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Sample records for magnetron plasma torch

  1. Time-Dependent 2D Modeling of Magnetron Plasma Torch in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lincun; Xia, Weidong

    2008-06-01

    A theoretical model is presented to describe the electromagnetic, heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena within a magnetron plasma torch and in the resultant plume, by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. Specific calculations are presented for a pure argon system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an argon environment), operated in a turbulent mode. An important finding of this work is that the external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of arc plasma and thus affects the resulting plume. The AMF impels the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. As a result, the plasma intensity distribution on the cross section of torch seems to be more uniform. Numerical results also show that with AMF, the highest plasma temperature decreases and the anode arc root moves upstream significantly, while the current density distribution at the anode is more concentrated with a higher peak value. In addition, the use of AMF then induces a strong backflow at the torch spout and its magnitude increases with the AMF strength but decreases with the inlet gas velocity.

  2. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  3. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  4. Microwave Argon Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, Edgar; Pencheva, Mariana; Benova, Evgenia; Dias, Fransisco; Tatarova, Elena

    2009-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of a microwave (2.45 GHz) Argon plasma torch driven by a surface wave is presented. The theoretical model couples in a self-consistent way the wave electrodynamics and the electron and heavy particle kinetics. The set of coupled equations includes: Maxwell's equations, the electron Boltzmann equation, including electron-electron collisions, and the particle balance equations for electrons, excited atoms (4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, 6s), and atomic (Ar^+) and molecular ions (Ar2^+). The input parameters of the model are: gas pressure (760 Torr), plasma radius (R = 0.75 cm), dielectric permittivity (ɛd = 4.0) and tube thickness (d = 0.15 cm) as well as the measured axial profile of the gas temperature (3500 K - 1500 K). The latter was determined from measurements of the rotational temperature of the OH molecular band in the range 306 - 315 nm. Phase and amplitude sensitive recording provides the data for the axial wavenumber and wave attenuation coefficient. The wavenumber decreases along the generated plasma torch. The electron density (Ne) axial profile as determined from measurements of Hβ Stark broadening is in agreement with the theoretical one.

  5. Adapter Helps To Aline Plasma Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosemer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Simple adapter allows plasma welding torch alined accurately on weld seam. Adapter fits over nozzle of torch. Light from pilot arc inside torch passes through central orifice in cone. Light emerges from cone as beam that creates spot of light at point where torch impinges on workpiece. When torch is alined with work, adapter is removed, plasma arc struck, and welding proceeds.

  6. Plasma torch igniter for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; O'Brien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1989-01-01

    A small, uncooled plasma torch was developed and used in combination with an injector designed to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. The plasma torch was operated on mixtures of hydrogen and argon with total flows of 10 to 70 scfh. The fuel injector design consisted of five small upstream pilot fuel injectors, a rearward facing step for recirculation, and three main fuel injectors downstream of the step. The plasma torch was located in the recirculation region, and all injection was perpendicular to the Mach 2 stream. Both semi-freejet and ducted tests were conducted. The experimental results indicate that a low power plasma torch operating on a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hydrogen and argon and located in the recirculation zone fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors is a good igniter for flow conditions simulating a flight Mach number of 3.7. The total temperature required to autoignite the hydrogen fuel for this injector geometry was 2640 R. The injector configuration was shown to be a good flameholder over a wide range of total temperature. Spectroscopic measurements were used to verify the presence of air total temperatures below 1610 R.

  7. Plasma torch igniter for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; Obrien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A small, uncooled plasma torch was developed and used in combination with an injector designed to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. The plasma torch was operated on mixtures of hydrogen and argon with total flows of 10 to 70 scfh. The fuel injector design consisted of five small upstream pilot fuel injectors, a rearward facing step for recirculation, and three main fuel injectors downstream of the step. The plasma torch was located in the recirculation region, and all injection was perpendicular to the Mach 2 stream. Both semi-freejet and ducted tests were conducted. The experimental results indicate that a low power plasma torch operating on a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hygrogen and argon and located in the recirculation zone fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors is a good igniter for flow conditions simulating a flight Mach number of 3.7. The total temperature required to autoignite the hydrogen fuel for this injector geometry was 2640 R. The injector configuration was shown to be a good flameholder over a wide range of total temperature. Spectroscopic measurements were used to verify the presence of air total temperatures below 1610 R.

  8. Arc plasma jets of a nontransferred plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K.D.; Hong, S.H.

    1996-02-01

    The dc plasma torches have been widely used as clean plasma sources for plasma processings such as plasma spraying and synthesis. The plasma flow of a nontransferred plasma torch used for thermal plasma processings is produced by the arc-gas interactions between a cathode tip and an anode nozzle and expands as a jet through the nozzle. In this work, numerically calculated images of the arc plasma characteristics are found over the entire plasma region, including both an arc-gas interacting region inside the torch and a jet expanding region outside the torch. A numerical model used assumes a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with near-electrode phenomena and compressible flow effects. The computational system is described by a two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric model which is solved for plasma temperature and velocity by a control volume approach with the modified SIMPLER algorithm in a real torch geometry.

  9. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  10. Plasma arc welding torch having means for vortexing plasma gas exiting the welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is described wherein a plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of the welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. The plasma gas is provided with a vortexing motion prior to exiting the body by a vortex motion imparting member which is mounted in an orifice housing member and carried in the forward portion of the torch body. The orifice housing member is provided with an orifice of an predetermined diameter through which the electric arc and the plasma gas exits.

  11. Modeling of Magnetron Argon Plasma Issuing into Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Cun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented to describe the heat transfer and fluid flow in a magnetron plasma torch, by means of a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code fluent. Specific calculations are presented for a gas-mixing system (i.e., an argon plasma discharging into an air environment), operating in a laminar mode. Numerical results show that an external axial magnetic field (AMF) may have a significant effect on the behavior of an arc plasma, i.e., the AMF will impel the plasma to retract axially and expand radially. In addition, the use of an AMF induces a strong air indraft at the torch spout, and the air mixing with the argon gas results in a marked increase in arc voltage. An increment in the amount of the oncoming argon gas restrains the quantity of the air indraft, and this should be responsible for a lower arc voltage in such an AMF torch when a larger gas inflow is used.

  12. Plasma Torch for Plasma Ignition and Combustion of Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustimenko, Alexandr; Messerle, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-fuel systems (PFS) have been developed to improve coal combustion efficiency. PFS is a pulverized coal burner equipped with arc plasma torch producing high temperature air stream of 4000 - 6000 K. Plasma activation of coal at the PFS increases the coal reactivity and provides more effective ignition and ecologically friendly incineration of low-rank coal. The main and crucial element of PFS is plasma torch. Simplicity and reliability of the industrial arc plasma torches using cylindrical copper cathode and air as plasma forming gas predestined their application at heat and power engineering for plasma aided coal combustion. Life time of these plasma torches electrodes is critical and usually limited to 200 hours. Considered in this report direct current arc plasma torch has the cathode life significantly exceeded 1000 hours. To ensure the electrodes long life the process of hydrocarbon gas dissociation in the electric arc discharge is used. In accordance to this method atoms and ions of carbon from near-electrode plasma deposit on the active surface of the electrodes and form electrode carbon condensate which operates as ``actual'' electrode. Complex physicochemical investigation showed that deposit consists of nanocarbon material.

  13. Dual Torch Plasma Arc Furnace for Medical Waste Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Kikuchi, M.; Li, Heping; Iwao, T.; Inaba, T.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, characteristics of a dual torch plasma arc used for hazardous waste treatment and operated at atmospheric pressure are studied, and also compared with those of the multi-torch plasma arc and the single torch plasma arc. The dual torch plasma arc is generated between the cathode and anode with argon as the working gas. The temperature distributions of the plasma arc are measured using a spectroscope and line pair method with the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the DC arc current I = 100 A and argon flow rate Q = 15 slpm. The measurements show that the temperatures of the dual torch arc plasma in the regions near the cathode, the anode and the center point are 10,000 K, 11,000 K and 9,000 K, respectively. And the high temperature region of the multi torch plasma arc is of double or much wider size than that of a conventional dual torch plasma arc and single plasma torch. Based on the preceding studies, a dual torch plasma arc furnace is developed in this study. The measured gas temperature at the center region of the argon arc is about 11,000 K for the case of I = 200 A and Q = 30 slpm operated in atmosphere.

  14. Microwave plasma torches used for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F. M.; Bundaleska, N.; Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2014-06-01

    A microwave plasma torch operating at 2.45 GHz and atmospheric pressure has been used as a medium and a tool for decomposition of alcohol in order to produce molecular hydrogen. Plasma in a gas mixture of argon and ethanol/methanol, with or without water, has been created using a waveguide surfatron launcher and a microwave generator delivering a power in the range 0.2-2.0 kW. Mass, Fourier Transform Infrared, and optical emission spectrometry have been applied as diagnostic tools. The decomposition yield of methanol was nearly 100 % with H2, CO, CO2, H2O, and solid carbon as the main reaction products. The influence of the fraction of Ar flow through the liquid ethanol/methanol on H2, CO, and CO2 partial pressures has been investigated, as well as the dependence of the produced H2 flow on the total flow and power. The optical emission spectrum in the range 250-700 nm has also been detected. There is a decrease of the OH(A-X) band intensity with the increase of methanol in the mixture. The emission of carbon atoms in the near UV range (240-300 nm) exhibits a significant increase as the amount of alcohol in the mixture grows. The obtained results clearly show that this microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure provides an efficient plasma environment for hydrogen production.

  15. Properties of microwave plasma torch operating at a low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Soon C.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Kim, Jae H.

    2008-10-15

    A microwave plasma torch system is attached to a low-pressure chamber in this study. The electric field induced in a quartz discharge tube by microwave radiation breaks down the gas at a sufficiently low pressure, igniting the plasma, which is continuously sustained by the microwave radiation. The plasma profile at a very low pressure is shown to be asymmetric with higher density on the incoming side of the microwaves. The gas temperature at the bright spot of the torch plasma measured via the optical emission from hydroxide radicals is shown to increase drastically upon high-pressure operation as the microwave power increases. The electron density at the torch flame is measured by recording the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line. The plasma density increases as the microwave power increases. The typical argon plasma density of a plasma torch powered at 500 W under a pressure of 150 Torr is on the order of 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3}. The electron temperature in the argon torch plasma was estimated to be 1.5 eV, thereby effectively exciting the molecules in the torch gas. Disintegration of nitrogen fluoride (NF{sub 3}) indicates that a microwave plasma torch operating at a low pressure can efficiently generate an abundant amount of chemical radicals.

  16. Plasma-Arc Torch For Welding Ducts In Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.; Bayless, Ernest; Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-arc-welding torch redesigned, more suitable for applications in which moved in circular or other orbits about stationary cylindrical workpieces. Preserves elements of original design critical to performance and endurance, but modifies other elements to decrease overall size of torch. Electrode collet and collet nut installed and removed through hole in top; makes installation and removal easier.

  17. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, G.; Karger, O.; Knetsch, A.; Xi, Y.; Deng, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smith, J.; Manahan, G. G.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Hidding, B.

    2015-08-01

    A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  19. Decontamination of biological warfare agents by a microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wilson; Lai, Henry; Kuo, Spencer P.; Tarasenko, Olga; Levon, Kalle

    2005-02-01

    A portable arc-seeded microwave plasma torch running stably with airflow is described and applied for the decontamination of biological warfare agents. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma torch indicated that this torch produced an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen that could effectively oxidize biological agents. Bacillus cereus was chosen as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis spores for biological agent in the decontamination experiments. Decontamination was performed with the airflow rate of 0.393 l/s, corresponding to a maximum concentration of atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The experimental results showed that all spores were killed in less than 8 s at 3 cm distance, 12 s at 4 cm distance, and 16 s at 5 cm distance away from the nozzle of the torch.

  20. Generation and characterization of atmospheric plasma torch array

    SciTech Connect

    Koretzky, E.; Kuo, S.P.

    1997-12-31

    Using a capacitively coupled electrical discharge, an array of plasma torches can be produced simultaneously by using a common 60 cycle power source (i.e. a simple wall plug) at atmospheric pressure. The size of each torch depends on the geometry of the electrode pair and the streaming speed of the air flow. Such a flat panel plasma torch array can be made into the desired volume and plasma density. A laser beam is used to measure the dimensions of the torch. It is found that each torch has a radius of about 1 cm and a height of about 6.5 cm. Surprisingly, it is shown that the torch can cause up to 80% modulation of the laser beam intensity. From the voltage and current measurements, the average power consumption of each torch is estimated to be 0.6 kW. The electron density can also be estimated and is found to exceed 10{sup 13}cm{sup {minus}3}. The discharge may be represented by a lump circuit. Thus, a computer simulation of the discharge is performed. The results are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. Simulations have also been performed to study the dependence of average electron density, with the electron-ion recombination coefficient as a parameter. The study is aimed at developing an efficient large volume dense plasma for industrial applications.

  1. Development and Use of the Dual-Mode Plasma Torch

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, R.; Shuey, M.

    2002-02-26

    After several years of development, a commercially available high-temperature treatment system has been developed and installed that treats heterogeneous low-level radioactive waste. High temperature plasma processing, unique torch design and operating features make it feasible to achieve a volume reduced, permanent, high integrity waste form while eliminating the personnel exposure and costs associated with conventional sorting, characterizing and handling. Plasma technology can also be used to treat previous conditioned waste packages that no longer meet the current acceptance criteria for final disposal. Plasma treatment can result, in many cases, in a substantial volume reduction, which lowers the final disposal costs. This paper covers the recently patented dual mode plasma torch design(1), the lessons learned that fostered its development and the advantages it brings to radioactive waste processing. This paper also provides current full scale Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) project status and how the dual mode torch is being used in the PACT system.

  2. A magnetically controlled arc for plasma torch incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.Y.; Mayo, R.M.; Bourham, M.A.; Corzine, R.K.; Hart, D.; Messimore, J.

    1996-12-31

    With the ever increasing problems of chemically hazardous and radioactive waste produced from federal, commercial, medical, academic, and nuclear utility sources, a safe means of waste elimination or disposal is desired. Plasma torches represent an electrical arc technology that possesses certain advantages in radioactive and hazardous waste incineration. A plasma torch provides an extremely high-temperature ionized gas (up to 1--2eV) that can be used to incinerate (and possibly vitrify) solid waste. What`s more, a plasma incinerator can be used to achieve high volume reduction ratios, possibly to 1/100 of the original waste volume, and can be used to eliminate chemical and biological hazardous waste. Further the technology is readily scalable so that a torch can be designed to operate at a power range from 30--50kW for a compact size incinerator to power level of 2 MW or greater for high throughput commercial incinerators. Several technology limiting problems, however, arise in the use of high temperature plasma torches. Present plasma incineration devices suffer from poor electrode (cathode) survivability. The authors discuss in this paper, recent developments in applying external magnetization to plasma torches in order to enhance the electrode performance through arc distribution.

  3. Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-03-08

    Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

  4. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10−3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10−7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10−5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  5. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyoung S; Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yong C; Choi, Eun H

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10(-3), nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10(-7), nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10(-5), where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  6. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-12-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10-3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10-7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10-5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch.

  7. Destruction of dimethyl methylphosphonate using a microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Cho, Soon C.; Hong, Yong C.; Park, Yang G.; Park, Ju S.

    2008-02-01

    A microwave plasma torch with a microwave power of 1.2kW destroys dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) with a destruction rate of 1.14l/h, demonstrating a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The FTIR spectra of the discharge gas from DMMP destruction indicates near perfect elimination of DMMP when the proper amount of oxygen gas is added. This can be confirmed by the gas chromatography spectra, which show the disappearance of even intermediary compounds. The compactness and light weight of the microwave plasma torch provide an effective means of on-site removal of the chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  8. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

    2010-11-30

    A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

  9. Advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Continuing research has resulted in significant advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology which extend and enhance its potential for broad range of uses in chemical processing, materials development and testing, and development of large illumination sources. Summaries of these advances are briefly described.

  10. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  11. The plasma arc torch -- its electrical and thermal characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    The plasma arc torch is a very effective heating device. Plasma arc heating technology is very appropriate and essential for product manufacture and for remediating and protecting the environment. The plasma torch initiates and maintains a length of arc column, similar to a lightning bolt, and the electrically-conducting column is used in the conversion of electricity into heat energy. The format of the heat energy delivery is a low-mass, high-enthalpy gas. Heat energy is delivered by the plasma torch with a minimum of mass -- only about 2--3% of the mass delivery from a combustion heater that is delivering the same heat enthalpy. This virtually mass-less heat is ideal for promoting very rapid physical changes and chemical changes in the material being heated. It is ideal for the pyrolysis (or gasification) of organic materials and for the vitrification (or melting) of inorganic materials -- processes that are desirable for new product manufacture and for environmental remediation and protection. Plasma arc heating technology has been perfected by industry during the last 20--30 years, and the industrial sector today is employing this unique heating source in product manufacture and, lately, in environmental remediation and protection processes. It is a cost-effective industrial heat source. The primary objective of this paper is to familiarize one with plasma heaters and their operating characteristics. The essential elements of the plasma arc torch: electrodes, insulators, gas injectors, water-cooling, electrical connectors, etc., are described and the electrical and thermal characteristics of this novel heating device are highlighted. An overview of today`s employment of plasma heating technology and a sample of some of today`s applications of the technology in the industrial sector in the United States and around the world are presented.

  12. A theory of the plasma torch for waste-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Hong, S.H.

    1997-12-31

    Arc-plasma technology has broad applications to waste treatment processing including the safe disposal of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. The plasma torch could be useful to the development of an efficient, compact, lightweight, clean burning incinerator for industrial and municipal waste disposal in an environmentally beneficial way. The authors therefore develop a simple theoretical model describing physics of the plasma torch plume in connection with its applications to the arc-plasma waste-treatment system. The theoretical analysis is carried out by making use of Bernoulli`s pressure-balance equation, which provides a stable equilibrium solution of the gas density in the plume ejected from the torch into a high-pressure reactor chamber with 4{var_epsilon} < 1. The pressure depression parameter {var_epsilon} is proportional to the gas temperature and inversely proportional to the square of the chamber pressure. In a low-pressure chamber, characterized by 4{var_epsilon} > 1, there is no stable equilibrium solution satisfying Bernoulli`s equation. Therefore, it is expected that the observable plasma data may change abruptly as the chamber pressure crosses the borderline defined by 4{var_epsilon} = 1. Indeed most of the plasma data measured in an experiment change abruptly at the pressure borderline of 4{var_epsilon} = 1.

  13. The effects of axial magnetic fields on the operating characteristics and downstream plasma parameters of DC plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, Y.; Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch is used in many industrial processes for high temperature sources. In the past, an application of magnetic field is experientially known to stabilize plasma torch operations. However, there is a little discussion regarding to magnetic field effects on plasma torch operating characteristics and plasma parameters. In this work, the influences of magnetic field and plasma gas flow rate on plasma torch current-voltage characteristics and downstream plasma parameters have been experimentally studied, and results are qualitatively analyzed based on the charged particle transport equation.

  14. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  15. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  16. Plasma torch with liquid metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Predtechenskii, M.R.; Tukhto, O.M.

    2006-03-15

    In order to eliminate the negative effect of erosion processes on electrodes in arc plasma generators, a new scheme of arc discharge was proposed in which the surface of a molten metal acts as electrodes. A plasma reactor was designed on the basis of this concept. The electrophysical characteristics of such a discharge in steam and air as plasma gases were studied. Experiments on destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls and steam coal gasification were performed.

  17. Polycrystal diamond growth in a microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Lukina, N. A.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Arutyunyan, N. R.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2010-12-15

    Diamond films of different structures were deposited on quartz, WC-Co, and molybdenum substrates in a microwave plasma torch discharge in an argon-hydrogen-methane gas mixture in a sealed chamber at pressures close to atmospheric by using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Images of diamond polycrystal films and separate crystals, as well as results of Raman spectroscopy, are presented. The spectra of optical plasma radiation recorded during film deposition demonstrate the presence of intense H{sub {alpha}} hydrogen and C{sub 2} radical bands known as Swan bands.

  18. A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Lande, B. K.; Das, A. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2012-01-15

    A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3 MHz, 50 kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent{sup (c)}. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow, sheath gas flow, RF-power dissipated in plasma, and plasma gas. The temperature contours, flow field, axial, and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasma resistance, inductance of the torch, and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

  19. Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF3 and SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su

    2006-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N2, NF3, or SF6, and C2H4 was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4kW. Also, a DRE of SF6 up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

  20. Influence of the Laminar Plasma Torch Construction on the Jet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiuquan; Yu, Deping; Xiang, Yong; Yao, Jin; Miao, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    Based on two typical laminar plasma torches (LPT), i.e. a multi-electrode plasma torch (MEPT) with segmented anode structure and a two-electrode plasma torch (TEPT) with conventional structure, this paper studied the influence of the LPTs construction on the jet characteristics. Experiments were designed to measure their arc voltage, jet length, thermal efficiency and specific enthalpy using a home-made data acquisition system. With them, the jet characteristics of the two different LPTs were compared in detail. Results show that different plasma torch construction leads to distinctively different characteristics of the generated plasma jet. Based on the different jet characteristics, a plasma torch with appropriate construction could be used to meet the different application requirements. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51405315) and the Laboratory of Precision Manufacturing Technology, CAEP (No. KF15002)

  1. Platelet-cooled plasma arc torch. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    In this 12-month program sponsored by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Aerojet designed, fabricated, and tested six platelet cooled electrodes for a Retech 75T (90 MW) plasma arc torch capable of processing mixed radioactive waste. Two of the electrodes with gas injection through the electrode wall demonstrated between eight and forty times the life of conventional water cooled electrodes. If a similar life increase can be produced in a 1 Mw size electrode, then electrodes possessing thousands, rather than hundreds, of hours of life will be available to DOE for potential application to mixed radioactive waste processing.

  2. Plasma Torch Toothbrush a New Insight in Fear Free Dentisry

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, P; Reddy CH, Sampath; Reddy M, Surendra; DSV, Nagasailaja

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment is considered painful either because of fear or anxiety. Even though fear and anxiety could be managed; the needle pricks and the heat generated with drills are both painful and destructive to the tissues of the tooth. A new technology which can reduce the pain and destruction of the dental tissues will be of huge value. Plasma torch toothbrush fits into such criteria and when developed fully, will be able to apply for many of the dental procedures for increasing the efficiency. PMID:25121075

  3. Plasma torch toothbrush a new insight in fear free dentisry.

    PubMed

    Kumar Ch, Santosh; Sarada, P; Reddy Ch, Sampath; Reddy M, Surendra; Dsv, Nagasailaja

    2014-06-01

    Dental treatment is considered painful either because of fear or anxiety. Even though fear and anxiety could be managed; the needle pricks and the heat generated with drills are both painful and destructive to the tissues of the tooth. A new technology which can reduce the pain and destruction of the dental tissues will be of huge value. Plasma torch toothbrush fits into such criteria and when developed fully, will be able to apply for many of the dental procedures for increasing the efficiency. PMID:25121075

  4. Effects of Nozzle Configuration on Flow Characteristics inside DC Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Li, H.; Zhao, T. Z.; Guo, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2004-10-01

    The effects of nozzle configuration on the characteristics of flow inside DC arc plasma torches are investigated by numerical simulation. The plasma torches with three typical types of nozzle configuration are used in this paper, and these torches are the SG-100 series commercial products of PRAXAIR Thermal Spray Products Inc. The assumption of steady-state, axis-symmetric, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and optically thin plasma is adopted in a two-dimensional modeling of plasma flow inside a plasma torch. The PHOENICS software is used for solving the governing equations, i.e., the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. The calculated arc voltages are consistent with the experimental results when arc current, gas inflow rate, and working gas are the same. Temperature, axial velocity contours inside the plasma torches, and profiles along the torch axis and at the outlet section are presented to show the plasma flow characteristics. Comparisons are made among these torches in detail and the results show that torches with different anode nozzle configurations produce different characteristic plasma flows.

  5. Plasma torch for ignition, flameholding and enhancement of combustion in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Billingsley, Matthew C. (Inventor); Sanders, Darius D. (Inventor); Schetz, Joseph A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Preheating of fuel and injection into a plasma torch plume fro adjacent the plasma torch plume provides for only ignition with reduced delay but improved fuel-air mixing and fuel atomization as well as combustion reaction enhancement. Heat exchange also reduced erosion of the anode of the plasma torch. Fuel mixing atomization, fuel mixture distribution enhancement and combustion reaction enhancement are improved by unsteady plasma torch energization, integral formation of the heat exchanger, fuel injection nozzle and plasma torch anode in a more compact, low-profile arrangement which is not intrusive on a highspeed air flow with which the invention is particularly effective and further enhanced by use of nitrogen as a feedstock material and inclusion of high pressure gases in the fuel to cause effervescence during injection.

  6. Design and test of a large plasma torch for environmental recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.

    1996-12-31

    A 2.5-inch inductive plasma torch has been tested with up to 600 kW rf power and with argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. A complete power balance is obtained from electrical, thermal, and radiation measurements. These data indicate that torch efficiencies of up to 30% are obtained with molecular gases, while efficiencies around 15% are obtained with argon. The efficiencies obtained with molecular gases almost triple earlier torch efficiencies and confirm substantially the predictions of a torch model developed during a previous CRADA. Torch efficiencies of up to 50% could be obtained in future tests with an improved rf power supply, with steam gas, and with larger torch dimensions. Future applications of the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC) process could include the high explosives of DOE`s nuclear weapons, chemical and biological remediation, and the treatment and volume reduction of radioactive mixed waste.

  7. Non-Asbestos Insulation Testing Using a Plasma Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Prince, A. S.; Selvidge, S. A.; Phelps, J.; Martin, C. L.; Lawrence, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    Insulation obsolescence issues are a major concern for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). As old sources of raw materials disappear, new sources must be found and qualified. No simple, inexpensive test presently exists for predicting the erosion performance of a candidate insulation in the full-scale motor, Large motor tests cost million of dollars and therefore can only be used on a few very select candidates. There is a need for a simple, low cost method of screening insulation performance that can simulate some of the different erosion environments found in the RSRM. This paper describes a series of erosion tests on two different non-asbestos insulation formulations, a KEVLAR(registered) fiber-filled and a carbon fiber-filled insulation containing Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) rubber as the binder. The test instrument was a plasma torch device. The two main variables investigated were heat flux and alumina particle impingement concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the two different formulations had very different responses to the main variable. The results of this work indicate that there may be fundamental differences in how these insulation formulations perform in the motor operating environment. The plasma torch appears to offer a low-cost means of obtaining a fundamental understanding of insulation response to critical factors in a series of statistically designed experiments.

  8. Characteristics of plasma sterilizer using microwave torch plasma with AC high-voltage discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itarashiki, Tomomasa; Hayashi, Nobuya; Yonesu, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Microwave plasma sterilization has recently been attracting attention for medical applications. However, it is difficult to perform low-temperature sterilization in short time periods. Increasing the output power shortens the time required for sterilization but causes the temperature to increase. To overcome this issue, we have developed a hybrid plasma system that combines a microwave torch plasma and a high-voltage mesh plasma, which allows radicals to be produced at low temperatures. Using this system, successful sterilization was shown to be possible in a period of 45 min at a temperature of 41 °C.

  9. Carbon dioxide elimination and regeneration of resources in a microwave plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Han S; Kwak, Hyoung S; Hong, Yong C

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide gas as a working gas produces a stable plasma-torch by making use of 2.45 GHz microwaves. The temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and a thermocouple device. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of a high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of a relatively low-temperature zone. The bright, whitish region is a typical torch based on plasma species where an analytical investigation indicates dissociation of a substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules, forming carbon monoxides and oxygen atoms. The emission profiles of the oxygen atoms and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. Various hydrocarbon materials may be introduced into the carbon dioxide torch, regenerating new resources and reducing carbon dioxide concentration in the torch. As an example, coal powders in the carbon dioxide torch are converted into carbon monoxide according to the reaction of CO2 + C → 2CO, reducing a substantial amount of carbon dioxide concentration in the torch. In this regards, the microwave plasma torch may be one of the best ways of converting the carbon dioxides into useful new materials. PMID:26774765

  10. Improved plasma torch for ignition and flame holding in supersonic combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, W. F.; Roby, R. J.; Stouffer, S. D.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma torch system designed for ignition and flame-holding in supersonic combustion studies has been modified, in order to decrease electrode wear and increase stability, through the incorporation of a flow swirler in the gas inlet that adds vortex-stabilization to the arc. The torch body was redesigned in order to achieve superior alignment of the electrodes; the electrode gap was made continuously adjustable, thereby allowing fine tuning during torch operation. Table operation of the improved torch has been demonstrated in pure nitrogen, eliminating the requirement of argon gas for arc stabilization.

  11. The plasma torch for the vitrification of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Peratt, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch technology provides a possible solution for radioactive material storage. During the past decade, plasma torches have been developed that produce temperatures as high as 25,000 F. Currently, the plasma torch finds application in solid waste vitrification and pyrolysis plants. Low-level radioactive waste is a topic of considerable interest for baseline technologies development, generally by means of low-temperature arc heating to characterize surrogate or low-level waste streams. High temperature plasma torches, the hottest members belonging to the family of plasma arc heaters, are efficient devices for reducing matter to its constituent elements but also the most complex in theory and operation. Characterization of the high energy density plasma instability that produces the intense heat, ranges from MHD computer modeling to stimulated Raman scattering by laser diagnostics. This paper describes the history of the plasma torch and the possible use of a 1-megawatt reverse polarity torch in a low-level radioactive waste testbed. Issues such as torch diagnostics, control, and the monitoring of radioactive gaseous, aqueous, solid, and plasma effluent streams are discussed.

  12. Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure by a Quenched Induction-Coupled Plasma Torch

    SciTech Connect

    A. Blutke; B.C. Stratton; D.R. Mikkelsen; J. Vavruska; R. Knight

    1998-01-01

    The technical feasibility of using an induction-coupled plasma (ICP) torch to synthesize ozone at atmospheric pressure is explored. Ozone concentrations up to ~250 ppm were produced using a thermal plasma reactor system based on an ICP torch operating at 2.5 MHz and ~11 kVA with an argon/oxygen mixture as the plasma-forming gas. A gaseous oxygen quench formed ozone by rapid mixing of molecular oxygen with atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The ozone concentration in the reaction chamber was measured by Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over a wide range of experimental configurations. The geometry of the quench gas flow, the quench flow velocity, and the quench flow rate played important roles in determining the ozone concentration. The ozone concentration was sensitive to the torch RF power, but was insensitive to the torch gas flow rates. These observations are interpreted within the framework of a simple model of ozone synthesis.

  13. Disintegration of water molecules in a steam-plasma torch powered by microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Kim, Jong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2007-07-15

    A pure steam torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Steam from a steam generator enters the discharge tube as a swirl gas at a temperature higher than 150 deg. C. This steam becomes a working gas and produces a stable steam torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. The temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and a thermocouple device. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of a high-temperature zone and a reddish, dimmer region of a relatively low-temperature zone. The bright, whitish region is a typical torch based on plasma species and the reddish, dimmer region is hydrogen burning in oxygen. Study of water molecule disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in steam-plasma of a microwave plasma torch at the atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of water disintegration indicates that a substantial fraction of water molecules disintegrate and form other compounds at high temperatures in the steam-plasma torch. Emission profiles of the hydroxide radical and water molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of water disintegration in the torch.

  14. Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide by Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chin; Chen, Hua-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Kai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized from titanium tetraisopropanol (TTIP) using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The visible light photocatalysis was studied by the decomposition of methylene blue. MB present in the aqueous solution could be almost completely (> 70%) decomposed within about 720 min of reaction time under visible light irradiation. This is due to the carbon-compounds on the surface of TiO2 (TiOC) corresponding to the results of FTIR. Furthermore, a decrease in recombination between the electron and hole was induced by the existence of TiOC. PMID:26353500

  15. Secondary-electrons-induced cathode plasma in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-11-19

    Results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of cathode plasma during a S-band relativistic magnetron operation and a magnetically insulated diode having an identical interelectrode gap are presented. It was shown that in the case of the magnetron operation, one obtains an earlier, more uniform plasma formation due to energetic electrons' interaction with the cathode surface and ionization of desorbed surface monolayers. No differences were detected in the cathode's plasma temperature between the magnetron and the magnetically insulated diode operation, and no anomalous fast cathode plasma expansion was observed in the magnetron at rf power up to 350 MW.

  16. Optimization of steam-vortex plasma-torch start-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new optimal method of steam-vortex plasma-torches start-up; this method completely prevents the danger of water steam condensation in the arc chamber and all undesirable consequences of it.

  17. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  18. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  19. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  20. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. I. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    The spatial structure of a microwave plasma torch driven by an azimuthally symmetric surface wave operating in a N{sub 2}-Ar mixture at atmospheric pressure is investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent theoretical model is developed to investigate the entire spatial structure of the source, including the discharge zone, sustained by the field of the surface TM{sub 00} mode, and the postdischarge plasma. Maxwell's equations, the rate balance equations for the most important excited species - vibrationally and electronically excited states, ions and nitrogen atoms N({sup 4}S) - and the Boltzmann equation for electrons are consistently solved. Model calculations of the 2D spatial distributions of species of interest such as charged particles (electrons and positive ions), N{sub 2}({Chi} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +},v) vibrationally excited molecules, N{sub 2}(A {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}) metastable molecules, and N({sup 4}S) ground state atoms are presented and discussed.

  1. Operating characteristics of a hydrogen-argon plasma torch for supersonic combustion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbi, E.; Mahan, J. R.; O'Brien, W. F.; Wagner, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    The residence time of the combustible mixture in the combustion chamber of a scramjet engine is much less than the time normally required for complete combustion. Hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels require an ignition source under conditions typically found in a scramjet combustor. Analytical studies indicate that the presence of hydrogen atoms should greatly reduce the ignition delay in this environment. Because hydrogen plasmas are prolific sources of hydrogen atoms, a low-power, uncooled hydrogen plasma torch has been built and tested to evaluate its potential as a possible flame holder for supersonic combustion. The torch was found to be unstable when operated on pure hydrogen; however, stable operation could be obtained by using argon as a body gas and mixing in the desired amount of hydrogen. The stability limits of the torch are delineated and its electrical and thermal behavior documented. An average torch thermal efficiency of around 88 percent is demonstrated.

  2. Operating characteristics of a hydrogen-argon plasma torch for supersonic combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barbi, E.; Mahan, J.R.; O'brien, W.F.; Wagner, T.C.

    1989-04-01

    The residence time of the combustible mixture in the combustion chamber of a scramjet engine is much less than the time normally required for complete combustion. Hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels require an ignition source under conditions typically found in a scramjet combustor. Analytical studies indicate that the presence of hydrogen atoms should greatly reduce the ignition delay in this environment. Because hydrogen plasmas are prolific sources of hydrogen atoms, a low-power, uncooled hydrogen plasma torch has been built and tested to evaluate its potential as a possible flame holder for supersonic combustion. The torch was found to be unstable when operated on pure hydrogen; however, stable operation could be obtained by using argon as a body gas and mixing in the desired amount of hydrogen. The stability limits of the torch are delineated and its electrical and thermal behavior documented. An average torch thermal efficiency of around 88 percent is demonstrated. 10 references.

  3. Parametric Study of Plasma Torch Operation Using a MHD Model Coupling the Arc and Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaya, M.; Chazelas, C.; Vardelle, A.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of the electromagnetic and heat transfer phenomena in a non-transferred arc plasma torch is generally based on a current density profile and a temperature imposed on the cathode surface. However, it is not possible to observe the current density profile experimentally and so the computations are grounded on an estimation of current distribution at cathode tip. To eliminate this boundary condition and be able to predict the arc dynamics in the plasma torch, the cathode was included in the computational domain, the arc current was imposed on the rear surface of the cathode, and the electromagnetism and energy conservation equations for the fluid and the electrode were coupled and solved. The solution of this system of equations was implemented in a CFD computer code to model various plasma torch operating conditions. The model predictions for various arc currents were consistent and indicated that such a model could be applied with confidence to plasma torches of different geometries, such as cascaded-anode plasma torches.

  4. On the atomic state densities of plasmas produced by the ``torche à injection axiale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, J.; Vos, H. P. C.; van der Mullen, J. A. M.; Timmermans, E. A. H.

    1996-04-01

    The atomic state densities of helium and argon plasmas produced by the microwave driven plasma torch called the "torche à injection axiale" are presented. They are obtained by absolute line intensity measurements of the excited states and by applying the ideal gas law to the ground state. It will be shown that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) does not obey the Saha-Boltzmann law: the ASDF cannot be described by one temperature. From the shape of the ASDF it can be concluded that the plasma is ionising. By extrapolating the measured state densities towards the ionisation limit, a minimum value of the electron density can be determined.

  5. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters.

    PubMed

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators - a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  6. Arc-Cathode Coupling in the Modeling of a Conventional DC Plasma Spray Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaya, M.; Chazelas, C.; Mariaux, G.; Vardelle, A.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma torch is the basis of the plasma spray process and understanding of the electric arc dynamics within the plasma torch is necessary for better control of torch and process instabilities. Numerical simulation is a useful tool for investigating the effect of the torch geometry and operating parameters on the electric arc characteristics provided that the model of arc dynamics is reliable and the boundary conditions of the computational domain are well founded. However, such a model should also address the intricate transient and 3D interactions between the electrically conducting fluid and electromagnetic, thermal, and acoustics phenomena. Especially, the description of the electrode regions where the electric arc connects with solid material is an important part of a realistic model of the plasma torch operation as the properties of electric arcs at atmospheric pressure depend not only on the arc plasma medium, but also on the electrodes. This paper describes the 3D and time-dependent numerical simulation of a plasma arc and is focused on the cathode boundary conditions. This model was used to investigate the differences in arc characteristics when the cathode is included into the numerical domain and coupled with the arc. The magnetic and thermal coupling between the cathode and arc made it possible to get rid of the current density boundary condition at the cathode tip that is delicate to predetermine. It also allowed a better prediction of the cathode flow jet generated by the pumping action induced by the interaction of the self-magnetic field with the electric current and so it allowed a better description of the dynamics of arc. It should be a necessary step in the development of a fully predictive model of DC plasma torch operation.

  7. Laser Doppler velocity measurements in a transferred-arc plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, O.P.; Okhuysen, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is a nonintrusive method of measuring velocity. The measurement volume formed by the intersection of the two laser beams is compact, thus the method provides excellent spatial resolution. Furthermore, aside from the requirement that the flow contain scattering particles, the method is nonintrusive. Thus, no probe disturbs the flow and measurements can be made in extremely high temperature and hostile environments. Here, the LDV technique has been used to map the velocity field in the plasma jet issuing from a transferred-arc, reverse polarity plasma torch. This gas flow field is important in understanding the physics of the plasma torch. The torch was operated with nitrogen at a fixed distance of 5 inches from the graphite billet. Velocity measurements were made for combinations of current at 125 and 175 A and pressure at 22 and 55 psig. Results are presented for the high current/high pressure condition. Since the test procedure involves reestablishing the same flow conditions after swapping graphite billets, it is instructive to see how closely the torch operating variables were reproduced. The average current varied from 175.2 to 175.8 A over the eight separate time periods. The nitrogen supply pressure varied from 52.5 to 53.9 psi. The torch voltage drop ranged from 430.6 to 436.1 V, and the nitrogen flow rate from 4.8 to 5.4 scfm.

  8. Abatement of CF4 by atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong C.; Uhm, Han S.

    2003-08-01

    An atmospheric microwave plasma torch is presented for post-pump destruction of perfluorocompound gases (PFCs), which are used widely in the semiconductor industry and are emitted with nitrogen gas for vacuum pump purges. Discharges of the microwave plasma torch are well suited for abatement of PFC contaminants discharged at a typical flow rate. The abatement was carried out using oxygen or air as additive gases. Analytical results are systematically compared to quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) data in the laboratory. Destruction and removal efficiency of more than 99% in FTIR data was achieved for carbon tetrafluoride.

  9. Measurement of the electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qing; Zhang Guixin; Wang Liming; Wang Xinxin; Wang Shumin; Chen Yan

    2009-11-16

    The electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure was measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The electron density is on the order of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}, one order higher than that deduced from the Stark broadening of spectral lines, and increases with the increase in the microwave power. The spatial distribution of the electron density was obtained. The highest electron density locates at the symmetrical axis of the plasma torch and decreases radially. It was found that the electron density fluctuates within a range of 0.3 with the time under the same experimental conditions.

  10. Establishing isokinetic flow for a plasma torch exhaust gas diagnostic for a plasma hearth furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, B.R.

    1996-05-01

    Real time monitoring of toxic metallic effluents in confined gas streams can be accomplished through use of Microwave Induced Plasmas to perform atomic emission spectroscopy, For this diagnostic to be viable it is necessary that it sample from the flowstream of interest in an isokinetic manner. A method of isokinetic sampling was established for this device for use in the exhaust system of a plasma hearth vitrification furnace. The flow and entrained particulate environment were simulated in the laboratory setting using a variable flow duct of the same dimensions (8-inch diameter, schedule 40) as that in the field and was loaded with similar particulate (less than 10 {mu}m in diameter) of lake bed soil typically used in the vitrification process. The flow from the furnace was assumed to be straight flow. To reproduce this effect a flow straightener was installed in the device. An isokinetic sampling train was designed to include the plasma torch, with microwave power input operating at 2.45 GHz, to match local freestream velocities between 800 and 2400 ft/sec. The isokinetic sampling system worked as planned and the plasma torch had no difficulty operating at the required flowrates. Simulation of the particulate suspension was also successful. Steady particle feeds were maintained over long periods of time and the plasma diagnostic responded as expected.

  11. Ordering of Fine Particles in a Planar Magnetron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Totsuji, H.; Ishihara, O.; Sato, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Adachi, S.

    2008-09-07

    Fine particles injected in a planar magnetron were pushed upward by diffusible plasma, leading to being suspended by the force balance with the gravity and forming three-dimensional structures on the two-dimensional structure formed by particle strings.

  12. Ion Clouds in the Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch: A Closer Look through Computations.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Maryam; Lindner, Helmut; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-08-16

    We have computationally investigated the introduction of copper elemental particles in an inductively coupled plasma torch connected to a sampling cone, including for the first time the ionization of the sample. The sample is inserted as liquid particles, which are followed inside the entire torch, i.e., from the injector inlet up to the ionization and reaching the sampler. The spatial position of the ion clouds inside the torch as well as detailed information on the copper species fluxes at the position of the sampler orifice and the exhausts of the torch are provided. The effect of on- and off-axis injection is studied. We clearly show that the ion clouds of on-axis injected material are located closer to the sampler with less radial diffusion. This guarantees a higher transport efficiency through the sampler cone. Moreover, our model reveals the optimum ranges of applied power and flow rates, which ensure the proper position of ion clouds inside the torch, i.e., close enough to the sampler to increase the fraction that can enter the mass spectrometer and with minimum loss of material toward the exhausts as well as a sufficiently high plasma temperature for efficient ionization. PMID:27457191

  13. Some numerical simulation results of swirling flow in d.c. plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipini, C. L.; Pimenta, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    We present and discuss some results of numerical simulation of swirling flow in d.c. plasma torch, obtained with a two-dimensional mathematical model (MHD model) which was developed to simulate the phenomena related to the interaction between the swirling flow and the electric arc in a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The model was implemented in a computer code based on the Finite Volume Method (FVM) to enable the numerical solution of the governing equations. For the study, cases were simulated with different operating conditions (gas flow rate; swirl number). Some obtained results were compared to the literature and have proved themselves to be in good agreement in most part of computational domain regions. The numerical simulations performed with the computer code enabled the study of the behaviour of the flow in the plasma torch and also study the effects of different swirl numbers on temperature and axial velocity of the plasma flow. The results demonstrated that the developed model is suitable to obtain a better understanding of the involved phenomena and also for the development and optimization of plasma torches.

  14. Modeling of the coal gasification processes in a hybrid plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, I.B.; Serbin, S.I.

    2007-12-15

    The major advantages of plasma treatment systems are cost effectiveness and technical efficiency. A new efficient electrodeless 1-MW hybrid plasma torch for waste disposal and coal gasification is proposed. This product merges several solutions such as the known inductive-type plasma torch, innovative reverse-vortex (RV) reactor and the recently developed nonequilibrium plasma pilot and plasma chemical reactor. With the use of the computational-fluid-dynamics-computational method, preliminary 3-D calculations of heat exchange in a 1-MW plasma generator operating with direct vortex and RV have been conducted at the air flow rate of 100 g/s. For the investigated mode and designed parameters, reduction of the total wall heat transfer for the reverse scheme is about 65 kW, which corresponds to an increase of the plasma generator efficiency by approximately 6.5%. This new hybrid plasma torch operates as a multimode, high power plasma system with a wide range of plasma feedstock gases and turn down ratio, and offers convenient and simultaneous feeding of several additional reagents into the discharge zone.

  15. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  16. Complex utilization of snf processing wastes in air plasma of high-frequency torch discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karengin, A. G.; Karengin, A. A.; Podgornaya, O. D.; Shlotgauer, E. E.

    2014-10-01

    We present results of complex spent nuclear fuel wastes utilization process in air plasma of high-frequency torch discharge in form of dispersed water-organic compositions. We demonstrate the possibility to apply magnetic separation for effective extraction of obtained dispersed solid products including magnetic iron oxide from water suspension.

  17. Development and evaluation of a 1 kW plasma torch ignitor for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; Obrien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A low power, uncooled plasma torch was tested in combination with a new injector design to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. Both semifree jet and ducted tests were conducted in a Mach 2 flow under simulated scramjet combustor conditions at 1 atmosphere static pressure and total temperatures between 1400 and 2800 R. The injector design incorporates a small upstream pilot fuel flow, a step for recirculation, and primary fuel injectors downstream of the recirculation region. Using a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hydrogen and argon, good performance at a simulated flight Mach number of 3.7 is found for a 1-kW torch which is located in the recirculation zone and fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors. Spectroscopic measurements verified the presence of hydrogen atoms in the torch exhaust, and it is suggested that hydrogen atoms are responsible for the ignition.

  18. Analytical interpretation of arc instabilities in a DC plasma spray torch: the role of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    Arc instabilities in a plasma spray torch are investigated experimentally and theoretically thanks to a linear simplified analytical model. The different parameters that determine the useful properties of the plasma jet at the torch exit, such as specific enthalpy and speed, but also pressure inside the torch and time variations of the flow rate are studied. The work is particularly focused on the link between the recorded arc voltage and the pressure in the cathode cavity. A frequency analysis of the recorded voltage and pressure allows the separation of different contributions following their spectral characteristics and highlights a resonance effect due to Helmholtz oscillations; these oscillations are responsible for the large amplitude fluctuations of all the parameters investigated. The influence of heat transfer, friction forces and residence time of the plasma in the nozzle are taken into account, thanks to different characteristics’ times. The volume of the cathode cavity in which the cold gas is stored before entering the arc region appears to be of prime importance for the dynamics of instabilities, particularly for the non-intuitive effect that induces flow-rate fluctuations in spite of the fact that the torch is fed at a constant flow rate.

  19. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s{sup -1} close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s{sup -1} close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  20. Modelling of an inductively coupled plasma torch with argon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahouh, Hanene; Rebiai, Saida; Rochette, David; Vacher, Damien; Dudeck, Michel

    2014-05-01

    A fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the electromagnetic field, fluid flow and heat transfer in an inductively coupled plasma torch working at atmospheric pressure for argon plasma. The numerical simulation is carried out by using the finite element method based on COMSOL software. The two-dimensional profiles of the electric field, temperature, velocity and charged particle densities are demonstrated inside the discharge region. These numerical results are obtained for a fixed flow rate, frequency and electric power.

  1. Effect of plasma suppression additives on electrodynamic characteristics of the torch discharge burning in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyaev, D.; Lutsenko, Yu; Boretsky, E.

    2016-06-01

    The paper shows the results of measurements of wave number of electromagnetic wave, which supports burning of high-frequency torch discharge in the mixture of air with water vapor and carbon dioxide. The nonmonotonic dependence of attenuation factor of electromagnetic waves is set on a concentration of water vapor. It is shown that the attenuation degree of electromagnetic field in the plasma with water vapor significantly exceeds the attenuation degree of electromagnetic field in the plasma with carbon dioxide.

  2. Evaluation of Rocket Research Company's Plasma Torch for NOx Reduction Studies CRADA PC93-001, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) formerly known as The Fuel Evaluation Facility was used from March 29 to April 17, 1993 for the sole purpose of evaluating the Rocket Research (RR) plasma torch and testing its effectiveness in reducing NO{sub x} emissions from coal flames. Two spare facility convective sections were modified to accept the torch and to allow for effective mixing in the convective section chambers. The torch was placed into the fourth convective section and a 1-inch fused silica bluff body was placed immediately upstream of the torch to further enhance the mixing at the torch injection location. The gases anticipated for use during testing included ammonia (NH{sub 3}) , hydrogen (H{sub 2}) , carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Ammonia and hydrogen were planned as the gases which would be introduced through the torch directly while CO and CH{sub 4} would be used only in the torch secondary injection ring. The intent was to minimize any potential fouling problems with the carbon containing gases. Actual test conditions did not allow evaluation of the CO or the CH{sub 4} due to continued intermittent operation of the Rocket Research plasma torch. The torch had not been previously tested under conditions similar to the high temperature condition of the CERF and consequently it was found that the torch would not operate effectively under the test conditions. The torch using NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} as primary and secondary gases has evaluated for short periods of time.

  3. Development of a 100 kW plasma torch for plasma assisted combustion of low heating value fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takali, S.; Fabry, F.; Rohani, V.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2014-11-01

    Most thermal power plants need an auxiliary power source to (i) heat-up the boiler during start up phases before reaching autonomy power and (ii) sustain combustion at low load. This supplementary power is commonly provided with high LHV fossil fuel burners which increases operational expenses and disables the use of anti-pollutant filters. A Promising alternative is under development and consists in high temperature plasma assisted AC electro-burners. In this paper, the development of a new 100 kW three phase plasma torch with graphite electrodes is detailed. This plasma torch is working at atmospheric pressure with air as plasma gas and has three-phase power supply and working at 680 Hz. The nominal air flow rate is 60 Nm3.h-1 and the outlet gas temperature is above 2 500 K. At the beginning, graphite electrodes erosion by oxidizing medium was studied and controlling parameters were identified through parametric set of experiments and tuned for optimal electrodes life time. Then, a new 3-phase plasma torch design was modelled and simulated on ANSYS platform. The characteristics of the plasma flow and its interaction with the environing elements of the torch are detailed hereafter.

  4. Measurements of solvent destruction efficiency using a low-frequency plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Gahl, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been constructed to determine the feasibility of its use to dispose of hazardous solvent waste such as acetone, trichloroethane and trichloroethylene. The plasma jet is generated using argon and a commercial AC/DC welding supply. The system is operated using torch currents ranging from 50--150 Amperes and solvent flow rates ranging from 0-500 ml/hr. Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor are added to alter the thermal chemistry occurring in the reaction chamber. The daughter products consist primarily of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub x}H{sub y} radicals. The relative amounts of the reaction byproducts are monitored using a residual gas analyzer. Results thus far have demonstrated over 99% destruction of acetone at a flow rate of 100 ml/hr using a torch current of 100 Amperes. This presentation will include data on the destruction efficiency of hazardous solvents as a function of solvent flow rate, torch current and reactive gas flow rate.

  5. Pressure and arc voltage coupling in dc plasma torches: Identification and extraction of oscillation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-08-15

    This work is devoted to the instabilities occurring in a plasma torch, such as those found in plasma spraying. These instabilities are responsible for a lack of reproducibility of coatings properties, especially in the case of suspension plasma spraying that is an innovative way to obtain thin coatings of submicron-sized particles. Strong Helmholtz oscillations are highlighted in the plasma flow and it is demonstrated that they overlap with different acoustic modes in addition with the more commonly admitted ''restrike'' mode, the later being due to rearcing events in the arc region. The instabilities occur in the arc voltage but it is experimentally shown in this paper that the pressure within the torch body presents the same kind of instabilities. Besides, a numerical filtering technique has been adapted to isolate the different instability components. The operating parameters of the plasma torch were varied in order to highlight their influence on the amplitude of the different modes, both for the arc voltage and the pressure.

  6. Multiple diagnostics in a high-pressure hydrogen microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.; Mullen, J. J. A. M. van der; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present an experimental study of a hydrogen plasma produced by a microwave axial injection torch, launching the plasma in a helium-filled chamber. Three different diagnostic methods have been used to obtain the electron density and temperature as follows: The Stark intersection method of Balmer spectral lines (already tested in argon and helium plasmas); the modified Boltzmann-plot showing that the plasma is far from the local thermodynamic equilibrium but ruled by the excitation-saturation balance; and a study by the disturbed bilateral relations theory. All of these diagnostic techniques show a good agreement.

  7. Spectroscopic diagnosis of an atmospheric-pressure waveguide-based microwave N2-Ar plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shou-Zhe; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric-pressure N2-Ar plasma is investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopic diagnosis concerning the variation of its fundamental parameters, electron density and plasma temperature, and concentrations of ionized molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and excited argon with the tuning variables, such as the input power and the ratio of N2 in N2-Ar mixture gas, in the discharge region of the plasma torch. Moreover, qualitative discussions are delivered with respect to the mechanisms for nitrogen dissociation and influence of the Ar component on the N2 plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Numerical analysis of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge for radioactive waste treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Min-Ho; Seo, Jun-Ho; Yang, O.-Bong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a numerical analysis is carried out in order to investigate the effects of the electrode configuration and the operation conditions on the arc flow structure and the performance of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. From the numerical results, a swirl injection of plasma gas and a hollowed cathode with a convergent entrance are found to help control the recirculation directions of backflows and the attachment position of the anode spot in the rear electrode. For example, the anode spot is observed to be moved to the central point of the blocked side in the rear electrode (the anode) when the plasma-forming gases are injected with a swirl. This attachment point is predicted to act as a stable anode spot for the transferred operation of the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. In addition, the torch performance is analyzed for operation variables, such as the arc current and the gas flow rates. Similar to that of a conventional hollow electrode plasma torch, the scale-up of input power is accompanied by increases in the arc current and the gas flow rate while increasing the arc current brings about a deterioration in the torch efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the exit enthalpy to the input power. On the other hand, the temperature profiles at the torch's exit plane show relatively negligible differences for various arc currents and gas flow rates due to the cathode spot being close to the torch exit. Based on these features, we expect the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge to be a promising tool for treating radioactive wastes in a single step, both as a non-transferred-type plasma incinerator for combustibles and as a transferred-type arc-melter for non-combustibles.

  9. Study of jet fluctuations in DC plasma torch using high speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nirupama; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Joshi, N. K.; Das, A. K.

    2010-02-01

    The power supplies used for the plasma torches are usually SCR controlled and have a large ripple factor. This is due to the fact that the currents in the torch are of the order of hundreds of amperes which prohibit effective filtering of the ripple. The voltage and current vary as per the ripple in the power supply and causes plasma jet to fluctuate. To record these fluctuations, the jet coming out from a D.C. plasma torch operating at atmospheric pressure was imaged using high speed camera at the rate of 3000 frame per second. Light emitted from a well defined zone in the plume was collected using an optical fibre and a Photo Multiplier Tube. Current, voltage and PMT signals were recorded simultaneously using a digital storage oscilloscope (DSO). The fast camera recorded the images for 25 ms and the starting pulse from the camera was used to trigger the DSO for recording voltage, current and optical signals. Each image of the plume recorded by the fast camera was correlated with the magnitude of the instantaneous voltage, current and optical signal. It was observed that the luminosity and length of the plume varies as per the product of instantaneous voltage and current i.e. electrical power fed to plasma torch. The experimental runs were taken with different gas flow rates and electrical powers. The images were analyzed using image processing software and constant intensity contours of images were determined. Further analysis of the images can provide a great deal of information about dynamics of the jet.

  10. Plasma torch testing for thermostructural evaluation of rocket motor nozzle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Andrew S.; Bunker, Robert C.; Lawrence, Tim

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents data from the thermostructural testing of tape-wrapped carbon phenolic. This work has been performed with the use of a plasma torch and loading device in an effort to study the anomalous erosion characteristicfs of that seen in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle STS-8A. Testing is conducted in an effort to determine conditions or parameters involved in this mode of failure.

  11. Dynamic behaviour of dc double anode plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, X.; Chéron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Cen, K. F.

    2007-07-01

    An original dc double anode plasma torch which provides a long-time and highly stable atmospheric plasma jet has been devised for the purpose of hazardous waste treatment. The arc fluctuations and dynamic behaviour of the argon and argon-nitrogen plasma jets under different operating conditions have been investigated by means of classical tools, such as the statistic method, fast Fourier transform (FFT) and correlation analysis. In our experiments, the takeover mode is identified as the fluctuation characteristic of the argon plasma jet while the restrike mode is typical in the argon-nitrogen plasma dynamic behaviour. In the case of pure argon, the FFT and correlation calculation results of electrical signals exhibit the only characteristic frequency of 150 Hz, which originates from the torch power and is independent of any change in the operating conditions. It indicates that the nature of fluctuations in an argon plasma jet is mainly induced by the undulation of the tri-phase rectified power supply. In contrast, besides the same low frequency bulk fluctuation, the dynamic behaviour of the argon-nitrogen plasma jet at high frequency (4.1 kHz) is ascribed to the rapid motion of both arc roots on the anode surface. In addition, it is found that each arc root attachment is rather diffused than located at a fixed position on the anode wall in the argon plasma jet, while constricted arc roots occur when nitrogen is added into argon as the plasma working gas.

  12. Baseline geoenvironmental experiments for in-situ soil transformation by plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, J.R.; Mayne, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The advent of the nontransferred plasma arc torch has implicated a range of in-situ geoenvironmental applications that can revolutionize methods of ground modification and field remediation of contaminated sites. With reverse polarity nontransferred arc type plasma torches, temperatures of 4,000 C to 7,000 C can be directed at specific targets of contaminated soil or waste. At these extreme temperatures, all organic materials within the soil undergo pyrolysis, while the bulk composition is transformed into a magma that subsequently cools to form a vitrified mass resembling volcanic obsidian or a dense partially crystalline material resembling microcrystalline igneous rock. Simulations of in-situ transformation of soil have been conducted using both 100-kW and 240-kW torches to alter clay, silty sand, and sand in chamber tests. Although these materials are primarily composed of silica and alumina oxides having melting temperatures of 1,100 C to 1,600 C, the formation of a spheroidal magma core occurred within the first five minutes of exposure to the plasma flame. Experiments were conducted to quantify the improved engineering properties that occur after transformation and to demonstrate the relative effects of power level, water content, and soil type on the size and strength of the altered material. The ongoing research also serves as a baseline study for further experimentation that will focus on the in-situ remediation of soils with varied contaminants.

  13. Effects of coil location and injection flow rate in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D.; Apelian, D.; Farouk, B.

    1985-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed to investigate the effects of central carrier gas flow rate and coil location in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch. Solution algorithm is based on the primitive variable formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and includes a pseudo two-dimensional electromagnetic field model. Computational results have shown that with increasing carrier gas flow rate, the plasma plume is penetrated and the back flow due to the magnetic pumping effects is diminished. This facilitates the delivery of powder particles into the discharge region. However, the plasma plume is also disturbed significantly thus enhancing power loss.

  14. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  15. Modeling of gas flow in the cylindrical channels of high-voltage plasma torches with rod electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovskoy, A. M.; Popov, S. D.; Surov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    The article is devoted to the calculation of gas dynamic parameters of gas flow in various areas of low-temperature plasma generator, therefore, target area's grid was built for the simulation of plasma gas flow in channels of studied high-voltage AC plasma torches and calculations of three-dimensional gas flow was made using GAMBIT and FLUENT soft-ware and Spalart-Allmares turbulence model, air flow was simulated in the tangential feed's areas, in the cylindrical channel, in the tapering nozzle chamber and in the mixing chamber of plasma torches and outside (in the environment); thus, 3D-modelling of the cold plasma-forming gas flow was performed in cylindrical channels of studied high-voltage AC plasma torches with rod electrodes for the first time.

  16. Current-voltage characteristics of hydrogen DC plasma torches with different sizes in an external axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jie; Wen, Guang-Dong; Su, Bao-Gen; Yang, Yi-Wen; Ren, Qi-Long

    2015-06-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of hydrogen DC plasma torches with different sizes in an external axial magnetic field under atmospheric pressure are reported. Three anodes with different diameters are adopted in a 50-kW torch: 25 mm, 30 mm, and 35 mm, respectively. Two different diameters of anodes, that is, 100 mm and 130 mm, are adopted in a 1-MW plasma torch. The arc voltage shows a negative trend with the increase of arc current under the operating regimes. On the contrary, arc voltage shows a positive trend as the flow rate of carrier gas increases, and a similar trend is found with increasing the external magnetic flux density. A similarity formula is constructed to correlate the experimental data of the torches mentioned above. Linear fitting shows that the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.9958. Project supported by the Special Fund for Basic Scientific Research of Central Colleges, China (Grant No. 2012FZA4023).

  17. Effect of current connection to the anode nozzle on plasma torch efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Collares, M.P.; Pfender, E.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the influence of the location of the electric power connection to the anode nozzle on the efficiency of dc plasma torches. The dc plasma torch used in these experiments offers the flexibility to work with different anode geometries and the possibility of connecting the electrical power to the anode at two different locations. For each set of experiments, the controllable parameters such as total gas flow rate, gas composition, and electric current were kept constant, changing only the location of the electrical connection to the anode nozzle. The efficiency of the torch, derived from a conventional energy balance, shows a significant change as the location of the electrical connection to the anode nozzle is changed. The measured mean voltage as well as the amplitude of the voltage fluctuations were also affected by the location of the electrical connection to the anode nozzle. An explanation for the arc behavior is given, based on an analysis of the forces acting on the anode arc column and their influence on the variation of the arc column length. Experimental data are in good agreement with analytical predictions.

  18. Destruction of acetone using a small-scale arcjet plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.R.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Gahl, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been constructed to determine the feasibility of its use to dispose of hazardous solvent wastes. The system has been studied using acetone as a test compound. The plasma jet is generated using argon and a commercial AC/DC welding supply. The system is operated using torch currents ranging from 50 to 200 A and solvent flow rates in the range 0--200 ml/h. Oxygen is added to alter the chemistry occurring in the reaction chamber. The destruction of acetone and the relative amounts of the reaction by-products are monitored using a residual gas analyzer. The pyrolysis products consist primarily of CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and other C{sub x}H{sub y} radicals when no oxygen is added to the system. By adding oxygen to the system, thermal oxidation processes occur that increase the production of CO{sub 2} and significantly decrease the amount of acetone in the exhaust gases. This paper includes data on the destruction efficiency of acetone as a function of solvent flow rate, torch power, argon flow rate and oxygen injection rate. The results indicate that greater than 99% destruction efficiency of acetone can be achieved with addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture using an arcjet current of 75 A.

  19. SOLUTION NEBULIZATION OF AQUEOUS SAMPLES INTO THE TUBULAR-ELECTRODE TORCH CAPACITATIVELY-COUPLED MICROWAVE PLASMA (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The work shows the feasibility of using nebulization for introduction of aqueous samples into the tubular-torch capacitatively-coupled microwave plasma (CMP). Previously, solid electrodes were used with this type of plasma, in which analyte carrier and plasma support gases are pr...

  20. Effect of a finely dispersed material fed into the channel of a plasma torch on its thermophysical and electrophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. V.; Komadynko, S. E.; Kostylev, A. G.; Panevin, I. G.

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the sprayed material on the plasma jet parameters of a plasma torch during the deposition of plasma sprayed coatings. The material used in the experiments was Al2O3 powder with fractions of 40-100 microns. The effect of the discharge current and flow rate on the electrophysical characteristics and efficiency of the plasma torch is determined for different channel lengths. Changes in temperature due to the presence of the powder are particularly noticeable in the central part of the jet, where the coldest solid phase is present. The absolute decrease in temperature is only slight.

  1. Characterization of Plasma Jet in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of YSZ Using a <80 kW Shrouded Torch Based on Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qing-Yu; Peng, Xiao-Zhuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-08-01

    During plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, evaporation of the YSZ powder is essential, but quite difficult when using a commercial <80 kW plasma torch. In this study, a shrouded plasma torch was examined to improve the YSZ evaporation. The plasma characteristics were diagnosed using optical emission spectroscopy. Results showed that the electron number density in the plasma jet was maintained at an order of magnitude of 1014 cm-3, indicating local thermal equilibrium of the plasma jet. Compared with a conventional torch, the shrouded torch resulted in much higher plasma temperature and much lower electron number density. With the shrouded torch, more energy of the plasma was transferred to the YSZ material, leading to more evaporation of the YSZ powder and thereby a much higher deposition rate of the YSZ coating. These results show that use of a shrouded torch is a simple and effective approach to improve the evaporation of feedstock material during PS-PVD.

  2. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  3. Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Tarasenko, O.; Chang, J.; Popovic, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Fan, H. W.; Scott, A.; Lahiani, M.; Alusta, P.; Drake, J. D.; Nikolic, M.

    2009-11-01

    The effectiveness and mechanism of a low temperature air plasma torch in clotting blood are explored. Both blood droplets and smeared blood samples were used in the tests. The treated droplet samples reveal how blood clotting depends on the distance at which the torch operated, and for how long the droplets have been exposed to the torch. Microscopy and cell count of smeared blood samples shed light on dependencies of erythrocyte and platelet counts on torch distance and exposure time. With an increase of torch distance, the platelet count of treated blood samples increases but is less than that of the control. The flux of reactive atomic oxygen (RAO) and the degree of blood clotting decreased. With an increase of exposure time, platelet count of treated samples decreased, while the degree of clot increased. The correlation among these dependencies and published data support a blood clotting mechanism that RAO as well as other likely reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma torch activate erythrocyte-platelets interactions and induces blood coagulation.

  4. Role of external magnetic field and current closure in the force balance mechanism of a magnetically stabilized plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Ravi; Goyal, Vidhi

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations on the role of applied external magnetic field and return current closure in the force balance mechanism of a plasma torch are reported. The plasma torch is of low power and has wall, gas and magnetic stabilization mechanisms incorporated in it. Gas flow is divided into two parts: axial-central and peripheral-shroud, applied magnetic field is axial and return current is co-axial. Results indicate that application of large external magnetic field gives rise to not only J x B force but also, coupled with gas flow, to a new drag-cum-centrifugal force that acts on the plasma arc root and column. The magnetic field also plays a role in the return current closure dynamics and thus in the overall force balance mechanism. This in turn affects the electro-thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Detailed experimental results, analytical calculations and physical model representing the processes will be presented and discussed.

  5. Influence of internal cold gas flow and of nozzle contour on spray properties of an atmospheric plasma spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, R.H.; Borck, V.; Mayr, W.; Landes, K.; Reusch, A.

    1995-12-31

    With an automated Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) equipment trajectories, distributions and velocities of spray particles were measured operating a plasma spray torch under atmospheric pressure conditions. For this purpose a standard APS torch (PT F4) was used, applying different gas distribution rings and nozzle modifications to study the influence of internal plasma gas flow and of plasma jet formation. The main results are: (1) An inclined injection of the plasma cold gas results in a considerable spin of the plasma jet and a significant deviation of the particle trajectories around the plasma jet center. (2) With a plasma cold gas injection parallel to the torch axis no spin is observable, but torch voltage and the plasma jet enthalpy show considerably diminished values. (3) The flow of injected powder may be split up, if it is injected too fast. (4) In comparison with cylindrical nozzles, specially developed nozzles with a controlled expanding contour, lead to broader temperature profiles across the plasma jet and hence to better melting conditions for the particles.

  6. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by high current divergent anode-channel plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. H.; Isakaev, E. Kh; Shavelkina, M. B.; Shatalova, T. B.

    2014-11-01

    In this study we propose the high-performance technology to produce carbon nanotubes (CNT) in plasma jet reactor by means of a direct current plasma torch. This technology provides excellent opportunities to investigate a direct evaporation of materials and their subsequent condensation on the carbon surface. Experiments were carried out at the electric power of a plasma torch up to 30 kW. Helium and argon served as plasma gases. CNT synthesis at pyrolysis of soot was catalyzed by the metal disperse powders of Ni, Co, Y2O3. We applied x-ray diffraction and electronic microscopy to investigate the structure of obtained products. Also we utilize the thermogravimetric analysis to determine the phase structure of carbon nanomaterials. Using available experimental data we were able to sequentially scale the production process of CNT of desirable space structure. Finally we established that structural and morphological properties of CNT produced at evaporation of soot in the presence of high- percentage combined catalysts depend upon the catalyst structure.

  7. Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su

    2006-03-15

    An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N{sub 2}, NF{sub 3}, or SF{sub 6}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4 kW. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6 lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4 kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

  8. Aerosol measurements from plasma torch cuts on stainless steel, carbon steel, and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Brodrick, C.J.; Crawford, S.; Nasiatka, J.; Pierucci, K.; Reyes, V.; Sambrook, J.; Wrobel, S.; Yeary, J.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to quantify aerosol particle size and generation rates produced by a plasma torch whencutting stainless steel, carbon steel and aluminum. the plasma torch is a common cutting tool used in the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Eventually, other cutting tools will be characterized and the information will be compiled in a user guide to aid in theplanning of both D&D and other cutting operations. The data will be taken from controlled laboratory experiments on uncontaminated metals and field samples taken during D&D operations at ANL nuclear facilities. The plasma torch data was collected from laboratory cutting tests conducted inside of a closed, filtered chamber. The particle size distributions were determined by isokinetically sampling the exhaust duct using a cascade impactor. Cuts on different thicknesses showed there was no observable dependence of the aerosol quantity produced as a function of material thickness for carbon steel. However, data for both stainless steel and aluminum revealed that the aerosol mass produced for these materials appear to have some dependance on thickness, with thinner materials producing tmore aerosols. The results of the laboratory cutting tests show that most measured particle size distributions are bimodal with one mode at about 0.2 {mu}m and the other at about 10 {mu}m. The average Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameters (MMAD`s) for these tests are 0.36 {+-}0.08 {mu}m for stainless steel, 0.48 {+-}0.17{mu}m for aluminum and 0.52{+-}0.12 {mu}m for carbon steel.

  9. Thermal inequilibrium of atmospheric helium microwave plasma produced by an axial injection torch

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.; Rodero, A.; Quintero, M.C.; Sola, A.; Gamero, A.; Ortega, D.

    2005-11-01

    The population density of several excited states has been obtained spectroscopically in a helium plasma sustained by a torch device at atmospheric pressure as a function of the radius in the plasma for different conditions of microwave power and plasma gas flow. The ground-state atom density is determined from the gas temperature, which is deduced from the rotational temperature of the molecular nitrogen ions. The population distribution is fitted to the theoretical results of a collisional-radiative model that includes particle transport. A large deviation of the measured populations is found from the theoretical populations for local thermodynamic equilibrium. The plasma at any radial position is far from local thermodynamic equilibrium; the equilibrium deviation parameter of the ground state is larger than 10 000. The equilibrium deviation parameters of the measured excited-state populations obey the theoretical p{sub k}{sup -6} exponential law.

  10. Numerical analysis on plasma characteristics of high power plasma torch of hollow electrode type for waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, M.; Kang, K.D.; Hong, S.H.

    1997-12-31

    In this study, the plasma characteristics of a high power nontransferred plasma torch with hollow electrodes are investigated in the atmospheric condition by analyzing the distributions of plasma temperature, velocity and current density. Typical assumptions of steady state, axisymmetry, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and optically thin plasma are adopted in a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling of thermal plasma with a special treatment of arc spot positions. A control volume method and the modified SIMPLER algorithm are used for solving the governing equations numerically, i.e., conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy along with the equations describing the {Kappa}-{var_epsilon} model for turbulence and the current continuity for arc discharge. The distributions of plasma temperature, velocity, and current density are calculated in various operation conditions such as gas species, gas flowrate, input current, and electrode geometry. The calculated results of plasma characteristics in various operations can be useful to determine the design parameters of the high power plasma torch of hollow electrode type for incinerating the hospital and municipal solid wastes.

  11. Computation of non-equilibrium flow downstream of a plasma torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harle, Christophe; Varghese, Philip L.; Carey, Graham F.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible reacting flow in an axisymmetric geometry are presented for a nitrogen plasma torch with both thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new axisymmetric finite element/finite volume formulation in which the convective flux is treated by an extension of the approximate Riemann solver due to Osher. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with a previous solution of the same problem using a different computational scheme. Results obtained using two different models of nonthermal dissociation rates are compared to experimental data.

  12. The deposition of chromium by the use of an inductively-coupled radio-frequency plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, L.; Chumbley, L.S.

    1997-11-15

    This paper discusses attempts to deposit a layer of hard Cr metal, with properties similar to those of layers currently obtained by electrolytic methods, onto a metallic substrate using an inductively-coupled, radio-frequency plasma torch (ICP-RF) torch. Preliminary studies indicated that it might be possible to produce a suitable layer using a number of chromium-based compounds. For this study, Cr powders and a chromium precursor were injected into the high temperature region of the plasma plume, where thermal decomposition of the feed material produced Cr atoms that deposited onto the surface of metal substrates placed below the plasma torch. The films produced were examined to determine thickness, chemical compositions, and adherence. Since the goal of the project was to develop a coating method that was not only industrially suitable but also environmentally safe, care was taken to monitor the emissions produced by the system during deposition.

  13. Plasma torch production of Ti/Al nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Zea, Hugo; Cheng, Lily; Luhrs, Claudia; Courtney, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Using the Aerosol-through-Plasma (A-T-P) technique high surface area bi-cationic (Ti-Al) oxide particles of a range of stoichiometries were produced that showed remarkable resistance to sintering. Specifically, we found that homogeneous nanoparticles with surface areas greater than 150 m{sup 2}/gm were produced at all stoichiometries. In particular, for particles with a Ti:Al ratio of 1:3 a surface area of just over 200 m{sup 2}/gm was measured using the BET method. The most significant characteristic of these particles was that their sinter resistance was far superior to that of TiAl particles produced using any other method. For example, A-T-P generated particles retained >70% of their surface area even after sintering at 1000 C for five hours. In contrast, particles made using all other methods lost virtually all of their surface area after an 800 C treatment.

  14. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  15. Influence of Structuring by Laser and Plasma Torch on the Adhesion of Metallic Films on Thermoplastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, W.; Djomani, D.; Coulon, J. F.; Grunchec, R.

    In this study three different types of thermoplastics haven been investigated: polypropylene (PP, used in automotive industry), poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK, used in aerospace applications) and polyethylene (PE, used in medical applications). Surface preparation prior to thin film coating was realized using industrial plasma torch and ultra-short pulse laser. Whereas the plasma torch is a very cost efficient tool the laser light allows precise and localized surface modification. The adhesion measurements of an Al-film deposited on the substrate show that laser structuring can yield in a cohesive rupture. Adhesion can be increased by a factor of 4 to 7 with regard to conventional joining techniques.

  16. Experimental characterization of ultraviolet radiation of air in a high enthalpy plasma torch facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casses, C. J.; Bertrand, P. J.; Jacobs, C. M.; Mac Donald, M. E.; Laux, Ch. O.

    2015-06-01

    During atmospheric reentry, a plasma is formed ahead of the surface of the vehicle and the excited particle present in the plasma produces radiative heating fluxes to the surface of the vehicle. A high-temperature air plasma torch operating at atmospheric pressure was used to experimentally reproduce atmospheric reentry conditions. A high-resolution and absolute intensity emission spectrum (full width at half maximum (FWHM) = 0.064 nm) was obtained from 200 to 450 nm and then compared with computational results provided by the SPECAIR code [1]. This paper discusses the comparison of the two spectra over this wavelength range in order to confirm the validity of the calculation and provide direction to improve the calculated spectrum.

  17. Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Torch and the Surface Interaction for Material Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Anthony Joseph

    An atmospheric pressure plasma torch has been developed and characterized for removal of organic based coatings. The focus of the Strategic Environmental Research & Development Program (SERDP) project WP-1762, that funded the bulk of this dissertation work, is removal of paint from US Navy vessels. The goal is to develop a novel technology for coating removal that is capable of reducing the amount of environmental waste produced during the commonly used grit blasting process. The atmospheric pressure air plasma torch was identified as having the capacity to remove the paint systems while using only compressed air and electricity as a media-less removal system with drastically reduced waste generation. Any improvements to the existing technology need to be based on scientific knowledge and thus the plasma removal mechanisms or material warranted investigation. The removal of material does not show a strong relation to the plasma parameters of power, frequency, and gas flow, nor is there a strong relation to the presences of inorganic fillers impeding or altering the removal rates. The underlying removal mechanisms also do not show a strong correlation to the rotational temperature of the plasma but do show a strong correlation to the optical emission intensity. Primarily, the emission from atomic oxygen and molecular nitrogen were identified significant contributors and were investigated further. The plasma feed gas was then varied from the nitrogen and oxygen ratio present in ambient air to pure nitrogen to identify the effect of oxygen on the removal mechanism. From these experiments it was concluded that the oxygen present in air does contribute to the overall removal mechanism; however, it is not the sole contributing factor with the other major factor being nitrogen.

  18. Study of Earth and Jupiter-like plasmas for atmospheric entries using a non-transferred arc torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menecier, S.; Gouy, P. A.; Duffour, E.; Perisse, F.; Vacher, D.; Cerqueira, N.; Dudeck, M.; Reynier, Ph; Marraffa, L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results obtained by a 100 kW non-transferred arc plasma torch dedicated to the studies of plasmas characteristics of atmospheric entries of spatial probes, especially Earth and Jupiter entries. Spectra acquisition of the produced plasmas is achieved using optical emission spectroscopy. For Earth entry conditions, air plasma was obtained with a maximal temperature around 6800 K with a good agreement using atomic lines of oxygen and nitrogen (and also copper coming from electrode’s ablation) and molecular bands of N2, CN and \\text{N}2+ , testifying to a good thermal equilibrium. As the first step in the study of Jupiter atmospheric entry, pure helium plasma was produced with the same maximal temperature of about 7500 K. Helium plasma was achieved for the first time using the plasma torch. Recorded spectra show a continuum, He I lines as well as copper. He II lines are not detected.

  19. Unbalance magnetron plasma source for ion mass-separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paperny, V. L.; Krasov, V. I.; Astrakchantsev, N. V.; Lebedev, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    The report presents the results of the preliminary studies characteristics of an unbalanced magnetron plasma source supplied with the transport system based on a curved magnetic field. The aim of these studies was to recognize if the system is suitable, in principle, for mass-separation of a multi-component plasma flow. The magnetron source has 50 mm diameter cathode manufactured of an alloy composed of Cu (64%), Pb (22.5%) and admixtures, about of 14% (Al, Zn, C). By means of an immersion time-of-flight spectrometer, a spatial distribution of ions of the cathode material was measured through the system output cross-section. Distribution of atom of these elements was measured here by the X-ray fluorescence spectrometry as well. Both methods showed that the ions of the lighter element (Cu) were concentrated in the inner part of the plasma flow deflected by the magnetic field while the distribution of the heavy element (Pb) was shifted toward the outer area of the flow. The similar effect was observed for each couple of the elements. Such a system is promising for use in plasma technology of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, namely for separation heavy radioactive fission product from nuclear waste.

  20. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. II. Experiment and comparison with theory

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    Spatially resolved emission spectroscopy techniques have been used to determine the gas temperature, the electron, and N{sub 2}{sup +} ion densities and the relative emission intensities of radiative species in a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma torch driven by a surface wave. The experimental results have been analyzed in terms of a two-dimensional theoretical model based on a self-consistent treatment of particles kinetics, gas dynamics, and wave electrodynamics. The measured spatial variations in the various quantities agree well with the model predictions. The radially averaged gas temperature is around 3000 K and varies only slowly along the discharge zone of the source but it drops sharply down to about 400 K in the postdischarge. The experimental wave dispersion characteristics nearly follow the theoretical ones, thus confirming that this plasma source is driven by a surface wave.

  1. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the coupling of time-dependent parameters in a blown arc plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    A low-power dc arc torch using nitrogen as plasma-forming gas is studied to highlight the modulation of plasma jet specific enthalpy and speed at the nozzle exit. A special design is used for the torch and by tuning the arc current and the mass flow rate a resonant oscillating mode is obtained in the kHz range, for which the arc voltage presents a periodic triangular waveform, which is the result of the combination of the input parameters. At stabilized current and following the voltage, the electric power is modulated for the specific enthalpy, the mass density and the speed of the plasma at the nozzle exit. A change in the plasma speed is accompanied by a change in the momentum of the jet, which must influence the pressure inside the torch and particularly in the cathode cavity, the volume of which stores the cold gas before it enters the arc region. Even though the torch is fed with a constant flow rate, the arc is subjected to a more or less fluctuating flow rate depending on the cathode cavity volume. The link between the fluctuating components of the different parameters is searched by using a conservation equation and solutions are obtained by means of Fourier analysis. The results obtained are consistent with speed measurements and time-resolved temperature measurements.

  2. The quenching effect of hydrogen on the nitrogen in metastable state in atmospheric-pressure N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shou-Zhe Zhang, Xin; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing; Xia, Guang-Qing

    2014-07-15

    The atmospheric-pressure microwave N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} plasma torch is generated and diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that a large amount of N atoms and NH radicals are generated in the plasma torch and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band is the strongest over the spectra. The mixture of hydrogen in nitrogen plasma torch causes the morphology of the plasma discharge to change with appearance that the afterglow shrinks greatly and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band decreases with more hydrogen mixed into nitrogen plasma. In atmospheric-pressure microwave-induced plasma torch, the hydrogen imposes a great influence on the characteristics of nitrogen plasma through the quenching effect of the hydrogen on the metastable state of N{sub 2}.

  3. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  4. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2012-04-15

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for a pulse length of 100 {mu}s at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were recorded with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target's racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic presheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons'ExB drift velocity, which is about 10{sup 5} m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  5. Experimental evidence of warm electron populations in magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, B. B. Han, Jeon G.; Kim, Hye R.; Ishikawa, K.; Hori, M.

    2015-01-21

    This work report on the results obtained using the Langmuir probe (LP) measurements in high-power dc magnetron sputtering discharges. Data show clear evidence of two electron components, such as warm and bulk electrons, in the sputtering plasma in a magnetic trap. We have also used optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic method along with LP to investigate the plasma production. Data show that there is a presence of low-frequency oscillations in the 2–3 MHz range, which are expected to be generated by high-frequency waves. Analysis also suggests that the warm electrons, in the plasmas, can be formed due to the collisionless Landau damping of the bulk electrons.

  6. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  7. Enthalpy probe measurements and three-dimensional modelling on air plasma jets generated by a non-transferred plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-03-01

    Thermal flow characteristics of air plasma jets generated by a non-transferred plasma torch with hollow electrodes are experimentally and numerically investigated in order to provide more reliable scientific and technical information, which has been insufficient for their practical applications to material and environmental industries. In this work, a thermal plasma torch of hollow electrode type is first designed and fabricated, and similarity criteria for predicting operational conditions for the scale-up to high-power torches are derived from the arc voltage characteristics measured with various operating and geometry conditions of the torch. The thermal flow characteristics of air plasma jets ejected from the torch are measured by enthalpy probe diagnostics and turn out to have relatively low temperatures of around 3000-7000 K, but show features of other unique properties, such as high energy flux, broad high temperature region and long plasma jet with moderate axial velocity, which are promising for their applications to material syntheses and hazardous waste treatments. Such high enthalpy at a relatively low temperature of air thermal plasma compared with the argon one is due to the high thermal energy residing in the vibrational and rotational states and oxygen dissociation, besides the translational states in monatomic gases such as argon. It is expected that this high specific enthalpy of the air plasma will enable material and environmental industries to treat a large amount of precursors and waste materials effectively at a lower temperature for a longer residence time by the low plasma velocity. It is also found from the measurements that the turbulence intensity influenced by the size of the electrode diameter has a significant effect on the axial and radial profiles of plasma jet properties and that a longer plasma jet is more readily achievable with a larger electrode diameter reducing the turbulence intensity in the external region of the torch. In

  8. Application of infrared thermography for online monitoring of wall temperatures in inductively coupled plasma torches with conventional and low-flow gas consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhard, Carsten; Scheffer, Andy; Maue, Thomas; Hieftje, Gary M.; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources typically used for trace elemental determination and speciation were investigated with infrared (IR) thermography to obtain spatially resolved torch temperature distributions. Infrared thermographic imaging is an excellent tool for the monitoring of temperatures in a fast and non-destructive way. This paper presents the first application of IR thermography to inductively coupled plasma torches and the possibility to investigate temperatures and thermal patterns while the ICP is operating and despite background emission from the plasma itself. A fast and easy method is presented for the determination of temperature distributions and stress features within ICP torches. Two different ICP operating torches were studied: a commercially available Fassel-type ICP unit with 14 L min - 1 total Ar consumption and a SHIP torch with the unusually low Ar flow of 0.6 L min - 1 . Spatially resolved infrared images of both torches were obtained and laterally resolved temperature profiles were extracted. After temperature-resolved calibration of the emissivity (between 0.5 and 0.35 at 873-1323 K) and transmission (20% between 3.75 and 4.02 μm) of the fused quartz used in the torch construction, an image correction was applied. Inhomogeneous temperature distributions with locally defined stress areas in the conventional Fassel-type torch were revealed. As a general trend, it was found that the SHIP torch exhibited higher temperatures ( Tmax = 1580 K) than the conventional torch ( Tmax = 730 K). In the former case, torch sites with efficient and inefficient cooling were discovered and the external flow of cooling air (24-48 m s - 1 ) was identified as the limiting factor.

  9. Experimental measurements of plasma properties for Miller SG-100 torch with Mach I setting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.L.T.; Heberlein, J.; Pfender, E. )

    1991-10-01

    In this work measurements of plasma properties, including the fields of temperature, velocity and plasma composition have been completed for the Miller SG-100 plasma torch using argon-helium mixtures with the Mach 1 nozzle at 1 atm pressure. A computer-controlled system combining both spectroscopic and enthalpy probe diagnostics has been developed to allow temperature measurements covering a range from 2000--16000K which includes the plasma flame region which is of interest. The experimental results expose the dominant effects in different spatial areas of argon-helium plasma jets. In the center near the nozzle exit the temperatures exceed 10,000K, and strong diffusion exists due to the steep radial gradients of temperature and particle number densities. In the jet tail region where the temperatures are well below 10,000K and decay in axial and radial direction, the dominant effects in this area are strong cold gas entrainment associated with turbulence. Substantial discrepancies between temperatures evaluated from spectroscopic and enthalpy probe data are particularly severe in the jet fringes indicating that strong deviations from LTE may exist in the jet fringes. In addition, entrainment of the cold surrounding gas into the plasma jet causes severe discrepancies between spectrometric and enthalpy probe data. The validity of the two diagnostic methods will be discussed. The temperature profiles in argon-helium plasma jets are flatter and wider, and the velocities are higher than in a pure argon plasma jet. These features of argon-helium plasma jets may be beneficial for obtaining better performance in the plasma spraying process. 26 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Production of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2005-05-15

    The key requirements of nanotube formation are an atomic carbon source and a source of nanometal particles. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized by an argon/nitrogen microwave plasma torch using a mixture of acetylene and vapor-phase iron pentacarbonyl at the atmospheric pressure. The synthesized CNTs have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and are shown to be multiwalled and have a bamboo-shaped structure. The synthesized CNTs in some areas are well aligned. It is also found that the higher the content of nitrogen gas used, the higher the number of rough and wavy surfaces and the inner intersecting layers.

  11. Plasma parameters of an active cathode during relativistic magnetron operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Y.; Kweller, T.; Sayapin, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2009-09-01

    The results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of the plasma produced at the surface of the ferroelectric cathode during the operation of an S-band relativistic magnetron generating ˜50 MW microwave power at f =3005 MHz and powered by a linear induction accelerator (LIA) (150 kV, 1.5 kA, 250 ns) are presented. The surface plasma was produced by a driving pulse (3 kV, 150 ns) prior to the application of the LIA accelerating high-voltage pulse. The cathode plasma electron density and temperature were obtained by analyzing hydrogen Hα and Hβ, and carbon ions CII and CIII spectral lines, and using the results of nonstationary collision radiative modeling. It was shown that the microwave generation causes an increase in plasma ion and electron temperature up to ˜4 and ˜7 eV, respectively, and the plasma density increases up to ˜7×1014 cm-3. Estimates of the plasma transport parameters and its interaction with microwave radiation are also discussed.

  12. Two-dimensional electromagnetic model of a microwave plasma reactor operated by an axial injection torch

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.; Alves, L. L.

    2007-05-15

    This paper presents a two-dimensional electromagnetic model for a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma reactor operated by an axial injection torch. The model solves Maxwell's equations, adopting a harmonic time description and considering the collision dispersion features of the plasma. Perfect-conductor boundary conditions are satisfied at the reactor walls, and absorbing boundary conditions are used at the open end of the coaxial waveguide powering the system. Simulations yield the distribution of the electromagnetic fields and the average power absorbed by the system for a given spatial profile of the plasma density (tailored from previous experimental measurements), with maximum values in the range 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. Model results reveal that the system exhibits features similar to those of an air-filled, one-end-shorted circular metal waveguide, supporting evanescent or oscillatory solutions for radial dimensions below or above a critical radius, respectively. Results also show that the fractional average power absorbed by the plasma is strongly influenced by the system dimensions, which play a major role in defining the geometry pattern of the electromagnetic field distribution. Simulations are used to provide general guidelines for device optimization.

  13. Emission spectroscopy study of CF{sub 4} decomposition in an Ar-H{sub 2} inductive plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Ricard, A.; Al Ayoubi, S.; Cavvadias, S.; Amouroux, J.

    1995-12-31

    Radiative species in Ar RF plasma torch with addition of H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CF{sub 4} polluting gases have been analyzed by emission spectroscopy. An efficient etching by F atoms of reactor quartz tube is detected from Si atom emission when a few 10{sup {minus}3} CF{sub 4} is introduced into the Ar plasma. The Si emission disappeared with H{sub 2} introduction into the Ar-CF{sub 4} gas mixture which has been correlated with HF formation. From C atomic emission, it is deduced that CF{sub 4} as CH{sub 4} polluting gases are largely dissociated into the Ar plasma torch.

  14. Analytical performance of a low-gas-flow torch optimized for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montaser, A.; Huse, G.R.; Wax, R.A.; Chan, S.-K.; Golightly, D.W.; Kane, J.S.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An inductively coupled Ar plasma (ICP), generated in a lowflow torch, was investigated by the simplex optimization technique for simultaneous, multielement, atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The variables studied included forward power, observation height, gas flow (outer, intermediate, and nebulizer carrier) and sample uptake rate. When the ICP was operated at 720-W forward power with a total gas flow of 5 L/min, the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) of spectral lines from 20 elements were either comparable or inferior, by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 2, to the results obtained from a conventional Ar ICP. Matrix effect studies on the Ca-PO4 system revealed that the plasma generated in the low-flow torch was as free of vaporizatton-atomizatton interferences as the conventional ICP, but easily ionizable elements produced a greater level of suppression or enhancement effects which could be reduced at higher forward powers. Electron number densities, as determined via the series until line merging technique, were tower ht the plasma sustained in the low-flow torch as compared with the conventional ICP. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  15. Detection of uranium in industrial and mines samples by microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Yang, Meiling; Sun, Rong; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT), traditionally used as the light source for atomic emission spectrophotometry, has been employed as the ambient ionization source for sensitive detection of uranium in various ground water samples with widely available ion trap mass spectrometer. In the full-scan mass spectra obtained in the negative ion detection mode, uranium signal was featured by the uranyl nitrate complexes (e.g. [UO2 (NO3 )3 ](-) ), which yielded characteristic fragments in the tandem mass spectrometry experiments, allowing confident detection of trace uranium in water samples without sample pretreatment. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the calibration curves were linearly responded within the concentration levels ranged in 10-1000 µg·l(-1) , with the limit of detection (LOD) of 31.03 ng·l(-1) . The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were 2.1-5.8% for the given samples at 100 µg·l(-1) . The newly established method has been applied to direct detection of uranium in practical mine water samples, providing reasonable recoveries 90.94-112.36% for all the samples tested. The analysis of a single sample was completed within 30 s, showing a promising potential of the method for sensitive detection of trace uranium with improved throughput. PMID:26889932

  16. Study on the effect of target on plasma parameters of magnetron sputtering discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the effect of magnetron target on different plasma parameters of Argon/Hydrogen (Ar - H{sub 2}) direct current (DC) magnetron discharge is examined. Here, Copper (Cu) and Chromium (Cr) are used as magnetron targets. The value of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (kT{sub e}), electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for both the target are studied as a function of input power and hydrogen content in the discharge. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. The obtained results show that electron and ion density decline with gradual addition of Hydrogen in the discharge and increase with rising input power. It brings significant changes on the degree of ionization of Ar and dissociation of H{sub 2}. The enhanced value of electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of Ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for Cr compared to Cu target is explained on the basis of it's higher Ion Induced Secondary Electron Emission Coefficient (ISEE) value.

  17. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys. Marshall awarded the torch contract to B & B Precision Machine, which produced a torch for the Shuttle, then automated the system, and eventually delivered a small torch used by companies such as Whirlpool for sheet metal welding of appliance parts and other applications. The dependability of the torch offers cost and time advantages.

  18. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Cho, C H; Shin, D H; Hong, Y C; Shin, Y W

    2015-08-30

    Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF6, NF3 by varying plasma power and N2 flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the N2 flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF6 was 99.99% at the N2 flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF3 and 29% of SF6 abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor. PMID:25841085

  19. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  20. Modeling of a supersonic DC plasma torch system for carbon nanotube production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liping

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) structure forms a very promising source material. It has unique properties such as high thermal and electrical conductivities, and a very high mechanical strength. In recent years, researchers were able to improve both the quantity and quality of the CNT production. Among the efforts made to scale up the production, Harbec and Meunier designed a new plasma torch process for the industrial production of CNT in bulk powder form. Their process is based on the DC plasma-jet pyrolysis of a carbon-containing gas. Experiments were conducted using either 100 slpm of argon or 225 slpm of helium. Tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4, or TCE) was selected as the carbon raw material. The present work focuses on the modeling of this CNT synthesis process and aims at an understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena observed in this system. First, a description is made of the temperature and flow fields, as well as the species concentration distribution in the torch nozzle using both possibilities of He or Ar as the plasma gas. This is followed in the second part of the thesis by a model aimed to study the nucleation and evolution of the metal particles acting as catalyst for CNT growth in the nozzle. In the third part, the modeling of the TCE pyrolysis process in the flow was carried out. The fluid dynamics equations are used in this system showing supersonic characteristics. A realizable k-ε model is used to address the turbulent effects in the flow fields. The moment method is employed to calculate the formation of the fine catalyst particles from the metal vapor injected. Within the supersonic domain of the flow field, the influence of existing shock waves on the particle nucleation is discussed, as well as the chemical reactions involved. Results show that the supersonic phenomena make it possible for metal particles to nucleate and be maintained in small sizes. This however also causes a backflow in the nozzle, which partially contributes to the

  1. Alternating current-driven non-thermal arc plasma torch working with air medium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guohua; Lin, Qifu; Li, Lei; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Longwei; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Meng, Yuedong

    2013-11-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of the discharge characteristics of high-frequency alternating current (ac) plasma torch working with air medium using electrical and spectroscopic techniques. A simple structure and compact ac plasma torch associated with a resonance power supply allows the generation of low power discharges (lower than 1 kW) with high voltage and low current. The discharge shows a negative resistance characteristic, and its curve shifts up with gas flow increased. The effects of power on the emission intensity of NO (A 2Σ+ → X 2Π), OH (A 2Σ → X 2Π, 0-0), N2(C 3Πu → B 3Πg), Hα and O (3p^{5}P \\to 3S^{5}S_{2}^{0}) and their spatial distributions in plasma jet axial direction were investigated. It has been found that the emission intensities of NO, OH, N2, Hα and O rise with an increase in power dissipation. With increasing axial distances of plasma jet from nozzle exit, the emission intensity of OH increases and then decreases, while the emission intensities of other species decrease sharply. The vibrational temperature is much higher than the gas temperature, which demonstrates the ac-driven arc discharge deviation from thermal equilibrium plasma.

  2. Localized Electronic Excitation Temperature Measurements in an Air Microwave Plasma Torch at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, K. M.; Flores, G. J., III; Woskov, P. P.; Hadidi, K.; Thomas, P.

    1999-10-01

    The Microwave Plasma Continuous Emissions Monitor, currently under development, uses atomic emission spectroscopy for trace metals pollution monitoring of stack exhaust. Operating at 2.45 GHz, the 1.5 kW magnetron sustains the plasma in a shorted WR-284 waveguide. Air flows through a 25.4 mm i.d. fused quartz tube traversing the waveguide. A pneumatic nebulizer introduces an iron nitrate solution into the axial gas flow. Radial profile measurements of atomic excitation temperature inside the waveguide have been obtained by Abel inversion of Fe I emission lines in the 367 nm to 377 nm range. An optical system with image magnification lenses and a fiber optic cable on a translation stage scans the radial intensity profile along 66 chords. Intensity and temperature profiles show peaked values on axis with a FWHM of 11 mm. An electronic excitation temperature of 6551 K ± 349 K is measured with an axial flow of 12 l/min and a swirl flow of 10 l/min.

  3. Numerical analysis of nitrogen-mixed argon plasma characteristics and injected particle behavior in an ICP torch for ultrafine powder synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Hong, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The ICP (inductively coupled plasma) torches have been extensively used for the synthesis of various ceramics and new materials as effective hot-temperature heat sources in the field of material processing. Here, a numerical model is presented for the analysis of plasma characteristics of an ICP torch and gas mixing effects on the plasma when a nitrogen gas is added into the argon plasma as a carrier or sheath gas at the torch inlet. The fluid equations describing the plasma flow and temperature fields and the diffusions between two different gases are solved along with a magnetic vector potential equation for electromagnetic fields. The trajectory and the temperature change with time for a particle injected into the plasma are also investigated by a plasma-particle interaction model to find out optimum injection conditions for the synthesis of ultra/fine nitride ceramic powders. It is found from the calculations that the nitrogen-mixed argon plasma with a nitrogen carrier gas for the reaction kinetics of nitride synthesis. It is also found that the radial injection through the holes of the tube wall is preferable to the axial injection at the torch inlet for the complete evaporation of injected particle and the effective chemical reaction of reactant vapor with nitrogen. For the radial injection in an ICP torch of 20 cm in axial length, the optimum injection locations and initial velocities of 50-{micro}m aluminum particles are found for synthesizing aluminum nitride are in the range of 6{approximately}12 cm apart from the torch inlet and over 15 m/s, respectively.

  4. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  5. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  6. Investigating the effect of Argon Pressure on DC and High Power Magnetron Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernales, Baysha; Bolat, Rustem; Anders, Andre; Slack, Jonathan; PAG Team; EETD Team

    2013-10-01

    Smart Glass is fabricated by depositing thin films of specialized material onto a transparent substrate. When a potential is applied across the surface of the Smart Glass, it changes its optical properties. Direct Current Magnetron Sputtering (DCMS) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) are two methods of PVD that are used to fabricate this material. In previous research, it has been noted that magnetron plasmas have localized ionization zones that rotate clockwise in DCMS and counterclockwise in HiPIMS. Not much is known about what causes the change in rotation. This research seeks to investigate what occurs during the first moments of plasma evolution. Both DC and high power magnetron plasmas were observed as Argon pressure was varied. It was found that pressure had a very pronounced effect on the floating-point potential signal that was received from the probes placed in the plasma. It was found that when a high-pressure jet of Argon was injected into the system, that the rotation pattern of the DC magnetron plasma was disrupted. It was also found that at certain pressures, the voltage signal was less indicative of azimuthal rotation and more indicative of z-direction breathing modes.

  7. A bulk plasma model for dc and HiPIMS magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenning, N.; Axnäs, I.; Raadu, M. A.; Lundin, D.; Helmerson, U.

    2008-11-01

    A plasma discharge model has been developed for the bulk plasma (also called the extended presheath) in sputtering magnetrons. It can be used both for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and conventional dc sputtering magnetrons. Demonstration calculations are made for the parameters of the HiPIMS sputtering magnetron at Linköping University, and also benchmarked against results in the literature on dc magnetrons. New insight is obtained regarding the structure and time development of the currents, the electric fields and the potential profiles. The transverse resistivity ηbottom has been identified as having fundamental importance both for the potential profiles and for the motion of ionized target material through the bulk plasma. New findings are that in the HiPIMS mode, as a consequence of a high value of ηbottom, (1) there can be an electric field reversal that in our case extends 0.01-0.04 m from the target, (2) the electric field in the bulk plasma is typically an order of magnitude weaker than in dc magnetrons, (3) in the region of electric field reversal the azimuthal current is diamagnetic in nature, i.e. mainly driven by the electron pressure gradient, and actually somewhat reduced by the electron Hall current which here has a reversed direction and (4) the azimuthal current above the racetrack can, through resistive friction, significantly influence the motion of the ionized fraction of the sputtered material and deflect it sideways, away from the target and towards the walls of the magnetron.

  8. TORCH Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the antigen or growing the microorganism in culture can be done earlier in the infectious disease process and are more specific. Some recent studies have found questionable benefit to routine TORCH screening ...

  9. TORCH Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  10. TORCH screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... different infections in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it ... used to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections ...

  11. Modification of film structure by plasma potential control using triode high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takeo; Umahashi, Takuya; Baba, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We have designed a new triode configuration in a magnetron sputtering apparatus to control the plasma potential of the discharge. An additional chimney electrode was introduced above the conventional sputter gun to apply a positive voltage. The discharge power was provided by a pulse power source to achieve high power pulsed magnetron sputtering operation. We confirmed that the plasma potential increased with increasing positive electrode voltage. Copper films with substantially flatter surfaces could be obtained on a water-cooled and electrically grounded substrate at an Ar gas pressure of 5 Pa.

  12. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.; Yu, He

    2014-06-14

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n{sub e} peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n{sub e} increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n{sub e} and T{sub e} data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V{sub p}) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T{sub e} and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  13. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Yu, He; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-06-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high ne peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, ne increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped ne and Te data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (Vp) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower Te and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  14. Swirl Ring Improves Performance Of Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-arc welding torch modified to create vortex in plasma gas to focus arc into narrower and denser column. Swirl ring contains four channels with angled exit holes to force gas to swirl as it flows out of torch past tip of electrode. Degradation of electrode and orifice more uniform and need to rotate torch during operation to compensate for asymmetry in arc reduced or eliminated. Used in both keyhole and nonkeyhole welding modes.

  15. A dc arc plasma torch as a tailored heat source for thermohydraulic simulation of proton beam target interaction in ADSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Murthy, P. S. S.; Das, A. K.

    2006-11-01

    Currently, research on accelerator driven subcritical systems (ADSS) is gaining significance due to their high safety levels and extremely attractive potential in terms of both thorium utilization and nuclear waste transmutation. While high energy and high current proton beams are being built worldwide, intensive efforts are being undertaken in parallel towards the development of complex lead bismuth eutectic target systems. The major focus is directed towards understanding of the material compatibility and detailed thermohydraulic simulation of the liquid metal flow. The requisite heat flux is being deposited using innovative and easily controllable heat sources. This paper presents an experimental and simulation study to explore the potential of using dc arc plasma torches as a tailored heat source for thermohydraulic simulation of proton beam-target interaction in such systems.

  16. TORCH infections.

    PubMed

    Neu, Natalie; Duchon, Jennifer; Zachariah, Philip

    2015-03-01

    TORCH infections classically comprise toxoplasmosis, Treponema pallidum, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpesvirus, hepatitis viruses, human immunodeficiency virus, and other infections, such as varicella, parvovirus B19, and enteroviruses. The epidemiology of these infections varies; in low-income and middle-income countries, TORCH infections are major contributors to prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal morbidity and mortality. Evidence of infection may be seen at birth, in infancy, or years later. For many of these pathogens, treatment or prevention strategies are available. Early recognition, including prenatal screening, is key. This article covers toxoplasmosis, parvovirus B19, syphilis, rubella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25677998

  17. AC plasma torch with a H2O/CO2/CH4 mix as the working gas for methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutberg, Ph G.; Nakonechny, Gh V.; Pavlov, A. V.; Popov, S. D.; Serba, E. O.; Surov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents results of investigations implemented during construction of the three-phase ac plasma torch working on a mixture of steam with carbon dioxide and methane (H2O/CO2/CH4) with power upto 120 kW. Such thermal plasma generators are needed in industrial technologies for methane reforming with the aim of producing the syngas comprising of the hydrogen and carbon mono-oxide (H2/CO). It was shown that during plasma torch work there are two character parts of the high-voltage arc. In these parts, the arc column has a different diameter and temperature about (8.5  -  8.3) · 103 K and (10.5  -  10.0) · 103 K, respectively. The plasma torch output characteristics have been obtained for working regimes with various flow rates of the methane (0.0-0.8 g s-1) in the plasma-forming mix and constant flow rates of the carbon dioxide and water steam (each of 3.0 g s-1). For the mentioned mix of gases, the unit generates plasma with the mass-average temperature ~(3.2-3.3) · 103K and the thermal efficiency ~94-96%. This provides effective reforming of methane.

  18. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS2 procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%–122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  19. Plasma Torch Development and Crater Growth Dynamics in the Course of Laser Processing of Materials and its Diangostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil‧ev, S. V.; Ivanov, A. Yu.; Kopytskii, A. V.; Nedolugov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of the plasma torch arising under the action of laser radiation on a metal specimen has been investigated by several methods. The dependence of the time form and the spectrum of acoustic vibrations on the parameters of the irradiated material and the law of increase in the crater depth has been determined. It has been found that under the action of a lser pulse of length ~20 μs on the surface of a copper specimen the growth time of the destruction zone is about 40-50 μs, which is in good agreement with the lifetime of plasma formation near the surface of the target subjected to laser-plasma processing (~50 μs). It has been shown that the use of the model of a loaded zone with moving boundaries emitting acoustic waves into an elastic medium permits solving an important practical problem — determining the law of time growth of the zone of irreversible deformations on the surface of the specimen subjected to pulsed laser plasma processing.

  20. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS(2) procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%-122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  1. Improved performance of a shielded torch using ethanol in inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Hu, Zhaochu; Liu, Shenghua; Liu, Yongsheng; Gao, Shan; Li, Ming; Zong, Keqing; Chen, Haihong; Hu, Shenghong

    2015-04-01

    To improve the accuracy and precision of trace element analysis, higher analytical sensitivity and lower interference are required. In this study, we investigated the effects of the addition of ethanol in combination with a shielded torch on the signal intensities of elements from 7Li to 238U, oxide yields, doubly charged ion yields, isobaric interferences and ion distributions in inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). For the 39 investigated elements in this study, using the shielded torch increases the sensitivity by a factor of 17-58. The well-known drawback of using a shielded torch is that it will increase the oxide yield. In this study, the CeO+/Ce+ ratio is increased by a factor of 3.3 in the GE-on mode compared to that in the GE-off mode at normal conditions (without ethanol). In the GE-on mode, the addition of 4% ethanol in ICP-SFMS is found not only to decrease the CeO+/Ce+ ratio by a factor of 4 but also to suppress the Ce2 +/Ce+ ratio by a factor of 4.2. In large contrast, the effect of 2-6% ethanol on the oxide yield and doubly charged ratio is minimal in the GE-off mode. Except for As, Se, Sb, Te and Au, for which the signal intensities are increased by a factor of 1.4-3.7 in the presence of 2-6% ethanol, an increased concentration of ethanol suppresses intensities of other elements. In the GE-off mode, the suppression of the analyte signal due to increased ethanol concentration is more significant than that in the GE-on mode. Compared to the spatial profiles of the ion distributions in the normal mode (without ethanol), the addition of 2-4% ethanol leads to significantly wider axial and radial profiles. The significantly wider axial and radial ion distribution had a dilution effect on the ion densities, which subsequently reduced the ion signal intensities. The addition of 4% ethanol was also found to suppress the interferences of Xe by a factor of 2.8 and increase the sensitivity of Te determination in ICP-SFMS by a

  2. E-H mode transition of a high-power inductively coupled plasma torch at atmospheric pressure with a metallic confinement tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberend, Jochen; Chichignoud, Guy; Delannoy, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma torches need high ignition voltages for the E-H mode transition and are therefore difficult to operate. In order to reduce the ignition voltage of an RF plasma torch with a metallic confinement tube the E-H mode transition was studied. A Tesla coil was used to create a spark discharge and the E-H mode transition of the plasma was then filmed using a high-speed camera. The electrical potential of the metallic confinement tube was measured using a high-voltage probe. It was found that an arc between the grounded injector and the metallic confinement tube is maintained by the electric field (E-mode). The transition to H-mode occurred at high magnetic fields when the arc formed a loop. The ignition voltage could be reduced by connecting the metallic confinement tube with a capacitor to the RF generator.

  3. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  4. S-band relativistic magnetron operation with an active plasma cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Hadas, Y.; Sayapin, A.; Kweller, T.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2009-04-15

    Results of experimental research on a relativistic S-band magnetron with a ferroelectric plasma source as a cathode are presented. The cathode plasma was generated using a driving pulse (approx3 kV, 200 ns) applied to the ferroelectric cathode electrodes via inductive decoupling prior to the beginning of an accelerating pulse (200 kV, 150 ns) delivered by a linear induction accelerator. The magnetron and generated microwave radiation parameters obtained for the ferroelectric plasma cathode and the explosive emission plasma were compared. It was shown that the application of the ferroelectric plasma cathode allows one to avoid a time delay in the appearance of the electron emission to achieve a better matching between the magnetron and linear induction accelerator impedances and to increase significantly (approx30%) the duration of the microwave pulse with an approx10% increase in the microwave power. The latter results in the microwave radiation generation being 30% more efficient than when the explosive emission cathode is used, where efficiency does not exceed 20%.

  5. S-band relativistic magnetron operation with an active plasma cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Y.; Sayapin, A.; Kweller, T.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2009-04-01

    Results of experimental research on a relativistic S-band magnetron with a ferroelectric plasma source as a cathode are presented. The cathode plasma was generated using a driving pulse (˜3 kV, 200 ns) applied to the ferroelectric cathode electrodes via inductive decoupling prior to the beginning of an accelerating pulse (200 kV, 150 ns) delivered by a linear induction accelerator. The magnetron and generated microwave radiation parameters obtained for the ferroelectric plasma cathode and the explosive emission plasma were compared. It was shown that the application of the ferroelectric plasma cathode allows one to avoid a time delay in the appearance of the electron emission to achieve a better matching between the magnetron and linear induction accelerator impedances and to increase significantly (˜30%) the duration of the microwave pulse with an ˜10% increase in the microwave power. The latter results in the microwave radiation generation being 30% more efficient than when the explosive emission cathode is used, where efficiency does not exceed 20%.

  6. Comparative study of two- and three-dimensional modeling on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-02-15

    A comparative study between two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) modeling is carried out on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes, in order to evaluate the effects of arc root configuration characterized by either 2D annular or 3D highly localized attachment on the electrode surface. For this purpose, a more precise 3D transient model has been developed by taking account of 3D arc current distribution and arc root rotation. The 3D simulation results apparently reveal that the 3D arc root attachment brings about the inherent 3D and turbulence nature of plasma fields inside the torch. It is also found that the constricted arc column near the vortex chamber plays an important role in heating and acceleration of injected arc gases by concentrating arc currents on the axis of the hollow electrodes. The inherent 3D nature of arc discharge is well preserved inside the cathode region, while these 3D features slowly diminish behind the vortex chamber where the turbulent flow begins to be developed in the anode region. Based on the present simulation results, it is noted that the mixing effects of the strong turbulent flow on the heat and mass transfer are mainly responsible for the gradual relaxation of the 3D structures of plasma fields into the 2D axisymmetric ones that eventually appear in the anode region near the torch exit. From a detailed comparison of the 3D results with the 2D ones, the arc root configuration seems to have a significant effect on the heat transfer to the electrode surfaces interacting with the turbulent plasma flow. That is, in the 2D simulation based on an axisymmetric stationary model, the turbulence phenomena are fairly underestimated and the amount of heat transferred to the cold anode wall is calculated to be smaller than that obtained in the 3D simulation. For the validation of the numerical simulations, calculated plasma temperatures and axial velocities are compared with experimentally measured ones

  7. Analytic model of the energy distribution function for highly energetic electrons in magnetron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gallian, Sara Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hitchon, William N. G.

    2015-01-14

    This paper analyzes a situation which is common for magnetized technical plasmas such as dc magnetron discharges and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) systems, where secondary electrons enter the plasma after being accelerated in the cathode fall and encounter a nearly uniform bulk. An analytic calculation of the distribution function of hot electrons is presented; these are described as an initially monoenergetic beam that slows down by Coulomb collisions with a Maxwellian distribution of bulk (cold) electrons, and by inelastic collisions with neutrals. Although this analytical solution is based on a steady-state assumption, a comparison of the characteristic time-scales suggests that it may be applicable to a variety of practical time-dependent discharges, and it may be used to introduce kinetic effects into models based on the hypothesis of Maxwellian electrons. The results are verified for parameters appropriate to HiPIMS discharges, by means of time-dependent and fully kinetic numerical calculations.

  8. Gas-phase synthesis of nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods by microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jong Hun; Bang, Chan Uk; Uhm, Han Sup

    2005-11-15

    Nitrogen (N)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods were directly synthesized via decomposition of gas-phase titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) by an atmospheric microwave plasma torch. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, field-emission transmission electron microscope, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to investigate fraction of the anatase and rutile phases, diameter and length, and chemical composition of the nanorods, respectively. The diameters of the nanorods are approximately 30-80 nm and the length is several micrometers. EELS data show that incorporation of N into the O site of TiO{sub 2} nanorods was enhanced in N{sub 2} gas by the microwave plasma torch. Also, a growth model of the rods was proposed on the basis of vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  9. Experimental investigation of quasiperiodic-chaotic-quasiperiodic-chaotic transition in a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabavath, Gopi Kishan; Banerjee, I.; Mahapatra, S. K.; Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2015-08-15

    Floating potential fluctuations from a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma have been analysed using time series analysis techniques like phase space plots, power spectra, frequency bifurcation plot, etc. The system exhibits quasiperiodic-chaotic-quasiperiodic-chaotic transitions as the discharge voltage was increased. The transitions of the fluctuations, quantified using the largest Lyapunov exponent, have been corroborated by Hurst exponent and the Shannon entropy. The Shannon entropy is high for quasiperiodic and low for chaotic oscillations.

  10. On the interplay of gas dynamics and the electromagnetic field in an atmospheric Ar/H2 microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synek, Petr; Obrusník, Adam; Hübner, Simon; Nijdam, Sander; Zajíčková, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    A complementary simulation and experimental study of an atmospheric pressure microwave torch operating in pure argon or argon/hydrogen mixtures is presented. The modelling part describes a numerical model coupling the gas dynamics and mixing to the electromagnetic field simulations. Since the numerical model is not fully self-consistent and requires the electron density as an input, quite extensive spatially resolved Stark broadening measurements were performed for various gas compositions and input powers. In addition, the experimental part includes Rayleigh scattering measurements, which are used for the validation of the model. The paper comments on the changes in the gas temperature and hydrogen dissociation with the gas composition and input power, showing in particular that the dependence on the gas composition is relatively strong and non-monotonic. In addition, the work provides interesting insight into the plasma sustainment mechanism by showing that the power absorption profile in the plasma has two distinct maxima: one at the nozzle tip and one further upstream.

  11. Study of hysteresis behavior in reactive sputtering of cylindrical magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakati, H.; M. Borah, S.

    2015-12-01

    In order to make sufficient use of reactive cylindrical magnetron plasma for depositing compound thin films, it is necessary to characterize the hysteresis behavior of the discharge. Cylindrical magnetron plasmas with different targets namely titanium and aluminium are studied in an argon/oxygen and an argon/nitrogen gas environment respectively. The aluminium and titanium emission lines are observed at different flows of reactive gases. The emission intensity is found to decrease with the increase of the reactive gas flow rate. The hysteresis behavior of reactive cylindrical magnetron plasma is studied by determining the variation of discharge voltage with increasing and then reducing the flow rate of reactive gas, while keeping the discharge current constant at 100 mA. Distinct hysteresis is found to be formed for the aluminium target and reactive gas oxygen. For aluminium/nitrogen, titanium/oxygen and titanium/nitrogen, there is also an indication of the formation of hysteresis; however, the characteristics of variation from metallic to reactive mode are different in different cases. The hysteresis behaviors are different for aluminium and titanium targets with the oxygen and nitrogen reactive gases, signifying the difference in reactivity between them. The effects of the argon flow rate and magnetic field on the hysteresis are studied and explained. Project supported by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India and Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India.

  12. ZnO nanocrystals synthesized by evaporation of Zn in microwave plasma torch in terms of mixture ratio of N{sub 2} to O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jong Hun; Cho, Soon Cheon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-06-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals synthesized by an atmospheric microwave plasma torch are characterized in terms of the mixture ratio of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} in the torch gas. Zinc (Zn) granules as a source material placed on the plasma reactor were evaporated and oxidized to ZnO immediately as soon as Zn granules were in contact with the plasma torch flame. The samples obtained from the different gas mixtures were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and photoluminescence (PL). As the N{sub 2} content in the gas mixture increased to 93.6%, the aggregates or clusters of ZnO crystals were synthesized without nanorod-like and multipod-like structures. Especially, ZnO crystals synthesized in the N{sub 2} content of 55.6% mainly revealed the tripod and tetrapod. Also, the visible to ultraviolet (UV) intensity ratio in the PL analysis was increased with increasing of the N{sub 2} content, revealing that the aggregated ZnO crystals have the high concentration of oxygen vacancies.

  13. Calculation of thermal fluxes of plasma torch reradiation under the action of laser radiation on a condensed target

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, V. V.

    2010-12-15

    The problem of laser deposition with allowance for thermal radiation transport inside and outside the laser torch is considered in a multigroup approximation. The energy fluxes of laser torch thermal radiation onto a target in the far and near zones are calculated as functions of time and the character of the exposure. It is shown that absorption of thermal fluxes in the substrate and target in the course of laser deposition results in their substantial heating. The possibility of diagnosing thermal radiation fluxes from the laser torch by using photodetectors is demonstrated.

  14. A feedback model of magnetron sputtering plasmas in HIPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. E.; Ganesan, R.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a 1D feedback model that captures the essential elements of plasma pulse initiation and is useful for control and diagnostics of sputtering plasmas. Our model falls into the class of single-species population models with recruitment and time delay, which show no oscillatory behaviour. The model can reproduce essential features of published time-current traces from plasma discharges and is useful to determine the key parameters affecting the evolution of the discharge. We include the external circuit and we focus on the time evolution of the current as a function of the applied voltage and the plasma parameters. We find the necessity of a nonlinear loss term in the time-dependent plasma ion population to ensure a stable discharge, and we show that a higher secondary electron emission coefficient reduces the time delay for current initiation. We report that I-V characteristics in the plateau region, where it exists, fit a power curve of the form I = kVn, where n is influenced most strongly by the nonlinear loss term.

  15. Plasma flares in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Pavel A.; Hornschuch, Christian; Panjan, Matjaz; Anders, Andre

    2012-11-26

    Self-organized ionization zones and associated plasma flares were recorded with fast cameras in side-on view. Flare velocities were estimated to be about 20 000 m/s suggesting that the local tangential field E{sub {xi}} is about 2000 V/m based on a concept where flare-causing electrons are initially ejected by E{sub {xi}} Multiplication-Sign B drift. At distances of 10 mm and greater from the target, where the electric field is very small, plasma flares are guided by the magnetic field B.

  16. Microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry for the direct detection of copper and molybdenum ions in aqueous liquids.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Runzhi; Wang, Shangxian; Zou, Wei; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT) is a simple and low power-consumption ambient ion source. And the MPT Mass spectra of many metal elements usually exhibit some novel features different from their inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectra, which may be helpful for metal element analysis. Here, we presented the results about the MPT mass spectra of copper and molybdenum elements by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). The generated copper or molybdenum contained ions in plasma were characterized further in collision-induced dissociated (CID) experiments. These researches built a novel, direct and sensitive method for the direct analysis of trace levels of copper and molybdenum in aqueous liquids. Quantitative results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) by using MS(2) procedure was estimated to be 0.265 µg/l (ppb) for copper and 0.497 µg/l for molybdenum. The linear dynamics ranges cover at least 2 orders of magnitude and the analysis of a single aqueous sample can be completed in 5-6 min with a reasonable semi-quantitative sense. Two practical aqueous samples, milk and urine, were also analyzed qualitatively with reasonable recovery rates and RSD. These experimental data demonstrated that the MPT MS is able to turn into a promising and hopeful tool in field analysis of copper and molybdenum ions in water and some aqueous media, and can be applied in many fields, such as environmental controlling, hydrogeology, and water quality inspection. Moreover, MPT MS could also be used as the supplement of ICP-MS for the rapid and in-situ analysis of metal ions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194522

  17. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  18. Optical diagnostics of a low power—low gas flow rates atmospheric-pressure argon plasma created by a microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuji; Srivastava, Nimisha; Scherrer, Susan; Jang, Ping-Rey; Dibble, Theodore S.; Duan, Yixiang

    2009-05-01

    We employ a suite of optical techniques, namely, visual imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), to characterize a low power, low gas flow rates, atmospheric-pressure argon microwave induced plasma. The plasma is created by a microwave plasma torch, which is excited by a 2.45 GHz microwave with powers ranging from 60 to 120 W. A series of plasma images captured in a time-resolution range of as fine as 10 µs shows that the converging point is actually a time-averaged visual effect and the converging point does not exist when the plasma is visualized under high time resolution, e.g. <2 ms. Simulations of the emission spectra of OH, N2 and N_{2}^{+} in the range 200-450 nm enable the plasma electronic excitation temperature (Texc) to be determined at 8000-9000 K, while the vibrational temperature (Tv), the rotational temperature (Tr) and the gas temperature (Tg) at different locations along the axis of the plasma column are all determined to be in the range 1800-2200 K. Thermal equilibrium properties of the plasma are discussed. OH radical concentrations along the plasma column axis are measured by CRDS and the concentrations are in the range 1.6 × 1013-3.0 × 1014 cm-3 with the highest density at the tail of the plasma column. The upper limit of electron density ne is estimated to be 5.0 × 1014 cm-3 from the Lorentzian component of the broadened lineshape obtained by ringdown spectral scans of the rovibrational line S21 of the OH A-X (0-0) band.

  19. Non-uniform plasma distribution in dc magnetron sputtering: origin, shape and structuring of spokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Loquai, Simon; Ewa Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta; Martinu, Ludvik

    2015-12-01

    Non-homogeneous plasma distribution in the form of organized patterns called spokes was first observed in high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). In the present work we investigate the spoke phenomenon in non-pulsed low-current dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS). Using a high-speed camera the spokes were systematically studied with respect to discharge current, pressure, target material and magnetic field strength. Increase in the discharge current and/or gas pressure resulted in the sequential formation of two, then three and more spokes. The observed patterns were reproducible for the same discharge conditions. Spokes at low currents and pressures formed an elongated arrowhead-like shape and were commonly arranged in symmetrical patterns. Similar spoke patterns were observed for different target materials. When using a magnetron with a weaker magnetic field, spokes had an indistinct and diffuse shape, whereas in stronger magnetic fields spokes exhibited an arrowhead-like shape. The properties of spokes are discussed in relation to the azimuthally dependent electron-argon interactions. It is suggested that a single spoke is formed due to local gas breakdown and subsequent electron drift in the azimuthal direction. The spoke is self-sustained by electrons drifting in complex electric and magnetic fields that cause and govern azimuthally dependent processes: ionization, sputtering, and secondary electron emission. In this view plasma evolves from a single spoke into different patterns when discharge conditions are changed either by the discharge current, pressure or magnetic field strength. The azimuthal length of the spoke is associated with the electron-Ar collision frequency which increases with pressure and results in shortening of spoke until an additional spoke forms at a particular threshold pressure. It is proposed that the formation of additional spokes at higher pressures and discharge currents is, in part, related to the increased transport of

  20. Short torch design for direct liquid sample introduction using conventional and micro-nebulizers for plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, Akbar; Westphal, Craig S.; Kahen, Kaveh; Rutkowski, William F.

    2008-01-08

    An apparatus and method for providing direct liquid sample introduction using a nebulizer are provided. The apparatus and method include a short torch having an inner tube and an outer tube, and an elongated adapter having a cavity for receiving the nebulizer and positioning a nozzle tip of the nebulizer a predetermined distance from a tip of the outer tube of the short torch. The predetermined distance is preferably about 2-5 mm.

  1. Fast tomographic measurements of temperature in an air plasma cutting torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlína, J.; Šonský, J.; Gruber, J.; Cressault, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Temperatures in an air plasma jet were measured using a tomographic experimental arrangement providing time-resolved scans of plasma optical radiation in the spectral band 559-601 nm from two directions. The acquired data and subsequent processing yielded time-resolved temperature distributions in measurement planes perpendicular to the plasma jet axis with a temporal resolution of 1 μs. The measurement system and evaluation methods afforded detailed information about the influence of high-frequency ripple modulation of the arc current on plasma temperature.

  2. High-Speed, Integrated Ablation Cell and Dual Concentric Injector Plasma Torch for Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, David N; Managh, Amy J; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L

    2015-11-17

    In recent years, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has gained increasing importance for biological analysis, where ultratrace imaging at micrometer resolution is required. However, while undoubtedly a valuable research tool, the washout times and sensitivity of current technology have restricted its routine and clinical application. Long periods between sampling points are required to maintain adequate spatial resolution. Additionally, temporal signal dispersion reduces the signal-to-noise ratio, which is a particular concern when analyzing discrete samples, such as individual particles or cells. This paper describes a novel, two-volume laser ablation cell and integrated ICP torch designed to minimize aerosol dispersion for fast, efficient sample transport. The holistic design utilizes a short, continuous diameter fused silica conduit, which extends from the point of ablation, through the ICP torch, and into the base of the plasma. This arrangement removes the requirement for a dispersive component for argon addition, and helps to keep the sample on axis with the ICP cone orifice. Hence, deposition of sample on the cones is theoretically reduced with a resulting improvement in the absolute sensitivity (counts per unit mole). The system described here achieved washouts of 1.5, 3.2, and 4.9 ms for NIST 612 glass, at full width half, 10%, and 1% maximum, respectively, with an 8-14-fold improvement in absolute sensitivity, compared to a single volume ablation cell. To illustrate the benefits of this performance, the system was applied to a contemporary bioanalytical challenge, specifically the analysis of individual biological cells, demonstrating similar improvements in performance. PMID:26460246

  3. Optical Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Gas/tungsten-arc welding torch supports electrode at center while enabling viewing of weld area along torch axis. Gas torch accommodates lens and optical fibers, all part of vision system for welding robot. Welding torch includes spoked structure in central bore of optical body. Structure supports welding electrode, carries electric current to it, and takes heat away from it. Spokes formed by drilling six holes 60 degrees apart around center line of torch.

  4. Spectroscopic imaging of self-organization in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore, Singapore; Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel; Anders, Andre

    2013-07-17

    Excitation and ionization conditions in traveling ionization zones of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas were investigated using fast camera imaging through interference filters. The images, taken in end-on and side on views using light of selected gas and target atom and ion spectral lines, suggest that ionization zones are regions of enhanced densities of electrons, and excited atoms and ions. Excited atoms and ions of the target material (Al) are strongly concentrated near the target surface. Images from the highest excitation energies exhibit the most localized regions, suggesting localized Ohmic heating consistent with double layer formation.

  5. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  6. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu; Phukan, Arindam

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  7. Rarefaction windows in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Palmucci, Maria; Britun, Nikolay; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2013-09-21

    The velocity distribution function of the sputtered particles in the direction parallel to the planar magnetron cathode is studied by spatially- and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a short-duration (20 μs) high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge. The experimental evidence for the neutral and ionized sputtered particles to have a constant (saturated) velocity at the end of the plasma on-time is demonstrated. The velocity component parallel to the target surface reaches the values of about 5 km/s for Ti atoms and ions, which is higher that the values typically measured in the direct current sputtering discharges before. The results point out on the presence of a strong gas rarefaction significantly reducing the sputtered particles energy dissipation during a certain time interval at the end of the plasma pulse, referred to as “rarefaction window” in this work. The obtained results agree with and essentially clarify the dynamics of HiPIMS discharge studied during the plasma off-time previously in the work: N. Britun, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131504 (2011)

  8. Production of Silicon Oxide like Thin Films by the Use of Atmospheric Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozono, E. M.; Fachini, E. R.; Silva, M. L. P.; Ruchko, L. F.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-03-01

    The advantages of HMDS (hexamethyldisilazane) APT-plasma films for sensor applications were explored producing films in a three-turn copper coil APT equipment. HMDS was introduced into the argon plasma at four different conditions. Additional flux of oxygen could modulate the presence of organic components in the film, the composition varying from pure inorganic oxides to organo-silane polymers. Oxygen promoted deposition rates as high as 900 nm/min on silicon, acrylic or piezoelectric quartz crystal substrates. Films with a clustered morphology and refractive index of 1.45 were obtained, mainly due to a silicon oxide structure. Raman spectroscopy and XPS data showed the presence of CHn and amorphous carbon in the inorganic matrix. The films were sensitive to the humidity of the air. The adsorptive capabilities of outstanding films were tested in a Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). The results support that those films can be a useful and simple alternative for the development of sensors.

  9. Cleaning of HT-7 Tokamak Exposed First Mirrors by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rong; Chen, Junling; Chen, Longwei; Ding, Rui; Zhu, Dahuan

    2014-12-01

    The stainless steel (SS) first mirror pre-exposed in the deposition-dominated environment of the HT-7 tokamak was cleaned in the newly built radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering plasma device. The deposition layer on the FM surface formed during the exposure was successfully removed by argon plasma with a RF power of about 80 W and a gas pressure of 0.087 Pa for 30 min. The total reflectivity of the mirrors was recovered up to 90% in the wavelength range of 300-800 nm, while the diffuse reflectivity showed a little increase, which was attributed to the increase of surface roughness in sputtering, and residual contaminants. The FMs made from single crystal materials could help to achieve a desired recovery of specular reflectivity in the future.

  10. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  11. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  12. Switchbox for welding torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Switchbox can be used to change from one welding torch setup to another without stopping production line. Simple flip of switch connects gas, water, and power to selected torch. In conventional systems, production must be stopped so that maintenance people can disconnect and reconnect another torch.

  13. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3  MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  14. Sensing Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown in MW Plasma Torch: Electronic and Electrochemical Behavior, Gas Sensing, Field Emission, IR Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Prášek, Jan; Pekárek, Jan; Svatoš, Vojtěch; Bannov, Alexander G.; Jašek, Ondřej; Synek, Petr; Eliáš, Marek; Zajíčková, Lenka; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 μm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‐modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures. PMID:25629702

  15. Sensing properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown in MW plasma torch: electronic and electrochemical behavior, gas sensing, field emission, IR absorption.

    PubMed

    Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Prášek, Jan; Pekárek, Jan; Svatoš, Vojtěch; Bannov, Alexander G; Jašek, Ondřej; Synek, Petr; Eliáš, Marek; Zajíčková, Lenka; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 µm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‑modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures. PMID:25629702

  16. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  17. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively. PMID:12940030

  18. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma mass spectrometer measurements during thin film depositions using simultaneous matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. N.; Check, M. H.; Muratore, C.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2010-05-15

    A hybrid plasma deposition process, combining matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of carbon nanopearls (CNPs) with magnetron sputtering of gold was investigated for growth of composite films, where 100 nm sized CNPs were encapsulated into a gold matrix. Composition and morphology of such composite films was characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Carbon deposits on a gold magnetron sputter target and carbon impurities in the gold matrices of deposited films were observed while codepositing from gold and frozen toluene-CNP MAPLE targets in pure argon. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma analysis was used to determine that a likely mechanism for generation of carbon impurities was a reaction between toluene vapor generated from the MAPLE target and the argon plasma originating from the magnetron sputtering process. Carbon impurities of codeposited films were significantly reduced by introducing argon-oxygen mixtures into the deposition chamber; reactive oxygen species such as O and O+ effectively removed carbon contamination of gold matrix during the codeposition processes. Increasing the oxygen to argon ratio decreased the magnetron target sputter rate, and hence hybrid process optimization to prevent gold matrix contamination and maintain a high sputter yield is needed. High resolution TEM with energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping was used to study carbon distribution throughout the gold matrix as well as embedded CNP clusters. This research has demonstrated that a hybrid MAPLE and magnetron sputtering codeposition process is a viable means for synthesis of composite thin films from premanufactured nanoscale constituents, and that cross-process contaminations can be overcome with understanding of hybrid plasma process interaction mechanisms.

  19. Fluid Mechanics of Torch Appearance in Capillary Microplasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaegu; Matsuo, Keita; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Namihira, Takao; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microplasma jets with long and fine torches have recently been used in industrial and medical applications, such as local dental treatment, inner surface treatment of capillaries, stimuli of microorganisms, and local cleaning of semiconductor devices. The final torch appearance is greatly dependent on both the plasma between electrodes and the gas flow that is also dominated by the configuration of the nozzle. In this study, the mechanisms of torch appearance in a dc-driven capillary microplasma jet using atmospheric-pressure air have been investigated. Experimentally measured visible torch lengths are analyzed on the basis of fluid mechanics using a fluid simulation code. The time evolution of the plasma torch is visualized with a high-speed camera, and the length and propagation velocity of the torch are presented.

  20. Distance-dependent plasma composition and ion energy in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, Arutiun P; Andersson, Joakim; Anders, André

    2010-04-18

    The plasma composition of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) has been studied for titanium and chromium targets using a combined energy analyser and quadrupole mass spectrometer. Measurements were done at distances from 50 to 300 mm from the sputtering target. Ti and Cr are similar in atomic mass but have significantly different sputter yields, which gives interesting clues on the effect of the target on plasma generation and transport of atoms. The Ti and Cr HIPIMS plasmas operated at a peak target current density of ~;;0.5 A cm-2. The measurements of the argon and metal ion content as well as the ion energy distribution functions showed that (1) singly and doubly charged ions were found for argon as well as for the target metal, (2) the majority of ions were singly charged argon for both metals at all distances investigated, (3) the Cr ion density was maintained to distances further from the target than Ti. Gas rarefaction was identified as a main factor promoting transport of metal ions, with the stronger effect observed for Cr, the material with higher sputter yield. Cr ions were found to displace a significant portion of the gas ions, whereas this was less evident in the Ti case. The observations indicate that the presence of metal vapour promotes charge exchange and reduces the electron temperature and thereby practically prevents the production of Ar2+ ions near the target. The content of higher charge states of metal ions depends on the probability of charge exchange with argon.

  1. Control of particle flux and energy on substrate in an inverted cylindrical magnetron for plasma PVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, A.; Mantel, M.; Bés, A.; Vachey, C.; Lacoste, A.

    2014-12-01

    Inverted cylindrical magnetrons (ICMs) are often used in dc, pulsed dc or mid-frequency ac mode for coating complex objects with thin films deposited by plasma PVD. Since in such a configuration the substrate is inherently surrounded by the target and hence by the plasma, the energy flux of the impinging particles represents the main contribution to the substrate heating. This can readily constitute a limiting factor in the deposition process, especially when it is not possible to cool and bias the substrate. This work concerns a dc-driven ICM configuration subjected to several constraints: not only is the substrate surface area small by comparison to the cathode surface area, but its imposed potential is the ground one, thus itself constituting the anode surface of the considered setup. Several important substrate heating factors are highlighted and, in order to reduce the most prominent of them, a means to raise the plasma potential is proposed. This is achieved by positively polarizing two additional electrodes with respect to the ground. This additional surface generates a redistribution of the current and consequently regulates the electron flux on the substrate. The results are shown as a function of bias applied on the auxiliary electrodes and discussed in terms of the impact on the substrate heating.

  2. Effect of hydrogen addition on the deposition of titanium nitride thin films in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Bhuyan, H.; Diaz-Droguett, D. E.; Guzman, F.; Mändl, S.; Saikia, B. K.; Favre, M.; Maze, J. R.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-06-01

    The properties and performance of thin films deposited by plasma assisted processes are closely related to their manufacturing techniques and processes. The objective of the current study is to investigate the modification of plasma parameters occurring during hydrogen addition in N2  +  Ar magnetron plasma used for titanium nitride thin film deposition, and to correlate the measured properties of the deposited thin film with the bulk plasma parameters of the magnetron discharge. From the Langmuir probe measurements, it was observed that the addition of hydrogen led to a decrease of electron density from 8.6 to 6.2  ×  (1014 m‑3) and a corresponding increase of electron temperature from 6.30 to 6.74 eV. The optical emission spectroscopy study reveals that with addition of hydrogen, the density of argon ions decreases. The various positive ion species involving hydrogen are found to increase with increase of hydrogen partial pressure in the chamber. The thin films deposited were characterized using standard surface diagnostic tools such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Although it was possible to deposit thin films of titanium nitride with hydrogen addition in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma, the quality of the thin films deteriorates with higher hydrogen partial pressures.

  3. A magnetron system for high-flux plasma-surface interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmoth, B.; Ilyinsky, L.; Hultberg, S.; Barchenko, V.; Nasarov, O.

    1997-04-01

    A new compact magnetron plasma system and its characteristics are described. The system makes it possible to carry out ion irradiation experiments at high fluxes of 10 18 ions/cm 2·s and to reach fluences of 10 22 cm -2, with a homogeneous distribution over an area of 0.3 × 0.2 cm 2. The sample temperature, the distribution of ion flux densities within the sputtering zone, and the energy spectrum of ions are in situ measured during irradiation. The device is capable of producing a discharge current of up to 1.2 A and mean current densities of up to 100 mA/cm 2. The mean ion energy can be regulated in the range 50-500 eV by changing the working pressure and the discharge self-sustaining degree. The plasma can be swept over the interaction zone by using a moving magnet controlled by a stepping motor. The VC characteristics and discharge current relations were measured for several different gases and at different pressures in the plasma. Integral ion energy and current density distributions at the cathode surface were measured at different parameters. In the first experiments targets of graphite, silicon, molybdenum and titanium were used and exposed under similar plasma conditions using deuterium in the discharge, energies of 150 eV and fluences of 10 21 cm -2. RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) and NRA (Nuclear reaction analysis) were analytical techniques for the determination of deposited layers with respect to the quantity of deposits and for the study of the purity and homogeneity of the irradiated layers.

  4. Study on the influence of nitrogen on titanium nitride in a dc post magnetron sputtering plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Borah, Sankar; Bailung, Heremba; Ratan Pal, Arup; Chutia, Joyanti

    2008-10-01

    The characteristics of direct current (dc) glow discharge plasma have been studied in a post magnetron device with an argon and nitrogen gas mixture. The introduction of nitrogen modifies the discharge leading to modifications of plasma parameters, transport mechanism and the cathode sheath. The electron energy distribution function, density and temperature profile are measured to characterize the discharge. Measured plasma potential profiles show the modification of the structure of the cathode sheath and confinement space variation. Optical emission spectroscopy is used to identify prominent transitions of the different species in the discharge. The discharge mode in argon undergoes a transition from metallic mode to reactive mode when nitrogen concentration exceeds argon.

  5. Observations of the long-term plasma evolution in a pulsed dc magnetron discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, H.; Bradley, J. W.

    2005-08-01

    Using a time-resolved Langmuir probe the temporal evolution of the plasma parameters in a pulsed dc magnetron discharge was determined for a number of positions both inside and outside the magnetic trap. The discharge was operated at a pulse frequency of 2 kHz with a 50% duty cycle, a titanium target and at a fixed argon pressure of 0.53 Pa. The electron density, ne, electron temperature, Te, plasma potential, Vp and floating potential, Vf have typically two-fold characteristic decay and rise times, which increase with distance from the target. In the magnetic trap, the initial ne decay rate is ~18 µs, lengthening to 120 µs. However, in the plasma bulk, this figure is about 250 µs at all times during the plasma decay. The ne decay rate on the discharge centreline is somewhat slower at about 600 µs. During the transition from duty on to off phases a 'density-wave', initiated at the cathode, is observed to propagate downstream at about 1000 m s-1 (a velocity close to the calculated ion acoustic speed). The results reveal a complex picture in terms of the electron energies. In the off time, the electrons are characterized by a single Maxwellian distribution function and the initial Te decay times are between 6 and 10 µs. However, these lengthen dramatically to values between 600 and 800 µs depending on position to give a final Te value of about 0.2-0.3 eV. In the on time, and outside the magnetic trap, bi-Maxwellian electrons are observed with Teh = 4-6 eV and Tec = 1-2 eV. A simple model, taking into account the effect of the magnetic field on electron collection at the probe, has been used to show that the relative density of hot electrons is as high as 40%. On magnetic field lines that connect with the walls, bi-Maxwellian electrons exist during the whole on period; however, on the centreline their temperatures converge after about 100 µs to form a single distribution with Te ~ 3 eV. Plasma potential measurements show that the strong axial electric fields in

  6. Production Of Multi-magnetron Plasma By Using Polyphase Ac Glow Discharge In An Improved Multi-pole Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazunori; Motoki, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Uetani, Yasuhiro

    1998-10-01

    Effects of an improved multi-pole magnetic field on a plasma production generated by a polyphase ac glow discharge with multiple electrodes have been investigated. Conventional configuration of the multi-pole magnetic filed has been modified to suppress plasma losses at both ends of the chamber due to ExB drift motion. The modified multi-pole magnetic field has enabled us to produce a multiple magnetron-plasma at a considerably low pressure less than mTorr. The low temperature plasma has been widely used as the fine processing technology of a dry etching and as the thin film formation technology of a sputtering coating. Large-scale plasmas which can be generated at a low gas-pressure have been desired for more wider dry etching and greater sputter coating. The purpose of this study is to develop a large-scale and low-cost plasma generator by using a polyphase ac power source with the low frequency. In this session, we will present the experimental result as to a multiple magnetron-plasma generated in the modified twenty-four poles magnetic field by using the twenty-four-phase ac power source with the commercial electric power frequency of 60Hz. The ac power is supplied to twenty-four electrodes which are fixed to the water-cooled chamber-wall through sheet insulators so that the electrodes can be cooled indirectly.

  7. Growth of crystalline hydroxyapatite thin films at room temperature by tuning the energy of the RF-magnetron sputtering plasma.

    PubMed

    López, Elvis O; Mello, Alexandre; Sendão, Henrique; Costa, Lilian T; Rossi, André L; Ospina, Rogelio O; Borghi, Fabrício F; Silva Filho, José G; Rossi, Alexandre M

    2013-10-01

    Right angle radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique (RAMS) was redesigned to favor the production of high-quality hydroxyapatite (HA) thin coatings for biomedical applications. Stoichiometric HA films with controlled crystallinity, thickness varying from 254 to 540 nm, crystallite mean size of 73 nm, and RMS roughness of 1.7 ± 0.9 nm, were obtained at room temperature by tuning the thermodynamic properties of the plasma sheath energy. The plasma energies were adjusted by using a suitable high magnetic field confinement of 143 mT (1430 G) and a substrate floating potential of 2 V at the substrate-to-magnetron distance of Z = 10 mm and by varying the sputtering geometry, substrate-to-magnetron distance from Z = 5 mm to Z = 18 mm, forwarded RF power and reactive gas pressure. Measurements that were taken with a Langmuir probe showed that the adjusted RAMS geometry generated a plasma with an adequate effective temperature of Teff ≈ 11.8 eV and electron density of 2.0 × 10(15) m(-3) to nucleate nanoclusters and to further crystallize the nanodomains of stoichiometric HA. The deposition mechanism in the RAMS geometry was described by the formation of building units of amorphous calcium phosphate clusters (ACP), the conversion into HA nanodomains and the crystallization of the grain domains with a preferential orientation along the HA [002] direction. PMID:24059686

  8. Olympic torch transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver (right) transfers the Olympic flame to KSC runner Joanne Maceo's torch at the top of Launch Pad 39A after he carried the Olympic torch to the top of the pad as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Jon Granston of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (center) witnesses the exchange. Maceo then carried her lit torch down the concrete hard stand of the pad to pass the flame to another of the 20-member KSC runner team that participated in the KSC relay effort. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind the trio, poised for the STS-79 mission, with will feature the fourth docking of the shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  9. Ion distribution measurements to probe target and plasma processes in electronegative magnetron discharges. II. Positive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Th.; Ellmer, K.; Naumov, S.

    2011-04-01

    Spectra of the ion mass and energy distributions of positive ions in reactive (Ar/O{sub 2}) and nonreactive (Ar) dc magnetron sputtering discharges have been investigated by energy-resolved mass spectrometry. The results of three sputter target materials, i.e., Cu, In, and W are compared to each other. Besides the main gas constituents, mass spectra reveal a variety of molecular ions which are dependent on the target material. In reactive mode, ArO{sup +} is always observed in Ar/O{sub 2} but molecules containing Ar and the metal were exclusively found for the Cu target. The occurrence of the different ions is explained in the context of their bond strengths obtained from density functional theory calculations. The energy spectra generally contain the known low-energy peak corresponding to the plasma potential. Differently extended high-energy tails due to sputtered material were observed for the different targets. Besides these, high-energetic ions were detected with up to several 100 eV. Their energies are significantly different for Ar{sup +} and O{sup +} with Ar{sup +} strongly depending on the target material. The spectra are discussed together with results from transport of ions in matter (TRIM) calculation to elucidate the origin of these energetic ions.

  10. (Ti,Al,Si,C)N nanocomposite coatings synthesized by plasma-enhanced magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Zhengxian, Li; Jihong, Du; Yunfeng, Hua; Baoyun, Wang

    2011-10-01

    Materials' surface service property could be enhanced by transition metal nitride hard coatings due to their high hardness, wear and high temperature oxidation resistance, but the higher friction coefficient (0.4-0.9) of which aroused terrible abrasion. In this work, quinternary (Ti,Al,Si,C)N hard coating 3-4 μm was synthesized at 300 °C using plasma enhanced magnetron sputtering system. It was found that the coating's columnar crystals structure was restrained obviously with the increase of C content and a non-columnar crystals growth mode was indicated at the C content of 33.5 at.%. Both the XRD and TEM showed that the (Ti,Al,Si,C)N hard coatings had unique nanocomposite structures composed of nanocrystalline and amorphous nc-(Ti,Al)(C,N)/nc-AlN/a-Si 3N 4/a-Si/a-C. However, the coatings were still super hard with the highest hardness of 41 GPa in spite of the carbon incorporation. That a-C could facilitate the graphitization process during the friction process which could improve the coating's tribological performance. Therefore, that nanocomposite (Ti,Al,Si,C)N coatings with higher hardness (>36 GPa) and a lower friction coefficient (<0.2) could be synthesized and enhance the tribological performance and surface properties profoundly.

  11. Efficiency of inductively torch plasma operating at atmospheric pressure on destruction of chlorinated liquid wastes- A path to the treatment of radioactive organic halogen liquid wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamgang-Youbi, G.; Poizot, K.; Lemont, F.

    2012-12-01

    The performance of a plasma reactor for the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon waste is reported. Chloroform was used as a target for a recently patented destruction process based using an inductive plasma torch. Liquid waste was directly injected axially into the argon plasma with a supplied power of ~4 kW in the presence of oxygen as oxidant and carrier gas. Decomposition was performed at CHCl3 feed rates up to 400 g·h-1 with different oxygen/waste molar ratios, chloroform destruction was obtained with at least 99% efficiency and the energy efficiency reached 100 g·kWh-1. The conversion end products were identified and assayed by online FTIR spectroscopy (CO2, HCl and H2O) and redox titration (Cl2). Considering phosgene as representative of toxic compounds, only very small quantities of toxics were released (< 1 g·h-1) even with high waste feed rates. The experimental results were very close to the equilibrium composition predicted by thermodynamic calculations. At the bottom of the reactor, the chlorinated acids were successfully trapped in a scrubber and transformed into mineral salts, hence, only CO2 and H2O have been found in the final off-gases composition.

  12. Detoxifying PCDD/Fs and heavy metals in fly ash from medical waste incinerators with a DC double are plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xinchao; Yan, Jianhua; Xie, Zhengmiao

    2013-07-01

    Medical waste incinerator (MWI) fly ash is regarded as a highly toxic waste because it contains high concentrations of heavy metals and dioxins, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Therefore fly ash from MWI must be appropriately treated before being discharged into the environment. A melting process based on a direct current thermal plasma torch has been developed to convert MWI fly ash into harmless slag. The leaching characteristics of heavy metals in fly ash and vitrified slag were investigated using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, while the content of PCDD/Fs in the fly ashes and slags was measured using method 1613 of the US EPA. The experimental results show that the decomposition rate of PCDD/Fs is over 99% in toxic equivalent quantity value and the leaching of heavy metals in the slag significantly decreases after the plasma melting process. The produced slag has a compact and homogeneous microstructure with density of up to 2.8 g/cm3. PMID:24218848

  13. Deposition and characterization of molybdenum thin films using dc-plasma magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Majid; Islam, Mohammad

    2013-12-15

    Molebdenum (Mo) thin films were deposited on well-cleaned soda-lime glass substrates using DC-plasma magnetron sputtering. In the design of experiment deposition was optimized for maximum beneficial characteristics by monitoring effect of process variables such as deposition power (100–200 W). Their electrical, structural and morphological properties were analyzed to study the effect of these variables. The electrical resistivity of Mo thin films could be reduced by increasing deposition power. Within the range of analyzed deposition power, Mo thin films showed a mono crystalline nature and the crystallites were found to have an orientation along [110] direction. The surface morphology of thin films showed that a highly dense micro structure has been obtained. The surface roughness of films increased with deposition power. The adhesion of Mo thin films could be improved by increasing the deposition power. Atomic force microscopy was used for the topographical study of the films and to determine the roughness of the films. X-ray diffractrometer and scanning electron microscopy analysis were used to investigate the crystallinity and surface morphology of the films. Hall effect measurement system was used to find resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of deposited films. The adhesion test was performed using scotch hatch tape adhesion test. Mo thin films prepared at deposition power of 200 W, substrate temperature of 23°C and Ar pressure of 0.0123 mbar exhibited a mono crystalline structure with an orientation along (110) direction, thickness of ∼550 nm and electrical resistivity value of 0.57 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm.

  14. The application of an assisting gas plasma generator for low- temperature magnetron sputtering of Ti-C-Mo-S antifriction coatings on titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Savostikov, V. M.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Dudarev, E. F.; Melnikova, E. A.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The positive effect of assisting influence of high-density gas plasma formed by an independent plasma generator PINK on mechanical and tribological characteristics of Ti-C- Mo-S magnetron coating on titanium alloys at lowered to 350°C temperature of coating regardless of alloy structural condition was revealed by methods of calotest, nanorecognition, scratch testing and frictional material tests. The coating formed by means of a combined magnetron plasma method reduces titanium alloys friction coefficient in multiple times and increases wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. At the same time the mechanical properties of ultra-fine-grained titanium alloys obtained by nanostructuring do not deteriorate.

  15. Novel plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition hardware and technique based on high power pulsed magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongzhen; Tian Xiubo; Shi Jingwei; Wang Zeming; Gong Chunzhi; Yang Shiqin; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-03-15

    A novel plasma immersion ion implantation technique based on high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) discharge that can produce a high density metal plasma is described. The metal plasma is clean and does not suffer from contamination from macroparticles, and the process can be readily scaled up for industrial production. The hardware, working principle, and operation modes are described. A matching circuit is developed to modulate the high-voltage and HPPMS pulses to enable operation under different modes such as simultaneous implantation and deposition, pure implantation, and selective implantation. To demonstrate the efficacy of the system and technique, CrN films with a smooth and dense surface without macroparticles were produced. An excellent adhesion with a critical load of 59.9 N is achieved for the pure implantation mode.

  16. Photocatalytic property of titanium dioxide thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in argon and water vapour plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.; Hatanaka, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is investigating the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 thin films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering of a pure TiO2 target in Ar and Ar/H2O (pressure ratio 40/3) plasmas. Optical absorption, structure, surface morphology and chemical structure of the deposited films were comparatively studied. The films were amorphous and included a large amount of hydroxyl groups (about 5% of oxygen atoms were bounded to hydrogen) irrespective of the intentional content of water in the deposition chamber. Incorporation of hydroxyl groups in the film deposited in pure Ar plasma is explained as contamination of the working gas with water molecules desorbed by plasma from the deposition chamber walls. However, intentional input of water vapour into the discharge chamber decreased the deposition speed and roughness of the deposited films. The good photocatalytic activity of the deposited films could be attributed hydroxyl groups in their structures.

  17. Refuse derived fuel (RDF) plasma torch gasification as a feasible route to produce low environmental impact syngas for the cement industry.

    PubMed

    López-Sabirón, Ana M; Fleiger, Kristina; Schäfer, Stefan; Antoñanzas, Javier; Irazustabarrena, Ane; Aranda-Usón, Alfonso; Ferreira, Germán A

    2015-08-01

    Plasma torch gasification (PTG) is currently researched as a technology for solid waste recovery. However, scientific studies based on evaluating its environmental implications considering the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology are lacking. Therefore, this work is focused on comparing the environmental effect of the emissions of syngas combustion produced by refuse derived fuel (RDF) and PTG as alternative fuels, with that related to fossil fuel combustion in the cement industry. To obtain real data, a semi-industrial scale pilot plant was used to perform experimental trials on RDF-PTG.The results highlight that PTG for waste to energy recovery in the cement industry is environmentally feasible considering its current state of development. A reduction in every impact category was found when a total or partial substitution of alternative fuel for conventional fuel in the calciner firing (60 % of total thermal energy input) was performed. Furthermore, the results revealed that electrical energy consumption in PTG is also an important parameter from the LCA approach. PMID:26081643

  18. ION MAGNETRON

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Layman, R.W.

    1962-10-31

    A magnetohydrodynamic device or plasma generator of the ion magnetron class is described wherein a long central electrode is disposed along the axis of an evacuated cylinder. A radial electric field and an axial magnetic field are provided between the cylsnder and the electrode, forming a plasma trapping and heating region. For maximum effectiveness, neutral particles from the cylinder wall must be prevented from entering such region This is effected by forming a cylindrical sheath of electrons near the cylinder wall for ionizing undesired neutral particles, which are then trapped and removed by the magnetic field. An annular filament at one end of the device provides the electrons, which follow the axial magnetic field to a reflecting electrode at the opposite end of the device. (AEC)

  19. Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-08-28

    The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

  20. Comparison of gate dielectric plasma damage from plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited and magnetron sputtered TiN metal gates

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Christopher J.; Neumann, Christopher M.; Vitale, Steven A.

    2015-07-28

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator transistors were fabricated using two different metal gate deposition mechanisms to compare plasma damage effects on gate oxide quality. Devices fabricated with both plasma-enhanced atomic-layer-deposited (PE-ALD) TiN gates and magnetron plasma sputtered TiN gates showed very good electrostatics and short-channel characteristics. However, the gate oxide quality was markedly better for PE-ALD TiN. A significant reduction in interface state density was inferred from capacitance-voltage measurements as well as a 1200× reduction in gate leakage current. A high-power magnetron plasma source produces a much higher energetic ion and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photon flux to the wafer compared to a low-power inductively coupled PE-ALD source. The ion and VUV photons produce defect states in the bulk of the gate oxide as well as at the oxide-silicon interface, causing higher leakage and potential reliability degradation.

  1. Comparison of gate dielectric plasma damage from plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited and magnetron sputtered TiN metal gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Christopher J.; Neumann, Christopher M.; Vitale, Steven A.

    2015-07-01

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator transistors were fabricated using two different metal gate deposition mechanisms to compare plasma damage effects on gate oxide quality. Devices fabricated with both plasma-enhanced atomic-layer-deposited (PE-ALD) TiN gates and magnetron plasma sputtered TiN gates showed very good electrostatics and short-channel characteristics. However, the gate oxide quality was markedly better for PE-ALD TiN. A significant reduction in interface state density was inferred from capacitance-voltage measurements as well as a 1200× reduction in gate leakage current. A high-power magnetron plasma source produces a much higher energetic ion and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photon flux to the wafer compared to a low-power inductively coupled PE-ALD source. The ion and VUV photons produce defect states in the bulk of the gate oxide as well as at the oxide-silicon interface, causing higher leakage and potential reliability degradation.

  2. Microwave torch as a plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Knyazev, V. Yu.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.

    2006-06-15

    The possibility of using a microwave coaxial plasmatron (a microwave torch) as an efficient plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides in an air jet has been studied experimentally. A plasmachemical model of the generator is developed. Results of calculations by this model do not contradict experimental results. A conclusion about the mechanisms governing NO{sub x} production in a plasma torch is drawn by comparing the experimental and calculated results.

  3. Ion distribution measurements to probe target and plasma processes in electronegative magnetron discharges. I. Negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Th.; Ellmer, K.; Naumov, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mass and energy spectra of negative ions in magnetron sputtering discharges have been investigated with an energy-dispersive mass spectrometer. The dc magnetrons have been operated in the same reactive Ar/O{sub 2} atmosphere but with three different target materials: Cu, In, and W. Besides negative ions of the working gas, a variety of target metal containing negative molecular ions were found in the discharge. Their occurrence is strongly dependent on the target material. It has been correlated to the electron affinity and the bond strength of the molecules which has been calculated by density functional theory. Energy spectra of the negative ions exhibit three contributions that are clearly distinguishable. Their different origin is discussed as electron attachment in the gas phase and at the target surface, and molecule fragmentation during transport from target to substrate. The latter two contributions again significantly deviate for different target material. The high-energy part of the spectra has been analyzed with respect to the energy the particles gain upon release from the surface. It suggests that bigger molecules formed on the surface are released by ion-assisted desorption.

  4. A Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM)

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Cohen; Z. Wang

    1998-04-01

    A new type of plasma sputtering device, named the hollow cathode magnetron (HCM), has been developed by surrounding a planar magnetron cathode with a hollow cathode structure (HCS). Operating characteristics of HCMs, current-voltage ( I-V ) curves for fixed discharge pressure and voltage-pressure ( V-p ) curves for fixed cathode current, are measured. Such characteristics are compared with their planar magnetron counterparts. New operation regimes, such as substantially lower pressures (0.3 mTorr), were discovered for HCMs. Cathode erosion profiles show marked improvement over planar magnetron in terms of material utilization. The use of HCMs for thin film deposition are discussed.

  5. Morphological changes of tungsten surfaces by low-flux helium plasma treatment and helium incorporation via magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Iyyakkunnel, Santhosh; Marot, Laurent; Eren, Baran; Steiner, Roland; Moser, Lucas; Mathys, Daniel; Düggelin, Marcel; Chapon, Patrick; Meyer, Ernst

    2014-07-23

    The effect of helium on the tungsten microstructure was investigated first by exposure to a radio frequency driven helium plasma with fluxes of the order of 1 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) and second by helium incorporation via magnetron sputtering. Roughening of the surface and the creation of pinholes were observed when exposing poly- and nanocrystalline tungsten samples to low-flux plasma. A coating process using an excess of helium besides argon in the process gas mixture leads to a porous thin film and a granular surface structure whereas gas mixture ratios of up to 50% He/Ar (in terms of their partial pressures) lead to a dense structure. The presence of helium in the deposited film was confirmed with glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy and thermal desorption measurements. Latter revealed that the highest fraction of the embedded helium atoms desorb at approximately 1500 K. Identical plasma treatments at various temperatures showed strongest modifications of the surface at 1500 K, which is attributed to the massive activation of helium singly bond to a single vacancy inside the film. Thus, an efficient way of preparing nanostructured tungsten surfaces and porous tungsten films at low fluxes was found. PMID:24960311

  6. Low-temperature growth of gallium nitride films by inductively coupled-plasma-enhanced reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chih-Jui; Chau-Nan Hong, Franklin

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films were grown on sapphire substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering. Inductively coupled-plasma (ICP) source was installed between the substrate holder and the sputtering target to increase the plasma density and the degree of ionization of nitrogen gas. Liquid Ga and Ar/N{sub 2} were used as the sputtering target and sputtering gases, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the authors could grow high quality GaN crystallites at 500 °C. However, the crystalline GaN (0002) peak remained even by lowering the growth temperature down to 300 °C. The N:Ga ratio of the film grown at 500 °C was almost 1:1, and the nitrogen composition became higher toward the 1:1 N:Ga ratio with increasing the growth temperature. The high degree of ionization induced by ICP source was essential to the growth of high crystalline quality GaN films.

  7. Hydrogen/Air-Ignition Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, George A.

    1988-01-01

    Torch is simple, reliable, and economical. Airflow cools inner tube prior to flowing through openings in inner tube and mixing with gaseous hydrogen. Spark plug connected to constant-duty simple ignition transformer threaded into side of torch and into inner tube. Transformer used to excite spark plug for period long enough to ignite gas. Transformer is turned off.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy enhanced by a micro torch.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Huang, X; Li, S; Lu, Yao; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2015-06-01

    A commercial butane micron troch was used to enhance plasma optical emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Fast imaging and spectroscopic analyses were used to observe plasma evolution in the atmospheric pressure for LIBS without and with using a micro torch. Optical emission intensities and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) as functions of delay time were studied. Enhanced optical emission and SNRs were obtained by using a micro torch. The effects of laser pulse energy on the emission intensities and SNRs were studied. The same spectral intensity could be obtained using micro torch with much lower laser pulse energy. The investigation of SNR evolution with delay time at different laser pulse energies showed that the SNR enhancement factor is higher for plasmas generated by lower laser pulse energies than those generated by higher laser energies. The calibration curves of emission line intensities with elemental concentrations showed that detection sensitivities of Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm were improved by around 3 times. The limits of detection for both Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm are reduced from 425 and 42 ppm to 139 and 20 ppm, respectively, after using the micro torch. The LIBS system with micro torch was demonstrated to be cost-effective, compact, and capable of sensitivity improvement, especially for LIBS system operating with low laser pulse energy. PMID:26072861

  9. Plasma properties during magnetron sputtering of lithium phosphorous oxynitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Ane S.; Stamate, Eugen; Thydén, Karl; Younesi, Reza; Holtappels, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitrogen dissociation and plasma parameters during radio frequency sputtering of lithium phosphorus oxynitride thin films in nitrogen gas are investigated by mass appearance spectrometry, electrostatic probes and optical emission spectroscopy, and the results are correlated with electrochemical properties and microstructure of the films. Low pressure and moderate power are associated with lower plasma density, higher electron temperature, higher plasma potential and larger diffusion length for sputtered particles. This combination of parameters favors the presence of more atomic nitrogen, a fact that correlates with a higher ionic conductivity. Despite of lower plasma density the film grows faster at lower pressure where the higher plasma potential, translated into higher energy for impinging ions on the substrate, resulted in a compact and smooth film structure. Higher pressures showed much less nitrogen dissociation and lower ion energy with thinner films, less ionic conductivity and poor film structure with large roughness.

  10. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  11. Microexplosions initiated by a microwave capillary torch on a metal surface at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-07-15

    The interaction of the plasma of a microwave capillary argon torch with a metal surface was studied experimentally. It is shown that the interaction of the plasma jet generated by the capillary plasma torch with the metal in atmospheric-pressure air leads to the initiation of microexplosions (sparks) on the metal surface. As a result, the initially smooth surface acquires a relief in the form of microtips and microcraters. The possibility of practical application of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  12. Microexplosions initiated by a microwave capillary torch on a metal surface at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of the plasma of a microwave capillary argon torch with a metal surface was studied experimentally. It is shown that the interaction of the plasma jet generated by the capillary plasma torch with the metal in atmospheric-pressure air leads to the initiation of microexplosions (sparks) on the metal surface. As a result, the initially smooth surface acquires a relief in the form of microtips and microcraters. The possibility of practical application of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  13. Study on the effect of hydrogen addition on the variation of plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge for synthesis of TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Bhuyan, Heman

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen addition on plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge plasma in the synthesis of H-doped TiO2 films. The parameters of the hydrogen-added Ar/O2 plasma influence the properties and the structural phases of the deposited TiO2 film. Therefore, the variation of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), ion density (ni), degree of ionization of Ar and degree of dissociation of H2 as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is studied. Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the plasma. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase of the magnetron discharge, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. It is observed that the electron and heavy ion density decline with gradual addition of hydrogen in the discharge. Hydrogen addition significantly changes the degree of ionization of Ar which influences the structural phases of the TiO2 film.

  14. Evolution of the plasma composition of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system studied with a time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim

    2009-05-01

    The plasma of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system has been investigated using a time-of-flight spectrometer. The target materials included high sputter yield materials (Cu, Ag), transition metals (Nb, Cr, Ti), and carbon (graphite); the sputtering gases were argon, krypton, and nitrogen, and two different target thicknesses were selected to consider the role of the magnetic field strength. Measurements for selected combinations of those parameters give quantitative information on the transition from gas-dominated to metal-dominated (self-sputtering) plasma, on the fractions of ion charge states, and in the case of molecular gases, on the fraction of atomic and molecular ions.

  15. Evolution of the plasma composition of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system studied with a time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2008-12-31

    The plasma of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system has been investigated using a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The target materials included high sputter yield materials (Cu, Ag), transition metals (Nb, Cr, Ti), and carbon (graphite); the sputtering gases were argon, krypton and nitrogen, and two different target thicknesses were selected to consider the role of the magnetic field strength. Measurements for selected combinations of those parameters give quantitative information on the transition from gas-dominated to metal-dominated (self-sputtering) plasma, on the fractions of ion charge states, and in the case of molecular gases, on the fraction of atomic and molecular ions.

  16. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  17. Vehicle exhaust gas clearance by low temperature plasma-driven nano-titanium dioxide film prepared by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  18. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu; Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W.

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  19. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Sáfrán, G.; Székely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N2 atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (Id) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti1+, Ti2+ and atomic nitrogen N1+. Ti1+ ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 × 1016 m-3. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high Id, N1+: N21+> 1 and Ti1+: Ti0> 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As Id reduced and N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low Id, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and properties are discussed.

  20. Loren Shriver carries Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the Center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  1. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  2. Correlation between optical characterization of the plasma in reactive magnetron sputtering deposition of Zr N on SS 316L and surface and mechanical properties of the deposited films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragiel, A.; Machorro, R.; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.; Salinas, J.; Cota, L.

    2008-05-01

    Optical and surface spectroscopies as well as nanoindentation techniques have been used to study ZrN coatings on 316L stainless steel obtained by DC-reactive magnetron sputtering. The deposit process was carried out using initial and working pressures of 10 -6 Torr and 10 -3 Torr, respectively. The experimental set-up for optical spectra acquisition was designed for the study in situ of the plasma in the deposition chamber. Auger spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the coatings. Nanoindentation tests were carried out to measure the mechanical properties of the coating. Plasma characterization revealed the presence of CN molecules and Cr ions in the plasma. Surface spectroscopy results showed that ZrN, Zr 3N 4 and ZrC coexist in the coating. These results allowed the understanding of the mechanical behavior of the coatings, demonstrating the importance of the plasma characterization as a tool for tailoring the properties of hard coatings.

  3. Determination of ionization fraction and plasma potential in a dc magnetron sputtering system using a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic which combines a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer has been developed to measure the ion-to- neutral ratio and the plasma potential in a commercial dc magnetron sputtering device. Additional features of this sensor include an externally controlled shutter which protects the diagnostic when it is in the chamber, but it is not in use. The diagnostic is mounted on a linear motion feedthrough and embedded in a slot in the wafer chuck to allow for measuring uniformity in deposition and ionization throughout the plane of the wafer. RF power is introduced to ionize the Al particles. Using the quartz crystal microbalance and the gridded energy analyzer, the ion-to-neutral ratio and other parameters are determined. Comparing the total deposition rate with and without a bias that screens out the ions, but leaves the plasma undisturbed, allows for the determination of the ion-to-neutral ratio. By varying the voltage applied to the grids, the plasma potential is measured. For example, a magnetron configuration having a pressure of 35 mtorr, a dc power of 2 kW, and a net rf power of 310{+-}5 W yielded 78{+-}5% ionization and a plasma potential of 35{+-}1 V.

  4. Spatially resolved electron density and electron energy distribution function in Ar magnetron plasmas used for sputter-deposition of ZnO-based thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L.

    2015-11-15

    Langmuir probe and trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy were used to analyze the spatial structure of the electron density and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a cylindrical Ar magnetron plasma reactor used for sputter-deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While a typical Bessel (zero order) diffusion profile was observed along the radial direction for the number density of charged particles at 21 cm from the ZnO target, a significant rise of these populations with respect to the Bessel function was seen in the center of the reactor at 4 cm from the magnetron surface. As for the EEDF, it was found to transform from a more or less Maxwellian far from the target to a two-temperature Maxwellian with a depletion of high-energy electrons where magnetic field confinement effects become important. No significant change in the behavior of the electron density and EEDF across a wide range of pressures (5–100 mTorr) and self-bias voltages (115–300 V) was observed during magnetron sputtering of Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets. This indicates that sputtering of Zn, In, and O atoms do not play a very significant role on the electron particle balance and electron heating dynamics, at least over the range of experimental conditions investigated.

  5. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Safran, G.; Szekely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N{sub 2} atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (I{sub d}) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti{sup 1+}, Ti{sup 2+} and atomic nitrogen N{sup 1+}. Ti{sup 1+} ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high I{sub d}, N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} > 1 and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} > 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As I{sub d} reduced and N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low I{sub d}, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and

  6. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering. PMID:27433719

  7. Micro torch assisted nanostructures' formation of nickel during femtosecond laser surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Duan, Ji'an; Wang, Cong; Dong, Xinran; Song, Yuxin; Luo, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we perform a comprehensive study of micro torch effect on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced nanostructures on nickel. Under identical experimental conditions, laser induced nanostructures and periodic surface patterns exhibit distinctly different level of morphology with and without the micro torch. In addition, assisted by the micro torch, the ablation threshold is considerably reduced and the content of oxygen in the textured nanostructures keeps a stable low level. It is suggested that the change on the surface directly relates to the status of plasma plume and substrate heating. With the assistance of the micro torch, laser induced plasma plume is confined and its density at center region is raised, which results in the increase of the central plasma's temperature, more energy deposited on the nickel surface, and ultimately leading to the changes in the nanostructures' morphology and ablation threshold.

  8. Welding torch and wire feed manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    Welding torch and wire feed manipulator increase capability for performing automatic welding operations. The manipulator rotates on its horizontal axis to avoid obstacles as they approach the torch. The initial individual attitudes of the torch and wire guide are set with respect to the general configuration of the part.

  9. Automatic Guidance System for Welding Torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H.; Wall, W.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Digital system automatically guides welding torch to produce squarebutt, V-groove and lap-joint weldments within tracking accuracy of +0.2 millimeter. Television camera observes and traverses weld joint, carrying welding torch behind. Image of joint digitized, and resulting data used to derive control signals that enable torch to track joint.

  10. Monitoring Weld Penetration Optically From Within Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Linsacum, Deron L.; Gutlow, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Photodetector or optical fiber leading to photodetector mounted inside gas/tungsten arc welding torch to monitor arc light reflected from oscillating surface of weld pool. Proposed optical monitoring components preserve compact profile of welding torch, maintained in fixed aim at weld-pool position at end of welding torch, and protected against bumping external objects.