and longer. From May to July, the emission disappears systematically during day-time from 6:00 UT to 20:00 UT. At the sunrise time the emission frequency suddenly decreases and systematically disappears when it reaches a threshold value (from 2.7 to 2.85 MHz). The emission (frequency and duration) is not influenced by the magnetic storms. We will show in the paper statistical results and some hypothesis on the mechanism which can produce this radio emission.

  12. Io's wobbling flux tube and nonuniform surface conductivity - Longitude control of decametric emission and other magnetospheric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Study of systematic relations between Io's flux tube orientation, decametric emission control, and areal surface properties suggest a model that can account for longitude control of principal Io-associated decametric emissions and other observed Io/magnetosphere interactions. The model is based on the fact that Jupiter's magnetic field structure is dominated by a tilted dipole rotating at a different angular velocity than Io's orbital motion. This caused Io's flux tube near Io to wobble (precess) with respect to Io's rotational axis. Discrete contact junctions are invoked between the active current-sheet regions in the flux tube and Io's surface.

  13. Virtual Observatory tools and Amateur Radio Observations Supporting Scientific Analysis of Jupiter Radio Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S. L. G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Savalle, R.; Erard, S.; Coffre, A.; Thétas, E.; André, N.; Génot, V.; Thieman, J.; Typinski, D.; Sky, J.; Higgins, C.

    2015-10-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets. A preliminary study based on January-February 2014 data will also be presented

  14. Jovian longitudinal control of Io-related radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to explain the control of Io-related radio emissions by Jupiter's rotational phase. The model is based on the hypothesis that the radio emissions are generated by Birkeland currents flowing between Io and the Jovian ionosphere. Specifically, it is suggested that the precipitation of radiation-belt electrons within a certain range of Jovian longitudes produces a restricted region of enhanced ionization and correspondingly enhanced conductivity in Jupiter's ionosphere and that the Io-Jupiter Birkeland current and the associated radio emissions are dramatically increased when Io's flux tube encounters this sector of enhanced ionization in Jupiter's ionosphere. The magnitude of the current is found to be about 100,000 A at most Jovian longitudes because of ionospheric resistance. It is estimated that within the favored longitudinal sector electron precipitation produces an enhancement of this current by one to three orders of magnitude. The model predictions are compared with observations made during the Pioneer 10 and 11 flybys, and satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  15. Radio emission from the magnetic equator of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The major observational characteristics of the smooth, narrow bandwidth component of Uranus' radio emissions are well described by sources radiating near the local electron gyrofrequency, confined to the magnetic equatorial plane and encircling the planet at radial distances of approximately 2 to 3 R(U). The most intense emission appears to be generated in association with the epsilon ring at 2.0 R(U) radial distance. A cold electron density of less than or equal to 4/cu cm are inferred in this region.

  16. Radio emission from the magnetic equator of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, M.L.; Desch, M.D.; Connerney, J.E.P. )

    1989-03-01

    The major observational characteristics of the smooth, narrow bandwidth component of Uranus' radio emissions are well described by sources radiating near the local electron gyrofrequency, confined to the magnetic equatorial plane and encircling the plant at radial distances of approximately 2 to 3 R{sub v}. The most intense emission appears to be generated in association with the {var epsilon} ring at 2.0 R{sub v} radial distance. The authors infer a cold electron density of {le} 4 cm{sup {minus}3} in this region.

  17. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  18. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J. L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2011-10-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5MHz and 50MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural Jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emission are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  19. Natural radio emission of Jupiter as interferences for radar investigations of the icy satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Hérique, A.; Santovito, M. R.; Santos-Costa, D.; Zarka, P.; Alberti, G.; Blankenship, D.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Bruzzone, L.; Kofman, W.

    2012-02-01

    Radar instruments are part of the core payload of the two Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) spacecraft: NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) and ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). At this point of the project, several frequency bands are under study for radar, which ranges between 5 and 50 MHz. Part of this frequency range overlaps with that of the natural jovian radio emissions, which are very intense in the decametric range, below 40 MHz. Radio observations above 40 MHz are free of interferences, whereas below this threshold, careful observation strategies have to be investigated. We present a review of spectral intensity, variability and sources of these radio emissions. As the radio emissions are strongly beamed, it is possible to model the visibility of the radio emissions, as seen from the vicinity of Europa or Ganymede. We have investigated Io-related radio emissions as well as radio emissions related to the auroral oval. We also review the radiation belts synchrotron emission characteristics. We present radio sources visibility products (dynamic spectra and radio source location maps, on still frames or movies), which can be used for operation planning. This study clearly shows that a deep understanding of the natural radio emissions at Jupiter is necessary to prepare the future EJSM radar instrumentation. We show that this radio noise has to be taken into account very early in the observation planning and strategies for both JGO and JEO. We also point out possible synergies with RPW (Radio and Plasma Waves) instrumentations.

  20. Radio emission from the nova-like variable AC Cancri and the symbiotic variable AG Draconis

    SciTech Connect

    Torbett, M.V.; Campbell, B.

    1987-07-01

    Radio emission at 6 cm has been detected from the nova-like cataclysmic variable AC Cnc and the symbiotic variable AG Dra. The AC Cnc observation constitutes the first radio detection in this class of objects. The AG Dra source is probably resolved and appears to show asymmetric, extended structure. The radio emission can best be explained by thermal bremsstrahlung. 26 references.

  1. X-ray emission from the giant magnetosphere of the magnetic O-type star NGC 1624-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, V.; Cohen, D. H.; Wade, G. A.; Nazé, Y.; Owocki, S. P.; Sundqvist, J. O.; ud-Doula, A.; Fullerton, A.; Leutenegger, M.; Gagné, M.

    2015-11-01

    We observed NGC 1624-2, the O-type star with the largest known magnetic field (Bp ˜ 20 kG), in X-rays with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) camera on-board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our two observations were obtained at the minimum and maximum of the periodic Hα emission cycle, corresponding to the rotational phases where the magnetic field is the closest to equator-on and pole-on, respectively. With these observations, we aim to characterize the star's magnetosphere via the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks. Our main findings are as follows. (i) The observed spectrum of NGC 1624-2 is hard, similar to the magnetic O-type star θ1 Ori C, with only a few photons detected below 0.8 keV. The emergent X-ray flux is 30 per cent lower at the Hα minimum phase. (ii) Our modelling indicated that this seemingly hard spectrum is in fact a consequence of relatively soft intrinsic emission, similar to other magnetic Of?p stars, combined with a large amount of local absorption (˜1-3× 1022 cm-2). This combination is necessary to reproduce both the prominent Mg and Si spectral features, and the lack of flux at low energies. NGC 1624-2 is intrinsically luminous in X-rays (log L^{em}_X˜ 33.4) but 70-95 per cent of the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks is absorbed before it escapes the magnetosphere (log L^{ISMcor}_X˜ 32.5). (iii) The high X-ray luminosity, its variation with stellar rotation, and its large attenuation are all consistent with a large dynamical magnetosphere with magnetically confined wind shocks.

  2. RELATIVISTIC MODEL ON PULSAR RADIO EMISSION AND POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, D.; Gangadhara, R. T. E-mail: ganga@iiap.res.in

    2012-02-20

    We have developed a relativistic model for pulsar radio emission and polarization by taking into account a detailed geometry of emission region, rotation, and modulation. The sparks activity on the polar cap leads to plasma columns in the emission region and modulated emission. By considering relativistic plasma bunches streaming out along the rotating dipolar field lines as a source of curvature radiation, we have deduced the polarization state of the radiation field in terms of the Stokes parameters. We have simulated a set of typical pulse profiles and analyzed the role of viewing geometry, rotation, and modulation in the pulsar polarization profiles. Our simulations explain most of the diverse behaviors of polarization generally found in pulsar radio profiles. We show that both the 'antisymmetric' and 'symmetric' types of circular polarization are possible within the framework of curvature radiation. We also show that the 'kinky' nature in the polarization position angle traverses might be due to the rotation and modulation effects. The phase lag of the polarization position angle inflection point relative to the phase of core peak depends upon the rotationally induced asymmetry in the curvature of source trajectory and modulation.

  3. Radio Emission from Red-giant Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yuka; Spiegel, David S.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Nordhaus, Jason; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-04-01

    When planet-hosting stars evolve off the main sequence and go through the red-giant branch, the stars become orders of magnitudes more luminous and, at the same time, lose mass at much higher rates than their main-sequence counterparts. Accordingly, if planetary companions exist around these stars at orbital distances of a few au, they will be heated up to the level of canonical hot Jupiters and also be subjected to a dense stellar wind. Given that magnetized planets interacting with stellar winds emit radio waves, such “Red-Giant Hot Jupiters” (RGHJs) may also be candidate radio emitters. We estimate the spectral auroral radio intensity of RGHJs based on the empirical relation with the stellar wind as well as a proposed scaling for planetary magnetic fields. RGHJs might be intrinsically as bright as or brighter than canonical hot Jupiters and about 100 times brighter than equivalent objects around main-sequence stars. We examine the capabilities of low-frequency radio observatories to detect this emission and find that the signal from an RGHJ may be detectable at distances up to a few hundred parsecs with the Square Kilometer Array.

  4. Radio Emission from Red-Giant Hot Jupiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, Yuka; Spiegel, David S.; Mroczkowski, Tony; Nordhaus, Jason; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-01-01

    When planet-hosting stars evolve off the main sequence and go through the red-giant branch, the stars become orders of magnitudes more luminous and, at the same time, lose mass at much higher rates than their main sequence counterparts. Accordingly, if planetary companions exist around these stars at orbital distances of a few au, they will be heated up to the level of canonical hot Jupiters and also be subjected to a dense stellar wind. Given that magnetized planets interacting with stellar winds emit radio waves, such "Red-Giant Hot Jupiters" (RGHJs) may also be candidate radio emitters. We estimate the spectral auroral radio intensity of RGHJs based on the empirical relation with the stellar wind as well as a proposed scaling for planetary magnetic fields. RGHJs might be intrinsically as bright as or brighter than canonical hot Jupiters and about 100 times brighter than equivalent objects around main-sequence stars. We examine the capabilities of low-frequency radio observatories to detect this emission and find that the signal from an RGHJ may be detectable at distances up to a few hundred parsecs with the Square Kilometer Array.

  5. Predicting Changes in the Radio Emission Fluxes of Extragalactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, A. L.; Ryabov, M. I.; Donskikh, G. I.

    2016-06-01

    Data from long-term monitoring with the 26-m University of Michigan radio telescope at a frequency of 14.5 GHz (1974-2011) is used to predict changes in the radio emission fluxes from the extragalactic sources 3C273, 3C120, 3C345, 3C446, 3C454.3, OJ287, OT081, and BLLac. The predictions are based on data on the major periods of variability and their durations obtained by wavelet analysis. The radio emission fluxes from the sources 3C345, 3C446, and 3C454.3, which have complicated variabilities, are predicted using an autoregression linear prediction method. This yields a forecast of the flux variations extending up to 5 years. Harmonic prediction is used for another group of sources, BLLac, OJ287, and OT081, with rapid variability. This approach yielded forecasts extending 4-9 years. For the sources 3C273 and 3C120, which have stable long periods, the harmonic method was also used and yielded a forecast extending up to 16 years. The reliability of the prediction was confirmed by independent observational data from the MOJAVE program for 2011-2015.

  6. Rotational modulation of Saturn's radio emissions after equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shengyi; Fischer, Georg; Kurth, William; Gurnett, Donald

    2016-04-01

    The modulation rate of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), originally thought to be constant, was found to vary with time by comparing the Voyager and Ulysses observations. More recently, Cassini RPWS observations of SKR revealed two different modulation rates, one associated with each hemisphere of Saturn, and it was proposed that the rotation rates are subject to seasonal change. The almost continuous observations of SKR, Saturn narrowband emission, and auroral hiss by RPWS provide a good method of tracking the rotation rates of the planet's magnetosphere. We will show that the rotation rate of the northern SKR is slower than that of the southern SKR in 2015. Auroral hiss provides another unambiguous method of tracking the rotation signals from each hemisphere because the whistler mode wave cannot cross the equator. Rotation rates of auroral hiss are shown to agree with those of SKR when both are observed at high latitudes. The dual rotation rates of 5 kHz narrowband emissions reappeared after a long break since equinox and they agree with those of auroral hiss in 2013.

  7. Cloud-to-stratosphere lightning discharges - A radio emission model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations of rare cloud-to-stratospheric lightning discharges suggest the events are inherently 'slow-rising', with the emitted energy reaching peak values in about 10 milliseconds. Applying a dipole radiation model, it is demonstrated that the emitted radio wave energy from such slow-rising events is strongest below about 50 Hz, and possesses a significant rolloff at higher frequencies. In the analysis, various current distributions are considered in order to determine the effect on the radio spectrum. Near 10 kHz, the emission from cloud-to-stratospheric lightning is significantly reduced as compared to the typical cloud-to-ground return stroke, with amplitudes as much as 50 dB lower. This result may explain the lack of detection of VLF signals from recently observed long-lasting discharge events.

  8. Chromospheric evaporation and decimetric radio emission in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered decimetric signatures of the chromospheric evaporation process. Evidence for the radio detection of chromospheric evaporation is based on the radio-inferred values of (1) the electron density, (2) the propagation speed, and (3) the timing, which are found to be in good agreement with statistical values inferred from the blueshifted Ca XIX soft X-ray line. The physical basis of our model is that free-free absorption of plasma emission is strongly modified by the steep density gradient and the large temperature increase in the upflowing flare plasma. The steplike density increase at the chromospheric evaporation front causes a local discontinuity in the plasma frequency, manifested as almost infinite drift rate in decimetric type III bursts. The large temperature increase of the upflowing plasma considerably reduces the local free-free opacity (due to the T(exp -3/2) dependence) and thus enhances the brightness of radio bursts emitted at the local plasma frequency near the chromospheric evaporation front, while a high-frequency cutoff is expected in the high-density regions behind the front, which can be used to infer the velocity of the upflowing plasma. From model calculations we find strong evidence that decimetric bursts with a slowly drifting high-frequency cutoff are produced by fundamental plasma emission, contrary to the widespread belief that decimetric bursts are preferentially emitted at the harmonic plasma level. We analyze 21 flare episodes from 1991-1993 for which broadband (100-3000 MHz) radio dynamic spectra from Pheonix, hard X-ray data from (BATSE/CGRO) and soft X-ray data from Burst and Transient Source Experiment/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GOES) were available.

  9. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  10. The Jovian magnetosphere - A post-Voyager view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    Results of observational and theoretical work presented at the Rice University Conference on the Physics of the Jovian Magnetosphere (February 27-29, 1980) are summarized and used to elucidate the post-Voyager status of the understanding of Jovian magnetosphere dynamics. Works considered treat earth-based and Voyager observations of the Io torus, decametric and kilometric radio emissions, corotation of magnetospheric plasma with the magnetic field, and theoretical studies of mechanisms of particle acceleration, diffusion and loss in the magnetosphere and interplanetary space. Issues remaining to be resolved by future research are also indicated, particularly questions of the discrepancy between plasma flow measurements obtained on the two plasma experiments on each Voyager spacecraft, and the localization of the source of torus plasma.

  11. Confirmation of Pulsed Radio Emission from the Pulsar J1907+0919 (Shitov Radio Pulsar, SGR 1900+14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushak, A. P.; Losovsky, B. Ya.; Dumsky, D. V.

    2015-10-01

    Observations at a frequency of 111 MHz with the Large Phased Array at the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the Astro Space Center of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute confirm the pulsed radio emission of the X-ray pulsar J1907+0919 that is a counterpart of the magnetar SGR 1900+14. Its pulsed radio emission was discovered earlier by Shitov (1999). A flux density periodogram is built. A new spin period P = 5.22756(42) s and flux density 50± 5~mJy are measured at the Epoch 56834.6 MJD. A value of the pulsar radio emission spectral index is estimated as < -4.3. This radio spectrum is one of the steepest among the spectra of known pulsars.

  12. Comparison of Natural Narrow-banded Emissions and Sounder Stimulated Resonances In The Magnetospheres of Jupiter and The Earth (ulysses and Image Spacecraft)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Benson, R. F.; MacDowall, R.

    The sounder stimulated resonances observed by Ulysses in JupiterSs Io torus re- vealed a spectrum of frequencies which has been interpreted in terms of Dn reso- nances together with electron plasma frequency fpe and Bernstein Qn resonances in order to determine the electron density and magnetic field strength (Osherovich et al. 1993; Benson et al. 1997). The presence of Dn resonances (cylindrical eigen- modes with frequencies proportional sqrtn, n = 1, 2, ...) has been predicted for the Io torus on the basis of the classification of the EarthSs Ionospheric sounder stim- ulated resonances (Osherovich 1987, 1989; Osherovich and Benson 1991; Benson and Osherovich 1992). The magnetic field strength measured by the Ulysses mag- netometer confirmed the values found from resonances to within a few percent. An alternative interpretation suggested that the Ulysses relaxation sounder did not excite Dn in JupiterSs magnetosphere( Le Sagre et al. 1998) and the topic has been subject to a recent debate (Canu 2001a; Benson et al. 2001; Canu 2001b) . We show that Dn resonances are present in both sounder stimulated spectra and in natural emissions ob- served by Ulysses during the inbound and outbound part of the trajectory inside the Io torus. The natural emissions (no sounding) have the same frequencies as their sounder stimulated counterparts. IMAGE/RPI observations, which confirm the specific rela- tion between Dn, fp and fce and for the subsidiary resonances Dn+ and Dn-, will also be presented. References: Benson, R.F. and V.A. Osherovich, Canu, J. Geophys. Res., 97, 19413, 1992. Benson, R.F. et al., Radio Sci., 32, 1127, 1997. Benson, R.F. et al., Radio Sci., 36, 1649, 2001. Canu, P., Radio Sci., 36, 171, 2001a. Canu, P., Radio Sci., 36, 1645, 2001b. Le Sagre, P. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 26667, 1998. 1 Osherovich, V. A., J. Geophys. Res., 92, 316, 1987. Osherovich, V. A., J. Geophys. Res., 94, 5530, 1989. Osherovich, V. A. and R.F. Benson, ., J. Geophys. Res., 96

  13. DARK MATTER AND SYNCHROTRON EMISSION FROM GALACTIC CENTER RADIO FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Hooper, Dan; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S{sub v} {proportional_to}{nu}{sup -0.1{+-}0.4}) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light ({approx}5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs are consistent with those required to explain the excess {gamma}-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  14. Dark Matter and Synchrotron Emission from Galactic Center Radio Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Hooper, Dan; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2011-11-10

    The inner degrees of the Galactic center contain a large population of filamentary structures observed at radio frequencies. These so-called non-thermal radio filaments (NRFs) trace magnetic field lines and have attracted significant interest due to their hard (S_v ~ -0.1 +/- 0.4) synchrotron emission spectra. The origin of these filaments remains poorly understood. We show that the electrons and positrons created through the annihilations of a relatively light (~5-10 GeV) dark matter particle with the cross section predicted for a simple thermal relic can provide a compelling match to the intensity, spectral shape, and flux variation of the NRFs. Furthermore, the characteristics of the dark matter particle necessary to explain the synchrotron emission from the NRFs is consistent with those required to explain the excess gamma-ray emission observed from the Galactic center by the Fermi-LAT, as well as the direct detection signals observed by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA.

  15. Theory of Type 3 and Type 2 Solar Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    2000-01-01

    The main features of some current theories of type III and type II bursts are outlined. Among the most common solar radio bursts, type III bursts are produced at frequencies of 10 kHz to a few GHz when electron beams are ejected from solar active regions, entering the corona and solar wind at typical speeds of 0.1c. These beams provide energy to generate Langmuir waves via a streaming instability. In the current stochastic-growth theory, Langmuir waves grow in clumps associated with random low-frequency density fluctuations, leading to the observed spiky waves. Nonlinear wave-wave interactions then lead to secondary emission of observable radio waves near the fundamental and harmonic of the plasma frequency. Subsequent scattering processes modify the dynamic radio spectra, while back-reaction of Langmuir waves on the beam causes it to fluctuate about a state of marginal stability. Theories based on these ideas can account for the observed properties of type III bursts, including the in situ waves and the dynamic spectra of the radiation. Type 11 bursts are associated with shock waves propagating through the corona and interplanetary space and radiating from roughly 30 kHz to 1 GHz. Their basic emission mechanisms are believed to be similar to those of type III events and radiation from Earth's foreshock. However, several sub-classes of type II bursts may exist with different source regions and detailed characteristics. Theoretical models for type II bursts are briefly reviewed, focusing on a model with emission from a foreshock region upstream of the shock for which observational evidence has just been reported.

  16. Kinetic Simulations of Solar Type II Radio Burst Emission Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ganse, Urs; Burkart, Thomas; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2010-03-25

    Using our kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulation code, we have examined the behavior of different plasma modes in the environment close to a CME shock front, with special focus on the modes that may contribute to the formation of type II radio bursts. Apart from electron velocity spectra, numerical dispersion plots obtained from simulation data allow for analysis of wave modes in the simulated plasma, especially showing growth and damping of these modes over time. These plots reveal features at 2omega{sub p} which are not predicted by linear wave theory, that may be results of nonlinear three wave interaction processes as theoretically predicted for type II emission processes.

  17. Pulsed Radio Emission from PSR J1119-6127 disappeared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Kerr, M.; Esposito, P.; Rea, N.; Zelati, F. Coti; Israel, G. L.; Johnston, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have searched for pulsed radio emission from the direction of the known high magnetic field pulsar PSR J1119-6127 (spin period of 409 ms, magnetic field intensity at surface of about 4 x 10^13 G, spin-down age of about 1700 yr, embedded in the supernova remnant SNR G292.2-0.5), which showed bursts similar to those typical of the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) at 13:02:07.91 UT on 27 July 2016 (Younes et al,GCN Circular #19735) and at 01:27:51 UT on 28 July 2016 (Kennea et al,Atel #9274).

  18. Diffuse radio emission from clusters in the MareNostrum Universe simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, M.; Brüggen, M.; Yepes, G.; Gottlöber, S.; Schwope, A.

    2008-12-01

    Large-scale diffuse radio emission is observed in some clusters of galaxies. There is ample of evidence that the emission has its origin in synchrotron losses of relativistic electrons that have been accelerated in cluster mergers. In a cosmological simulation, we estimate the radio emission of structure formation shocks as follows: introducing a novel approach to identify strong shock fronts in an smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation, we determine the Mach number as well as the downstream density and temperature in the MareNostrum Universe simulation which has 2 × 10243 particles in a 500h-1Mpc box. Then, we estimate the radio emission using the formalism derived in Hoeft & Brüggen to produce artificial radio maps of massive clusters and to derive a luminosity function of diffuse radio sources. Several of our clusters show radio objects with similar morphology to observed large-scale radio relics, whereas about half of the clusters show only very little radio emission. In agreement with observational findings, the maximum diffuse radio emission of our clusters depends strongly on their X-ray temperature. We find that the so-called accretion shocks cause only very little radio emission. We conclude that a moderate efficiency of shock acceleration, namely ξe = 0.005, and moderate magnetic fields in the region of the relics, namely 0.07-0.8μG are sufficient to reproduce the number density and luminosity of radio relics.

  19. Correlation of pulsar radio emission spectrum with peculiarities of particle acceleration in a polar gap

    SciTech Connect

    Kontorovich, V. M. Flanchik, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The analytical expression for the frequency of radio emission intensity maximum in pulsars with free electron emission from the stellar surface has been found. Peculiarities of the electron acceleration in a polar gap are considered. The correlation between the high-frequency cutoff and low-frequency turnover in the radio emission spectrum of pulsars known from observations has been explained.

  20. Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered decimetric signatures of the chromospheric evaporation process. Evidence for the radio detection of chromospheric evaporation is based on the radio-inferred values of (1) the electron density, (2) the propagation speed, and (3) the timing, which are found to be in good agreement with statistical values inferred from the blueshifted Ca xix soft X-ray line. The physical basis of our model is that free-free absorption of plasma emission is strongly modified by the steep density gradient and the large temperature increase in the upflowing flare plasma. The steplike density increase at the chromospheric evaporation front causes a local discontinuity in the plasma frequency, manifested as almost infinite drift rate in decimetric type III bursts. The large temperature increase of the upflowing plasma considerably reduces the local free-free opacity (due to the T-(exp -3/2) dependence) and thus enhances the brightness of radio bursts emitted at the local plasma frequency near the chromospheric evaporation front, while a high-frequency cutoff is expected in the high-density regions behind the front, which can be used to infer the velocity of the upflowing plasma. From model calculations we find strong evidence that decimetric bursts with a slowly drifting high-frequency cutoff are produced by fundamental plasma emission, contrary to the widespread belief that decimetric bursts are preferentially emitted at the harmonic plasma level. We analyzed 21 flare episodes from 1991-1993 for which broadband (100-3000 MHz) radio dynamic spectra from Phoenix, hard X-ray data from BATSE/CGRO, and soft X-ray data from GOES were available. We detected slowly drifting high-frequency cutoffs between 1.1 and 3.0 GHz, with drift rates of -41 +/- 32 MHz/s, extending over time intervals of 24 +/- 23 s. Developing a density model for type III-emitting flare loops based on the statistically observed drift rate of type III bursts by Alvarez & Haddock, we infer velocities of up to

  1. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  2. Radio continuum and far-infrared emission of spiral galaxies: Implications of correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, T. N.; Iyengar, K. V. K.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers present a study extending the correlation seen between radio continuum and far-infrared emissions from spiral galaxies to a lower frequency of 408 MHz and also as a function of radio spectral index. The tight correlation seen between the two luminosities is then used to constrain several parameters governing the emissions such as the changes in star formation rate and mass function, frequency of supernovae that are parents of the interstellar electrons and factors governing synchrotron radio emission.

  3. Optical emission study of radio-frequency excited toluene plasma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szetsen; Liu, Shiao-Jun; Liang, Rui-Ji

    2008-12-25

    UV-visible emission spectra of radio-frequency (rf) excited toluene plasma were studied. Benzyl radicals as well as toluene monomer and excimer were observed in toluene plasma. It was found that the intensities, peak positions, and linewidths of monomer and excimer emission bands exhibit strong dependence on rf power and plasma processing time. This can be ascribed to photochemical reactions in plasma. Gas-chromatographic analysis of the deposition products from toluene plasma indicated that the main component was bibenzyl. Spectroscopic evidence has shown that the bibenzyl molecule was formed by the coupling reaction between two benzyl radicals in plasma. The spectroscopic characteristics of toluene monomer and excimer are correlated with a kinetic model in plasma. PMID:19049320

  4. Considerations on the radio emission from extended air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, E.; Sartori, G.

    2016-05-01

    The process of radio emission from extended air showers produced by high energy cosmic rays has reached a good level of comprehension and prediction. It has a coherent nature, so the emitted power scales quadratically with the energy of the primary particle. Recently, a laboratory measurement has revealed that an incoherent radiation mechanism exists, namely, the bremsstrahlung emission. In this paper we expound why bremsstrahlung radiation, that should be present in showers produced by ultra high energy cosmic rays, has escaped detection so far, and why, on the other side, it could be exploited, in the 1–10 GHz frequency range, to detect astronomical γ-rays. We propose an experimental scheme to verify such hypothesis, which, if correct, would deeply impact on the observational γ-ray astronomy.

  5. The sources of Uranus' dominant nightside radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Curtis, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    The broad-bandwidth radio emission detected by Voyager 2 over the nightside of Uranus is examined. It is concluded that the source location of the smooth component is consistent with emission originating near the electron gyrofrequency from a small set of field lines whose foot points lie near the Uranomagnetic southern (dark) pole. The source centroid is at L = 11.5, and extends in latitude between about L = 8 and L = 25. This deduced source region is primarily on closed field lines that pass through the outer radiation belt and have their opposite foot points near the Uranomagnetic northern pole (near the present epoch terminator). The source location of the bursty component is less well defined but is consistent with the set of open field lines which map down to the region surrounding the planet's south magnetic dipole tip.

  6. Real-Time Detection and Constraining Pulsar Emission Physics through Radio/Gamma-Ray Correlation of Crab Giant Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaliger, Mitchell B.; Ransom, S.; Langston, G.; McLaughlin, M.; Lorimer, D.; Bilous, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Lyutikov, M.

    2010-01-01

    Giant pulses are rare, short, bright bursts of radio emission. Although giant pulses are well documented, the physical processes behind them are not well known. To determine these processes, certain properties of giant pulses need to be constrained. Among these constraints are the rate of giant pulses and the number of giant pulses as a function of intensity. Data have been taken with the 43-m telescope at Green Bank over a time span of several months and reduced in real time to search for giant pulses. We have developed a real time detection algorithm to search the data for pulses, ruling out periodic signal. When a pulse is found, the intensity vs time profile, frequency vs time plot, and raw data within a second of the burst are saved. This real time detection algorithm allows us to take a large amount of data on the Crab with minimal disk space and human intervention. Another way we are trying to determine emission processes is by correlating Fermi data with giant pulse data from the 100-m Green Bank Telescope and the 43-m telescope. The main purpose of this is to test whether giant pulses are due to changes in the coherence of the radio emission mechanism, variations in the pair creation rate in the pulsar magnetosphere, or changes in the beaming direction. Also being tested is a specific giant pulse emission model proposed by Lyutikov, in which Crab giant pulses are generated on closed magnetic field lines near the light cylinder via anomalous cyclotron resonance of the ordinary mode. This model gives a clear prediction that radio giant pulses should be accompanied by gamma-ray photons.

  7. Radio emission of sea surface at centimeter wavelengths and is fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseytlin, N. M.; Shutko, A. M.; Zhislin, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The eigen thermal radio emission of the sea was examined as well as the agitated surface of the sea when the reflection (scattering) is similar in nature to diffused scattering. The contribution of this emission to the total emission of the sea is practically constant in time, and the time fluctuations of the radio emissions of the sea are basically determined only by a change in the eigen emission of the sea, connected with the agitation.

  8. Sharing Planetary Radio Emission Dataset in the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Le Sidaner, P.; Erard, S.; Coffre, A.; Thétas, E.; André, N.; Jacquey, C.

    2013-09-01

    In the double frame of the preparation of the ESA-led JUICE mission and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet/IDIS (Integrated and Distributed Information Service). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nançay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  9. Sharing Planetary Radio Emission Dataset in the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.; Le Sidaner, P.; Coffre, A.; Thetas, E.; andre, N.

    2013-12-01

    In the double frame of the preparation of the ESA-led JUICE mission and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet/IDIS (Integrated and Distributed Information Service). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nançay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.

  10. Sharing Planetary Radio Emission Dataset in the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Baptiste; Le Sidaner, Pierre; Hess, Sebastien; Girard, Julien; Thetas, Emmanuel; Coffre, Andree; Malapert, Jean-Christophe; Genot, Vincent

    In the double frame of the preparation of the ESA-led JUICE mission and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet/IDIS (Integrated and Distributed Information Service). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nançay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets.