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Sample records for mainstream silicon carbide

  1. Correlated Strontium and Barium Isotopic Compositions of Acid-cleaned Single Mainstream Silicon Carbides from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Savina, Michael R.; Gallino, Roberto; Davis, Andrew M.; Bisterzo, Sara; Gyngard, Frank; Käppeler, Franz; Cristallo, Sergio; Dauphas, Nicolas; Pellin, Michael J.; Dillmann, Iris

    2015-04-01

    We present strontium, barium, carbon, and silicon isotopic compositions of 61 acid-cleaned presolar SiC grains from Murchison. Comparison with previous data shows that acid washing is highly effective in removing both strontium and barium contamination. For the first time, by using correlated 88Sr/86Sr and 138Ba/136Ba ratios in mainstream SiC grains, we are able to resolve the effect of 13C concentration from that of 13C-pocket mass on s-process nucleosynthesis, which points toward the existence of large 13C pockets with low 13C concentrations in asymptotic giant branch stars. The presence of such large 13C pockets with a variety of relatively low 13C concentrations seems to require multiple mixing processes in parent asymptotic giant branch stars of mainstream SiC grains.

  2. Isotopic compositions of s-process elements in acid-cleaned mainstream presolar silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan

    Pristine meteorites contain ancient stellar relicts that survived destructions in the early solar system. Isotopic studies of these presolar grains have proven to be a unique method to understand various known and unknown nucleosynthetic processes occurred in their parent stars. Previous studies of isotopic compositions of heavy elements in mainstream SiC grains from low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars reported contamination from solar system materials with normal isotopic compositions on grain surfaces and prevented the authors from obtaining the pure nucleosynthetic isotopic signature from stars. In addition, in these previous studies uncertainties in the major neutron source 13C within the 13C-pocket were underestimated because only the 13C mass fraction was considered as a parameter with the 13C-pocket mass and the 13C profile fixed in model calculations. The oversimplified treatment of the 13C-pocket mainly resulted from the fact that it was unclear if there exists any tracer to distinguish different effects of the 13C concentration, the 13C-pocket mass, and the 13C profile within the 13C-pocket. To address these issues, we acid-cleaned all the presolar SiC grains used in this study after their separation from the bulk Murchison meteorite. In addition, we chose to measure strontium and barium isotopic compositions in these acid-cleaned SiC grains, because both elements sit at the first and second s-process peaks along the s-process path, and are sensitive to varying parameters for the s-process in model calculations. By comparing our new acid-cleaned grain data with single grain data from previous studies for barium isotopes, we conclude that the acid-cleaning procedure is quite effective in removing surface barium contamination. For the first time, we find that model predictions for 138Ba/ 136Ba are sensitive to all three variables of the 13C-pocket adopted in AGB model calculations. In order to match the low 138Ba/ 136Ba values in a minor group of

  3. Barium Isotopic Composition of Mainstream Silicon Carbides from Murchison: Constraints for s-process Nucleosynthesis in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Savina, Michael R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Gallino, Roberto; Straniero, Oscar; Gyngard, Frank; Pellin, Michael J.; Willingham, David G.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Pignatari, Marco; Bisterzo, Sara; Cristallo, Sergio; Herwig, Falk

    2014-05-01

    We present barium, carbon, and silicon isotopic compositions of 38 acid-cleaned presolar SiC grains from Murchison. Comparison with previous data shows that acid washing is highly effective in removing barium contamination. Strong depletions in δ(138Ba/136Ba) values are found, down to -400‰, which can only be modeled with a flatter 13C profile within the 13C pocket than is normally used. The dependence of δ(138Ba/136Ba) predictions on the distribution of 13C within the pocket in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models allows us to probe the 13C profile within the 13C pocket and the pocket mass in AGB stars. In addition, we provide constraints on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg rate in the stellar temperature regime relevant to AGB stars, based on δ(134Ba/136Ba) values of mainstream grains. We found two nominally mainstream grains with strongly negative δ(134Ba/136Ba) values that cannot be explained by any of the current AGB model calculations. Instead, such negative values are consistent with the intermediate neutron capture process (i process), which is activated by the very late thermal pulse during the post-AGB phase and characterized by a neutron density much higher than the s process. These two grains may have condensed around post-AGB stars. Finally, we report abundances of two p-process isotopes, 130Ba and 132Ba, in single SiC grains. These isotopes are destroyed in the s process in AGB stars. By comparing their abundances with respect to that of 135Ba, we conclude that there is no measurable decay of 135Cs (t 1/2 = 2.3 Ma) to 135Ba in individual SiC grains, indicating condensation of barium, but not cesium into SiC grains before 135Cs decayed.

  4. Barium isotopic composition of mainstream silicon carbides from Murchison: Constraints for s-process nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Savina, Michael R.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio; Gyngard, Frank; Willingham, David G.; Pignatari, Marco; Herwig, Falk

    2014-05-01

    We present barium, carbon, and silicon isotopic compositions of 38 acid-cleaned presolar SiC grains from Murchison. Comparison with previous data shows that acid washing is highly effective in removing barium contamination. Strong depletions in δ({sup 138}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) values are found, down to –400‰, which can only be modeled with a flatter {sup 13}C profile within the {sup 13}C pocket than is normally used. The dependence of δ({sup 138}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) predictions on the distribution of {sup 13}C within the pocket in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models allows us to probe the {sup 13}C profile within the {sup 13}C pocket and the pocket mass in AGB stars. In addition, we provide constraints on the {sup 22}Ne(α, n){sup 25}Mg rate in the stellar temperature regime relevant to AGB stars, based on δ({sup 134}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) values of mainstream grains. We found two nominally mainstream grains with strongly negative δ({sup 134}Ba/{sup 136}Ba) values that cannot be explained by any of the current AGB model calculations. Instead, such negative values are consistent with the intermediate neutron capture process (i process), which is activated by the very late thermal pulse during the post-AGB phase and characterized by a neutron density much higher than the s process. These two grains may have condensed around post-AGB stars. Finally, we report abundances of two p-process isotopes, {sup 130}Ba and {sup 132}Ba, in single SiC grains. These isotopes are destroyed in the s process in AGB stars. By comparing their abundances with respect to that of {sup 135}Ba, we conclude that there is no measurable decay of {sup 135}Cs (t {sub 1/2} = 2.3 Ma) to {sup 135}Ba in individual SiC grains, indicating condensation of barium, but not cesium into SiC grains before {sup 135}Cs decayed.

  5. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  6. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  7. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  8. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  9. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  10. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  11. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  12. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  13. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  14. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  15. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  16. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamic maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of Region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicon carbide is the single stable solid phase in Region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4, and SiH. Analysis of the kinetics of reaction for Region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to Regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  17. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamics maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicone carbide is the single stable solid phase in region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4 and SiH. Analyses of the kinetics of reaction for region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  18. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  19. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  20. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  1. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  2. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  3. Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    House, M.B.; Day, P.S.

    1997-05-01

    High frequency (50--150 MHz), ultrasonic immersion testing has been used to characterize the surface and interfacial joint conditions of microwave bonded, monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The high resolution ultrasonic C-scan images point to damage accumulation after thermal cycling. Image processing was used to study the effects of the thermal cycling on waveform shape, amplitude and distribution. Such information is useful for concurrently engineering material fabrication processes and suitable nondestructive test procedures.

  4. Silicon carbide semiconductor technology for high temperature and radiation environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on silicon carbide semiconductor technology and its potential for enabling electronic devices to function in high temperature and high radiation environments are presented. Topics covered include silicon carbide; sublimation growth of 6H-SiC boules; SiC chemical vapor deposition reaction system; 6H silicon carbide p-n junction diode; silicon carbide MOSFET; and silicon carbide JFET radiation response.

  5. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  6. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  7. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  8. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T. L.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Lewis, R. S.; Messenger, S.; Stadermann, F. J.; Amari, S.; Materials Science Division; Naval Research Lab.; Washington Univ.; Univ. of Chicago

    2002-06-07

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures.

  9. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Daulton, T L; Bernatowicz, T J; Lewis, R S; Messenger, S; Stadermann, F J; Amari, S

    2002-06-01

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures. PMID:12052956

  10. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  11. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  12. Damage kinetics in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickup, I. M.; Barker, A. K.

    1998-07-01

    Three silicon carbides of similar density and grain size but manufactured via different routes (reaction bonded, pressureless sintered and pressure assisted densification) have been investigated. High speed photography in conjunction with Hopkinson pressure bar compression tests has revealed that not only does the manufacturing route confer a significant difference in failure kinetics but also modifies the phenomenology of failure. Plate impact experiments using lateral and longitudinal manganin stress gauges have been used to study shear strength behaviour of damaged material. Failure waves have been observed in all three materials and characteristically different damaged material shear strength relationships with pressure have been observed.

  13. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  14. Nitride-bonded silicon carbide composite filter

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, B.N.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an advanced hot gas filter, using ceramic component technology, with enhanced durability to provide increased resistance to thermal fatigue and crack propagation. The material is silicon carbide fiber reinforced nitride bonded silicon carbide.

  15. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  16. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  17. Anisotropic tribological properties of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of crystallographic orientation on the tribological properties of single-crystal silicon carbide surfaces in contact with various solids are investigated for adhesive and abrasive wear processes. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion and wear of silicon carbide is found to be markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force resisting shearing fracture of the adhesive bonds at the interface is lower in preferred crystallographic direction of slip. In the abrasive wear process, the 1 0 -1 0 direction on the basal plane of silicon carbide exhibits the lowest coefficient of friction and the greatest resistance to abrasion.

  18. Converted silicon carbide technology developments for optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duston, Christopher; Woestman, Ken; Vargas, Hugo; deBlonk, Brett

    2007-09-01

    Silicon carbide structures fabricated by converting near-net-shape graphite preforms via Chemical Vapor Conversion (CVC) phase reaction have long provided improved performance components for electronics processing. In recent years, this same technology has been applied to the fabrication of simple and lightweighted mirrors and is moving into optical bench applications. To support the expanded applications, Poco has further evaluated the material properties of SUPERSiC® silicon carbide, developed technologies to mount silicon carbide mirrors on benches of similar and dissimilar materials, and fabricated complex monolithic geometries using in situ conversion bonding of mating graphite components. Overviews of each of these areas will be presented.

  19. Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  20. Improved consolidation of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. R.; Millard, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha silicon carbide powder was consolidated by both dry and wet methods. Dry pressing in a double acting steel die yielded sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 235.6 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 100 micro m. An aqueous slurry pressing technique produced sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 440.8 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 25 micro m. Image analysis revealed a reduction in both pore area and pore size distribution in the slurry pressed sintered test bars. The improvements in the slurry pressed material properties are discussed in terms of reduced agglomeration and improved particle packing during consolidation.

  1. Silicon carbide material sintered bodies manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for producing a high density silicon carbide sintering substance which contains aluminum oxide. The sintering is done in CO gas atmosphere, which is kept at 2 to 20 atmospheric pressures.

  2. Silicon Carbide Transistor For Detecting Hydrocarbon Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Williams, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed silicon carbide variable-potential insulated-gate field-effect transistor specially designed for use in measuring concentrations of hydrocarbon gases. Devices like this prove useful numerous automotive, industrial, aeronautical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  3. Whatever happened to silicon carbide. [semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The progress made in silicon carbide semiconductor devices in the 1955 to 1975 time frame is examined and reasons are given for the present lack of interest in the material. Its physical and chemical properties and methods of preparation are discussed. Fabrication techniques and the characteristics of silicon carbide devices are reviewed. It is concluded that a combination of economic factors and the lack of progress in fabrication techniques leaves no viable market for SiC devices in the near future.

  4. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  5. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  6. Direct plasmadynamic synthesis of ultradisperse silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Nikitin, D. S.; Pak, A. Ya.; Rakhmatullin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultradisperse cubic silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been obtained by direct plasmadynamic synthesis in pulsed supersonic carbon-silicon plasma jet incident on a copper obstacle in argon atmosphere. The powdered product has a high content of β-SiC in the form of single crystals with average size of about 100 nm and nearly perfect crystallographic habit.

  7. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  8. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  9. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  10. Joining of silicon carbide composites for fusion energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewinsohn, C. A.; Singh, M.; Shibayama, T.; Hinoki, T.; Ando, M.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2000-12-01

    Joining of silicon carbide based materials has been recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the successful utilization of ceramic components in fusion energy systems. Sintered silicon carbide (Hexoloy SA) and silicon carbide (Hi-Nicalon™) fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites have been joined using reaction forming/bonding based joining technologies. The room- and high-temperature mechanical properties and fractography of ceramic joints have been reported.

  11. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  12. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOEpatents

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  13. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  14. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  15. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  16. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  17. On the sintering of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugel, E.

    1986-01-01

    This document deals with the sintering of silicon carbide using pressureless sintering. This technique makes it possible to sinter a primarily covalent material to usable densities up to over 98% thD without having to use a high amount of sinter additives as is the case with other non-oxide ceramic materials. The process takes place rapidly, and it is also possible to produce relatively thick-walled structural parts without major problems. This sheds more light on the true characteristics of silicon carbide in one structural part, since there is no second or nearly no second phase. Heat pressing has improved stability.

  18. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  19. Tough silicon nitride matrix composites using Textron silicon carbide monofilaments

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, W.; Lecostaouec, J.F.; Landry, C.; Dipietro, S.; Vasilos, T.

    1989-10-01

    The use of Textron SCS silicon carbide monofilament fibers as a reinforcement for silicon nitride is described. Samples were processed by both chemical vapor infiltration and hot pressing. Mechanical tests were performed in flexure, tension, and in shear. A ballistic test demonstrated high velocity impact toughness. 5 refs.

  20. Design considerations and experimental analysis for silicon carbide power rectifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemka, V.; Patel, R.; Chow, T. P.; Gutmann, R. J.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper we present the investigation of properties of silicon carbide power rectifiers, in particular Schottky, PiN and advanced hybrid power rectifiers such as the trench MOS barrier Schottky rectifier. Analysis of the forward, reverse and switching experimental characteristics are presented and these silicon carbide rectifiers are compared to silicon devices. Silicon carbide Schottky rectifiers are attractive for applications requiring blocking voltage in excess of 100 V as the use of Si is precluded by its large specific on-resistance. Analysis of power dissipation indicates that silicon carbide Schottky rectifiers offer significant improvement over silicon counterparts. Silicon carbide junction rectifiers, on the other hand, are superior to silicon counterparts only for blocking voltage greater than 2000 V. Performance of acceptor (boron) and donor (phosphorus) implanted experimental silicon carbide junction rectifiers are presented and compared. Some of the recent developments in silicon carbide rectifiers have been described and compared with theory and our experimental results. The well established silicon rectifiers theory are often inadequate to describe the characteristics of the experimental silicon carbide junction rectifiers and appropriate generalization of these theories are presented. Experimental trench MOS barrier Schottky rectifiers (TMBS) have demonstrated significant improvement in leakage current compared to planar Schottky devices. Performance of current state-of-the-art silicon carbide rectifiers are far from theoretical predictions. Availability of high-quality silicon carbide crystals is crucial to successful realization of these performance projections.

  1. Tribological properties of sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Srinivasan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Tribological studies and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were conducted with sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide surfaces in sliding contact with iron at various temperatures to 1500 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the friction properties and the surface chemistry of silicon carbide. The main contaminants on the as received sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide surfaces are adsorbed carbon, oxygen, graphite, and silicon dioxide. The surface revealed a low coefficient of friction. This is due to the presence of the graphite on the surface. At temperatures of 400 to 600 C graphite and copious amount of silicon dioxide were observed on the polycrystalline silicon carbide surface in addition to silicon carbide. At 800 C, the amount of the silicon dioxide decreased rapidly and the silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. The coefficients of friction were high in the temperature range 400 to 800 C. Small amounts of carbon and oxygen contaminants were observed on the as received single crystal silicon carbide surface below 250 C. Silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were seen on the silicon carbide in addition to very small amount of graphite and silicon dioxide at temperatures of 450 to 800 C.

  2. PWR cores with silicon carbide cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dobisesky, J. P.; Carpenter, D.; Pilat, E.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of using silicon carbide rather than Zircaloy cladding, to reach higher power levels and higher discharge burnups in PWRs has been evaluated. A preliminary fuel design using fuel rods with the same dimensions as in the Westinghouse Robust Fuel Assembly but with fuel pellets having 10 vol% central void has been adopted to mitigate the higher fuel temperatures that occur due to the lower thermal conductivity of the silicon carbide and to the persistence of the open clad-pellet gap over most of the fuel life. With this modified fuel design, it is possible to achieve 18 month cycles that meet present-day operating constraints on peaking factor, boron concentration, reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin, while allowing batch average discharge burnups up to 80 MWD/kgU and peak rod burnups up to 100 MWD/kgU. Power uprates of 10% and possibly 20% also appear feasible. For non-uprated cores, the silicon carbide-clad fuel has a clear advantage that increases with increasing discharge burnup. Even for comparable discharge burnups, there is a savings in enriched uranium. Control rod configuration modifications may be required to meet the shutdown margin criterion for the 20% up-rate. Silicon carbide's ability to sustain higher burnups than Zircaloy also allows the design of a licensable two year cycle with only 96 fresh assemblies, avoiding the enriched uranium penalty incurred with use of larger batch sizes due to their excessive leakage. (authors)

  3. High Q silicon carbide microdisk resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y.; Feng, Philip X.-L.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-05-05

    We demonstrate a silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk resonator with optical Q up to 5.12 × 10{sup 4}. The high optical quality, together with the diversity of whispering-gallery modes and the tunability of external coupling, renders SiC microdisk a promising platform for integrated quantum photonics applications.

  4. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  5. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Ipidapo; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Generation IV nuclear reactors will use the TRISO fuels, a type of micro fuel particle. It consists of a fuel kernel coated with four layers of isotropic material. One of the materials considered for these layers is silicon carbide ceramic. This lightweight material can maintain chemical and dimensional stability in adverse environments at very high temperatures up to 3000 C, and it is chemically inert. It is widely used as a semiconductor material in electronics because of its high thermo conductivity, high electric field break down strength, and high maximum current density, which makes it more desirable than silicon. Silicon carbide has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion and has no phase transition that would discontinue its thermal expansion. At the Center for Irradiation of Materials (C.I.M.) we are developing a new fabrication process for nanopowdered silicon carbide for TRISO fuel coating purposes. We also study the mechanical properties of the material produced. Among the different test being performed are particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) an Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The mechanical properties of interest are hardness (measured by Vickers Hardness machine), toughness (measured by the Anstis equation, KIC= 1.6 x 10-2(E/H)^1/2(P/C0^3/2, where P=load, C0=crack length, E=Young's modulus and H=Vickers Hardness), tensile strength and flexural strength (measured by a three point bend test). Results will be presented during the meeting.

  7. Making a Silicon-Nitride/Silicon-Carbide Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.

    1987-01-01

    Hot pressing and nitriding produce strong fiber/matrix material. Fabrication method developed for processing strong and tough silicon-based ceramic composite material, SiC/RBSN, which consists of reaction-bonded Si3N4 (RBSN) reinforced by continuous-length, high-modulus, high strength silicon carbide (SiC) fibers prepared by chemical-vapor deposition method. Increased toughness and ultimate strength of SiC/RBSN composite makes it potential structural material for advanced heat engines.

  8. Low blow Charpy impact of silicon carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, H.; Chandan, H. C.; Bradt, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The room-temperature impact resistance of several commercial silicon carbides was examined using an instrumented pendulum-type machine and Charpy-type specimens. Energy balance compliance methods and fracture toughness approaches, both applicable to other ceramics, were used for analysis. The results illustrate the importance of separating the machine and the specimen energy contributions and confirm the equivalence of KIc and KId. The material's impact energy was simply the specimen's stored elastic strain energy at fracture.

  9. Producing Silicon Carbide for Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Processes proposed for production of SiC crystals for use in semiconductors operating at temperatures as high as 900 degrees C. Combination of new processes produce silicon carbide chips containing epitaxial layers. Chips of SiC first grown on porous carbon matrices, then placed in fluidized bed, where additional layer of SiC grows. Processes combined to yield complete process. Liquid crystallization process used to make SiC particles or chips for fluidized-bed process.

  10. Acoustic microscopy of silicon carbide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Heitman, P. W.; Yuhas, D.; Vorres, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) is able to detect such fracture-controlling flaws in dense silicon carbide materials as surface voids, whose diameter-by-depth size is a minimum of 75 by 17 microns in reaction-bonded SiC and 68 by 25 microns in alpha-SiC. Surface conditions such as pitting, which have been found to limit the discernibility of drilled holes, become important when pit and drilled hole sizes become comparable.

  11. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  12. Microwave joining of silicon carbide using several different approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R. ); Black, W.M.; Sa'adaldin, H.S. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Katz, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Microwave joining of sintered silicon carbide, both to itself and reaction bonded silicon carbide, has been accomplished in a single-mode rectangular resonant cavity. Several approaches using different interlayer materials were employed to join sintered silicon carbide. Effective joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide to itself and sintered silicon carbide was accomplished without the use of any interlayer material in the single-mode resonant cavity as well as in a multi-mode oven. Specimens cut from 3/8'' diameter-rods were joined in the single-mode cavity, whereas a variety of arbitrary shapes and larger specimens (of reaction bonded silicon carbide) were joined in the multi-mode oven.

  13. Microwave joining of silicon carbide using several different approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R.; Black, W.M.; Sa`adaldin, H.S.; Katz, J.D.

    1992-07-01

    Microwave joining of sintered silicon carbide, both to itself and reaction bonded silicon carbide, has been accomplished in a single-mode rectangular resonant cavity. Several approaches using different interlayer materials were employed to join sintered silicon carbide. Effective joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide to itself and sintered silicon carbide was accomplished without the use of any interlayer material in the single-mode resonant cavity as well as in a multi-mode oven. Specimens cut from 3/8`` diameter-rods were joined in the single-mode cavity, whereas a variety of arbitrary shapes and larger specimens (of reaction bonded silicon carbide) were joined in the multi-mode oven.

  14. Friction and deformation behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and deformation studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with diamond. When the radius of curvature of the spherical diamond rider was large (0.3), deformation of silicon carbide was primarily elastic. Under these conditions the friction coefficient was low and did not show a dependence on the silicon carbide orientation. Further, there was no detectable cracking of the silicon carbide surfaces. When smaller radii of curvature of the spherical diamond riders (0.15 and 0.02 mm) or a conical diamond rider was used, plastic grooving occured and the silicon carbide exhibited anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Under these conditions the friction coefficient depended on load. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the basal plane of silicon carbide was controlled by the slip system. 10101120and cleavage of1010.

  15. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  16. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  17. Optical waveguide formed by cubic silicon carbide on sapphire substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Xiao; Wongchotigul, Kobchat; Spencer, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    Optical confinement in beta silicon carbide (beta-SiC) thin films on sapphire substrate is demonstrated. Measurements are performed on waveguides formed by the mechanical transfer of thin beta-SiC films to sapphire. Recent results of epitaxial films of SiC on sapphire substrates attest to the technological viability of optoelectronic devices made from silicon carbide. Far-field mode patterns are shown. It is believed that this is the first step in validating a silicon carbide optoelectronic technology.

  18. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  19. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  20. Silicon carbide/SRBSN composites

    SciTech Connect

    Razzell, A.G.; Lewis, M.H.

    1991-08-01

    Ceramic matrix composites have been produced using unidirectionally aligned Textron SCS-6 fibers in a sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) matrix. A tape casting technique was used to produce a prepreg sheet that could be cut and stacked to form a layup. Sintering aids were MgO, Al2O3, and Y2O3 either singly or in combination, final sintering being carried out under pressure at temperatures up to 1750 C. The three-point bend strength of the material varied between 448 and 513 MPa and showed no variation with oxidation time at 1000 C up to 25 hours. Interfacial shear strength measured by indentation was 4 MPa; some samples had a reaction layer at the interface and a shear strength of greater than MPa. Within sections 6 mm from exposed fiber ends, the interfacial carbon layers were partially removed, and the interfacial shear strength was reduced with increasing oxidation time. 4 refs.

  1. Ultrafine alumina coated silicon carbide particles for alumina-silicon carbide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Warrier, K.G.K.; Hareesh, U.S.; Damodaran, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Aluminum oxide, toughened by fine and uniform dispersion of silicon carbide particles has been found to possess interesting high temperature properties of high toughness and strength. Recent reports suggest that the finer the silicon carbide size, the better would be the fracture toughness. By addition of as few as 5 vol% submicron SiC particles strengthened Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from 350 MPa to 1 GPa, with toughness as high as 4.7 Mpa m{sup {1/2}}. The mechanism of such high extent of fracture toughness has been investigated to be due to crack deflection and microcracking introduced by thermal expansion mismatch between particles and matrix grains, although the real contributions from the silicon carbide nanoparticles are still under investigation. In all these cases the primary requirement for most effective composite is the fine, uniform size of the particles and their homogeneous dispersion in the alumina matrix. Usual methods adopted for the preparation of composites such as physical mixing of alumina and silicon carbide particles often result in localized agglomerations and inhomogeneity making the composite inferior in properties.

  2. Excess carbon in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X; Oxley, Mark P.; Puzyrev, Y; Tuttle, B R; Duscher, Gerd; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2010-01-01

    The application of SiC in electronic devices is currently hindered by low carrier mobility at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces. Recently, it was reported that 4H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interfaces might have a transition layer on the SiC substrate side with C/Si ratio as high as 1.2, suggesting that carbon is injected into the SiC substrate during oxidation or other processing steps. We report finite-temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations that explore the behavior of excess carbon in SiC. For SiC with 20% excess carbon, we find that, over short time ({approx} 24 ps), carbon atoms bond to each other and form various complexes, while the silicon lattice is largely unperturbed. These results, however, suggest that at macroscopic times scale, C segregation is likely to occur; therefore a transition layer with 20% extra carbon would not be stable. For a dilute distribution of excess carbon, we explore the pairing of carbon interstitials and show that the formation of dicarbon interstitial cluster is kinetically very favorable, which suggests that isolated carbon clusters may exist inside SiC substrate.

  3. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, T. J.; Winterbottom, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed to develop silicon carbide materials of high strength and to form components of complex shape and high reliability is described. A beta-SiC powder and binder system was adapted to the injection molding process and procedures and process parameters developed capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort has been to characterize the baseline precursor materials (beta silicon carbide powder and boron and carbon sintering aids), develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures have been carried out in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 MOR bars of the baseline material have been molded, and 122 bars have been fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. The material has a mean MOR room temperature strength of 43.31 ksi (299 MPa), a Weibull characteristic strength of 45.8 ksi (315 MPa), and a Weibull modulus of 8.0. Mean values of the MOR strengths at 1000, 1200, and 14000 C are 41.4, 43.2, and 47.2 ksi, respectively. Strength controlling flaws in this material were found to consist of regions of high porosity and were attributed to agglomerates originating in the initial mixing procedures. The mean stress rupture lift at 1400 C of five samples tested at 172 MPa (25 ksi) stress was 62 hours and at 207 MPa (30 ksi) stress was 14 hours. New fluid mixing techniques have been developed which significantly reduce flaw size and improve the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicate the strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  4. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, A.V.; Balooch, M.; Moalem, M.

    1999-01-19

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C{sub 60} precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C{sub 60} with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C{sub 60} on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K. 5 figs.

  5. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Balooch, Mehdi; Moalem, Mehran

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C.sub.60 precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C.sub.60 with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C.sub.60 on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K.

  6. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  7. Critically coupled surface phonon-polariton excitation in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Burton; Korobkin, Dmitriy; Fietz, Chris; Carole, Davy; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-09-01

    We observe critical coupling to surface phonon-polaritons in silicon carbide by attenuated total reflection of mid-IR radiation. Reflectance measurements demonstrate critical coupling by a double scan of wavelength and incidence angle. Critical coupling occurs when prism coupling loss is equal to losses in silicon carbide and the substrate, resulting in maximal electric field enhancement. PMID:19724526

  8. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This patent pertains to compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia. Fabrication, fracture toughness, and bend strength are covered.

  9. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1995-01-17

    Compositions are disclosed consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  10. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  11. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyuk, Bulent; Beril Tugrul, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide-silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites.

  12. Infrared Kerr measurements on ferromagnetic silicon and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jungryeol; Mukherjee, Alok; Arik, Mumtaz Murat; Cerne, John; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Shengqiang; Böttger, Roman; Song, Bo; Wang, Gang

    We measure the infrared (100-1000 meV) Kerr angle in ferromagnetic silicon and silicon carbide. The samples were either neutron irradiated or aluminum doped to induce ferromagnetic behavior. The samples are studied in the 10-300K temperature range at magnetic fields up to 7T. We also explore the dependence of the magneto-optical signal on samples with different irradiation exposure levels. This study provides new information on the optical, magnetic, and electronic properties of these materials. Work supported by NSF-DMR1410599 and the Helmholtz Postdoctoral Program PD-146.

  13. The growth of cubic silicon carbide on a compliant substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Sharanda; Soward, Ida

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that silicon carbide grown on silicon and 6H silicon carbide has problems associated with these substrates. This is because silicon and silicon carbide has a 20% lattice mismatch and cubic silicon carbide has not been successfully achieved on 6H silicon carbide. We are investigating the growth of silicon carbide on a compliant substrate in order to grow defect free silicon carbide. This compliant substrate consists of silicon/silicon dioxide with 1200 A of single crystal silicon on the top layer. We are using this compliant substrate because there is a possibility that the silicon dioxide layer and the carbonized layer will allow the silicon lattice to shrink or expand to match the lattice of the silicon carbide. This would improve the electrical properties of the film for the use of device fabrication. When trying to grow silicon carbide, we observed amorphous film. To investigate, we examined the process step by step using RHEED. RHEED data showed that each step was amorphous. We found that just by heating the substrate in the presence of hydrogen it changed the crystal structure. When heated to 1000 C for 2 minutes, RHEED showed that there was an amorphous layer on the surface. We also heated the substrate to 900 C for 2 minutes and RHEED data showed that there was a deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We assumed that the presence of oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. Therefore, we evaporated 2500 A of silicon to all four edges of the wafer to try to enclose the oxygen. When heating the evaporated wafer to 900 C the RHEED data showed single crystalline structure however at 1000 C the RHEED data showed deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We conclude that the substrate itself is temperature dependent and that the oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. We propose to evaporate more silicon on the edges of the wafer to eliminate the escape of oxygen. this will allow

  14. Silicon carbide - Progress in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of two processes for producing large-area high-quality single crystals of SiC is described: (1) a modified Lely process for the growth of the alpha polytypes (e.g., 6H SiC) initially developed by Tairov and Tsvetkov (1978, 1981) and Ziegler et al. (1983), and (2) a process for the epitaxial growth of the beta polytype on single-crystal silicon or other substrates. Growth of large-area cubic SiC on Si is described together with growth of defect-free beta-SiC films on alpha-6H SiC crystals and TiC lattice. Semiconducting qualities of silicon carbide crystals grown by various techniques are discussed.

  15. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  16. An overview of silicon carbide device technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) as a semiconductor is briefly reviewed. This material shows great promise towards providing electronic devices that can operate under the high-temperature, high-radiation, and/or high-power conditions where current semiconductor technologies fail. High quality single crystal wafers have become available, and techniques for growing high quality epilayers have been refined to the point where experimental SiC devices and circuits can be developed. The prototype diodes and transistors that have been produced to date show encouraging characteristics, but by the same token they also exhibit some device-related problems that are not unlike those faced in the early days of silicon technology development. Although these problems will not prevent the implementation of some useful circuits, the performance and operating regime of SiC electronics will be limited until these device-related issues are solved.

  17. Reaction bonded silicon carbide gimbaled pointing mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, J.; Akerstrom, A.; Frey, S.; Crompton, D.; Cucchiaro, P.; Deveau, G.; Peters, M.; Mason, S.; Ullathorne, C.

    2007-09-01

    A Silicon Carbide (SiC) based wide field of view Pointing Mirror Assembly (PMA) has been developed to provide two axis line-of-sight control for a fixed, space based imaging sensor. Thermal modeling has been completed in order to project the excellent thermal stability anticipated from the SiC PMA, and closed loop servo testing of the hardware has been conducted in order to quantify the bandwidth associated with line-of-sight control. In addition to the system level testing the SiC mirror substrate itself has been tested for thermal stability. We also report on results obtained with a novel polishing technique which has been applied in order to allow optical finishing of the two-phased Reaction Bonded (RB) SiC mirror substrate without the need for Silicon or SiC claddings.

  18. Converting a carbon preform object to a silicon carbide object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for converting in depth a carbon or graphite preform object to a silicon carbide object, silicon carbide/silicon object, silicon carbide/carbon-core object, or a silicon carbide/silicon/carbon-core object, by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time in a reaction chamber. In the process, a stream comprised of a silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a coreactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into the reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. Thus, the precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. Any stream of decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from the reaction chamber is removed. A carbon or graphite preform object placed in the reaction chamber is contacted with the silicon. The carbon or graphite preform object is recovered from the reactor chamber after it has been converted to a desired silicon carbide, silicon and carbon composition.

  19. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual technical report for the program entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, for the period February 16, 1987 to February 15, 1988. The objective of the original program was the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. Injection molding is the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals of the revised program are to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in 4-point loading. Two tasks are discussed: Task 1 which involves materials and process improvements, and Task 2 which is a MOR bar matrix to improve strength and reliability. Many statistically designed experiments were completed under task 1 which improved the composition of the batches, the mixing of the powders, the sinter and anneal cycles. The best results were obtained by an attritor mixing process which yielded strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and an individual Weibull modulus of 16.8 for a 9-sample group. Strengths measured at 1200 and 1400 C were equal to the room temperature strength. Annealing of machined test bars significantly improved the strength. Molding yields were measured and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. The second iteration of the Task 2 matrix experiment is described.

  20. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  1. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.; Mangels, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide materials of high strength was initiated and components of complex shape and high reliability were formed. The approach was to adapt a beta-SiC powder and binder system to the injection molding process and to develop procedures and process parameters capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort was to characterize the baseline precursor materials, develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures were performed in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 modulus-of-rupture (MOR) bars of the baseline material was molded, and 122 bars were fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. Fluid mixing techniques were developed which significantly reduced flaw size and improved the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicated that strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent. the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  2. Dispersion aspects of silicon carbide gelcasting

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, A.

    1991-09-01

    The principal objective of this research was to increase the solid loading of silicon carbide (SiC) powder, in an appropriate liquid medium, to a level that is useful for gelcasting technology. A number of factors that determine the maximum concentration of silicon carbide that can be incorporated into a pourable ceramic suspension have been identified. The pH of the system is the most critical processing parameter. Its proper adjustment (pH 11 to 13) allows SiC concentrations exceeding 50%, based on volume, to be routinely achieved without the use of additional dispersing agents. The particle size of SiC was also found to affect the maximum, attainable concentration. The surface area of the powder and the presence of free carbon in the powder, though not significantly influencing the suspension properties, determine the concentration of initiator required to induce polymerization and gelation. SiC specimens have been gelcast for powders in the size range of 0.8 to 8.5 {mu}m; the powders employed contain either {approximately} 0 or 19% carbon by weight. Finally, the generation of bubbles, typically encountered by the use of ammonia to adjust pH has been circumvented by the use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

  3. Development of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L. )

    1993-08-01

    The use of silicon carbide composites for structural materials is of growing interest in the fusion community. However, radiation effects in these materials are virtually unexplored, and the general state of ceramic matrix composites for nonnuclear applications is still in its infancy. Research into the radiation response of the most popular silicon carbide composite, namely, the chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC-carbon-Nicalon fiber system is discussed. Three areas of interest are the stability of the fiber and matrix materials, the stability of the fiber-matrix interface, and the true activation of these [open quotes]reduced activity[close quotes] materials. Two methods are presented that quantitatively measure the effect of radiation on fiber and matrix elastic modulus as well as the fiber-matrix interfacial strength. The results of these studies show that the factor limiting the radiation performance of the CVD SiC-carbon-Nicalon system is degradation of the Nicalon fiber, which leads to a weakened carbon interface. The activity of these composites is significantly higher than expected and is dominated by impurity isotopes. 52 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Silicon Carbide: The Problem with Laboratory Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A. K.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Barlow, M. J.

    2000-03-01

    The interpretation of astronomical observations of infrared (IR) silicon carbide (SiC) features in the spectra of carbon stars have revealed discrepancies between the work of astronomers and that of meteoriticists. The silicon carbide observed around carbon stars has been attributed to one type of SiC (α) while meteoritic samples believed to have formed around such stars are of another type of SiC (β). The key to solving this problem has been to understand the sources of laboratory data used by astronomers in order to interpret the IR spectra. Through comparison of thin film IR absorption spectra and spectra taken using finely ground samples dispersed in potassium bromide (KBr) pellets we show that the previously invoked ``KBr matrix-correction'' is unnecessary for powder dispersions obtained from very fine grain sizes of SiC. Comparison of our data and previous measurements show that dust around carbon stars is β-SiC, consistent with laboratory studies of presolar grains in meteorites. The implications of these findings affect twenty years of work. The IR spectroscopic laboratory data used by astronomers to identify dust species in space must be carefully scrutinized to ensure that the KBr correction is not responsible for further misattributions of minerals in astronomical dust features.

  5. Oxidation kinetics of coated silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC)

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) was exposed for 100 hours to dry, flowing oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were determined via thermogravimetric analysis at 981{degrees}, 1204{degrees} and 1316{degrees}C (1800{degrees}, 2200{degrees} and 2400{degrees}F). The effectiveness of three external coating systems applied for oxidation protection is discussed. In all cases, weight gains were observed, and the pyrolytic carbon interface layer remained intact. A CVD SiC external coating is the most promising due to low oxidation kinetics resulting from solid silica formation. A borosilicate glass was observed on the surface of two of the materials that have boron-containing coatings.

  6. Production and characterization of nanostructured silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Kendra Lee

    Nanostructured materials continue to attract attention because of their new and interesting properties, which are very different from their macrostructured equivalents. Since the size of grain and surface differs, a better understanding of the microstructure, the mechanism of formation, and methods of controlling surface properties is necessary. In this study, nanostructured silicon carbide has been produced from the solid-solid reaction of a mixture of silicon nanopowder and carbon multiwalled nanotubes (MWNT) sintered by induction. A study of the reaction rate at different temperatures has yielded a value for the activation energy of 254 +/- 36 kJ/mol, and has led to the conclusion that the reaction is diffusion-controlled. A second method produced pure silicon carbide nanowires using a procedure which kept the solid reactants, silicon powder and MWNT, separated while sintering at a constant temperature of 1200°C. Silicon in the vapor-phase reacted at the surface of the MWNTs followed by diffusion of both precursors through the product phase boundary. The reaction time was varied, and a morphological study has been done describing changes in shape and size as a function of time. The initial reaction produced a layer of SiC providing the outer shell of coaxial structures with carbon nanotubes inside. As Si and C diffused through the product phase to react at the interface, the tube became filled with SiC to form solid SiC nanowires, and the outer diameter of the nanowires grew continuously as reaction time increased. After long sintering times, growth continued in two dimensions, fusing nanowires together into planar structures. In addition, the precursor form of carbon was varied, and nanowires produced by two different types of nanotubes have been studied. The produced SiC nanowires show cubic crystal structure. After a few hours of sintering, stacking faults began to occur inside the wires, and the frequency of occurrence of the stacking faults increased as

  7. Direct microwave joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Black, W.M.; Silberglitt, R.

    1992-08-01

    A single-mode rectangular resonant cavity operating at 2.45 GHz was used to join, without any interlayer or applied pressure, specimens of reaction bonded silicon carbide. Specimens of 0.95 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height were joined at temperatures 1400-1450 C in 10 to 15 minutes. Specimens of arbitrary shapes and practical sizes were joined in a commercially available 900 watt multi-mode oven with hybrid heating. The joined specimens were sectioned and examined. The joint was not detectable even by scanning electron microscope observation. On heating silicon bleeds out of reaction bonded silicon carbide. The apparent density of the heated reaction bonded silicon carbide was 3.01 gm/cc as compared to 3.05 gm/cc for the as received material. However, the only difference in microstructure was some grain growth of the microwave heated reaction bonded silicon carbide, compared to the as received material. 10 refs.

  8. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26394207

  9. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  10. Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yu-Min; Wang, Jih-Wen; Liue, Chun-Ying; Yeh, Shinn-Horng

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

  11. Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    F. H. Ruddy; J.G. Seidel; R.W. Flammang

    2007-03-01

    The need to address increasingly challenging inspection requirements (such as large volume objects, very fast inspection throughputs, potentially significant shielding, etc.) for such items as nuclear materials and explosives will require the use of active interrogation technologies. While these active technologies can successfully address these challenges by inducing unique, temporal signatures, the inspection environment will also induce overall “background signals” that can be orders of magnitude larger than the induced signatures. Detectors that can successfully operate in these types of customized, inspection environments (pulsed and continuous) and successfully extract induced signature data are clearly needed and will effectively define the limitations of any active inspection system. A novel silicon carbide detector is now being investigated to successfully address both neutron- and photon/bremsstrahlung-type inspection applications. While this paper describes this detector and highlights efforts related to neutron inspection, it will focus on its neutron and gamma-ray/photon detection performance in neutron- and bremssstrahlung-type inspection applications.

  12. Comparison Measurements of Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-06-01

    As part of the efforts initiated through the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program to make Silicon Carbide (SiC) temperature monitors available, a capability was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. INL selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. To demonstrate this new capability, comparison measurements were completed by INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on identical samples subjected to identical irradiation conditions. Results reported in this paper indicate that the resistance measurement approach can yield similar peak irradiation temperatures if appropriate equipment is used and appropriate procedures are followed.

  13. Nanoporous Silicon Carbide for Nanoelectromechanical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hossain, T.; Khan, F.; Adesida, I.; Bohn, P.; Rittenhouse, T.; Lienhard, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to produce porous silicon carbide (PSiC) via an electroless process for eventual utilization in nanoscale sensing platforms. Results in the literature have shown a variety of porous morphologies in SiC produced in anodic cells. Therefore, predictability and reproducibility of porous structures are initial concerns. This work has concentrated on producing morphologies of known porosity, with particular attention paid toward producing the extremely high surface areas required for a porous flow sensor. We have conducted a parametric study of electroless etching conditions and characteristics of the resulting physical nanostructure and also investigated the relationship between morphology and materials properties. Further, we have investigated bulk etching of SiC using both photo-electrochemical etching and inductively-coupled-plasma reactive ion etching techniques.

  14. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  15. Silicon carbide mirrors for high power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P. Z.

    1981-11-01

    The advent of synchrotron radiation (SR) sources and high energy lasers (HEL) in recent years has brought about the need for optical materials that can withstand the harsh operating conditions in such devices. SR mirrors must be ultra-high vacuum compatible, must withstand intense x-ray irradiation without surface damage, must maintain surface figure under thermal loading and must be capable of being polished to an extremely smooth surface finish. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide in combination with sintered substrate material meets these requirements and offers additional benefits as well. It is an extremely hard material and offers the possibility of being cleaned and recoated many times without degradation of the surface finish, thereby prolonging the lifetime of expensive optical components. It is an extremely strong material and offers the possibility of weight reduction over conventional mirror materials.

  16. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  17. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Pirouz

    1999-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as an enabling electronic technology for many aerospace applications. The Lewis team is focusing on the chemical vapor deposition of the thin, single-crystal SiC films from which devices are fabricated. These films, which are deposited (i.e., epitaxially "grown") on commercial wafers, must consist of a single crystal with very few structural defects so that the derived devices perform satisfactorily and reliably. Working in collaboration (NASA grant) with Professor Pirouz of Case Western Reserve University, we developed a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) technique for removing the subsurface polishing damage prior to epitaxial growth of the single-crystal SiC films.

  18. Temperature-dependent reflectivity of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The spectral reflectivity of a commercial silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic surface was measured at wavelengths from 2.5 to 14.5 microns and at temperatures ranging from 358 to 520 K using a NASA-developed multiwavelength pyrometer. The SiC surface reflectivity was low at the short wavelengths, decreasing to almost zero at 10 microns, then increasing rapidly to a maximum at approximately 12.5 microns, and decreasing gradually thereafter. The reflectivity maximum increased in magnitude with increasing surface temperature. The wavelength and temperature dependence can be explained in terms of the classical dispersion theory of crystals and the Lorentz electron theory. Electronic transitions between the donor state and the conduction band states were responsible for the dispersion. The concentration of the donor state in SiC was determined to be approximately 4 x 10 exp 18 and its ionization energy was determined to be approximately 71 meV.

  19. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  20. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  1. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  2. Development of a silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Vasudev, Anand

    1989-01-01

    A silicon carbide (SiC) sewing thread has been designed which consists of a two-ply yarn in a 122 turns-per-meter-twist construction. Two processing aids in thread construction were evaluated. Prototype blankets were sewn using an SiC thread prepared either with polytetrafluoroethylene sizing or with an overwrap of rayon/dacron service yarn. The rayon/dacron-wrapped SiC thread was stronger, as shown by higher break-strength retention and less damage to the outer-mold-line fabric. This thread enables thermal protection system articles to be sewn or joined, or have perimeter close-out of assembled parts when using SiC fabric for high-temperature applications.

  3. Quantitative Ultrasound Characterization of Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portune, A. R.; Haber, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    Silicon carbide mirrors were characterized using several qualitative and quantitative nondestructive ultrasound techniques in order to determine the most efficient method for rapid performance evaluations. Ultrasound testing was performed in immersion using both phased array and single transducer systems in pulse-echo configuration. C-scan images of top and bottom surface reflected signal peak amplitudes were used to qualitatively locate and identify homogeneity variations within the mirror materials. Quantitative analysis of normalized amplitude histograms revealed significant differences in homogeneity estimations between phased array and single transducer test methods. Acoustic spectroscopy over the 10-33 MHz regime identified bulk microstructural differences between high and low amplitude regions in the samples. While ultrasound phased array performed well at rapidly locating surface and subsurface heterogeneities, it could not match the resolution and clarity of single transducer C-scan images or the insight of acoustic spectroscopy analyses.

  4. Comparison of silicon oxide and silicon carbide absorber materials in silicon thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Cordula; Kellermann, Martin; Wendler, Elke; Rensberg, Jura; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Since solar energy conversion by photovoltaics is most efficient for photon energies at the bandgap of the absorbing material the idea of combining absorber layers with different bandgaps in a multijunction cell has become popular. In silicon thin-film photovoltaics a multijunction stack with more than two subcells requires a high bandgap amorphous silicon alloy top cell absorber to achieve an optimal bandgap combination. We address the question whether amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) or amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO:H) is more suited for this type of top cell absorber. Our single cell results show a better performance of amorphous silicon carbide with respect to fill factor and especially open circuit voltage at equivalent Tauc bandgaps. The microstructure factor of single layers indicates less void structure in amorphous silicon carbide than in amorphous silicon oxide. Yet photoconductivity of silicon oxide films seems to be higher which could be explained by the material being not truly intrinsic. On the other hand better cell performance of amorphous silicon carbide absorber layers might be connected to better hole transport in the cell.

  5. Amorphous silicon carbide films prepared using vaporized silicon ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Takashi; Shen, Zhongrong; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    The deposition of wide-band-gap silicon films using nonvacuum processes rather than conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest because it may reduce cost. Herein, we present the optical and electrical properties of p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films prepared using a nonvacuum process in a simple chamber with a vaporized silicon ink consisting of cyclopentasilane, cyclohexene, and decaborane. The incorporation of carbon into the silicon network induced by the addition of cyclohexene to the silicon ink resulted in an increase in the optical band gap (Eg) of films from 1.56 to 2.11 eV. The conductivity of films with Eg < 1.9 eV is comparable to that of conventional a-SiC:H films prepared using a vacuum process, while the films with Eg > 1.9 eV show lower conductivity than expected because of the incorporation of excess carbon without the formation of Si-C bonds.

  6. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed.

  7. Silicon carbide nanowires synthesized with phenolic resin and silicon powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Shi, Limin; Li, Ziqiang; Tang, Chunhe

    2009-02-01

    Large-scale silicon carbide nanowires with the lengths up to several millimeters were synthesized by a coat-mix, moulding, carbonization, and high-temperature sintering process, using silicon powder and phenolic resin as the starting materials. Ordinary SiC nanowires, bamboo-like SiC nanowires, and spindle SiC nanochains are found in the fabricated samples. The ordinary SiC nanowire is a single-crystal SiC phase with a fringe spacing of 0.252 nm along the [1 1 1] growth direction. Both of the bamboo-like SiC nanowires and spindle SiC nanochains exhibit uniform periodic structures. The bamboo-like SiC nanowires consist of amorphous stem and single-crystal knots, while the spindle SiC nanochains consist of uniform spindles which grow uniformly on the entire nanowires.

  8. Conventional and Microwave Joining of Silicon Carbide Using Displacement Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, J.; Yiin, T.; Barmatz, M.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to join Silicon Carbide rods using a thin TiC /Si tape interlayer . Microwaves quickly heated the rods and tape to temperatures where solid-state displacement reactions between TiC and Si occurred.

  9. Silicon carbide materials for high duty seal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Berroth, K.E. )

    1990-12-01

    Properties, fabrication, and high-duty applications of silicon carbide grades are discussed. The two types of silicon carbide, i.e., reaction-bonded and sintered, are considered. The potential for adhesion and the lack of dry running abilities lead to a variety of microstructures. For reaction-bonded silicon carbide, the microstructure can be a tool for optimization of the tribological behavior. Besides the high corrosion resistance of the material, its thermal conductivity is excellent. Grain sizes of about 40-50 microns are used in high-duty applications. Reaction-bonded silicon carbide with residual content of carbon graphite has improved tribological/hydrodynamic characteristics and performs well in sealing hard faces.

  10. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Method of producing fine-grain silicon carbide powder comprises combining methyltrimethoxysilane with a solution of phenolic resin, acetone and water or sugar and water, gelling the resulting mixture, and then drying and heating the obtained gel.

  11. Silicon carbide for high-temperature heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penty, R. A.; Bjerklie, J. W.

    1982-02-01

    It is noted that ceramic heat exchangers are now being used industrially in low-pressure applications, such as recuperators and air preheaters, and that serious consideration is being given to using ceramic materials for high-pressure heat exchangers. The principal advantage of using ceramic heat exchangers in the candidate applications is the potential for higher temperature service or increased life over that obtainable with metallic exchangers. Silicon carbide-based materials are now in service in many areas. The use of low-pressure ceramic recuperators constructed of silicon carbide has demonstrated fuel savings exceeding 40% in high-temperature industrial furnaces. At a material temperature of 1375 C, the demonstrated lifetime of some silicon carbide tubes is 12 to 15 months. The availability of silicon carbide materials is discussed, together with properties required for designing reliable heat exchangers. Attention is also given to the usual failure mode encountered in the field.

  12. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews material properties of adhesion, friction and wear of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. The tribological properties in the metal removal processes are divided into properties which remove metal by adhesion between sliding surfaces, and metal removal by silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows. The paper also deals with fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface; the adhesion, friction and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion and friction properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear decrease as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases.

  13. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  14. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ˜ 0.60 ( λ / n ) 3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ˜104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  15. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Material properties are considered as they relate to adhesion, friction, and wear of single crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys that are likely to be involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. Metal removal from adhesion between sliding surfaces in contact and metal removal as a result of the silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting into it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows are discussed. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface are also covered. The adhesion, friction, and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the adhesion and friction, and the greater the metal transfer to silicon carbide. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and abrasive wear properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear (metal removal) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. They decrease as the solute to solvent atomic radius ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity, and with an increase of solute content. The surface fracture of silicon carbide is due to cleavages of 0001, 10(-1)0, and/or 11(-2)0 planes.

  16. Thermal properties of wood-derived silicon carbide and copper-silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappecena, Kristen E.

    Wood-derived ceramics and composites have been of interest in recent years due to their unique microstructures, which lead to tailorable properties. The porosity and pore size distribution of each wood type is different, which yields variations in properties in the resultant materials. The thermal properties of silicon carbide ceramics and copper-silicon carbide composites derived from wood were studied as a function of their pore structures. Wood was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 300-2400°C to yield porous carbon. The progression toward long-range order was studied as a function of pyrolyzation temperature. Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a porous ceramic material resulting from silicon melt infiltration of these porous carbon materials. BioSiC has potential applicability in many high temperature environments, particularly those in which rapid temperature changes occur. To understand the behavior of bioSiC at elevated temperatures, the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five precursors was determined using flash diffusivity at temperatures up to 1100°C. Thermal conductivity results varied with porosity, temperature and orientation, and decreased from 42-13 W/mK for porosities of 43-69%, respectively, at room temperature. The results were compared with to object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures. The thermal shock resistance of bioSiC was also studied, and no bioSiC sample was found to fail catastrophically after up to five thermal shock cycles from 1400°C to room temperature oil. Copper-silicon carbide composites have potential uses in thermal management applications due to the high thermal conductivity of each phase. Cu-bioSiC composites were created by electrodeposition of copper into bioSiC pores. The detrimental Cu-SiC reaction was avoided by using this room temperature

  17. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with titanium. Results indicate that the friction coefficient is greater in vacuum than in argon and that this is due to the greater adhesion or adhesive transfer in vacuum. Thin films of silicon carbide transferred to titanium also adhered to silicon carbide both in argon at atmospheric pressure and in high vacuum. Cohesive bonds fractured on both the silicon carbide and titanium surfaces. The wear debris of silicon carbide created by fracture plowed the silicon carbide surface in a plastic manner. The friction characteristics of titanium in contact with silicon carbide were sensitive to the surface roughness of silicon carbide, and the friction coefficients were higher for a rough surface of silicon carbide than for a smooth one. The difference in friction results was due to plastic deformation (plowing of titanium).

  18. Silicon nano-carbide in strengthening and ceramic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudneva, V. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Technological advantages and conditions of new quality assurance of coatings and products, provided by silicon nano-carbide, have been ascertained in the course of composite electrodeposition of coatings, structural ceramics patterning, and surface hardening of steels via electro-explosive alloying. Silicon nano-carbide has been recommended to be used as a component of wear and corrosion resistant chromium carbide electrodeposited coatings, which can be operated at high temperatures and used for strengthening tools and equipment including those with a complex microrelief of functional surfaces. Silicon nano-carbide as a component of composite “silicon carbide - boron - carbon” can be applied to produce ceramic half products via solid phase sintering in argon under pressure of 0.1 MPa and temperature 2273 K. Application of silicon nano-carbide in technology of tool steel surface hardening via electroexplosive alloying ensures obtaining of a high micro-hard, wear and heat resistant shielding layer which is about 20 μm deep.

  19. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  20. Aluminum-silicon eutectic alloy improves electrical and mechanical contact to silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shier, J. S.

    1970-01-01

    Alloy contact layer is made at relatively low temperature and has good wetting characteristics. Contacts adhere well to silicon carbide surface, penetrating about 300 to 500 angstroms into it. Contacts are ohmic on p-type silicon carbide and blocking on n-type.

  1. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  2. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  3. Material testing of silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Palusinski, Iwona A.

    2009-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is developing a space qualification method for silicon carbide optical systems that covers material verification through system development. One of the initial efforts has been to establish testing protocols for material properties. Three different tests have been performed to determine mechanical properties of SiC: modulus of rupture, equibiaxial flexural strength and fracture toughness. Testing materials and methods have been in accordance with the respective ASTM standards. Material from four vendors has been tested to date, as part of the MISSE flight program and other programs. Data analysis has focused on the types of issues that are important when building actual components- statistical modeling of test results, understanding batch-to-batch or other source material variations, and relating mechanical properties to microstructures. Mechanical properties are needed as inputs to design trade studies and development and analysis of proof tests, and to confirm or understand the results of non-destructive evaluations of the source materials. Measuring these properties using standardized tests on a statistically valid number of samples is intended to increase confidence for purchasers of SiC spacecraft components that materials and structures will perform as intended at the highest level of reliability.

  4. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  5. Thermal equation of state of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhi T. Y.; Khare, Sanjay V.; Collins, Sean Andrew; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    A large volume press coupled with in-situ energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray was used to probe the change of silicon carbide (SiC) under high pressure and temperature (P-T) up to 8.1 GPa and 1100 K. The obtained pressure-volume-temperature data were fitted to a modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, yielding values of a series of thermo-elastic parameters, such as the ambient bulk modulus KTo = 237(2) GPa, temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant pressure (∂K/∂T)P = -0.037(4) GPa K-1, volumetric thermal expansivity α(0, T) = a + bT with a = 5.77(1) × 10-6 K-1 and b = 1.36(2) × 10-8 K-2, and pressure derivative of the thermal expansion at a constant temperature (∂α/∂P)T = 6.53 ± 0.64 × 10-7 K-1 GPa-1. Furthermore, we found the temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant volume, (∂KT/∂T)V, equal to -0.028(4) GPa K-1 by using a thermal pressure approach. In addition, the elastic properties of SiC were determined by density functional theory through the calculation of Helmholtz free energy. The computed results generally agree well with the experimentally determined values.

  6. Methods for producing silicon carbide architectural preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties for each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  7. Irradiation creep of advanced silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Youngblood, G. E.

    2000-12-01

    The bend stress relaxation (BSR) method was applied to study irradiation enhanced creep (IEC) of small diameter silicon carbide (SiC) fibers after 10 MeV proton irradiation. A first series of tests was conducted on Sylramic™ fibers irradiated at 600°C with average bending stresses of 400 and 667 MPa and for irradiation doses smaller than 0.04 dpa. The BSR results are compared to previously obtained torsional creep test results for the Textron SCS-6™ type SiC fibers by calculating the tensile equivalents for both testing methods. For the Sylramic fibers, the creep constant κ=4.7×10-6 Mpa-1 dpa-1, was a factor of 6 smaller than the κ-value determined for SCS-6 fibers at 600°C. In contrast, for T<900°C the κ-value determined by R.J. Price [Nucl. Technol. 35 (1977) 320] for high purity monolithic β-Si after 7.7 dpa neutron irradiation was only 0.4×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1.

  8. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  9. Silicon Carbide Technologies for Lightweighted Aerospace Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, L.; Chen, M.; Deblonk, B.; Palusinski, I.

    The use of monolithic glass and beryllium to produce lightweighted aerospace mirror systems has reached its limits due to the long lead times, high processing costs, environmental effects and launch load/weight requirements. New material solutions and manufacturing processes are required to meet DoD's directed energy weapons, reconnaissance/surveillance, and secured communications needs. Over the past several years the Air Force, MDA, and NASA has focused their efforts on the fabrication, lightweighting, and scale-up of numerous silicon carbide (SiC) based materials. It is anticipated that SiC can be utilized for most applications from cryogenic to high temperatures. This talk will focus on describing the SOA for these (near term) SiC technology solutions for making mirror structural substrates, figuring and finishing technologies being investigated to reduce cost time and cost, and non-destructive evaluation methods being investigated to help eliminate risk. Mirror structural substrates made out of advanced engineered materials (far term solutions) such as composites, foams, and microsphere arrays for ultra lightweighting will also be briefly discussed.

  10. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  11. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 {micro}m to 100 {micro}m) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC polytypes were similar.

  12. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, George C.

    1984-01-01

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  13. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  14. Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Carbide Mirrors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The surface figure of a developmental silicon carbide mirror, cooled to 87 K and then 20 K within a cryostat, was measured with unusually high precision at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The concave spherical mirror, with a radius of 600 mm and a clear aperture of 150 mm, was fabricated of sintered silicon carbide. The mirror was mounted to an interface plate representative of an optical bench, made of the material Cesic@, a composite of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide. The change in optical surface figure as the mirror and interface plate cooled from room temperature to 20 K was 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  15. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  16. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  17. Occurrence of airborne silicon carbide fibers during industrial production of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Bye, E; Eduard, W; Gjønnes, J; Sørbrøden, E

    1985-04-01

    Airborne dust from the production of silicon carbide has been analyzed for particle morphology and composition. Fibers of alpha silicon carbide were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction techniques (SAED). Micrographs taken at high magnification revealed several stacking periods along the fiber axis, and one or more of the polytypes 2H, 4H, or 6H could be distinguished. Preliminary investigations applying SEM showed that 80% of the fibers had diameters of less than 0.5 micron and a length greater than 5 micron. Fiber concentrations were examined by the counting of stationary and personal samples in an optical phase contrast microscope. The fiber levels in the three plants investigated were low and less than 1 fiber/cc of air (10(6) fibers/m3). Dust samples from the handling of raw material, including recycled material, contained up to 5 fibers/cc (5 X 10(6) fibers/m3). PMID:4001899

  18. Interface reactions between silicon carbide and interlayers in silicon carbide copper metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köck, T.; Brendel, A.; Bolt, H.

    2007-05-01

    Novel copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide fibres are considered as a new generation of heat sink materials for the divertor of future fusion reactors. The divertor is exposed to intense particle bombardment and heat loads of up to 15 MW m-2. This component consists of the plasma-facing material which is bonded to the actively cooled heat sink. Due to its high thermal conductivity of about 400 W m-1 K-1 copper is a promising material for the heat sink. To increase the mechanical properties of copper at working temperature (823 K), silicon carbide fibres with a diameter of 140 μm are used to reinforce the interface area between the plasma-facing material and the heat sink. Push-out tests show that the adhesion between SiC fibre and Cu matrix without any interlayer is very low. To increase the fibre-matrix bonding the fibres are coated with Cr and W with a thickness of 300-400 nm before Cu deposition by magnetron sputtering. Push-out tests on these modified fibres show a significant increase in adhesion compared to the fibres without interlayer. XRD investigations after a heat treatment at 923 K show a chromium carbide (Cr23C6, Cr3C2) formation and the absence of chromium silicides. In the case of a W interlayer a W2C formation is detected and also no tungsten silicides. Single-fibre tensile tests were performed to investigate the influence of the reaction zone on the ultimate tensile strength of the fibres. The ultimate tensile strength for fibres without interlayer remains constant at about 2200 MPa after annealing at 923 K. The fibres with chromium and tungsten interlayers, respectively, show a decrease of about 30% of the ultimate tensile strength after the heat treatment at 923 K.

  19. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2005-09-06

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  20. Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Forrester, S.C.; Akerman, A.

    1997-05-07

    Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.

  1. Silicon Carbide Diodes Performance Characterization and Comparison With Silicon Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Trapp, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky diodes from different manufacturers were electrically tested and characterized at room temperature. Performed electrical tests include steady state forward and reverse I-V curves, as well as switching transient tests performed with the diodes operating in a hard switch dc-to-dc buck converter. The same tests were performed in current state of the art silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) Schottky and pn junction devices for evaluation and comparison purposes. The SiC devices tested have a voltage rating of 200, 300, and 600 V. The comparison parameters are forward voltage drop at rated current, reverse current at rated voltage and peak reverse recovery currents in the dc to dc converter. Test results show that steady state characteristics of the tested SiC devices are not superior to the best available Si Schottky and ultra fast pn junction devices. Transient tests reveal that the tested SiC Schottky devices exhibit superior transient behavior. This is more evident at the 300 and 600 V rating where SiC Schottky devices showed drastically lower reverse recovery currents than Si ultra fast pn diodes of similar rating.

  2. Palladium-defect complexes in diamond and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W.; Timmers, H.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-04-01

    Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) studies, supported by Density Functional Theory (DFT) modelling, have shown that palladium atoms in silicon and germanium pair with vacancies. Building on these results, here we present DFT predictions and some tentative TDPAC results on palladium-defect complexes and site locations of palladium impurities in diamond and silicon carbide. For both diamond and silicon carbide, the DFT calculations predict that a split-vacancy V-PdBI-V complex is favoured, with the palladium atom on a bond-centred interstitial site having a nearest-neighbour semi-vacancy on either side. Consistent with experimental results, this configuration is also assigned to palladium complexes in silicon and germanium. For silicon carbide, the DFT modelling predicts furthermore that a palladium atom in replacing a carbon atom moves to a bond-centred interstitial site and pairs with a silicon vacancy to form a complex that is more stable than that of a palladium atom which replaces a silicon atom and then moves to a bond-centred interstitial site pairings with a carbon vacancy. These two competing alternatives differ by 8.94 eV. The favourable pairing with a silicon vacancy is also supported independently by TRIM Monte Carlo calculations, which predict that more silicon vacancies than carbon vacancies are created during heavy ion. implantation.

  3. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  4. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphousmore » silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.« less

  5. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-14

    With this study, amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300°C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  6. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C.

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  7. Processing, texture and mechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landfermann, H.; Hausner, H.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to its favorable properties, in particular those shown at high temperatures, silicon carbide is of great interest for applications related to the construction of engines and turbines. Thus, silicon carbide could replace heat-resisting alloys with the objective to achieve a further increase in operational temperature. The present investigation is concerned with approaches which can provide silicon carbide material with suitable properties for the intended applications, taking into account the relations between characteristics of the raw material, material composition, sinter conditions, and results of the sintering process. The effects of density and texture formation on the mechanical properties are studied. It is found that a dense material with a fine-grained microstructure provides optimal mechanical properties, while any deviation from this ideal condition can lead to a considerable deterioration with respect to the material properties.

  8. A study of silicon carbide synthesis from waste serpentine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Hsu, C W

    2006-06-01

    There are 60000 tons of serpentine wastes produced in year 2004 in Taiwan. This is due to the well-developed joints in the serpentine ore body as well as the stringent requirements of the particle size and chemical composition of serpentine by iron making company. The waste also creates considerable environmental problems. The purpose of this study is reutilization of waste serpentine to produce a high value silica powder after acid leaching. These siliceous microstructure products obtained from serpentine would be responsible for high reactivity and characteristic molecular sieving effect. In this study, the amorphous silica powder was then synthesized to silicon carbide with the C/SiO(2) molar ratio of 3. The experiment results show that silicon carbide can be synthesized in 1550 degrees C. The formed silicon carbide was whisker beta type SiC which can be used as raw materials for industry. PMID:16405956

  9. Solar silicon from directional solidification of MG silicon produced via the silicon carbide route

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustioni, M.; Margadonna, D.; Pirazzi, R.; Pizzini, S.

    1986-01-01

    A process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon production is presented which appears particularly suitable for photovoltaic (PV) applications. The MG silicon is prepared in a 240 KVA, three electrode submerged arc furnace, starting from high grade quartz and high purity silicon carbide. The silicon smelted from the arc furnace was shown to be sufficiently pure to be directionally solidified to 10 to 15 kg. After grinding and acid leaching, had a material yield larger than 90%. With a MG silicon feedstock containing 3 ppmw B, 290 ppmw Fe, 190 ppmw Ti, and 170 ppmw Al, blended with 50% of off grade electronic grade (EG) silicon to reconduct the boron content to a concentration acceptable for solar cell fabrication, the 99% of deep level impurities were concentrated in the last 5% of the ingot. Quite remarkably this material has OCV values higher tham 540 mV and no appreciable shorts due to SiC particles.

  10. Liquid-phase reaction-bonding of silicon carbide using alloyed silicon-molybdenum melts

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, R.P.; Chiang, Y.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The authors have investigated reaction-forming of silicon carbide by the infiltration of carbonaceous preforms using alloyed silicon melts, in order to synthesize composite materials free of the residual silicon phase that has previously limited mechanical properties and upper use temperatures. In this approach, rejection of the alloying component(s) from the primary silicon carbide phase into the remaining melt results in the formation of a secondary refractory phase, such as a silicide, in place of residual free silicon. Experiments conducted in the Si-Mo melt system show that relatively dense ({gt}90%) silicon carbide-molybdenum silicide materials free of residual silicon and residual carbon can be obtained. A model for reactive infiltration based on time-dependent permeabilities is proposed. Processing variables important for control of the reaction rate relative to the infiltration rate, and associated processing flaws, are discussed.

  11. The Active Oxidation of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2009-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in two very different modes. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits further attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and may lead to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g) Generally passive oxidation occurs at higher oxidant pressures and active oxidation occurs at lower oxidant pressures and elevated temperatures. Active oxidation is a concern for reentry, where the flight trajectory involves the latter conditions. Thus the transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major concern. Passive/active transitions have been studied by a number of investigators. An examination of the literature indicates many questions remain regarding the effect of impurity, the hysteresis of the transition (i.e. the difference between active-to-passive and passive-toactive), and the effect of total pressure. In this study we systematically investigate each of these effects. Experiments were done in both an alumina furnace tube and a quartz furnace tube. It is known that alumina tubes release impurities such as sodium and increase the kinetics in the passive region [1]. We have observed that the active-to-passive transition occurs at a lower oxygen pressure when the experiment is conducted in alumina tubes and the resultant passive silica scale contains sodium. Thus the tests in this study are conducted in quartz tubes. The hysteresis of the transition has been discussed in the detail in the original theoretical treatise of this problem for pure silicon by Wagner [2], yet there is little mention of it in subsequent literature. Essentially Wagner points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. A series of experiments were conducted for active-to-passive and passive

  12. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S; Flipse, Cees F J

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG. PMID:26891244

  13. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S.; Flipse, Cees F. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG.

  14. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  15. Electronic states in epitaxial graphene fabricated on silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    An analytical expression for the density of states of a graphene monolayer interacting with a silicon carbide surface (epitaxial graphene) is derived. The density of states of silicon carbide is described within the Haldane-Anderson model. It is shown that the graphene-substrate interaction results in a narrow gap of {approx}0.01-0.06 eV in the density of states of graphene. The graphene atom charge is estimated; it is shown that the charge transfer from the substrate is {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}e per graphene atom.

  16. Flaw imaging and ultrasonic techniques for characterizing sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus x-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  17. Radiographic and ultrasonic characterization of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Abel, P. B.

    1988-01-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus X-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  18. Silicon carbide alloys: Research reports in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The book draws from work done on other silicon materials, silicon nitrides and sialons, to emphasize the importance of the SiC system. A comprehensive treatment of non-oxide silicon ceramics, this work is of special interest to researchers involved in ceramics, materials science, and high-temperature technology. This book covers the alloys of silicon carbide with aluminum nitride. Crystallography and experimental methods including sample preparation, furnace methods, X-ray and electron diffraction, optical and electron microscopy and chemical analysis are covered.

  19. The development of silicon carbide-based power electronics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Richard H.; Perkins, John F.

    1995-01-01

    In 1989 Westinghouse created an internally funded initiative to develop silicon carbide materials and device technology for a variety of potential commercial and military applications. Westinghouse saw silicon carbide as having the potential for dual use. For space applications, size and weight reductions could be achieved, together with increased reliability. Terrestrially, uses in harsh-temperature environments would be enabled. Theoretically, the physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide were highly promising for high-power, high-temperature, radiation-hardened electronics. However, bulk material with the requisite electronic qualities was not available, and the methods needed to produce a silicon carbide wafer—to fabricate high-quality devices—and to transition these technologies into a commercial product were considered to be a high-risk investment. It was recognized that through a collaborative effort, the CCDS could provide scientific expertise in several areas, thus reducing this risk. These included modeling of structures, electrical contacts, dielectrics, and epitaxial growth. This collaboration has been very successful, with developed technologies being transferred to Westinghouse.

  20. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  1. Mechanical properties of some silicon carbide reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsangarakis, N.; Andrews, B.O.; Cavallaro, C.

    1987-05-01

    The mechanical properties of several particulate and continuous fiber silicon carbide-reinforced aluminum composites were examined. The tensile strength of a 47 percent silicon carbide fiber unidirectionally-reinforced aluminum composite was 1273 and 76 MPa parallel and normal to the fiber direction, respectively. The tensile strength of (0 deg/90 deg) 4s and (0/sub 2/90/0)s composites were 629 and 864 MPa, respectively. The tensile properties of a 30 percent silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminum were found to depend on the chemistry of the metal matrix. The endurance limits of the fiber and the particulate reinforced aluminum were at the most 55 percent and 33 percent of the respective tensile strengths. The fracture toughness of the fiber reinforced composite varied with specimen width, while that of the particulate reinforced composite was 21-29 MPa sq rt m. The fatigue crack growth rate in the latter composite decreased with material thickness. There were indications that the fatigue crack growth rate in the silicon carbide particulate reinforced aluminum may be independent of variations in the chemistry of the metal matrix. 6 references.

  2. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  3. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  4. Sintered silicon carbide molded body and method for its production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, M.; Sendai, M.; Ohira, K.

    1984-01-01

    Sintered silicon carbide shapes are described. They are produced by using a composition containing an oxide of at least one element chosen from the group: Li, Be, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Nb, Mo, Ba, Tc, Ta, W and Th as a supplement to known sintering aids.

  5. Improved epitaxial process for fabricating silicon carbide semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.; Powell, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Process of growing expitaxial silicon carbide (SiC) layers on SiC substrates so that epitaxial growth is perpendicular to c-axis by chemical vapor deposition process at temperatures of 1590 to 1660 K minimizes variations in stacking sequence and problems associated with high temperatures.

  6. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, G. J.; Vartabedian, A. M.; Wade, J. A.; White, C. S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP'ed Si3N4 with 4wt% Y2O3 (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  7. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  8. Fabrication and properties of silicon carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, is a promising material candidate for future devices such as high-temperature electronics and super-strong lightweight structures. Combined with superior intrinsic properties, the nanomaterials of SiC show further advantages thanks to nanoscale effects. This thesis reports the growth mechanism, the self-integration, and the friction of SiC nanowires. The study involves nanowires fabrication using thermal evaporation, structure characterization using electron microscopy, friction measurement, and theoretical modeling. The study on nanowire growth mechanism requires understanding of the surfaces and interfaces of nanowire crystal. The catalyzed growth of SiC nanowires involves interfaces between source vapor, catalytic liquid, and nanowire solid. Our experimental observation includes the periodical twinning in a faceted SiC nanowire and three stage structure transitions during the growth. The proposed theoretical model shows that such phenomenon is the result of surface energy minimization process during the catalytic growth. Surface interactions also exist between nanowires, leading to their self-integration. Our parametric growth study reveals novel self-integration of SiC-SiO 2 core-shell nanowires as a result of SiO2 joining. Attraction between nanowires through van der Waals force and enhanced SiO2 diffusion at high temperature transform individual nanowires to the integrated nanojunctions, nanocables, and finally nanowebs. We also show that such joining process becomes effective either during growth or by annealing. The solid friction is a result of the interaction between two solid surfaces, and it depends on the adhesion and the deformation of two contacting solids among other factors. Having strong adhesion as shown from gecko foot-hairs, nanostructured materials should also have strong friction; this study is the first to investigate friction of nanostructures under

  9. Silicon carbide high temperature thermoelectric flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Man I.

    Current high temperature flow measurement devices are bulky, expensive and have slow response time. Therefore, there has been increasing demand for developing a flow sensor that has high temperature capability yet is small in size, fast in response time, and low in cost through mass fabrication. In this thesis, a high temperature flow sensor utilizing micromachining and microfabrication technology has been designed, simulated, fabricated, packaged and tested. This micro flow sensor is developed based on heavily-nitrogen-doped polycrystalline silicon carbide (n-SiC) thin film, a high temperature semiconductor well known for its mechanical robustness and chemical inertness in high temperatures and harsh environments. The small thermal mass and wide operating temperature range provide an excellent platform for a flow sensor operating with the thermal sensing principle. The n-SiC thermoelectric flow sensor prototype developed here is based on the calorimetric sensing mechanism. The sensor has a n-SiC heater for thermal marker creation, an upstream and a downstream n-SiC/p-Si thermopile for flow sensing, and a n-SiC thermistor for ambient temperature monitoring. This device is packaged in a stainless steel enclosure with a bypass channel. The tested flow range is between 0 to 20,000 sccm. The flow sensor has demonstrated high temperature capability and mechanical robustness up to 450 °C on a hotplate at zero flow condition, and up to 300 °C in a heated flow stream. The device has a response time of 8 ms. Maximum power consumption is 96 mW when operated at 8 mA (12 V) and 45 mW when operated at 5 mA (9V), with a sensor warm-up time less than 1 minute. In addition, the thermoelectric properties of n-SiC have been thoroughly studied through the characterization of the electrical resistivity, the Seebeck coefficient and the thermal conductivity of n-SiC thin film. The 0.93 microm-thick, n-SiC thin film utilized in the thermoelectric flow sensor has an electrical

  10. Selective-area laser deposition (SALD) Joining of silicon carbide with silicon carbide filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Shay Llewellyn

    Selective Area Laser Deposition (SALD) is a gas-phase, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) process that utilizes a laser-driven, pyrolytic gas reaction to form a desired solid product. This solid product only forms in the heated zone of the laser beam and thus can be selectively deposited by control of the laser position. SALD Joining employs the SALD method to accomplish 'welding' of ceramic structures together. The solid reaction product serves as a filler material to bond the two parts. The challenges involved with ceramic joining center around the lack of a liquid phase, little plastic deformation and diffusivity and poor surface wetting for many ceramic materials. Due to these properties, traditional metal welding procedures cannot be applied to ceramics. Most alternative ceramic welding techniques use some form of a metal addition to overcome these material limitations. However, the metal possesses a lower ultimate use temperature than the ceramic substrate and therefore it decreases the temperature range over which the joined part can be safely used. SALD Joining enjoys several advantages over these ceramic welding procedures. The solid filler material chemistry can be tailored to match the type of ceramic substrate and therefore fabricate monolithic joints. The SALD filler material bonds directly to the substrate and the joined structure is made in a one step process, without any post-processing. The research documented in this dissertation focused on SALD Joining of silicon carbide structures with silicon carbide filler material. A historical progression of gas-phase SFF research and a literature review of the most prominent ceramic joining techniques are provided. A variety of SiC substrates were examined, as were various conditions of gas precursor pressures and mixtures, laser beam scan speed and joint configuration. The SALD material was characterized for composition and structure by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic

  11. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  12. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  13. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  14. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

  15. Catastrophic degradation of the interface of epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepkumar, Aiswarya; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Boeckl, John J.; Hellerstedt, Jack; Fuhrer, Michael S.; Iacopi, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    Epitaxial cubic silicon carbide on silicon is of high potential technological relevance for the integration of a wide range of applications and materials with silicon technologies, such as micro electro mechanical systems, wide-bandgap electronics, and graphene. The hetero-epitaxial system engenders mechanical stresses at least up to a GPa, pressures making it extremely challenging to maintain the integrity of the silicon carbide/silicon interface. In this work, we investigate the stability of said interface and we find that high temperature annealing leads to a loss of integrity. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows a morphologically degraded SiC/Si interface, while mechanical stress measurements indicate considerable relaxation of the interfacial stress. From an electrical point of view, the diode behaviour of the initial p-Si/n-SiC junction is catastrophically lost due to considerable inter-diffusion of atoms and charges across the interface upon annealing. Temperature dependent transport measurements confirm a severe electrical shorting of the epitaxial silicon carbide to the underlying substrate, indicating vast predominance of the silicon carriers in lateral transport above 25 K. This finding has crucial consequences on the integration of epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon and its potential applications.

  16. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  17. Growth of silicon carbide crystals on a seed while pulling silicon crystals from a melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schwuttke, G. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A saturated solution of silicon and an element such as carbon having a segregation coefficient less than unity is formed by placing a solid piece of carbon in a body of molten silicon having a temperature differential decreasing toward the surface. A silicon carbide seed crystal is disposed on a holder beneath the surface of the molten silicon. As a rod or ribbon of silicon is slowly pulled from the melt, a supersaturated solution of carbon in silicon is formed in the vicinity of the seed crystal. Excess carbon is emitted from the solution in the form of silicon carbide which crystallizes on the seed crystal held in the cool region of the melt.

  18. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Kiggans, Jim; Cetiner, Nesrin; McDuffee, Joel

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  19. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  20. Development of a continuous spinning process for producing silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus was designed for the continuous production of silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers. The precursor polymer can be fiberized, crosslined and pyrolyzed. The product is a metallic black fiber with the composition of the type C sub x Si sub y n sub z. Little, other than the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, is known of the physical properties.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic silicon carbide. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Addamiano, A.

    1985-07-02

    This invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide crystals. More specifically, this invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). One object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of cubic SiC for high temperature electronic devices. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of highly pure, single crystal cubic SiC that is duplicable. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of large-area single-crystal wafers of cubic SiC. These and other objects of the present invention can be achieved by a method for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic Silicon Carbide (SiC) comprising the steps of etching silicon substrated having one mechanically polished face; depositing a thin buffer layer of cubic SiC formed by reaction between a heated Si substrate and a H2-C3H8 gas mixuture; and depositing SiC on the buffer layer at high temperature using H2+C3HY+SiH4 mixture.

  2. Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites; preparation and physicochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Omastova, Maria . E-mail: upolmaom@savba.sk; Boukerma, Kada; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Trchova, Miroslava

    2005-05-18

    Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole (SiC/PPy) conducting composites were prepared using silicon carbide as inorganic substrate. The surface modification of SiC was performed in aqueous solution by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ferric chloride as oxidant. Elemental analysis was used to determine the mass loading of polypyrrole in the SiC/PPy composites. Scanning electron microscopy showed the surface modification of SiC by PPy. PPy in composites was confirmed by the presence of PPy bands in the infrared spectra of SiC/PPy containing various amounts of conducting polymer. The conductivity of SiC/PPy composites depends on PPy content on the surface. The composite containing 35 wt.% PPy showed conductivity about 2 S cm{sup -1}, which is in the same range as the conductivity of pure polypyrrole powder prepared under the same conditions using the same oxidant. PPy in the composites was clearly detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements by its N1s and Cl2p peaks. High resolution scans of the C1s regions distinguished between silicon carbide and polypyrrole carbons. The fraction of polypyrrole at the composite surface was estimated from the silicon and nitrogen levels. The combination of XPS and conductivity measurements suggests that the surface of the SiC/PPy composites is polypyrrole-rich for a conducting polymer mass loading of at least 12.6 wt.%.

  3. A model of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Kee, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents a model describing the interacting gas phase and surface chemistry present during the steady-state chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC). In this work, the authors treat the case of steady-state deposition of SiC from silane (SiH{sub 4}) and propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) mixtures in hydrogen carrier gas at one atmosphere pressure. Epitaxial deposition is assumed to occur on a pre-existing epitaxial silicon carbide crystal. Pyrolysis of SiH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} is modeled by 83 elementary gas-phase reactions. A set of 36 reactions of gas- phase species with the surface is used to simulate the deposition process. Rates for the gas/surface reactions were obtained from experimental measurements of sticking coefficients in the literature and theoretical estimates. The authors' results represent the first simulation of a silicon carbide deposition process that includes detailed description of both the gas phase and surface reactions. The chemical reaction mechanism is also combined with a model of a rotating disk reactor (RDR), which is a convenient way to study the interaction of chemical reactions with fluid mechanics. Transport of species from the gas to the surface is accounted for using multicomponent transport properties. Predictions of deposition rates as a function of susceptor temperature, disk rotation rate, and reactant partial pressure are presented. In addition, velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles normal to the heated disk for 41 gas-phase species are determined using reactor conditions typical of epitaxial silicon carbide deposition on silicon substrates.

  4. In situ-grown hexagonal silicon nanocrystals in silicon carbide-based films

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) were grown in situ in carbide-based film using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that these nanocrystallites were embedded in an amorphous silicon carbide-based matrix. Electron diffraction pattern analyses revealed that the crystallites have a hexagonal-wurtzite silicon phase structure. The peak position of the photoluminescence can be controlled within a wavelength of 500 to 650 nm by adjusting the flow rate of the silane gas. We suggest that this phenomenon is attributed to the quantum confinement effect of hexagonal Si-NCs in silicon carbide-based film with a change in the sizes and emission states of the NCs. PMID:23171576

  5. In situ-grown hexagonal silicon nanocrystals in silicon carbide-based films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Youb; Huh, Chul; Park, Nae-Man; Choi, Cheol-Jong; Suemitsu, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) were grown in situ in carbide-based film using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that these nanocrystallites were embedded in an amorphous silicon carbide-based matrix. Electron diffraction pattern analyses revealed that the crystallites have a hexagonal-wurtzite silicon phase structure. The peak position of the photoluminescence can be controlled within a wavelength of 500 to 650 nm by adjusting the flow rate of the silane gas. We suggest that this phenomenon is attributed to the quantum confinement effect of hexagonal Si-NCs in silicon carbide-based film with a change in the sizes and emission states of the NCs. PMID:23171576

  6. Fabrication and characterization of silicon quantum dots in Si-rich silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-Rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan; Xu, Kewei

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous Si-rich silicon carbide films were prepared by magnetron co-sputtering and subsequently annealed at 900-1100 degrees C. After annealing at 1100 degrees C, this configuration of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide formed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the chemical modulation of the films. The formation and orientation of silicon quantum dots were characterized by glancing angle X-ray diffraction, which shows that the ratio of silicon and carbon significantly influences the species of quantum dots. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigations directly demonstrated that the formation of silicon quantum dots is heavily dependent on the annealing temperatures and the ratio of silicon and carbide. Only the temperature of about 1100 degrees C is enough for the formation of high-density and small-size silicon quantum dots due to phase separation and thermal crystallization. Deconvolution of the first order Raman spectra shows the existence of a lower frequency peak in the range 500-505 cm(-1) corresponding to silicon quantum dots with different atom ratio of silicon and carbon. PMID:22409005

  7. Field testing of pressureless sintered silicon carbide for choke trim

    SciTech Connect

    Regitz, A.; Keene, K.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, tungsten carbide has been the most erosion resistant material in use for choke stem tips and seats. An increase in the number of wells that produce sand has led to a need for an improved material that will maintain its integrity significantly longer, when exposed to high velocity sand. During the last two years, FMC Wellhead Equipment Division's R and D Engineering Department has been conducting field tests of pressureless sintered silicon carbide (herein called SiC) used as trim for chokes. The test results have been very encouraging. SiC appears to have wear resistance two to three times better than tungsten carbide. The main problems encountered have been the brittleness of the material and the difficulty in attaching a SiC tip to the steel choke stem.

  8. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  9. Revised activation estimates for silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Cheng, E.T.; Mann, F.M.

    1996-10-01

    Recent progress in nuclear data development for fusion energy systems includes a reevaluation of neutron activation cross sections for silicon and aluminum. Activation calculations using the newly compiled Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library result in calculated levels of {sup 26}Al in irradiated silicon that are about an order of magnitude lower than the earlier calculated values. Thus, according to the latest internationally accepted nuclear data, SiC is much more attractive as a low activation material, even in first wall applications.

  10. Processing of reaction-bonded silicon carbide without residual silicon phase

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, R.P.; Chiang, Y.M.

    1988-08-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon carbide free of the residual silicon phase that has previously limited upper use temperatures and mechanical properties has been synthesized by the infiltration of carbonaceous preforms using alloyed silicon melts. In this approach, rejection of the alloying components from the primary reacted silicon carbide phase into the remaining liquid forms a secondary refractory silicide, in a potentially broad and controllable range of volume fractions. Dense SiC-MoSi/sub 2/ materials free of residual silicon and residual carbon have been synthesized. In addition to a fully-infiltrated monolith, surface coatings on a carbon body have been synthesized by control of processing parameters. In each, the absence of free silicon and incorporation of the secondary phase is expected to improve mechanical properties. 14 references.

  11. Comparison of the surface charge behavior of commercial silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of protons from aqueous solution onto the surfaces of a variety of commercial silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders has been examined using a surface titration methodology. This method provides information on some colloidal characteristics, such as the point of zero charge (pzc) and the variation of proton adsorption with dispersion pH, useful for the prediction of optimal ceramic-processing conditions. Qualitatively, the magnitude of the proton adsorption from solution reveals small differences among all of the materials studied. However, the results show that the pzc for the various silicon nitride powders is affected by the powder synthesis route. Complementary investigations have shown that milling can also act to shift the pzc exhibited by silicon nitride powder. Also, studies of the role of the electrolyte in the development of surface charge have indicated no evidence of specific adsorption of ammonium ion on either silicon nitride or silicon carbide powders.

  12. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  13. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  14. Friction, deformation and fracture of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical and conical diamond riders sliding on the basal plane of silicon carbide. The results indicate that, when deformation is primarily elastic, the friction does not depend on crystallographic orientation and there is no detectable fracture or cracking. When, however, plastic deformation occurs, silicon carbide exhibits anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Surface fracture crack patterns surrounding wear tracks are observed to be of three types. The crack-geometries of two types are generally independent of orientation, the third crack, however, depends on the orientation. All surface cracks extend into subsurface. Anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture on the basal plane are primarily controlled by the slip system and cleavage.

  15. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  16. Optical nonlinearities in high-confinement silicon carbide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Jaime; Yu, Mengjie; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Poitras, Carl B; Lau, Ryan K W; Dutt, Avik; Gaeta, Alexander L; Lipson, Michal

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate strong nonlinearities of n2=8.6±1.1×10(-15)  cm2 W(-1) in single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) at a wavelength of 2360 nm. We use a high-confinement SiC waveguide fabricated based on a high-temperature smart-cut process. PMID:26368731

  17. Anodic etching of p-type cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, G. L.; Fekade, K.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1992-01-01

    p-Type cubic silicon carbide was anodically etched using an electrolyte of HF:HCl:H2O. The etching depth was determined versus time with a fixed current density of 96.4 mA/sq cm. It was found that the etching was very smooth and very uniform. An etch rate of 22.7 nm/s was obtained in a 1:1:50 HF:HCl:H2O electrolyte.

  18. Electron spin decoherence in silicon carbide nuclear spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping

    In this paper, we study the electron spin decoherence of single defects in silicon carbide (SiC) nuclear spin bath. We find that, although the natural abundance of 29Si (4.7 counter-intuitive result, is the suppression of heteronuclear-spin flip-flop process in finite magnetic field. Our results show that electron spin of defect centers in SiC are excellent candidates for solid state spin qubit in quantum information processing.

  19. Microstructure and properties of IN SITU toughened silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Zhang, Xiao Feng

    2003-05-01

    A silicon carbide with a fracture toughness as high as 9.1 MPa.m1/2 has been developed by hot pressing b-SiC powder with aluminum, boron, and carbon additions (ABC-SiC). Central in this material development has been systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and mechanical characterizations. In particular, atomic-resolution electron microscopy and nanoprobe composition quantification were combined in analyzing grain boundary structure and nanoscale structural features.

  20. Synthesis of multifilament silicon carbide fibers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    A process for development of clean silicon carbide fiber with a small diameter and high reliability is presented. An experimental evaluation of operating conditions for SiC fibers of good mechanical properties and devising an efficient technique which will prevent welding together of individual filaments are discussed. The thermodynamic analysis of a different precursor system was analyzed vigorously. Thermodynamically optimum conditions for stoichiometric SiC deposit were obtained.

  1. Assessment of exposure to quartz, cristobalite and silicon carbide fibres (whiskers) in a silicon carbide plant.

    PubMed

    Dion, Chantal; Dufresne, André; Jacob, Marcel; Perrault, Guy

    2005-06-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to report on the concentration of silicon carbide (SiC) fibres, crystalline silica and respirable dust in a Canadian SiC production plant and to compare the results with earlier investigations. The second objective is to tentatively explain the differences in concentration of the fibrogenic substances between different countries. The assessment of SiC fibres, dusts, respirable quartz and cristobalite was performed according to standard procedures. The highest 8 h time-weighted average concentrations of fibres were found among the crusher and backhoe attendants and the carboselectors with an arithmetic mean of 0.63 fibres ml(-1) for the former group and 0.51 fibres ml(-1) for the latter group. The results of respirable SiC fibres in the Canadian plant were lower than in the Norwegian and Italian industries. Most of the 8 h time-weighted average concentrations for quartz were less than or around the limit of detection of 0.01 mg m(-3). The maximum 8 h time-weighted average concentration for quartz was found among the carboselectors (0.157 mg m(-3)), followed by the labourers (0.032 mg m(-3)). Similarly, most of the 8 h time-weighted average cristobalite measurements were less than the limit of detection of 0.01 mg m(-3) except for the carboselectors where it was found to be 0.044 mg m(-3). The assessment of the Italian occupational settings exposure demonstrated elevated quartz concentrations, while cristobalite was absent. The authors have concluded that the investigations that were performed in the last two decades in this field by researchers from different countries seem to support that SiC fibres (whiskers) constitute a major airborne health hazard. PMID:15650014

  2. Reaction kinetics of nanostructured silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, K. L.; Patyk, J. K.; Zerda, T. W.

    2008-08-01

    SiC nanowires were produced from carbon nanotubes and silicon by two different methods at high temperature. X-ray powder diffraction was used to determine SiC concentration. The reaction rate using the Avrami-Erofeev method was determined for samples sintered at temperatures ranging from 1313 to 1823 K. The activation energy was found to be (254 ± 36) kJ mol-1. The limiting factor in SiC formation is diffusion of silicon and carbon atoms through the produced layer of SiC.

  3. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Finely divided silicon carbide powder is obtained by mixing colloidal silica and unreacted phenolic resin in either acetone or methanol, evaporating solvent from the obtained solution to form a gel, drying and calcining the gel to polymerize the phenolic resin therein, pyrolyzing the dried and calcined gel at a temperature in the range of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C, and reacting silicon and carbon in the pyrolyzed gel at a temperature in the range of 1550 to 1700/sup 0/C to form the powder.

  4. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  5. Barrier properties of nano silicon carbide designed chitosan nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Gopal C; Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2015-12-10

    Nano silicon carbide (SiC) designed chitosan nanocomposites were prepared by solution technique. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for studying structural interaction of nano silicon carbide (SiC) with chitosan. The morphology of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The thermal stability of chitosan was substantially increased due to incorporation of stable silicon carbide nanopowder. The oxygen permeability of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was reduced by three folds as compared to the virgin chitosan. The chemical resistance properties of chitosan were enhanced due to the incorporation of nano SiC. The biodegradability was investigated using sludge water. The tensile strength of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was increased with increasing percentage of SiC. The substantial reduction in oxygen barrier properties in combination with increased thermal stability, tensile strength and chemical resistance properties; the synthesized nanocomposite may be suitable for packaging applications. PMID:26428100

  6. CVD silicon carbide characterization. Final report, August 1992-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, G.A.; Iden, D.

    1994-08-01

    Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide is a candidate material for high quality ground and space-based mirror substrates and high quality reflective optics. Statistically valid material property data has not been available, however, to make durability and lifetime predictions for such optics. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the Weibull and slow crack growth parameters for CVD silicon carbide. Specimens were cut from various locations in a 25 mm thick, 50 cm diameter piece of SiC to analyze bulk material property homogeneity. Flexural strength was measured using a four-point bend technique. In addition to mechanical testing for strength, hardness, and fracture toughness, the material crystallography and microstructure were studied. Thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, optical absorption, and infrared reflectivity measurements were also conducted. Raman spectroscopy was used to check for any residual stress. Test results show this CVD silicon carbide is a high-purity, homogeneous, fine-grained substrate material with very good mechanical, optical, and thermal properties.

  7. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  8. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  9. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  10. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon carbide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, N.; Hashim, M.R.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: • Highly reliable UV detectors are fabricated on porous silicon carbide substrates. • The optical properties of samples are enhanced by increasing the current density. • The optimized sample exhibits enhanced sensitivity to the incident UV radiation. - Abstract: Highly reliable visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were successfully fabricated on porous silicon carbide (PSC) substrates. High responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetector that was fabricated on an optimized PSC substrate. The PSC samples were prepared via the UV-assisted photo-electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using different etching current densities. The optical results showed that the current density is an outstanding etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC substrates. A highly porous substrate was synthesized using a suitable etching current density to enhance its light absorption, thereby improving the sensitivity of UV detector with this substrate. The electrical characteristics of fabricated devices on optimized PSC substrates exhibited enhanced sensitivity and responsivity to the incident radiation.

  11. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  12. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  13. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V.; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Ranjbar Kermany, Atieh; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  14. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. PMID:25053702

  15. Affordable Fabrication and Properties of Silicon Carbide-Based Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    1998-01-01

    An affordable processing technique for the fabrication of silicon carbide-based interpenetrating phase composites (IPCs) is presented. This process consists of the production of microporous carbon preforms and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture for which methods to control pore volume and pore size have been established. The process gives good control of microstructure and morphology of silicon carbide-based composite materials. Room and high temperature mechanical properties (flexural strength, compressive strength, and flexural creep) of low and high silicon-silicon carbide composites will be discussed.

  16. A study of the effect of grain size on the ballistic performance of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The depth of penetration method was used to ballistically evaluate the performance of silicon carbide as a function of grain size. The hot-pressed silicon carbide was backed by 4340 steel Rc = 35 and impacted by tungsten heavy metal projectiles of L/D = 4 at velocities of 1.6 and 1/75 km/s. The hot-pressed silicon carbide was also compared with reaction-sintered silicon carbide of identical thickness in the current study. Results are compared with data previously reported by others.

  17. Optical constants of silicon carbide deposited with emerging PVD techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Gianni; Suman, M.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Nicolosi, P.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an attractive material for EUV and soft X-ray optics. CVD-deposited silicon carbide (deposited at 1400° C on Si substrate) is the best reflective material in the whole EUV interval (with about the 48% of reflectance at 121.6 nm). Despite of this, SiC thin films deposited with PVD techniques, such as magnetron sputtering, on silicon substrate, do not have the same performances and they undergo to a degradation with time, probably because of some stoichiometry reason (carbon rich). Depositing stable SiC with PVD techniques is crucial in building ML's, like Si/SiC and SiC/Mg for soft X-ray applications (such space telescope and photolithography). We deposited some preliminary samples using the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and the Pulsed Electron Deposition (PED) techniques achieving a good reflectance in the whole EUV range (27% at near normal incidence at 121.6 nn) on a silicon substrate. The higher energy involved in these deposition processes could lead to a film with a stoichiometry much closer to the target one. The reflectivity of the deposited films has been measured at the BEAR beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron in Trieste (Italy; the optical constants retrieved at six wavelength from 121.6 nm down to 5 nm.

  18. Polymeric synthesis of silicon carbide with microwaves.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan; Urueta, Luis; Valdez, Zarel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is conducting polymeric synthesis with microwaves for producing beta-SiC. A polymeric precursor was prepared by means of hydrolysis and condensation reactions from pheniltrimethoxysilane, water, methanol, ammonium hydroxide and chloride acid. The precursor was placed into a quartz tube in vacuum; pyrolysis was carried out conventionally in a tube furnace, and by microwaves at 2.45 GHz in a multimode cavity. Conventional tests took place in a scheme where temperature was up to 1500 degrees C for 120 minutes. Microwave heating rate was not controlled and tests lasted 60 and 90 minutes, temperature was around 900 degrees C. Products of the pyrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction; in the microwave case the diffraction patterns showed a strong background of either very fine particles or amorphous material, then infrared spectroscopy was also employed for confirming carbon bonds. In both processes beta-SiC was found as the only produced carbide. PMID:17645205

  19. Exposure to Fibres, Crystalline Silica, Silicon Carbide and Sulphur Dioxide in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry

    PubMed Central

    Føreland, S.; Bye, E.; Bakke, B.; Eduard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess personal exposure to fibres, crystalline silica, silicon carbide (SiC) and sulphur dioxide in the Norwegian SiC industry. Methods: Approximately 720 fibre samples, 720 respirable dust samples and 1400 total dust samples were collected from randomly chosen workers from the furnace, processing and maintenance departments in all three Norwegian SiC plants. The respirable dust samples were analysed for quartz, cristobalite and non-fibrous SiC content. Approximately 240 sulphur dioxide samples were collected from workers in the furnace department. Results: The sorting operators from all plants, control room and cleaning operators in Plant A and charger, charger/mix and payloader operators in Plant C had a geometric mean (GM) of fibre exposure above the Norwegian occupational exposure limit (OEL) (0.1 fibre cm−3). The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable quartz (20 μg m−3). The charger/mix operators in Plant C had the highest GM exposure to respirable cristobalite (38 μg m−3) and the refinery crusher operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to non-fibrous SiC (0.65 mg m−3). Exposure to the crystalline silica and non-fibrous SiC was generally low and between 0.4 and 2.1% of the measurements exceeded the OELs. The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable dust (1.3 mg m−3) and total dust (21 mg m−3). GM exposures for respirable dust above the Norwegian SiC industry-specific OEL of 0.5 mg m−3 were also found for refinery crusher operators in all plants and mix, charger, charger/mix and sorting operators in Plant C. Only 4% of the total dust measurements exceeded the OEL for nuisance dust of (10 mg m−3). Exposure to sulphur dioxide was generally low. However, peaks in the range of 10–100 p.p.m. were observed for control room and crane operators in Plants A and B and for charger and charger/mix operators in Plant C. Conclusion: Workers in

  20. Gas-phase formation of silicon carbides, oxides, and sulphides from atomic silicon ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohme, Diethard K.; Wlodek, Stanislaw; Fox, Arnold

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental study of the kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions in the gas phase between ground-state Si(+)2p and a variety of astrophysical molecules. The aim of this study is to identify the reactions which trigger the formation of chemical bonds between silicon and carbon, oxygen and sulphur, and the chemical pathways which lead to further molecular growth. Such knowledge is valuable in the identification of new extraterrestrial silicon-bearing molecules and for an assessment of the gas-phase transition from atomic silicon to silicon carbide and silicate grain particles in carbon-rich and oxygen-rich astrophysical environments.

  1. Exciton Resonances in Novel Silicon Carbide Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burggraf, Larry; Duan, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    A revolutionary technology transformation from electronics to excitionics for faster signal processing and computing will be advantaged by coherent exciton transfer at room temperature. The key feature required of exciton components for this technology is efficient and coherent transfer of long-lived excitons. We report theoretical investigations of optical properties of SiC materials having potential for high-temperature excitonics. Using Car-Parinello simulated annealing and DFT we identified low-energy SiC molecular structures. The closo-Si12C12 isomer, the most stable 12-12 isomer below 1100 C, has potential to make self-assembled chains and 2-D nanostructures to construct exciton components. Using TDDFT, we calculated the optical properties of the isomer as well as oligomers and 2-D crystal formed from the isomer as the monomer unit. This molecule has large optical oscillator strength in the visible. Its high-energy and low-energy transitions (1.15 eV and 2.56 eV) are nearly pure one-electron silicon-to-carbon transitions, while an intermediate energy transition (1.28 eV) is a nearly pure carbon-to-silicon one-electron charge transfer. These results are useful to describe resonant, coherent transfer of dark excitons in the nanostructures. Research supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. The magnetic and hyperfine properties of iron in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzain, M.; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Gismelseed, A.; Al-Rawas, A.; Yousif, A.; Widatallah, H.; Al-Barwani, M.

    2014-04-01

    The magnetic and hyperfine properties of iron impurities in 3C- and 6H- silicon-carbide are calculated using the abinitio method of full-potential linear-augmented-plane-waves. The iron atoms are introduced at substitutional carbon, Fe C , and silicon, Fe Si , sites as well as at the tetrahedral interstitial sites with four nearest neighbours carbon atoms, Fe I (C), and four nearest neighbours silicon atoms, Fe I (Si). The effect of introducing vacancies at the neighbours of these sites is also studied. Fe atoms with complete neighbors substituted at Si or C sites are found to be nonmagnetic, while Fe atoms at interstitial sites are magnetic. Introduction of a vacancy at a neighboring site reverse the picture.

  3. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  4. Subsurface damage of single crystalline silicon carbide in nanoindentation tests.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiwang; Gai, Xiaohui; Harada, Hirofumi

    2010-11-01

    The response of single crystalline silicon carbide (SiC) to a Berkovich nanoindenter was investigated by examining the indents using a transmission electron microscope and the selected area electron diffraction technique. It was found that the depth of indentation-induced subsurface damage was far larger than the indentation depth, and the damaging mechanism of SiC was distinctly different from that of single crystalline silicon. For silicon, a broad amorphous region is formed underneath the indenter after unloading; for SiC, however, no amorphous phase was detected. Instead, a polycrystalline structure with a grain size of ten nanometer level was identified directly under the indenter tip. Micro cracks, basal plane dislocations and possible cross slips were also found around the indent. These finding provide useful information for ultraprecision manufacturing of SiC wafers. PMID:21138038

  5. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; Huang, Alex Q.; Melcher, Jerry; Atcitty, Stan

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  6. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1994-06-28

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400 C to 1000 C where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100 C to 1600 C to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process. 5 figures.

  7. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  8. Synthesis of silicon carbide at room temperature from colloidal suspensions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Kulikova, T. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical approaches were used for the investigation of mechanisms and conditions of self-organized nanostructures formation in the drying drop of the mixture of colloidal suspensions of nanoscale amorphous silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes. The formation of rodlike structures with diameter 250-300nm and length ∼4pm was revealed. The diffraction analysis of the obtained nanostructures showed the formation of the silicon carbide phase at room temperature.

  9. Microstructural Evolution of Chloride-Cleaned Silicon Carbide Aluminum Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Gbenebor, O. P.; Balogun, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    This study examines the synergy between reinforcement surface modifications on the evolution of microstructures of AA6011-silicon carbide particle (SiCp) composites in multidirectional solidification. Silicon carbide particles (SiCp) were cleaned with ammonium chloride, tin(II) chloride, sodium chloride, and palladium(II) chloride and used as reinforcement to cast AA6011-SiCp composites by applying the stir casting method. A scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer were used to investigate the morphology and phases present, respectively, in the composite material. Results show that wetting agents were effective as they inhibited the formation of Al4C3 in all modified composites. The modified SiCp was found to have varying effects on the morphology, dendrite arm size and direction, size and configuration of AlFeSi, and the amount of eutectic silicon depending on the concentration of the reagent and cleaning time. The highest effect was shown by the use of 40 g/L of tin(II) chloride. The composites had short dendritic arms, good interfacial interaction, and only a few crystals of AlFeSi.

  10. Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

  11. Decoding the message from meteoritic stardust silicon carbide grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate

    2014-05-01

    SiC mainstream grains are presolar grains believed to form in the envelopes of carbon rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with masses between 1.5 and 3 solar masses. These grains represent a conundrum as the 29Si and 30Si abundances indicate that they formed in stars of super-solar metallicity, before the solar system formed. To shed light on this problem, we use silicon isotopic abundances to derive an age-metallicity relation for the stars believed to have produced the SiC mainstream grains. For 2732 mainstream SiC grains listed in the Presolar Grain Database, we use the 29Si abundances with the latest galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models to derive [Fe/H], and 30Si abundances along with the models of Zinner et al. (2006) to determine an approximate birth age for the parent AGB star. Comparing our age-metallicity relation with observational relationships derived for nearby stars, we find that the spread of [Fe/H] is in agreement, but the mean [Fe/H] in our relation is higher by 0.2 dex. We propose that this difference is because stars with higher [Fe/H] produce more dust and thus are over-represented in our age metallicity diagram, a finding consistent with previous published works. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in Stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modelling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  12. Decoding the message from meteoritic stardust silicon carbide grains

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate

    2014-05-02

    SiC mainstream grains are presolar grains believed to form in the envelopes of carbon rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with masses between 1.5 and 3 solar masses. These grains represent a conundrum as the {sup 29}Si and {sup 30}Si abundances indicate that they formed in stars of super-solar metallicity, before the solar system formed. To shed light on this problem, we use silicon isotopic abundances to derive an age-metallicity relation for the stars believed to have produced the SiC mainstream grains. For 2732 mainstream SiC grains listed in the Presolar Grain Database, we use the {sup 29}Si abundances with the latest galactic chemical evolution (GCE) models to derive [Fe/H], and {sup 30}Si abundances along with the models of Zinner et al. (2006) to determine an approximate birth age for the parent AGB star. Comparing our age-metallicity relation with observational relationships derived for nearby stars, we find that the spread of [Fe/H] is in agreement, but the mean [Fe/H] in our relation is higher by 0.2 dex. We propose that this difference is because stars with higher [Fe/H] produce more dust and thus are over-represented in our age metallicity diagram, a finding consistent with previous published works. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in Stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modelling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  13. Study of Nitrogen Concentration in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Kong, Hai-Kuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Xin, Jun; Shi, Er-Wei; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-01

    This work focused on studying the nitrogen concentration ( C N) in SiC. The variations of C N in the synthesis of SiC powder as well as the transport during SiC crystal growth have been investigated for broad ranges of temperature and Ar pressure. Before SiC crystal growth, SiC powders were synthesized from high-purity silicon and carbon powders. The concentrations of nitrogen, free C, and free Si in the as-prepared powders were all measured. C N in the SiC source powder decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing Ar pressure, whereas it did not show a remarkable trend with the molar ratio of free Si to free C. SiC crystal was then grown by the physical vapor transport (PVT) technique using the as-prepared powder. The distribution of C N in the remaining material indirectly indicated the temperature field of crystal growth. In addition, compared with introducing N2 during SiC crystal growth, doping with nitrogen during synthesis of the SiC source powder might be a better method to control C N in SiC crystals.

  14. Irradiation and annealing of p-type silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Alexander A.; Bogdanova, Elena V.; Grigor'eva, Maria V.; Lebedev, Sergey P.; Kozlovski, Vitaly V.

    2014-02-21

    The development of the technology of semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide and the beginning of their industrial manufacture have made increasingly topical studies of the radiation hardness of this material on the one hand and of the proton irradiation to form high-receptivity regions on the other hand. This paper reports on a study of the carrier removal rate (V{sub d}) in p-6H-SiC under irradiation with 8 MeV protons and of the conductivity restoration in radiation- compensated epitaxial layers of various p-type silicon carbide polytypes. V{sub d} was determined by analysis of capacitance-voltage characteristics and from results of Hall effect measurements. It was found that the complete compensation of samples with the initial value of Na - Nd ≈ 1.5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} occurs at an irradiation dose of ∼1.1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. It is shown that specific features of the sublimation layer SiC (compared to CVD layers) are clearly manifested upon the gamma and electron irradiation and are hardly noticeable under the proton and neutron irradiation. It was also found that the radiation-induced compensation of SiC is retained after its annealing at ≤1000°C. The conductivity is almost completely restored at T ≥ 1200°C. This character of annealing of the radiation compensation is independent of a silicon carbide polytype and the starting doping level of the epitaxial layer. The complete annealing temperatures considerably exceed the working temperatures of SiC-based devices. It is shown that the radiation compensation is a promising method in the technology of high-temperature devices based on SiC.

  15. Evolution of defects in silicon carbide implanted with helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Song, Yin; Yang, Yitao; Zhou, Chunlan; Wei, Long; Ma, Hongji

    2014-05-01

    Effects of accumulation of radiation damage in silicon carbide are important concerns for the use of silicon carbide in advanced nuclear energy systems. In the present work lattice damage in silicon carbide crystal (4H type) implanted with 100 keV 4He+ ions was investigated with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/c) and positron beam Doppler broadening spectrometry (PBDB). Helium implantation was performed at the specimen temperature of 510 K to avoid amorphization of the SiC crystal. Fluences of helium ions were selected to be in the range from 1 × 1016 to 3 × 1016 ions cm-2, around the dose threshold for the formation of observable helium bubbles under transmission electron microscopes (TEM). The RBS/c measurements show distinctly different annealing behavior of displaced Si atoms at doses below or above the threshold for helium bubble formation. The RBS/c yield in the peak damage region of the specimen implanted to 3 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 shows an increase on the subsequently thermal annealing above 873 K, which is readily ascribed to the extra displacement of Si atoms due to helium bubble growth. The RBS/c yield in the specimen implanted to a lower ion fluence of 1.5 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 decreases monotonously on annealing from ambient temperatures up to 1273 K. The PBDB measurements supply evidence of clustering of vacancies at temperatures from 510 to 1173 K, and dissociation of vacancy clusters above 1273 K. The similarity of annealing behavior in PBDB profiles for helium implantation to 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1016 ions cm-2 is ascribed to the saturation of trapping of positrons in vacancy type defects in the damaged layers in the specimens helium-implanted to the two dose levels.

  16. Net shape fabrication of Alpha Silicon Carbide turbine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Development of Alpha Silicon Carbide components by net shape fabrication techniques has continued in conjunction with several turbine engine programs. Progress in injection molding of simple parts has been extended to much larger components. Turbine rotors fabricated by a one piece molding have been successfully spin tested above design speeds. Static components weighing up to 4.5 kg and 33 cc in diameter have also been produced using this technique. Use of sintering fixtures significantly improves dimensional control. A new Si-SiC composite material has also been developed with average strengths up to 1000 MPa (150 ksi) at 1200 C.

  17. Deuteron irradiation creep of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.

    1998-03-01

    Irradiation creep tests were conducted on Textron SCS-6 silicon carbide (SiC) fibers during irradiation with 14 MeV deuterons at 450 and 600°C. The fibers are produced by a CVD procedure; their microstructure may therefore be representative for the matrix of a SiC composite. There is a significant radiation induced increase in creep deformation. Both quantities, irradiation creep strain and creep rate, are higher at 450°C than at 600°C for doses <0.07 dpa.

  18. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  19. Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, S.; Cantrell, J.H.; Yost, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber reveals large radial variations in acoustic reflectivity associated with the chemical composition and microstructure of a given fiber region. Rayleigh wave fringe patterns observed in each of five subregions are used to calculate the average Young modulus of that subregion. The Young modulus is found to increase monotonically from 40 GPa in the carbon core to a value of 413 GPa in the stoichiometric SiC region. The effective Young modulus of the fiber as a whole is estimated from the moduli of the individual regions and it is compared with mechanical measurements reported in the literature.

  20. Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-04-26

    This project utilizes Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials platform to fabricate advanced sensors to be used as high-temperature downhole instrumentation for the DOE’s Geothermal Technologies Program on Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The scope of the proposed research is to 1) develop a SiC pressure sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 2) develop a SiC temperature sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 3) develop a bonding process for adhering SiC sensor die to well casing couplers, and 4) perform experimental exposure testing of sensor materials and the sensor devices.

  1. The Oxidation of CVD Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynchGiao N.

    1997-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 100 and 500 hours at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic laws are discussed. Oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants typically found in combustion environments: oxygen and water vapor.

  2. Improved Silicon Carbide Crystals Grown From Atomically Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is demonstrating that atomically flat (i.e., step-free) silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces are ideal for realizing greatly improved wide bandgap semiconductor films with lower crystal defect densities. Further development of these improved films could eventually enable harsh-environment electronics beneficial to jet engine and other aerospace and automotive applications, as well as much more efficient and compact power distribution and control. The technique demonstrated could also improve blue-light lasers and light-emitting-diode displays.

  3. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Simple processing method for high-strength silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet B.; Dutta, Sunil

    1987-01-01

    Silicon carbide test bars were made by a simple wet-processing technique. The pressure casting method used the same equipment as conventional dry-pressing, but with a modified die. This casting technique was employed in order to produce test bars with improved strength and smaller fracture flaws than produced by dry-pressing. This was accomplished by eliminating pore clusters which were present in dry-pressed specimens and identified as a common source of failure in SiC MOR test bars.

  5. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  6. Heat transfer to a silicon carbide/water nanofluid.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France , D. M.; Smith, D. S.; Singh, D.; Timofeeva, E. V.; Routbort, J. L.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2009-07-01

    Heat transfer experiments were performed with a water-based nanofluid containing 170-nm silicon carbide particles at a 3.7% volume concentration and having potential commercial viability. Heat transfer coefficients for the nanofluid are presented for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3300 to 13,000 and are compared to the base fluid water on the bases of constant Reynolds number, constant velocity, and constant pumping power. Results were also compared to predictions from standard liquid correlations and a recently altered nanofluid correlation. The slip mechanisms of Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis postulated in the altered correlation were investigated in a series of heating and cooling experiments.

  7. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  8. Demonstration of Minimally Machined Honeycomb Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, William

    2012-01-01

    Honeycomb silicon carbide composite mirrors are made from a carbon fiber preform that is molded into a honeycomb shape using a rigid mold. The carbon fiber honeycomb is densified by using polymer infiltration pyrolysis, or through a reaction with liquid silicon. A chemical vapor deposit, or chemical vapor composite (CVC), process is used to deposit a polishable silicon or silicon carbide cladding on the honeycomb structure. Alternatively, the cladding may be replaced by a freestanding, replicated CVC SiC facesheet that is bonded to the honeycomb. The resulting carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide honeycomb structure is a ceramic matrix composite material with high stiffness and mechanical strength, high thermal conductivity, and low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). This innovation enables rapid, inexpensive manufacturing. The web thickness of the new material is less than 1 millimeter, and core geometries tailored. These parameters are based on precursor carbon-carbon honeycomb material made and patented by Ultracor. It is estimated at the time of this reporting that the HoneySiC(Trademark) will have a net production cost on the order of $38,000 per square meter. This includes an Ultracor raw material cost of about $97,000 per square meter, and a Trex silicon carbide deposition cost of $27,000 per square meter. Even at double this price, HoneySiC would beat NASA's goal of $100,000 per square meter. Cost savings are estimated to be 40 to 100 times that of current mirror technologies. The organic, rich prepreg material has a density of 56 kilograms per cubic meter. A charred carbon-carbon panel (volatile organics burnt off) has a density of 270 kilograms per cubic meter. Therefore, it is estimated that a HoneySiC panel would have a density of no more than 900 kilograms per cubic meter, which is about half that of beryllium and about onethird the density of bulk silicon carbide. It is also estimated that larger mirrors could be produced in a matter of weeks

  9. Silicon threshold displacement energy determined by photoluminescence in electron-irradiated cubic silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Jeremie; Esnouf, Stephane; Petite, Guillaume; Costantini, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-15

    In view of the potential use of silicon carbide (SiC) in the nuclear industry, it is of major interest to understand point defect formation in this material. This work is a contribution to the determination of the silicon threshold displacement energy in the cubic polytype of SiC using electron irradiations with increasing energies from 275 to 680 keV. The photoluminescence signal of the silicon vacancy was related to the number of displacements per atom in the silicon sublattice. This quantity was calculated taking into account the energy loss and angular dispersion of electrons in the target. A best fit of experimental data was obtained for a displacement cross section using a threshold displacement energy of 25 eV along the [100] lattice direction. We checked the relevance of this result by comparing the experimental concentration of silicon single vacancies measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with the theoretical number of displaced silicon atoms.

  10. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-19

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells. PMID:20975214

  11. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50–200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor–solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core–shell interface. PMID:20651911

  12. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface.

  13. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 degrees C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface. PMID:20651911

  14. Epitaxy of silicon carbide on silicon: Micromorphological analysis of growth surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhgasan, Ramazanov; Ştefan, Ţălu; Dinara, Sobola; Sebastian, Stach; Guseyn, Ramazanov

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of our research was the study of evolution of silicon carbide films on silicon by micromorphological analysis. Surface micromorphologies of Silicon Carbide epilayers with two different thicknesses were compared by means of fractal geometry. Silicon Carbide films were prepared on Si substrates by magnetron sputtering of polycrystalline target SiC in Ar atmosphere (99.999% purity). Synthesis of qualitative SiC/Si templates solves the questions of large diameter SiC single-crystal wafers formation. This technology decreases financial expenditure and provides integration of SiC into silicon technology. These hybrid substrates with buffer layer of high oriented SiC are useful for growth of both wide band gap materials (SiC, AlN, GaN) and graphene. The main problem of SiC heteroepitaxy on Si (1 1 1) is the large difference (∼20%) of the lattice parameters. Fractal analysis of surface morphology of heteroepitaxial films could help to understand the films growth mechanisms. The 3D (three-dimensional) surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension (D) provided global quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry.

  15. Phase equilibrium in the formation of silicon carbide by topochemical conversion of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Methods of linear algebra were used to find a basis of independent chemical reactions in the topochemical conversion of silicon into silicon carbide by the reaction with carbon monoxide. The pressure-flow phase diagram was calculated from this basis, describing the composition of the solid phase for a particular design of vacuum furnace. It was demonstrated that to grow pure silicon carbide, it is necessary to ensure the pressure of carbon monoxide less than a certain value and its flow more than a certain value, depending on the temperature of the process. The elastic fields around vacancies formed were considered for the first time in calculating the topochemical reaction. It was shown that the anisotropy of these fields in a cubic crystal increases the constant of the main reaction approximately fourfold.

  16. Surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide: theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S.; Korobkin, D.; Neuner, B.; Shvets, G.

    2009-01-22

    Compact near-field solid-state accelerating structure powered by a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is considered. The accelerating luminous transverse magnetic mode is excited in a few-micron wide evacuated planar channel between two silicon carbide (SiC) films grown on silicon (Si) wafers. Laser coupling to this mode is accomplished through the properly designed Si gratings. Operating wavelength is dictated by the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of SiC and the channel width. The geometric loss factor {kappa} of the accelerating mode is computed. It is found that the unwanted excitation of the guided modes in Si wafers reduces the laser coupling efficiency and increases the fields inside the Si wafer.

  17. Epitaxial Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj,G.; Dudley, M.; Chen, Y.; Ragothamachar, B.; Wu, B.; Zhang, H.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) epitaxial layers have been grown in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system designed and fabricated in our laboratory. Silicon tetrachloride-propane as well as silane-propane were used as precursor gases. The hot zone was designed based on simulation by using numerical modeling. Growth rates up to 200 {mu}m could be achieved. A new growth-assisted hydrogen etching was developed to show the distribution of the micropipes present in the substrate. Higher growth rate was observed on off-axis (0 0 0 1) 4 H SiC compared to the on-axis (0 0 0 1) wafer and growth mechanism was explained.

  18. Electromechanical computing at 500 degrees C with silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Te-Hao; Bhunia, Swarup; Mehregany, Mehran

    2010-09-10

    Logic circuits capable of operating at high temperatures can alleviate expensive heat-sinking and thermal-management requirements of modern electronics and are enabling for advanced propulsion systems. Replacing existing complementary metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with silicon carbide (SiC) nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) switches is a promising approach for low-power, high-performance logic operation at temperatures higher than 300 degrees C, beyond the capability of conventional silicon technology. These switches are capable of achieving virtually zero off-state current, microwave operating frequencies, radiation hardness, and nanoscale dimensions. Here, we report a microfabricated electromechanical inverter with SiC complementary NEMS switches capable of operating at 500 degrees C with ultralow leakage current. PMID:20829479

  19. Porous silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor device employs at least one layer of semiconducting porous silicon carbide (SiC). The porous SiC layer has a monocrystalline structure wherein the pore sizes, shapes, and spacing are determined by the processing conditions. In one embodiment, the semiconductor device is a p-n junction diode in which a layer of n-type SiC is positioned on a p-type layer of SiC, with the p-type layer positioned on a layer of silicon dioxide. Because of the UV luminescent properties of the semiconducting porous SiC layer, it may also be utilized for other devices such as LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

  20. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  1. DECODING THE MESSAGE FROM METEORITIC STARDUST SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate E-mail: karen.michelle.lewis@gmail.com E-mail: kpilkington@uclan.ac.uk

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  2. Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics for Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment (high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation) that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. This is due to its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  3. Decoding the Message from Meteoritic Stardust Silicon Carbide Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  4. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  5. Photonic Crystal Cavities in Cubic (3C) Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulaski, Marina; Babinec, Thomas; Buckley, Sonia; Rundquist, Armand; Provine, J.; Alassaad, Kassem; Ferro, Gabriel; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2014-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) combines many of the outstanding material properties of other well-known optical and quantum optical materials, including strong optical nonlinearity, high Young's modulus, and a host of optically-active crystalline defects, in a single CMOS-compatible platform. For many applications in classical and quantum information processing, the material properties of the cubic silicon carbide polytype (3C-SiC) in particular are advantageous. We therefore present the design, fabrication, and characterization of high quality factor and small mode volume planar photonic crystal cavities in cubic 3C-SiC thin films (200 nm). We demonstrate cavity resonances across the infrared telecommunications band, with wavelengths from 1.25 - 1.6 μm. Finally, we highlight our progress developing higher Q/V nanobeam cavities, as well as extending this optical cavity platform towards integration with SiC color centers. PECASE Grant ECCS-10 25811, NSF Grant ECS-9731293, Stanford Graduate Fellowship, National Science Graduate Fellowship.

  6. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Frenette, K. Fleury; Jamar, C.

    2004-06-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms. Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC. Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 μm was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  7. Cavity-Enhanced Measurements of Defect Spins in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calusine, Greg; Politi, Alberto; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-07-01

    The identification of new solid-state defect-qubit candidates in widely used semiconductors has the potential to enable the use of nanofabricated devices for enhanced qubit measurement and control operations. In particular, the recent discovery of optically active spin states in silicon carbide thin films offers a scalable route for incorporating defect qubits into on-chip photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of 3C silicon carbide photonic crystal cavities for enhanced excitation of color-center defect spin ensembles in order to increase measured photoluminescence signal count rates, optically detected magnetic-resonance signal intensities, and optical spin initialization rates. We observe an up to a factor of 30 increase in the photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic-resonance signals from Ky5 color centers excited by cavity-resonant excitation and increase the rate of ground-state spin initialization by approximately a factor of 2. Furthermore, we show that the 705-fold reduction in excitation mode volume and enhanced excitation and collection efficiencies provided by the structures can be used to overcome inhomogenous broadening in order to facilitate the study of defect-qubit subensemble properties. These results highlight some of the benefits that nanofabricated devices offer for engineering the local photonic environment of color-center defect qubits to enable applications in quantum information and sensing.

  8. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  9. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  10. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  11. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  12. Development of the SOFIA silicon carbide secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Michel; Antoine, Pascal; Varin, Jean-Luc; Bittner, Hermann; Erdmann, Matthias

    2003-02-01

    The SOFIA telescope is ajoint NASA-DLR project for a 2.5 m airborne Stratospheric Observatory for IR Astronomy to be flown in a specially adapted Boeing 747 SP plane, Kayser-Threde being resopinsible for the development of the Telescope Optics. The φ 352 mm Secondary Mirror is mounted ona chopping mechanism to allow avoidance of background noise during IR observations. Stiffness associated to lightness is a major demand for such a mirror to achieve high frequency chopping. This leads to select SIlicon Carbide for the mirror blank. Its development has been run by the ASTRIUM/BOOSTEC joint venture SiCSPACE, taking full benefit of the instrinsic properties of the BOOSTEC SiC-100 sintered material, associated to qualified processes specifically developed for space borne mirrors by ASTRIUM. Achieved performances include a low mass of 1.97 kg, a very high stiffness with a first resonant frequency of 1865 Hz and a measured optical surface accuracy of 39 nm rms, using Ion Beam Figuring. It is proposed here to present the major design features of the SOFIA Secondary Mirror, highlighting the main advantages of using Silicon Carbide, the main steps of its development and the achieved optomechanical performances of the developed mirror.

  13. Fatigue behavior of continuous fiber silicon-carbide-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Wallis, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Four lay-ups of continuous fiber silicon carbide (SCS2) fiber/aluminum matrix composites were tested to assess fatigue mechanisms including stiffness loss when cycled below their respective fatigue limits. The lay-ups were 0 (sub 8), 0(sub 2)/ + or - 45 (sub 2s), 0/90 (sub 2s),and 0/ + or 45/90 (subs). The data were compared with predictions from the author's previously published shakedown model which predicts fatigue-induced stiffness loss in metal matrix composites. A fifth lay-up, + or - 45 (sub 2s), was tested to compare shakedown and fatigue limits. The particular batch of silicon-carbide fibers tested in this program had a somewhat lower modulus (340 GPa) than expected and displayed poor bonding to the aluminum matrix. Good agreement was obtained between the stiffness loss model and the test data. The fatigue damage below the fatigue limit was primarily in the form of matrix cracking. The fatigue limit corresponded to the laminate shakedown for the + or - 45 (sub 2s) laminate.

  14. Displacement damage in silicon carbide irradiated in fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, H. L.; Greenwood, L. R.; Weber, W. J.; Williford, R. E.

    2004-05-01

    Calculations are performed for displacement damage in SiC due to irradiation in the neutron environments of various types of nuclear reactors using the best available models and nuclear data. The displacement damage calculations use recently developed damage functions for SiC that are based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations of displacement events. Displacements per atom (DPA) cross sections for SiC have been calculated as a function of neutron energy, and they are presented here in tabular form to facilitate their use as the standard measure of displacement damage for irradiated SiC. DPA cross sections averaged over the neutron energy spectrum are calculated for neutron spectra in the cores of typical commercial reactors and in the test sample irradiation regions of several materials test reactors used in both past and present irradiation testing. Particular attention is focused on a next-generation high-temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor, for which the high-temperature properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites are well suited. Calculated transmutations and activation levels in a pebble bed reactor are compared to those in other reactors.

  15. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  16. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Mabena, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide.

  17. Homogeneous nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide films prepared by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijin; Xu, S; Long, Jidong; Huang, Shiyong; Guo, Jun

    2007-11-21

    Silicon carbide films with different carbon concentrations x(C) have been synthesized by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition from a SiH(4)/CH(4)/H(2) gas mixture at a low substrate temperature of 500 °C. The characteristics of the films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Our experimental results show that, at x(C) = 49 at.%, the film is made up of homogeneous nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide without any phase of silicon, graphite, or diamond crystallites/clusters. The average size of SiC crystallites is approximately 6 nm. At a lower value of x(C), polycrystalline silicon and amorphous silicon carbide coexist in the films. At a higher value of x(C), amorphous carbon and silicon carbide coexist in the films. PMID:21730481

  18. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  19. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  20. Meteoritic silicon carbide and its stellar sources - Implications for galactic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Tang; Anders, Edward; Hoppe, Peter; Zinner, Ernst

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar silicon carbide grains in meteorites provide a novel means for studying the carbon-star population of about 5 x 10 to the 9th years ago. Their C-12/C-13 ratios differ greatly from the solar value but resemble those of present-day csrbon stars, implying little change in the galactic C-13 inventory. Isotope data on nitrogen and silicon suggest that the silicon carbide grains come mainly from red giants, with small contributions from novae.

  1. Toxicity in vitro of some silicon carbides and silicon nitrides: whiskers and powders.

    PubMed

    Svensson, I; Artursson, E; Leanderson, P; Berglind, R; Lindgren, F

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the toxicity of silicon carbide whiskers and powders and silicon nitride whiskers and powders and to compare their toxicity with the toxicity of crocidolite. The effects studied were inhibition of the cloning efficiency of V79 cells, formation of DNA strand breaks by means of a nick translation assay, formation of oxygen radicals in three different assays, and the ability to stimulate neutrophils to produce hydroxyl radicals. All materials showed concentration-dependent inhibition of the cloning efficiency of V79 cells. The inhibition by the most toxic whiskers was in the same order of magnitude as that of crocidolite. Milled whiskers and powders were less toxic than the whiskers. There was a high DNA breaking potential for crocidolite and four of the silicon carbide whiskers and a rather low one for the other materials. Formation of hydroxyl radicals was found for crocidolite and one of the silicon carbide whiskers. In the neutrophil activation test, there was a great variation in the different materials' abilities to activate neutrophils. There was also a good correlation between chemiluminescence and H2O2 formation. The highest activation was found in neutrophils exposed to two of the silicon carbide whiskers and one milled whisker. The conclusion of the investigation is that some of the ceramic materials studied had damaging biological effects comparable to or greater than those of crocidolite. The results from the investigation clearly imply that caution is needed in the introduction of new ceramic fiber materials, so that the correct precautions and protective devices are used in order to avoid harm to the personnel handling the material. PMID:9055957

  2. Stability and rheology of dispersions of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the surface and colloid chemistry of commercial ultra-fine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders was examined by a variety of standard characterization techniques and by methodologies especially developed for ceramic dispersions. These include electrokinetic measurement, surface titration, and surface spectroscopies. The effects of powder pretreatment and modification strategies, which can be utilized to augment control of processing characteristics, were monitored with these technologies. Both silicon carbide and nitride were found to exhibit silica-like surface chemistries, but silicon nitride powders possess an additional amine surface functionality. Colloidal characteristics of the various nitride powders in aqueous suspension is believed to be highly dependent on the relative amounts of the two types of surface groups, which in turn is determined by the powder synthesis route. The differences in the apparent colloidal characteristics for silicon nitride powders cannot be attributed to the specific absorption of ammonium ions. Development of a model for the prediction of double-layer characteristics of materials with a hybrid site interface facilitated understanding and prediction of the behavior of both surface charge and surface potential for these materials. The utility of the model in application to silicon nitride powders was demonstrated.

  3. Growth of silicon quantum dots by oxidation of the silicon nanocrystals embedded within silicon carbide matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-10-15

    A moderately low temperature (≤800 °C) thermal processing technique has been described for the growth of the silicon quantum dots (Si-QD) within microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) dielectric thin films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The nanocrystalline silicon grains (nc-Si) present in the as deposited films were initially enhanced by aluminium induced crystallization (AIC) method in vacuum at a temperature of T{sub v} = 525 °C. The samples were then stepwise annealed at different temperatures T{sub a} in air ambient. Analysis of the films by FTIR and XPS reveal a rearrangement of the μc-SiC:H network has taken place with a significant surface oxidation of the nc-Si domains upon annealing in air. The nc-Si grain size (D{sub XRD}) as calculated from the XRD peak widths using Scherrer formula was found to decrease from 7 nm to 4 nm with increase in T{sub a} from 250 °C to 800 °C. A core shell like structure with the nc-Si as the core and the surface oxide layer as the shell can clearly describe the situation. The results indicate that with the increase of the annealing temperature in air the oxide shell layer becomes thicker and the nc-Si cores become smaller until their size reduced to the order of the Si-QDs. Quantum confinement effect due to the SiO covered nc-Si grains of size about 4 nm resulted in a photoluminescence peak due to the Si QDs with peak energy at 1.8 eV.

  4. Wear of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with single crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. The hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing of silicon carbide that occurred is believed to be due to cleavages of both the prismatic and basal planes. The silicon carbide wear debris, which was produced by brittle fracture, slides or rolls on both the metal and silicon carbide and produces grooves and indentations on these surfaces. The wear scars of aluminum and titanium, which have much stronger chemical affinity for silicon and carbon, are generally rougher than those of the other metals. Fracturing and cracking along the grain boundary of rhodium and tungsten were observed. These may be primarily due to the greater shear moduli of the metals.

  5. Reaction-Based SiC Materials for Joining Silicon Carbide Composites for Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Singh, M.; Serizawa, H.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2000-09-01

    The fabrication of large or complex silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) components for fusion energy systems requires a method to assemble smaller components that are limited in size by manufacturing constraints. Previous analysis indicates that silicon carbide should be considered as candidate joint materials. Two methods to obtain SiC joints rely on a reaction between silicon and carbon to produce silicon carbide. This report summarizes preliminary mechanical properties of joints formed by these two methods. The methods appear to provide similar mechanical properties. Both the test methods and materials are preliminary in design and require further optimization. In an effort to determine how the mechanical test data is influenced by the test methodology and specimen size, plans for detailed finite element modeling (FEM) are presented.

  6. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  7. Surface Micromachined Silicon Carbide Accelerometers for Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAnna, Russell G.

    1998-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of possible silicon carbide (SIC) folded-beam, lateral-resonating accelerometers is presented. Results include stiffness coefficients, acceleration sensitivities, resonant frequency versus temperature, and proof-mass displacements due to centripetal acceleration of a blade-mounted sensor. The surface micromachined devices, which are similar to the Analog Devices Inc., (Norwood, MA) air-bag crash detector, are etched from 2-pm thick, 3C-SiC films grown at 1600 K using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The substrate is a 500 gm-thick, (100) silicon wafer. Polysilicon or silicon dioxide is used as a sacrificial layer. The finite element analysis includes temperature-dependent properties, shape change due to volume expansion, and thermal stress caused by differential thermal expansion of the materials. The finite-element results are compared to experimental results for a SiC device of similar, but not identical, geometry. Along with changes in mechanical design, blade-mounted sensors would require on-chip circuitry to cancel displacements due to centripetal acceleration and improve sensitivity and bandwidth. These findings may result in better accelerometer designs for this application.

  8. Silicon Carbide Diodes Performance Characterization at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Gardner, Brent G.; Adams, Jerry

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research center's Electrical Systems Development branch is working to demonstrate and test the advantages of Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices in actual power electronics applications. The first step in this pursuit is to obtain commercially available SiC Schottky diodes and to individually test them under both static and dynamic conditions, and then compare them with current state of the art silicon Schottky and ultra fast p-n diodes of similar voltage and current ratings. This presentation covers the results of electrical tests performed at NASA Glenn. Steady state forward and reverse current-volt (I-V) curves were generated for each device to compare performance and to measure their forward voltage drop at rated current, as well as the reverse leakage current at rated voltage. In addition, the devices were individually connected as freewheeling diodes in a Buck (step down) DC to DC converter to test their reverse recovery characteristics and compare their transient performance in a typical converter application. Both static and transient characterization tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 300 C, in order to test and demonstrate the advantages of SiC over Silicon at high temperatures.

  9. Characterization of SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using NASA's reaction forming process. Silicon-2 at a percent of niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bi-modal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon and silicon. Fiber push-out tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approx. 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approx. 60 MPa. A typical four point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pull out.

  10. Characterization of SiC Fiber (SCS-6) Reinforced-Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) reinforced-reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using a reaction-forming process. Silicon-2 at.% niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bimodal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon, and silicon. Fiber pushout tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approximately 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approximately 60 MPa. A typical four-point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pullout.

  11. Optimization of sinter/HIP parameters of multiphase silicon nitride/silicon carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, D.S.; Moricca, S.; Drennan, J.; Fan, Q.S.; Gu, P.Z.

    1996-12-31

    Multiphase silicon carbide reinforced silicon nitride materials were sintered using 3 techniques, (1) pressureless sintering, (2) post-sinter HIPing and (3) sintering and HIPing in the same cycle (sinter/HIP). The materials have been characterized with respect to their microstructure, phase relationships and mechanical properties. The materials reached almost the theoretical density using the 3 sintering methods, but this was achieved at a lower temperature with sinter/HIPing. A balance should be sought between the high pressure required for high density and the prevention of excessive nitrogen (pressurizing gas) dissolution in the glassy grain boundary phases. The optimization of sinter/HIP parameters are discussed with respect to sintering mechanisms.

  12. Coaxial nanocable: silicon carbide and silicon oxide sheathed with boron nitride and carbon

    PubMed

    Zhang; Suenaga; Colliex; Iijima

    1998-08-14

    Multielement nanotubes comprising multiple phases, with diameters of a few tens of nanometers and lengths up to 50 micrometers, were successfully synthesized by means of reactive laser ablation. The experimentally determined structure consists of a beta-phase silicon carbide core, an amorphous silicon oxide intermediate layer, and graphitic outer shells made of boron nitride and carbon layers separated in the radial direction. The structure resembles a coaxial nanocable with a semiconductor-insulator-metal (or semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor) geometry and suggests applications in nanoscale electronic devices that take advantage of this self-organization mechanism for multielement nanotube formation. PMID:9703508

  13. Molecular dynamics study of thermal transport across grain boundaries in silicon carbide nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chengbin; Ma, Jiawen; Huai, Ping

    2016-03-01

    The thermal transport behaviors of < 011> Σ3, Σ9 and Σ11 grain boundaries (GBs) in silicon carbide nanorod are investigated by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation. Temperature changes suddenly at the boundaries if a constant heat flux is assumed. The thermal conductance of these GBs is found several times larger than that of interfaces of other materials previously reported. Furthermore the interfacial thermal resistance increases with elevated temperature above 500 K. Our results give theoretical guidance to understand the underlying thermal transport mechanism in silicon carbide, and may be helpful to design silicon carbide materials for high temperature applications.

  14. A New Approach to Joining of Silicon Carbide-Based Materials for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic joining is recognized as one of the enabling technologies for the application of silicon carbide-based materials in a number of high temperature applications. An affordable, robust technique for the joining of silicon carbide-based ceramics has been developed. This technique is capable of producing joints with tailorable thickness and composition. Microstructure and mechanical properties of reaction formed joints in a reaction bonded silicon carbide have been reported. These joints maintain their mechanical strengths at high temperatures (up to 1350 C) in air. This technique is capable of joining large and complex shaped ceramic components.

  15. Experience with silicon-carbide tiles in mass-fired refuse boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Strach, L. ); Wasyluk, D.T. )

    1993-12-01

    The conventional material used to protect furnace water walls in mass-burn refuse boilers has been silicon-carbide refractory lining and an associated anchoring mechanism. Without this kind of protection, water walls quickly deteriorate due to the corrosive products of combustion. Although this lining is successful in protecting the water walls, it is not without operational and maintenance problems. There is a range of silicon-carbide products and materials available to help minimize these problems. One approach that is gaining commercial acceptance is the use of preformed silicon-carbide tiles. This article presents design considerations for selecting the proper tile based on the authors' operational experiences.

  16. Low Cost Fabrication of Silicon Carbide Based Ceramics and Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Levine, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC's) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

  17. Low cost fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics and fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Levine, S.R.

    1995-07-01

    A low cost processing technique called reaction forming for the fabrication of near-net and complex shaped components of silicon carbide based ceramics and composites is presented. This process consists of the production of a microporous carbon preform and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture with very good control of pore volume and pore size thereby yielding materials with tailorable microstructure and composition. Mechanical properties (elastic modulus, flexural strength, and fracture toughness) of reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics are presented. This processing approach is suitable for various kinds of reinforcements such as whiskers, particulates, fibers (tows, weaves, and filaments), and 3-D architectures. This approach has also been used to fabricate continuous silicon carbide fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCC`s) with silicon carbide based matrices. Strong and tough composites with tailorable matrix microstructure and composition have been obtained. Microstructure and thermomechanical properties of a silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites are discussed.

  18. Microresonators with Q-factors over a million from highly stressed epitaxial silicon carbide on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermany, Atieh R.; Brawley, George; Mishra, Neeraj; Sheridan, Eoin; Bowen, Warwick P.; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    We utilize the excellent mechanical properties of epitaxial silicon carbide (SiC) on silicon plus the capability of tuning its residual stress within a large tensile range to fabricate microstrings with fundamental resonant frequencies (f0) of several hundred kHz and mechanical quality factors (Q) of over a million. The fabrication of the perfect-clamped string structures proceeds through simple silicon surface micromachining processes. The resulting f × Q product in vacuum is equal or higher as compared to state-of-the-art amorphous silicon nitride microresonators. We demonstrate that as the residual epitaxial SiC stress is doubled, the f × Q product for the fundamental mode of the strings shows a four-fold increase.

  19. Optical limiting effects in nanostructured silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Borshch, A A; Starkov, V N; Volkov, V I; Rudenko, V I; Boyarchuk, A Yu; Semenov, A V

    2013-12-31

    We present the results of experiments on the interaction of nanosecond laser radiation at 532 and 1064 nm with nanostructured silicon carbide thin films of different polytypes. We have found the effect of optical intensity limiting at both wavelengths. The intensity of optical limiting at λ = 532 nm (I{sub cl} ∼ 10{sup 6} W cm{sup -2}) is shown to be an order of magnitude less than that at λ = 1064 nm (I{sub cl} ∼ 10{sup 7} W cm{sup -2}). We discuss the nature of the nonlinearity, leading to the optical limiting effect. We have proposed a method for determining the amount of linear and two-photon absorption in material media. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Catalytic synthesis of silicon carbide preceramic polymers: Polycarbosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.H.

    1992-10-01

    Polycarbosilanes are the most successful and widely studied class of polymer precursors for silicon carbide, but traditional methods for their synthesis are inefficient and nonselective. This project is focused on developing transition metal catalysts for the synthesis of polycarbosilanes and other preceramic polymers. In recent work we have developed the first homogeneous transition metal catalysts for the dehydrogenative coupling of simple alkyl silanes to oligomeric and polymeric carbosilanes, H-(SiR[sub 2]CR[prime][sub 2])n-SiR[sub 3]. The coupling of alkylgermanes, however, yields the corresponding oligomeric poly(germanes) (Ge-Ge). Future work will help elucidate the mechanisms of these catalytic process, explore the use of hydrogen acceptors as reaction accelerators, and develop new and more active catalysts.

  1. Cryogenic Performance of a Lightweight Silicon Carbide Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Carpenter, James; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; Kegley, Jeff; Stahl, H. Philip; Wright, Ernie; Kane, Dave; Hadaway, James

    2005-01-01

    Low cost, high performance lightweight Silicon Carbide (SiC) mirrors provide an alternative to Beryllium mirrors. A Trex Enterprises 0.25m diameter lightweight SiC mirror using its patented Chemical Vapor Composites (CVC) technology was evaluated for its optical performance. CVC SiC is chemically pure, thermally stable, and mechanically stiff. CVC technology yields higher growth rate than that of CVD SiC. NASA has funded lightweight optical materials technology development efforts involving SiC mirrors for future space based telescope programs. As part of these efforts, a Trex SiC was measured interferometrically from room temperature to 30 degrees Kelvin. This paper will discuss the test goals, the test instrumentation, test results, and lessons learned.

  2. Cryogenic performance of a lightweight silicon carbide mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Ron; Carpenter, James R.; Foss, Colby A., Jr.; Hadaway, James B.; Haight, Harlan J.; Hogue, William D.; Kane, David; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Stahl, H. Philip; Wright, Ernest R.

    2005-08-01

    Low cost, high performance lightweight Silicon Carbide (SiC) mirrors provide an alternative to Beryllium mirrors. A Trex Enterprises 0.25m diameter low areal density SiC mirror using its patented Chemical Vapor Composites (CVC) technology was evaluated for its optical performance at cryogenic temperature. CVC SiC is chemically pure, thermally stable, and mechanically stiff. CVC technology yields higher growth rate than that of CVD SiC. NASA has funded lightweight optical materials technology development efforts for future space based telescope programs. As part of these efforts, a Trex SiC mirror was measured interferometrically from room temperature to 30 degrees Kelvin. This paper will discuss the test goals, the cryogenic optical testing infrastructure and instrumentation at MSFC, test results, and lessons learned.

  3. Silicon carbide tritium permeation barrier for steel structural components.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A.; Garde, Joseph Maurico; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Calderoni, Pattrick; Holschuh, Thomas, Jr.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Wright, Matt; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-09-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has superior resistance to tritium permeation even after irradiation. Prior work has shown Ultrametfoam to be forgiving when bonded to substrates with large CTE differences. The technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate foams of vanadium, niobium and molybdenum metals and SiC for CTE mitigation between a dense SiC barrier and steel structure; (2) Thermostructural modeling of SiC TPB/Ultramet foam/ferritic steel architecture; (3) Evaluate deuterium permeation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC; (4) D testing involved construction of a new higher temperature (> 1000 C) permeation testing system and development of improved sealing techniques; (5) Fabricate prototype tube similar to that shown with dimensions of 7cm {theta} and 35cm long; and (6) Tritium and hermeticity testing of prototype tube.

  4. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  5. Joining and Integration of Silicon Carbide for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    The critical need for ceramic joining and integration technologies is becoming better appreciated as the maturity level increases for turbine engine components fabricated from ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials. Ceramic components offer higher operating temperatures and reduced cooling requirements. This translates into higher efficiencies and lower emissions. For fabricating complex shapes, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC is being developed. For the integration of ceramic parts to the surrounding metallic engine system, brazing of SiC to metals is being developed. Overcoming the chemical, thermal, and mechanical incompatibilities between dissimilar materials is very challenging. This presentation will discuss the types of ceramic components being developed by researchers and industry and the benefits of using ceramic components. Also, the development of strong, crack-free, stable bonds will be discussed. The challenges and progress in developing joining and integration approaches for a specific application, i.e. a SiC injector, will be presented.

  6. Behavior of inversion layers in 3C silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Kopanski, J. J.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A study on the field-induced surface-charge region in 3C silicon carbide (SiC) using 1 MHz capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at room temperature is here reported. A double column mercury probe was used on oxidized SiC substrates to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. These structures were characterized in terms of the substrate doping profile, effective fixed oxide charge, and interface trap density. A distinctive feature of the MOS C-V curves from accumulation to inversion is that after going into deep depletion the capacitance rises to its equilibrium inversion level during the voltage sweep. Capacitance transient measurements indicate that the minority-carrier generation occurs at the SiO2/SiC interface.

  7. Development of silicon carbide semiconductor devices for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1991-01-01

    The semiconducting properties of electronic grade silicon carbide crystals, such as wide energy bandgap, make it particularly attractive for high temperature applications. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include instrumentation for engines under development, engine control and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Discrete prototype SiC devices were fabricated and tested at elevated temperatures. Grown p-n junction diodes demonstrated very good rectification characteristics at 870 K. A depletion-mode metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor was also successfully fabricated and tested at 770 K. While optimization of SiC fabrication processes remain, it is believed that SiC is an enabling high temperature electronic technology.

  8. Behavior of inversion layers in 3C silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, R. E.; Kopanski, J. J.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-08-01

    A study on the field-induced surface-charge region in 3C silicon carbide (SiC) using 1 MHz capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at room temperature is here reported. A double column mercury probe was used on oxidized SiC substrates to form metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures. These structures were characterized in terms of the substrate doping profile, effective fixed oxide charge, and interface trap density. A distinctive feature of the MOS C-V curves from accumulation to inversion is that after going into deep depletion the capacitance rises to its equilibrium inversion level during the voltage sweep. Capacitance transient measurements indicate that the minority-carrier generation occurs at the SiO2/SiC interface.

  9. Amorphization and defect recombination in ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, M.G.; Calcagno, L.; Musumeci, P.; Frangis, N.; Van Landuyt, J.

    1997-06-01

    The damage produced in silicon carbide single crystals by ion implantation was investigated by Rutherford backscattering channeling and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Implantations were performed at liquid nitrogen and at room temperatures with several ions to examine the effect of the ion mass and of the substrate temperature on the damaging process. The damage accumulation is approximately linear with fluence until amorphization occurs when the elastic energy density deposited by the ions overcomes a critical value. The critical energy density for amorphization depends on the substrate temperature and is greatest at 300 K indicating that defects recombination occurs already at room temperature. Formation of extended defects never occurred and point defects and uncollapsed clusters of point defects were found before amorphization even in the case of light ion implantation. The atomic displacement energy has been estimated to be {approximately}12 eV/atom from the analysis of the damage process in dilute collision cascades. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. High-temperature diffusion doping of porous silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbaeva, M. G.; Mokhov, E. N.; Lavrent'ev, A. A.; Mynbaev, K. D.

    2008-09-01

    The results of experiments on high-temperature (2000-2200°C) diffusion doping of porous silicon carbide (PSC) by vanadium and erbium are reported. It is established that the specific features of diffusion processes in PSC at these temperatures are determined by modification of the porous structure due to the transport of vacancies. Based on a comparison of these results to available data on the low-temperature (900-1000°C) diffusion, it is concluded that the mechanisms of diffusion in PSC at low and high temperatures are different and that SiC with a porous structure is an effective medium particularly for low-temperature diffusion.

  11. Machining characteristics and removal mechanisms of reaction bonded silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wang; Zhang, Yu-min; Han, Jie-cai

    2006-02-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) has been recognized as a leading material for optical applications. In this paper, grinding of RBSiC using diamond wheels on surface milling machine under various grinding parameters was investigated. Examinations of ground surfaces reveal that surface roughness increases with increase of depth of cut and decreases with increase of burnishing time, but a further prolonged of burnishing time did not work obviously to improve surface quality. Values of surface roughness swing with increase of work-piece rotation speed and exhibit variety with the increase of the cumulate removal volume under different depths of cut. The Vickers hardness of ground RBSiC decreases with the depth of cut. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation revealed that brittle fracture and plastic flow removal mode coexist during grinding process. The percentage of ductile-mode grinding area decreased with increasing of depth of cut.

  12. Application of silicon carbide to synchrotron-radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Hursman, T.L.; Williams, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Damage to conventional mirror materials exposed to the harsh synchrotron radiation (SR) environment has prompted the SR user community to search for more suitable materials. Next-generation insertion devices, with their attendant flux increases, will make the problem of mirror design even more difficult. A parallel effort in searching for better materials has been underway within the laser community for several years. The technology for dealing with high thermal loads is highly developed among laser manufacturers. Performance requirements for laser heat exchangers are remarkably similar to SR mirror requirements. We report on the application of laser heat exchanger technology to the solution of typical SR mirror design problems. The superior performance of silicon carbide for laser applications is illustrated by various material trades studies, and its superior performance for SR applications is illustrated by means of model calculations.

  13. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the area of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality of single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  14. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the areas of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  15. Method of producing novel silicon carbide articles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.V.

    1982-06-18

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  16. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing. PMID:26205309

  17. Infiltration kinetics of aluminum in silicon carbide compacts. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1987-07-01

    Although metal-matrix composites have been fabricated by various techniques, the most successful are solid state processes such as powder metallurgy and diffusion bonding. Liquid-metal processes such as compucasting, pultrusion, and infiltration, while less successful, are potentially more economical. The advantages of producing silicon carbide-aluminum matrix composites by liquid-metal infiltration techniques can not be fully realized without an improved understanding of the infiltration behavior and the fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms. This paper reports on infiltration models which consider the physical properties of the liquid and preform (either porous compact or capillary/tube bundle). These properties include viscosity, density, surface tension, and wettability (pore shape and size in the case of the porous compact). The models have been assessed in terms of their ability to predict infiltration behavior from known physical properties of the materials.

  18. Raman spectra of silicon carbide small particles and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieligor, Monika; Wang, Yuejian; Zerda, T. W.

    2005-04-01

    Two manufacturing protocols of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires are discussed. The Raman spectra of produced SiC nanowires are compared with spectra of SiC powders of various grain sizes. The temperature and pressure dependence of the Raman spectra for powders is similar to that of bulk crystals, but is different for nanowires. Frequency shifts, band broadenings and the presence of shoulders are discussed in terms of crystal size, character of defects and their population. The concentration of defects in synthesized nanowires depends on the sintering method. Raman intensity enhancement of the LO phonon was observed when the wavelength of the excitation laser was changed from 780 to 514 nm.

  19. Joining of Silicon Carbide Through the Diffusion Bonding Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael .; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2009-01-01

    In order for ceramics to be fully utilized as components for high-temperature and structural applications, joining and integration methods are needed. Such methods will allow for the fabrication the complex shapes and also allow for insertion of the ceramic component into a system that may have different adjacent materials. Monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic material of focus due to its high temperature strength and stability. Titanium foils were used as an interlayer to form diffusion bonds between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC ceramics with the aid of hot pressing. The influence of such variables as interlayer thickness and processing time were investigated to see which conditions contributed to bonds that were well adhered and crack free. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  20. Powder containing 2H-type silicon carbide produced by reacting silicon dioxide and carbon powder in nitrogen atmosphere in the presence of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuramoto, N.; Takiguchi, H.

    1984-01-01

    The production of powder which contains silicon carbide consisting of 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide, beta type silicon carbide and less than 3% of nitrogen is discussed. The reaction temperature to produce the powder containing 40% of 2H-type silicon carbide is set at above 1550 degrees C in an atmosphere of aluminum or aluminum compounds and nitrogen gas or an antioxidation atmosphere containing nitrogen gas. The mixture ratio of silicon dioxide and carbon powder is 0.55 - 1:2.0 and the contents of aluminum or aluminum compounds within silicon dioxide is less than 3% in weight.

  1. The 11 micron Silicon Carbide Feature in Carbon Star Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speck, A. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Skinner, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is known to form in circumstellar shells around carbon stars. SiC can come in two basic types - hexagonal alpha-SiC or cubic beta-SiC. Laboratory studies have shown that both types of SiC exhibit an emission feature in the 11-11.5 micron region, the size and shape of the feature varying with type, size and shape of the SiC grains. Such a feature can be seen in the spectra of carbon stars. Silicon carbide grains have also been found in meteorites. The aim of the current work is to identity the type(s) of SiC found in circumstellar shells and how they might relate to meteoritic SiC samples. We have used the CGS3 spectrometer at the 3.8 m UKIRT to obtain 7.5-13.5 micron spectra of 31 definite or proposed carbon stars. After flux-calibration, each spectrum was fitted using a chi(exp 2)-minimisation routine equipped with the published laboratory optical constants of six different samples of small SiC particles, together with the ability to fit the underlying continuum using a range of grain emissivity laws. It was found that the majority of observed SiC emission features could only be fitted by alpha-SiC grains. The lack of beta-SiC is surprising, as this is the form most commonly found in meteorites. Included in the sample were four sources, all of which have been proposed to be carbon stars, that appear to show the SiC feature in absorption.

  2. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  3. The current understanding on the diamond machining of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    The Glenn Research Centre of NASA, USA (www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/SiC/, silicon carbide electronics) is in pursuit of realizing bulk manufacturing of silicon carbide (SiC), specifically by mechanical means. Single point diamond turning (SPDT) technology which employs diamond (the hardest naturally-occurring material realized to date) as a cutting tool to cut a workpiece is a highly productive manufacturing process. However, machining SiC using SPDT is a complex process and, while several experimental and analytical studies presented to date aid in the understanding of several critical processes of machining SiC, the current knowledge on the ductile behaviour of SiC is still sparse. This is due to a number of simultaneously occurring physical phenomena that may take place on multiple length and time scales. For example, nucleation of dislocation can take place at small inclusions that are of a few atoms in size and once nucleated, the interaction of these nucleations can manifest stresses on the micrometre length scales. The understanding of how these stresses manifest during fracture in the brittle range, or dislocations/phase transformations in the ductile range, is crucial to understanding the brittle-ductile transition in SiC. Furthermore, there is a need to incorporate an appropriate simulation-based approach in the manufacturing research on SiC, owing primarily to the number of uncertainties in the current experimental research that includes wear of the cutting tool, poor controllability of the nano-regime machining scale (effective thickness of cut), and coolant effects (interfacial phenomena between the tool, workpiece/chip and coolant), etc. In this review, these two problems are combined together to posit an improved understanding on the current theoretical knowledge on the SPDT of SiC obtained from molecular dynamics simulation.

  4. Expanding the versatility of silicon carbide thin films and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Lunet

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based electronics and sensors hold promise for pushing past the limits of current technology to achieve small, durable devices that can function in high-temperature, high-voltage, corrosive, and biological environments. SiC is an ideal material for such conditions due to its high mechanical strength, excellent chemical stability, and its biocompatibility. Consequently, SiC thin films and nanowires have attracted interest in applications such as micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, biological sensors, field emission cathodes, and energy storage devices. However to fully realize SiC in such technologies, the reliability of metal contacts to SiC at high temperatures must be improved and the nanowire growth mechanism must be understood to enable strict control of nanowire crystal structure and orientation. Here, we present a novel metallization scheme, utilizing solid-state graphitization of SiC, to improve the long-term reliability of Pt/Ti contacts to polycrystalline n-type SiC films at high temperature. The metallization scheme includes an alumina protection layer and exhibits low, stable contact resistivity even after long-term (500 hr) testing in air at 450 ºC. We also report the crystal structure and growth mechanism of Ni-assisted silicon carbide nanowires using single-source precursor, methyltrichlorosilane. The effects of growth parameters, such as substrate and temperature, on the structure and morphology of the resulting nanowires will also be presented. Overall, this study provides new insights towards the realization of novel SiC technologies, enabled by advanced electron microscopy techniques located in the user facilities at the Molecular Foundry in Berkeley, California. This work was performed in part at the Molecular Foundry, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Silicon Carbide High-Temperature Power Rectifiers Fabricated and Characterized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far ranging variety of applications and systems. These improvements range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the case of jet engines, uncooled operation of 300 to 600 C SiC power actuator electronics mounted in key high-temperature areas would greatly enhance system performance and reliability. Because silicon cannot function at these elevated temperatures, the semiconductor device circuit components must be made of SiC. Lewis' HTIES group recently fabricated and characterized high-temperature SiC rectifier diodes whose record-breaking characteristics represent significant progress toward the realization of advanced high-temperature actuator control circuits. The first figure illustrates the 600 C probe-testing of a Lewis SiC pn-junction rectifier diode sitting on top of a glowing red-hot heating element. The second figure shows the current-versus voltage rectifying characteristics recorded at 600 C. At this high temperature, the diodes were able to "turn-on" to conduct 4 A of current when forward biased, and yet block the flow of current ($quot;turn-off") when reverse biases as high as 150 V were applied. This device represents a new record for semiconductor device operation, in that no previous semiconductor electronic device has ever simultaneously demonstrated 600 C functionality

  6. Nondestructive ultrasonic characterization of armor grade silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portune, Andrew Richard

    Ceramic materials have traditionally been chosen for armor applications for their superior mechanical properties and low densities. At high strain rates seen during ballistic events, the behavior of these materials relies upon the total volumetric flaw concentration more so than any single anomalous flaw. In this context flaws can be defined as any microstructural feature which detriments the performance of the material, potentially including secondary phases, pores, or unreacted sintering additives. Predicting the performance of armor grade ceramic materials depends on knowledge of the absolute and relative concentration and size distribution of bulk heterogeneities. Ultrasound was chosen as a nondestructive technique for characterizing the microstructure of dense silicon carbide ceramics. Acoustic waves interact elastically with grains and inclusions in large sample volumes, and were well suited to determine concentration and size distribution variations for solid inclusions. Methodology was developed for rapid acquisition and analysis of attenuation coefficient spectra. Measurements were conducted at individual points and over large sample areas using a novel technique entitled scanning acoustic spectroscopy. Loss spectra were split into absorption and scattering dominant frequency regimes to simplify analysis. The primary absorption mechanism in polycrystalline silicon carbide was identified as thermoelastic in nature. Correlations between microstructural conditions and parameters within the absorption equation were established through study of commercial and custom engineered SiC materials. Nonlinear least squares regression analysis was used to estimate the size distributions of boron carbide and carbon inclusions within commercial SiC materials. This technique was shown to additionally be capable of approximating grain size distributions in engineered SiC materials which did not contain solid inclusions. Comparisons to results from electron microscopy

  7. Raman and FTIR Studies of Silicon Carbide Surface Damage from Palladium Implantation in Presence of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Muntele, C. J.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ion implantation in a crystal such as silicon carbide will cause both damage in the ion track and in the substrate at the end of the ion track. We used both keV, and MeV Pd ions in fabricating electronic chemical sensors in silicon carbide, which can operate at elevated temperatures. In order to study the feasibility of fabricating an optical chemical sensor (litmus sensor), we need to understand the optical behavior of the embedded damage in the presence of hydrogen, as well as the potential chemical interaction of silicon carbide broken lattice bonds with the hydrogen dissociated from gas by palladium. Implanted samples of silicon carbide were studied using both Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform-Infrared). The results of this work will be presented during the meeting.

  8. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Stratis V. Sotirchos

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this research project was the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Since alumina has excellent resistance to corrosion but coefficient than silicon carbide, the key idea of this project has been to develop graded coatings with composition varying smoothly along their thickness between an inner (base) layer of mullite in contact with the silicon carbide component and an outer layer of pure alumina, which would function as the actual protective coating of the component. (Mullite presents very good adhesion towards silicon carbide and has thermal expansion coefficient very close to that of the latter.)

  9. Dynamic Modulus and Damping of Boron, Silicon Carbide, and Alumina Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Williams, W.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic modulus and damping capacity for boron, silicon carbide, and silicon carbide coated boron fibers were measured from-190 to 800 C. The single fiber vibration test also allowed measurement of transverse thermal conductivity for the silicon carbide fibers. Temperature dependent damping capacity data for alumina fibers were calculated from axial damping results for alumina-aluminum composites. The dynamics fiber data indicate essentially elastic behavior for both the silicon carbide and alumina fibers. In contrast, the boron based fibers are strongly anelastic, displaying frequency dependent moduli and very high microstructural damping. Ths single fiber damping results were compared with composite damping data in order to investigate the practical and basic effects of employing the four fiber types as reinforcement for aluminum and titanium matrices.

  10. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.

  11. Rapid fabrication of a silicon modification layer on silicon carbide substrate.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Li, Longxiang; Xue, Donglin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-08-01

    We develop a kind of magnetorheological (MR) polishing fluid for the fabrication of a silicon modification layer on a silicon carbide substrate based on chemical theory and actual polishing requirements. The effect of abrasive concentration in MR polishing fluid on material removal rate and removal function shape is investigated. We conclude that material removal rate will increase and tends to peak value as the abrasive concentration increases to 0.3 vol. %, and the removal function profile will become steep, which is a disadvantage to surface frequency error removal at the same time. The removal function stability is also studied and the results show that the prepared MR polishing fluid can satisfy actual fabrication requirements. An aspheric reflective mirror of silicon carbide modified by silicon is well polished by combining magnetorheological finishing (MRF) using two types of MR polishing fluid and computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) processes. The surface accuracy root mean square (RMS) is improved from 0.087λ(λ=632.8  nm) initially to 0.020λ(λ=632.8  nm) in 5.5 h total and the tool marks resulting from MRF are negligible. The PSD analysis results also shows that the final surface is uniformly polished. PMID:27505358

  12. All-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon using graphene from silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bei; Ahmed, Mohsin; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-based supercapacitors are lightweight devices with high energy storage performance, allowing for faster charge-discharge rates than batteries. Here, we present an example of all-solid-state supercapacitors on silicon for on-chip applications, paving the way towards energy supply systems embedded in miniaturized electronics with fast access and high safety of operation. We present a nickel-assisted graphitization method from epitaxial silicon carbide on a silicon substrate to demonstrate graphene as a binder-free electrode material for all-solid-state supercapacitors. We obtain graphene electrodes with a strongly enhanced surface area, assisted by the irregular intrusion of nickel into the carbide layer, delivering a typical double-layer capacitance behavior with a specific area capacitance of up to 174 μF cm-2 with about 88% capacitance retention over 10 000 cycles. The fabrication technique illustrated in this work provides a strategic approach to fabricate micro-scale energy storage devices compatible with silicon electronics and offering ultimate miniaturization capabilities.

  13. Optical thermometry based on level anticrossing in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, A N; Simin, D; Soltamov, V A; Lebedev, S P; Baranov, P G; Astakhov, G V; Dyakonov, V

    2016-01-01

    We report a giant thermal shift of 2.1 MHz/K related to the excited-state zero-field splitting in the silicon vacancy centers in 4H silicon carbide. It is obtained from the indirect observation of the optically detected magnetic resonance in the excited state using the ground state as an ancilla. Alternatively, relative variations of the zero-field splitting for small temperature differences can be detected without application of radiofrequency fields, by simply monitoring the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of the level anticrossing. This effect results in an all-optical thermometry technique with temperature sensitivity of 100 mK/Hz(1/2) for a detection volume of approximately 10(-6) mm(3). In contrast, the zero-field splitting in the ground state does not reveal detectable temperature shift. Using these properties, an integrated magnetic field and temperature sensor can be implemented on the same center. PMID:27624819

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a simple method to synthesize silicon carbide (SiC) nanoribbons is presented. Silicon powder and carbon black powder placed in a horizontal tube furnace were exposed to temperatures ranging from 1,250 to 1,500°C for 5–12 h in an argon atmosphere at atmospheric pressure. The resulting SiC nanoribbons were tens to hundreds of microns in length, a few microns in width and tens of nanometers in thickness. The nanoribbons were characterized with electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and were found to be hexagonal wurtzite–type SiC (2H-SiC) with a growth direction of . The influence of the synthesis conditions such as the reaction temperature, reaction duration and chamber pressure on the growth of the SiC nanomaterial was investigated. A vapor–solid reaction dominated nanoribbon growth mechanism was discussed. PMID:20676202

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Ding, Weiqiang; He, Kai; Li, Ming

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, a simple method to synthesize silicon carbide (SiC) nanoribbons is presented. Silicon powder and carbon black powder placed in a horizontal tube furnace were exposed to temperatures ranging from 1,250 to 1,500°C for 5-12 h in an argon atmosphere at atmospheric pressure. The resulting SiC nanoribbons were tens to hundreds of microns in length, a few microns in width and tens of nanometers in thickness. The nanoribbons were characterized with electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and were found to be hexagonal wurtzite-type SiC (2H-SiC) with a growth direction of [10bar{1}0] . The influence of the synthesis conditions such as the reaction temperature, reaction duration and chamber pressure on the growth of the SiC nanomaterial was investigated. A vapor-solid reaction dominated nanoribbon growth mechanism was discussed.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanoscale transport properties at silicon carbide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccaforte, F.; Giannazzo, F.; Raineri, V.

    2010-06-01

    Wide bandgap semiconductors promise devices with performances not achievable using silicon technology. Among them, silicon carbide (SiC) is considered the top-notch material for a new generation of power electronic devices, ensuring the improved energy efficiency required in modern society. In spite of the significant progress achieved in the last decade in the material quality, there are still several scientific open issues related to the basic transport properties at SiC interfaces and ion-doped regions that can affect the devices' performances, keeping them still far from their theoretical limits. Hence, significant efforts in fundamental research at the nanoscale have become mandatory to better understand the carrier transport phenomena, both at surfaces and interfaces. In this paper, the most recent experiences on nanoscale transport properties will be addressed, reviewing the relevant key points for the basic devices' building blocks. The selected topics include the major concerns related to the electronic transport at metal/SiC interfaces, to the carrier concentration and mobility in ion-doped regions and to channel mobility in metal/oxide/SiC systems. Some aspects related to interfaces between different SiC polytypes are also presented. All these issues will be discussed considering the current status and the drawbacks of SiC devices.

  17. Assessment of the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials. Topical report, September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    Advancements have been made during the past five years to not only increase the strength of the as-manufactured clay bonded silicon carbide candle filter materials, but also to improve their high temperature creep resistance properties. This report reviews these developments, and describes the results of preliminary qualification testing which has been conducted at Westinghouse prior to utilizing the advanced clay bonded silicon carbide filters in high temperature, pressurized, coal-fired combustion and/or gasification applications.

  18. Shock profile studies on selected silicon carbide ceramics with application to dynamic yield mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2000-04-01

    Recent shock wave profile studies have been performed on several hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics and a reaction bonded silicon carbide ceramic. Comparisons of the data with earlier wave profile measurements reveal striking differences in dynamic yield behavior through observations of the compression precursor wave structure. New data are presented and underlying microstructural mechanisms are considered to explain observed differences in the dynamic yield process.

  19. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  20. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  1. Displacement Damage Induced Catastrophic Second Breakdown in Silicon Carbide Schottky Power Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, Leif; Selva, Luis; Selva, Luis

    2004-01-01

    A novel catastrophic breakdown mode in reversed biased Silicon carbide diodes has been seen for low LET particles. These particles are too low in LET to induce SEB, however SEB was seen from particles of higher LET. The low LET mechanism correlates with second breakdown in diodes due to increase leakage and assisted charge injection from incident particles. Percolation theory was used to predict some basic responses of the devices, but the inherent reliability issue with silicon carbide have proven challenging.

  2. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  3. Changes in surface chemistry of silicon carbide (0001) surface with temperature and their effect on friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Friction studies were conducted with a silicon carbide (0001) surface contacting polycrystalline iron. The surface of silicon carbide was pretreated: (1) by bombarding it with argon ions for 30 minutes at a pressure of 1.3 pascals; (2) by heating it at 800 C for 3 hours in vacuum at a pressure of 10 to the minus eighth power pascal; or (3) by heating it at 1500 C for 3 hours in a vacuum of 10 to the minus eighth power pascal. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to determine the presence of silicon and carbon and the form of the carbon. The surfaces of silicon carbide bombarded with argon ions or preheated to 800 C revealed the main Si peak and a carbide type of C peak in the Auger spectra. The surfaces preheated to 1500 C revealed only a graphite type of C peak in the Auger spectra, and the Si peak had diminished to a barely perceptible amount. The surfaces of silicon carbide preheated to 800 C gave a 1.5 to 3 times higher coefficient of friction than did the surfaces of silicon carbide preheated to 1500 C. The coefficient of friction was lower in the 11(-2)0 direction than in the 10(-1)0 direction; that is, it was lower in the preferred crystallographic slip direction.

  4. Microstructural optimization of solid-state sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Gonzalez, Lionel R.

    Silicon carbide armor, manufactured through solid-state sintering, liquid-phase sintering, and hot-pressing, is being used by the United States Armed Forces for personal and vehicle protection. There is a lack of consensus, however, on which process results in the best-performing ballistic armor. Previous studies have shown that hot-pressed ceramics processed with secondary oxide and/or rare earth oxides, which exhibit high fracture toughness, perform well in handling and under ballistic impact. This high toughness is due to the intergranular nature of the fracture, creating a tortuous path for cracks and facilitating crack deflection and bridging. However, it has also been shown that higher-hardness sintered SiC materials might perform similarly or better to hot-pressed armor, in spite of the large fracture toughness deficit, if the microstructure (density, grain size, purity) of these materials are improved. In this work, the development of theoretically-dense, clean grain boundary, high hardness solid-state sintered silicon carbide (SiC) armor was pursued. Boron carbide and graphite (added as phenolic resin to ensure the carbon is finely dispersed throughout the microstructure) were used as the sintering aids. SiC batches between 0.25--4.00 wt.% carbon were mixed and spray dried. Cylindrical pellets were pressed at 13.7 MPa, cold-isostatically pressed (CIP) at 344 MPa, sintered under varying sintering soaking temperatures and heating rates, and varying post hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) parameters. Carbon additive amounts between 2.0--2.5 wt.% (based on the resin source), a 0.36 wt.% B4C addition, and a 2050°C sintering soak yielded parts with high sintering densities (˜95.5--96.5%) and a fine, equiaxed microstructure (d50 = 2.525 mum). A slow ramp rate (10°C/min) prevented any occurrence of abnormal grain growth. Post-HIPing at 1900°C removed the remaining closed porosity to yield a theoretically-dense part (3.175 g/cm3, according to rule of mixtures). These

  5. A study of the applicability of gallium arsenide and silicon carbide as aerospace sensor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, John S.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the piezoresistive sensors, to date, are made of silicon and germanium. Unfortunately, such materials are severly restricted in high temperature environments. By comparing the effects of temperature on the impurity concentrations and piezoresistive coefficients of silicon, gallium arsenide, and silicon carbide, it is being determined if gallium arsenide and silicon carbide are better suited materials for piezoresistive sensors in high temperature environments. The results show that the melting point for gallium arsenide prevents it from solely being used in high temperature situations, however, when used in the alloy Al(x)Ga(1-x)As, not only the advantage of the wider energy band gas is obtained, but also the higher desire melting temperature. Silicon carbide, with its wide energy band gap and higher melting temperature suggests promise as a high temperature piezoresistive sensor.

  6. Room-temperature quantum microwave emitters based on spin defects in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, H.; Soltamov, V. A.; Riedel, D.; Väth, S.; Fuchs, F.; Sperlich, A.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2014-02-01

    Atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide are always present and usually limit the performance of this material in high-power electronics and radiofrequency communication. Here, we reveal a family of homotypic silicon vacancy defects in silicon carbide exhibiting attractive spin properties. In particular, the defect spins can be initialized and read out even at room temperature by means of optically detected magnetic resonance, suggesting appealing applications such as spin qubits and spin magnetometers. Using this technique we detect two-quantum spin resonances, providing strong evidence for the S=3/2 ground state of the silicon vacancy defects. The optically induced population inversion of these high-spin ground states leads to stimulated microwave emission, which we directly observed in our silicon carbide crystals. The analysis based on the experimentally obtained parameters shows that this property can be used to implement solid-state masers and extraordinarily sensitive radiofrequency amplifiers.

  7. Silicate-Based Thermal Spray Coatings for Environmental Protection of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Ari Isaac

    Environmental barrier coatings are a key technology for implementing ceramics in high-temperature, high-moisture environments. One such ceramic, silicon carbide, is a material that can be used in gas turbines. However, silicon carbide oxidizes into silicon dioxide with exposure to oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor and would normally provide protection for the silicon carbide. However, silicon dioxide volatilizes in a gas turbine environment, which leads to the degradation of its mechanical properties, making it unfit for use in a gas turbine. Materials like yttria-monosilicate and barium-strontium doped aluminosilicate (BSAS) both have good environmental coating properties. However, sintered yttria-monosilicate does not bond well to silicon carbide, and thermally sprayed BSAS transforms very slowly from a metastable hexacelsian phase to the desired celsian phase that is necessary for it to bond well to silicon carbide. Coatings of these materials have been produced by plasma spray with some additional work using HVOF. Phase identification has been done by x-ray diffraction, and microstructural analysis has been done using scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Power detectors for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun Jane; Li, James C.; Tang, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes and compares three different types of detectors, including CMOS power detectors, bipolar power detectors, and super-regenerative detectors, deployed in the literature for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies. Each detector has unique working mechanism and demonstrates different behavior with respects to bias conditions, input signal power, as well as bandwidth responses. Two Figure-of-Merits for both wideband and narrowband imaging have been defined to quantify the detector performance comparison. CMOS and Bipolar detectors are good for passive imaging, while super regenerative detectors are superior for active imaging. The analytical results have been verified by both simulation and measurement results. These analyses intend to provide design insights and guidance for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging power detectors.

  9. Characterization of silicon carbide coatings on Zircaloy-4 substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Olayyan, Yousif Abdullah

    The lifetime of light water reactor (LWR) fuels is limited by the corrosion and degradation of Zircaloy cladding in the high temperature and high pressure operating conditions. As the thickness of the oxide layer increases, stresses build up in the oxide layer due to density differences between the oxide and the zirconium metal which lead to degradation and spallation of the oxide layer. The main objective of this research is to form protective coatings on the Zircaloy clad to prevent or at least slow the oxidation which can allow higher burnup of the fuel resulting in major benefits in plant safety and economics. Silicon carbide was identified as a candidate protective coating to reduce the corrosion and degradation of Zircaloy cladding. Silicon carbide coatings were deposited on Zircaloy substrates using plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) and were found to be amorphous as determined by X-ray analysis. Since the adhesion of the films to the substrate was the most important property of a coating, scratch tests were used to assess the adhesion. The effects of different parameters on the test results including residual stresses, plastic deformation and friction between the stylus and the surface are discussed. Critical loads, characterized by continuous delamination of the SiC coatings deposited on Zircaloy-4, occurred at 0.5--2.5 N. The experimental results indicated that all SiC coatings used in this project, without exception, showed an adhesive failure when tested by scratch and indentation tests. Plastic deformation of the substrate due to compressive stresses induced by the scratch stylus caused flaking of the films at the interface, which was attributed to the low interfacial toughness. The effects of film thickness and substrate surface treatment on the quality and adhesion of SiC coatings were studied in detail. Thick films (5mum) exhibited extensive cracking. The scratch tests indicated higher adhesion with intermediate substrate surface

  10. Microstructural control of silicon carbide via liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrotek, Sharon Robinson

    Silicon carbide ceramics with various microstructures were fabricated by controlling the amount and composition of a Y2O3-Al 2O3 liquid phase, crystallographic phase of the starting powders, trace impurities in those powders, and time and temperature of sintering and post- sintering heat-treatments. Alpha and beta SiC "seeds" were used to control grain growth during sintering. The grain size distribution and aspect ratio of the grains were determined through microstructural analysis of polished and etched samples. TEM was used in conjunction with EDS to determine the distribution of the sintering aids in the grains and the grain boundaries. Additionally, the final phase content of the samples was determined via x-ray diffraction. The fracture toughness and hardness were measured to evaluate the relative effects of the microstructural variations on the mechanical properties. Alpha silicon carbide samples exhibited a fine grained, equiaxed microstructure. Under appropriate conditions, samples prepared from beta-SiC powders underwent a phase transformation to alpha-SiC accompanied by the growth of elongated platelet grains. The addition of alpha seeds to the beta powder reduced the size of the platelets compared to unseeded samples of the same composition. If the beta to alpha phase transformation did not occur, the beta samples developed an equiaxed microstructure. The grain size of all samples decreased with increasing amounts of sintering additives. The beta to alpha phase transformation, required to obtain an elongated grain microstructure, was catalyzed by the presence of sufficient amounts of aluminum. If insufficient Al impurity was present in the powder, purposeful additions of Al metal could induce the phase transformation. Examination of the sintering progression over time indicated that the phase transformation occurred late in the sintering process and appeared to occur via a solution/reprecipitation mechanism. Post-sintering heat treatments were also used

  11. Silicon carbide-free graphene growth on silicon for lithium-ion battery with high volumetric energy density

    PubMed Central

    Son, In Hyuk; Hwan Park, Jong; Kwon, Soonchul; Park, Seongyong; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Song, Hyun Jae; Ku, Junhwan; Choi, Jang Wook; Choi, Jae-man; Doo, Seok-Gwang; Chang, Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Silicon is receiving discernable attention as an active material for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes because of its unparalleled gravimetric capacity. However, the large volume change of silicon over charge–discharge cycles weakens its competitiveness in the volumetric energy density and cycle life. Here we report direct graphene growth over silicon nanoparticles without silicon carbide formation. The graphene layers anchored onto the silicon surface accommodate the volume expansion of silicon via a sliding process between adjacent graphene layers. When paired with a commercial lithium cobalt oxide cathode, the silicon carbide-free graphene coating allows the full cell to reach volumetric energy densities of 972 and 700 Wh l−1 at first and 200th cycle, respectively, 1.8 and 1.5 times higher than those of current commercial lithium-ion batteries. This observation suggests that two-dimensional layered structure of graphene and its silicon carbide-free integration with silicon can serve as a prototype in advancing silicon anodes to commercially viable technology. PMID:26109057

  12. Silicon carbide-free graphene growth on silicon for lithium-ion battery with high volumetric energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, In Hyuk; Hwan Park, Jong; Kwon, Soonchul; Park, Seongyong; Rümmeli, Mark H.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Song, Hyun Jae; Ku, Junhwan; Choi, Jang Wook; Choi, Jae-Man; Doo, Seok-Gwang; Chang, Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    Silicon is receiving discernable attention as an active material for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes because of its unparalleled gravimetric capacity. However, the large volume change of silicon over charge-discharge cycles weakens its competitiveness in the volumetric energy density and cycle life. Here we report direct graphene growth over silicon nanoparticles without silicon carbide formation. The graphene layers anchored onto the silicon surface accommodate the volume expansion of silicon via a sliding process between adjacent graphene layers. When paired with a commercial lithium cobalt oxide cathode, the silicon carbide-free graphene coating allows the full cell to reach volumetric energy densities of 972 and 700 Wh l-1 at first and 200th cycle, respectively, 1.8 and 1.5 times higher than those of current commercial lithium-ion batteries. This observation suggests that two-dimensional layered structure of graphene and its silicon carbide-free integration with silicon can serve as a prototype in advancing silicon anodes to commercially viable technology.

  13. Characterization of silicon carbide metal oxide semiconductor capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinella, Matthew J.

    Only a few years after the invention of the transistor, William Shockley considered silicon carbide (SiC) an excellent material for high temperature semiconductor devices. Over a half century later, SiC technology is nearly mature enough that it may be considered for use in commercial electronic devices. Furthermore, since SiC has the ability to grow thermal silicon dioxide, significant research has been directed toward the creation of a commercial SiC metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). However, a number of significant hurdles still must be overcome before SiC devices can become commercially competitive, including the relatively high cost and low quality of materials. Another significant problem is the lack of understanding of factors which limit the minority carrier lifetime. The primary purpose of this work was to use the pulsed metal oxide semiconductor capacitor (MOS-C) technique to measure generation lifetime in SiC materials. It was found that many nonidealities corrupt the results obtained by this technique. One very interesting nonideality was negative bias temperature instability (NBTI), which has also been widely studied by the silicon industry in recent years. Methods to understand and minimize the effect of these nonidealities were developed. Furthermore, these methods allowed for further study of the oxide properties, such as leakage current. Even after accounting for nonidealities, generation lifetimes showed several peculiarities, such as a variation of as much as a factor of 1000 within a square cm area. In addition, the ratio of generation to recombination lifetime is less than unity, which is not predicted by classic theory, nor typically observed in silicon devices. Possible explanations are put forth to explain these observations. In addition, to further investigate these abnormalities, Schottky diodes were fabricated and characterized. When applied to the SiC MOS capacitor, the pulsed MOS-C technique involves

  14. Controlled growth of nanocrystalline silicon within amorphous silicon carbide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-04-01

    Controlled formation of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) within hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films has been demonstrated by a rf (13.56 MHz) plasma chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method at a low deposition temperature of 200°C by regulating the deposition pressure (Pr) between 26.7 Pa and 133.3 Pa. Evolution of the size and the crystalline silicon volume fraction within the a-SiC:H matrix has been studied by XRD, Raman and HRTEM. The study reveals that at Pr of 26.7 Pa there are mostly isolated grains of nc-Si within the a-SiC:H matrix with average size of 4.5 nm. With increase of Pr the isolated nc-Si grains coalesce more and more giving rise to larger size connected nc-Si islands which appear as microcrystalline silicon in the Raman spectra. As a result net isolated nc-Si volume fraction decreases while the total crystalline silicon volume fraction increases.

  15. Surface chemistry and friction behavior of the silicon carbide (0001) surface at temperatures to 1500 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analyses and friction studies were conducted with a silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with iron at various temperatures to 1200 or 1500 C in a vacuum of 10 to the minus 8th power Pa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the surface chemistry and friction properties of silicon carbide. The principal contaminant of adsorbed amorphous carbon on the silicon carbide surface in the as received state is removed by simply heating to 400 C. Above 400 C, graphite and carbide type carbine are the primary species on the silicon carbide surface, in addition to silicon. The coefficients of friction of polycrystalline iron sliding against a single crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface were high at temperatures to 800 C. Similar coefficients of friction were obtained at room temperature after the silicon carbide was preheated at various temperatures up 800 C. When the friction experiments were conducted above 800 C or when the specimens were preheated to above 800 C, the coefficients of friction were dramatically lower. At 800 C the silicon and carbide type carbon are at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. With increasing temperature above 800 C, the concentration of the graphite increases rapidly on the surface, whereas those of the carbide type carbon and silicon decrease rapidly.

  16. Evolution of Shock Waves in Silicon Carbide Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Balagansky, I. A.; Balagansky, A. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Utkin, A. V.

    2006-07-28

    Evolution of shock waves in self-bonded silicon carbide bars in the shape of 20 mm x 20 mm square prisms of varying lengths (20 mm, 40 mm, and 77.5 mm) is investigated. The density and porosity of the test specimens were 3.08 g/cm3 and 2%, respectively. Shock waves were generated by detonating a cylindrical shaped (d=40 mm and 1=40 mm) stabilized RDX high explosive charge of density 1.60 g/cm3. Embedded manganin gauges at various distances from the impact face were used to monitor the amplitude of shock pressure profiles. Propagation velocity of the stress pulse was observed to be equal to the elastic bar wave velocity of 11 km/s and was independent of the amplitude of the impact pulse. Strong fuzziness of the stress wave front is observed. This observation conforms to the theory on the instability of the shock formation in a finite size elastic body. This phenomenon of wave front fuzziness may be useful for desensitization of heterogeneous high explosives.

  17. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  18. Cytocompatibility of bio-inspired silicon carbide ceramics.

    PubMed

    López-Alvarez, M; de Carlos, A; González, P; Serra, J; León, B

    2010-10-01

    Due to its good mechanical and biochemical properties and, also, because of its unique interconnected porosity, bio-inspired silicon carbide (bioSiC) can be considered as a promising material for biomedical applications, including controlled drug delivery devices and tissue engineering scaffolds. This innovative material is produced by molten-Si infiltration of carbon templates, obtained by controlled pyrolysis of vegetable precursors. The final SiC ceramic presents a porous-interconnected microstructure that mimics the natural hierarchical structure of bone tissue and allows the internal growth of tissue, as well as favors angiogenesis. In the present work, the in vitro cytocompatibility of the bio-inspired SiC ceramics obtained, in this case, from the tree sapelli (Entandrophragma cylindricum) was evaluated. The attachment, spreading, cytoskeleton organization, proliferation, and mineralization of the preosteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 were analyzed for up to 28 days of incubation by scanning electron microscopy, interferometric profilometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, MTT assay, as well as red alizarin staining and quantification. Cells seeded onto these ceramics were able to attach, spread, and proliferate properly with the maintenance of the typical preosteoblastic morphology throughout the time of culture. A certain level of mineralization on the surface of the sapelli-based SiC ceramics is observed. These results demonstrated the cytocompatibility of this porous and hierarchical material. PMID:20737554

  19. Silicon carbide deformable mirror with 37 actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyohoon; Rhee, Hyug-Gyo; Yang, Ho-Soon; Kihm, Hagyong

    2015-11-01

    We present a prototype of a silicon carbide (SiC) deformable mirror (DM) for high power laser applications. The DM has a continuous SiC faceplate, the diameter and the thickness of which are 100 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and 37 stack-type piezoelectric actuators arranged in a rectangular grid. Compared with the glass faceplates used for conventional DMs, SiC has a high thermal diffusivity that effectively minimizes mirror distortions due to thermal gradients. The faceplate is thick enough for possible integration with monolithic cooling channels inside the faceplate. The faceplate without cooling channels presented in this paper has a high bending stiffness compared with glass DMs, but the proposed actuator configuration has flexure supports to reduce the shear stress at the adhesive while preserving optical performances. To examine the characteristics of the SiC DM, we simulated influence functions (IFs) by using a finite element analysis and then compared these results with the IF measured by using an optical interferometer. The optical performance of the DM was verified by generating Zernike polynomial modes based on the measured IF.

  20. Chemical vapor composite silicon carbide for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, C. T.; Webb, K.

    2006-06-01

    Components for space telescopes using high quality silicon carbide (SiC) produced via the chemical vapor composite (CVC) process are currently under development. This CVC process is a modification of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and results in a dramatic reduction in residual stress of the SiC deposit. The resultant CVC SiC material has high modulus, high thermal conductivity and can be polished to better than 1nm RMS surface roughness, making it ideal for space telescopes requiring lightweight, stiff and thermally stable components. Moreover, due to its lower intrinsic stress, CVC SiC is much more readily scaled to large sizes and manufactured into the complex geometries needed for the telescope assemblies. Results are presented on the optical figure for a lightweight 15cm CVC SiC mirror demonstrating low wavefront error (<30nm peak-to-valley and <5.1nm rms). Theoretical and experimental modal analysis measured the first four resonant modes of the mirror and found a first modal frequency in the vicinity of 2100 Hz, representing a highly stiff mirror.

  1. Liquid fuel combustion within silicon-carbide coated carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaykant, S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2007-10-15

    Combustion of kerosene inside porous inert medium (PIM) has been investigated with the goal of reducing the emissions of nitric oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO) and soot. Silicon-carbide (SiC) coated carbon foam is used as PIM to attain high structural strength. The two-zone porous burner design consists of preheat and combustion sections. Different PIM configurations were tested by stacking together square porous pieces of 2.5 cm thickness. Two types of fuel injectors are considered: (i) in the air-assist injector, approximately 5% of the combustion air is used for atomization and the remaining air enters as the primary co-flow around the injector, and (ii) in the swirling-air injector, all of the combustion air enters the injector to create a swirling flow around the fuel jet to enhance atomization and fuel-air premixing. The distance between the injector and PIM inlet is a key operational parameter, which was varied in experiments with both injectors over a range of equivalence ratios and heat release rates. The NO{sub x} and CO emissions were measured to optimize the PIM configuration with minimum emissions. Results show stable combustion over a wide operating range. Three combustor operational regimes are identified depending upon the injector location. (author)

  2. Determining polytype composition of silicon carbide films by UV ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A universal ellipsometric model is proposed that describes the optical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) films grown on Si substrates by the method of atomic substitution due to a chemical reaction between the substrate and gaseous carbon monoxide. According to the proposed three-layer model, Si concentration decreases in a stepwise manner from the substrate to SiC film surface. The ellipsometric curves of SiC/Si(111), SiC/Si(100), and SiC/Si(110) samples grown under otherwise identical conditions have been measured in a 1.35-9.25 eV range using a VUV-VASE (J.A. Woollam Co.) ellipsometer with a rotating analyzer. Processing of the obtained spectra in the framework of the proposed model allowed the polytype composition of SiC films to be determined for the first time. It is established that SiC grown on Si(111) is predominantly cubic, while SiC on Si(110) is predominantly hexagonal (with cubic polytype admixture) and SiC on Si(100) has a mixed polytype composition.

  3. Development of Ultra-High Sensivity Silicon Carbide Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Xin, Xiao-Bin; Alexandrov, Petre; Stahle, Carl M.; Guan, Bing; Zhao, Jian H.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of silicon carbide (SiC) detectors have been developed to study the sensitivity of SiC ultraviolet (UV) detectors, including Schottky photodiodes, p-i-n photodiodes, avalanche photodiodes (APDs), and single photon-counting APDs. Due to the very wide bandgap and thus extremely low leakage current, Sic photo-detectors showed excellent sensitivity. The specific detectivity, D*, of SiC photodiodes are orders of magnitude higher than that of their competitors, such as Si photodiodes, and comparable to the D* of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). To pursue the ultimate detection sensitivity, SiC APDs and single photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) have also been fabricated. By operating the SiC APDs at a linear mode gain over 10(exp 6), SPADs in UV have been demonstrated. SiC UV detectors have great potential for use in solar blind UV detection and biosensing. Moreover, SiC detectors have excellent radiation hardness and high temperature tolerance which makes them ideal for extreme environment applications such as in space or on the surface of the Moon or Mars.

  4. A silicon carbide room-temperature single-photon source.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, S; Johnson, B C; Ivády, V; Stavrias, N; Umeda, T; Gali, A; Ohshima, T

    2014-02-01

    Over the past few years, single-photon generation has been realized in numerous systems: single molecules, quantum dots, diamond colour centres and others. The generation and detection of single photons play a central role in the experimental foundation of quantum mechanics and measurement theory. An efficient and high-quality single-photon source is needed to implement quantum key distribution, quantum repeaters and photonic quantum information processing. Here we report the identification and formation of ultrabright, room-temperature, photostable single-photon sources in a device-friendly material, silicon carbide (SiC). The source is composed of an intrinsic defect, known as the carbon antisite-vacancy pair, created by carefully optimized electron irradiation and annealing of ultrapure SiC. An extreme brightness (2×10(6) counts s(-1)) resulting from polarization rules and a high quantum efficiency is obtained in the bulk without resorting to the use of a cavity or plasmonic structure. This may benefit future integrated quantum photonic devices. PMID:24240243

  5. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers - Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  6. High-strain-rate deformation and comminution of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, C. J.; Nesterenko, V. F.; Meyers, M. A.

    1998-05-01

    Granular flow of comminuted ceramics governs the resistance for penetration of ceramic armor under impact. To understand the mechanism of the granular flow, silicon carbide was subjected to high-strain, high-strain-rate deformation by radial symmetric collapse of a thick-walled cylinder by explosive. The deformation, under compressive stresses, was carried out in two stages: the first stage prefractured the ceramic, while a large deformation was accomplished in the second stage. The total tangential strain (-0.23) was accommodated by both homogeneous deformation (-0.10) and shear localization (-0.13). Three microstructures, produced by different processing methods, were investigated. The microstructural differences affected the microcrack propagation: either intergranular or transgranular fracture was observed, depending on the processing conditions. Nevertheless, the spacing between shear bands and the shear displacement within the shear bands were not significantly affected by the microstructure. Within the shear bands, the phenomenon of comminution occurred, and the thickness of the shear bands increased gradually with the shear strain. A bimodal distribution of fragments developed inside the shear bands. The comminution proceeded through the incorporation of fragments from the shear-band interfaces and the erosion of fragments inside the shear band. Outside the shear bands, an additional comminution mechanism was identified: localized bending generated comminution fronts, which transformed the fractured material into the comminuted material. The observed features of high-strain-rate deformation of comminuted SiC can be used for validation of computer models for penetration process.

  7. Silicon carbide optics for space and ground based astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Sampath, Deepak; Wainer, Chris; Schwartz, Jay; Peton, Craig; Mix, Steve; Heller, Court

    2012-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical materials are being applied widely for both space based and ground based optical telescopes. The material provides a superior weight to stiffness ratio, which is an important metric for the design and fabrication of lightweight space telescopes. The material also has superior thermal properties with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, and a high thermal conductivity. The thermal properties advantages are important for both space based and ground based systems, which typically need to operate under stressing thermal conditions. The paper will review L-3 Integrated Optical Systems - SSG’s (L-3 SSG) work in developing SiC optics and SiC optical systems for astronomical observing systems. L-3 SSG has been fielding SiC optical components and systems for over 25 years. Space systems described will emphasize the recently launched Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) developed for JHU-APL and NASA-GSFC. Review of ground based applications of SiC will include supporting L-3 IOS-Brashear’s current contract to provide the 0.65 meter diameter, aspheric SiC secondary mirror for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST).

  8. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  9. Proton irradiation creep of beta-silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Vani; Was, Gary S.

    2011-11-01

    In situ irradiation creep behavior of chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline beta silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been studied using proton beam of energies 2.8 MeV and 3.2 MeV. Experiments were conducted at 1183 K and at stresses of 18.5 MPa and 97.9 MPa between dose rates of 1.5 and 2.45 × 10 -6 dpa/s. Strain was measured using a laser speckle extensometer (LSE) and a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT), and temperature was measured using a 2-dimensional infrared pyrometer. Results showed that the total strain rate increased with increasing stress and dose rate. Shifts of XRD peaks following proton irradiation of SiC at 1183 K indicated that swelling had occurred and that it increased with dose. A uniform expansion of the lattice with no X-ray line broadening clearly indicated that the swelling at doses up to 0.37 dpa was due to single point defects. The swelling rate was determined and subtracted from the measured total strain rate to obtain the true creep rate. The creep rate was found to exhibit a linear dependence on the applied tensile stress, and on dose rate to the third power.

  10. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D. G.; Cho, K. Y.; Jin, E. J.; Riu, D. H.

    2011-10-01

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and γ-Al2O3. Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200°C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  11. Joining of silicon carbide with a cordierite glass-ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Perham, T.J.; De Jonghe, L.C. |; MoberlyChan, W.J. ||

    1999-02-01

    A method for the joining of silicon carbide using a cordierite glass-ceramic has been developed. Cordierite, with glass-ceramic processing, remains amorphous and wets the SiC substrate to form a strong bond when rapidly fired. Subsequent heat treatment crystallizes a multiphase interlayer with a matching bulk thermal expansion coefficient (CTE). A benchtop tape casting method for depositing joining precursor films of varying thickness is described. The wetting characteristics of cordierite on SiC that are pertinent to the joining process are shown to be highly sensitive to processing atmosphere. Doping with a fluoride ion flux can lower the peak processing temperature without significantly altering the crystallization path. The effect of interlayer thickness is observed by monitoring indentation crack paths and with 4-point bending tests. Controlling the degree of crystallinity is shown to tailor the mismatches in thermal expansion coefficient and elastic moduli to produce joints of high strength ({sigma}{sub F} > 500 MPa). Characterization is accomplished with XRD, SEM, and TEM.

  12. MAGNESIUM PRECIPITATION AND DIFUSSION IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-02

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. Calculations by Sawan et al. predict that at a dose of ~100 dpa (displacements per atom), there is ~0.5 at.% Mg generated in SiC. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <100> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C–SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C–SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4E-19 m2/s.

  13. Evaluation of CVD silicon carbide for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.

    1981-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) is a recent addition to the list of materials suitable for use in the harsh environment of synchrotron radiation (SR) beam lines. SR mirrors for use at normal incidence must be ultrahigh vacuum compatible, must withstand intense x-ray irradiation without surface damage, must be capable of being polished to an extremely smooth surface finish, and must maintain surface figure under thermal loading. CVD SiC exceeds the performance of conventional optical materials in all these areas. It is, however, a relatively new optical material. Few manufacturers have experience in producing optical quality material, and few opticians have experience in figuring and polishing the material. The CVD material occurs in a variety of forms, sensitively dependent upon reaction chamber production conditions. We are evaluating samples of CVD SiC obtained commercially from various manufacturers, representing a range of deposition conditions, to determine which types of CVD material are most suitable for superpolishing. At the time of this writing, samples are being polished by several commercial vendors and surface finish characteristics are being evaluated by various analytical methods.

  14. Impedance Spectroscopy of Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, D.S.; Sauti, G.; Vorster, A.; Hermann, M.

    2004-02-26

    Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide (LPSSiC) materials were produced with different Y2O3: Al2O3 and Y2O3: SiO2 sintering additive ratios. Densification was achieved by hot pressing (HP). The ratio of the polytypes and the amount and crystalline composition of the grain boundary phases was determined using Rietveld analysis. Microstructures of the materials were related to the mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness and strength), which are not presented. The impedance Spectroscopy measurements were made at temperatures between 100 deg. C and 400 deg. C and analyzed using Effective Media Theories and the Brick Layer Model. In some cases, in order to correctly fit the results, it was necessary to use or model the frequency dependence of the conductivity or dielectric constant of the SiC grains using various theoretical models. The impedance arcs for the SiC grains in the different samples varied widely, probably more due to the 'semiconductor' doping of the grains or nonstoichiometry, than the SiC polytypes in the grains. The SiC grains all showed an Arrhenius behavior with energy gaps in the range 0.3 to 0.5eV.

  15. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers: Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  16. Process-Induced Morphological Defects in Epitaxial CVD Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor technology has been advancing rapidly, but there are numerous crystal growth problems that need to be solved before SiC can reach its full potential. Among these problems is a need for an improvement in the surface morphology of epitaxial films that are grown to produce device structures. Various processes before and during epilayer growth lead to the formation of morphological defects observed in SiC epilayers grown on SiC substrates. In studies of both 6H and 4H-SiC epilayers, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques have been used to characterize SiC epilayer surface morphology. In addition to the well-known micropipe defect, SiC epilayers contain growth pits, triangular features (primarily) in 4H-SiC, and macro step due to step bunching. In work at NASA Lewis, it has been found that factors contributing to the formation of some morphological defects include: defects in the substrate bulk, defects in the substrate surface caused by cutting and polishing the wafer, the tilt angle of the wafer surface relative to the basal plane, and growth conditions. Some of these findings confirm results of other research groups. This paper presents a review of published and unpublished investigations into processes that are relevant to epitaxial film morphology.

  17. Process-Induced Morphological Defects in Epitaxial CVD Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1997-07-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor technology has been advancing rapidly, but there are numerous crystal growth problems that need to be solved before SiC can reach its full potential. Among these problems is a need for an improvement in the surface morphology of epitaxial films that are grown to produce device structures. Various processes before and during epilayer growth lead to the formation of morphological defects observed in SiC epilayers grown on SiC substrates. In studies of both 6H and 4H-SiC epilayers, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques have been used to characterize SiC epilayer surface morphology. In addition to the well-known micropipe defect, SiC epilayers contain growth pits, triangular features (primarily) in 4H-SiC, and macro step due to step bunching. In work at NASA Lewis, it has been found that factors contributing to the formation of some morphological defects include: defects in the substrate bulk, defects in the substrate surface caused by cutting and polishing the wafer, the tilt angle of the wafer surface relative to the basal plane, and growth conditions. Some of these findings confirm results of other research groups. This paper presents a review of published and unpublished investigations into processes that are relevant to epitaxial film morphology.

  18. Nano-precipitation in hot-pressed silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Sixta, Mark E.; Chen, Da; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2000-05-16

    Heat treatments at 1300 degrees C, 1400 degrees C, 1500 degrees C, and 1600 degrees C in Ar were found to produce nanoscale precipitates in hot-pressed silicon carbide containing aluminum, boron, and carbon sintering additives (ABC-SiC). The precipitates were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nano-probe energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (nEDS). The precipitates were plate-like in shape, with a thickness, length and separation of only a few nanometers, and their size coarsened with increasing annealing temperature, accompanied by reduced number density. The distribution of the precipitates was uniform inside the SiC grains, but depleted zones were observed in the vicinity of the SiC grain boundaries. A coherent orientation relationship between the precipitates and the SiC matrix was found. Combined high-resolution electron microscopy, computer simulation, and nEDS identified an Al4C3-based structure and composition for the nano-precipitates. Most Al ions in SiC lattice exsolved as precipitates during the annealing at 1400 to 1500 degrees C. Formation mechanism and possible influences of the nanoscale precipitates on mechanical properties are discussed.

  19. Investigation of Transparent Silicon Carbide Proprieties for Atom Chips Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, L.; Ammar, M.; Morvan, E.; Sarazin, N.; Pocholle, J.-P.; Reichel, J.; Guerlin, C.; Schwartz, S.

    2012-06-01

    Atom chips are an efficient tool for trapping, cooling and manipulating cold atoms. This is in particular due to the fact that they can achieve strong magnetic field gradients near the chip surface, hence strong atomic confinement. However, this advantage typically comes at the price of reducing the optical access to the atoms, which are confined very close to the chip surface. Moreover, the maximum achievable confinement strongly depends on thermal management issues within the atom chip. We report in the following experimental investigations showing how these limits could be pushed further by using an atom chip made of a gold microcircuit deposited on a single-crystal Silicon Carbide (SiC) substrate. With a band gap energy value of about 3.2 eV at room temperature, the latter material is transparent at 780nm, potentially restoring quasi full optical access to the atoms. Moreover, it combines a very high electrical resistivity (over 105 W.cm ) with a very high thermal conductivity (over 390 W.m-1.K-1), making it a good candidate for supporting wires with large currents without the need of any additional electrical insulation layer. We have demonstrated robust magneto-optical trapping (MOT) of about one million rubidium atoms through the SiC chip.

  20. Toxicological investigations on silicon carbide. 1. Inhalation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, J; Rehn, B; Song, H; Gono, E; Malkusch, W

    1993-01-01

    The question of lung damage as a result of exposure to silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated by inhalation experiments to obtain information on the qualitative response of lung tissue to the test substance (SiC). For comparison, quartz, kaolinite, and tempered clay dusts were used. The indices for the effects of the dusts studied were organ weights, numbers of bronchoalveolar cells, lung surfactant phospholipid concentrations including subfractions, and lung clearance. Exposure to the test samples was carried out according to the Essen inhalation model in two independent series. The results of the two series were similar: Compared with sham controls, exposure to SiC did not affect the indices studied. Even at a low dose (a quarter of the SiC dose) quartz gave pronounced deviations in all indices. In particular, an increase in granulocytes indicated toxic properties of the dust. The long term elimination of quartz from the lung was worse than that of SiC. The kaolinite and tempered clay dusts were intermediate between SiC and quartz based on several of the indices studied. It is concluded that SiC is deposited practically inert in the lung. PMID:8398873

  1. Magnetic Behavior of 3d Transition Metals in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Maosheng; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2002-03-01

    The magnetic properties of cubic silicon carbide (SiC) doped by first row transition metals (TM) are studied within the local spin density functional approach using the linearized muffin-tin orbital method in the atomic sphere approximation. It is found that the couplings between the TM d orbitals and the dangling bond states are stronger for the Si site doping, which gives a larger e-t2 splitting. The stronger coupling also delocalizes the t2 states and hence reduces the spin polarization. As a result the TMs tend to have a low spin configuration at the Si site and a high spin one at the C site. On the other hand, the strong couplings lower the formation energy at the Si site and TMs prefer to dope the Si site in both the Si-rich and C-rich limits. For Si site doping, Cr and Mn exhibit the most pronounced magnetic behavior with Cr favoring ferromagnetic and Mn antiferromagnetic nearest neighbor coupling.

  2. Interstellar grains in primitive meteorites - Diamond, silicon carbide, and graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward; Zinner, Ernst

    1993-01-01

    Primitive meteorites contain a few parts per million (ppm) of pristine interstellar grains that provide information on nuclear and chemical processes in stars. Their interstellar origin is proven by highly anomalous isotopic ratios, varying more than 1000-fold for elements such as C and N. Most grains isolated thus far are stable only under highly reducing conditions (C/O greater than 1), and apparently are 'stardust' formed in stellar atmospheres. Microdiamonds, of median size about 10 A, are most abundant (about 400-1800 ppm) but least understood. They contain anomalous noble gases including Xe-HL, which shows the signature of the r- and p-processes. Silicon carbide, of grain size 0.2-10 microns and abundance about 6 ppm, shows the signature of the s-process and apparently comes mainly from red giant carbon (AGB) stars of 1-3 solar masses. Some grains appear to be not less than 10 exp 9 a older than the solar system. Graphite spherules of grain size 0.8-7 microns and abundance less than 2 ppm contain highly anomalous C and noble gases, as well as large amounts of fossil Mg-26 from the decay of extinct Al-26. They seem to come from at least three sources, probably AGB stars, novae, and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  3. USE OF SILICON CARBIDE MONITORS IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; B. Chase; T. Unruh; D. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. For example, silicon carbide (SiC) monitors are now available to detect peak irradiation temperatures between 200°C and 800°C. Using a resistance measurement approach, specialized equipment installed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) and specialized procedures were developed to ensure that accurate peak irradiation temperature measurements are inferred from SiC monitors irradiated at the ATR. Comparison examinations were completed by INL to demonstrate this capability, and several programs currently rely on SiC monitors for peak temperature detection. This paper discusses the use of SiC monitors at the ATR, the process used to evaluate them at the HTTL, and presents representative measurements taken using SiC monitors.

  4. Influence of radiation damage on xenon diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Gärtner, K.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Thabethe, T. T.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of xenon in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide and the possible influence of radiation damage on it are investigated. For this purpose 360 keV xenon ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and xenon retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1500 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channelling. No diffusion or xenon loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature serious erosion of the implanted surface occurred, which made any analysis impossible. No diffusion or xenon loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC.

  5. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized. PMID:26558694

  6. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  7. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized. PMID:26558694

  8. Thermal stress analysis of a silicon carbide/aluminum composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdoutos, E. E.; Karalekas, D.; Daniel, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal deformations and stresses were studied in a silicon-carbide/aluminum filamentary composite at temperatures up to 370 C (700 F). Longitudinal and transverse thermal strains were measured with strain gages and a dilatometer. An elastoplastic micromechanical analysis based on a one-dimensional rule-of-mixtures model and an axisymmetric two-material composite cylinder model was performed. It was established that beyond a critical temperature thermal strains become nonlinear with decreasing longitudinal and increasing transverse thermal-expansion coefficients. This behavior was attributed to the plastic stresses in the aluminum matrix above the critical temperature. An elastoplastic analysis of both micromechanical models was performed to determine the stress distributions and thermal deformation in the fiber and matrix of the composite. While only axial stresses can be determined by the rule-of-mixtures model, the complete triaxial state of stress is established by the composite cylinder model. Theoretical predictions for the two thermal-expansion coefficients were in satisfactory agreement with experimental results.

  9. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  10. The diffusion of cesium, strontium, and europium in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwaraknath, S. S.; Was, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    A novel multi-layer diffusion couple was used to isolate the diffusion of strontium, europium and cesium in SiC without introducing radiation damage to SiC and at concentrations below the solubility limit for the fission products in SiC. Diffusion occurred by both bulk and grain boundary pathways for all three fission products between 900∘ C and 1 ,300∘ C. Cesium was the fastest diffuser below 1 ,100∘ C and the slowest above this temperature. Strontium and europium diffusion tracked very closely as a function of temperature for both bulk and grain boundary diffusion. Migration energies ranged from 1.0 eV to 5.7 eV for bulk diffusion and between 2.2 eV and 4.7 eV for grain boundary diffusion. These constitute the first measurements of diffusion of cesium, europium, and strontium in silicon carbide, and the magnitude of the cesium diffusion coefficient supports the premise that high quality TRISO fuel should have minimal cesium release.

  11. Radiolytic hydrogen generation at silicon carbide-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, Jennifer; Reiff, Sarah C.; Pimblott, Simon M.; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2016-02-01

    While many of the proposed uses of SiC in the nuclear industry involve systems that are assumed to be dry, almost all materials have dissociated chemisorbed water associated with their surface, which can undergo chemistry in radiation fields. Silicon carbide α-phase and β-phase nanoparticles with water were irradiated with γ-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions followed by the determination of the production of molecular hydrogen, H2, and characterization of changes in the particle surface. The yields of H2 from SiC-water slurries were always greater than expected from a simple mixture rule indicating that the presence of SiC was influencing the production of H2 from water, probably through an energy transfer from the solid to liquid phase. Although the increase in H2 yields was modest, a decrease in the water mass percentage led to an increase in H2 yields, especially for very low amounts of water. Surface analysis techniques included diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), nitrogen absorption with the Brunauer - Emmett - Teller (BET) methodology for surface area determination, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Little change in the SiC surface was observed following radiolysis except for some conversion of β-phase SiC to the α-phase and the formation of SiO2 with He ion radiolysis.

  12. Impedance Spectroscopy of Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, D. S.; Sauti, G.; Vorster, A.; Hermann, M.

    2004-02-01

    Liquid-Phase Sintered Silicon Carbide (LPSSiC) materials were produced with different Y2O3: Al2O3 and Y2O3: SiO2 sintering additive ratios. Densification was achieved by hot pressing (HP). The ratio of the polytypes and the amount and crystalline composition of the grain boundary phases was determined using Rietveld analysis. Microstructures of the materials were related to the mechanical properties (hardness, fracture toughness and strength), which are not presented. The impedance Spectroscopy measurements were made at temperatures between 100°C and 400°C and analyzed using Effective Media Theories and the Brick Layer Model. In some cases, in order to correctly fit the results, it was necessary to use or model the frequency dependence of the conductivity or dielectric constant of the SiC grains using various theoretical models. The impedance arcs for the SiC grains in the different samples varied widely, probably more due to the "semiconductor" doping of the grains or nonstoichiometry, than the SiC polytypes in the grains. The SiC grains all showed an Arrhenius behavior with energy gaps in the range 0.3 to 0.5eV.

  13. In situ processing of silicon carbide layer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Padture, N.P.; Pender, D.C.; Wuttiphan, S.; Lawn, B.R.

    1995-11-01

    A novel route to low-cost processing of silicon carbide (SiC) layer structures is described. The processing involves pressureless liquid-phase cosintering of compacted powder layers of SiC, containing alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) sintering additives to yield a yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) second phase. By adjusting the {beta}:{alpha} SiC phase ratios in the individual starting powders, alternate layers with distinctly different microstructures are produced: (i) homogeneous microstructures, with fine equiaxed SiC grains, designed for high strength; and (ii) heterogeneous microstructures with coarse and elongate SiC grains, designed for high toughness. By virtue of the common SiC and YAG phases, the interlayer interfaces are chemically compatible and strongly bonded. Exploratory Hertzian indentation tests across a bilayer interface confirm the capacity of the tough heterogeneous layer to inhibit potentially dangerous cracks propagating through the homogeneous layer. The potential for application of this novel processing approach to other layer architectures and other ceramic systems is considered.

  14. Silicon Carbide Junction Field Effect Transistor Digital Logic Gates Demonstrated at 600 deg. C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. The HTIES team recently fabricated and demonstrated the first semiconductor digital logic gates ever to function at 600 C.

  15. Simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, M.; Shahid, M. Y.; Iqbal, F.; Fatima, K.; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Arbi, H. M.; Tsu, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we report thermal evaporation technique as a simple method for the growth of 4H silicon carbide on p-type silicon substrate. A mixture of Si and C60 powder of high purity (99.99%) was evaporated from molybdenum boat. The as grown film was characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis Spectrophotometer and Hall Measurements. The XRD pattern displayed four peaks at 2Θ angles 28.550, 32.700, 36.100 and 58.900 related to Si (1 1 1), 4H-SiC (1 0 0), 4H-SiC (1 1 1) and 4H-SiC (2 2 2), respectively. FTIR, UV-Vis spectrophotometer and electrical properties further strengthened the 4H-SiC growth.

  16. An evaluation system for experimental silicon and silicon carbide super gate turn off thyristors.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Stephen; Lacouture, Shelby; Lawson, Kevin; Giesselmann, Michael; Scozzie, Charles J; O'Brien, Heather; Ogunniyi, Aderinto A

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a small-scale pulsed power system specifically intended to evaluate the suitability of experimental silicon and silicon carbide high power Super Gate Turn Off thyristors for high action (500 A(2) s and above) pulsed power applications where energy is extracted from a storage element in a rapid and controlled manner. To this end, six of each type of device was placed in a controlled three phase rectifier circuit which was in turn connected to an aircraft ground power motor-generator set and subjected to testing protocols with varying power levels, while parameters such as offset firing angle were varied. PMID:25085173

  17. Preparation of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers by the pyrolysis of polycarbosilazane precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; Clemons, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers (SiC-Si3N4) by the pyrolysis of polycarbosilazane precursors is reviewed. Precursor resin, which was prepared by heating tris(N-methylamino)methylsilane or tris(N-methylamino)phenylsilane to about 520 C, was drawn into fibers from the melt and then made unmeltable by humidity conditioning at 100 C and 95 percent relative humidity. The humidity treated precursor fibers were pyrolyzed to ceramic fibers with good mechanical properties and electrical resistivity. For example, SiC-Si3N4 fibers derived from tris(N-methylamino)methylsilane had a tensile rupture modulus of 29 million psi and electrical resistivity of 6.9 x ten to the 8th power omega-cm, which is ten to the twelfth power times greater than that obtained for graphite fibers.

  18. First-principles simulation on Seebeck coefficient in silicon and silicon carbide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    The Seebeck coefficients of silicon and silicon carbide for both bulk and nanosheet structures were simulated on the basis of first-principles calculation. The simulation procedure by means of the electronic band structure with periodic boundary condition is presented, and the dependences of the Seebeck coefficient on temperature and carrier concentration have been demonstrated for many kinds of n- or p-doped models. Under the assumption that the relaxation time is constant regardless of energy, the calculated Seebeck coefficients for bulk structures are mostly in accordance with the measured values quantitatively. The typical quantum-mechanical confinement can be observed for all nanosheet models in this study owing to dimensional reduction from bulk to nanosheet structure, but it is not so effective on the Seebeck coefficient. By the simulation with consideration of the energy dependence of the relaxation time, it is confirmed that the Seebeck coefficient should be significantly affected by the relaxation time in a wide range of temperature.

  19. Preparation of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers by the pyrolysis of polycarbosilazane precursors - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; Clemons, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers (SiC-Si3N4) by the pyrolysis of polycarbosilazane precursors is reviewed. Precursor resin, which was prepared by heating tris(N-methylamino)methylsilane or tris(N-methylamino)phenylsilane to about 520 C, was drawn into fibers from the melt and then made unmeltable by humidity conditioning at 100 C and 95 percent relative humidity. The humidity treated precursor fibers were pyrolyzed to ceramic fibers with good mechanical properties and electrical resistivity. For example, SiC-Si3N4 fibers derived from tris(N-methylamino)methylsilane had a tensile rupture modulus of 29 million psi and electrical resistivity of 6.9 x ten to the 8th power omega-cm, which is ten to the twelfth power times greater than that obtained for graphite fibers.

  20. High gas velocity burner tests on silicon carbide and silicon nitride at 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. A.; Probst, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    Specimens of silicon carbide and silicon nitride were exposed to a Mach one gas velocity burner simulating a turbine engine environment. Cyclic tests up to 100 hour duration were conducted at specimen temperatures of 1200 C. A specimen geometry was used that develops thermal stresses during thermal cycling in a manner similar to blades and vanes of a gas turbine engine. Materials were compared on a basis of weight change, dimensional reductions, metallography, fluorescent penetrant inspection, X-ray diffraction analyses, failure mode, and general appearance. One hot pressed SiC, one reaction sintered SiC, and three hot pressed Si3N4 specimens survived the program goal of 100 one-hour cycle exposures. Of the materials that failed to meet the program goal, thermal fatigue was identified as the exclusive failure mode.

  1. Theoretical considerations for Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) formation by molten silicon infiltration into slurry-derived preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.; Singh, M.

    1993-01-01

    For reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics produced by silicon melt infiltration of porous carbon preforms, equations are developed to relate the amount of residual silicon to the initial carbon density. Also, for a slurry derived preform containing both carbon and silicon powder, equations are derived which relate the amount of residual silicon in the RFSC to the relative density of the carbon in the preform and to the amount of silicon powder added to the slurry. For a porous carbon preform that does not have enough porosity to prevent choking-off of the silicon infiltration, these results show that complete silicon infiltration can occur by adding silicon powder to the slurry mixture used to produce these preforms.

  2. Effect of Heat Treatment on Silicon Carbide Based Joining Materials for Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, Charles A.; Jones, Russell H.; Nozawa, T.; Kotani, M.; Kishimoto, H.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.

    2001-10-01

    Two general approaches to obtaining silicon carbide-based joint materials were used. The first method relies on reactions between silicon and carbon to form silicon carbide, or to bond silicon carbide powders together. The second method consists of pyrolysing a polycarbosilane polymer to yield an amorphous, covalently bonded material. In order to assess the long-term durability of the joint materials, various heat treatments were performed and the effects on the mechanical properties of the joints were measured. Although the joints derived from the polycarbosilane polymer were not the strongest, the value of strength measured was not affected by heat treatment. On the other hand, the value of the strength of the reaction-based joints was affected by heat treatment, indicating the presence of residual stresses or unreacted material subsequent to processing. Further investigation of reaction-based joining should consist of detailed microscopic studies; however, continued study of joints derived from polymers is also warranted.

  3. Rheological behavior of injection-moldable silicon powder-silicon carbide whisker formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, I.; Danforth, S.C. . Dept. of Ceramic Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The rheological behavior of injection-moldable formulations for reaction-bonded Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] toughened with silicon carbide whiskers was studied using capillary rheometry. The effects on rheology of the following parameters were examined: solids loading, powder/whisker volume ratio, particle size and type, and binder composition. Two important aspects of the flow behavior were delineated. First, corrections for end effects and slippage along the wall were made in order to interpret the experimental data properly. At high shearing rates slip may account for more than 50% of the total flow. Such slippage promotes flow into the smallest channels for corners of the mold and may appreciably facilitate molding. Consequently the careful study of slippage is an inherent requirement of the rheological characterization of these concentrated suspensions. Second, the suspension viscosities were delineated. An empirical equation for predicting relative viscosity was developed for formulations containing up to [approximately]30 vol% of silicon carbide whiskers. Suspension viscosities generally increased with decreasing particle size and increasing whisker contents. Particle surface roughness appears to affect the shearing behavior. Binders of low molecular weight resulted in higher relative viscosities than higher molecular weight binders, indicating possibly better dispersion of solids when more viscous binders are employed.

  4. Influence Of Ultrasonic Waves On The Formation Of High Pores Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Toana, Musfirah C. F.; Soegijono, B.; Hikam, M.

    2009-09-14

    The Challenge to produce a quality Silicon Carbide that combination high surface area is promising and this material can be used in many application such as Hydrogen storage materials. Synthesis of high surface area carbon materials by selective etching of Silicon Carbide with choric acid while exposing ultrasonic wave have been made.Powder Of Sic (surface area 17.8 m{sup 2}/g) was treated in the chloric acetic as well as their mixture of various compositions and various time exposure of ultrasonic waves. Surface area and pore size can be controlled by temperature and concentration composition of Chloric and time exposure of ultrasonic wave.The resultant carbon and carbon-silicon carbide composite powders were characterized X-ray diffraction and Electron microscope. To determine a conversion degree of silicon carbide due to influence of the ultrasonic wave, the samples were annealed in open air at 1000 deg. C. There by carbon component of the carbon/silicon carbide composite was completely oxidized. The analysis of the samples shows the strong influence of time exposure of ultrasonic waves on the formation of pores.

  5. Influence Of Ultrasonic Waves On The Formation Of High Pores Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toana, Musfirah C. F.; Soegijono, B.; Hikam, M.

    2009-09-01

    The Challenge to produce a quality Silicon Carbide that combination high surface area is promising and this material can be used in many application such as Hydrogen storage materials. Synthesis of high surface area carbon materials by selective etching of Silicon Carbide with choric acid while exposing ultrasonic wave have been made. Powder Of Sic (surface area 17.8 m2/g) was treated in the chloric acetic as well as their mixture of various compositions and various time exposure of ultrasonic waves. Surface area and pore size can be controlled by temperature and concentration composition of Chloric and time exposure of ultrasonic wave. The resultant carbon and carbon-silicon carbide composite powders were characterized X-ray diffraction and Electron microscope. To determine a conversion degree of silicon carbide due to influence of the ultrasonic wave, the samples were annealed in open air at 1000° C. There by carbon component of the carbon/silicon carbide composite was completely oxidized. The analysis of the samples shows the strong influence of time exposure of ultrasonic waves on the formation of pores.

  6. Analysis of the pyrolysis products of dimethyldichlorosilane in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide in argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E.; Riccitiello, Salvatore R.; Carswell, Marty G.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the products and reactions occurring during the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide from dimethyldichlorosilane in argon is presented. Reaction conditions were as follows: 700 to 1100 C, a contact time of about 1 min, and a pressure of 1 atm. At these conditions, the gases that formed were mainly methane, hydrogen, silicon tetrachloride, trichlorosilane, and methyltrichlorosilane. The silicon carbide solid that formed showed the presence of hydrogen and chloride as impurities, which might degrade the silicon carbide properties. These impurities were eliminated slowly, even at 1100 C, forming hydrogen, trichlorosilane, and silicon tetrachloride.

  7. Surface and Internal Structure of Pristine Presolar Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Rhonda, M.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide is the most well-studied type of presolar grain. Isotope measurements of thousands [1,2] and structural data from over 500 individual grains have been reported [3]. The isotope data indicate that approximately 98% originated in asymptotic giant branch stars and 2% in supernovae. Although tens of different polytypes of SiC are known to form synthetically, only two polytypes have been reported for presolar grains. Daulton et al. [3] found that for SiC grains isolated from Murchison by acid treatments, 79.4% are 3C cubic beta-SiC, 2.7% are 2H hexagonal alpha-SiC, 17.1% are intergrowths of and , and 0.9% are heavily disordered. They report that the occurrence of only the and polytypes is consistent with the observed range of condensation temperatures of circumstellar dust for carbon stars. Further constraint on the formation and subsequent alteration of the grains can be obtained from studies of the surfaces and interior structure of grains in pristine form, i.e., prepared without acid treatments [4,5]. The acid treatments remove surface coatings, produce etch pits around defect sites and could remove some subgrains. Surface oxides have been predicted by theoretical modeling as a survival mechanism for SiC grains exposed to the hot oxidizing solar nebula [6]. Scanning electron microscopy studies of pristine SiC shows some evidence for the existence of oxide and organic coatings [4]. We report herein on transmission electron microscopy studies of the surface and internal structure of two pristine SiC grains, including definitive evidence of an oxide rim on one grain, and the presence of internal TiC and AlN grains.

  8. Silicon Carbide Telescope Investigations for the LISA Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanjuan, J.; Spannagel, R.; Braxmaier, C.; Korytov, D.; Mueller, G.; Preston, A.; Livas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave (GW) detectors are conceived to detect GWs in the low frequency range (mili-Hertz) by measuring the distance between free-falling proof masses in spacecraft (SC) separated by 5 Gm. The reference in the last decade has been the joint ESA-NASA mission LISA. One of the key elements of LISA is the telescope since it simultaneously gathers the light coming from the far SC (approximately or equal to 100 pW) and expands, collimates and sends the outgoing beam (2 W) to the far SC. Demanding requirements have been imposed on the telescope structure: the dimensional stability of the telescope must be approximately or equal to 1pm Hz(exp-1/2) at 3 mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5 micrometer over the mission lifetime to prevent defocussing. In addition the telescope structure must be light, strong and stiff. For this reason a potential on-axis telescope structure for LISA consisting of a silicon carbide (SiC) quadpod structure has been designed, constructed and tested. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the LISA expected temperature range has been measured with a 1% accuracy which allows us to predict the shrinkage/expansion of the telescope due to temperature changes, and pico-meter dimensional stability has been measured at room temperature and at the expected operating temperature for the LISA telescope (around -6[deg]C). This work is supported by NASA Grants NNX10AJ38G and NX11AO26G,

  9. A silicon carbide nanowire field effect transistor for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Fradetal, L; Bano, E; Attolini, G; Rossi, F; Stambouli, V

    2016-06-10

    This work reports on the label-free electrical detection of DNA molecules for the first time, using silicon carbide (SiC) as a novel material for the realization of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFETs). SiC is a promising semiconductor for this application due to its specific characteristics such as chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Non-intentionally n-doped SiC NWs are first grown using a bottom-up vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, leading to the NWs exhibiting needle-shaped morphology, with a length of approximately 2 μm and a diameter ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Then, the SiC NWFETs are fabricated and functionalized with DNA molecule probes via covalent coupling using an amino-terminated organosilane. The drain current versus drain voltage (I d-V d) characteristics obtained after the DNA grafting and hybridization are reported from the comparative and simultaneous measurements carried out on the SiC NWFETs, used either as sensors or references. As a representative result, the current of the sensor is lowered by 22% after probe DNA grafting and by 7% after target DNA hybridization, while the current of the reference does not vary by more than ±0.6%. The current decrease confirms the field effect induced by the negative charges of the DNA molecules. Moreover, the selectivity, reproducibility, reversibility and stability of the studied devices are emphasized by de-hybridization, non-complementary hybridization and re-hybridization experiments. This first proof of concept opens the way for future developments using SiC-NW-based sensors. PMID:27120971

  10. Hydrogen in the Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, M. S.; Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.; Achtziger, N.; Unéus, L.; Lloyd Spetz, A.; Forsberg, U.

    In this paper we give a review of our recent results related to the incorporation of hydrogen (H) in silicon carbide (SiC) and its interaction with acceptor doping atoms and implantation induced defects. Hydrogen is an abundant impurity in the growth of epitaxial SiC since it is present in the precursor gases and since H2 is used as the carrier gas. High concentrations of hydrogen are indeed incorporated into highly doped p-type epi-layers and it is shown that the main source is the carrier gas. Furthermore, it is revealed that the entire substrate becomes homogeneously filled with hydrogen during growth and that this hydrogen is more thermally stable than that in the epi-layer. Incorporation of hydrogen from an H2 ambient, at temperatures considerably lower than those used for epitaxy, is also demonstrated in p-type samples coated with a catalytic metal film. This effect is most likely the cause for the increased series resistance observed in p-type SiC Schottky sensor devices using a catalytic metal gate after annealing at 600 °C in a H2 containing ambient. Hydrogen is found to passivate the acceptors Al and B by forming electrically neutral H-acceptor complexes. Unlike in Si and GaAs, the two H-acceptor complexes in SiC exhibit very different dissociation energies, suggesting that the atomic configurations of the complexes are significantly different. The migration of mobile hydrogen in the presence of externally applied, or internal built-in, electric fields further reveals that hydrogen is present as H+ in p-type SiC. Finally, the redistribution and subsequent out-diffusion of low energy implanted 1H and 2H is investigated. Two annealing phases for the redistribution are observed, and the activation energies for the processes are extracted.

  11. Sintering of nanocrystalline silicon carbide in plasma pressure compaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothara, Manish G.

    Nanostructured ceramics offer significant improvements in properties over the corresponding materials with grain sizes on the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Silicon carbide (SiC) is an important structural ceramic whose properties can potentially be enhanced due to nanoscale microstructures. It has been suggested that SiC samples with grain sizes on the order of a few hundred nanometers can result in significant improvements in flexural strength, chemical resistance, thermal stability and electrical resistivity. To realize these properties, it is important to be able to sinter SiC powder to full density while avoiding exaggerated grain growth. Hence, sintering behavior and microstructural evolution in nanocrystalline SiC has been investigated in this study. Nanocrystalline SiC samples (average size ˜ 70 nm) were fabricated in a plasma pressure compaction (P2C) system, a novel sintering technique. Master Sintering Curve (MSC) analysis was used to correlate the densification in SiC to the amount of work put into the system. MSC as a function of pressure for were generated. The activation energy, Q, for sintering was determined for three different pressures of 10, 30 and 50 MPa and found to be 1666, 1034 and 1162 kJ/mol, respectively. The variation of Q with pressure was reasoned to be an effect of various competing mechanisms. Taguchi analysis was used to study the effect of sintering parameters such as time, temperature, pressure and heating rate on the properties of the sintered part such as density, hardness and fracture toughness. Optimal operating conditions were determined and it was also found that each parameter affected the final properties almost equally. Complete densification of SiC samples was achieved at 1600°C which is ˜150°C lower than reported in the literature for other sintering techniques.

  12. A silicon carbide nanowire field effect transistor for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradetal, L.; Bano, E.; Attolini, G.; Rossi, F.; Stambouli, V.

    2016-06-01

    This work reports on the label-free electrical detection of DNA molecules for the first time, using silicon carbide (SiC) as a novel material for the realization of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFETs). SiC is a promising semiconductor for this application due to its specific characteristics such as chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Non-intentionally n-doped SiC NWs are first grown using a bottom-up vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism, leading to the NWs exhibiting needle-shaped morphology, with a length of approximately 2 μm and a diameter ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Then, the SiC NWFETs are fabricated and functionalized with DNA molecule probes via covalent coupling using an amino-terminated organosilane. The drain current versus drain voltage (I d–V d) characteristics obtained after the DNA grafting and hybridization are reported from the comparative and simultaneous measurements carried out on the SiC NWFETs, used either as sensors or references. As a representative result, the current of the sensor is lowered by 22% after probe DNA grafting and by 7% after target DNA hybridization, while the current of the reference does not vary by more than ±0.6%. The current decrease confirms the field effect induced by the negative charges of the DNA molecules. Moreover, the selectivity, reproducibility, reversibility and stability of the studied devices are emphasized by de-hybridization, non-complementary hybridization and re-hybridization experiments. This first proof of concept opens the way for future developments using SiC-NW-based sensors.

  13. Diluted magnetic semiconductor effects in Mn-implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Komarov, A. V.; Ryabchenko, S. M.; Los, A. V.; Romanenko, S. M.

    2011-04-15

    Light transmission and Faraday rotation spectra measured at the temperature of 2 K were compared for silicon carbide single crystals of 4H polytype (4H-SiC), implanted with 3.8 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} of Mn ions at the beam energy of 190 keV, and a control 4H-SiC single crystal sample, which was not implanted. Mn ion implantation led to the creation of a Mn-doped surface layer with the average Mn concentration of 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and a thickness of approximately 0.2 {mu}m. Transmission of light through the implanted crystal changed only slightly in comparison with the control sample, which however, corresponded to a relatively strong attenuation in the implanted layer. This was interpreted as a result of scattering, which emerges in the surface layer due to optical nonuniformities, created by the high energy ion irradiation. The presence of a thin Mn-ion-containing surface layer led, despite its small thickness, to noticeable changes in the sample Faraday rotation spectra. The estimated values of the Verdet constant for this layer were about three orders of magnitude larger and of opposite sign compared to the Verdet constant values of the undoped sample. Magnetic field dependencies of the Faraday rotation contribution from the implanted layer were found to be saturating functions, which points to a proportionality of the Faraday rotation to the magnetization of the paramagnetic Mn ion subsystem. Based on these findings we conclude that the Mn-implanted SiC layer exhibits magneto-optical properties typical of a diluted magnetic semiconductor. At the same time, no ferromagnetic ordering was observed in the studied (Si, Mn)C sample.

  14. Characterization and adsorption modeling of silicon carbide-derived carbons.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T X; Bae, J-S; Bhatia, S K

    2009-02-17

    We present characterization results of silicon carbide-derived carbons (Si-CDCs) prepared from both nano- and micron-sized betaSiC particles by oxidation in pure chlorine atmosphere at various synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Subsequently, the adsorption modeling study of simple gases (CH4 and CO2) in these Si-CDC samples for a wide range of pressures and temperatures using our Finite Wall Thickness model [Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K. Langmuir 2004, 20, 3532] was also carried out. In general, characterization results showed that the core of Si-CDC particles contains predominantly amorphous material while minor graphitization was also observed on the surface of these particles for all the investigated synthesis temperatures (600-1000 degrees C). Furthermore, postsynthetic heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for 3 days, as well as particle size of precursor (betaSiC) were shown to have slight impact on the graphitization. In spite of the highly disordered nature of Si-CDC samples, the adsorption modeling results revealed that the Finite Wall Thickness model provides reasonably good prediction of experimental adsorption data of CO2 and CH4 in all the investigated Si-CDC samples at the temperatures of 273 K, 313 K, and 333 K for a wide range of pressure up to 200 bar. Furthermore, the impact of the difference in molecular size and geometry between analysis and probing gases on the prediction of the experimental adsorption isotherm in a disordered carbon using the slit-pore model is also found. Finally, the correlation between compressibility of the Si-CDC samples under high pressure adsorption and their synthesis temperature was deduced from the adsorption modeling. PMID:19123908

  15. Silicon Carbide Gas Sensors for Propulsion Emissions and Safety Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J.; Neudeck, P. G.; Lukco, D.; Trunek, A.; Spry, D.; Lampard, P.; Androjna, D.; Makel, D.; Ward, B.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based gas sensors have the ability to meet the needs of a range of aerospace propulsion applications including emissions monitoring, leak detection, and hydrazine monitoring. These applications often require sensitive gas detection in a range of environments. An effective sensing approach to meet the needs of these applications is a Schottky diode based on a SiC semiconductor. The primary advantage of using SiC as a semiconductor is its inherent stability and capability to operate at a wide range of temperatures. The complete SiC Schottky diode gas sensing structure includes both the SiC semiconductor and gas sensitive thin film metal layers; reliable operation of the SiC-based gas sensing structure requires good control of the interface between these gas sensitive layers and the SiC. This paper reports on the development of SiC gas sensors. The focus is on two efforts to better control the SiC gas sensitive Schottky diode interface. First, the use of palladium oxide (PdOx) as a barrier layer between the metal and SiC is discussed. Second, the use of atomically flat SiC to provide an improved SiC semiconductor surface for gas sensor element deposition is explored. The use of SiC gas sensors in a multi-parameter detection system is briefly discussed. It is concluded that SiC gas sensors have potential in a range of propulsion system applications, but tailoring of the sensor for each application is necessary.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Diffusion Bonds for Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael; Singh, Mrityunjay; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion bonds of silicon carbide (SiC) were fabricated using several different types of titanium (Ti) based interlayers between the SiC substrates. The interlayers were an alloyed Ti foil, a pure Ti foil, and a physically vapor deposited (PVD) Ti coating. Microscopy was conducted to evaluate the cross-sections of the resulting bonds. Microprobe analysis identified reaction formed phases in the diffusion bonded region. Uniform and well adhered bonds were formed between the SiC substrates. In the case where the alloyed Ti foil or a thick Ti coating (i.e. 20 micron) was used as the interlayer, microcracks and several phases were present in the diffusion bonds. When a thinner interlayer was used (i.e. 10 micron PVD Ti), no microcracks were observed and only two reaction formed phases were present. The two phases were preferred and fully reacted phases that did not introduce thermal stresses or microcracks during the cool-down stage after processing. Diffusion bonded samples were evaluated with the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods of pulsed thermography and immersion ultrasonic testing. Joined SiC substrates that were fully bonded and that had simulated bond flaws in the interlayer were also evaluated using immersion ultrasound. Pull testing was conducted on the bonds to determine the tensile strength. To demonstrate the joining approach for a complex multilayered component for a low NOx injector application, the diffusion bonding approach was used to join three 4" diameter SiC discs that contained complex fuel and air flow channels.

  17. Extreme service packaging for silicon carbide electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinel, Maxime Jean-Francois

    Electronic devices based on silicon carbide (SiC) represent a good choice for a variety of new high temperature, high power electronic applications. Moreover, SiC ceramics have great potentials for use in harsh environments. Nevertheless, many technical challenges still need to be addressed, including high temperature stability. Results obtained on several levels in the development of a SiC-based package are presented. The sealing of ceramic packages is generally accomplished using specialty glasses. Several commercial glasses were tested in view of their application as glass sealants. The reactions between SiC and certain oxides present in the glasses were responsible for the formation of CO gas. Selection criteria were developed based on thermodynamic calculations. This approach provides valuable information in tailoring suitable glasses. The oxidation of SiC in air results in the formation of silica that does not prove to be protective above about 1800 K because of interfacial reactions with its SiC substrate. The oxidation of both single crystal and polycrystalline SiC, between 973 and 2053 K, resulted in the formation of quartz, cristobalite or tridymite, which are the stable crystalline polymorphs of silica at ambient pressure. The polymorphs were pure SiO2, and contamination of the oxide scales from the oxidizing environment did not occur. The only variable affecting the occurrence of a specific polymorph was the oxidation temperature. Cristobalite was formed at temperatures ≥ 1673 K, tridymite between 1073 and 1573 K, while quartz formed at 973 K. Cristobalite was observed to grow in a spherulitic fashion from amorphous silica. This was not the case for tridymite and quartz, which appeared to grow as oriented crystalline films. The presence of a thin layer of silicon oxycarbide was detected at the SiC/SiO 2 interface. Formation of reliable and homogeneous interconnects can be a critical issue for demanding applications. The approach that was undertaken to

  18. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Biomorphic Silicon Carbide Ceramics Fabricated from Wood Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Salem, J. A.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide based, environment friendly, biomorphic ceramics have been fabricated by the pyrolysis and infiltration of natural wood (maple and mahogany) precursors. This technology provides an eco-friendly route to advanced ceramic materials. These biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics have tailorable properties and behave like silicon carbide based materials manufactured by conventional approaches. The elastic moduli and fracture toughness of biomorphic ceramics strongly depend on the properties of starting wood preforms and the degree of molten silicon infiltration. Mechanical properties of silicon carbide ceramics fabricated from maple wood precursors indicate the flexural strengths of 3441+/-58 MPa at room temperature and 230136 MPa at 1350C. Room temperature fracture toughness of the maple based material is 2.6 +/- 0.2 MPa(square root of)m while the mahogany precursor derived ceramics show a fracture toughness of 2.0 +/- 0.2 Mpa(square root of)m. The fracture toughness and the strength increase as the density of final material increases. Fractographic characterization indicates the failure origins to be pores and chipped pockets of silicon.

  19. Friction and wear characteristics of iron-chromium alloys in contact with themselves and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with various iron-chromium alloys in contact with (1) themselves, (2) single crystal silicon carbide disks, and (3) single crystal abrasive grit of silicon carbide. Results indicate the coefficients of friction for the alloys sliding against themselves are between those for pure iron and pure chromium, and are only slightly different with 1, 5, 9, 14, and 19 weight percent chromium in iron. The wear is due, primarily, to shearing, or tearing fracture, of the cohesive bonds in the bulk metal and plowing of the bulk by lumps of wear debris. There are only slight differences in the coefficients of friction for the various alloys when sliding on silicon carbide. The coefficient of friction for the alloys are higher than those for pure iron and pure chromium. Alloy hardening observed in the alloys plays a dominant role in controlling the abrasive friction and wear behavior of the alloys.

  20. Aluminum nitride-silicon carbide whisker composites: Processing, properties, and microstructural stability

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum nitride -- silicon carbide whisker composites with up to 20 vol % whiskers were fabricated by pressureless sintering (1750{degree}--1800{degree}C) and by hot-pressing (1700{degree}--1800{degree}C). Silicon carbide whiskers were found to degrade depending on the type of protective powder bed used during sintering. Whiskers were found to degraded in high oxygen containing samples by reaction with sintering additives. Whisker degradation was also due to the formation of silicon carbide -- aluminum nitride solid solution. No whisker degradation was observed in hot-pressed samples. For these samples Young's modulus and fracture toughness were measured. A 33% increase in the fracture toughness was measured by the indentation technique for a 20 vol % whisker composite. Operative toughening mechanisms were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Crack deflection and whisker bridging were the dominant mechanisms. It was also shown that load transfer from matrix to whiskers can be a contributing factor to toughening. 88 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide (RFSC) Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reaction-formed silicon carbide (RFSC) ceramics fabricated by silicon infiltration of porous carbon preforms are discussed. The morphological characterization of the carbon preforms indicates a very narrow pore size distribution. Measurements of the preform density by physical methods and by mercury porosimetry agree very well and indicate that virtually all of the porosity in the preforms is open to infiltrating liquids. The average room temperature flexural strength of the RFSC material with approximately 8 at.% free silicon is 369 +/- 28 MPa (53.5 +/- 4 ksi). The Weibull strength distribution data give a characteristic strength value of 381 MPa (55 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 14.3. The residual silicon content is lower and the strengths are superior to those of most commercially available reaction-bonded silicon carbide materials.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Ceramics. Materials Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    Microstructural characterization of two reaction-formed silicon carbide ceramics has been carried out by interference layering, plasma etching, and microscopy. These specimens contained free silicon and niobium disilicide as minor phases with silicon carbide as the major phase. In conventionally prepared samples, the niobium disilicide cannot be distinguished from silicon in optical micrographs. After interference layering, all phases are clearly distinguishable. Back scattered electron (BSE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the results obtained by interference layering. Plasma etching with CF4 plus 4% O2 selectively attacks silicon in these specimens. It is demonstrated that interference layering and plasma etching are very useful techniques in the phase identification and microstructural characterization of multiphase ceramic materials.

  4. Design and fabrication of silicon carbide split furnace for high-speed compression tests up to 1573 K

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, S.; Mannan, S.L.; Sasidhara, S.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K. Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore )

    1993-04-01

    A split furnace with silicon carbide heating elements that can be used for high-speed compression tests is described. It is concluded that the life of silicon carbide elements will be longer if the elements are fixed in horizontal direction. The shrinkage cracks on the refractories can be avoided if they are thin and stacked as plies. 5 refs.

  5. Processing and mechanical properties of silicon nitride/silicon carbide ceramic nanocomposites derived from polymer precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Matthew Jeremy

    Creep deformation of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics is dominated by a solution-precipitation process through the glassy interface phase at grain boundary regions, which is formed by the reaction of oxide additives with the silicon oxide surface layer of the ceramic powder particles during liquid phase sintering. The ultimate approach to increase the creep resistance of these materials is to decrease the oxide content at the grain boundaries, rendering the solution-precipitation process non-effective. This research presents a new method of enhancing the creep properties of silicon nitride/silicon carbide composites by forming micro-nano and nano-nano microstructures during sintering. Starting from amorphous Si-C-N powders of micrometric size particles, powders were consolidated in three ways: (1) Consolidation of pyrolyzed powders without additives, (2) Electric Field Assisted Sintering (EFAS) of pyrolyzed powders with and without additives and (3) High pressure sintering. In all three cases, nanocomposites with varied grain size were achieved. High temperature mechanical creep testing was performed on the samples sintered by EFAS. Creep rates ranged from 1 x 10-8/s to 1 x 10-11/s depending on method in which powders were prepared and total oxide additive amount. For samples with high oxide contents the stress exponent was found to be n ˜ 2 with an activation energy of Q ˜ 600kJ/mol*K, indicating the typical solution precipitation process of deformation. But for the nano-nano composites sintered with little to none oxide additive, the stress exponent was found to be n ˜ 1 with and activation energy of Q ˜ 200kJ/mol*K, hinting at a diffusion controlled mechanism of creep deformation. For the nano-nano composites sintered without oxide additives, oxygen was found in the microstructure. However, oxygen contamination was found to distribute at grain boundary regions especially triple junctions. It is suggested that this highly dispersed distribution of

  6. Modelling of an ultra-thin silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlexer, Philomena; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a well-ordered silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid thin-film supported on Ru(0 0 0 1) has been reported (2015 Surf. Sci. 632 9–13). The thin-film consist of a monolayer of corner sharing (SiO4)-tetrahedra on top of a (Si2C3) monolayer supported on the Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. This silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid system may exhibit interesting properties for nano-technological applications and represents another example of a 2D material. We explore the physical and chemical properties of the silicatene/silicon-carbide thin-film using DFT and compare the vibrational spectra with existing experimental data. The characteristics of the silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid system are compared with those of the bilayer-silicatene (pure SiO2 film). We found large differences in the adsorption modes of the two thin-films on the Ru(0 0 0 1) support. Whereas the bilayer-silicatene physisorbs on the Ru(0 0 0 1) surface, the silicatene/silicon-carbide layer binds via chemisorption. The chemical properties of the two thin-films were probed by adsorption of H atoms at various positions, as well as by Al-doping and the formation of hydroxyl groups (Al–OH). These results show that despite the similar structure of the top layer and the identical metal support (Ru), the mixed silicatene/silicon-carbide system behaves quite differently from the pure silica two-layer counterpart.

  7. Modelling of an ultra-thin silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid film.

    PubMed

    Schlexer, Philomena; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2016-09-14

    Recently, a well-ordered silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid thin-film supported on Ru(0 0 0 1) has been reported (2015 Surf. Sci. 632 9-13). The thin-film consist of a monolayer of corner sharing (SiO4)-tetrahedra on top of a (Si2C3) monolayer supported on the Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. This silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid system may exhibit interesting properties for nano-technological applications and represents another example of a 2D material. We explore the physical and chemical properties of the silicatene/silicon-carbide thin-film using DFT and compare the vibrational spectra with existing experimental data. The characteristics of the silicatene/silicon-carbide hybrid system are compared with those of the bilayer-silicatene (pure SiO2 film). We found large differences in the adsorption modes of the two thin-films on the Ru(0 0 0 1) support. Whereas the bilayer-silicatene physisorbs on the Ru(0 0 0 1) surface, the silicatene/silicon-carbide layer binds via chemisorption. The chemical properties of the two thin-films were probed by adsorption of H atoms at various positions, as well as by Al-doping and the formation of hydroxyl groups (Al-OH). These results show that despite the similar structure of the top layer and the identical metal support (Ru), the mixed silicatene/silicon-carbide system behaves quite differently from the pure silica two-layer counterpart. PMID:27406792

  8. Reactive infiltration in fabricating silicon carbide composites for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liming

    The silicon carbide (SiC) composite is a promising material to improve thermal dissipation and thermal expansion matching for electronic packaging, but its wide application has been greatly hindered by the high fabrication cost. To address this cost issue, two new reactive infiltration methods have been proposed and developed to fabricate SiC composite in a net-shape manner. They are Method 1--locally magnesium-enhanced infiltration and Method 2--globally carbon-enhanced infiltration. In Method 1, a magnesium wetting agent was strategically inserted at the interface between SiC powder and Al-Si alloy. The molten Al-Si alloy was assisted by chemical reaction to infiltrate into the porous SiC powder in an inert atmosphere sealed in a quartz tube or a steel cup. The infiltration kinetics was characterized by measuring the infiltration weight gain with respect to time. It was found that the infiltration kinetics could be divided into three stages: infiltration initiation, rapid infiltration, and slow infiltration, and most of the weight gain occurred in the rapid infiltration stage. The rapid infiltration was due to the magnesium-silicon oxide reaction and the magnesium accumulation at the infiltration front. Modeling of the infiltration kinetics showed the magnesium dilution increased the dynamic contact angle, which in turn decreased the infiltration rate. The SiC oxidation, Mg content and temperature were shown to be important factors affecting the infiltration. In Method 2, a carbon wetting agent is coated globally on every SiC particle. To accomplish this coating, a slip casting, drying, curing and carbonization process was developed. A crucibleless infiltration method was designed to fabricate SiC composites in an open atmosphere protected by nitrogen. The temperature change of SiC preform during infiltration was monitored to determine the infiltration kinetics. The silicon-carbon reaction was found to create a spontaneous infiltration of molten Si or molten Al

  9. Dynamic elastic modulus and vibration damping behavior of porous silicon carbide ceramics at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenden, A.; Proffitt, C.B.; Singh, M.

    1999-10-01

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT) has been used to measure the Young's modulus, E, the mechanical damping, Q{sup {minus}1}, and the strain amplitude, {epsilon}, of a sintered silicon carbide containing pores (Hexoloy-SP). The silicon carbide material used in this study had at least 14 vol% porosity. Young's modulus was found to have a linear temperature dependence from room temperature to 740 C. The damping was near 10{sup {minus}4} and was independent of strain amplitude above room temperature.

  10. Observations on infiltration of silicon carbide compacts with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    The melt infiltration of ceramic particulates permits an opportunity to observe such fundamental materials phenomena as nucleation, dynamic wetting and growth in constrained environments. Experimental observations are presented on the infiltration behavior and matrix microstructures that form when porous compacts of platelet-shaped single crystals of alpha- (hexagonal) silicon carbide are infiltrated with a liquid 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration process involved counter gravity infiltration of suitably tamped and preheated compacts of silicon carbide platelets under an external pressure in a special pressure chamber for a set period, then by solidification of the infiltrant metal in the interstices of the bed at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Improvement of uniformity in chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide by using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin-Won; Kim, Jun-Woo; Choi, Kyoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC) on carbon has been widely used as a general method to suppress dust generation on carbon surfaces. For a CH3SiCl3 (MTS) and hydrogen system, computational fluid dynamic simulations to predict the growth rate of the silicon carbide are performed. The results of the simulations are consistent with the experimental results where the deposition rate depends highly on the H/Si composition and the specimen's location. This simulation can provide guidance in optimizing the CVD process and improving the apparatus for CVD of SiC.

  12. The effect of diamond powder characteristics on lapping of sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosczyk, Benjamin; Burkam, Eric; Titov, Artem; Onyenemezu, Clement; Benea, Ion C.

    2015-10-01

    In Automotive applications, sintered Silicon Carbide has been used in applications such as seal pump faces. The surface of sintered SiC, when lapped or polished for sealing to another surface, must be free of blemishes and mechanical defects. Lapping and polishing processes therefore must be well defined and controlled assuring minimal variation and production scrap. In this study, we related the characteristics of different diamond powders (particle size distribution, particle shape and surface) to their performance in lapping of sintered silicon carbide material, expressed as removal rate and surface finish.

  13. Surface Modification of Nanometre Silicon Carbide Powder with Polystyrene by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Meng, Yuedong; Zhong, Shaofeng; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Zhongqing; Shu, Xingsheng; Ren, Zhaoxing; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-02-01

    An investigation was made into polystyrene (PS) grafted onto nanometre silicon carbide (SiC) particles. In our experiment, the grafting polymerization reaction was induced by a radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment of the nanometre powder. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrum) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) results reveal that PS is grafted onto the surface of silicon carbide powder. An analysis is presented on the effectiveness of this approach as a function of plasma operating variables including the plasma treating power, treating time, and grafting reaction temperature and time.

  14. Alumina-zirconia-silicon carbide-magnesia compositions and articles made through therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, P.K.; Billman, E.R.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes an alumina based ceramic composition. It comprises: about 1.5 to 17.5 v/o silicon carbide whiskers; about 5 to 17.5 v/o zirconia; a residue of a magnesia addition added in the amount of about 0.03 to 3 v/o; alumina forming essentially the remainder of the composition; wherein the silicon carbide whiskers, the zirconia and the residue of the magnesia addition are substantially homo-geneously dispersed in a matrix formed of the alumina; and wherein at least about 4.0 v/o of the ceramic composition is tetragonal zirconia.

  15. On electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kewei; Li, Xuqin; Ma, Baisheng; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Ligong; An, Linan

    2014-06-01

    The electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics was studied by combining measurements of temperature-dependent conductivity and optical absorption. By comparing the experimental results to theoretical models, electronic structure was constructed for a carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide, which revealed several unique features, such as deep defect energy level, wide band-tail band, and overlap between the band-tail band and defect level. These unique features were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the material and used to explain the electric behavior.

  16. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC) matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%). Si nanocrystals (Si-NC) containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results. PMID:21711625

  17. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhenyu; Huang, Shujuan; Green, Martin A; Conibeer, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC) matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%). Si nanocrystals (Si-NC) containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results. PMID:21711625

  18. Microstructure-property relationship in silicon carbide armor ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirbas, Memduh Volkan

    Defects are one of the factors that show a negative effect on the ballistic performance. Uniform microstructures with a low percentage of well distributed porosity could possibly demonstrate high ballistic strength; therefore, it is of interest to estimate the parameters that define the spatial arrangement of defects. This aspect of microstructures was investigated in a variety of silicon carbide ceramics ranging from off-density sintered samples to high density hot-pressed armor grade samples. The spatial distribution of defects was examined by various techniques including nearest neighbor distance distributions, tessellation analysis, and pair correlation functions. Random distributions were observed for most of the samples with some degree of clustering. Hardness was selected as a mechanical property to correlate with microstructural findings. Hardness contour maps were constructed by indenting samples with a statistically significant number of indents per load to see the variation in terms of location. The large number of indents allowed for Weibull analysis to be used to examine the spread in the data and to test spatial variability. A high degree of correlation was obtained between microstructural parameters and hardness/Weibull modulus values. Smaller defect sizes and homogenous distribution of defects were shown to provide higher hardness values. A sintered SiC tile was examined using ultrasound to determine high and low amplitude regions in C-scan image maps. Serial sectioning was performed on diced samples from these two regions. Although no significant difference was observed in terms of density and average defect size, statistical tests showed that the difference in the largest defect size detected in low amplitude and high amplitude regions was significant. Clusters of defects were also identified in the samples from the low amplitude regions. The signal loss that was observed in C-scans maps could partially be attributed to these results. A

  19. Diffusion and impurity segregation in hydrogen-implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Barcz, A.; Kozubal, M.; Ratajczak, J.; Gołaszewska, K.; Celler, G. K.

    2014-06-14

    Diffusion and segregation behavior of hydrogen and oxygen in silicon carbide subjected to H implantation and subsequent annealing were studied with a number of analytical techniques including Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. H{sup +} implantation was carried out with energies of 200 keV, 500 keV, or 1 MeV to doses of 1 × 10{sup 16}, 1 × 10{sup 17}, or 2 × 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2}, and thermal treatment was conducted in flowing argon for 1 to 2 h at temperatures of 740, 780, 1000, or 1100 °C. The process of migration and eventual loss of hydrogen in a point defect regime is postulated to proceed to a large extent through ionized vacancies. This conclusion was derived from the observed substantial difference in H mobilities in n- vs. p-type SiC as the population of ionized vacancies is governed by the Fermi-Dirac statistics, i.e., the position of the Fermi level. For higher doses, a well defined buried planar zone forms in SiC at the maximum of deposited energy, comprising numerous microvoids and platelets that are trapping sites for hydrogen atoms. At a certain temperature, a more or less complete exfoliation of the implanted layer is observed. For a 1 MeV implant heated to 1100 °C in nominally pure argon, SIMS profiling reveals a considerable oxygen peak of 10{sup 16} O atoms/cm{sup 2} situated at a depth close to that of the peak of the implanted H{sup +}. Similarly, 1100 °C annealing of a 200 keV implant induces the formation of a thin oxide (4 nm), located at the interface between the implanted layer and the substrate as evidenced by both SIMS and HRTEM. The measurements were taken on the part of the sample that remained un-exfoliated. In view of a lack of convincing evidence that a hexagonal SiC might contain

  20. Study of Pellets and Lumps as Raw Materials in Silicon Production from Quartz and Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Martello, E.; Tranell, G.; Gaal, S.; Raaness, O. S.; Tang, K.; Arnberg, L.

    2011-10-01

    The use of high-purity carbon and quartz raw materials reduces the need for comprehensive refining steps after the silicon has been produced carbothermically in the electric reduction furnace. The current work aims at comparing the reaction mechanisms and kinetics occurring in the inner part of the reduction furnace when pellets or lumpy charge is used, as well as the effect of the raw material mix. Laboratory-scale carbothermic reduction experiments have been carried out in an induction furnace. High-purity silicon carbide and two different high-purity hydrothermal quartzes were charged as raw materials at different molar ratios. The charge was in the form of lumps (size, 2-5 mm) or as powder (size, 10-20 μm), mixed and agglomerated as pellets (size, 1-3 mm) and reacted at 2273 K (2000 °C). The thermal properties of the quartzes were measured also by heating a small piece of quartz in CO atmosphere. The investigated quartzes have different reactivity in reducing atmosphere. The carbothermal reduction experiments show differences in the reacted charge between pellets and lumps as charge material. Solid-gas reactions take place from the inside of the pellets porosity, whereas reactions in lumps occur topochemically. Silicon in pellets is produced mainly in the rim zone. Larger volumes of silicon have been found when using lumpy charge. More SiO is produced when using pellets than for lumpy SiO2 for the same molar ratio and heating conditions. The two SiC polytypes used in the carbothermal reduction experiments as carbon reductants presented different reactivity.

  1. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  2. Isotopic Composition of Barium in Single Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savina, M. R.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Davis, A. M.; Clayton, R. N.; Lewis, R. S.; Amari, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have measured Ba isotope distributions in individual presolar SiC grains. We find that the Ba isotopic composition in mainstream SiC grains is consistent with models of nucleosynthesis in low to intermediate mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. High Temperature Corrosion of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are proposed for applications in high temperature combustion environments containing water vapor. Both SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica (SiO2) scale. It is therefore important to understand the durability of SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 in water vapor. Thermogravimetric analyses, furnace exposures and burner rig results were obtained for these materials in water vapor at temperatures between 1100 and 1450 C and water vapor partial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 3.1 atm. First, the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4 in water vapor is considered. The parabolic kinetic rate law, rate dependence on water vapor partial pressure, and oxidation mechanism are discussed. Second, the volatilization of silica to form Si(OH)4(g) is examined. Mass spectrometric results, the linear kinetic rate law and a volatilization model based on diffusion through a gas boundary layer are discussed. Finally, the combined oxidation and volatilization reactions, which occur when SiC or Si3N4 are exposed in a water vapor-containing environment, are presented. Both experimental evidence and a model for the paralinear kinetic rate law are shown for these simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions.

  4. All-Optical dc Nanotesla Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancy Fine Structure in Isotopically Purified Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simin, D.; Soltamov, V. A.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Anisimov, A. N.; Babunts, R. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Mokhov, E. N.; Trupke, M.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Sperlich, A.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    We uncover the fine structure of a silicon vacancy in isotopically purified silicon carbide (4H-28SiC) and reveal not yet considered terms in the spin Hamiltonian, originated from the trigonal pyramidal symmetry of this spin-3 /2 color center. These terms give rise to additional spin transitions, which would be otherwise forbidden, and lead to a level anticrossing in an external magnetic field. We observe a sharp variation of the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of this level anticrossing, which can be used for a purely all-optical sensing of the magnetic field. We achieve dc magnetic field sensitivity better than 100 nT /√{Hz } within a volume of 3 ×10-7m m3 at room temperature and demonstrate that this contactless method is robust at high temperatures up to at least 500 K. As our approach does not require application of radio-frequency fields, it is scalable to much larger volumes. For an optimized light-trapping waveguide of 3 mm3 , the projection noise limit is below 100 fT /√{Hz } .

  5. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching. PMID:24521208

  6. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching. PMID:24521208

  7. Investigation of hydrogen plasma treatment for reducing defects in silicon quantum dot superlattice structure with amorphous silicon carbide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on the properties of silicon quantum dot superlattice films. Hydrogen introduced in the films efficiently passivates silicon and carbon dangling bonds at a treatment temperature of approximately 400°C. The total dangling bond density decreases from 1.1 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.7 × 1017 cm-3, which is comparable to the defect density of typical hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films. A damaged layer is found to form on the surface by HPT; this layer can be easily removed by reactive ion etching.

  8. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide: Low-vacuum growth, characterization, and device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinkle, Michael W.

    In the past several years, epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide has been transformed from an academic curiosity of social scientists to a leading candidate material to replace silicon in post-CMOS electronics. This has come with rapid development of growth technologies, improved understanding of epitaxial graphene on the polar faces of silicon carbide, and new device fabrication techniques. The contributions of this thesis include refinement and improved understanding of graphene growth on the silicon- and carbon-faces in the context of managed local silicon partial pressure, high-throughput epitaxial graphene thickness measurement and uniformity characterization by ellipsometry, observations of nearly ideal graphene band structures on rotationally stacked carbon-face multilayer epitaxial graphene, presentation of initial experiments on localized in situ chemical modification of epitaxial graphene for an alternate path to semiconducting behavior, and novel device fabrication methods to exploit the crystal structure of the silicon carbide substrate. The latter is a particularly exciting foray into three dimensional patterning of the substrate that may eliminate the critical problem of edge roughness in graphene nanoribbons.

  9. Stability and electrokinetic potential of silicon carbide suspensions in aqueous organic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeremenko, B. V.; Lyubchenko, I. N.; Skobets, I. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The method of electroosmosis was used to study the dependence of the electrokinetic potential of silicon carbide suspensions in mixtures of water -n. alcohol. The reasons for the dependence of the electrokinetic potential on the composition of the intermicellar liquid are discussed.

  10. Additive-free hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics-A material with exceptional mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sajgalik, P.; Sedlacek, J.; Lences, Z.; Dusza, J.; Lin, H. -T.

    2015-12-30

    Densification of silicon carbide without any sintering aids by hot-pressing and rapid hot pressing was investigated. Full density (>99% t.d.) has been reached at 1850 °C, a temperature of at least 150-200 °C lower compared to the up to now known solid state sintered silicon carbide powders. Silicon carbide was freeze granulated and heat treated prior the densification. Furthermore, evolution of microstructure, mechanical properties and creep behavior were evaluated and compared to reference ceramics from as received silicon carbide powder as well as those of commercial one. Novel method results in dense ceramics with Vickers hardness and indentation fracture toughness of 29.0 GPa and 5.25 MPam1/2, respectively. Moreover, the creep rate of 3.8 x 10–9 s–1 at 1450 °C and the load of 100 MPa is comparable to the commercial α-SiC solid state sintered at 2150 °C.

  11. Additive-free hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics-A material with exceptional mechanical properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sajgalik, P.; Sedlacek, J.; Lences, Z.; Dusza, J.; Lin, H. -T.

    2015-12-30

    Densification of silicon carbide without any sintering aids by hot-pressing and rapid hot pressing was investigated. Full density (>99% t.d.) has been reached at 1850 °C, a temperature of at least 150-200 °C lower compared to the up to now known solid state sintered silicon carbide powders. Silicon carbide was freeze granulated and heat treated prior the densification. Furthermore, evolution of microstructure, mechanical properties and creep behavior were evaluated and compared to reference ceramics from as received silicon carbide powder as well as those of commercial one. Novel method results in dense ceramics with Vickers hardness and indentation fracture toughnessmore » of 29.0 GPa and 5.25 MPam1/2, respectively. Moreover, the creep rate of 3.8 x 10–9 s–1 at 1450 °C and the load of 100 MPa is comparable to the commercial α-SiC solid state sintered at 2150 °C.« less

  12. Electromagnetic simulations of microwave heating experiments using reaction vessels made out of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John; Kingman, Sam; Irvine, Derek; Licence, Peter; Smith, Alastair; Dimitrakis, Georgios; Obermayer, David; Kappe, C Oliver

    2010-09-28

    There is a growing body of literature which reports the use of silicon carbide vessels to shield reaction mixtures during microwave heating. In this paper we use electromagnetic simulations and microwave experiments to show that silicon carbide vessels do not exclude the electric field, and that dielectric heating of reaction mixtures will take place in addition to heat transfer from the silicon carbide. The contribution of dielectric heating and heat transfer depends on the dielectric properties of the mixture, and the temperature at which the reaction is carried out. Solvents which remain microwave absorbent at high temperatures, such as ionic liquids, will heat under the direct influence of the electric field from 30-250 degrees C. Solvents which are less microwave absorbent at higher temperatures will be heated by heat-transfer only at temperatures in excess of 150 degrees C. The results presented in this paper suggest that the influence of the electric field cannot be neglected when interpreting microwave assisted synthesis experiments in silicon carbide vessels. PMID:20625593

  13. Method of deposition of silicon carbide layers on substrates and product

    DOEpatents

    Angelini, Peter; DeVore, Charles E.; Lackey, Walter J.; Blanco, Raymond E.; Stinton, David P.

    1984-01-01

    A method for direct chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide to substrates, especially nuclear waste particles, is provided by the thermal decomposition of methylsilane at about 800.degree. C. to 1050.degree. C. when the substrates have been confined within a suitable coating environment.

  14. Development of high-density fiber-reinforced silicon carbide FCVI composites

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Y.G. ); Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine conditions for optimum (uniform) matrix distribution for forced-flow chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI) produced silicon carbide composites. In particular, the effect of the thermal gradient across the preform and the densification time on composite overall density and density gradients were investigated. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  15. In-situ light-scattering measurements during the CVD of polycrystalline silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldon, B.W. |; Reichle, P.A.; Besmann, T.M.

    1992-12-31

    Light-scattering was used to monitor the chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide from methyltrichlorosilane. Nucleation and growth of SiC caused changes in surface topography that altered the angular scattering spectrum generated by a He-Ne laser. These scattering spectra were analyzed to obtain information about the occurring nucleation and growth processes.

  16. Low temperature synthesis of silicon carbide nanomaterials using a solid-state method.

    PubMed

    Dasog, Mita; Smith, Larissa F; Purkait, Tapas K; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2013-08-11

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanomaterials have been prepared via the solid-state metathesis reaction of various silica sources, magnesium and carbon. This approach enables synthesis of crystalline β-SiC nanomaterials of varied morphologies at 600 °C - the lowest temperature reported to date. The resulting materials were characterized using XRD, FTIR, XPS, TEM and SEM techniques. PMID:23811852

  17. Recent trends and theoretical background in sintering of silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, H.

    1983-01-01

    This article gives an outline of sintering techniques of silicon carbide and refers to recent developments. These techniques are also applicable to other oxides with a high melting point and particularly high sinterability, namely MgO and BeO.

  18. Effect of silicon carbide on devitrification of a glass coating for reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, P. O.

    1978-01-01

    Devitrification (nucleation and growth of cristobalite) were investigated in the LI-0042 coating used for the space shuttle surface insulation. Excessive devitrification was found to be associated with the silicon carbide (SiC) constituent in the coating. Test results show that significant devitrification occurred only when SiC was present in the coating and when the thermal-exposure atmosphere was oxidizing.

  19. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  20. The influence of sintering temperature and silicon carbide percent on the compression properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Y.; Alaalam, M.

    2015-03-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) is the processing of parts from metal powders. In (P/M) technology can be produce homogenous and net shape products, to generate properties not attainable through conventional metal working processes or to manufacture parts to net shape, this reason has motivated the need to find a cost effective technological production method for these composites. In this study the effect of Sintering Temperature and Silicon Carbide Percent on the Compression Properties of the aluminum silicon carbide produced by powder metallurgy is investigated by using the heat treatment of the composite. This method produce a local fusing and welding of the aluminum particles while using aluminum powder with thick oxide layer surrounding the particles prevents the all melting of the composite. Sintering temperatures between 500 and 850 °C were applied after cold compaction on samples containing (0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% 30% and 35%) of silicon carbide powder then the specimens examined to study the compression properties. The results show that the compression properties of the samples increases with increasing the silicon carbide percent and sintering temperature. Also, to obtain good compression properties the sintering temperature are found to be 600°C for the aluminum with no silicon carbide content, 700 °C for composite containing both 5% and 10% SiC, 750°C for composite containing 15% SiC, 800 °C for composite containing 20%, 25% SiC, 850°C for composite containing 30%, 35% SiC.

  1. Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Films Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) holds great potential as an electronic material because of its wide band gap energy, high breakdown electric field, thermal stability, and resistance to radiation damage. Possible aerospace applications of high-temperature, high-power, or high-radiation SiC electronic devices include sensors, control electronics, and power electronics that can operate at temperatures up to 600 C and beyond. Commercially available SiC devices now include blue light-emitting diodes (LED's) and high-voltage diodes for operation up to 350 C, with other devices under development. At present, morphological defects in epitaxially grown SiC films limit their use in device applications. Research geared toward reducing the number of structural inhomogeneities can benefit from an understanding of the type and nature of problems that cause defects. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has proven to be a useful tool in characterizing defects present on the surface of SiC epitaxial films. The in-house High-Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center not only extended the dopant concentration range achievable in epitaxial SiC films, but it reduced the concentration of some types of defects. Advanced structural characterization using the AFM was warranted to identify the type and structure of the remaining film defects and morphological inhomogeneities. The AFM can give quantitative information on surface topography down to molecular scales. Acquired, in part, in support of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP), the AFM had been used previously to detect partial fiber debonding in composite material cross sections. Atomic force microscopy examination of epitaxial SiC film surfaces revealed molecular-scale details of some unwanted surface features. Growth pits propagating from defects in the substrate, and hillocks due, presumably, to existing screw dislocations in the substrates, were

  2. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  3. NanoSIMS studies of Ba isotopic compositions in single presolar silicon carbide grains from AGB stars and supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marhas, K. K.; Hoppe, P.; Ott, U.

    2007-08-01

    We have studied 74 single presolar silicon carbide grains with sizes between 0.2 and 2.6 μm from the Murchison and Murray meteorites for Ba isotopic compositions using NanoSIMS. We also analyzed 7 SiC particles either consisting of sub-micron-size SiC grains or representing a morphologically and isotopically distinct subgroup. Of the 55 (likely) mainstream grains, originating from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 32 had high enough Ba contents for isotopic analysis. For 26 of them, CsHx interferences were either negligible or could be corrected with confidence. They exhibit typical s-process Ba isotopic patterns with slightly higher than solar 134Ba/136Ba and lower than solar 135,137,138Ba/136Ba ratios. Results are generally well explained in the context of neutron capture nucleosynthesis in low mass (1-3 M⊙) AGB stars and provide constraints on AGB models, by reducing the needed 13C spread from factor of ˜20 down to 2. Out of the 19 supernova X grains, three had sufficient concentrations for isotopic analysis. They tend to exhibit higher than solar 134Ba/136Ba and 138Ba/136Ba ratios, close to solar 137Ba/136Ba, and 135Ba/136Ba lower than solar but higher than in mainstream grains. This signature could indicate a mixture of n-burst type Ba with either "normal Ba" more s-process-rich than solar, or normal Ba plus weak s-process Ba. In the n-burst component Cs may have to be separated from Ba at ˜10 years after the SN explosion. Depending on predictions for its composition, another possibility is early separation (at ˜1 year) coupled with addition of some unfractionated n-burst matter. Abundances of trace elements (Sr, Zr, Cs, La, and Ce) analyzed along with Ba signify that implantation may have been an important process for their introduction.

  4. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Reaction-Formed Joints in Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    1998-01-01

    A reaction-bonded silicon carbide (RB-SiC) ceramic material (Carborundum's Cerastar RB-SIC) has been joined using a reaction forming approach. Microstructure and mechanical properties of three types of reaction-formed joints (350 micron, 50-55 micron, and 20-25 micron thick) have been evaluated. Thick (approximately 350 micron) joints consist mainly of silicon with a small amount of silicon carbide. The flexural strength of thick joints is about 44 plus or minus 2 MPa, and fracture always occurs at the joints. The microscopic examination of fracture surfaces of specimens with thick joints tested at room temperature revealed the failure mode to be typically brittle. Thin joints (<50-55 micron) consist of silicon carbide and silicon phases. The room and high temperature flexural strengths of thin (<50-55 micron) reaction-formed joints have been found to be at least equal to that of the bulk Cerastar RB-SIC materials because the flexure bars fracture away from the joint regions. In this case, the fracture origins appear to be inhomogeneities inside the parent material. This was always found to be the case for thin joints tested at temperatures up to 1350C in air. This observation suggests that the strength of Cerastar RB-SIC material containing a thin joint is not limited by the joint strength but by the strength of the bulk (parent) materials.

  5. Nonlinear-optical and structural properties of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Brodyn, M. S.; Volkov, V. I. Lyakhovetskii, V. R.; Rudenko, V. I.; Puzilkov, V. M.; Semenov, A. V.

    2012-02-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the nonlinearity of refraction in nanostructured silicon carbide films depending on their structural features (synthesis conditions for such films, substrate temperature during their deposition, concentration of the crystalline phase in the film, Si/C ratio of atomic concentrations in the film, and size of SiC nanocrystals formed in the film). The corresponding dependences are obtained, as well as the values of nonlinear-optical third-order susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)}({omega}; {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}) for various silicon polytypes (3C, 21R, and 27R) which exceed the value of {chi}{sup (3)} in bulk silicon carbide single crystals by four orders of magnitude.

  6. Improvement of physicomechanical and chemical propeties of reaction-sintered silicon carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyadykevich, Yu.V.; Bochar, I.I.

    1994-10-01

    Sic-based materials are currently used in a number of industrial applications because of their high-temperature strength, high Young`s modulus and hardness, low specific weight and thermal expansion, and high wear and erosion resistance. The self-bonded silicon carbide obtained by reaction sintering (RSSC) is one of the most generally employed ceramic materials. It is a nearly pore-free two-phase composite containing 80-90% silicon carbide and 5 - 20% free silicon. For more severe operating conditions, improvement of the traditional methods of manufacturing SiC articles and development of new ones are required. To date, several approaches to the problem have been proposed.

  7. High Temperature Joining and Characterization of Joint Properties in Silicon Carbide-Based Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Advanced silicon carbide-based ceramics and composites are being developed for a wide variety of high temperature extreme environment applications. Robust high temperature joining and integration technologies are enabling for the fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped components. The development of a new joining approach called SET (Single-step Elevated Temperature) joining will be described along with the overview of previously developed joining approaches including high temperature brazing, ARCJoinT (Affordable, Robust Ceramic Joining Technology), diffusion bonding, and REABOND (Refractory Eutectic Assisted Bonding). Unlike other approaches, SET joining does not have any lower temperature phases and will therefore have a use temperature above 1315C. Optimization of the composition for full conversion to silicon carbide will be discussed. The goal is to find a composition with no remaining carbon or free silicon. Green tape interlayers were developed for joining. Microstructural analysis and preliminary mechanical tests of the joints will be presented.

  8. Modified Process For Formation Of Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, Donald R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    1996-01-01

    Modified version of process for making SiC-fiber/SiC-matrix composite material reduces damage to SiC (SCS-6) fibers and to carbon-rich coatings on fibers. Modification consists of addition of second polymer-infiltration-and-pyrolysis step to increase carbon content of porous matrix before infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon alloy.

  9. Charging/discharging behavior and mechanism of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide films

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin Zheng, Wenjun; Liao, Wugang; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The charging/discharging behavior of Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x}) was investigated based on the Al/insulating layer/Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (metal-insulator-quantum dots-oxide-silicon) multilayer structure by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy measurements reveal the microstructure and distribution of Si QDs. The occurrence and shift of conductance peaks indicate the carrier transfer and the charging/discharging behavior of Si QDs. The multilayer structure shows a large memory window of 5.2 eV at ±8 V sweeping voltage. Analysis of the C-V and G-V results allows a quantification of the Coulomb charging energy and the trapped charge density associated with the charging/discharging behavior. It is found that the memory window is related to the size effect, and Si QDs with large size or low Coulomb charging energy can trap two or more electrons by changing the charging voltage. Meanwhile, the estimated lower potential barrier height between Si QD and a-SiC{sub x}, and the lower Coulomb charging energy of Si QDs could enhance the charging and discharging effect of Si QDs and lead to an enlarged memory window. Further studies of the charging/discharging mechanism of Si QDs embedded in a-SiC{sub x} can promote the application of Si QDs in low-power consumption semiconductor memory devices.

  10. Charging/discharging behavior and mechanism of silicon quantum dots embedded in amorphous silicon carbide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xixing; Zeng, Xiangbin; Zheng, Wenjun; Liao, Wugang; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The charging/discharging behavior of Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCx) was investigated based on the Al/insulating layer/Si QDs embedded in a-SiCx/SiO2/p-Si (metal-insulator-quantum dots-oxide-silicon) multilayer structure by capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy measurements reveal the microstructure and distribution of Si QDs. The occurrence and shift of conductance peaks indicate the carrier transfer and the charging/discharging behavior of Si QDs. The multilayer structure shows a large memory window of 5.2 eV at ±8 V sweeping voltage. Analysis of the C-V and G-V results allows a quantification of the Coulomb charging energy and the trapped charge density associated with the charging/discharging behavior. It is found that the memory window is related to the size effect, and Si QDs with large size or low Coulomb charging energy can trap two or more electrons by changing the charging voltage. Meanwhile, the estimated lower potential barrier height between Si QD and a-SiCx, and the lower Coulomb charging energy of Si QDs could enhance the charging and discharging effect of Si QDs and lead to an enlarged memory window. Further studies of the charging/discharging mechanism of Si QDs embedded in a-SiCx can promote the application of Si QDs in low-power consumption semiconductor memory devices.

  11. Strong visible electroluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon carbide film

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Chul Kim, Tae-Youb; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Bong Kyu

    2015-05-25

    We report the strong visible light emission from silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a Si carbide (SiC) film. Compared to Si NC light-emitting diode (LED) by employing the Si nitride (SiN{sub x}) film as a surrounding matrix, the turn-on voltage of the Si NC LED with the SiC film was significantly decreased by 4 V. This was attributed to a smaller barrier height for injecting the electrons into the Si NCs due to a smaller band gap of SiC film than a SiN{sub x} film. The electroluminescence spectra increases with increasing forward voltage, indicating that the electrons are efficiently injected into the Si NCs in the SiC film. The light output power shows a linear increase with increasing forward voltage. The light emission originated from the Si NCs in a SiC film was quite uniform. The power efficiency of the Si NC LED with the SiC film was 1.56 times larger than that of the Si NC LED with the SiN{sub x} film. The Si NCs in a SiC film show unique advantages and are a promising candidate for application in optical devices.

  12. Anisotropy of the solid-state epitaxy of silicon carbide in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, S. A. Osipov, A. V.

    2013-12-15

    A new method for the solid-state synthesis of epitaxial layers is developed, in which a substrate participates in the chemical reaction and the reaction product grows not on the substrate surface, as in traditional epitaxial methods, but inside the substrate. This method offers new opportunities for elastic-energy relaxation due to a mechanism operating only in anisotropic media, specifically, the attraction of point defects formed during the chemical reaction. The attracting point centers of dilatation form relatively stable objects, dilatation dipoles, which significantly reduce the total elastic energy. It is shown that, in crystals with cubic symmetry, the most favorable arrangement of dipoles is the 〈111〉 direction. The theory is tested by growing silicon carbide (SiC) films on Si (111) substrates by chemical reaction with carbon monoxide CO. High-quality single-crystal SiC-4H films with thicknesses of up to 100 nm are grown on Si (111). Ellipsometric analysis showed that the optical constants of the SiC-4H films are significantly anisotropic. This is caused not only by the lattice hexagonality but also by a small amount (about 2–6%) of carbon atoms remaining in the film due to dilatation dipoles. It is shown that the optical constants of the carbon impurity correspond to strongly anisotropic highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  13. Thermal oxidation of 3C silicon carbide single-crystal layers on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C. D.; Kopanski, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal oxidation of thick single-crystal 3C SiC layers on silicon substrates was studied. The oxidations were conducted in a wet O2 atmosphere at temperatures from 1000 to 1250 C for times from 0.1 to 50 h. Ellipsometry was used to determine the thickness and index of refraction of the oxide films. Auger analysis showed them to be homogeneous with near stoichiometric composition. The oxide growth followed a linear parabolic relationship with time. Activation energy of the parabolic rate constant was found to be 50 kcal/mole, while the linear rate constant was 74 kcal/mole. The latter value corresponds approximately to the energy required to break a Si-C bond. Electrical measurements show an effective density of 4-6 x 10 to the 11th per sq cm for fixed oxide charges at the oxide-carbide interface, and the dielectric strength of the oxide film is aproximately 6 x 10 to the 6th V/cm.

  14. HRMC_2.1: Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo method with silicon, carbon, germanium and silicon carbide potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opletal, G.; Petersen, T. C.; Russo, S. P.

    2014-06-01

    The Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC) code models the atomic structure of materials via the use of a combination of constraints including experimental diffraction data and an empirical energy potential. In this version 2.1 update, an empirical potential for silicon-carbide has been added to the code along with an experimentally motivated constraint on the bond type fraction applicable to systems containing multiple elements.

  15. Tribological properties and surface chemistry of silicon carbide at temperatures to 1500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon carbide surfaces were heated to 1500 C in a vacuum and analyzed at room temperature with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The basic unit of the surfaces was considered as a plane of a tetrahedron of either SiC4 and CSi4 composition. AES spectra were obtained from 250-1500 C, with an analysis depth of 1 nm revealed the presence of little Si and mostly graphite. XPS analysis depth was 2 nm or less, and Si was found in the second 1 nm. Sliding friction tests with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with iron in a vacuum were characterized by a stock-slip value. The coefficient of friction increased with increasing temperature up to 400 C, then decreased with increasing temperature from 400-600 C. Reheating surfaces to 800 C after preheating them to that temperature produced no changes in AES readings. It is concluded that the maximum density of silicon and silicon-carbide is at 800 C, and the higher the sliding temperature, the more metal that is transferred.

  16. Metal-like self-organization of periodic nanostructures on silicon and silicon carbide under femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Tokita, Shigeki; Sakabe, Shuji; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas

    2013-11-21

    Periodic structures were generated on Si and SiC surfaces by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. Self-organized structures with spatial periodicity of approximately 600 nm appear on silicon and silicon carbide in the laser fluence range just above the ablation threshold and upon irradiation with a large number of pulses. As in the case of metals, the dependence of the spatial periodicity on laser fluence can be explained by the parametric decay of laser light into surface plasma waves. The results show that the proposed model might be universally applicable to any solid state material.

  17. Substitution of ceramics for high temperature alloys. [advantages of using silicon carbides and silicon nitrides in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature capability of ceramics such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide can result in turbine engines of improved efficiency. Other advantages when compared to the nickel and cobalt alloys in current use are raw material availability, lower weight, erosion/corrosion resistance, and potentially lower cost. The use of ceramics in three different sizes of gas turbine is considered; these are the large utility turbines, advanced aircraft turbines, and small automotive turbines. Special consideration, unique to each of these applications, arise when one considers substituting ceramics for high temperature alloys. The effects of material substitutions are reviewed in terms of engine performance, operating economy, and secondary effects.

  18. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    DOEpatents

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  19. Tuning the band structures of single walled silicon carbide nanotubes with uniaxial strain: a first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Xiao, H. Y.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2008-05-09

    Electronic band structures of single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes are studied under uniaxial strain using first principles calculations. The band structure can be tuned by mechanical strain in a wide energy range. The band gap decreases with uniaxial tensile strain, but initially increases with uniaxial compressive strain and then decreases with further increases in compressive strain. These results may provide a way to tune the electronic structures of silicon carbide nanotubes, which may have promising applications in building nanodevices.

  20. Natural occurrence of silicon carbide in a diamondiferous kimberlite from Fuxian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, I.; Guo, W.; Friedman, I.; Gleason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Considerable debate surrounds the existence of silicon carbide in nature, mostly owing to the problem of possible contamination by man-made SiC. Recently, Gurney1 reviewed reports of rare SiC inclusions in diamonds, and noted that SiC can only be regarded as a probable rather than proven cogenetic mineral. Here we report our observation of clusters of SiC coexisting with diamond in a kimberlite from Fuxian, China. Macrocrysts of ??-SiC are overgrown epitaxially by ??-SiC, and both polymorphs are structurally well ordered. We have also measured the carbon isotope compositions of SiC and diamonds from Fuxian. We find that SiC is more enriched in 12C than diamond by 20% relative to the PDB standard. Isotope fractionation might have occurred through an isotope exchange reaction in a common carbon reservoir. Silicon carbide may thus ultimately provide information on carbon cycling in the Earth's mantle.