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Sample records for maintain cardiac output

  1. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  2. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  3. A Review of Systemic Vasodilators in Low Cardiac Output Syndrome Following Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kimberly I; Costello, John M; Almodovar, Melvin C

    2016-01-01

    Following surgery for congenital heart disease, patients develop a predictable and progressive decline in cardiac output known as low cardiac output syndrome. During low cardiac output states, a compensatory response to increase systemic perfusion occurs both innately and as part of the postoperative pharmacologic support strategies intended to increase or sustain adequate oxygen delivery. The result typically involves a rise in systemic vascular resistance and heart rate. These and other responses may actually limit the ability of the recently operated heart to provide sufficient cardiac output to meet the oxygen demands of the body. In order to improve systemic oxygen delivery, clinicians have increasingly employed systemic vasodilator therapy to reduce afterload and improve ventriculoarterial coupling. This review will summarize currently utilized pharmacologic agents that promote systemic vasodilation and improve cardiac output through afterload reduction. This article addresses the fourth of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463987

  4. Regulation of cardiac output in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Lundby, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    This brief review addresses the regulation of cardiac output (Q) at rest and during submaximal exercise in acute and chronic hypoxia. To preserve systemic O2 delivery in acute hypoxia Q is increased by an acceleration of heart rate, whereas stroke volume (SV) remains unchanged. Tachycardia is governed by activation of carotid and aortic chemoreceptors and a concomitant reduction in arterial baroreflex activation, all balancing sympathovagal activity toward sympathetic dominance. As hypoxia extends over several days a combination of different adaptive processes restores arterial O2 content to or beyond sea level values and hence Q normalizes. The latter however occurs as a consequence of a decrease in SV whereas tachycardia persists. The diminished SV reflects a lower left ventricular end-diastolic volume which is primarily related to hypoxia-generated reduction in plasma volume. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction may contribute by increasing right ventricular afterload and thus decreasing its ejection fraction. In summary, the Q response to hypoxia is the result of a complex interplay between several physiological mechanisms. Future studies are encouraged to establish the individual contributions of the different components from an integrative perspective. PMID:26589118

  5. Pulmonary Vasodilators in the Management of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Del Cerro Marin, Maria Jesus; Bautista-Hernandez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is among the causes of low cardiac output syndrome after neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. In the setting of transient postoperative myocardial dysfunction, even a moderate elevation of pulmonary pressure can result in heart dysfunction and circulatory collapse. Although, specific pharmacological manipulation of pulmonary vascular resistance is frequently required in the perioperative period, there is no widely standardized management. In this review, a systematic literature search of PubMed and MEDLINE databases using relevant terms was performed. All clinical trials and relevant manuscripts, along with important physiological, pharmacological, and evidence-based considerations involving the use of pulmonary vasodilators in the management of low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac surgery were reviewed. This article addresses the fifth of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463986

  6. The relationship between cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow in patients with cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    McGiffin, D; Tauxe, W N; Lewis, C; Karp, R; Mantle, J

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and cardiac output was examined in 46 patients (22 with congestive heart failure and 24 following cardiac surgical procedures) by simultaneously measuring the global ERPF by the single-injection method and cardiac output by the thermodilution method. Of the patients in the heart-failure group, 21 also had pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure (PAEDP) recorded at the same time. ERPF and cardiac output were found to be related by the regression equation: cardiac output = 2.08 +/- 0.0065 ERPF (r, 0.80), with a SE of estimate of 0.81 l/min. ERPF and PAEDP were related by the regression equation: PAEDP = 45.02-0.0675 ERPF (r, 0.86), with a SE of estimate of 5.5 mm Hg. ERPF may be a useful noninvasive method of estimating cardiac output if it is known that no intrinsic kidney disease is present, and if the error of 0.81 l/min (1 SE of estimate) is within the range of clinical usefulness. The error is principally attributable to the determination of cardiac output by the thermodilution method. PMID:6526053

  7. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Hernandez, Victor; Karamanlidis, Georgios; McCully, James D; Del Nido, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    Several cellular and molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the development of myocardial dysfunction and low cardiac output in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery. Ischemia- reperfusion injury with alterations in calcium homeostasis as well as mitochondrial function has been strongly related to myocyte damage and heart failure in this population. In this article, we will review the main mechanisms of postoperative cardiac dysfunction at cellular and molecular levels and the subsequent protective strategies. In addition, we will describe cellular features of the neonatal or immature myocardium and will suggest possible protective management strategies. This article addresses the first of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463990

  8. Reduced cardiac output in imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Volume substitution remains subject of controversy in the light of effusions and oedema potentially complicating this highly febrile disease. Understanding the role of myocardial and circulatory function appears to be essential for clinical management. In the present study, cardiac function and cardiac proteins have been assessed and correlated with parasitological and immunologic parameters in patients with imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods In a prospective case-control study, 28 patients with uncomplicated and complicated P. falciparum malaria were included and findings were compared with 26 healthy controls. Cardiac function parameters were assessed by an innovative non-invasive method based on the re-breathing technique. In addition, cardiac enzymes and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured and assessed with respect to clinical symptoms and conditions of malaria. Results Cardiac index (CI) as a measurement of cardiac output (CO) was 21% lower in malaria patients than in healthy controls (2.7 l/min/m2 versus 3.4 l/min/m2; P < 0.001). In contrast, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) was increased by 29% (32.6 mmHg?m2/(l/min) versus 23.2 mmHg?m2/(l/min); P < 0.001). This correlated with increased cardiac proteins in patients versus controls: pro-BNP 139.3 pg/ml versus 60.4 pg/ml (P = 0.03), myoglobin 43.6 ?g/l versus 27.8 ?g/l (P = < 0.001). All measured cytokines were significantly increased in patients with malaria. CI, SVRI as well as cytokine levels did not correlate with blood parasite density. Conclusions The results support previous reports suggesting impaired cardiac function contributing to clinical manifestations in P. falciparum malaria. Findings may be relevant for fluid management and should be further explored in endemic regions. PMID:21658247

  9. Cardiac output during excitation of chemoreflexes in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Barer, Gwenda R.; Nüsser, E.

    1958-01-01

    In cats under chloralose anaesthesia the reflex fall of blood pressure and heart rate caused by injection of veratrine, amidines, diphenhydramine, or ethyl acetoacetate was accompanied by a fall in cardiac output. After veratrine and amidines there was a fall in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and after veratrine no significant change in pulmonary vascular resistance. After diphenhydramine and ethyl acetoacetate there was a rise in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and after diphenhydramine an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. The effects of veratrine and amidines, but not those of diphenhydramine and ethyl acetoacetate, were abolished by section of the vagi. The main change leading to the fall of cardiac output after amidines was bradycardia. PMID:13618538

  10. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  11. Inodilators in the Management of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Barba, Angela; Gonzalez-Rivera, Iria; Bautista-Hernandez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative low cardiac output syndrome has been shown to have both a central and a peripheral vascular involvement. Therefore, inodilators which provide with a combination of positive inotropic and vasodilating therapy, conceptually should be an ideal form of treatment. However, contradictory data on these drugs exist. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (e.g. milrinone) and more recently calcium sensitizers (e.g. levosimendan) have been most commonly used groups in the clinical setting. This review will summarize the pharmacology of inodilators with a special foccus on current clinical evidence. This article addresses the sixth of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463985

  12. A fiberoptic reflection densitometer with cardiac output calculator.

    PubMed

    Landsman, M L; Knop, N; Mook, G A; Zijlstra, W G

    1979-02-14

    A catheter-tip densitometer for indocyanine green is described consisting of a cardiac catheter containing optical fibers, an incandescent light source, a light detection unit and a processing unit. Half of the optical fibers guide the light to the blood at the tip of the catheter, the other half the back-scattered (reflected) light to the detection unit. In the detection unit the light is measured by two silicium barrier layer photocells after it has been split into two beams by a beam splitter. In the measuring channel the light passes an 800 nm filter before reaching the photocell. When fiberoptic catheters with glass fibers are employed, the other channel, used for compensation of non-specific effects such as blood flow variations, contains no filter, thus measuring light in a broad spectral band. It is shown that in this way compensation of flow effects may be about two times better than when a 920 nm filter is used. When using plastic optical fibers a 950 nm filter must be used, because above lambda = 850 nm plastic fibers transmit only a band around that wavelength (950 nm). At zero dye concentration the densitometer output or ratio of compensating and measuring photocell output R/R800 is almost insensitive to changes in haemoglobin concentration. When the blood contains dye, however, the influence of haemoglobin concentration is considerable. The densitometer output R/R800 is linearly related to dye concentration up to 50 mg . 1-1, the output R920/R800 up to 30 mg . 1(-1). The output R/R800 decreases with decreasing oxygen saturation; the slope of the calibration line, however, appears to be unaffected. The processing unit also contains an analog cardiac output calculator consisting of an integrator and a divider. Central dye dilution curves recorded from the pulmonary artery after injection of dye into the right atrium or a caval vein come down to the baseline. At this moment the reading of a digital voltmeter displaying the divider output calibrated in 1 . min-1 can be held and the reading taken. PMID:372921

  13. Maximal Cardiac Output Determines 6 Minutes Walking Distance in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Deboeck, Gaël; Taboada, Dolores; Hagan, Guy; Treacy, Carmen; Page, Kathy; Sheares, Karen; Naeije, Robert; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The 6 minutes walk test (6MWT) is often shown to be the best predictor of mortality in pulmonary hypertension (PH) probably because it challenges the failing heart to deliver adequate cardiac output. We hypothesised that the 6MWT elicits maximal cardiac output as measured during a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Methods 18 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (n?=?12) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (n?=?6) and 10 healthy subjects performed a 6MWT and CPET with measurements of cardiac output (non invasive rebreathing device) before and directly after exercise. Heart rate was measured during 6MWT with a cardiofrequence meter. Results Cardiac output and heart rate measured at the end of the 6MWT were linearly related to 6MW distance (mean±SD: 490±87 m). Patients with a high NT-pro-BNP achieve a maximum cardiac output during the 6MWT, while in normal subjects and in patients with a low-normal NT-proBNP, cardiac output at the end of a 6MWT was lower than achieved at maximum exercise during a CPET. In both cases, heart rate is the major determinant of exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. However, stroke volume increased during CPET in healthy subjects, not in PH patients. Conclusion Maximal cardiac output is elicited by 6MWT in PH patients with failing right ventricle. Cardiac output increase is dependent on chronotropic response in patients with PH. PMID:24647561

  14. Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Allison J.; Cohn, Jennifer Hochman; Ranasinghe, J. Sudharma

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-risk surgeries. Despite controversies, complications and inherent errors in measurement, pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) continuous and intermittent bolus techniques of CO measurement continue to be the gold standard. Newer techniques provide less invasive alternatives; however, currently available monitors are unable to provide central circulation pressures or true mixed venous saturations. Esophageal Doppler and pulse contour monitors can predict fluid responsiveness and have been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity. Many minimally invasive techniques continue to suffer from decreased accuracy and reliability under periods of hemodynamic instability, and so few have reached the level of interchangeability with the PAC. PMID:21776254

  15. Thermodynamics of the heart: Relation between cardiac output and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mituo; Sakane, Kumiko K.; Bertolotti, Simone A.

    2008-06-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to derive a relation between cardiac output and rate of oxygen consumption. As an example, the relation is used to calculate the cardiac output of a young woman exercising on a treadmill. The results can be understood by undergraduates without any previous knowledge of human physiology.

  16. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pianosi, Paolo T; Goodloe, Adele H; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O; Brands, Chad K; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise - hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long-standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head-up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2-3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ?40 beat·min(-1) with head-up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1), designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1). Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an inappropriately vasodilated systemic circulation to maintain perfusion pressure. PMID:25168872

  17. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Pianosi, Paolo T.; Goodloe, Adele H.; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O.; Brands, Chad K.; Fischer, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise – hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long?standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head?up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2–3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ?40 beat·min?1 with head?up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min?1 per L·min?1, designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min?1 per L·min?1. Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an inappropriately vasodilated systemic circulation to maintain perfusion pressure. PMID:25168872

  18. [Low cardiac output following open heart surgery and catecholamine therapy].

    PubMed

    Papp, L; Gombocz, K; Wrana, G; Alotti, N; Varró, M; Feiler, E; Boronyák, A; Simon, J; Kecskés, G; Vígh, A

    1999-01-24

    The authors have studied the possible risk factors and complications of low cardiac output (LCO) following open heart operations. A retrospective analysis of 537 consecutive open heart operations has been performed with regards to the patients past medical and perioperative data. For statistical analysis the authors have applied the Chi-square test, T-probe, Mann-Whitney-test and logistical regression analysis by means of the SPSS software. Occurrence of various types of operations was as follows: coronary bypass (CABG): n = 266, 49.5%, combined CABG: n = 62, 11.5%, aortic valve replacement (AVR): n = 73, 13.6%, mitral valve replacement (MVR): n = 59, 11%, multiple valve replacement: n = 39, 7.3%, adult congenital surgery: n = 25, 4.7%. Aortic dissection repair: n = 6, 1.1%, miscellaneous: n = 7, 1.3%. LCO has developed in 7.3% (n = 39) of the patients. The authors have concluded that in the studied group of patients the independent risk factors of postoperative LCO are as follows: atrial fibrillation in the patient history, mitral valve disease, perioperative myocardial infarction, length of anaesthesia, NYHA stage, number of transfused units of blood, and the perioperative LDH value. Beyond these variables the cause of LCO in some cases was surely an intra or perioperative myocardial necrosis. At least a certain part of this perioperative myocardial damage must have been or might have been caused by the catecholamines given under compulsion for the treatment of LCO. PMID:10047705

  19. Noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Saugel, B; Cecconi, M; Wagner, J Y; Reuter, D A

    2015-04-01

    The determination of blood flow, i.e. cardiac output, is an integral part of haemodynamic monitoring. This is a review on noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine. We present the underlying principles and validation data of the following technologies: thoracic electrical bioimpedance, thoracic bioreactance, vascular unloading technique, pulse wave transit time, and radial artery applanation tonometry. According to clinical studies, these technologies are capable of providing cardiac output readings noninvasively and continuously. They, therefore, might prove to be innovative tools for the assessment of advanced haemodynamic variables at the bedside. However, for most technologies there are conflicting data regarding the measurement performance in comparison with reference methods for cardiac output assessment. In addition, each of the reviewed technology has its own limitations regarding applicability in the clinical setting. In validation studies comparing cardiac output measurements using these noninvasive technologies in comparison with a criterion standard method, it is crucial to correctly apply statistical methods for the assessment of a technology's accuracy, precision, and trending capability. Uniform definitions for 'clinically acceptable agreement' between innovative noninvasive cardiac output monitoring systems and criterion standard methods are currently missing. Further research must aim to further develop the different technologies for noninvasive continuous cardiac output determination with regard to signal recording, signal processing, and clinical applicability. PMID:25596280

  20. Determination of cardiac output in critically ill patients by dual beam Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, D S; Liebson, P R; Bone, R C; Balk, R A; Messer, J V

    1989-02-01

    Recent technology in Doppler echocardiography has produced a dual beam Doppler instrument that is capable of insonating the total cross-sectional area of the ascending aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this instrument in measuring cardiac output in critically ill patients by comparing results with those of the thermodilution-derived cardiac output. A technically adequate Doppler cardiac output measurement was attained in 71 (91%) of 78 patients. The range of thermodilution-derived cardiac output measurements was from 1.58 to 11.70 liters/min. To maximize thermodilution cardiac output reliability, several measurements were made for each patient. Those patients in whom the difference between the highest and lowest measurement varied by less than 10% from the averaged results were accepted into the 50 patient study. There was significant correlation between dual beam Doppler- and thermodilution-derived cardiac output (r = 0.96, SEE = 0.55 liters/min, p less than 0.0001). This study demonstrates that dual beam Doppler ultrasound is a promising noninvasive method of measuring cardiac output in the critically ill patient. PMID:2913112

  1. Measurement of cardiac output by use of noninvasively measured transient hemodilution curves with photoacoustic technology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongyel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2014-01-01

    We present the theoretical basis and experimental verification for cardiac output measurements using noninvasively measured hemodilution curves afforded with an indicator dilution technique and the emerging photoacoustic technology. A photoacoustic system noninvasively tracks a transient hemodilution effect induced by a bolus of isotonic saline as an indicator. As a result, a photoacoustic indicator dilution curve is obtained, which allows to estimate cardiac output from the developed algorithm. The experiments with a porcine blood circulatory phantom system demonstrated the feasibility of this technology towards the development of a noninvasive cardiac output measurement system for patient monitoring. PMID:24877007

  2. [Echocardiography in emergency admissions. Recognition of cardiac low-output failure].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Maier, A; Christ, M

    2012-10-01

    Detection of acute cardiac dysfunction and differential diagnosis of low cardiac output syndrome is challenging for emergency physicians. For the critical ill patient it is essential to rapidly identify the underlying disease to initiate the correct therapy and optimize patient outcome. Echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for the evaluation of low cardiac output states. In the setting of the emergency department the use of focused echocardiography instead of detailed echocardiographic studies of cardiologists is appropriate and should be provided for emergency care. The differentiation in preserved versus reduced left ventricular ejection fraction as a first assessment is helpful, particularly for physicians not well trained in echocardiography. The structured and focused approach to evaluate or exclude differential diagnoses of cardiac dysfunction is the key for optimal management of acute and critically ill patients with low cardiac output. PMID:23052991

  3. Analysis of uncertainty in theoretical methods of cardiac output measurement using the "Monte Carlo" technique.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R R; Baker, A B

    1993-09-01

    We have developed three models which describe the relationship between cardiac output and the uptake of volatile anaesthetic agents, based on the Fick equation, and determined if these models could provide useful methods of cardiac output measurement. Because many variables are involved in the calculation of cardiac output using these methods, a "Monte Carlo" simulation was performed to investigate the combined effect of uncertainties in several variables on the resultant cardiac output estimate. We found that the single-breath model was most accurate when the inspired concentration was large, while the rebreathing model was better with smaller inspired concentrations. The three-breath model was the least accurate under all conditions studied. Volatile anaesthetics were generally more accurate than nitrous oxide, with both enflurane and halothane more accurate than isoflurane. The "Monte Carlo" technique provides a valuable tool for analysis of errors in measurement methods. PMID:8398524

  4. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, D B; Findlay, I N; Wilson, J; Henderson, E; Dargie, H J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in most patients. None the less, three results with each method disagreed with thermodilution by more than 1 1/min. Both non-invasive techniques were reproducible and accurate in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. Doppler echocardiography was time consuming and technically demanding. Electrical bioimpedance was simple to use and had the additional advantage of allowing continuous monitoring of the cardiac output. PMID:2317415

  5. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  6. Cardiac output estimation from arterial blood pressure waveforms using the MIMIC II database

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    The effect of signal quality on the accuracy of cardiac output (CO) estimation from arterial blood pressure (ABP) was evaluated using data from the Multi-Parameter Intelligent Patient Monitoring for Intensive Care (MIMIC) ...

  7. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.?Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.?Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.?Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias ?2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of ?9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias ?0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of ?4.9 and 3.3 l/min.?Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.?? Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  8. Redistribution of cardiac output to the kidneys by tertatolol does not involve prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Naeije, R; Degaute, J P

    1989-11-01

    Renal perfusion has been shown to be preserved or improved during treatment by tertatolol in patients with arterial hypertension. The aims of the present study were (1) to document the central and renal hemodynamic effects of tertatolol in normal subjects and (2) to look for a possible interaction between tertatolol and products of the cyclooxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. Five mg of tertatolol, 1 g aspirin, 5 mg tertatolol together with 1 g aspirin, and placebo were administered to 8 healthy volunteers at 1 week intervals in a random order and in a double-blind fashion. Cardiac output was measured by cardiac Doppler echography and renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate by constant infusion techniques using I123-iodohippurate and Cr51-EDTA respectively. Measurements were performed before and then successively 2 and 4 h after oral intake of drugs or placebo. Tertatolol alone or with aspirin significantly decreased heart rate and cardiac output (P less than .05) without change in blood pressure, renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate. The renal fraction of cardiac output was increased by tertatolol alone or with aspirin (P less than .05). Either placebo or aspirin alone had no effect. Thus tertatolol redistributes cardiac output to the kidneys in normal subjects as previously reported in hypertensive patients. This favorable effect on renal hemodynamics appers unlikely to be mediated by a local release of vasodilating prostaglandins. PMID:2573371

  9. Hibernator Citellus undulatus maintains safe cardiac conduction and is protected against tachyarrhythmias

    E-print Network

    Hibernator Citellus undulatus maintains safe cardiac conduction and is protected against. In contrast, hibernators remain in sinus rhythm even at body temperatures of 0°C. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to quantify electrical activity and connexin expression in the heart of hibernating Siberian

  10. Efficacy of Goal-Directed Therapy Using Bioreactance Cardiac Output Monitoring after Valvular Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sak; Lee, Seung Hyun; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared the efficacy of postoperative hemodynamic goal-directed therapy (GDT) using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and bioreactance-based noninvasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM) in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing valvular heart surgery. Materials and Methods Fifty eight patients were randomized into two groups of GDT with common goals to maintain a mean arterial pressure of 60-80 mm Hg and cardiac index ?2 L/min/m2: the PAC group (n=29), based on pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and the NICOM group (n=29), based on changes in stroke volume index after passive leg raising. The primary efficacy variable was length of hospital stay. Secondary efficacy variables included resource utilization including vasopressor and inotropic requirement, fluid balance, and major morbidity endpoints. Results Patient characteristics and operative data were similar between the groups, except that significantly more patients underwent double valve replacement in the NICOM group. The lengths of hospital stay were not different between the two groups (12.2±4.8 days vs. 10.8±4.0 days, p=0.239). Numbers of patients requiring epinephrine (5 vs. 0, p=0.019) and ventilator care >24 h (6 vs. 1, p=0.044) were significantly higher in the PAC group. The PAC group also required significantly larger amounts of colloid (1652±519 mL vs. 11430±463 mL, p=0.004). Conclusion NICOM-based postoperative hemodynamic GDT showed promising results in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing valvular heart surgery in terms of resource utilization. PMID:26069111

  11. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  12. Exercise cardiac output following Skylab missions - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Mauldin, D. G.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.; Sawin, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cardiac output was measured during preflight and postflight exercise-stress tests on the Skylab astronauts. In the postflight tests immediately following the 28-, 59-, and 84-d earth orbital missions, the astronauts exhibited an approximate 30% decrease in cardiac output coupled with an approximate 50% decrease in cardiac stroke volume during exercise. These changes were accompanied by elevated heart rates and significant increases in total systemic peripheral vascular resistance. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. All parameters returned to normal preflight values within 30 d of the end of the orbital period. Duration of the zero-G exposure did not appear to influence either the magnitude of the hemodynamic changes or the time-course of their return to normal. These results are discussed in relation to other cardiovascular findings and possible mechanisms responsible for the observations are outlined.

  13. Cardiac output distribution and uteroplacental blood flow in the pregnant rabbit: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.; Gilbert, M.; Meschia, G.; Battaglia, F.C.

    1985-03-01

    This study presents data on cardiac output distribution and uterine and placental blood flows in pregnant rabbits under chronic steady-state conditions. Ten litters and 67 fetuses were studied at 29 days of gestation, by means of radioactive microspheres. Five nonpregnant female animals were also studied for comparison. Mean cardiac outputs were 747.16 +/- 55.7 and 613.80 +/- 63.76 ml/min in the pregnant and nonpregnant states, respectively. In the pregnant animals, uterine and mammary blood flows were 6.7% +/- 0.7% and 5.1% +/- 0.5% of cardiac output, respectively. Within litters, the highest placental blood flows occurred at the ovarian and vaginal ends of the uterine horn. Placental blood flow per gram of fetus was 0.106 +/- 0.008 ml X min-1 X gm-1. A comparison with analogous data in the guinea pig and sheep demonstrates that toward the end of pregnancy placental blood flow per gram of fetus is approximately 2.5-times higher in sheep than in rabbits and guinea pigs. Expressed as a percentage of cardiac output, near-term uterine blood flow is significantly less in rabbits than in guinea pigs and sheep, whereas mammary blood flow is significantly higher. These interspecies differences are related to differences in placental structure, fetal/maternal mass ratio, and maturity at birth.

  14. Cardiac output and peripheral resistance during larval development in the anuran amphibian Xenopus laevis

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    Cardiac output and peripheral resistance during larval development in the anuran amphibian Xenopus larval develop- ment in the anuran amphibian Xenopus Zaeuis. Am. J. PhysioZ. 269 (Regulatory Integrative; amphibians SURPRISINGLYLITTLE is known of the early development of cardiovascular function in vertebrates

  15. Effect of Hemorrhage on Cardiac Output, PVP, Alodosterone and Diuresis during Immersion in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K.; Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q (sup dot) sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses.

  16. The Circadian Clock Maintains Cardiac Function by Regulating Mitochondrial Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohsaka, Akira; Das, Partha; Hashimoto, Izumi; Nakao, Tomomi; Deguchi, Yoko; Gouraud, Sabine S.; Waki, Hidefumi; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Maeda, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac function is highly dependent on oxidative energy, which is produced by mitochondrial respiration. Defects in mitochondrial function are associated with both structural and functional abnormalities in the heart. Here, we show that heart-specific ablation of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 results in cardiac mitochondrial defects that include morphological changes and functional abnormalities, such as reduced enzymatic activities within the respiratory complex. Mice without cardiac Bmal1 function show a significant decrease in the expression of genes associated with the fatty acid oxidative pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the heart and develop severe progressive heart failure with age. Importantly, similar changes in gene expression related to mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are also observed in C57BL/6J mice subjected to chronic reversal of the light-dark cycle; thus, they show disrupted circadian rhythmicity. These findings indicate that the circadian clock system plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial metabolism and thereby maintains cardiac function. PMID:25389966

  17. Validation and application of single breath cardiac output determinations in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Fletcher, E. R.; Myhre, L. G.; Luft, U. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a procedure for estimating cardiac output by a single-breath technique (Qsb), obtained in healthy males during supine rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer, were compared with the results on cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick method (QF). The single breath maneuver consisted of a slow exhalation to near residual volume following an inspiration somewhat deeper than normal. The Qsb calculations incorporated an equation of the CO2 dissociation curve and a 'moving spline' sequential curve-fitting technique to calculate the instantaneous R from points on the original expirogram. The resulting linear regression equation indicated a 24-percent underestimation of QF by the Qsb technique. After applying a correction, the Qsb-QF relationship was improved. A subsequent study during upright rest and exercise to 80 percent of VO2(max) in 6 subjects indicated a close linear relationship between Qsb and VO2 for all 95 values obtained, with slope and intercept close to those in published studies in which invasive cardiac output measurements were used.

  18. Cardiac Output and Performance during a Marathon Race in Middle-Aged Recreational Runners

    PubMed Central

    Billat, Véronique L.; Petot, Hélène; Landrain, Morgan; Meilland, Renaud; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance) and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost). Methods. We measured the SV, heart rate (HR), CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maximal laboratory test and then during a real marathon race (mean performance: 3?hr 30?min ± 45?min). Results. Our data revealed that HR, SV and CO were all in a high but submaximal steady state during the marathon (87.0 ± 1.6%, 77.2 ± 2.6%, and 68.7 ± 2.8% of maximal values, respectively). Marathon performance was inversely correlated with an upward drift in the CO/speed ratio (mL of CO × m?1) (r = ?0.65, P < 0.01) and positively correlated with the runner's ability to complete the race at a high percentage of the speed at maximal SV (r = 0.83, P < 0.0002). Conclusion. Our results showed that marathon performance is inversely correlated with cardiac cost and positively correlated with cardiac endurance. The CO response could be a benchmark for race performance in recreational marathon runners. PMID:22645458

  19. The influence of nonlinear intra-thoracic vascular behaviour and compression characteristics on cardiac output during CPR.

    PubMed

    Koeken, Yvette; Aelen, Paul; Noordergraaf, Gerrit J; Paulussen, Igor; Woerlee, Pierre; Noordergraaf, Abraham

    2011-05-01

    Clinical observations suggest that the assumption of a linear relationship between chest compression pressure and cardiac output may be oversimplified. More complex behaviour may occur when the transmural pressure is large, changing the compliances and resistances in the intra-thoracic vasculature. A fundamental understanding of these compression induced phenomena is required for improving CPR. An extensively used, lumped element computer model (model I) of the circulation was upgraded and refined to include the intrathoracic vasculature (model II). After validation, model II was extended by adding variable compliances and resistances (model III) to the vascular structures. Successively, ranges of compression pressures, frequencies, duty cycles and compression pulse shapes were applied while controlling all other parameters. Cardiac output was then compared. The nonlinearities in compliance and resistance become important, limiting factors in cardiac output, starting in our experimental series at 70 mmHg peak compression pressure, and increasing with higher pressures. This effect is reproducible for sinusoidal and trapezoidal compression forms, resulting in lower cardiac output in all experiments at high compression pressures. Duty cycle and wait time are key parameters for cardiac output. Our data strongly indicate that vascular compliance, especially the ability of vessels to collapse (and potentially the cardiac chambers), can be a central factor in the limited output generated by chest compressions. Just pushing 'harder' or 'faster' is not always better, as an 'optimal' force and frequency may exist. Overly forceful compression can limit blood flow by restricting filling or depleting volume in the cardiac chambers and central great vessels. PMID:21324578

  20. Sarcomere length dependence of power output is increased after PKA treatment in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hanft, Laurin M.; McDonald, Kerry S.

    2009-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relationship of the heart yields increased stroke volume with greater end-diastolic volume, and this relationship is steeper after ?-adrenergic stimulation. The underlying basis for the Frank-Starling mechanism involves length-dependent changes in both Ca2+ sensitivity of myofibrillar force and power output. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PKA-induced phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins would increase the length dependence of myofibrillar power output, which would provide a myofibrillar basis to, in part, explain the steeper Frank-Starling relations after ?-adrenergic stimulation. For these experiments, adult rat left ventricles were mechanically disrupted, permeabilized cardiac myocyte preparations were attached between a force transducer and position motor, and the length dependence of loaded shortening and power output were measured before and after treatment with PKA. PKA increased the phosphorylation of myosin binding protein C and cardiac troponin I, as assessed by autoradiography. In terms of myocyte mechanics, PKA decreased the Ca2+ sensitivity of force and increased loaded shortening and power output at all relative loads when the myocyte preparations were at long sarcomere length (?2.30 ?m). PKA had less of an effect on loaded shortening and power output at short sarcomere length (?2.0 ?m). These changes resulted in a greater length dependence of myocyte power output after PKA treatment; peak normalized power output increased ?20% with length before PKA and ?40% after PKA. These results suggest that PKA-induced phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins explains, in part, the steeper ventricular function curves (i.e., Frank-Starling relationship) after ?-adrenergic stimulation of the left ventricle. PMID:19252095

  1. Effect of hemorrhage on cardiac output, vasopressin, aldosterone, and diuresis during immersion in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Simanonok, K.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypotesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q(sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses. Eight men (19-23 yr) were supine during a 2-hr control period in air, and then sat for 5-hr test periods in air at 20 C (dry control, DC); water at 34.5 C (wet control, WC); and water (34.5 C) after hemorrhage (WH) of 14.8 plus or minus 0.3 percent of their blood volume. Blood volume was -11.6 plus or minus 0.6 percent at immersion (time 0). Mean (bar-X hrs 1-5) Q(sub co) was unchanged in WC (5.3 plus or minus 0.01 l/min) and in WH (4.5 plus or minus 0.1 l/min), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in DC to 3.6 plus or minus 0.1 l/min. Mean urine excretion rates were 1.0 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for DC and 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for WH; both were lower (P less than 0.05) than that for WC of 2.0 plus or minus 0.4 ml/min. Plasma (Na+) and (Osm) were unchanged in all experiments. Mean plasma vasopressin (PVP) (bar-X hrs 1-5) was 1.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml in WC, and higher (P less than 0.05) in DC (2.1 plus or minus 0.2 pg/ml)and WH (2.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml); it was unchanged during air and water test periods. Thus, hemorrhage attenuated the immersion-induced increase in Q(sub co), eliminated the WC diuresis, maintained plasma renin activity and PVP at DC levels and did not change immersion-induced aldosterone suppression; the osmotic diuresis during control immersion is apparently not due to either aldosterone suppression or vasopressin suppression.

  2. Quantification of Cardiac Sac Network Effects on a Movement-Related Parameter of Pyloric Network Output in the Lobster

    E-print Network

    Hooper, Scott

    Output in the Lobster JEFF B. THUMA AND SCOTT L. HOOPER Neuroscience Program, Department of Biological on a movement-related parameter of pyloric network output in the lobster. J Neurophysiol 89: 745­753, 2003; 10 of cardiac sac activity on the OSF of all pyloric neurons in the lobster, Panulirus interruptus

  3. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  4. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S A; Russell, A E; West, M J; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were significantly correlated with those measured by the indirect Fick method, although there was a wide scatter with over 73% of the readings lying outside the limits defined by the line of identity +/- 20%. This correlation was greatly reduced when stroke volume index was used instead of cardiac output. Indirect Fick results were linearly related to oxygen uptake both at rest and on exercise, while impedance cardiography results did not correlate with oxygen uptake. Impedance cardiography gave consistently lower results for cardiac output than indirect Fick at all levels of exercise. Both machines were easy to use and produced acceptable mean (SE) coefficients of variation (BoMed NCCOM3 7.7 (1.0)%, Gould 9000 IV 10.6 (1.4)%). Further validation is required before either of these machines can be recommended as an alternative to invasive monitoring in clinical practice. PMID:3128316

  5. Assessment of cardiac dynamics during stress echocardiography by the peak power output-to-left ventricular mass ratio.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L

    2011-05-01

    Peak cardiac power-to-mass and peak mass-to-power are variables that couple cardiac power output with left ventricular (LV) mass at peak exercise or during maximal inotropic stimulation. Quantitative stress echocardiography enables the calculation of power output according to the formula: 133 × 10(-6) × stroke volume per second (ml) × mean blood pressure (BP; mmHg) × heart rate. Power-to-mass may be calculated as LV power output per 100 g of LV mass: 100 g × LV power output divided by LV mass (W/100 g). Conversely, mass-to-power may be estimated by dividing LV mass index by LV power output (g/m(2)/W). With a little rearrangement of the formulas we can write: power-to-mass (W/100 g) = 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean BP (mmHg)/LV mass (g) and mass-to-power (g/m(2)/W) = LV mass index/0.00222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean BP (mmHg). These parameters reflect the energy delivery of ventricular myocardium with respect to potential energy that is stored in LV mass. The assessment of peak power-to-mass and peak mass-to-power indices may be useful to distinguish compensatory versus maladaptive remodeling in patients with LV dysfunction. When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a disproportion becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and LV mass and this leads to either a reduction of peak power-to-mass or an increase of peak mass-to-power. Preliminary reports have demonstrated the usefulness and the prognostic value of peak power-to-mass and peak mass-to-power in patients with LV systolic dysfunction and coronary artery disease. PMID:21627476

  6. Noninvasive photoacoustic measurement of the composite indicator dilution curve for cardiac output estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongYel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the measurement of indicator dilution curves using a photoacoustic (PA) technology was reported, which showed promising results on the noninvasive estimation of cardiac output (CO) that is an important hemodynamic parameter useful in various clinical situations. However, in clinical practice, measuring PA indicator dilution curves from an arterial blood vessel requires an ultrasound transducer array capable of focusing on the targeted artery. This causes several challenges on the clinical translation of the PA indicator dilution method, such as high sensor cost and complexity. In this paper, we theoretically derived that a composite PA indicator dilution curve simultaneously measured from both arterial and venous blood vessels can be used to estimate CO correctly. The ex-vivo and in-vivo experimental results with a flat ultrasound transducer verified the developed theory. We believe this new concept would overcome the main challenges on the clinical translation of the noninvasive PA indicator dilution technology. PMID:25780743

  7. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  8. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was validated quantitatively by comparing it with the CO values measured from the volume flow in the pulmonary artery. Relative bias varied between 0 and -17%, where the nominal accuracy of the flow meter is in the order of 10%. Assuming the CO measurements from the flow probe as a gold standard, excellent correlation (r = 0.99) was observed with the CO estimates obtained from image segmentation.

  9. Elevations in energy expenditure are accompanied by increments in both ventilation and cardiac output to maintain

    E-print Network

    Bennett, Albert F.

    and Diamond, 1995, 1997). The increase in metabolic rate generated from the mechanical and physiological- to tenfold increment they experience during vigorous crawling (Secor and Diamond, 1995) or while rapidly as the heart rate, systemic blood flow and stroke volume of Burmese pythons (Python molurus) while fasting

  10. Determination of cardiac output by an angle and diameter independent dual beam Doppler technique in critically ill infants.

    PubMed Central

    Wippermann, C F; Schranz, D; Huth, R; Zepp, F; Oelert, H; Jüngst, B K

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare cardiac output measurements in critically ill infants by the dual beam Doppler and thermodilution techniques. DESIGN--Prospective direct comparison of the two techniques. For statistical evaluation one randomly assigned paired measurement of every patient was used. SETTING--Paediatric intensive care unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS--18 infants after open heart surgery aged 4-25 months (weight 4-10 kg). INTERVENTIONS--Cardiac output measurements by dual beam Doppler and thermodilution techniques were performed within 10 minutes of each other and without knowledge of the results of the other methods. Multiple measurements were performed on some patients with a pharmacological or electrophysiological intervention or with a minimum of six hours between each pair of measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Three patients were excluded because of an inadequate Doppler signal or a significant residual shunt. Cardiac output measurements ranged from 0.4 to 2.2 l/min for the thermodilution technique and from 0.5 to 2.1 l/min for the dual beam Doppler technique. Agreement between both methods was acceptable. The mean difference between the two methods was 0.026 l/min with two standard deviations ranging from -0.20 to 0.26 l/min. CONCLUSION--The dual beam Doppler technique was shown to have promise for the non-invasive determination of cardiac output in critically ill infants. PMID:1540440

  11. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  12. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  13. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  14. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  15. May-Thurner syndrome: High output cardiac failure as a result of iatrogenic iliac fistula

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Singh, Shivank; Jyothimallika, Juthika; Lynch, Teresa J

    2015-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) also termed iliocaval compression or Cockett-Thomas syndrome is a common, although rarely diagnosed, condition in which the patient has an anatomical variant wherein the right common iliac artery overlies and compresses the left common iliac vein against the fifth lumbar spine resulting in increased risk of iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. This variant has been shown to be present in over 23% of the population but most go undetected. We present a patient with MTS who developed high output cardiac failure due to an iatrogenic iliac fistula. The patient underwent an extensive workup for a left to right shunt including MRI and arterial duplex in the vascular lab. He was ultimately found to have a 2.1 cm left common iliac artery aneurysm and history of common iliac stent. We took the patient to the operating room for aortogram with placement of an endovascular plug of the left internal iliac artery and aorto-bi-iliac stent graft placement with CO2 and IV contrast. Subsequently the patient underwent successful stent placement in the area that was compressed followed by 6 mo of anticoagulation with warfarin. The flow from the fistula decreased significantly. PMID:25789305

  16. Retinal venous oxygen saturation and cardiac output during controlled hemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Denninghoff, Kurt R; Smith, Matthew H; Lompado, Art; Hillman, Lloyd W

    2003-03-01

    The objective was to test calibration of an eye oximeter (EOX) in a vitiligo swine eye and correlate retinal venous oxygen saturation (Srv(O(2))), mixed venous oxygen saturation (Sv(O(2))), and cardiac output (CO) during robust changes in blood volume. Ten anesthetized adult Sinclair swine with retinal vitiligo were placed on stepwise decreasing amounts of oxygen. At each oxygen level, femoral artery oxygen saturation (Sa(O(2))) and retinal artery oxygen saturation (Sra(O(2))) were obtained. After equilibration on 100% O(2), subjects were bled at 1.4 ml. kg(-1). min(-1) for 20 min. Subsequently, anticoagulated shed blood was reinfused at the same rate. During graded hypoxia, exsanguination, and reinfusion, Sra(O(2)) and Srv(O(2)) were measured by using the EOX, and CO and Sv(O(2)) were measured by using a pulmonary artery catheter. During graded hypoxia, Sra(O(2)) correlated with Sa(O(2)) (r = 0.92). Srv(O(2)) correlated with Sv(O(2)) (r = 0.89) during exsanguination and reinfusion. Sv(O(2)) and Srv(O(2)) correlated with CO during blood removal and resuscitation (r = 0.92). Use of vitiligo retinas improved the calibration of EOX measurements. In this robust hemorrhage model, Srv(O(2)) correlates with CO and Sv(O(2)) across the range of exsanguination and resuscitation. PMID:12571124

  17. Association of HeartMate II left ventricular assist device flow estimate with thermodilution cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Huebner, Marianne; Li, Zhuo; Brown, Daniel; Stulak, John M; Boilson, Barry A; Joyce, Lyle; Pereira, Naveen L; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) assessment is important in treating patients with heart failure. Durable left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) provide essentially all CO. In currently used LVADs, estimated device flow is generated by a computerized algorithm. However, LVAD flow estimate may be inaccurate in tracking true CO. We correlated LVAD (HeartMate II) flow with thermodilution CO during postoperative care (day 2-10 after implant) in 81 patients (5,616 paired measurements). Left ventricular assist device flow and CO correlated with a low correlation coefficient (r = 0.42). Left ventricular assist device readings were lower than CO measurements by approximately 0.36 L/min, trending for larger difference with higher values. Left ventricular assist device flow measurements showed less temporal variability compared with CO. Grouping for simultaneous measured blood pressure (BP < 60, 60-70, 70-80, 80-90, and ?90), the correlation of CO with LVAD flow differed (R = 0.42, 0.67, 0.48, 0.32, 0.32, respectively). Indicating better correlation when mean blood pressure is 60 to 70 mm Hg. Left ventricular assist device flow generally trends with measured CO, but large variability exists, hence flow measures should not be assumed to equal with CO. Clinicians should take into account variables such as high CO, BP, and opening of the aortic valve when interpreting LVAD flow readout. Direct flow sensors incorporated in the LVAD system may allow for better estimation. PMID:25068779

  18. Non-Invasive Determination of Cardiac Output in Pre-Capillary Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lador, Frédéric; Hervé, Philippe; Bringard, Aurélien; Günther, Sven; Garcia, Gilles; Savale, Laurent; Ferretti, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Chemla, Denis; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) is a major diagnostic and prognostic factor in pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). Reference methods for CO determination, like thermodilution (TD), require invasive procedures and allow only steady-state measurements. The Modelflow (MF) method is an appealing technique for this purpose as it allows non-invasive and beat-by-beat determination of CO. Methods We aimed to compare CO values obtained simultaneously from non-invasive pulse wave analysis by MF (COMF) and by TD (COTD) to determine its precision and accuracy in pre-capillary PH. The study was performed on 50 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or chronic thrombo-embolic PH (CTEPH). CO was determined at rest in all patients (n = 50) and during nitric oxide vasoreactivity test, fluid challenge or exercise (n = 48). Results Baseline COMF and COTD were 6.18 ± 1.95 and 5.46 ± 1.95 L·min-1, respectively. Accuracy and precision were 0.72 and 1.04 L·min-1, respectively. Limits of agreement (LoA) ranged from -1.32 to 2.76 L·min-1. Percentage error (PE) was ±35.7%. Overall sensitivity and specificity of COMF for directional change were 95.2% and 82.4%, (n = 48) and 93.3% and 100% for directional changes during exercise (n = 16), respectively. After application of a correction factor (1.17 ± 0.25), neither proportional nor fixed bias was found for subsequent CO determination (n = 48). Accuracy was -0.03 L·min?1 and precision 0.61 L·min?1. LoA ranged from -1.23 to 1.17 L·min?1 and PE was ±19.8%. Conclusions After correction against a reference method, MF is precise and accurate enough to determine absolute values and beat-by-beat relative changes of CO in pre-capillary PH. PMID:26226280

  19. Bioreactance Is Not Interchangeable with Thermodilution for Measuring Cardiac Output during Adult Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Gaabsoo; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Choi, Soo Joo; Kwon, Ji Hae; Heo, Burn Young; Gwak, Mi Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter is widely used for the assessment of cardiac output (CO) in patients undergoing liver transplantation. However, the unclearness of the risk-benefit ratio of this method has led to an interest in less invasive modalities. Thus, we evaluated whether noninvasive bioreactance CO monitoring is interchangeable with thermodilution technique. Methods Nineteen recipients undergoing adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation were enrolled in this prospective observational study. COs were recorded automatically by the two devices and compared simultaneously at 3-minute intervals. The Bland–Altman plot was used to evaluate the agreement between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable agreement was defined as a percentage error of limits of agreement <30%. The four quadrant plot was used to evaluate concordance between bioreactance and thermodilution. Clinically acceptable concordance was defined as a concordance rate >92%. Results A total of 2640 datasets were collected. The mean CO difference between the two techniques was 0.9 l/min, and the 95% limits of agreement were -3.5 l/min and 5.4 l/min with a percentage error of 53.9%. The percentage errors in the dissection, anhepatic, and reperfusion phase were 50.6%, 56.1%, and 53.5%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two techniques was 54.8%. Conclusion Bioreactance and thermodilution failed to show acceptable interchangeability in terms of both estimating CO and tracking CO changes in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Thus, the use of bioreactance as an alternative CO monitoring to thermodilution, in spite of its noninvasiveness, would be hard to recommend in these surgical patients. PMID:26017364

  20. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise by open-circuit acetylene uptake.

    PubMed

    Barker, R C; Hopkins, S R; Kellogg, N; Olfert, I M; Brutsaert, T D; Gavin, T P; Entin, P L; Rice, A J; Wagner, P D

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output (QT) is problematic during heavy exercise. We report a new approach that avoids unpleasant rebreathing and resultant changes in alveolar PO(2) or PCO(2) by measuring short-term acetylene (C(2)H(2)) uptake by an open-circuit technique, with application of mass balance for the calculation of QT. The method assumes that alveolar and arterial C(2)H(2) pressures are the same, and we account for C(2)H(2) recirculation by extrapolating end-tidal C(2)H(2) back to breath 1 of the maneuver. We correct for incomplete gas mixing by using He in the inspired mixture. The maneuver involves switching the subject to air containing trace amounts of C(2)H(2) and He; ventilation and pressures of He, C(2)H(2), and CO(2) are measured continuously (the latter by mass spectrometer) for 20-25 breaths. Data from three subjects for whom multiple Fick O(2) measurements of QT were available showed that measurement of QT by the Fick method and by the C(2)H(2) technique was statistically similar from rest to 90% of maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)). Data from 12 active women and 12 elite male athletes at rest and 90% of VO(2 max) fell on a single linear relationship, with O(2) consumption (VO(2)) predicting QT values of 9.13, 15.9, 22.6, and 29.4 l/min at VO(2) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 l/min. Mixed venous PO(2) predicted from C(2)H(2)-determined QT, measured VO(2), and arterial O(2) concentration was approximately 20-25 Torr at 90% of VO(2 max) during air breathing and 10-15 Torr during 13% O(2) breathing. This modification of previous gas uptake methods, to avoid rebreathing, produces reasonable data from rest to heavy exercise in normal subjects. PMID:10517785

  1. Effects of ventilation on cardiac output determined by inert gas rebreathing.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter

    2005-05-01

    One of the most important methodological problems of the foreign gas rebreathing technique is that outcome of the measurements depends on procedural variables such as rebreathing frequency (RF), rebreathing bag volume (V(reb)), lung volume at start of rebreathing and intervals between measurements. Therefore, in 10 healthy males we investigated the effects of changes in ventilation pattern on cardiac output (CO) estimated by an N(2)O-rebreathing technique. Reducing the rebreathing volume (V(reb)) from 1.5 to 1.0 l diminished CO by 0.5 +/- 0.2 l min(-1), whereas an increase in V(reb) from 1.5 to 2.5 l had no effects. CO was 1.0 +/- 0.2 l min(-1) higher when, rebreathing was performed after a forced expiration than following a normal tidal expiration. Serial determinations of CO required a 3-min interval between the measurements to avoid effects of recirculation of N(2)O. Changing RF from 15 to 30 breaths min(-1) or adding serial dead space by up to 600 ml did not affect the determination of CO. In conclusion, the rebreathing procedure for determination of CO at rest should be performed following a normal tidal expiration with a rebreathing bag volume of between 1.5 and 2.5 l and with manoeuvres separated by at least 3-5 min. Variations in RF within the physiological range from 15 to 30 breaths min(-1) do not affect outcome of the measurements. PMID:15888093

  2. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert A.; Hood, Sally G.; Jacobson, Beverley M.; West, Malcolm J.; Wan, Li; May, Clive N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2?L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5?L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4?L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9?L/min to 11.7?L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was ?17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected ?30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes. PMID:22649718

  3. Estimation of cardiac output in patients with congestive heart failure by analysis of right ventricular pressure waveforms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) is an important determinant of the hemodynamic state in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We tested the hypothesis that CO can be estimated from the right ventricular (RV) pressure waveform in CHF patients using a pulse contour cardiac output algorithm that considers constant but patient specific RV outflow tract characteristic impedance. Method In 12 patients with CHF, breath-by-breath Fick CO and RV pressure waveforms were recorded utilizing an implantable hemodynamic monitor during a bicycle exercise protocol. These data were analyzed retrospectively to assess changes in characteristic impedance of the RV outflow tract during exercise. Four patients that were implanted with an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) implementing the algorithm were studied prospectively. During a two staged sub-maximal bicycle exercise test conducted at 4 and 16 weeks of implant, COs measured by direct Fick technique and estimated by the ICD were recorded and compared. Results At rest the total pulmonary arterial resistance and the characteristic impedance were 675 ± 345 and 48 ± 18 dyn.s.cm-5, respectively. During sub-maximal exercise, the total pulmonary arterial resistance decreased (? 91 ± 159 dyn.s.cm-5, p < 0.05) but the characteristic impedance was unaffected (? 3 ± 9 dyn.s.cm-5, NS). The algorithm derived cardiac output estimates correlated with Fick CO (7.6 ± 2.5 L/min, R2 = 0.92) with a limit of agreement of 1.7 L/min and tracked changes in Fick CO (R2 = 0.73). Conclusions The analysis of right ventricular pressure waveforms continuously recorded by an implantable hemodynamic monitor provides an estimate of CO and may prove useful in guiding treatment in patients with CHF. PMID:21569499

  4. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viš?or, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  5. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of <2.5 ?m concentration of 300 ?g/m(3) for 2 h in a randomized, crossover study design. The effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (?), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg·min·l(-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg·min·l(-1) in DE (P < 0.05) and the ? coefficient decreased from 0.96 ± 0.15 to 0.64 ± 0.12%/mmHg (P < 0.01). DE did not further enhance the hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. PMID:26497960

  6. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred because of the blunted rise in CO or because arterial BP cannot overcome the cuff pressure. As LBFR(sub DBP) effectively reduced BF and CO with cuff pressures less than systolic BP, future studies should investigate the hypertrophic potential of LBFR at even lower cuff pressures.

  7. Missed cardiac tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Thomson-Moore, Alexandra Louise

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade can have an insidious onset, becoming life threatening when an adequate cardiac output can no longer be maintained. This case provides an example of a presentation where all the classic signs were present but unfortunately they were missed, in this way providing good revision of what these signs are. It gives some anaesthetic and procedure based perspectives for this rare presentation. It is noteworthy for the speed at which symptoms and signs resolved after the tamponade was relieved. PMID:22679253

  8. Evaluating cardiac physiology through echocardiography in bottlenose dolphins: using stroke volume and cardiac output to estimate systolic left ventricular function during rest and following exercise.

    PubMed

    Miedler, Stefan; Fahlman, Andreas; Valls Torres, Mónica; Álvaro Álvarez, Teresa; Garcia-Parraga, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Heart-rate (fH) changes during diving and exercise are well documented for marine mammals, but changes in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are much less known. We hypothesized that both SV and CO are also modified following intense exercise. Using transthoracic ultrasound Doppler at the level of the aortic valve, we compared blood flow velocities in the left ventricle and cardiac frequencies during rest and at 1, 3 and 4?min after a bout of exercise in 13 adult bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, six male and seven female, body mass range 143-212?kg). Aortic cross-sectional area and ventricle blood velocity at the aortic valve were used to calculate SV, which together with fH provided estimates of left CO at rest and following exercise. fH and SV stabilized approximately 4-7?s following the post-respiratory tachycardia, so only data after the fH had stabilized were used for analysis and comparison. There were significant increases in fH, SV and CO associated with each breath. At rest, fH, SV and CO were uncorrelated with body mass, and averaged 41±9 beats min(-1), 136±19?ml and 5514±1182 l min(-1), respectively. One minute following high intensity exercise, the cardiac variables had increased by 104±43%, 63±11% and 234±84%, respectively. All variables remained significantly elevated in all animals for at least 4?min after the exercise. These baseline values provide the first data on SV and CO in awake and unrestrained cetaceans in water. PMID:26385334

  9. A Review of Intraoperative Goal-Directed Therapy Using Arterial Waveform Analysis for Assessment of Cardiac Output

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that goal-directed hemodynamic management can improve outcomes in surgical and intensive care settings. Arterial waveform analysis is one of the different techniques used for guiding goal-directed therapy. Multiple proprietary systems have developed algorithms for obtaining cardiac output from an arterial waveform, including the FloTrac, LiDCO, and PiCCO systems. These systems vary in terms of how they analyze the arterial pressure waveform as well as their requirements for invasive line placement and calibration. Although small-scale clinical trials using these monitors show promising data, large-scale multicenter trials are still needed to better determine how intraoperative goal-directed therapy with arterial waveform analysis can improve patient outcomes. This review provides a comparative analysis of the different arterial waveform monitors for intraoperative goal-directed therapy. PMID:24987744

  10. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bart?omiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets. PMID:26006113

  11. Effect of sodium nitroprusside on cardiac output during cross-clamping of the descending thoracic aorta in pigs.

    PubMed

    Aadahl, P; Aakhus, S; Strømholm, T; Saether, O D; Myhre, H O

    1995-01-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is used to control proximal hypertension during cross-clamping of the descending thoracic aorta (XC). To assess the haemodynamic effects of SNP on cardiac output (CO) during XC, 21 pigs were anaesthetized with ketamine and fentanyl. In the control group (n = 11), no vasodilating therapy was given. In the investigation group (SNP group), 2 animals died during the surgical preparation and were excluded, leaving 8 animals in the group (n = 8). In these animals, SNP was infused in order to keep the mean arterial pressure (MAP) at about 100 mm Hg during cross-clamping. In both groups, aorta was cross-clamped for 30 min, and cardiac output (CO) was measured by the thermodilution technique. Following cross-clamping, CO increased 107% in the control group and 96% in the SNP group. There was an increase in heart rate (HR) of 77% in the control group and of 110% in the SNP group, and a reduction in systemic vascular resistance of 41% in the SNP group. Stroke volume (SV) was unchanged in both groups. MAP increased 83% in the control-group. No differences were observed between the two groups regarding central venous pressure or pulmonary artery pressure. Four animals in the SNP group died 5-10 min after release of the aortic clamp. In conclusion, we found equal increase in CO in both groups. The increase in CO was related predominantly to increased HR, whereas SV was largely unaltered. Vasodilation with SNP increased the mortality following clamp removal in this experimental model. PMID:7589004

  12. The Neuromuscular Transform of the Lobster Cardiac System Explains the Opposing Effects of a Neuromodulator on Muscle Output

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alex H.; Calkins, Andrew; O'Leary, Timothy; Symonds, Renee; Marder, Eve

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron activity is transformed into muscle movement through a cascade of complex molecular and biomechanical events. This nonlinear mapping of neural inputs to motor behaviors is called the neuromuscular transform (NMT). We examined the NMT in the cardiac system of the lobster Homarus americanus by stimulating a cardiac motor nerve with rhythmic bursts of action potentials and measuring muscle movements in response to different stimulation patterns. The NMT was similar across preparations, which suggested that it could be used to predict muscle movement from spontaneous neural activity in the intact heart. We assessed this possibility across semi-intact heart preparations in two separate analyses. First, we performed a linear regression analysis across 122 preparations in physiological saline to predict muscle movements from neural activity. Under these conditions, the NMT was predictive of contraction duty cycle but was unable to predict contraction amplitude, likely as a result of uncontrolled interanimal variability. Second, we assessed the ability of the NMT to predict changes in motor output induced by the neuropeptide C-type allatostatin. Wiwatpanit et al. (2012) showed that bath application of C-type allatostatin produced either increases or decreases in the amplitude of the lobster heart contractions. We show that an important component of these preparation-dependent effects can arise from quantifiable differences in the basal state of each preparation and the nonlinear form of the NMT. These results illustrate how properly characterizing the relationships between neural activity and measurable physiological outputs can provide insight into seemingly idiosyncratic effects of neuromodulators across individuals. PMID:24133260

  13. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  14. Differential acute effects of carbohydrate- and protein-rich drinks compared with water on cardiac output during rest and exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Werner, Kristin; Sanders, Thomas A B; Hall, Wendy L

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of drinks rich in protein (PRO) versus carbohydrate (CHO) on cardiovascular hemodynamics and reactivity are uncertain. A randomized crossover design was used to compare 400-mL isoenergetic (1.1 MJ) drinks containing whey protein (PRO; 44 g) or carbohydrate (CHO; 57 g) versus 400 mL of water in 14 healthy men. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in cardiac output, blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and digital volume pulse measured prior to and 30 min following consumption at rest, during 12 min of multi-stage bicycle ergometry, and 15 min postexercise. The mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)) in resting cardiac output at 30 min was greater for CHO than for PRO or water: 0.7 (0.4 to 1.0), 0.1 (-0.2 to 0.40), and 0.0 (-0.3 to 0.3) L/min (P < 0.001), respectively; the higher cardiac output following CHO was accompanied by an increase in stroke volume and a lower SVR. The mean increments (95% CI) in cardiac output during exercise were CHO 4.7 (4.4 to 5.0), PRO 4.9 (4.6 to 5.2), and water 4.6 (4.3 to 4.9) L/min with the difference between PRO versus water being significant (P < 0.025). There were no other statistically significant differences. In summary, a CHO-rich drink increased cardiac output and lowered SVR in the resting state compared with a PRO-rich drink or water but the effect size of changes in these variables did not differ during or after exercise between CHO and PRO. Neither protein nor carbohydrate affected blood pressure reactivity to exercise. PMID:26244599

  15. Roles for Cardiac MyBP-C in Maintaining Myofilament Lattice Rigidity and Prolonging Myosin Cross-Bridge Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, B.M.; Sadayappan, S.; Wang, Y.; Weith, A.E.; Previs, M.J.; Bekyarova, T.; Irving, T.C.; Robbins, J.; Maughan, D.W.

    2011-10-06

    We investigated the influence of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) and its constitutively unphosphorylated status on the radial and longitudinal stiffnesses of the myofilament lattice in chemically skinned myocardial strips of the following mouse models: nontransgenic (NTG), effective null for cMyBP-C (t/t), wild-type cMyBP-C expressed into t/t (WT{sub t/t}), and constitutively unphosphorylated cMyBP-C (AllP{sub -t/t}). We found that the absence of cMyBP-C in the t/t and the unphosphorylated cMyBP-C in the AllP{sub -t/t} resulted in a compressible cardiac myofilament lattice induced by rigor not observed in the NTG and WT{sub t/t}. These results suggest that the presence and phosphorylation of the N-terminus of cMyBP-C provides structural support and radial rigidity to the myofilament lattice. Examination of myofilament longitudinal stiffness under rigor conditions demonstrated a significant reduction in cross-bridge-dependent stiffness in the t/t compared with NTG controls, but not in the AllP{sub -t/t} compared with WT{sub t/t} controls. The absence of cMyBP-C in the t/t and the unphosphorylated cMyBP-C in the AllP{sub -t/t} both resulted in a shorter myosin cross-bridge lifetime when myosin isoform was controlled. These data collectively suggest that cMyBP-C provides radial rigidity to the myofilament lattice through the N-terminus, and that disruption of the phosphorylation of cMyBP-C is sufficient to abolish this structural role of the N-terminus and shorten cross-bridge lifetime. Although the presence of cMyBP-C also provides longitudinal rigidity, phosphorylation of the N-terminus is not necessary to maintain longitudinal rigidity of the lattice, in contrast to radial rigidity.

  16. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.P.; Morrow, W.R.; Gerstmann, D.R.; Taylor, A.F.; deLemos, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  17. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  18. Continuous measurement of cardiac output with the electrical velocimetry method in patients under spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Pian-Smith, May C M; Leffert, Lisa R; Minehart, Rebecca D; Torri, Andrea; Coté, Charles; Kacmarek, Robert M; Jiang, Yandong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to continuously measure cardiac output (CO) with the electrical velocimetry (EV) method and characterize the hemodynamic profile of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery (CD), and to discuss the potential benefit of using real time CO monitoring to guide patient management. Forty-two patients scheduled for elective CD under spinal anesthesia were enrolled in this observational study. A non-invasive CO monitor incorporating the electrical velocimetry algorithm, ICON(®) (Cardiotronic(®), La Jolla, California, USA), was used to measure CO and stroke volume (SV) continuously. Peripheral venous pressure was measured intermittently at pre-defined time points. Systemic vascular resistance was calculated retrospectively after completion of the study. Hemodynamic changes at pre-defined time points and caused by phenylephrine administration were analyzed. Hypotension (MAP reduction more than 20% from baseline values) occurred in 71.1% of patients after spinal anesthesia, while the coinstantaneous CO was increased ?20% from baseline in the majority of patients (76.3%) at the same time. Significant increase in CO took place at 3-2 min before the administration of phenylephrine bolus. Treatment of hypotension with phenylephrine was associated with significant decrease in CO. Continuous CO monitoring with EV enables clinicians to determine CO and SV changes prior to onset of hypotension and to better understand patients' hemodynamics. It is an important addition to the current monitoring. The benefit of routinely using this technique remains to be determined in term of the patient outcomes. PMID:25510959

  19. The effects of methoxamine and epinephrine on survival and regional distribution of cardiac output in dogs with prolonged ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Landolfo, K; Dobson, K; Light, R B

    1990-10-01

    This study compares the effects of methoxamine, a pure alpha 1-agonist, and epinephrine on cerebral and myocardial blood flow, central hemodynamics, and survival in a randomized placebo-controlled fashion during prolonged ventricular fibrillation (VF) in a canine model. Twenty-four anesthetized and ventilated adult mongrel dogs were instrumented for regional blood flow determinations using radio-labeled microspheres. The dogs were randomized to receive either 20 mg of methoxamine as a single intravenous bolus or repeated boluses of 0.02 mg/kg of epinephrine, 0.2 mg/kg of epinephrine, or normal saline solution placebo beginning at three minutes following induction of VF and initiation of closed chest cardiac massage (CCCM). Organ blood flow measurements were determined during normal sinus rhythm and after five and 20 minutes of VF. All six dogs receiving methoxamine were successfully resuscitated in contrast to only one in each of the epinephrine-treated groups and none of the dogs receiving placebo (p less than .01). Although epinephrine was associated with significantly higher blood pressures than placebo during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), blood pressures achieved with methoxamine were significantly higher than those observed in the other three treatment groups (p less than .001). Cerebral blood flow was significantly higher with both methoxamine and high-dose epinephrine (p less than .05). Mean left and right ventricular myocardial flows were highest with methoxamine but this did not achieve statistical significance. In contrast, organ flows measured in the animals receiving the lowest dose of epinephrine were not significantly higher than those associated with placebo. Cardiac output after 20 minutes of CPR was significantly lower with high-dose epinephrine than with methoxamine or placebo (p less than .05). Our results suggest that methoxamine significantly improves regional cerebral blood flow and survival during CPR and although high-dose epinephrine is associated with comparable improvements in regional cerebral blood flow, this treatment is associated with deterioration in central hemodynamics during prolonged VF and does not enhance survival. PMID:2209164

  20. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  1. Early predictors of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infection: urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cardiac output as reliable tools

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Rafael O.; Farias, Alberto Q.; Helou, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic abnormalities and acute kidney injury (AKI) are often present in infected cirrhotic patients. Hence, an early diagnosis of AKI is necessary, which might require the validation of new predictors as the determinations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and cardiac output. Methods We evaluated 18 infected cirrhotic patients subdivided into two groups at admission (0 hours). In Group I, we collected urine samples at 0 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours for uNGAL and fractional excretion of sodium determinations. In Group II, we measured cardiac output using echocardiography. Results The age of patients was 55.0±1.9 years, and 11 patients were males. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 21±1, whereas the Child–Pugh score was C in 11 patients and B in 7 patients. Both patients in Group I and Group II showed similar baseline characteristics. In Group I, we diagnosed AKI in 5 of 9 patients, and the mean time to this diagnosis by measuring serum creatinine was 5.4 days. Patients with AKI showed higher uNGAL levels than those without AKI from 6 hours to 48 hours. The best accuracy using the cutoff values of 68 ng uNGAL/mg creatinine was achieved at 48 hours when we distinguished patients with and without AKI in all cases. In Group II, we diagnosed AKI in 4 of 9 patients, and cardiac output was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI at 0 hours. Conclusion Both uNGAL and cardiac output determinations allow the prediction of AKI in infected cirrhotic patients earlier than increments in serum creatinine. PMID:26484038

  2. Derivation of cardiac output and alveolar ventilation rate based on energy expenditure measurements in healthy males and females.

    PubMed

    Brochu, Pierre; Brodeur, Jules; Krishnan, Kannan

    2012-08-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and occupational exposure assessment studies often use minute ventilation rates (VE), alveolar ventilation rates (VA) and cardiac outputs (Q) that are not reflective of the physiological variations encountered during the aggregate daytime activities of individuals from childhood to adulthood. These variations of VE, VA and Q values were determined for healthy normal-weight individuals aged 5-96?years by using two types of published individual data that were measured in the same subjects (n?=?902), namely indirect calorimetry measurements and the disappearance rates of oral doses of deuterium (²H) and heavy-oxygen (¹?O) in urine monitored by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Arteriovenous oxygen content differences (0.051-0.082?ml of O? consumed ml?¹ of blood) and ratios of the physiological dead space to the tidal volume (0.232-0.419) were determined for oxygen consumption rates (0.157-0.806?l min?¹) required by minute energy expenditures ranging from 0.76 to 3.91?kcal min?¹. Generally higher values for the 2.5th up to the 99th percentile for VE (0.132-0.774?l kg?¹ min?¹, 4.42-21.69?l m?² min?¹), VA (0.093-0.553?l kg?¹ min?¹, 3.09-15.53?l m?² min?¹), Q (0.065-0.330?l kg?¹ min?¹, 2.17 to 9.46?l m?² min?¹) and ventilation-perfusion ratios (1.12-2.16) were found in children and teenagers aged 5-<16.5?years compared with older individuals. The distributions of cardiopulmonary parameters developed in this study should be useful in facilitating a scientifically sound characterization of the inter-individual differences in the uptake and health risks of lipophilic air pollutants, particularly as they relate to younger children. PMID:21365669

  3. Pharmacokinetics, hemodynamic and metabolic effects of epinephrine to prevent post-operative low cardiac output syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The response to exogenous epinephrine (Ep) is difficult to predict given the multitude of factors involved such as broad pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic between-subject variabilities, which may be more pronounced in children. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Ep, co-administered with milrinone, in children who underwent open heart surgical repair for congenital defects following cardiopulmonary bypass, including associated variability factors. Methods Thirty-nine children with a high risk of low cardiac output syndrome were prospectively enrolled. Ep pharmacokinetics, hemodynamic and metabolic effects were analyzed using the non-linear mixed effects modeling software MONOLIX. According to the final model, an Ep dosing simulation was suggested. Results Ep dosing infusions ranged from 0.01 to 0.23 ?g.kg-1.min-1 in children whose weight ranged from 2.5 to 58 kg. A one-compartment open model with linear elimination adequately described the Ep concentration-time courses. Bodyweight (BW) was the main covariate influencing clearance (CL) and endogenous Ep production rate (q0) via an allometric relationship: CL(BWi)?=??CL x (BWi)3/4 and q0(BWi)?=??q0 x (BWi )3/4. The increase in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as a function of Ep concentration were well described using an Emax model. The effect of age was significant on HR and MAP basal level parameters. Assuming that Ep stimulated the production rate of plasma glucose, the increases in plasma glucose and lactate levels were well described by turnover models without any significant effect of age, BW or exogenous glucose supply. Conclusions According to this population analysis, the developmental effects of BW and age explained a part of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics between-subject variabilities of Ep administration in critically ill children. This approach ultimately leads to a valuable Ep dosing simulation which should help clinicians to determine an appropriate a priori dosing regimen. PMID:24456639

  4. The effects of cardiac output and pulmonary arterial hypertension on volumetric capnography derived-variables during normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mosing, Martina; Kutter, Annette P N; Iff, Samuel; Raszplewicz, Joanna; Mauch, Jacqueline; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary artery hypertension (PHT) on volumetric capnography (VCap) derived-variables. Nine pigs were mechanically ventilated using fixed ventilatory settings. Two steps of PHT were induced by IV infusion of a thromboxane analogue: PHT25 [mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) of 25 mmHg] and PHT40 (MPAP of 40 mmHg). CO was increased by 50% from baseline (COup) with an infusion of dobutamine?5 ?g kg(-1) min(-1) and decreased by 40% from baseline (COdown) infusing sodium nitroglycerine?30 ?g kg(-1) min(-1) plus esmolol 500 ?g kg(-1) min(-1). Another state of PHT and COdown was induced by severe hypoxemia (FiO2 0.07). Invasive hemodynamic data and VCap were recorded and compared before and after each step using a mixed random effects model. Compared to baseline, the normalized slope of phase III (SnIII) increased by 32% in PHT25 and by 22% in PHT40. SnIII decreased non-significantly by 4% with COdown. A combination of PHT and COdown associated with severe hypoxemia increased SnIII by 28% compared to baseline. The elimination of CO2 per breath decreased by 7% in PHT40 and by 12% in COdown but increased only slightly with COup. Dead space variables did not change significantly along the protocol. At constant ventilation and body metabolism, pulmonary artery hypertension and decreases in CO had the biggest effects on the SnIII of the volumetric capnogram and on the elimination of CO2. PMID:24908108

  5. Myozap, a novel intercalated disc protein, activates SRF-dependent signaling and is required to maintain cardiac function in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Thalia S.; Frank, Derk; Rohr, Claudia; Will, Rainer; Just, Steffen; Grund, Christine; Lyon, Robert; Lüdde, Mark; Koegl, Manfred; Sheikh, Farah; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Franke, Werner W.; Katus, Hugo A.; Olson, Eric N.; Frey, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The intercalated disc (ID) is a highly specialized cell-cell contact structure that ensures mechanical and electrical coupling of contracting cardiomyocytes. Recently, the ID has been recognized to be a hot spot of cardiac disease, in particular inherited cardiomyopathy. Objective Given its complex structure and function we hypothesized that important molecular constituents of the ID still remain unknown. Methods Using a bioinformatic screen, we discovered and cloned a previously uncharacterized 54 kDa cardiac protein which we termed Myozap (Myocardium-enriched ZO-associated protein). Results Myozap is strongly expressed in the heart and lung. In cardiac tissue it localized to the ID and directly binds to desmoplakin and ZO-1. In a yeast-two hybrid screen for additional binding partners of Myozap we identified myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), a negative regulator of Rho activity. Myozap, in turn, strongly activates SRF-dependent transcription through its ERM (Ezrin/radixin/moesin)-like domain in a Rho-dependent fashion. Finally, in vivo knockdown of the Myozap orthologue in zebrafish led to severe contractile dysfunction and cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Taken together, these findings reveal Myozap as a previously unrecognized component of a Rho-dependent signaling pathway that links the intercalated disc to cardiac gene regulation. Moreover, its subcellular localization and the observation of a severe cardiac phenotype in zebrafish, implicate Myozap in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy. PMID:20093627

  6. Human cardiac stem cells exhibit mesenchymal features and are maintained through Akt/GSK-3{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tateishi, Kento |; Ashihara, Eishi; Honsho, Shoken |; Takehara, Naofumi; Nomura, Tetsuyaital |; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Ueyama, Tomomi; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Yaku, Hitoshi; Matsubara, Hiroaki |. E-mail: matsubah@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Oh, Hidemasa . E-mail: hidemasa@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-01-19

    Recent evidence suggested that human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) may have the clinical application for cardiac repair; however, their characteristics and the regulatory mechanisms of their growth have not been fully investigated. Here, we show the novel property of hCSCs with respect to their origin and tissue distribution in human heart, and demonstrate the signaling pathway that regulates their growth and survival. Telomerase-active hCSCs were predominantly present in the right atrium and outflow tract of the heart (infant > adult) and had a mesenchymal cell-like phenotype. These hCSCs expressed the embryonic stem cell markers and differentiated into cardiomyocytes to support cardiac function when transplanted them into ischemic myocardium. Inhibition of Akt pathway impaired the hCSC proliferation and induced apoptosis, whereas inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) enhanced their growth and survival. We conclude that hCSCs exhibit mesenchymal features and that Akt/GSK-3{beta} may be crucial modulators for hCSC maintenance in human heart.

  7. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17?±?0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50?±?0.35 L/min/m2; P?

  8. Coconut Haustorium Maintains Cardiac Integrity and Alleviates Oxidative Stress in Rats Subjected to Isoproterenol-induced Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Chikku, A M; Rajamohan, T

    2012-09-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of aqueous extract of coconut haustorium on isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in Sprague Dawley rats. Rats were pretreated with aqueous extract of coconut haustorium (40 mg/100 g) orally for 45 days. After pretreatment, myocardial infarction was induced by injecting isoproterenol subcutaneously (20 mg/100 g body weight) twice at an interval of 24 h. Activity of marker enzymes like lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine kinase-MB, aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were increased in the serum and decreased in the heart of isoproterenol treated rats indicating cardiac damage. These changes were significantly reduced in haustorium pretreated rats. Moreover, an increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decrease in the levels of peroxidation products were observed in the myocardium of coconut haustorium pretreated rats. Histopathology of the heart of these rats showed almost normal tissue morphology. From these results, it is clear that aqueous extract of coconut haustorium possess significant cardioprotective and antioxidant properties during isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats. PMID:23716867

  9. Seven times replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker in 33 years to maintain adequate heart rate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; Liao, Derong; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, recent developments in pacemaker technology from fixed-rate single-chamber pacemakers to dual chamber pacemakers with pacing algorithms have changed the therapeutic landscape resulting in better healthcare outcomes by improving rate response with minimal ventricular pacing. Here, we share our longest clinical experience with an elderly Chinese male patient who was diagnosed with third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and was admitted in our hospital 33 years ago. An 85-year-old male patient from China was hospitalized due to dizziness and syncope, with an initial diagnosis revealing third-degree AV block with a heart rate of 35–40 beats per minute (bpm) along with Aase’s syndrome and primary hypertension. A single-chamber pacemaker (VVI) was implanted immediately giving the patient symptomatic relief. However, 5-year post-surgery VVI was replaced due to battery exhaustion, while the primary electrode catheter was kept in use. Few years later, the patient again complained of dizziness and re-examination revealed VVI battery debilitation due to premature battery exhaustion. Single-chamber pacemaker was again implanted via the same position of right upper chest. However, after adjusting the frequency of stimulation of the pacemaker to 70 bpm, patient had a symptomatic relief. Considering the severity of patient’s disease and knowing that cardiac dysfunction was reported previously, a tri-chamber pacemaker was chosen to take place of previous single-chamber pacemaker. For 33 years, the patient underwent 7 times replacement of pacemaker for battery exhaustion or inadequacy. We successfully performed overall seven pacemaker implantations and upgradation in an elderly Chinese patient diagnosed with third-degree AV block for 33 years. A long following up till now demonstrated no major complications with normal heart rate functioning.

  10. Pediatric cardiac emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Mason, L J

    2001-06-01

    Successful management of pediatric cardiac emergencies requires an accurate diagnosis to institute an appropriate plan of therapy. The diagnosis, however, is not always straightforward, as evidenced by the nonspecific clinical picture that can be presented by congenital heart defects. Entertaining the possibility of a cardiac problem in neonates with pulmonary symptoms unresponsive to standard therapies is crucial for successful management of patients with congenital heart disease. In addition to ventilatory support, prostaglandin E1 infusions or emergency interventional cardiac catheterization is often a life-saving initial measure in patients with acutely decompensated congenital cardiac lesions that require a patent ductus arteriosus for survival. Pericardial tamponade is associated with various acquired and iatrogenic causes. Emergent pericardiocentesis is mandatory when cardiovascular compromise occurs. The goal of anesthetic management is to maintain cardiac output. With the increasing use of central venous catheters in neonatal ICUs and the high mortality rate for central venous catheter-related cardiac tamponade, the diagnosis must be considered in any patient with a central venous catheter in situ who acutely develops unexplained hypotension, bradycardia, and diminished pulses. Arrhythmias also can cause hemodynamic instability in infants and children. Supraventricular tachycardia is by far the most common emergently presenting arrhythmia in the pediatric population. Unstable patients require immediate intravenous adenosine or synchronized cardioversion. Complete heart block is rare, but it can lead to congestive heart failure and occasionally to cardiovascular collapse and sudden death. Emergency treatment of complete heart block includes pharmacologic support and temporary or permanent pacemaker placement as indicated. In infants, congestive heart failure usually is related to congenital heart disease, whereas in older children, it tends to be secondary to an acquired cause. Supportive measures, fluid restriction, and inotropic support are the principles of initial treatment. Prompt recognition and initiation of appropriate therapy in pediatric cardiac emergencies are essential for favorable outcomes. PMID:11469066

  11. Estimation of cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance using a multivariate regression model with features selected from the finger photoplethysmogram and routine cardiovascular measurements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) are two important parameters of the cardiovascular system. The ability to measure these parameters continuously and noninvasively may assist in diagnosing and monitoring patients with suspected cardiovascular diseases, or other critical illnesses. In this study, a method is proposed to estimate both the CO and SVR of a heterogeneous cohort of intensive care unit patients (N=48). Methods Spectral and morphological features were extracted from the finger photoplethysmogram, and added to heart rate and mean arterial pressure as input features to a multivariate regression model to estimate CO and SVR. A stepwise feature search algorithm was employed to select statistically significant features. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to assess the generalized model performance. The degree of agreement between the estimation method and the gold standard was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Results The Bland-Altman bias ±precision (1.96 times standard deviation) for CO was -0.01 ±2.70 L min-1 when only photoplethysmogram (PPG) features were used, and for SVR was -0.87 ±412 dyn.s.cm-5 when only one PPG variability feature was used. Conclusions These promising results indicate the feasibility of using the method described as a non-invasive preliminary diagnostic tool in supervised or unsupervised clinical settings. PMID:23452705

  12. Heart mass and the maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating the maximum aerobic power input of flying animals

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Empirical studies of cardiovascular variables suggest that relative heart muscle mass (relative Mh) is a good indicator of the degree of adaptive specialization for prolonged locomotor activities, for both birds and mammals. Reasonable predictions for the maximum oxygen consumption of birds during flight can be obtained by assuming that avian heart muscle has the same maximum physiological and biomechanical performance as that of terrestrial mammals. Thus, data on Mh can be used to provide quantitative estimates for the maximum aerobic power input (aerobic Pi,max) available to animals during intense levels of locomotor activity. The maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals is calculated to scale with respect to Mh (g) as 213 Mh0.88+-0.04 (ml min-1), while aerobic Pi,max is estimated to scale approximately as 11 Mh0.88+-0.09 (W). In general, estimated inter-species aerobic Pi,max, based on Mh for all bird species (excluding hummingbirds), is calculated to scale with respect to body mass (Mb in kg) as 81 Mb0.82+-0.11 (W). Comparison of family means for Mh indicate that there is considerable diversity in aerobic capacity among birds and mammals, for example, among the medium to large species of birds the Tinamidae have the smallest relative Mh (0.25 per cent) while the Otidae have unusually large relative Mh (1.6 per cent). Hummingbirds have extremely large relative Mh (2.28 per cent), but exhibit significant sexual dimorphism in their scaling of Mh and flight muscle mass, so that when considering hummingbird flight performance it may be useful to control for sexual differences in morphology. The estimated scaling of aerobic Pi,max (based on Mh and Mb in g) for male and female hummingbirds is 0.51 Mb0.83 +/-0.07 and 0.44 Mb0.85+- 0.11 (W), respectively. Locomotory muscles are dynamic structures and it might be anticipated that where additional energetic 'costs' occur seasonally (e.g. due to migratory fattening or the development of large secondary sexual characteristics) then the relevant cardiac and locomotor musculature might also be regulated seasonally. This is an important consideration, both due to the intrinsic interest of studying muscular adaptation to changes in energy demand, but also as a confounding variable in the practical use of heart rate to estimate the energetics of animals. Haemoglobin concentration (or haematocrit) may also be a confounding variable. Thus, it is concluded that data on the cardiovascular and flight muscle morphology of animals provides essential information regarding the behavioural, ecological and physiological significance of the flight performance of animals.

  13. Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY*

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    of the sympathetic nervous system. We will also see how to found cardiac output using A. The purpose of the heart's electrical system is to initiate muscle cells and does not come from the nervous system. Likewise, we can

  14. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  15. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  16. Cardiac disease in mucopolysaccharidosis type I attributed to catecholaminergic and hemodynamic deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Palpant, Nathan J.; Bedada, Fikru B.; Peacock, Brandon; Blazar, Bruce R.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a common cause of death among pediatric patients with mutations in the lysosomal hydrolase ?-l-iduronidase (IDUA) gene, which causes mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I). The purpose of this study was to analyze adrenergic regulation of cardiac hemodynamic function in MPS-I. An analysis of murine heart function was performed using conductance micromanometry to assess in vivo cardiac hemodynamics. Although MPS-I (IDUA?/?) mice were able to maintain normal cardiac output and ejection fraction at baseline, this cohort had significantly compromised systolic and diastolic function compared with IDUA+/? control mice. During dobutamine infusion MPS-I mice did not significantly increase cardiac output from baseline, indicative of blunted cardiac reserve. Autonomic tone, measured functionally by ?-blockade, indicated that MPS-I mice required catecholaminergic stimulation to maintain baseline hemodynamics. Survival analysis showed mortality only among MPS-I mice. Linear regression analysis revealed that heightened end-systolic volume in the resting heart is significantly correlated with susceptibility to mortality in MPS-I hearts. This study reveals that cardiac remodeling in the pathology of MPS-I involves heightened adrenergic tone at the expense of cardiac reserve with cardiac decompensation predicted on the basis of increased baseline systolic volumes. PMID:21076027

  17. Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY SECTION 3: CARDIAC MECHANICS*

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Cardiac Coordination and Mechanics 1 CIRCULATORY PHYSIOLOGY SECTION 3 nervous system. We will also see how to found cardiac output using the Fick of a sausage. However, a system of valves allows blood to move in one direction

  18. Preoperative levosimendan decreases mortality and the development of low cardiac output in high-risk patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ricardo; Degrange, Marcela; Del Mazo, Carlos; Tanus, Eduardo; Porcile, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcium sensitizer levosimendan has been used in cardiac surgery for the treatment of postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and difficult weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of preoperative treatment with levosimendan on 30-day mortality, the risk of developing LCOS and the requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. METHODS: Patient with severe left ventricular dysfunction and an ejection fraction <25% undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB were admitted 24 h before surgery and were randomly assigned to receive levosimendan (loading dose 10 ?g/kg followed by a 23 h continuous infusion of 0.1?g/kg/min) or a placebo. RESULTS: From December 1, 2002 to June 1, 2008, a total of 252 patients were enrolled (127 in the levosimendan group and 125 in the control group). Individuals treated with levosimendan exhibited a lower incidence of complicated weaning from CPB (2.4% versus 9.6%; P<0.05), decreased mortality (3.9% versus 12.8%; P<0.05) and a lower incidence of LCOS (7.1% versus 20.8%; P<0.05) compared with the control group. The levosimendan group also had a lower requirement for inotropes (7.9% versus 58.4%; P<0.05), vasopressors (14.2% versus 45.6%; P<0.05) and intra-aortic balloon pumps (6.3% versus 30.4%; P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severe left ventricle dysfunction (ejection fraction <25%) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB who were pretreated with levosimendan exhibited lower mortality, a decreased risk for developing LCOS and a reduced requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to confirm whether these findings represent a new strategy to reduce the operative risk in this high-risk patient population. PMID:23620700

  19. The role of cardiac sympathetic innervation and skin thermoreceptors on cardiac responses during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Umemoto, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Tokio; Kouda, Ken; Ito, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Crandall, Craig G; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism(s) for the changes in cardiac function during heat stress remain unknown. This study tested two unique hypotheses. First, sympathetic innervation to the heart is required for increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress. This was accomplished by comparing responses during heat stress between paraplegics versus tetraplegics, with tetraplegics having reduced/absent cardiac sympathetic innervation. Second, stimulation of skin thermoreceptors contributes to cardiovascular adjustments that occur during heat stress in humans. This was accomplished by comparing responses during leg only heating between paraplegic versus able-bodied individuals. Nine healthy able-bodied, nine paraplegics, and eight tetraplegics participated in this study. Lower body (i.e., nonsensed area for para/tetraplegics) was heated until esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C. Echocardiographic indexes of diastolic and systolic function were performed before and at the end of heat stress. The heat stress increased cardiac output in all groups, but the magnitude of this increase was attenuated in the tetraplegics relative to the able-bodied (1.3 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 1.0 l/min; P < 0.05). Diastolic function was maintained in all groups. Indexes of left atrial and ventricular systolic function were enhanced in the able-bodied, but did not change in tetraplegics, while these changes in paraplegics were attenuated relative to the able-bodied. These data suggest that the cardiac sympathetic innervation is required to achieve normal increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress but not required to maintain diastolic function during this exposure. Second, elevated systolic function during heat stress primarily occurs as a result of increases in internal temperature, although stimulation of skin thermoreceptors may contribute. PMID:25795714

  20. Validation of stroke volume and cardiac output by electrical interrogation of the brachial artery in normals: assessment of strengths, limitations, and sources of error.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Donald P; Henry, Isaac C; Lemmens, Harry J; Chaltas, Janell L; DeMaria, Anthony N; Moon, James B; Kahn, Andrew M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study is to validate a new, continuous, noninvasive stroke volume (SV) method, known as transbrachial electrical bioimpedance velocimetry (TBEV). TBEV SV was compared to SV obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in normal humans devoid of clinically apparent heart disease. Thirty-two (32) volunteers were enrolled in the study. Each subject was evaluated by echocardiography to assure that no aortic or mitral valve disease was present. Subsequently, each subject underwent electrical interrogation of the brachial artery by means of a high frequency, low amplitude alternating current. A first TBEV SV estimate was obtained. Immediately after the initial TBEV study, subjects underwent cMRI, using steady-state precession imaging to obtain a volumetric estimate of SV. Following cMRI, the TBEV SV study was repeated. Comparing the cMRI-derived SV to that of TBEV, the two TBEV estimates were averaged and compared to the cMRI standard. CO was computed as the product of SV and heart rate. Statistical methods consisted of Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis. TBEV SV and CO estimates were obtained in 30 of the 32 subjects enrolled. Bland-Altman analysis of pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV showed a mean bias of 2.87 % (2.05 mL), precision of 13.59 % (11.99 mL) and 95 % limits of agreement (LOA) of +29.51 % (25.55 mL) and -23.77 % (-21.45 mL). Regression analysis for pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV values yielded y = 0.76x + 25.1 and r(2) = 0.71 (r = 0.84). Bland-Altman analysis comparing cMRI SV with averaged TBEV SV showed a mean bias of -1.56 % (-1.53 mL), precision of 13.47 % (12.84 mL), 95 % LOA of +24.85 % (+23.64 mL) and -27.97 % (-26.7 mL) and percent error = 26.2 %. For correlation analysis, the regression equation was y = 0.82x + 19.1 and correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.61 (r = 0.78). Bland-Altman analysis of averaged pre- and post-cMRI TBEV CO versus cMRI CO yielded a mean bias of 5.01 % (0.32 L min(-1)), precision of 12.85 % (0.77 L min(-1)), 95 % LOA of +30.20 % (+0.1.83 L min(-1)) and -20.7 % (-1.19 L min(-1)) and percent error = 24.8 %. Regression analysis yielded y = 0.92x + 0.78, correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.74 (r = 0.86). TBEV is a novel, noninvasive method, which provides satisfactory estimates of SV and CO in normal humans. PMID:25682204

  1. Cardiac innervation and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-06-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy, and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem, and higher centers), which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes to hours), and long term (days to years). This important neurovisceral/autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death. Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extracardiac neural remodeling has also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provide a rational mechanistic basis for the development of neuraxial therapies for preventing sudden cardiac death and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  2. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients. PMID:26593140

  3. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  4. [Design and application of cardiac stimulator for rapid atrial pacing animal model].

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Yu, Jiahui; Zhou, Zhen; Wei, Hongming

    2014-01-01

    A cardiac stimulator for rapid atrial pacing animal model was designed in this paper. According to the needs of clinical research, output pulse parameters of the cardiac stimulator can be designed. The cardiac stimulator will be controlled through magnet. Efficiency of the cardiac stimulator was validated by animal experiments. PMID:24839845

  5. Overload protection circuit for output driver

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Roger G. (Neshanic Station, NJ)

    1982-05-11

    A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

  6. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePLUS

    ... done during a cardiac catheterization include: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ... bandage. It's normal for the site to be black and blue, red, or slightly swollen for a ...

  7. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanis?aw

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=?0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  8. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  9. Cardiac emergencies in children.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, M S

    1996-06-01

    Pediatric cardiac emergencies require very specific treatment in the emergency room setting. Considering the possibility of a cardiac problem as the cause for the presenting symptoms is the initial step in successful management. Many patients present with what is initially considered a primary pulmonary disorder such as pneumonia, asthma, or bronchiolitis. Airway stabilization and ventilatory support, if needed, remain the first steps in stabilizing the patient. Many neonates with acutely decompensating heart disease may require the patency of the ductus arteriosus for survival. Prostaglandin E given as continuous infusion is the treatment of choice. Congestive heart failure can present at any age. In older patients, it is often due to myocarditis and is characterized by low cardiac output. Supportive measures, fluid restriction, and inotropic support are the basic concepts for initial treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia is a frequent arrhythmia, especially in young children. If the patient is unstable, immediate intravenous administration of adenosine or synchronized cardioversion are the initial interventions. In stable patients, vagal maneuvers may be attempted to abort the arrhythmia. PMID:8793920

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent future heart problems and even death. Exercise training as part of cardiac rehab might not be safe for all patients. For example, if you have very high blood pressure or severe heart disease, you might not be ready for exercise. However, ...

  11. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  12. Robotic cardiac surgery: an anaesthetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Changqing

    2014-08-01

    Robotic cardiac surgery with the da Vinci robotic surgical system offers the benefits of a minimally invasive procedure, including a smaller incision and scar, reduced risk of infection, less pain and trauma, less bleeding and blood transfusion requirements, shorter hospital stay and decreased recovery time. Robotic cardiac surgery includes extracardiac and intracardiac procedures. Extracardiac procedures are often performed on a beating heart. Intracardiac procedures require the aid of peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass via a minithoracotomy. Robotic cardiac surgery, however, poses challenges to the anaesthetist, as the obligatory one-lung ventilation (OLV) and CO2 insufflation may reduce cardiac output and increase pulmonary vascular resistance, potentially resulting in hypoxaemia and haemodynamic compromise. In addition, surgery requires appropriate positioning of specialised cannulae such as an endopulmonary vent, endocoronary sinus catheter, and endoaortic clamp catheter under the guidance of transoesophageal echocardiography. Therefore, cardiac anaesthetists should have a working knowledge of these systems, OLV and haemodynamic support. PMID:24958894

  13. The physiology of external cardiac massage: high-impulse cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Maier, G W; Tyson, G S; Olsen, C O; Kernstein, K H; Davis, J W; Conn, E H; Sabiston, D C; Rankin, J S

    1984-07-01

    In intact chronically instrumented dogs, left ventricular dynamics were studied during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Electromagnetic flow probes measured cardiac output and coronary blood flow, ultrasonic transducers measured cardiac dimensions, and micromanometers measured left ventricular, right ventricular, aortic, and intrathoracic pressures. The dogs were anesthetized with morphine, intubated, and fibrillated by rapid ventricular pacing. Data were obtained during manual external massage with dogs in the lateral and supine positions. Force of compression was varied from a peak intrathoracic pressure of 10 to 30 mm Hg, and compression rate was varied from 60 to 150/min. Increasing force of compression increased stroke volume up to a peak intrathoracic pressure of approximately 20 mm Hg, beyond which stroke volume remained constant or declined. Stroke volume appeared to result primarily from direct transmission of manual compression force to the heart rather than from positive intrathoracic pressure because peak cardiac or vascular pressures or the change in these pressures were consistently two to four times greater than the corresponding intrathoracic pressures during manual compression. With increasing compression rate, stroke volume remained relatively constant, and total cardiac output increased significantly: 425 +/- 92 ml/min at 60/min, 643 +/- 130 ml/min at 100/min, and 975 +/- 219 ml/min at 150/min (p less than .05). Left ventricular dimensions decreased minimally at higher manual compression rates. In four patients undergoing CPR, systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure increased with faster compression rates, correlating well with data obtained in the dog. Dynamic coronary blood flow in canine experiments decreased to zero or negative values during compression. Antegrade coronary flow occurred primarily during noncompression periods and seemed to be related to diastolic aortic perfusion pressure; coronary flow at a compression rate of 150/min averaged 75% of control. Therefore stroke volume and coronary blood flow in this canine preparation were maximized with manual chest compression performed with moderate force and brief duration. Increasing rate of compression increased total cardiac output while coronary blood flow was well maintained. Direct cardiac compression appeared to be the major determinant of stroke volume during manual external cardiac massage. PMID:6723014

  14. Cardiac lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Imtiaz; Al-Khafaji, Khalid; Mutyala, Monica; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Cotter, William; Hakim, Hosam; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas of the heart are encapsulated tumors that are composed primarily of mature fat cells. Cardiac lipomas can originate either from subendocardium (approximately 50%), subpericardium (25%), or from the myocardium (25%) and may be located more frequently in left ventricle or right atrium. We report a 74-year-old female who presented with dyspnea on exertion and was found to have 5×5 cm mass occupying most of the right atrium on a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:26486106

  15. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  16. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  17. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)? and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  18. Maintaining Children's Safety

    E-print Network

    Molinari, Marc

    Maintaining Children's Safety and Security on the Premises Policy V.2 June 18 2014 Owned by: Tracy/DepartmentResources/StudentServicesPoliciesandProcedures/EarlyYearsCentre /MaintainingChildren'sSafetyandSecurityonthePremisesPolicy June 2012 V.2 Impact Assessed: Update due: May 2015 #12;Policy 1 Title: Maintaining Children's Safety and Security on the Premises From: Early Years

  19. Increase in cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) alpha protein isoform in hibernating ground squirrels, with echocardiographic visualization of ventricular wall hypertrophy and prolonged contraction

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, O. Lynne; Rourke, Bryan C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Deep hibernators such as golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis) have multiple challenges to cardiac function during low temperature torpor and subsequent arousals. As heart rates fall from over 300 beats min?1 to less than 10, chamber dilation and reduced cardiac output could lead to congestive myopathy. We performed echocardiography on a cohort of individuals prior to and after several months of hibernation. The left ventricular chamber exhibited eccentric and concentric hypertrophy during hibernation and thus calculated ventricular mass was ~30% greater. Ventricular ejection fraction was mildly reduced during hibernation but stroke volumes were greater due to the eccentric hypertrophy and dramatically increased diastolic filling volumes. Globally, the systolic phase in hibernation was ~9.5 times longer, and the diastolic phase was 28× longer. Left atrial ejection generally was not observed during hibernation. Atrial ejection returned weakly during early arousal. Strain echocardiography assessed the velocity and total movement distance of contraction and relaxation for regional ventricular segments in active and early arousal states. Myocardial systolic strain during early arousal was significantly greater than the active state, indicating greater total contractile movement. This mirrored the increased ventricular ejection fraction noted with early arousal. However, strain rates were slower during early arousal than during the active period, particularly systolic strain, which was 33% of active, compared with the rate of diastolic strain, which was 67% of active. As heart rate rose during the arousal period, myocardial velocities and strain rates also increased; this was matched closely by cardiac output. Curiously, though heart rates were only 26% of active heart rates during early arousal, the cardiac output was nearly 40% of the active state, suggesting an efficient pumping system. We further analyzed proportions of cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms in a separate cohort of squirrels over 5 months, including time points before hibernation, during hibernation and just prior to emergence. Hibernating individuals were maintained in both a 4°C cold room and a 20°C warm room. Measured by SDS-PAGE, relative percentages of cardiac MyHC alpha were increased during hibernation, at both hibernacula temperatures. A potential increase in contractile speed, and power, from more abundant MyHC alpha may aid force generation at low temperature and at low heart rates. Unlike many models of cardiomyopathies where the alpha isoform is replaced by the beta isoform in order to reduce oxygen consumption, ground squirrels demonstrate a potential cardioprotective mechanism to maintain cardiac output during torpor. PMID:24072796

  20. Heterozygous deletion of sarcolipin maintains normal cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Daisuke; Kusakari, Yoichiro; Sasano, Tetsuo; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Gaku; Jiao, Qibin; Jin, Meihua; Yokota, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Atsushi; Goda, Nobuhito; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Sarcolipin (SLN) is a small proteolipid and a regulator of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. In heart tissue, SLN is exclusively expressed in the atrium. Previously, we inserted Cre recombinase into the endogenous SLN locus by homologous recombination and succeeded in generating SLN-Cre knockin (Sln(Cre/+)) mice. This Sln(Cre/+) mouse can be used to generate an atrium-specific gene-targeting mutant, and it is based on the Cre-loxP system. In the present study, we used adult Sln(Cre/+) mice atria and analyzed the effects of heterozygous SLN deletion by Cre knockin before use as the gene targeting mouse. Both SLN mRNA and protein levels were decreased in Sln(Cre/+) mouse atria, but there were no morphological, physiological, or molecular biological abnormalities. The properties of contractility and Ca(2+) handling were similar to wild-type (WT) mice, and expression levels of several stress markers and sarcoplasmic reticulum-related protein levels were not different between Sln(Cre/+) and WT mice. Moreover, there was no significant difference in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity between the two groups. We showed that Sln(Cre/+) mice were not significantly different from WT mice in all aspects that were examined. The present study provides basic characteristics of Sln(Cre/+) mice and possibly information on the usefulness of Sln(Cre/+) mice as an atrium-specific gene-targeting model. PMID:26519028

  1. Noninvasive monitoring of transient cardiac changes with impedance cardiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjun; Li, John K-J

    2008-12-01

    Impedance cardiography (IC) has been used to monitor the pumping function of the heart in terms of stroke volume or cardiac output. We explored the extent to which IC can be used for monitoring transient effects of cardiac alterations on a beat-to-beat basis. A four-spot-electrode configuration was used in the present design. The spatial arrangement of the four electrodes was carefully selected to obtain an optimal result. A constant current source provided a 4 mA, 20 kHz sinusoidal excitation current. Analog signal processing was developed to demodulate and amplify the resultant impedance information, eliminate low frequency motion artifacts and incidental breathing artifacts. Experiments were performed on normal healthy volunteers. Impedance waveforms were recorded from each subject beginning from a supine position then moving to an upright position. Breath holding was maintained throughout the procedure. The impedance waveform, Z, its first derivative dZ/dt, the DC component, Z(0), and electrocardiogram were recorded simultaneously and continuously. The results showed a significant increase in the relative impedance levels from supine to transient state and then decreased during the upright position. Additionally, the supine position had a higher (dZ/dt)(max) than sitting resulting in a reduction in stroke volume. The increased impedance from supine to sitting verified the physiological findings obtained by others. The results of this investigation illustrate the ability of impedance cardiography to effectively monitor the dynamic cardiovascular function under transient conditions. PMID:19130223

  2. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest. PMID:25372919

  3. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained

  4. Role of breathing in cardiac performance: experimental and mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the close proximity of the heart and lungs within a closed chest environment, we expect breathing to affect various cardiac performance parameters and hence cardiac output. We present an integrative approach to study heart-lung interactions, combining a mathematical formulation of the circulation system with imaging techniques using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) and dynamic x-ray CT (EBCT). We hypothesize that appropriate synchronization of mechanical ventilation to cardiac-cycle specific events can improve cardiac function, i.e. stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Computational and experimental results support the notion that heart-lung interaction, leading to altered cardiac output associated with inspiration/expiration, is not directly associated with lung inflation/deflation and thus is felt to be more influenced by pleural pressure changes. The mathematical model of the circulation demonstrates the importance of cardiac-cycle specific timing of ventilation on cardiac function and matches with experimentally observed relationships found in animal models studied via EBCT and human studies using EPI. Results show that positive pressure mechanical ventilation timed to systolic events may increase SV and CO by up to 30%, mainly by increased filling of the ventricles during diastole. Similarly, negative pressure (spontaneous) respiration has its greatest effect on ventricular diastolic filling. Cardiac-gated mechanical ventilation may provide sufficient cardiac augmentation to warrant further investigation as a minimally-invasive technique for temporary cardiac assist. Through computational modeling and advanced imaging protocols, we were able to uniquely study heart-lung interactions within the intact milieu of the never-invaded thorax.

  5. Maintain Combustion Systems 

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Energy is consumed, and wasted, in liberal amounts in the combustion processes which supply heat energy to boilers and process heaters. Close attention to combustion systems can be extremely beneficial: Optimum air to fuel ratios, i.e., maintaining...

  6. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  7. Satellite Tagging and Cardiac Physiology Reveal Niche

    E-print Network

    Block, Barbara A.

    Satellite Tagging and Cardiac Physiology Reveal Niche Expansion in Salmon Sharks Kevin C. Weng,1 to track salmon sharks (Lamna ditropis) for up to 3.2 years. Here we show that salmon sharks have-contraction coupling proteins is en- hanced in salmon shark hearts, which may underlie the shark's ability to maintain

  8. Cardiac pacing in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Furman, S; Young, D

    1977-04-01

    Nineteen patients aged 1 month to 18 years underwent implantation of a cardiac pacemaker and were followed up for up to 9 years (average duration of pacing 54 months). Complete heart block was present in 16 patients and sinus nodal dysfunction in 3. Heart block was presumably of congenital orgin in eight, secendary to cardiac surgery in seven and subsequent to cardiac catheterization in one. Sinus nodal dysfunction was of presumed congenital origin in one and occurred after cardiac surgery in two. Pacing was required because of syncopal attacks in eight patients, three of whom had congestive heart failure or low cardiac output on physiologic studies. It was required in four because of congestive heart failure, in two because of low cardiac output (one with a wide QRS complex), and in five for postoperative rhythm control. With return of sinus rhythm after 2 and 3 months, respectively, pacing was discontinued in two patients. One child was partially corrected disease died within 3 months, one died of wound breakdown and sepsis after 10 months of pacing and one died suddenly 4 years after implantation. All others have returned to normal activity; only one requires cardiac medication. The degree of emotional stability has been striking. Asynchronous and atrial synchronous pacing are of equal therapeutic value. The very small radiofrequency implanted receiver has been useful in younger children. The major problems have been caused by the large size and short longevity of the generators and the child's growth stressing the lead system. Transvenously implanted pacemakers have presented no greater management problems than those placed during thoracotomy. PMID:848440

  9. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePLUS

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  10. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  11. Cardiac tamponade: atypical presentations after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kirti, Ravi; Karadi, Rangaprasad

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of cardiac tamponade presenting in the aftermath of cardiac surgery. We have briefly discussed the aetiology, presentation, diagnosis and management of the condition with emphasis on its atypical presentation in postoperative patients. A high index of suspicion and early access to echocardiography is necessary for prompt recognition and treatment of this life threatening emergency. PMID:22860267

  12. Demystifying Maintainability Manfred Broy

    E-print Network

    Broy, Manfred

    . In fact, every software organization of significant size seems to have its own definition of maintainability. We address this problem by defining an unique two-dimensional quality model that associates with the incremental development of the quality model and its application to large scale com- mercial software projects

  13. Maintaining Medicinal Plant Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For all plant genetic resources collections, including medicinal plant germplasm, maintaining the genetic integrity of material held ex situ is of major importance. This holds true for all intended end uses of the material whether it is as a source for crop improvement, medical research, as voucher...

  14. Titin-mediated control of cardiac myofibrillar function

    PubMed Central

    Hanft, Laurin M.; Greaser, Marion L.; McDonald, Kerry S.

    2013-01-01

    According to the Frank-Starling relationship, ventricular pressure or stroke volume increases with end-diastolic volume. This is regulated, in large part, by the sarcomere length (SL) dependent changes in cardiac myofibrillar force, loaded shortening, and power. Consistent with this, both cardiac myofibrillar force and absolute power fall at shorter SL. However, when Ca2+ activated force levels are matched between short and long SL (by increasing the activator [Ca2+]), short SL actually yields faster loaded shortening and greater peak normalized power output (PNPO). A potential mechanism for faster loaded shortening at short SL is that, at short SL, titin becomes less taut, which increases the flexibility of the cross-bridges, a process that may be mediated by titin's interactions with thick filament proteins. We propose a more slackened titin yields greater myosin head radial and azimuthal mobility and these flexible cross-bridges are more likely to maintain thin filament activation, which would allow more force-generating cross-bridges to work against a fixed load resulting in faster loaded shortening. We tested this idea by measuring SL-dependence of power at matched forces in rat skinned cardiac myocytes containing either N2B titin or a longer, more compliant N2BA titin. We predicted that, in N2BA titin containing cardiac myocytes, power-load curves would not be shifted upward at short SL compared to long SL (when force is matched). Consistent with this, peak normalized power was actually less at short SL versus long SL (at matched force) in N2BA-containing myocytes (N2BA titin: ?PNPO (Short SL peak power minus long SL peak power) = ?0.057 ± 0.049 (n=5) versus N2B titin: ?PNPO = +0.012 ± 0.012 (n=5)). These findings support a model whereby SL per se controls mechanical properties of cross-bridges and this process is mediated by titin. This myofibrillar mechanism may help sustain ventricular power during periods of low preloads, and perhaps a breakdown of this mechanism is involved in impaired function of failing hearts. PMID:24269766

  15. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  16. Nuclear power plant maintainability.

    PubMed

    Seminara, J L; Parsons, S O

    1982-09-01

    In the mid-1970s a general awareness of human factors engineering deficiencies associated with power plant control rooms took shape and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) awarded the Lockheed Corporation a contract to review the human factors aspects of five representative operational control rooms and their associated simulators. This investigation revealed a host of major and minor deficiencies that assumed unforeseen dimensions in the post- Three Mile Island accident period. In the course of examining operational problems (Seminara et al, 1976) and subsequently the methods for overcoming such problems (Seminara et al, 1979, 1980) indications surfaced that power plants were far from ideal in meeting the needs of maintenance personnel. Accordingly, EPRI sponsored an investigation of the human factors aspects of power plant maintainability (Seminara, 1981). This paper provides an overview of the maintainability problems and issues encountered in the course of reviewing five nuclear power plants. PMID:15676441

  17. Inherent force-dependent properties of ?-cardiac myosin contribute to the force-velocity relationship of cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Shuman, Henry; Ostap, E Michael

    2014-12-16

    The heart adjusts its power output to meet specific physiological needs through the coordination of several mechanisms, including force-induced changes in contractility of the molecular motor, the ?-cardiac myosin (?CM). Despite its importance in driving and regulating cardiac power output, the effect of force on the contractility of a single ?CM has not been measured. Using single molecule optical-trapping techniques, we found that ?CM has a two-step working stroke. Forces that resist the power stroke slow the myosin-driven contraction by slowing the rate of ADP release, which is the kinetic step that limits fiber shortening. The kinetic properties of ?CM are affected by load, suggesting that the properties of myosin contribute to the force-velocity relationship in intact muscle and play an important role in the regulation of cardiac power output. PMID:25517169

  18. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  19. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ? Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ? Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ? Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ? Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance 'virtual catheterization' for the quantification of valvular regurgitations and cardiac shunt.

    PubMed

    Aquaro, Giovanni Donato; Barison, Andrea; Todiere, Giancarlo; Festa, Pierluigi; Ait-Ali, Lamia; Lombardi, Massimo; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is considered the gold-standard noninvasive technique for the quantification of ventricular volumes by cine-imaging and of vascular flows by velocity-encoded phase contrast (VENC). In routine CMR scans, it is common to found clinical conditions, as valve regurgitations and cardiac shunts, producing a volume overload and significant mismatch between the right and left ventricular stroke volumes (RSV and LSV). In the presence of a valve regurgitation, the volume overload involves the respective ventricular chamber, whereas in cardiac shunts, the location of the volume overload depends on the site of the anatomic defect. Moreover, when a cardiac shunt is present, pulmonary and systemic cardiac outputs are different (Qp/Qs??1), whereas in the presence of valve regurgitation, Qp/Qs?=?1. Therefore, by combining the cine-imaging with the VENC technique, it is possible to investigate the cardiac physiology underlying different pathological conditions producing volume overload, and to quantify this overload (the regurgitant volume and/or shunt volume). In this report, we discussed the technical, theoretical and methodological aspects of this sort of 'virtual catheterization' by CMR, providing a simple algorithm to make the correct diagnosis. PMID:25643193

  1. Maintaining Bermudagrass Lawns 

    E-print Network

    Chalmers, David; McAfee, James; Havlak, Roger

    2006-08-08

    stream_source_info pdf_1125.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11189 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_1125.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 David R. Chalmers, Associate... Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist James A. McAfee, Associate Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist Roger Havlak, Extension Program Specialist?Turfgrass and Water Management The Texas A&M University System Maintaining Bermudagrass L a w ns L...

  2. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  3. Cardiac developmental toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is a highly prevalent problem with mostly unknown origins. Many cases of CHD likely involve an environmental exposure coupled with genetic susceptibility, but practical and ethical considerations make nongenetic causes of CHD difficult to assess in humans. The development of the heart is highly conserved across all vertebrate species, making animal models an excellent option for screening potential cardiac teratogens. This review will discuss exposures known to cause cardiac defects, stages of heart development that are most sensitive to teratogen exposure, benefits and limitations of animal models of cardiac development, and future considerations for cardiac developmental toxicity research. PMID:22271678

  4. Reagan: Maintain Antarctic program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan has decided that the United States should maintain an ‘active and influential presence’ in Antarctica to support the nation's interests. Following a review of a study by the Antarctica Policy Group, Reagan issued a memorandum, dated February 5, to the heads of 14 government agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Office of Management and Budget.The U.S. presence in Antarctica ‘shall include the conduct of scientific activities in major disciplines; year-round occupation of the South Pole and two coastal stations; and availability of related necessary logistics support,’ wrote the President. In addition, NSF should continue to budget for the entire U.S. program in Antarctica. Short-term programs by other agencies require the recommendation of the Antarctica Policy Group and should be coordinated within the framework of NSF logistics support.

  5. Hippo pathway effector Yap promotes cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Kim, Yuri; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Murakami, Masao; Qi, Xiaoxia; McAnally, John; Porrello, Enzo R.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Tan, Wei; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Sadek, Hesham A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2013-01-01

    The adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration. Thus, after injury, cardiomyocytes are permanently lost, and contractility is diminished. In contrast, the neonatal heart can regenerate owing to sustained cardiomyocyte proliferation. Identification of critical regulators of cardiomyocyte proliferation and quiescence represents an important step toward potential regenerative therapies. Yes-associated protein (Yap), a transcriptional cofactor in the Hippo signaling pathway, promotes proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes by activating the insulin-like growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways. Here we report that mice bearing mutant alleles of Yap and its paralog WW domain containing transcription regulator 1 (Taz) exhibit gene dosage-dependent cardiac phenotypes, suggesting redundant roles of these Hippo pathway effectors in establishing proper myocyte number and maintaining cardiac function. Cardiac-specific deletion of Yap impedes neonatal heart regeneration, resulting in a default fibrotic response. Conversely, forced expression of a constitutively active form of Yap in the adult heart stimulates cardiac regeneration and improves contractility after myocardial infarction. The regenerative activity of Yap is correlated with its activation of embryonic and proliferative gene programs in cardiomyocytes. These findings identify Yap as an important regulator of cardiac regeneration and provide an experimental entry point to enhance this process. PMID:23918388

  6. SHP-2 is required for the maintenance of cardiac progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Yvette G.; Goetz, Sarah C.; Berg, Anna E.; Swanik, Jackie Thomas; Conlon, Frank L.

    2009-01-01

    The isolation and culturing of cardiac progenitor cells has demonstrated that growth factor signaling is required to maintain cardiac cell survival and proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate in Xenopus that SHP-2 activity is required for the maintenance of cardiac precursors in vivo. In the absence of SHP-2 signaling, cardiac progenitor cells downregulate genes associated with early heart development and fail to initiate cardiac differentiation. We further show that this requirement for SHP-2 is restricted to cardiac precursor cells undergoing active proliferation. By demonstrating that SHP-2 is phosphorylated on Y542/Y580 and that it binds to FRS-2, we place SHP-2 in the FGF pathway during early embryonic heart development. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibition of FGF signaling mimics the cellular and biochemical effects of SHP-2 inhibition and that these effects can be rescued by constitutively active/Noonan-syndrome-associated forms of SHP-2. Collectively, these results show that SHP-2 functions within the FGF/MAPK pathway to maintain survival of proliferating populations of cardiac progenitor cells. PMID:17928416

  7. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  8. Development lifts Egyptian output

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Oil revenue is now the largest source of foreign exchange for the Arab Republic of Egypt, and, as such, is of vital importance to the country's plans for industrial and social development. Last year oil exports earned Egypt $2.9 billion, playing a key role in keeping the nation's economy in the black. Oil production in 1980 averaged 585,000 bpd, up from 510,000 bpd in 1979. This year oil output should average 650,000 bpd. While output is increasing, it does not appear to be doing so at a sufficient rate to meet the 1984 government target of 1 million bpd. However, the oil industry view in Egypt is that this target is achievable, though not until the mid to late 1980s. Development work scheduled for completion by 1984 only seems set to lift output to between 750,000 and 800,000 bpd. At the same time, if expansions plans for gas production are taken into account, then total hydrocarbon output measured in oil equivalents will not be too far short of the 1-million-bpd figure.

  9. AN INTEGRATEDMICROELECTROMECHANICALRESONANT OUTPUT GYROSCOPE -

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    AN INTEGRATEDMICROELECTROMECHANICALRESONANT OUTPUT GYROSCOPE - Ashwin A. Seshia*,Roger T. Howe vibratory rate gyroscope based on resonant sensing of the Coriolis force. The new design has several advantages over rate gyroscopes that utilize open-loop displacement sensing for rotation rate measurement

  10. [Cardiac involvement in polymyositis].

    PubMed

    Romdhane, M B; Mahdhaoui, A; Khelifa, M B; Lagren, A; Hajri, S E; Bouraoui, H; Trimeche, B; Ghannouchi, N; Jeridi, G; Bahri, F

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular involvement in polymyositis constitutes a major cause of death. However, the cardiac location is rarely symptomatic and does not usually represent the principle clinical feature at the time of the initial presentation. We present here an unusual case of polymyositis with severe and polymorph cardiac disturbances that predominant the muscular signs. PMID:20709312

  11. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  12. Psychosocial components of cardiac recovery and rehabilitation attendance

    PubMed Central

    King, K; Humen, D; Smith, H; Phan, C; Teo, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relations between demographic factors, specific psychosocial factors, and cardiac rehabilitation attendance.?DESIGN—Cohort, repeated measures design.?SETTING—A large tertiary care centre in western Canada?PATIENTS—304 consecutive consenting patients discharged following acute myocardial infarction and/or coronary artery bypass graft surgery.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The Jenkins self-efficacy expectation scales and activity checklists of behaviour performance for maintaining health and role resumption, modified version of the self-motivation inventory, and the shortened social support scale.?RESULTS—Those who had higher role resumption behaviour performance scores at two weeks after discharge were significantly less likely to attend cardiac rehabilitation programmes. At six months after discharge, those who attended cardiac rehabilitation demonstrated higher health maintenance self-efficacy expectation and behaviour performance scores. Health maintenance self-efficacy expectation and behaviour performance improved over time. Women reported less social support but showed greater improvement in health maintenance self-efficacy expectation. Changes in self-efficacy scores were unrelated to—but changes in health maintenance behaviour performance scores were strongly associated with—cardiac rehabilitation attendance.?CONCLUSIONS—Cardiac patients and practitioners may have misconceptions about the mandate and potential benefits of rehabilitation programmes. Patients who resumed role related activities early and more completely apparently did not see the need to "rehabilitate" while those who attended cardiac rehabilitation programmes enhanced their secondary prevention behaviours.???Keywords: self-efficacy; motivation; social support; cardiac recovery; cardiac rehabilitation PMID:11179268

  13. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nim, Hieu T.; Furtado, Milena B.; Costa, Mauro W.; Kitano, Hiroaki; Rosenthal, Nadia A.; Boyd, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP), an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1) relevant to cardiac literature, and (2) differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10) are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research. PMID:26673252

  14. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  15. Micromolded gelatin hydrogels for extended culture of engineered cardiac tissues

    E-print Network

    Parker, Kevin Kit

    Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Cardiotoxicity is a leading cause of market withdrawal- diotoxicity is usually identified in animal models, such as mice [5,6] or dogs [7], that are exposed of cardiac output. Furthermore, studies with animals and animal cells are not always relevant to humans due

  16. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  17. Cardiac fiber unfolding by semidefinite programming.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongying; Robini, Marc C; Yang, Feng; Magnin, Isabelle; Zhu, Yuemin

    2015-02-01

    Diffusion-tensor imaging allows noninvasive assessment of the myocardial fiber architecture, which is fundamental in understanding the mechanics of the heart. In this context, tractography techniques are often used for representing and visualizing cardiac fibers, but their output is only qualitative. We introduce here a new framework toward a more quantitative description of the cardiac fiber architecture from tractography results. The proposed approach consists in taking three-dimensional (3-D) fiber tracts as inputs, and then unfolding these fibers in the Euclidean plane under local isometry constraints using semidefinite programming. The solution of the unfolding problem takes the form of a Gram matrix which defines the two-dimensional (2-D) embedding of the fibers and whose spectrum provides quantitative information on their organization. Experiments on synthetic and real data show that unfolding makes it easier to observe and to study the cardiac fiber architecture. Our conclusion is that 2-D embedding of cardiac fibers is a promising approach to supplement 3-D rendering for understanding the functioning of the heart. PMID:25291787

  18. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community?s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as anmore »all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.« less

  19. Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Guyette, Francis X; Reynolds, Joshua C; Frisch, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is a dynamic disease that tests the multitasking and leadership abilities of emergency physicians. Providers must simultaneously manage the logistics of resuscitation while searching for the cause of cardiac arrest. The astute clinician will also realize that he or she is orchestrating only one portion of a larger series of events, each of which directly affects patient outcomes. Resuscitation science is rapidly evolving, and emergency providers must be familiar with the latest evidence and controversies surrounding resuscitative techniques. This article reviews evidence, discusses controversies, and offers strategies to provide quality cardiac arrest resuscitation. PMID:26226873

  20. Cardiac tumors: leiomyosarcoma – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Syska-Sumi?ska, Joanna; Zieli?ski, Piotr; D?u?niewski, Miros?aw; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a long history of leiomyosarcoma in different locations. She was admitted to the clinic due to a left ventricular tumor diagnosed in ECHO examination. The patient was qualified for radical tumor resection. The early postoperative period was complicated due to low cardiac output syndrome and bradyarrhythmia requiring temporary cardiac pacing. Optimized pharmacological therapy resulted in a gradual reduction of symptoms and a clinical improvement of congestive heart failure (NYHA III – NYHA II). Due to the radical nature of the surgery, the patient was not referred for supplementary treatment. The follow-up currently exceeds 12 months – no new metastases have been found. This case provides an example of how to diagnose and treat heart tumors. PMID:26702284

  1. Cardiac function of the naked mole-rat: ecophysiological responses to working underground

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Kelly M.; Voorhees, Andrew; Chiao, Ying Ann; Han, Hai-Chao; Lindsey, Merry L.

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) is a strictly subterranean rodent with a low resting metabolic rate. Nevertheless, it can greatly increase its metabolic activity to meet the high energetic demands associated with digging through compacted soils in its xeric natural habitat where food is patchily distributed. We hypothesized that the NMR heart would naturally have low basal function and exhibit a large cardiac reserve, thereby mirroring the species' low basal metabolism and large metabolic scope. Echocardiography showed that young (2–4 yr old) healthy NMRs have low fractional shortening (28 ± 2%), ejection fraction (43 ± 2%), and cardiac output (6.5 ± 0.4 ml/min), indicating low basal cardiac function. Histology revealed large NMR cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (216 ± 10 ?m2) and cardiac collagen deposition of 2.2 ± 0.4%. Neither of these histomorphometric traits was considered pathological, since biaxial tensile testing showed no increase in passive ventricular stiffness. NMR cardiomyocyte fibers showed a low degree of rotation, contributing to the observed low NMR cardiac contractility. Interestingly, when the exercise mimetic dobutamine (3 ?g/g ip) was administered, NMRs showed pronounced increases in fractional shortening, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and stroke volume, indicating an increased cardiac reserve. The relatively low basal cardiac function and enhanced cardiac reserve of NMRs are likely to be ecophysiological adaptations to life in an energetically taxing environment. PMID:24363308

  2. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cardiac Arrest ( SCA ) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly and without warning. If this happens, blood ... when SCA occurs. During SCA , the heart stops beating and no blood is pumped to the rest ...

  3. Cardiac ablation procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for performing cardiac ablation: Radiofrequency ablation uses heat energy to eliminate the problem area. Cryoablation uses very ... is used to send electrical (or sometimes cold) energy to the problem area. This creates a small ...

  4. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helpful? Formal name: Cardiac Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | ... on Coronary artery disease: Tests and diagnosis .) The lipid profile is the most important blood test for ...

  5. Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces 1 Declarative Output by

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    Brass University of Halle, Germany Stefan Brass ICLP 2011 #12;Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces and important part. Stefan Brass ICLP 2011 #12;Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces 3 Motivation (2) Aren). Stefan Brass ICLP 2011 #12;Declarative Output by Ordering Text Pieces 4 Motivation (3) Problems

  6. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  7. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  8. Management of Complex Cardiac Issues in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huayong; Pasca, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Management of peripartum heart disease in the intensive care unit requires optimization of maternal hemodynamics and maintenance of fetal perfusion. This requires fetal monitoring and should address the parturient's oxygen saturation, hemoglobin, and cardiac output as it relates to uterine blood flow. Pharmacologic strategies have limited evidence pertaining to hemodynamic stabilization and fetal perfusion. There is some evidence that surgical management of critical mitral stenosis should be percutaneous when possible because cardiac bypass is associated with increased fetal mortality. Fetal monitoring strategies should address central organ perfusion because peripheral scalp pH has not been associated with improved fetal outcomes. PMID:26600447

  9. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac reinnervation, and understand the pathogenesis of arrhytmias. The other uncommon applications of cardiac PET include NaF imaging to identify calcium deposition in atherosclerotic plaques and ?-amyloid imaging to diagnose cardiac amyloid involvement. 18F-FDG imaging with a novel PET/MR camera has been reported to be very sensitive and specific for the differentiation between malignant and nonmalignant cardiac masses. The other potential applications of PET/MR are cardiac infectious/inflammatory conditions such as endocarditis. PMID:26035516

  10. Radiation from Cardiac Imaging Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... User Name Password Sign In Cardiology Patient Page Radiation From Cardiac Imaging Tests Questions You Should Ask ... cardiac imaging techniques computed tomography imaging nuclear medicine radiation Next Section Introduction Many patients are referred by ...

  11. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy. PMID:20572107

  12. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient reductions in plasma potassium concentration are of importance. Hypokalemia is present in 7% to 17% of patients with cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, up to 20% of hospitalized patients and up to 40% of patients on diuretics suffer from hypokalemia. Importantly, inadequate management of hypokalemia was found in 24% of hospitalized patients. Hypokalemia is associated with increased risk of arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as increased all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and heart failure mortality by up to 10-fold. Long-term potassium homeostasis depends on renal potassium excretion. However, skeletal muscles play an important role in short-term potassium homeostasis, primarily because skeletal muscles contain the largest single pool of potassium in the body. Moreover, due to the large number of Na+/K+ pumps and K+ channels, the skeletal muscles possess a huge capacity for potassium exchange. In cardiovascular patients, hypokalemia is often caused by nonpotassium-sparing diuretics, insufficient potassium intake and a shift of potassium into stores by increased potassium uptake stimulated by catecholamines, beta-adrenoceptor agonists and insulin. Interestingly, drugs with a proven significant positive effect on mortality and morbidity rates in heart failure patients all increase plasma potassium concentration. Thus, it may prove beneficial to pay more attention to hypokalemia and to maintain plasma potassium levels in the upper normal range. The more at risk of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis. PMID:21264075

  13. Influence of gravity on cardiac performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, G. M.; Sharp, M. K.; Woodruff, S. J.; O'Leary, D. S.; Lorange, R.; Everett, S. D.; Bennett, T. E.; Shurfranz, T.

    1998-01-01

    Results obtained by the investigators in ground-based experiments and in two parabolic flight series of tests aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft with a hydraulic simulator of the human systemic circulation have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume of 20%-50%. A corresponding drop in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) was observed over a range of atrial pressures (AP), representing a rightward shift of the classic CO versus AP cardiac function curve. These results are in agreement with echocardiographic experiments performed on space shuttle flights, where an average decrease in SV of 15% was measured following a three-day period of adaptation to weightlessness. The similarity of behavior of the hydraulic model to the human system suggests that the simple physical effects of the lack of hydrostatic pressure may be an important mechanism for the observed changes in cardiac performance in astronauts during the weightlessness of space flight.

  14. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  15. Cardiac Syndrome X: Update.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shilpa; Mehta, Puja K; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX), characterized by angina-like chest discomfort, ST segment depression during exercise, and normal epicardial coronary arteries at angiography, is highly prevalent in women. CSX is not benign, and linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes and a poor quality of life. Coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal cardiac nociception have been implicated in the pathogenesis of CSX. Treatment includes life-style modification, anti-anginal, anti-atherosclerotic, and anti-ischemic medications. Non-pharmacological options include cognitive behavioral therapy, enhanced external counterpulsation, neurostimulation, and stellate ganglionectomy. Studies have shown the efficacy of individual treatments but guidelines outlining the best course of therapy are lacking. PMID:26567981

  16. Cardiac disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nqayana, T; Moodley, J; Naidoo, DP

    2008-01-01

    Summary Summary This study was a retrospective review of patient charts of a relatively large number of patients with cardiac disease in pregnancy in a developing country. Ninety-five patients were evaluated; the majority (n = 36) were in the age group 21?25 years. Rheumatic heart disease was the commonest aetiology; eight women required balloon mitral valvuloplasty and one had a valve replacement at 32 weeks’ gestation. There were no maternal deaths but morbidity was high; 13 patients were admitted in cardiac failure, nine had atrial fibrillation and three required intensive-care management. There were 86 live births of the 97 deliveries. PMID:18568175

  17. Endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barile, Lucio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro; Marbán, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years it has been established that the heart contains a reservoir of stem and progenitor cells. These cells are positive for various stem/progenitor cell markers (Kit, Sca-1, Isl-1, and Side Population (SP) properties). The relationship between the various cardiac stem cells (CSC) and progenitor cells described awaits clarification. Furthermore, they may open a new therapeutic strategies of cardiac repair based on the regeneration potential of cardiac stem cells. Currently, cellular cardiomyoplasty is actively explored as means of regenerating damaged myocardium using several different cell types. CSCs seem a logical cell source to exploit for cardiac regeneration therapy. Their presence into the heart, the frequent co-expression of early cardiac progenitor transcription factors, and the capability for ex vivo and in vivo differentiation toward the cardiac lineages offer promise of enhanced cardiogenicity compared to other cell sources. CSCs, when isolated from various animal models by selection based on c-Kit, Sca-1, and/or MDR1, have shown cardiac regeneration potential in vivo following injection in the infracted myocardium. Recently, we have successfully isolated CSCs from small biopsies of human myocardium and expanded them ex vivo by many folds without losing differentiation potential into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, bringing autologous transplantation of CSCs closer to clinical evaluation. These cells are spontaneously shed from human surgical specimens and murine heart samples in primary culture. This heterogeneous population of cells forms multi-cellular clusters, dubbed cardiospheres (CSs), in suspension culture. CSs are composed of clonally-derived cells, consist of proliferating c-Kit positive cells primarily in their core and differentiating cells expressing cardiac and endothelial cell markers on their periphery. Although the intracardiac origin of adult myocytes has been unequivocally documented, the potential of an extracardiac source of cells, able to repopulate the lost CSCs in pathological conditions (infarct) cannot be excluded and will be discussed in this review. The delivery of human CSs or of CSs-derived cells into the injured heart of the SCID mouse resulted in engraftment, migration, myocardial regeneration and improvement of left ventricular function. Our method for ex vivo expansion of resident CSCs for subsequent autologous transplantation back into the heart, may give these cell populations, the resident and the transplanted one, the combined ability to mediate myocardial regeneration to an appreciable degree, and may change the way in which cardiovascular disease will be approached in the future. PMID:17631436

  18. Body size and work output.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Naidu, A N; Chatterjee, B; Rao, N

    1977-03-01

    The relationship between work output and anthropometric, biochemical, and socioeconomic varables was studied in 57 male industrial workers engaged in the production of detonator fuses. These workers were studied for 3 months and their daily work output was carefully measured. Work output was measured in terms of the number of fuses produced per day. Clinical and biochemical examination indicated that their current nutritional status was adequate. Among the parameters studied only body weight, height, and lean body weight were significantly correlated with work output. Body weight and lean body weight were significantly correlated (P less than 0.001) with work output even after removing the influence of height by partial correlation. Total daily work output was significantly higher (P less than 0.01) in those with higher body weight and lean body weight. The rate of work was also higher in the higher body weight group PMID:842484

  19. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  20. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  1. In vivo assessment of cardiac metabolism and function in the abdominal aortic banding model of compensated cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Anne-Marie L.; Giles, Lucia; Ball, Vicky; Miller, Jack J.; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to chronic mechanical overload and can lead to functional deterioration and heart failure. Changes in cardiac energy metabolism are considered as key to the hypertrophic remodelling process. The concurrence of obesity and hypertrophy has been associated with contractile dysfunction, and this work therefore aimed to investigate the in vivo structural, functional, and metabolic remodelling that occurs in the hypertrophied heart in the setting of a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western diet (WD). Methods and results Following induction of cardiac hypertrophy through abdominal aortic banding, male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to either a standard diet or a WD (containing 45% fat and 16% sucrose) for up to 14 weeks. Cardiac structural and functional characteristics were determined by CINE MRI, and in vivo metabolism was investigated using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled pyruvate. Cardiac hypertrophy was observed at all time points, irrespective of dietary manipulation, with no evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Pyruvate dehydrogenase flux was unchanged in the hypertrophied animals at any time point, but increased incorporation of the 13C label into lactate was observed by 9 weeks and maintained at 14 weeks, indicative of enhanced glycolysis. Conclusion Hypertrophied hearts revealed little evidence of a switch towards increased glucose oxidation but rather an uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism from glucose oxidation. This was maintained under conditions of dietary stress provided by a WD but, at this compensated phase of hypertrophy, did not result in any contractile dysfunction. PMID:25750189

  2. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  3. Evidence for increased cardiac compliance during exposure to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, S. C.; Convertino, V. A.; Fanton, J. W.; Reister, C. A.; Gaffney, F. A.; Ludwig, D. A.; Krotov, V. P.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Latham, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured hemodynamic responses during 4 days of head-down tilt (HDT) and during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in invasively instrumented rhesus monkeys to test the hypotheses that exposure to simulated microgravity increases cardiac compliance and that decreased stroke volume, cardiac output, and orthostatic tolerance are associated with reduced left ventricular peak dP/dt. Six monkeys underwent two 4-day (96 h) experimental conditions separated by 9 days of ambulatory activities in a crossover counterbalance design: 1) continuous exposure to 10 degrees HDT and 2) approximately 12-14 h per day of 80 degrees head-up tilt and 10-12 h supine (control condition). Each animal underwent measurements of central venous pressure (CVP), left ventricular and aortic pressures, stroke volume, esophageal pressure (EsP), plasma volume, alpha1- and beta1-adrenergic responsiveness, and tolerance to LBNP. HDT induced a hypovolemic and hypoadrenergic state with reduced LBNP tolerance compared with the control condition. Decreased LBNP tolerance with HDT was associated with reduced stroke volume, cardiac output, and peak dP/dt. Compared with the control condition, a 34% reduction in CVP (P = 0.010) and no change in left ventricular end-diastolic area during HDT was associated with increased ventricular compliance (P = 0.0053). Increased cardiac compliance could not be explained by reduced intrathoracic pressure since EsP was unaltered by HDT. Our data provide the first direct evidence that increased cardiac compliance was associated with headward fluid shifts similar to those induced by exposure to spaceflight and that reduced orthostatic tolerance was associated with lower cardiac contractility.

  4. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each stream, record or block name must be unique in its category (i.e. all streams must have different names, but a stream can have the same name as a record). Each category is an arbitrary length list which is handled by a 'manager' and there is one manager for each category.

  5. Pharmacological Manipulation of Peripheral Vascular Resistance in Special Clinical Situations after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Moga, Michael-Alice; Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Mazwi, Mjaye L; Costello, John M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery patients commonly suffer from alterations in vascular tone in the early post-operative period. Pharmacologic manipulation of systemic vascular resistance (SVR) can be complex in a variety of special patient situations including extremes of age, presence of left sided valvar lesions and the use of mechanical circulatory support. Familiarity with how these special circumstances alter SVR and the response to pharmacologic intervention will allow for tailored therapy and hopefully, optimized outcomes. This article addresses the eighth topic of the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery". PMID:26463983

  6. Design of a specialized computer for on-line monitoring of cardiac stroke volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Gebben, V. D.

    1972-01-01

    The design of a specialized analog computer for on-line determination of cardiac stroke volume by means of a modified version of the pressure pulse contour method is presented. The design consists of an analog circuit for computation and a timing circuit for detecting necessary events on the pressure waveform. Readouts of arterial pressures, systolic duration, heart rate, percent change in stroke volume, and percent change in cardiac output are provided for monitoring cardiac patients. Laboratory results showed that computational accuracy was within 3 percent, while animal experiments verified the operational capability of the computer. Patient safety considerations are also discussed.

  7. “Lung packing” in breath hold-diving: An impressive case of pulmo–cardiac interaction

    PubMed Central

    Schipke, Jochen D.; Kelm, Malte; Siegmund, Klaus; Muth, Thomas; Sievers, Burkhard; Steiner, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    There is a complex interaction between the heart and the lungs. We report on a healthy female who performs breath hold diving at a high, international level. In order to optimize pressure equalization during diving and to increase oxygen available, apneists employed a special breathing maneuver, so called “lung packing”. Based on cardiac MRI we could demonstrate impressive effects of this maneuver on left ventricular geometry and hemodynamics. Beyond the fact, that our findings support the concept of pulmonary –cardiac interrelationship, it should be emphasized, that the reported, extreme breathing maneuver could have detrimental consequences due to reduction of stroke volume and cardiac output.

  8. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Morley, David W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  9. Alcohol drinking and cardiac risk.

    PubMed

    Buemann, Benjamin; Dyerberg, Jørn; Astrup, Arne

    2002-06-01

    The present paper provides a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to the impact of alcohol intake on cardiovascular disease. Both cross-sectional and prospective studies have disclosed a negative association between moderate intake of alcoholic beverages and cardiovascular disease. The relationship appears to be present for both wine, beer and spirits. Effects of alcohol itself and also the role of different cardio-protective substances in alcoholic beverages are discussed. Alcohol has been suggested to beneficially affect the blood lipid profile, as it increases plasma HDL-cholesterol level. Furthermore, it may inhibit thrombogenesis by reducing thromboxan formation and decreasing the plasma level of fibrinogen. However, high blood concentrations of alcohol may impair fibrinolysis by increasing plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 level. This action could contribute to explaining the 'U'-shaped association between alcohol intake and cardiac events. Alcohol seems to promote abdominal fat distribution, but the importance of this effect in non-obese individuals is uncertain. Wine in particular, but also beer, contains polyphenols which act as antioxidants. Their action could maintain the integrity of the endothelial function by reducing the formation of superoxide. Moreover, these antioxidants may protect against LDL oxidation and modulate the macrophage attack on the endothelium. Although the cardio-protective effect of alcohol can hardly be addressed in healthy individuals by intervention studies with hard end points, there are many observational and experimental findings indicating that moderate alcohol drinking possesses properties preventive of cardiovascular disease. PMID:19087400

  10. NITROGEN OUTPUTS OF SMALL MAMMALS FROM FECAL AND URINE DEPOSITION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of small mammals in nitrogen cycling is poorly understood and could have reverberations back to the producer community by maintaining or even magnifying increased nitrogen availability. Our objective was to model nitrogen outputs (deposition of feces and urine) ...

  11. Maintaining Sustainability for Green Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The promise of sustainably designed school facilities is that they will operate more efficiently and last longer than buildings constructed in more traditional ways. But that promise comes with a big if. The payoff is delivered only if the facility managers operate and maintain the buildings in ways that adhere to sustainable strategies called for…

  12. [Maintaining patients' autonomy at home].

    PubMed

    Niang, Bénédicte; Coudre, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To maintain the flow of hospital discharges, the patient's return home with support from a home nursing service is important. If any difficulties are identified, there are various programmes or good practices which can be put into place. The future law on adapting society to ageing also comprises a scheme combining home assistance and nursing care. PMID:26144953

  13. [Cardiac auscultation in children].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Grassi, Laura; De Maria, Elia; Bonetti, Lorenzo; Borghi, Adriana; Cappelli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac auscultation permits to distinguish between the innocent heart murmurs and pathologic murmurs; characteristics of pathologic murmurs include a holosystolic or diastolic murmur, maximal murmur intensity at the upper left sternal border and increased intensity when the patient stands. Murmurs should be described by their timing in the cardiac cycle, intensity, shape, pitch, location, radiation, and response to dynamic maneuvers. When the medical history and physical examination support the diagnosis of innocent heart murmur, neither further investigation nor referal is indicated. On the contrary, echocardiography is recommended for patients with any other abnormal physical examination findings that increase the likelihood of structural heart disease. In this review we discuss the definition and classification of murmurs, how to evaluate it. PMID:25533235

  14. Experimental characterization of variable output refractive beamshapers using freeform elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jason A.; Smilie, Paul J.; Dutterer, Brian S.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    We present experimental results from variable output refractive beam shapers based on freeform optical surfaces. Two freeform elements in close proximity comprise a beam shaper that maps a circular Gaussian input to a circular `flat-top' output. Different lateral relative shifts between the elements result in a varying output diameter while maintaining the uniform irradiance distribution. We fabricated the beam shaping elements in PMMA using multi-axis milling on a Moore Nanotech 350FG diamond machining center and tested with a 632.8 nm Gaussian input. Initial optical testing confirmed both the predicted beam shaping and variable functionality, but with poor output uniformity. The effects of surface finish on optical performance were investigated using LightTrans VirtualLabTM to perform physical optics simulations of the milled freeform surfaces. These simulations provided an optimization path for determining machining parameters to improve the output uniformity of the beam shaping elements. A second variable beam shaper based on a super-Gaussian output was designed and fabricated using the newly determined machining parameters. Experimental test results from the second beam shaper showed outputs with significantly higher quality, but also suggest additional areas of study for further improvements in uniformity.

  15. Inhibition of a cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum chloride channel by tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Beca, Sanja; Pavlov, Evgeny; Kargacin, Margaret E; Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; French, Robert J; Kargacin, Gary J

    2008-10-01

    Anion and cation channels present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are believed to be necessary to maintain the electroneutrality of SR membrane during Ca(2+) uptake by the SR Ca(2+) pump (SERCA). Here we incorporated canine cardiac SR ion channels into lipid bilayers and studied the effects of tamoxifen and other antiestrogens on these channels. A Cl(-) channel was identified exhibiting multiple subconductance levels which could be divided into two primary conductance bands. Tamoxifen decreases the time the channel spends in its higher, voltage-sensitive band and the mean channel current. The lower, voltage-insensitive, conductance band is not affected by tamoxifen, nor is a K(+) channel present in the cardiac SR preparation. By examining SR Ca(2+) uptake, SERCA ATPase activity, and SR ion channels in the same preparation, we also estimated SERCA transport current, SR Cl(-) and K(+) currents, and the density of SERCA, Cl(-), and K(+) channels in cardiac SR membranes. PMID:18458943

  16. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-01-15

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-{alpha} plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-{alpha} activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription.

  17. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies.

    PubMed

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2013-07-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  18. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:14764186

  19. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-02-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, the corridor procedure, and the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, and the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25 to 30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom upon which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:15028063

  20. Cardiac surgery for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cox, James L

    2004-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia surgery was initiated in 1968 with the first successful division of an accessory AV connection for the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome. Subsequent surgical procedures included the left atrial isolation procedure and the right atrial isolation procedure for automatic atrial tachycardias, discrete cryosurgery of the AV node for AV nodal reentry tachycardia, the atrial transection procedure, corridor procedure and Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, the right ventricular disconnection procedure for arrhythmogenic right ventricular tachycardia, the encircling endocardial ventriculotomy, subendocardial resection procedure, endocardial cryoablation, the Jatene procedure, and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Because of monumental strides in the treatment of most refractory arrhythmias by endocardial catheter techniques during the past decade, the only remaining viable surgical procedures for cardiac arrhythmias are the Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation and the Dor procedure for ischemic ventricular tachycardia. Nevertheless, the 25-30 years of intense activity in the field of cardiac arrhythmia surgery provided the essential foundation for the development of these catheter techniques and represent one of the most exciting and productive eras in the history of medicine. In one short professional career, we have witnessed the birth of arrhythmia surgery, its adolescence as an "esoteric" specialty, its prime as an enlightening yet exhausting period, and finally its waning years as a source of knowledge and wisdom on which better methods of treatment have been founded. One could hardly ask for a more rewarding experience. PMID:23570110

  1. Cardiac Signatures of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Enge, Juliane; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Background There are well-established relations between personality and the heart, as evidenced by associations between negative emotions on the one hand, and coronary heart disease or chronic heart failure on the other. However, there are substantial gaps in our knowledge about relations between the heart and personality in healthy individuals. Here, we investigated whether amplitude patterns of the electrocardiogram (ECG) correlate with neurotisicm, extraversion, agreeableness, warmth, positive emotion, and tender-mindedness as measured with the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness (NEO) personality inventory. Specifically, we investigated (a) whether a cardiac amplitude measure that was previously reported to be related to flattened affectivity (referred to as values) would explain variance of NEO scores, and (b) whether correlations can be found between NEO scores and amplitudes of the ECG. Methodology/Principal Findings NEO scores and rest ECGs were obtained from 425 healthy individuals. Neuroticism and positive emotion significantly differed between individuals with high and low values. In addition, stepwise cross-validated regressions indicated correlations between ECG amplitudes and (a) agreeableness, as well as (b) positive emotion. Conclusions/Significance These results are the first to demonstrate that ECG amplitude patterns provide information about the personality of an individual as measured with NEO personality scales and facets. These findings open new perspectives for a more efficient personality assessment using cardiac measures, as well as for more efficient risk-stratification and pre-clinical diagnosis of individuals at risk for cardiac, affective and psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22363649

  2. Cardiac surgery 2014 reviewed.

    PubMed

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Valchanov, Ilija; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2015-12-01

    For the year 2014, more than 17,000 published references can be found in Pubmed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been characterized by a vivid discussion in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Specifically, there have been important contributions in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery as well as in the fields of interventional valve therapy. Here, the US core valve trial with the first demonstration of a survival advantage at 1 year with transcatheter valves compared to surgical aortic valve replacement or the 5-year outcome of the SYNTAX trial with significant advantages for bypass surgery has been the landmark. However, in addition to these most visible publications, there have been several highly relevant and interesting contributions. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices) and aortic surgery. This condensed summary will provide the reader with "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery. PMID:26404007

  3. Nuclear imaging for cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Longhi, Simone; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Hazenberg, Bouke P C; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Histological analysis of endomyocardial tissue is still the gold standard for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis, but has its limitations. Accordingly, there is a need for non-invasive modalities to diagnose cardiac amyloidosis. Echocardiography and ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can show characteristics which may not be very specific for cardiac amyloid. Nuclear medicine has gained a precise role in this context: several imaging modalities have become available for the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of cardiac amyloidosis during the last two decades. The different classes of radiopharmaceuticals have the potential to bind different constituents of the amyloidotic infiltrates, with some relevant differences among the various aetiologic types of amyloidosis and the different organs and tissues involved. This review focuses on the background of the commonly used modalities, their present clinical applications, and future clinical perspectives in imaging patients with (suspected) cardiac amyloidosis. The main focus is on conventional nuclear medicine (bone scintigraphy, cardiac sympathetic innervation) and positron emission tomography. PMID:25424887

  4. Cardiac sarcoidosis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Vishal; Sanal, Shireen; DeLorenzo, Lawrence J.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Maguire, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology characterized by noncaseating granulomas in involved organs. Organs involved with sarcoidosis include lymph nodes, skin, lung, central nervous system, and eye. Only 40-50% of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis diagnosed at autopsy have the diagnosis made during their lifetime. Cardiac sarcoidosis can manifest itself as complete heart block, ventricular arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, pericardial effusion, pulmonary hypertension, and ventricular aneurysms. Diagnostic tests such as the electrocardiogram, two-dimensional echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography scan, radionuclide scan, and endomyocardial biopsy can be helpful in the early detection of cardiac sarcoidosis. Considering the increased risk of sudden death, cardiac sarcoidosis is an indication for early treatment with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive agents. Other treatments include placement of a pacemaker or implantable defibrillator to prevent sudden death. In refractory cases, cardiac transplantation should be considered. PMID:22291785

  5. Sudden cardiac death and obesity.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Benoit; Sarrazin, Jean-François; Nault, Isabelle; Poirier, Paul

    2014-09-01

    For individuals and the society as a whole, the increased risk of sudden cardiac death in obese patients is becoming a major challenge, especially since obesity prevalence has been increasing steadily around the globe. Traditional risk factors and obesity often coexist. Hypertension, diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome are well-known risk factors for CV disease and are often present in the obese patient. Although the bulk of evidence is circumstantial, sudden cardiac death and obesity share common traditional CV risk factors. Structural, functional and metabolic factors modulate and influence the risk of sudden cardiac death in the obese population. Other risk factors such as left ventricular hypertrophy, increased number of premature ventricular complexes, altered QT interval and reduced heart rate variability are all documented in both obese and sudden cardiac death populations. The present review focuses on out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death and potential mechanisms leading to sudden cardiac death in this population. PMID:25160995

  6. [Sudden cardiac death in athletes].

    PubMed

    Parikka, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Sudden deaths occurring during exercise are rare and are most commonly due to cardiac arrest. It is most commonly underlain by symptomless cardiomyopathy or coronary artery disease. Preventive work comes up against a diagnostic problem in distinguishing adaptational changes of the athletic heart from a heart disorder. To reveal the danger of cardiac arrest and reduce human tragedies international sports organizations and cardiologic expert groups recommend screening of cardiac disorders among competing athletes. PMID:24163971

  7. Measuring Air-Ionizer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonborg, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Test apparatus checks ion content of airstream from commercial air ionizer. Apparatus ensures ion output is sufficient to neutralize static charges in electronic assembly areas and concentrations of positive and negative ions are balanced.

  8. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (inventor); Gunter, William D. (inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  9. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-13

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  10. Sudden cardiac death – Historical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, S.P.; Namboodiri, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is an unexpected death due to cardiac causes that occurs in a short time period (generally within 1 h of symptom onset) in a person with known or unknown cardiac disease. It is believed to be involved in nearly a quarter of human deaths, with ventricular fibrillation being the most common mechanism. It is estimated that more than 7 million lives per year are lost to SCD worldwide. Historical perspectives of SCD are analyzed with a brief description on how the developments in the management of sudden cardiac arrest evolved over time. PMID:24568828

  11. NMG documentation, part 3: maintainer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    This is the third of a three-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. Part I is aimed at the user of the systenL It contains an introduction, with an out- line of the complete report, and Chapter 1, User`s Point of View. Part II is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, How It Works. Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and contains Chapter 3, Maintenance, and Chapter 4, Validation. Because its contents are so specialized, Part III will receive only limited distribution. Note that each chapter has its own page numbering and table of contents.

  12. Amino Acids as Metabolic Substrates during Cardiac Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Kenneth J.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The heart is well known as a metabolic omnivore in that it is capable of consuming fatty acids, glucose, ketone bodies, pyruvate, lactate, amino acids and even its own constituent proteins, in order of decreasing preference. The energy from these substrates supports not only mechanical contraction, but also the various transmembrane pumps and transporters required for ionic homeostasis, electrical activity, metabolism and catabolism. Cardiac ischemia – for example, due to compromise of the coronary vasculature or end-stage heart failure – will alter both electrical and metabolic activity. While the effects of myocardial ischemia on electrical propagation and stability have been studied in depth, the effects of ischemia on metabolic substrate preference has not been fully appreciated: oxygen deprivation during ischemia will significantly alter the relative ability of the heart to utilize each of these substrates. Although changes in cardiac metabolism are understood to be an underlying component in almost all cardiac myopathies, the potential contribution of amino acids in maintaining cardiac electrical conductance and stability during ischemia is underappreciated. Despite clear evidence that amino acids exert cardioprotective effects in ischemia and other cardiac disorders, their role in the metabolism of the ischemic heart has yet to be fully elucidated. This review synthesizes the current literature of the metabolic contribution of amino acids during ischemia by analyzing relevant historical and recent research. PMID:23354395

  13. Topical minoxidil: cardiac effects in bald man.

    PubMed Central

    Leenen, F H; Smith, D L; Unger, W P

    1988-01-01

    Systemic cardiovascular effects during chronic treatment with topical minoxidil vs placebo were evaluated using a double-blind, randomized design for two parallel groups (n = 20 for minoxidil, n = 15 for placebo). During 6 months of follow-up, blood pressure did not change, whereas minoxidil increased heart rate by 3-5 beats min-1. Compared with placebo, topical minoxidil caused significant increases in LV end-diastolic volume, in cardiac output (by 0.751 min-1) and in LV mass (by 5 g m-2). We conclude that in healthy subjects short-term use of topical minoxidil is likely not to be detrimental. However, safety needs to be established regarding ischaemic symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease as well as for the possible development of LV hypertrophy in healthy subjects during years of therapy. PMID:3191000

  14. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a)...

  15. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a)...

  16. Capillary force lithography for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide(1). Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart's extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale(2). Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering(3-5). A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling(2). Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart(6-9). Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)(8) and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function(10-14). Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively(15,16). Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip and the PUA mold is placed on top. For UV-assisted CFL, the PU is then exposed to UV radiation (? = 250-400 nm) for curing. For solvent-mediated CFL, the PLGA is embossed using heat (120 °C) and pressure (100 kPa). After curing, the PUA mold is peeled off, leaving behind an ANFS for cell culture. Primary cells, such as neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, as well as human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, can be maintained on the ANFS(2). PMID:24962161

  17. Cardiovascular anatomy and cardiac function in the air-breathing swamp eel (Monopterus albus).

    PubMed

    Iversen, Nina K; Lauridsen, Henrik; Do, Thi Thanh Huong; Nguyen, Van Cong; Gesser, Hans; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bayley, Mark; Pedersen, Michael; Wang, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Monopterus albus, a swamp eel inhabiting the freshwaters of South East Asia, relies on an extensive vascularisation of the buccal cavity, pharynx and anterior oesophagus for gas exchange, while the gills are much reduced. In the present study we describe the macro-circulation in the cephalic region and the vascularisation of the buccal cavity of M. albus using vascular fillings and micro-computed tomography (?CT). We also show that M. albus has the capacity to use the buccal cavity for aquatic gas exchange, being able to maintain normal arterial blood gas composition, blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac output throughout 10h of forced submergence. M. albus therefore can be characterised as a facultative air-breather. Because M. albus aestivates for many months in moist mud during the dry season we characterised in vivo cardiovascular function during exposure to anoxia as well as the effects of anoxia on in vitro contractility of strip preparations from atria and ventricle. Both studies revealed a low anoxia tolerance, rendering it unlikely that M. albus can survive prolonged exposure to anoxia. PMID:22944727

  18. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11?mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240?mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  19. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw and label…

  20. GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Capote, Leany A; Mendez Perez, Roberto; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as ?-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future. PMID:25981298

  1. [No compression of cardiac cavities in transthoracic ultrasound does not exclude cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Frederiksen, Christina Alcaraz; Sloth, Erik

    2014-11-24

    The clinical presentation of cardiac tamponade is difficult to distinguish from other causes of shock. Pericardial fluid is easy to visualize with cardiac ultrasound and a key sign of overt cardiac tamponade is the compression of right side cavities. We present two cases in which cardiac tamponade was present, but where compression of cardiac cavities could not be demon-strated with transthoracic cardiac ultrasound. This emphasizes that cardiac tamponade is still a clinical diagnosis. PMID:25430575

  2. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance. PMID:20884217

  3. Cardiac Remodeling in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    ABEL, E. DALE; LITWIN, SHELDON E.; SWEENEY, GARY

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and its strong association with cardiovascular disease have resulted in unprecedented interest in understanding the effects of obesity on the cardiovascular system. A consistent, but puzzling clinical observation is that obesity confers an increased susceptibility to the development of cardiac disease, while at the same time affording protection against subsequent mortality (termed the obesity paradox). In this review we focus on evidence available from human and animal model studies and summarize the ways in which obesity can influence structure and function of the heart. We also review current hypotheses regarding mechanisms linking obesity and various aspects of cardiac remodeling. There is currently great interest in the role of adipokines, factors secreted from adipose tissue, and their role in the numerous cardiovascular complications of obesity. Here we focus on the role of leptin and the emerging promise of adiponectin as a cardioprotective agent. The challenge of understanding the association between obesity and heart failure is complicated by the multifaceted interplay between various hemodynamic, metabolic, and other physiological factors that ultimately impact the myocardium. Furthermore, the end result of obesity-associated changes in the myocardial structure and function may vary at distinct stages in the progression of remodeling, may depend on the individual pathophysiology of heart failure, and may even remain undetected for decades before clinical manifestation. Here we summarize our current knowledge of this complex yet intriguing topic. PMID:18391168

  4. Decoding the Cardiac Message

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    This review reflects and expands upon the contents of the author’s presentation at The Thomas W. Smith Memorial Lecture at AHA Scientific Sessions, 2011. “Decoding the cardiac message” refers to accumulating results from ongoing microRNA research that is altering longstanding concepts of the mechanisms for, and consequences of, messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation in the heart. First, I provide a brief historical perspective of the field of molecular genetics, touching upon seminal research that paved the way for modern molecular cardiovascular research and helped establish the foundation for current concepts of mRNA regulation in the heart. I follow with some interesting details about the specific research that led to the discovery and appreciation of microRNAs as highly conserved pivotal regulators of RNA expression and translation. Finally, I provide a personal viewpoint as to how agnostic genome-wide techniques for measuring microRNAs, their mRNA targets, and their protein products can be applied in an integrated multi-systems approach to uncover direct and indirect effects of microRNAs. Experimental designs integrating next-generation sequencing and global proteomics have the potential to address unanswered questions regarding microRNA-mRNA interactions in cardiac disease, how disease alters mRNA targeting by specific microRNAs, and how mutational and polymorphic nucleotide variation in microRNAs can affect end-organ function and stress-response. PMID:22383710

  5. Effect of hypokinesia on cardiac contractile function and nervous regulation of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Gorina, M. S.; Shchegolkov, A. N.; Larinov, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Longterm hypokinesia caused cardiac deadaptation in rabbits, which resulted in the diminishing of the left ventricular rate of contraction and relaxation, joined later by decreased vascular resistance. As a results, the ejection rate as well as stroke volume and cardiac output were normal. The decrease of the relaxation speed was more obvious at a high heart rate and results in shortening of the diastolic pause and diminishing of cardiac output. Hearts of the hypokinetic animals were characterized by normal maximal pressure developed by a unit of muccardial mass aorta clamping, decreased adrenoreactivity, and increased cholinoreactivity. This complex of changes is contrary to changes observed in adaptation to exercise, but is similar to changes observed in compensatory hypertrophy of the heart.

  6. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  7. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  8. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  9. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  10. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  11. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  12. Explicit feedback maintains implicit knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mealor, Andy D; Dienes, Zoltan

    2013-09-01

    The role of feedback was investigated with respect to conscious and unconscious knowledge acquired during artificial grammar learning (AGL). After incidental learning of training sequences, participants classified further sequences in terms of grammaticality and reported their decision strategy with or without explicit veridical feedback. Sequences that disobeyed the learning structure conformed to an alternative structure. Feedback led to an increase in the amount of reported conscious knowledge of structure (derived rules and recollections) but did not increase its accuracy. Conversely, feedback maintained the accuracy of unconscious knowledge of structure (intuition or familiarity-based responses) which otherwise degraded. Results support a dual-process account of AGL. They suggest that implicit learning of the to-be-rejected structure at test contaminates familiarity-based classifications whereas feedback allows competing familiarity signals to be contextualised, which is incompatible with theories that consider familiarity context-insensitive. PMID:23770696

  13. Maintaining integrity on buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    This article outlines options available to the pipeline operator for monitoring the external corrosion protection systems applied to pipelines and describes the practices used by the British Pipeline Agency to maintain the integrity of some 2,500 km of pipelines. More than half of the network was constructed in the 1940s and water later replaced during the 1960s and 1970s with coated and welded pipe. Until the late 1970s, the lines were coated with either a conventional hot bitumen or coal tar flood coat enamel with a fiber glass insert and impregnated outer wrap. Later, extruded polyethylene was used. Welded joints were coated with either hot- or cold-applied tapes. Cathodic protection (CP) was gradually applied from the mid-1950s until the entire network was completed in 1970.

  14. Installing and maintaining gear pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmire, K.

    1996-03-01

    While not as common as centrifugal pumps in the CPI, gear pumps play important roles in handling many of today`s more difficult-to-pump fluids. Because they operate at lower speeds -- generally, 900 rpm or less -- their seals and bearings tend to last longer than those of centrifugal models. In addition, unlike centrifugal pumps, gear pumps` flows are independent of their systems` pressure curves, and they can handle a wider range of viscosities. Although high-flow, low-head applications remain the domain of centrifugal pumps, the use of gear pumps is increasing in the chemical process industries (CPI). While some application boundaries between gears and centrifugals are blurring, there are some crucial differences between the way the two are operated and maintained -- for example, where pressure relief is concerned. This article provides a general summary of gear pump characteristics and applications, highlighting critical aspects of installation, operation and maintenance.

  15. When to maintain centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Karassik, I.J.

    1993-04-01

    Centrifugal pumps comprise critical maintenance equipment. The rationale of when to maintain them relates to a spreading tendency to contain costs in the face of tight money. Plant managers are thus entitled to a thorough analysis of whether reduced expenditures truly lower costs or actually hinder maintenance and increase costs. Absence of such an analysis hides the fact that proper and timely maintenance has a double effect: it not only reduces power consumption but also extends equipment life, and thus reduces the frequency of labor and material expenditures for scheduled or crisis maintenance. Centrifugal pump maintenance can demonstrate well the validity of this observation. The paper discusses: restoring internal clearances; real cost of renewing clearances; and monitoring clearances and pump performance.

  16. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  17. Mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescence mimicking cardiac tumor.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Arava, Sudheer; Muthukumaran, Subramanian; Sharma, Bhavna; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar; Ray, Ruma

    2016-01-01

    Mesothelial incidental cardiac excrescence is a non-neoplastic tumor-like lesion commonly occurring in the intracardiac region. The exact etiology is unclear. A 32-year-old woman presented with respiratory distress on exertion. Echocardiography showed severe aortic, mitral, and tricuspid regurgitation, for which triple-valve replacement was performed. A small cardiac excrescence was found over the aortic valve, measuring 0.6?×?0.3?×?0.3-cm, which on microscopy showed features of mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescence. This condition is very rare but it must be recognized because it mimics a metastatic malignancy. PMID:24838237

  18. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  19. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output

  20. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  1. Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output

    EPA Science Inventory

    COMBO is a spreadsheet-based model for the use of managers, conservationists, and biologists for projecting the effects of climate change on coral reefs at local-to-regional scales. The COMBO (Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output) model calculates the impacts to coral reefs from...

  2. A simple method of maintaining cannula patency for repeated hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    CHUNG, W B; PRICE, J D

    1963-06-01

    Hemodialysis requires repeated arterial and venous cut-downs unless Scribner's bypass technique is used. Infusion of large volumes of fluid causes further attrition of vessels; cardiac decompensation is a contraindication for an arteriovenous bypass. To overcome these problems a simple method of maintaining indwelling arterial and venous cannula patency by gravity infusion of 20 mg. heparin in 500 mg. of solution has been devised. The solution is suspended from a ceiling hook, the height being adjusted by pulley, according to the patient's blood pressure. A minimum infusion rate of 500 ml. per day keeps the cannula open indefinitely. In three patients dialyzed repeatedly the cannulae remained patent up to 13 days and were still open when removed. The method also facilitates connection of the patient to a dialyzer. PMID:14021246

  3. Anesthetic issues for robotic cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Wendy K; Walker, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    As innovative technology continues to be developed and is implemented into the realm of cardiac surgery, surgical teams, cardiothoracic anesthesiologists, and health centers are constantly looking for methods to improve patient outcomes and satisfaction. One of the more recent developments in cardiac surgical practice is minimally invasive robotic surgery. Its use has been documented in numerous publications, and its use has proliferated significantly over the past 15 years. The anesthesiology team must continue to develop and perfect special techniques to manage these patients perioperatively including lung isolation techniques and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). This review article of recent scientific data and personal experience serves to explain some of the challenges, which the anesthetic team must manage, including patient and procedural factors, complications from one-lung ventilation (OLV) including hypoxia and hypercapnia, capnothorax, percutaneous cannulation for cardiopulmonary bypass, TEE guidance, as well as methods of intraoperative monitoring and analgesia. As existing minimally invasive techniques are perfected, and newer innovations are demonstrated, it is imperative that the cardiothoracic anesthesiologist must improve and maintain skills to guide these patients safely through the robotic procedure. PMID:25566713

  4. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Venkateswara Sarma; Ilankumaran, V; Rao, N.Srinivasa

    2004-01-01

    Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future. PMID:16943934

  5. Repair of a Complex Congenital Cardiac Defect

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... 00:00:14 ANNOUNCER: Over the next hour, live from Children's Hospital Boston's cardiac OR, see cardiac surgeons repair a complex congenital cardiac defect. Each year the pediatric cardiac surgery program provides surgical care to approximately 1,100 patients, including more than 700 cases of open ...

  6. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  7. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with ?-myosin heavy chain-cre (?MHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  8. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  9. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 ?M. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  10. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader’s further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  11. Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Chen, Robert Jeen-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Videoscope-assisted cardiac surgery (VACS) offers a minimally invasive platform for most cardiac operations such as coronary and valve procedures. It includes robotic and thoracoscopic approaches and each has strengths and weaknesses. The success depends on appropriate hardware setup, staff training, and troubleshooting efficiency. In our institution, we often use VACS for robotic left-internal-mammary-artery takedown, mitral valve repair, and various intra-cardiac operations such as tricuspid valve repair, combined Maze procedure, atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, etc. Hands-on reminders and updated references are provided for reader's further understanding of the topic. PMID:24455172

  12. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li-Ming; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this mini-review, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26635926

  13. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed. PMID:21934524

  14. Polarization maintaining linear cavity Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heesuk; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Kim, Seungman; Lee, Keunwoo; Han, Seongheum; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    We present a polarization-maintaining (PM) type of Er-doped fiber linear oscillator designed to produce femtosecond laser pulses with high operational stability. Mode locking is activated using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) attached to one end of the linear PM oscillator. To avoid heat damage, the SESAM is mounted on a copper-silicon-layered heat sink and connected to the linear oscillator through a fiber buffer dissipating the residual pump power. A long-term stability test is performed to prove that the proposed oscillator design maintains a soliton-mode single-pulse operation without breakdown of mode locking over a week period. With addition of an Er-doped fiber amplifier, the output power is raised to 180 mW with 60 fs pulse duration, from which an octave-spanning supercontinuum is produced.

  15. Adaptive Neural Output Feedback Control of Output-Constrained Nonlinear Systems With Unknown Output Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Lai, Guanyu; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Chun Lung Philip

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of adaptive neural output-feedback control for a class of special nonlinear systems with the hysteretic output mechanism and the unmeasured states. A modified Bouc-Wen model is first employed to capture the output hysteresis phenomenon in the design procedure. For its fusion with the neural networks and the Nussbaum-type function, two key lemmas are established using some extended properties of this model. To avoid the bad system performance caused by the output nonlinearity, a barrier Lyapunov function technique is introduced to guarantee the prescribed constraint of the tracking error. In addition, a robust filtering method is designed to cancel the restriction that all the system states require to be measured. Based on the Lyapunov synthesis, a new neural adaptive controller is constructed to guarantee the prescribed convergence of the tracking error and the semiglobal uniform ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system. Simulations are implemented to evaluate the performance of the proposed neural control algorithm in this paper. PMID:25915964

  16. Identification of cardiac stem cells within mature cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Nevorotin, Alexey; Galagudza, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac stem cells are described in a number of mammalian species including humans. Cardiac stem cell clusters consisting of both lineage-negative and partially committed cells are generally identified between contracting cardiac myocytes. In the present study, c-kit(+), Sca(+), and Isl1(+) stem cells were revealed to be located inside the sarcoplasm of cardiac myocytes in myocardial cell cultures derived from newborn, 20-, and 40-day-old rats. Intracellularly localized cardiac stem cells had a coating or capsule with a few pores that opened into the host cell sarcoplasm. The similar structures were also identified in the suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells (ex vivo) of 20- and 40-day-old rats. The results from this study provide direct evidence for the replicative division of encapsulated stem cells, followed by their partial cardiomyogenic differentiation. The latter is substantiated by the release of multiple transient amplifying cells following the capsule rupture. In conclusion, functional cardiac stem cells can reside not only exterior to but also within cardiomyocytes. PMID:26280107

  17. A meta-analysis of in vivo vertebrate cardiac performance: implications for cardiovascular support in the evolution of endothermy.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hedrick, Michael S

    2015-04-15

    Endothermy in birds and mammals is associated with high body temperatures, and high rates of metabolism that are aerobically supported by elevated rates of cardiovascular O2 transport. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine cardiovascular data from ectothermic and endothermic vertebrates, at rest and during exercise, with the goal of identifying key variables that may have contributed to the role of the cardiovascular system in supporting high rates of O2 transport associated with endothermy. Vascular conductance, cardiac power and stroke work were summarized and calculated from a variety of studies at rest and during exercise for five classes of vertebrates where data were available. Conductance and cardiac power were linearly related to cardiac output from rest to exercise and also interspecifically. Exercise cardiac power and stroke work were greater in the endothermic species, owing to increased flow resulting from increased heart rate and increased pressure. Increased relative ventricle mass (RVM) was related to increased stroke volume in both groups. However, the increased RVM of endotherms was related to the increased pressure, as stroke work per gram of ventricle during exercise was equivalent between the groups. Cardiac power was linearly related to aerobic metabolic power, with 158?mW aerobic power output achieved per mW of cardiac power input. This analysis indicates that the greatly increased heart rate and cardiac stroke work leading to increased blood flow rate and blood pressure was necessary to support the metabolic requirements of endothermy. PMID:25911732

  18. Cardiac responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zarndt, Rachel; Piloto, Sarah; Powell, Frank L; Haddad, Gabriel G; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen

    2015-12-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen is important for the survival of all tissues, but it is especially critical for tissues with high-energy demands, such as the heart. Insufficient tissue oxygenation occurs under a variety of conditions, including high altitude, embryonic and fetal development, inflammation, and thrombotic diseases, often affecting multiple organ systems. Responses and adaptations of the heart to hypoxia are of particular relevance in human cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, in which the effects of hypoxic exposure can range in severity from transient to long-lasting. This study uses the genetic model system Drosophila to investigate cardiac responses to acute (30 min), sustained (18 h), and chronic (3 wk) hypoxia with reoxygenation. Whereas hearts from wild-type flies recovered quickly after acute hypoxia, exposure to sustained or chronic hypoxia significantly compromised heart function upon reoxygenation. Hearts from flies with mutations in sima, the Drosophila homolog of the hypoxia-inducible factor alpha subunit (HIF-?), exhibited exaggerated reductions in cardiac output in response to hypoxia. Heart function in hypoxia-selected flies, selected over many generations for survival in a low-oxygen environment, revealed reduced cardiac output in terms of decreased heart rate and fractional shortening compared with their normoxia controls. Hypoxia-selected flies also had smaller hearts, myofibrillar disorganization, and increased extracellular collagen deposition, consistent with the observed reductions in contractility. This study indicates that longer-duration hypoxic insults exert deleterious effects on heart function that are mediated, in part, by sima and advances Drosophila models for the genetic analysis of cardiac-specific responses to hypoxia and reoxygenation. PMID:26377557

  19. Microgyroscope with closed loop output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Cargille, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop operation by a control voltage (V.sub.TY), that is demodulated by an output signal of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis). The present invention provides wide-band, closed-loop operation for a micro-gyroscope (10) and allows the drive frequency to be closely tuned to a high Q sense axis resonance. A differential sense signal (S1-S2) is compensated and fed back by differentially changing the voltage on the drive electrodes to rebalance Coriolis torque. The feedback signal is demodulated in phase with the drive axis signal (K.sub..omega..crclbar..sub.x) to produce a measure of the Coriolis force.

  20. UFO - The Universal FEYNRULES Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so-called Universal FEYNRULES Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a PYTHON module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the MATHEMATICA package FEYNRULES that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

  1. Standardized multiple output power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive program to develop a prototype model of a standardized multiple output power supply for use in space flight applications is described. The prototype unit was tested and evaluated to assure that the design would provide near optimum performance for the planned application. The prototype design used a dc-to-dc converter incorporating reqenerative current feedback with a time-ratio controlled duty cycle to achieve high efficiency over a wide variation of input voltage and output loads. The packaging concept uses a mainframe capable of accommodating up to four inverter/regulator modules with one common input filter and housekeeping module. Each inverter/regulator module provides a maximum of 100 watts or 10 amperes. Each module is adaptable to operate at any voltage between 4.0 volts and 108 volts. The prototype unit contains +5, + or - 15 and +28 volt modules.

  2. Image guidance in cardiac electrophysiology

    E-print Network

    Malchano, Zachary John

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are characterized by a disruption or abnormal conduction of electrical signals within the heart. Treatment of arrhythmias has dramatically evolved over the past half-century, and today, minimally-invasive ...

  3. Blood Conservation in Cardiac Surgery 

    E-print Network

    Slight, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is traditionally a heavy user of blood and blood products. Until recently, the benefits of transfusion have been largely assumed and the risks relatively ignored. This has prompted us to examine new ways ...

  4. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma has resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgical procedures. Endoscopic surgery offers patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, and surgical robots have enhanced the ability and precision of surgeons. Consequently, technological advances have facilitated totally endoscopic robotic cardiac surgery, which has allowed surgeons to operate endoscopically rather than through a median sternotomy during cardiac surgery. Thus, repairs for structural heart conditions, including mitral valve plasty, atrial septal defect closure, multivessel minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCAB), and totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), can be totally endoscopic. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery as minimally invasive cardiac surgery is reviewed. PMID:26134073

  5. Symptoms of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... you need to protect your health. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cardiac Arrest About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ... Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page ...

  6. Computational cardiac anatomy using MRI.

    PubMed

    Beg, Mirza Faisal; Helm, Patrick A; McVeigh, Elliot; Miller, Michael I; Winslow, Raimond L

    2004-11-01

    Ventricular geometry and fiber orientation may undergo global or local remodeling in cardiac disease. However, there are as yet no mathematical and computational methods for quantifying variation of geometry and fiber orientation or the nature of their remodeling in disease. Toward this goal, a landmark and image intensity-based large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) method to transform heart geometry into common coordinates for quantification of shape and form was developed. Two automated landmark placement methods for modeling tissue deformations expected in different cardiac pathologies are presented. The transformations, computed using the combined use of landmarks and image intensities, yields high-registration accuracy of heart anatomies even in the presence of significant variation of cardiac shape and form. Once heart anatomies have been registered, properties of tissue geometry and cardiac fiber orientation in corresponding regions of different hearts may be quantified. PMID:15508155

  7. Output gear of automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ideta, Y.; Miida, S.

    1986-12-16

    An automatic transmission is described for a front engine, front wheel drive vehicle, comprising: a torque converter; a main power train comprising a rotatory terminal member, the main power train being connected with the torque converter for transmitting a driving torque from the torque converter to the terminal member; housing means enclosing the main power train, the housing means having a cylindrical bore and at least one oil feed passage opening in a cylindrical surface of the bore, and an output gear rotatably supported by the housing means and connected detachably with the terminal member of the main power train for transmitting the driving torque from the main power train to front wheels of the vehicle. The main power train is placed between the torque converter and the output gear, the output gear having a hub which is splined detachably to the terminal member, and which is fitting in the bore of the housing means in such a manner that the hub can rotate in the bore. The hub has an annular groove formed on an outer cylindrical surface of the hub, the output gear being formed with lubricating means extending from the annular groove for conveying oil from the annular groove, the oil feed passage of the housing means opening into the annular groove for supplying oil into the lubricating means through the annular groove. The annular groove has sufficient depth and width within a range permitted by a strength of the hub to prevent a shortage of the oil supply through the annular groove to the lubricating means due to a centrifugal force of the oil rotating in the annular groove together with walls of the annular groove.

  8. The relationship between aerobic fitness and both power output and subsequent recovery during maximal intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    McMahon, S; Wenger, H A

    1998-12-01

    The primary aim of the study was to establish a link between aerobic adaptation and both the recovery from maximal short duration exercise, and the ability to maintain power output in a subsequent bout. The question as to whether the aerobic adaptations facilitating recovery are centrally or peripherally located was also examined. Male university level rugby and soccer players (n=20) volunteered for the study. Mean (SD) age, mass and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was 21.9 (1.8) years, 84.7 (12.7) kg and 52.7 (6.9) ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) respectively. Subjects completed six 15s maximal intensity sprints (90s active recovery) on a Monark friction braked cycle ergometer. A significant relationship (r=-.49, P=0.03) was obtained between VO2 max (mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and the percent drop-off in mean power in bouts 5 and 6 compared with bout 1. A correlation of r=-.62 (P=0.002) was obtained between VO2 max (mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and the percent drop off in peak power in bouts 5 and 6 compared with bout 1. A significant correlation was obtained between arterial venous oxygen difference and the drop in mean power (r=-.54, P=0.02) but not with the drop in peak power (r=-.22, P=.36). There was no significant relationship between cardiac output and the drop in mean power (r=-.16, P=.51) or the drop in peak power (r=-.02, P=.94). Percent drop-off in oxygen consumption, when compared with the first, in the second (RVO2(30-60)), third (RVO2(60-90)), fourth (RVO2(90-120)) and fifth (RVO2(120-150)) 30s time periods of recovery following the intermittent protocol was calculated. Correlations between VO2 max (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and these variables were (r=.51, P=-0.03), (r=.44, P=0.06), (r=.63, P=-0.003) and (r=.6, P=0.007) respectively. Consequently it was concluded that maximal oxygen uptake particularly the peripheral component, is an important determinant of the ability to perform intermittent exercise of this nature and to recover between bouts. PMID:9923730

  9. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis (SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography (especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome. PMID:25276300

  10. FGF21 and Cardiac Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Planavila, Anna; Redondo-Angulo, Ibon; Villarroya, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of ?-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPAR? and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease. PMID:26379627

  11. Cardiac Regeneration and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Mignone, John; MacLellan, W Robb

    2015-10-01

    After decades of believing the heart loses the ability to regenerate soon after birth, numerous studies are now reporting that the adult heart may indeed be capable of regeneration, although the magnitude of new cardiac myocyte formation varies greatly. While this debate has energized the field of cardiac regeneration and led to a dramatic increase in our understanding of cardiac growth and repair, it has left much confusion in the field as to the prospects of regenerating the heart. Studies applying modern techniques of genetic lineage tracing and carbon-14 dating have begun to establish limits on the amount of endogenous regeneration after cardiac injury, but the underlying cellular mechanisms of this regeneration remained unclear. These same studies have also revealed an astonishing capacity for cardiac repair early in life that is largely lost with adult differentiation and maturation. Regardless, this renewed focus on cardiac regeneration as a therapeutic goal holds great promise as a novel strategy to address the leading cause of death in the developed world. PMID:26269526

  12. Drosophila Models of Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Nicole; Wessells, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a useful model for cardiac diseases, both developmental abnormalities and adult functional impairment. Using the tools of both classical and molecular genetics, the study of the developing fly heart has been instrumental in identifying the major signaling events of cardiac field formation, cardiomyocyte specification, and the formation of the functioning heart tube. The larval stage of fly cardiac development has become an important model system for testing isolated preparations of living hearts for the effects of biological and pharmacological compounds on cardiac activity. Meanwhile, the recent development of effective techniques to study adult cardiac performance in the fly has opened new uses for the Drosophila model system. The fly system is now being used to study long-term alterations in adult performance caused by factors such as diet, exercise, and normal aging. The fly is a unique and valuable system for the study of such complex, long-term interactions, as it is the only invertebrate genetic model system with a working heart developmentally homologous to the vertebrate heart. Thus, the fly model combines the advantages of invertebrate genetics (such as large populations, facile molecular genetic techniques, and short lifespan) with physiological measurement techniques that allow meaningful comparisons with data from vertebrate model systems. As such, the fly model is well situated to make important contributions to the understanding of complicated interactions between environmental factors and genetics in the long-term regulation of cardiac performance. PMID:21377627

  13. Estrogen-Related Receptor ? (ERR?) and ERR? Are Essential Coordinators of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor ? (ERR?) and ERR? are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERR? and ERR? together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERR? and ERR? influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERR? and cardiac ERR? develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  14. Relationship of glucose and oleate metabolism to cardiac function in lipin-1 deficient (fld) mice.

    PubMed

    Kok, Bernard P C; Kienesberger, Petra C; Dyck, Jason R B; Brindley, David N

    2012-01-01

    Lipin-1 is the major phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) in the heart and a transcriptional coactivator that regulates fatty acid (FA) oxidation in the liver. As the control of FA metabolism is essential for maintaining cardiac function, we investigated whether lipin-1 deficiency affects cardiac metabolism and performance. Cardiac PAP activity in lipin-1 deficient [fatty liver dystrophy (fld)] mice was decreased by >80% compared with controls. Surprisingly, oleate oxidation and incorporation in triacylglycerol (TG), as well as glucose oxidation, were not significantly different in perfused working fld hearts. Despite this, [³H]oleate accumulation in phosphatidate and phosphatidylinositol was increased in fld hearts, reflecting the decreased PAP activity. Phosphatidate accumulation was linked to increased cardiac mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Transthoracic echocardiography showed decreased cardiac function in fld mice; however, cardiac dysfunction was not observed in ex vivo perfused working fld hearts. This showed that changes in systemic factors due to the global absence of lipin-1 could contribute to the decreased cardiac function in vivo. Collectively, this study shows that fld hearts exhibit unchanged oleate esterification, as well as oleate and glucose oxidation, despite the absence of lipin-1. However, lipin-1 deficiency increases the accumulation of newly synthesized phosphatidate and induces aberrant cell signaling. PMID:22058427

  15. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and adverse cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Medzikovic, Lejla; Schumacher, Cees A.; Verkerk, Arie O.; van Deel, Elza D.; Wolswinkel, Rianne; van der Made, Ingeborg; Bleeker, Natascha; Cakici, Daniella; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Meggouh, Farid; Creemers, Esther E.; Ann Remme, Carol; Baartscheer, Antonius; de Winter, Robbert J.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Arkenbout, E. Karin; de Waard, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Distinct stressors may induce heart failure. As compensation, ?-adrenergic stimulation enhances myocardial contractility by elevating cardiomyocyte intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). However, chronic ?-adrenergic stimulation promotes adverse cardiac remodelling. Cardiac expression of nuclear receptor Nur77 is enhanced by ?-adrenergic stimulation, but its role in cardiac remodelling is still unclear. We show high and rapid Nur77 upregulation in cardiomyocytes stimulated with ?-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Nur77 knockdown in culture resulted in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Ventricular cardiomyocytes from Nur77-deficient (Nur77-KO) mice exhibited elevated diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i and prolonged action potentials compared to wild type (WT). In vivo, these differences resulted in larger cardiomyocytes, increased expression of hypertrophic genes, and more cardiac fibrosis in Nur77-KO mice upon chronic isoproterenol stimulation. In line with the observed elevated [Ca2+]i, Ca2+-activated phosphatase calcineurin was more active in Nur77-KO mice compared to WT. In contrast, after cardiac pressure overload by aortic constriction, Nur77-KO mice exhibited attenuated remodelling compared to WT. Concluding, Nur77-deficiency results in significantly altered cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis and distinct remodelling outcome depending on the type of insult. Detailed knowledge on the role of Nur77 in maintaining cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis and the dual role Nur77 plays in cardiac remodelling will aid in developing personalized therapies against heart failure. PMID:26486271

  16. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  17. Women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Ginzel, A R

    1996-01-01

    As the incidence of cardiovascular disease in women increases, the process of cardiac rehabilitation in women is becoming increasingly important to nurses. Specifically, the issue of women's compliance with cardiac rehabilitation needs to be addressed by nurses. Most past and current research on cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with rehabilitation programs has been conducted on male subjects and cannot be accurately generalized to the female population. This article reviews current literature which addresses the issues of heart disease in women, cardiac rehabilitation and compliance in the general population, gender differences in cardiac rehabilitation, and compliance of women in cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:8657707

  18. Post-hypothermic cardiac left ventricular systolic dysfunction after rewarming in an intact pig model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We developed a minimally invasive, closed chest pig model with the main aim to describe hemodynamic function during surface cooling, steady state severe hypothermia (one hour at 25°C) and surface rewarming. Methods Twelve anesthetized juvenile pigs were acutely catheterized for measurement of left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume loops (conductance catheter), cardiac output (Swan-Ganz), and for vena cava inferior occlusion. Eight animals were surface cooled to 25°C, while four animals were kept as normothermic time-matched controls. Results During progressive cooling and steady state severe hypothermia (25°C) cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), mean arterial pressure (MAP), maximal deceleration of pressure in the cardiac cycle (dP/dtmin), indexes of LV contractility (preload recruitable stroke work, PRSW, and maximal acceleration of pressure in the cardiac cycle, dP/dtmax) and LV end diastolic and systolic volumes (EDV and ESV) were significantly reduced. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR), isovolumetric relaxation time (Tau), and oxygen content in arterial and mixed venous blood increased significantly. LV end diastolic pressure (EDP) remained constant. After rewarming all the above mentioned hemodynamic variables that were depressed during 25°C remained reduced, except for CO that returned to pre-hypothermic values due to an increase in heart rate. Likewise, SVR and EDP were significantly reduced after rewarming, while Tau, EDV, ESV and blood oxygen content normalized. Serum levels of cardiac troponin T (TnT) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) were significantly increased. Conclusions Progressive cooling to 25°C followed by rewarming resulted in a reduced systolic, but not diastolic left ventricular function. The post-hypothermic increase in heart rate and the reduced systemic vascular resistance are interpreted as adaptive measures by the organism to compensate for a hypothermia-induced mild left ventricular cardiac failure. A post-hypothermic increase in TnT indicates that hypothermia/rewarming may cause degradation of cardiac tissue. There were no signs of inadequate global oxygenation throughout the experiments. PMID:21092272

  19. HYPOTHALAMIC DYSFUNCTION—A Review of Experimental and Clinical Observations of Cardiac and Renal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, S. J.

    1952-01-01

    The nuclear cell masses of the hypothalamus act as autonomic regulators for visceromotor function. Through the correlation of impulses arising in or about the hypothalamus with the changes in cellular chemistry, there is provided, by mediation of the endocrines, a balanced control of water metabolism, renal function and cardiac action. Derangement of hypothalamic regulation causes specific clinical syndromes described by the general term “diencephalohypophyseal dystrophy.” Cardiac abnormalities attributable to hypothalamic dysfunction include alterations in rate and various arrhythmias. Alteration in renal function includes hematuria, polyuria or relative anuria, and specific effects on electrolyte and nitrogen output. PMID:13009469

  20. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease affects millions worldwide and is a progressive condition involving loss of cardiomyocytes. The human heart has limited endogenous regenerative capacity and is thus an important target for novel regenerative medicine approaches. While cell-based regenerative therapies hold promise, cellular reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the mammalian heart, may be an attractive alternative strategy for regenerating cardiac muscle. Recent advances leveraging years of developmental biology point to the feasibility of generating de novo cardiomyocyte-like cells from terminally differentiated non-myocytes in the heart in situ after ischemic damage. Here, we review the progress in cardiac reprogramming methods and consider the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in refining this technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:24030021

  1. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further developments in this area of translational research. PMID:25405172

  2. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    PubMed

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly. PMID:1493823

  3. Preoperative and perioperative use of levosimendan in cardiac surgery: European expert opinion.

    PubMed

    Toller, W; Heringlake, M; Guarracino, F; Algotsson, L; Alvarez, J; Argyriadou, H; Ben-Gal, T; ?erný, V; Cholley, B; Eremenko, A; Guerrero-Orriach, J L; Järvelä, K; Karanovic, N; Kivikko, M; Lahtinen, P; Lomivorotov, V; Mehta, R H; Muši?, Š; Pollesello, P; Rex, S; Riha, H; Rudiger, A; Salmenperä, M; Szudi, L; Tritapepe, L; Wyncoll, D; Öwall, A

    2015-04-01

    In cardiac surgery, postoperative low cardiac output has been shown to correlate with increased rates of organ failure and mortality. Catecholamines have been the standard therapy for many years, although they carry substantial risk for adverse cardiac and systemic effects, and have been reported to be associated with increased mortality. On the other hand, the calcium sensitiser and potassium channel opener levosimendan has been shown to improve cardiac function with no imbalance in oxygen consumption, and to have protective effects in other organs. Numerous clinical trials have indicated favourable cardiac and non-cardiac effects of preoperative and perioperative administration of levosimendan. A panel of 27 experts from 18 countries has now reviewed the literature on the use of levosimendan in on-pump and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting and in heart valve surgery. This panel discussed the published evidence in these various settings, and agreed to vote on a set of questions related to the cardioprotective effects of levosimendan when administered preoperatively, with the purpose of reaching a consensus on which patients could benefit from the preoperative use of levosimendan and in which kind of procedures, and at which doses and timing should levosimendan be administered. Here, we present a systematic review of the literature to report on the completed and ongoing studies on levosimendan, including the newly commenced LEVO-CTS phase III study (NCT02025621), and on the consensus reached on the recommendations proposed for the use of preoperative levosimendan. PMID:25734940

  4. Peri-operative Levosimendan in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: An Overview of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shi, William Y; Li, Sheila; Collins, Nicholas; Cottee, David B; Bastian, Bruce C; James, Allen N; Mejia, Ross

    2015-07-01

    Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, has recently emerged as a valuable agent in the peri-operative management of cardiac surgery patients. Levosimendan is a calcium-sensitising ionodilator. By binding to cardiac troponin C and reducing its calcium-binding co-efficient, it enhances myofilament responsiveness to calcium and thus enhances myocardial contractility without increasing oxygen demand. Current evidence suggests that levosimendan enhances cardiac function after cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with both normal and reduced left ventricular function. In addition to being used as post-operative rescue therapy for low cardiac output syndrome, a pre-operative levosimendan infusion in high risk patients with poor cardiac function may reduce inotropic requirements, the need for mechanical support, the duration of intensive care admissions as well as post-operative mortality. Indeed, it is these higher-risk patients who may experience a greater degree of benefit. Larger, multicentre randomised trials in cardiac surgery will help to elucidate the full potential of this agent. PMID:25862519

  5. The Network Structure of Economic Output

    E-print Network

    Hidalgo, Cesar A.

    Much of the analysis of economic growth has focused on the study of aggregate output. Here, we deviate from this tradition and look instead at the structure of output embodied in the network connecting countries to the ...

  6. The PTIP-Associated Histone Methyltransferase Complex Prevents Stress-Induced Maladaptive Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Adam B.; Goonewardena, Sascha N.; Jones, Thomas A.; Prusick, Parker J.; Bazzi, Ahmad A.; Belyavskaya, Jane M.; McCoskey, Makayla M.; Dandar, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure overload induces stress-induced signaling pathways and a coordinated transcriptional response that begets concentric cardiac hypertrophy. Although concentric hypertrophy initially attenuates wall stress and maintains cardiac function, continued stress can result in maladaptive cardiac remodeling. Cardiac remodeling is orchestrated by transcription factors that act within the context of an epigenetic landscape. Since the epigenetic landscape serves as a molecular link between environmental factors (stress) and cellular phenotype (disease), defining the role of the epigenome in the development and progression of cardiac remodeling could lead to new therapeutic approaches. In this study, we hypothesized that the epigenetic landscape is important in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and the progression to maladaptive remodeling. To demonstrate the importance of the epigenome in HF, we targeted the PTIP-associated histone methyltransferase complex in adult cardiac myocytes. This complex imparts histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation marks at actively expressed genes. We subjected PTIP null (PTIP-) mice to 2 weeks of transverse aortic constriction, a stress that induces concentric hypertrophy in control mice (PTIP+). PTIP- mice have a maladaptive response to 2wk of transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced pressure overload characterized by cardiac dilatation, decreased LV function, cardiac fibrosis, and increased cell death. PTIP deletion resulted in altered stress-induced gene expression profiles including blunted expression of ADRA1A, ADRA1B, JUN, ATP2A2, ATP1A2, SCN4B, and CACNA1G. These results suggest that H3K4 methylation patterns and the complexes that regulate them, specifically the PTIP-associated HMT, are necessary for the adaptive response to TAC. PMID:26001054

  7. Basal Ganglia Outputs Map Instantaneous Position Coordinates during Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barter, Joseph W.; Li, Suellen; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Rossi, Mark A.; Bartholomew, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) are implicated in many movement disorders, yet how they contribute to movement remains unclear. Using wireless in vivo recording, we measured BG output from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice while monitoring their movements with video tracking. The firing rate of most nigral neurons reflected Cartesian coordinates (either x- or y-coordinates) of the animal's head position during movement. The firing rates of SNr neurons are either positively or negatively correlated with the coordinates. Using an egocentric reference frame, four types of neurons can be classified: each type increases firing during movement in a particular direction (left, right, up, down), and decreases firing during movement in the opposite direction. Given the high correlation between the firing rate and the x and y components of the position vector, the movement trajectory can be reconstructed from neural activity. Our results therefore demonstrate a quantitative and continuous relationship between BG output and behavior. Thus, a steady BG output signal from the SNr (i.e., constant firing rate) is associated with the lack of overt movement, when a stable posture is maintained by structures downstream of the BG. Any change in SNr firing rate is associated with a change in position (i.e., movement). We hypothesize that the SNr output quantitatively determines the direction, velocity, and amplitude of voluntary movements. By changing the reference signals to downstream position control systems, the BG can produce transitions in body configurations and initiate actions. PMID:25673860

  8. The TEA CO2-Lasers with High Output Emission Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, ?. V.; Jun, Yao

    2014-03-01

    TEA CO2-lasers generating short pulse radiation and operating in a pulse-periodic mode with the repetition rate up to 10 Hz have been developed. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen up to 8% in the mixture of molecular gases ??2:H2 = 500:50 at a total pressure of P = 0.6 bar enhances the peak emission power maintaining the temporary pulse shape. An output beam intensity of 12.3 MW/cm2 was obtained for the 30 ns pulse at a laser efficiency of 2.8%. In a compact TEA ??2-laser with an active medium volume of 6 cm3, a beam with an output intensity of 24 MW/cm2 at pulse duration of 70 ns was obtained.

  9. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Marc L. (Harriman, TN); McNeilly, David R. (Maryville, TN)

    1985-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phototransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  10. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, M.L.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phtotransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  11. Context sensitive cardiac x-ray imaging: a machine vision approach to x-ray dose control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Keeble, Claire; Magee, Derek R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cardiac x-ray imaging systems regulate their radiation output based on the thickness of the patient to maintain an acceptable signal at the input of the x-ray detector. This approach does not account for the context of the examination or the content of the image displayed. We have developed a machine vision algorithm that detects iodine-filled blood vessels and fits an idealized vessel model with the key parameters of contrast, diameter, and linear attenuation coefficient. The spatio-temporal distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient samples, when appropriately arranged, can be described by a simple linear relationship, despite the complexity of scene information. The algorithm was tested on static anthropomorphic chest phantom images under different radiographic factors and 60 dynamic clinical image sequences. It was found to be robust and sensitive to changes in vessel contrast resulting from variations in system parameters. The machine vision algorithm has the potential of extracting real-time context sensitive information that may be used for augmenting existing dose control strategies.

  12. Cardiac manifestations in Behcet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Demirelli, Selami; Degirmenci, Husnu; Inci, Sinan; Arisoy, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Summary Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder, with vasculitis underlying the pathophysiology of its multisystemic effects. Venous pathology and thrombotic complications are hallmarks of BD. However, it has been increasingly recognised that cardiac involvement and arterial complications are also important aspects of the course of the disease. Cardiac lesions include pericarditis, endocarditis, intracardiac thrombosis, myocardial infarction, endomyocardial fibrosis, and myocardial aneurysm. Treatment of cardiovascular involvement in BD is largely empirical, and is aimed towards suppressing the vasculitis. The most challenging aspect seems to be the treatment of arterial aneurysms and thromboses due to the associated risk of bleeding. When the prognosis of cardiac involvement in BD is not good, recovery can be achieved through oral anticoagulation, immunosuppressive therapy, and colchicine use. In this review, we summarise the cardiovascular involvement, different manifestations, and treatment of BD. PMID:25984424

  13. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  14. Mechanical regulation of cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces are essential contributors to and unavoidable components of cardiac formation, both inducing and orchestrating local and global molecular and cellular changes. Experimental animal studies have contributed substantially to understanding the mechanobiology of heart development. More recent integration of high-resolution imaging modalities with computational modeling has greatly improved our quantitative understanding of hemodynamic flow in heart development. Merging these latest experimental technologies with molecular and genetic signaling analysis will accelerate our understanding of the relationships integrating mechanical and biological signaling for proper cardiac formation. These advances will likely be essential for clinically translatable guidance for targeted interventions to rescue malforming hearts and/or reconfigure malformed circulations for optimal performance. This review summarizes our current understanding on the levels of mechanical signaling in the heart and their roles in orchestrating cardiac development. PMID:25191277

  15. An integrated platform for image-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying Liang; Shetty, Anoop K.; Duckett, Simon; Etyngier, Patrick; Gijsbers, Geert; Bullens, Roland; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with heart failure but 30% of patients do not respond. This may be due to sub-optimal placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead. It is hypothesized that the use of cardiac anatomy, myocardial scar distribution and dyssynchrony information, derived from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may improve outcome by guiding the physician for optimal LV lead positioning. Whole heart MR data can be processed to yield detailed anatomical models including the coronary veins. Cine MR data can be used to measure the motion of the LV to determine which regions are late-activating. Finally, delayed Gadolinium enhancement imaging can be used to detect regions of scarring. This paper presents a complete platform for the guidance of CRT using pre-procedural MR data combined with live x-ray fluoroscopy. The platform was used for 21 patients undergoing CRT in a standard catheterization laboratory. The patients underwent cardiac MRI prior to their procedure. For each patient, a MRI-derived cardiac model, showing the LV lead targets, was registered to x-ray fluoroscopy using multiple views of a catheter looped in the right atrium. Registration was maintained throughout the procedure by a combination of C-arm/x-ray table tracking and respiratory motion compensation. Validation of the registration between the three-dimensional (3D) roadmap and the 2D x-ray images was performed using balloon occlusion coronary venograms. A 2D registration error of 1.2 ± 0.7 mm was achieved. In addition, a novel navigation technique was developed, called Cardiac Unfold, where an entire cardiac chamber is unfolded from 3D to 2D along with all relevant anatomical and functional information and coupled to real-time device detection. This allowed more intuitive navigation as the entire 3D scene was displayed simultaneously on a 2D plot. The accuracy of the unfold navigation was assessed off-line using 13 patient data sets by computing the registration error of the LV pacing lead electrodes which was found to be 2.2 ± 0.9 mm. Furthermore, the use of Unfold Navigation was demonstrated in real-time for four clinical cases.

  16. [Pathophysiology of ischemic cardiac pain.].

    PubMed

    Münzel, T; Bassenge, E

    1988-09-01

    Cardiac pain is a conscious experience that can be explored only indirectly with experimental approaches. The exact machanisms eliciting cardiac pain still remain obscure. The afferent fibres running in the cardiac sympathetic nerves are regarded as the essential pathway for the transmission of cardiac pain. Atria and ventricle are abundantly supplied with sympathetic sensory innervation. In the spinal cord, impulses transmitted by the sympathetic pathway converge with impulses from somatic thoracic structures onto the same ascending spinothalamic neuron which probably explains the mechanism of referred pain (=projection of pain to another organ). Two hypotheses have been put forward to explain the peripheral mechanism for nociception. The intensity mechanism assumes that pain results from an excessive stimulation of receptive structures normally stimulated at lower levels whereas a specific sensation is considered to result from an excitation of a well defined nociceptive apparatus. Ventricular sympathetic afferent fibres whether myelinated or unmyelinated, always possess some mechanosensitivity and respond to normal chemical and mechanical stimuli, thus displaying properties of polymodal receptors. Afferent vagal fibres may contribute to the mechanisms of cardiac nociception by modulating the threshold and characteristics of pain. Experimental studies identified three main mechanisms, which may be responsible for eliciting cardiac pain during ischemic periods in humans: a) nonphysiological motion of the ischemic left ventricular wall (bulging) and an excitation of mechanical receptors by passive stretching. b) The excitation of free sensory nerve endings by chemicals such as bradykinin, PGE(2), adenosin, histamin or potassium. c) A combination of a and b: algogenic chemicals may sensitize mechanical receptors and therefore lower their threshold for nociception. PMID:18415323

  17. Simulation Evaluation of Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion Assessment from Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2014-03-19

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ?0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ?1.2 and ?1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial blood flow estimation. In conclusion, quantitative model-based dynamic cardiac CT perfusion assessment is capable of accurately estimating MBF across a range of cardiac outputs and tissue perfusion states, outperforms comparable static perfusion estimates, and is relatively robust to noise and temporal subsampling. PMID:25395812

  18. Digital plus analog output encoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafle, R. S. (inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The disclosed encoder is adapted to produce both digital and analog output signals corresponding to the angular position of a rotary shaft, or the position of any other movable member. The digital signals comprise a series of binary signals constituting a multidigit code word which defines the angular position of the shaft with a degree of resolution which depends upon the number of digits in the code word. The basic binary signals are produced by photocells actuated by a series of binary tracks on a code disc or member. The analog signals are in the form of a series of ramp signals which are related in length to the least significant bit of the digital code word. The analog signals are derived from sine and cosine tracks on the code disc.

  19. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines. PMID:26548984

  20. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian (Glenmont, NY); Bievenue, Thomas J. (Delmar, NY); Burdett, John H. (Charlton, NY); Gallagher, Brian W. (Guilderland, NY); Shakshober, Stuart M. (Hudson, NY); Chen, Zewu (Schenectady, NY); Moore, Michael D. (Alplaus, NY)

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  1. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  2. Regeneration of infarcted myocardium with resveratrol-modified cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Nikolai; Petrovski, Goran; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Ray, Diptarka; Kim, Do Han; Das, Dipak K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The major problem in stem cell therapy includes viability and engraftment efficacy of stem cells after transplantation. Indeed, the vast majority of host-transfused cells do not survive beyond 24–72 hrs. To increase the survival and engraftment of implanted cardiac stem cells in the host, we developed a technique of treating these cells with resveratrol, and tested it in a rat model of left anterior descending (LAD) occlusion. Multi-potent clonogenic cardiac stem cells isolated from rat heart and stably transfected with EGFP were pre-treated with 2.5 ?M resveratrol for 60 min. Rats were anaesthetized, hearts opened and the LAD occluded to induce heart attack. One week later, the cardiac reduced environment was confirmed in resveratrol treated rat hearts by the enhanced expression of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). M-mode echocardiography after stem cell therapy, showed improvement in cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction, fractional shortening and cardiac output) in both, the treated and control group after 7 days, but only resveratrol-modified stem cell group revealed improvement in cardiac function at the end of 1, 2 and 4 months time. The improvement of cardiac function was accompanied by enhanced stem cell survival and engraftment as demonstrated by the expression of cell proliferation marker Ki67 and differentiation of stem cells towards the regeneration of the myocardium as demonstrated by the expression of EGFP up to 4 months after LAD occlusion in the resveratrol-treated stem cell group. Expression of stromal cell-derived factor and myosin conclusively demonstrated homing of stem cells in the infarcted myocardium, its regeneration leading to improvement of cardiac function. PMID:21352470

  3. Designing for Maintainability and System Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, Vincent R.; Packard, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The final goal for a delivered system (whether a car, aircraft, avionics box or computer) should be its availability to operate and perform its intended function over its expected design life. Hence, in designing a system, we cannot think in terms of delivering the system and just walking away. The system supplier needs to provide support throughout the operating life of the product. Here, supportability requires an effective combination of reliability, maintainability, logistics and operations engineering (as well as safety engineering) to have a system that is available for its intended use throughout its designated mission lifetime. Maintainability is a key driving element in the effective support and upkeep of the system as well as providing the ability to modify and upgrade the system throughout its lifetime. This paper then, will concentrate on maintainability and its integration into the system engineering and design process. The topics to be covered include elements of maintainability, the total cost of ownership, how system availability, maintenance and logistics costs and spare parts cost effect the overall program costs. System analysis and maintainability will show how maintainability fits into the overall systems approach to project development. Maintainability processes and documents will focus on how maintainability is to be performed and what documents are typically generated for a large scale program. Maintainability analysis shows how trade-offs can be performed for various alternative components. The conclusions summarize the paper and are followed by specific problems for hands-on training.

  4. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  5. Myocardial Hypertrophic Remodeling and Impaired Left Ventricular Function in Mice with a Cardiac-Specific Deletion of Janus Kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaohong T; Rajapurohitam, Venkatesh; Xue, Jenny; Huang, Cathy; Bairwa, Suresh; Tang, Xilan; Chow, Jeffrey T-Y; Liu, Melissa F W; Chiu, Felix; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Karmazyn, Morris

    2015-12-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK) system is involved in numerous cell signaling processes and is highly expressed in cardiac tissue. The JAK isoform JAK2 is activated by numerous factors known to influence cardiac function and pathologic conditions. However, although abundant, the role of JAK2 in the regulation or maintenance of cardiac homeostasis remains poorly understood. Using the Cre-loxP system, we generated a cardiac-specific deletion of Jak2 in the mouse to assess the effect on cardiac function with animals followed up for a 4-month period after birth. These animals had marked mortality during this period, although at 4 months mortality in male mice (47%) was substantially higher compared with female mice (30%). Both male and female cardiac Jak2-deleted mice had hypertrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and severe left ventricular dysfunction, including a marked reduction in ejection fractions as assessed by serial echocardiography, although the responses in females were somewhat less severe. Defective cardiac function was associated with altered protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-regulatory proteins particularly in hearts from male mice that had depressed levels of SERCA2 and phosphorylated phospholamban. In contrast, SERCA2 was unchanged in hearts of female mice, whereas phosphorylated phospholamban was increased. Our findings suggest that cardiac JAK2 is critical for maintaining normal heart function, and its ablation produces a severe pathologic phenotype composed of myocardial remodeling, heart failure, and pronounced mortality. PMID:26475415

  6. Changes in cardiac output and tibial artery flow during and after progressive LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A 3.0 MHz Pulsed Doppler velocity meter (PD) was used to determine blood velocities in the ascending aorta from the suprasternal notch before, during and after progressive 5 min stages of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 7 subjects. Changes in stroke volume were calculated from the systolic velocity integrals. A unique 20 MHz PD was used to estimate bloodflow in the posterior tibial artery. With -20 torr mean stroke volume fell 11% and then continued to decline by 48% before LBNP was terminated. Mean tibial flow fell progressively with LBNP stress, due to an increase in reverse flow component and a reduction in peak forward flow and diameter. Stroke volume increased and heart rate fell dramatically during the first 15 sec of recovery. The LBNP was terminated early in 2 subjects because of vasovagal symptons (V). During V the stroke volume rose 86% which more than compensated for the drop in heart rate. This implies that V is accompanied by a paradoxical increase in venous return and that the reduction in HR is the primary cardiovascular event. During the first 15 sec of recovery these 2 subjects had a distinctive marked rise to heart rate reminiscent of the Bainbridge reflex.

  7. Relating Noninvasive Cardiac Output and Total Peripheral Resistance Estimates to Physical Activity in an Ambulatory Setting

    E-print Network

    Haslam, Bryan Todd

    The prevalence and cost of heart disease indicate the need for better methods of detecting, diagnosing and treating this pervasive problem. Appropriate monitoring outside of the hospital can potentially lead to earlier ...

  8. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P < 0.001). There was a concomittant reduction in stroke volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P < 0.05) late in flight. These findings suggest that, despite increased pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  9. Reduced Heart Rate and Cardiac Output Differentially Affect Angiogenesis, Growth, and Development in Early

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    vs. de- velopment) have differential sensitivities to altered convective blood flow. Introduction and flow (Isogai et al. 2003; le Noble et al. 2008). Blood pressure creates both an absolute transmural

  10. DISTRIBUTION OF CARDIAC OUTPUT DURING DIURNAL CHANGES IN ACTIVITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform in rats is increased when exposure occurs during the dark part of the lighting cycle when rats are more active. ats are used as surrogates for humans in toxicology, but have opposite activity patterns, with humans being ac...

  11. Evaluation of a morphological filter in mean cardiac output determination: application to left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael Charles; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Mason, David Glen

    2013-08-01

    A morphological filter (MF) is presented for the determination of beat-to-beat mean rotary left ventricular assist device (LVAD) flow rate, measured using an implanted flow probe. The performance of this non-linear filter was assessed using LVAD flow rate (QLVAD) data sets obtained from in silico and in vivo sources. The MF was compared with a third-order Butterworth filter (BWF) and a 10-s moving average filter (MAF). Performance was assessed by calculating the response time and steady state error across a range of heart rates and levels of noise. The response time of the MF was 3.5 times faster than the MAF, 0.5 s slower than the BWF, and had a steady state error of 2.61 %. It completely removed pulsatile signal components caused by residual ventricular function, and tracked sharp transient changes in QLVAD better than the BWF. The use of a two-stage MF improved the noise immunity compared to the single-stage MF. This study showed that the good performance characteristics of the non-linear MF make it a more suitable candidate for embedded real-time processing of QLVAD than linear filters. PMID:23526415

  12. Cardiovascular physiologists have long assumed that the initiation of cardiac output in the developing embryo occurs

    E-print Network

    Burggren, Warren

    in the developing embryo occurs concomitant with the need for convective delivery of nutrients and oxygen. Recent data from lower vertebrate embryos indicate that the heart may begin to generate blood flow well heart development) in salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum) embryos (Mellish et al., 1994, 2000

  13. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  14. Tolerability of sirolimus: a decade of experience at a single cardiac transplant center.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Kaiser, Patricia A; Ayers, Colby R; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Ring, William Steves; Peltz, Matthias; Drazner, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    Sirolimus is used in cardiac transplant recipients to prevent rejection, progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, and renal dysfunction. However, sirolimus has many potential side effects and its tolerability when used outside of clinical trials is not well established. We describe a decade of experience with sirolimus in cardiac transplant recipients at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed records of all adult cardiac transplant recipients living between September 1999 and February 2010 (n = 329) and identified 67 patients (20%) who received sirolimus. The indications for sirolimus were cardiac allograft vasculopathy (67%), renal dysfunction (25%), rejection (4%), and intolerability of tacrolimus (3%). One-third of patients discontinued sirolimus at a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 0.9 (0.2, 1.6) yr of duration. Over 70% of subjects experienced an adverse event attributed to sirolimus. Adverse events were associated with higher average sirolimus levels (9.1 ng/mL vs. 7.1 ng/mL, p = 0.004). We conclude that sirolimus is frequently used in cardiac transplant recipients (20%) and commonly causes side effects, often necessitating discontinuation. Higher average sirolimus levels were associated with adverse events, suggesting that tolerability may improve if levels are maintained within the lower end of the current therapeutic range; however, the improvement in tolerability would need to be balanced with the potential for decreased efficacy. PMID:24304376

  15. PRODUCING SALMON TO MAINTAIN COMMERCIAL AND

    E-print Network

    THIS IS A SALMO HATCH PRODUCING SALMON TO MAINTAIN COMMERCIAL AND SPORT FISHERIES SHKT* illiiniltiiiii SALMON HATCHERY? To maintain the resource, enough of the mature salmon entering and destroyed young salmon. To counteract the effects of these, salmon hatcheries are necessary. Hatchery salmon

  16. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  17. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hamilton, Melinda A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Benson, Jennifer (Cockermouth, GB); Green, Martin J. (Wooton, GB); Milner, Timothy N. (Centerville, VA)

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  18. Phenomics of Cardiac Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2014-01-01

    Forward genetic studies have identified several chloride (Cl?) channel genes, including CFTR, ClC-2, ClC-3, CLCA, Bestrophin, and Ano1, in the heart. Recent reverse genetic studies using gene targeting and transgenic techniques to delineate the functional role of cardiac Cl? channels have shown that Cl? channels may contribute to cardiac arrhythmogenesis, myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure, and cardioprotection against ischemia reperfusion. The study of physiological or pathophysiological phenotypes of cardiac Cl? channels, however, is complicated by the compensatory changes in the animals in response to the targeted genetic manipulation. Alternatively, tissue-specific conditional or inducible knockout or knockin animal models may be more valuable in the phenotypic studies of specific Cl? channels by limiting the effect of compensation on the phenotype. The integrated function of Cl? channels may involve multiprotein complexes of the Cl? channel subproteome. Similar phenotypes can be attained from alternative protein pathways within cellular networks, which are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The phenomics approach, which characterizes phenotypes as a whole phenome and systematically studies the molecular changes that give rise to particular phenotypes achieved by modifying the genotype under the scope of genome/proteome/phenome, may provide more complete understanding of the integrated function of each cardiac Cl? channel in the context of health and disease. PMID:23720326

  19. Bifurcation theory and cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Stepanyan, Hayk; Mandel, William J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review two types of dynamic behaviors defined by the bifurcation theory that are found to be particularly useful in describing two forms of cardiac electrical instabilities that are of considerable importance in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. The first is action potential duration (APD) alternans with an underlying dynamics consistent with the period doubling bifurcation theory. This form of electrical instability could lead to spatially discordant APD alternans leading to wavebreak and reentrant form of tachyarrhythmias. Factors that modulate the APD alternans are discussed. The second form of bifurcation of importance to cardiac arrhythmogenesis is the Hopf-homoclinic bifurcation that adequately describes the dynamics of the onset of early afterdepolarization (EAD)-mediated triggered activity (Hopf) that may cause ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF respectively). The self-termination of the triggered activity is compatible with the homoclinic bifurcation. Ionic and intracellular calcium dynamics underlying these dynamics are discussed using available experimental and simulation data. The dynamic analysis provides novel insights into the mechanisms of VT/VF, a major cause of sudden cardiac death in the US. PMID:23459417

  20. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  1. Device Assists Cardiac Chest Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichstadt, Frank T.

    1995-01-01

    Portable device facilitates effective and prolonged cardiac resuscitation by chest compression. Developed originally for use in absence of gravitation, also useful in terrestrial environments and situations (confined spaces, water rescue, medical transport) not conducive to standard manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques.

  2. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium sensitivity. I compared this pathway of mutational propagation with the pathway of the calcium activation of the thin filament and found that they are identical in terms of location but opposite in direction.

  3. Model output: fact or artefact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke

    2015-04-01

    As a third-year PhD-student, I relatively recently entered the wonderful world of scientific Hydrology. A science that has many pillars that directly impact society, for example with the prediction of hydrological extremes (both floods and drought), climate change, applications in agriculture, nature conservation, drinking water supply, etcetera. Despite its demonstrable societal relevance, hydrology is often seen as a science between two stools. Like Klemeš (1986) stated: "By their academic background, hydrologists are foresters, geographers, electrical engineers, geologists, system analysts, physicists, mathematicians, botanists, and most often civil engineers." Sometimes it seems that the engineering genes are still present in current hydrological sciences, and this results in pragmatic rather than scientific approaches for some of the current problems and challenges we have in hydrology. Here, I refer to the uncertainty in hydrological modelling that is often neglected. For over thirty years, uncertainty in hydrological models has been extensively discussed and studied. But it is not difficult to find peer-reviewed articles in which it is implicitly assumed that model simulations represent the truth rather than a conceptualization of reality. For instance in trend studies, where data is extrapolated 100 years ahead. Of course one can use different forcing datasets to estimate the uncertainty of the input data, but how to prevent that the output is not a model artefact, caused by the model structure? Or how about impact studies, e.g. of a dam impacting river flow. Measurements are often available for the period after dam construction, so models are used to simulate river flow before dam construction. Both are compared in order to qualify the effect of the dam. But on what basis can we tell that the model tells us the truth? Model validation is common nowadays, but validation only (comparing observations with model output) is not sufficient to assume that a model reflects reality. E.g. due to nonuniqueness or so called equifinality; different model construction lead to same output (Oreskes et al., 1994, Beven, 2005). But also because validation only does not provide us information on whether we are 'right for the wrong reasons' (Kirchner, 2006; Oreskes et al., 1994). We can never know how right or wrong our models are, because we do not fully understand reality. But we can estimate the uncertainty from the model and the input data itself. Many techniques have been developed that help in estimating model uncertainty. E.g. model structural uncertainty, studied in the FUSE framework (Clark et al., 2008), parameter uncertainty with GLUE (Beven and Binley, 1992) and DREAM (Vrugt et al., 2008), input data uncertainty using BATEA (Kavetski et al., 2006). These are just some examples that pop-up in a first search. But somehow, these techniques are only used and applied in studies that focus on the model uncertainty itself, and hardly ever occur in studies that have a research question outside of the uncertainty-region. We know that models don't tell us the truth, but we have the tendency to claim they are, based on validation only. A model is always a simplification of reality, which by definition leads to uncertainty when model output and observations of reality are compared. The least we could do is estimate the uncertainty of the model and the data itself. My question therefore is: As a scientist, can we accept that we believe things of which we know they might not be true? And secondly: How to deal with this? How should model uncertainty change the way we communicate scientific results? References Beven, K., and A. Binley, The future of distributed models: Model calibration and uncertainty prediction, HP 6 (1992). Beven, K., A manifesto for the equifinality thesis, JoH 320 (2006). Clark, M.P., A.G. Slater, D.E. Rupp, R.A. Woods, J.A. Vrugt, H.V. Gupta, T. Wagener and L.E. Hay, Framework for Understanding Structural Errors (FUSE): A modular framework to diagnose differences between hydrological models, WRR 44 (20

  4. Short-duration spaceflight impairs human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Bennett, Barbara S.; Jones, Michele M.; Eckberg, Dwain L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a spaceflight on the vagally mediated baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses of humans were investigated by measuring the responses (provoked by neck pressure changes) in supine position and the heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and standing positions in 16 astronauts before and after 4- to 5-day long Space Shuttle missions. The results showed that exposures to spaceflight resulted in reduced baseline levels of the vagal-cardiac outflow and the vagally mediated responses to changes of the arterial baroreceptor input and that these changes contribute to postflight reductions of astronauts' ability to maintain standing arterial pressures.

  5. Allogenic benefit in stem cell therapy: cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Al-Daccak, R; Charron, D

    2015-09-01

    Stem cell (SC)-based therapies are a developing mean to repair, restore, maintain, or enhance organ functioning through life span. They are in particular a fast track to restore function in failing heart. Various types of SCs have been used in experimental and clinical studies showing the potential of these cells to revolutionize the treatment of heart diseases. Autologous cells have been privileged to overpass immunological barriers. The field has progressed tremendously and the hurdles, which have been largely overlooked in the excitement over the expected benefit the immunogenicity, have been revealed. Also, manufacturing of patient-specific clinical grade SC product, whether adult stem or reprogrammed induced pluripotent SCs, and the availability of these cells in sufficient amounts and status when needed is questionable. In contrast, adult SCs derived from healthy donors, thus allogeneic, have the advantage to be immediately available as an 'off-the-shelf' therapeutic product. The challenge is to overcome the immunological barriers to their transplantation. Recent research provided new insights into the mode of action and immune behavior of SCs in autologous as well as allogeneic settings. Lessons are learned and immune paradigms are changing: allogenicity, if balanced could be part of the dynamic and durable mechanisms that are critical to sustain cardiac regeneration and repair. We discuss the hurdles, lessons, and advances accomplished in the field through the progressive journey of cardiac-derived stem/progenitor cells toward allogeneic cardiac regenerative/reparative therapy. PMID:26206374

  6. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  7. EHD3-Dependent Endosome Pathway Regulates Cardiac Membrane Excitability and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Musa, Hassan; Liu, Bin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Alecusan, Joe; Wright, Patrick; Li, Jingdong; Billman, George E.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Band, Hamid; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac function is dependent on the coordinate activities of membrane ion channels, transporters, pumps, and hormone receptors to dynamically tune the membrane electrochemical gradient in response to acute and chronic stress. While our knowledge of membrane proteins has rapidly advanced over the past decade, our understanding of the subcellular pathways governing the trafficking and localization of integral membrane proteins is limited, and essentially unstudied in vivo. In heart, to our knowledge, there are no in vivo mechanistic studies that directly link endosome-based machinery with cardiac physiology. Objective Define the in vivo roles of endosome-based cellular machinery for cardiac membrane protein trafficking, myocyte excitability, and cardiac physiology. Methods and Results We identify the endosome-based EHD3 pathway as essential for cardiac physiology. EHD3?/? hearts display structural and functional defects including bradycardia and rate variability, conduction block, and blunted response to adrenergic stimulation. Mechanistically, EHD3 is critical for membrane protein trafficking, as EHD3?/? myocytes display reduced expression/localization of Na/Ca exchanger and Cav1.2 with a parallel reduction in INCX and ICa,L. Functionally, EHD3?/? myocytes show increased sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca], increased spark frequency, and reduced expression/localization of ankyrin-B, a binding partner for EHD3 and Na/Ca exchanger. Finally, we show that in vivo EHD3?/? defects are due to cardiac-specific roles of EHD3 as mice with cardiac-selective EHD3 deficiency demonstrate both structural and electrical phenotypes. Conclusions These data provide new insight into the critical role of endosome-based pathways in membrane protein targeting and cardiac physiology. EHD3 is a critical component of protein trafficking in heart and is essential for the proper membrane targeting of select cellular proteins that maintain excitability. PMID:24759929

  8. Measurement of cardiac index and stroke volume using electrical cardiometry before and after administration of adenosine in a 6-year-old patient with supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoek, Samuel M; Coté, Charles J

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old boy who developed a supraventricular tachycardia during an upper endoscopy while under general anesthesia. A noninvasive electrical cardiometry device was applied to the patient, and cardiac index and stroke volume were measured before and after the administration of adenosine. Cardiac index fell 41% (P < .0001) after adenosine was given, highlighting the known interdependence between cardiac output and heart rate in the pediatric patient. Stroke volume decreased 9% (P = .0002) after adenosine arrested the tachycardia, lending support to an increasing body of data that suggests that heart rate itself can augment contractility. PMID:26427304

  9. NITROGEN OUTPUTS FROM FECAL AND URINE DEPOSITION OF SMALL MAMMALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of small mammals to nitrogen cycling is poorly understood, but it could have reverberations back to the producer community by maintaining or perhaps magnifying nitrogen availability. Our objective was to model nitrogen outputs (deposition of feces and urine) of ...

  10. Priority Queue Schedulers with Approximate Sorting in Output Bu ered Switches

    E-print Network

    Liebeherr, Jörg

    , scheduling with approximate sorting is a viable option. Key Words: Packet Switching, Output Bu ering transmits packets in the order of `deadlines' 8, 13, 15, 25 . In addition, tra c shapers 15, 16, 32, 43 which enforce that tra c entering a scheduler conforms to a given tra c speci cation, typically maintain

  11. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Constancy and Variability in the Output of a Central Pattern

    E-print Network

    Calabrese, Ronald

    State University, San Marcos, California, 92096 Experimental and corresponding modeling studies have demonstrated a twofold to fivefold variation of intrinsic and synaptic parame- ters across animals, whereas functional output is maintained. These studies have led to the hypothesis that correlated, compensatory

  12. Measuring cardiac waste: the premier cardiac waste measures.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Timothy J; Partovian, Chohreh; Kroch, Eugene; Martin, John; Bankowitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The authors developed 8 measures of waste associated with cardiac procedures to assist hospitals in comparing their performance with peer facilities. Measure selection was based on review of the research literature, clinical guidelines, and consultation with key stakeholders. Development and validation used the data from 261 hospitals in a split-sample design. Measures were risk adjusted using Premier's CareScience methodologies or mean peer value based on Medicare Severity Diagnosis-Related Group assignment. High variability was found in resource utilization across facilities. Validation of the measures using item-to-total correlations (range = 0.27-0.78), Cronbach ? (.88), and Spearman rank correlation (0.92) showed high reliability and discriminatory power. Because of the level of variability observed among hospitals, this study suggests that there is opportunity for facilities to design successful waste reduction programs targeting cardiac-device procedures. PMID:23719033

  13. Inhaled nitric oxide in cardiac surgery: Evidence or tradition?

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Maria; Romano, Rosalba; Baca, Georgiana; Sarridou, Despoina; Fischer, Andreas; Simon, Andre; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-09-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy as a selective pulmonary vasodilator in cardiac surgery has been one of the most significant pharmacological advances in managing pulmonary hemodynamics and life threatening right ventricular dysfunction and failure. However, this remarkable story has experienced a roller-coaster ride with high hopes and nearly universal demonstration of physiological benefits but disappointing translation of these benefits to harder clinical outcomes. Most of our understanding on the iNO field in cardiac surgery stems from small observational or single centre randomised trials and even the very few multicentre trials fail to ascertain strong evidence base. As a consequence, there are only weak clinical practice guidelines on the field and only European expert opinion for the use of iNO in routine and more specialised cardiac surgery such as heart and lung transplantation and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) insertion. In this review the authors from a specialised cardiac centre in the UK with a very high volume of iNO usage provide detailed information on the early observations leading to the European expert recommendations and reflect on the nature and background of these recommendations. We also provide a summary of the progress in each of the cardiac subspecialties for the last decade and initial survey data on the views of senior anaesthetic and intensive care colleagues on these recommendations. We conclude that the combination of high price tag associated with iNO therapy and lack of substantial clinical evidence is not sustainable on the current field and we are risking loosing this promising therapy from our daily practice. Overcoming the status quo will not be easy as there is not much room for controlled trials in heart transplantation or in the current atmosphere of LVAD implantation. However, we call for international cooperation to conduct definite studies to determine the place of iNO therapy in lung transplantation and high risk mitral surgery. This will require new collaboration between the pharmaceutical companies, national grant agencies and the clinical community. Until these trials are realized we should gather multi-institutional experience from large retrospective studies and prospective data from a new international registry. We must step up international efforts if we wish to maintain the iNO modality in the armamentarium of hemodynamic tools for the perioperative management of our high risk cardiac surgical patients. PMID:26186889

  14. Exercise efficiency of low power output cycling.

    PubMed

    Reger, M; Peterman, J E; Kram, R; Byrnes, W C

    2013-12-01

    Exercise efficiency at low power outputs, energetically comparable to daily living activities, can be influenced by homeostatic perturbations (e.g., weight gain/loss). However, an appropriate efficiency calculation for low power outputs used in these studies has not been determined. Fifteen active subjects (seven females, eight males) performed 14, 5-min cycling trials: two types of seated rest (cranks vertical and horizontal), passive (motor-driven) cycling, no-chain cycling, no-load cycling, cycling at low (10, 20, 30, 40 W), and moderate (50, 60, 80, 100, 120 W) power outputs. Mean delta efficiency was 57% for low power outputs compared to 41.3% for moderate power outputs. Means for gross (3.6%) and net (5.7%) efficiencies were low at the lowest power output. At low power outputs, delta and work efficiency values exceeded theoretical values. In conclusion, at low power outputs, none of the common exercise efficiency calculations gave values comparable to theoretical muscle efficiency. However, gross efficiency and the slope and intercept of the metabolic power vs mechanical power output regression provide insights that are still valuable when studying homeostatic perturbations. PMID:22462656

  15. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  16. Functional cardiac magnetic resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, Anja Christina Sophie

    2003-07-01

    The study of small animal models of human cardiovascular disease is critical to our understanding of the origin, progression, and treatment of this pervasive disease. Complete analysis of disease pathophysiology in these animal models requires measuring structural and functional changes at the level of the whole heart---a task for which an appropriate non-invasive imaging method is needed. The purpose of this work was thus to develop an imaging technique to support in vivo characterization of cardiac structure and function in rat and mouse models of cardiovascular disease. Whereas clinical cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides accurate assessment of the human heart, the extension of cardiac MRI from humans to rodents presents several formidable scaling challenges. Acquiring images of the mouse heart with organ definition and fluidity of contraction comparable to that achieved in humans requires an increase in spatial resolution by a factor of 3000 and an increase in temporal resolution by a factor of ten. No single technical innovation can meet the demanding imaging requirements imposed by the small animal. A functional cardiac magnetic resonance microscopy technique was developed by integrating improvements in physiological control, imaging hardware, biological synchronization of imaging, and pulse sequence design to achieve high-quality images of the murine heart with high spatial and temporal resolution. The specific methods and results from three different sets of imaging experiments are presented: (1) 2D functional imaging in the rat with spatial resolution of 175 mum2 x 1 mm and temporal resolution of 10 ms; (2) 3D functional imaging in the rat with spatial resolution of 100 mum 2 x 500 mum and temporal resolution of 30 ms; and (3) 2D functional imaging in the mouse with spatial resolution down to 100 mum2 x 1 mm and temporal resolution of 10 ms. The cardiac microscopy technique presented here represents a novel collection of technologies capable of acquiring routine high-quality images of murine cardiac structure and function with minimal artifacts and markedly higher spatial resolution compared to conventional techniques. This work is poised to serve a valuable role in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease and should find broad application in studies ranging from basic pathophysiology to drug discovery.

  17. The endogenous peptide apelin potently improves cardiac contractility and reduces cardiac loading in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Euan A.; Powers, Jennifer; Chen, Mary; Kundu, Ramendra; Finsterbach, Tom; Caffarelli, Anthony; Deng, Alicia; Eichhorn, Jens; Mahajan, Raina; Agrawal, Rani; Greve, Joan; Robbins, Robert; Patterson, Andrew J; Bernstein, Daniel; Quertermous, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Objective The endogenous peptide apelin is differentially regulated in cardiovascular disease but the nature of its role in cardiac function remains unclear. Methods We investigated the functional relevance of this pathway using ECG and respiration gated magnetic resonance imaging, conductance catheter pressure-volume hemodynamic measurements, and echocardiography in vivo. In addition, we carried out histology and immunohistochemistry to assess cardiac hypertrophy and to localize apelin and APJ in the adult and embryonic mouse heart. Results Intraperitoneal injection of apelin12 (300µg/kg) resulted in a decrease in left ventricular end diastolic area (pre: 0.122±0.007; post: 0.104±0.005 cm2, p=0.006) and an increase in heart rate (pre: 537±20; post 559±19 beats per minute, p=0.03). Hemodynamic measurements revealed a marked increase in ventricular elastance (pre: 3.7±0.9; post: 6.5±1.4 mmHg/RVU, p=0.018) and preload recruitable stroke work (pre: 27.4±8.0; post: 51.8±3.1, p=0.059) with little change in diastolic parameters following acute infusion of apelin. Chronic infusion (2mg/kg/day) resulted in significant increases in the velocity of circumferential shortening (baseline: 5.36±0.401; 14 days: 6.85±0.358 circ/sec, p=0.049) and cardiac output (baseline: 0.142±0.019; 14 days: 0.25±0.019 l/min, p=0.001) as determined by 15MHz echocardiography. Post mortem corrected heart weights were not different between apelin and saline groups (p=0.5) and histology revealed no evidence of cellular hypertrophy in the apelin group (nuclei per unit area, p=0.9). Immunohistochemistry studies revealed APJ staining of myocardial cells in all regions of the adult mouse heart. Antibody staining, as well as quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction identified expression of both APJ and apelin in embryonic myocardium as early as embryonic day 13.5. Conclusions Apelin reduces left ventricular preload and afterload, and increases contractile reserve without evidence of hypertrophy. These results associate apelin with a positive hemodynamic profile and suggest it as an attractive target for pharmacotherapy in the setting of heart failure. PMID:15621035

  18. Mechanisms maintaining grassland biodiversity and ecosystem stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologists need to know how particular processes influence biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We demonstrate how data from biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiments can be used to identify and quantify the classes of mechanisms maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We predicted...

  19. 7 CFR 1430.508 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.508 Maintaining records. Dairy operations making application for benefits under this program...

  20. Ecology: Tribal Warfare Maintains Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Greig, Duncan; Goddard, Matthew

    2015-07-20

    When two tribes of Myxococcus bacteria attack each other, the most numerous usually wins. Established colonies can therefore resist invaders by outnumbering them. This shows how positive frequency dependence can maintain diversity across spatially structured environments. PMID:26196492

  1. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  2. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  3. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  4. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  5. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  6. 7 CFR 1429.113 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ASPARAGUS REVENUE MARKET LOSS ASSISTANCE PAYMENT PROGRAM § 1429...Maintaining records. Producers applying for payment through the Asparagus Revenue Market Loss Assistance Payment Program must...

  7. 7 CFR 1429.113 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ASPARAGUS REVENUE MARKET LOSS ASSISTANCE PAYMENT PROGRAM § 1429...Maintaining records. Producers applying for payment through the Asparagus Revenue Market Loss Assistance Payment Program must...

  8. 7 CFR 1429.113 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ASPARAGUS REVENUE MARKET LOSS ASSISTANCE PAYMENT PROGRAM § 1429...Maintaining records. Producers applying for payment through the Asparagus Revenue Market Loss Assistance Payment Program must...

  9. Creating & Maintaining a Diversity Certificate Program

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Business Development Center · The Culture Building Institute · Diversity Certificate · Customized Diversity hours of employee professional development resulting in a University supported certificate. #12;TheCreating & Maintaining a Diversity Certificate Program Dr. Shanda Gore Associate Vice President

  10. Progeria syndrome with cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Saadia; Ilyas, Hajira; Hameed, Abdul; Ilyas, Muhammad

    2013-09-01

    A case report of 6-year-old boy with progeria syndrome, with marked cardiac complications is presented. The boy had cardiorespiratory failure. Discoloured purpuric skin patches, alopecia, prominent forehead, protuberant eyes, flattened nasal cartilage, malformed mandible, hypodentition, and deformed rigid fingers and toes were observed on examination. The boy was unable to speak. A sclerotic systolic murmur was audible over the mitral and aortic areas. Chest x-rays showed cardiac enlargement and the electrocardiogram (ECG) showed giant peaked P waves (right atrial hypertrophy) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Atherosclerotic dilated ascending aorta, thickened sclerotic aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves with increased echo texture, left and right atrial and right ventricular dilatation, reduced left ventricular cavity, and thickened speckled atrial and ventricular septa were observed on echocardiography. PMID:24601202

  11. Cardiac regeneration: epicardial mediated repair.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Lydon, Teresa; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2015-12-22

    The hearts of lower vertebrates such as fish and salamanders display scarless regeneration following injury, although this feature is lost in adult mammals. The remarkable capacity of the neonatal mammalian heart to regenerate suggests that the underlying machinery required for the regenerative process is evolutionarily retained. Recent studies highlight the epicardial covering of the heart as an important source of the signalling factors required for the repair process. The developing epicardium is also a major source of cardiac fibroblasts, smooth muscle, endothelial cells and stem cells. Here, we examine animal models that are capable of scarless regeneration, the role of the epicardium as a source of cells, signalling mechanisms implicated in the regenerative process and how these mechanisms influence cardiomyocyte proliferation. We also discuss recent advances in cardiac stem cell research and potential therapeutic targets arising from these studies. PMID:26702046

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Arthur R; Lavie, Carl J; Forman, Daniel E; Arena, Ross; Milani, Richard V; Franklin, Barry A

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Advanced age is associated with a higher prevalence of CHD as well as increased morbidity and mortality. One key vulnerability relates to the fact that older individuals are generally among the least fit, least active cohort and at increased risk of complications after an acute cardiac event and/or major surgery. There is ample evidence to demonstrate the beneficial effects of exercised-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs on improving functional capacity and other indices of cardiovascular (CV) health. Although the predominant number of studies is in middle-aged patients, there is an escalating amount of new information that establishes the cardioprotective role of CR and, in particular, structured exercise therapy (ET) among the elderly. The present review summarizes the current data available regarding CR and ET and its salutary impact on today's growing population of older adults with CHD. PMID:25216614

  13. Systemic and Cardiac Depletion of M2 Macrophage through CSF-1R Signaling Inhibition Alters Cardiac Function Post Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kenneth; Turner, Elizebeth C.; Kumar, Arun H.; Browne, Tara; Caplice, Noel M.

    2015-01-01

    The heart hosts tissue resident macrophages which are capable of modulating cardiac inflammation and function by multiple mechanisms. At present, the consequences of phenotypic diversity in macrophages in the heart are incompletely understood. The contribution of cardiac M2-polarized macrophages to the resolution of inflammation and repair response following myocardial infarction remains to be fully defined. In this study, the role of M2 macrophages was investigated utilising a specific CSF-1 receptor signalling inhibition strategy to achieve their depletion. In mice, oral administration of GW2580, a CSF-1R kinase inhibitor, induced significant decreases in Gr1lo and F4/80hi monocyte populations in the circulation and the spleen. GW2580 administration also induced a significant depletion of M2 macrophages in the heart after 1 week treatment as well as a reduction of cardiac arginase1 and CD206 gene expression indicative of M2 macrophage activity. In a murine myocardial infarction model, reduced M2 macrophage content was associated with increased M1-related gene expression (IL-6 and IL-1?), and decreased M2-related gene expression (Arginase1 and CD206) in the heart of GW2580-treated animals versus vehicle-treated controls. M2 depletion was also associated with a loss in left ventricular contractile function, infarct enlargement, decreased collagen staining and increased inflammatory cell infiltration into the infarct zone, specifically neutrophils and M1 macrophages. Taken together, these data indicate that CSF-1R signalling is critical for maintaining cardiac tissue resident M2-polarized macrophage population, which is required for the resolution of inflammation post myocardial infarction and, in turn, for preservation of ventricular function. PMID:26407006

  14. Impella left ventricular assist device in cardiac arrest after spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nayan; Chaudhry, Kunal; Aji, Janah

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest after neuraxial anaesthesia is very well described. Inhibition of the sympathetic efferent system and vagal activation leading to decrease preload and severe bradycardia results in cardiac arrest. Pregnant patients undergoing spinal anaesthesia are at increased risk for vasovagal events due to aortocaval compression and higher level of spinal block. A 36-year-old pregnant woman at 39?weeks presented for an elective caesarean section. She underwent spinal anaesthesia. Immediately after, she had severe bradycardia followed by asystole cardiac arrest. She had spontaneous return of circulation. The patient was in cardiogenic shock causing pulmonary oedema and required four vasopressors to maintain her blood pressure. An Impella 2.5 percutaneous microaxial left ventricle (LV) support device was inserted to support her haemodynamics. She fully recovered and was discharged in stable condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is first case report of the use of an LV-assist device in a patient postcardiac arrest from spinal anaesthesia. PMID:26511992

  15. Congenital cardiac disease in dogs.

    PubMed

    McCaw, D; Aronson, E

    1984-07-01

    Pulmonic stenosis is caused by a malformed pulmonic valve, stricture of the right ventricular outflow tract or stricture of the pulmonary artery. English Bulldogs, Beagles, Samoyeds, Fox Terriers and Chihuahuas are predisposed. Clinical signs in severely affected dogs include exercise intolerance, stunting, dyspnea, syncope and ascites. Auscultation reveals a high-frequency, crescendo-decrescendo murmur during systole, loudest over the left side of the thorax, near the sternal cardiac border. An ECG may reveal a right-axis deviation of greater than 120 degrees, S waves in leads I, II and III, deep S waves in CV6LL, CV6LU and V10, Q waves deeper than 0.5 mv in leads II, III and AVF, and positive T waves in lead V10. Plain film LAT thoracic radiographs reveal an elevated carina, increased sternal contact of the heart, loss of the cranial cardiac waist and a widened cardiac silhouette, with normal pulmonary vasculature. A DV projection reveals an inverted "D" shape of the right ventricle and a pulmonary artery bulge. A nonselective angiocardiogram reveals poststenotic dilation of the main pulmonary artery. Treatment involves surgical correction of the stenosis. PMID:6749116

  16. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized. PMID:26044247

  17. The history of cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Martial G

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of cardiac catheterization has occurred over at least four centuries. One of the first major steps was the description of the circulation of the blood by William Harvey in 1628. The next milestone was the measurement of arterial pressure by Stephen Hales, one century later. However, the 19th century represented the golden age of cardiovascular physiology, highlighted by the achievements of Carl Ludwig, Etienne-Jules Marey and Claude Bernard, among others. Human cardiac catheterization developed during the 20th century. The first right heart catheterization in a human was performed by Werner Forssmann on himself in 1929. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization was introduced by André Cournand and Dickinson Richards in the early 1940s, and selective coronary angiography was described by Mason Sones in the early 1960s. More recently, with the advent of catheter-based interventions, pioneered by Andreas Gruentzig in the late 1970s, there has been considerable progress in the refinement and expansion of these techniques. Currently, the Sones technique is used only infrequently, and coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention rely mainly on percutaneous femoral and percutaneous radial artery approaches. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Montreal Heart Institute, it seems appropriate to highlight the contribution of this institution in these two areas. PMID:16234881

  18. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  19. Relationship of glucose and oleate metabolism to cardiac function in lipin-1 deficient (fld) mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Bernard P. C.; Kienesberger, Petra C.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Brindley, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Lipin-1 is the major phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) in the heart and a transcriptional coactivator that regulates fatty acid (FA) oxidation in the liver. As the control of FA metabolism is essential for maintaining cardiac function, we investigated whether lipin-1 deficiency affects cardiac metabolism and performance. Cardiac PAP activity in lipin-1 deficient [fatty liver dystrophy (fld)] mice was decreased by >80% compared with controls. Surprisingly, oleate oxidation and incorporation in triacylglycerol (TG), as well as glucose oxidation, were not significantly different in perfused working fld hearts. Despite this, [3H]oleate accumulation in phosphatidate and phosphatidylinositol was increased in fld hearts, reflecting the decreased PAP activity. Phosphatidate accumulation was linked to increased cardiac mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Transthoracic echocardiography showed decreased cardiac function in fld mice; however, cardiac dysfunction was not observed in ex vivo perfused working fld hearts. This showed that changes in systemic factors due to the global absence of lipin-1 could contribute to the decreased cardiac function in vivo. Collectively, this study shows that fld hearts exhibit unchanged oleate esterification, as well as oleate and glucose oxidation, despite the absence of lipin-1. However, lipin-1 deficiency increases the accumulation of newly synthesized phosphatidate and induces aberrant cell signaling. PMID:22058427

  20. A physiologic comparison of external cardiac massage techniques.

    PubMed

    Newton, J R; Glower, D D; Wolfe, J A; Tyson, G S; Spratt, J A; Fenely, M P; Rankin, J S; Olsen, C O

    1988-05-01

    On the basis of recent investigation, controversy has arisen regarding which of several cardiopulmonary resuscitation methods optimizes hemodynamics. The present study was designed to compare five recently described chest compression techniques: high-impulse manual chest compression at 150/min, mechanical compression at 60/min with simultaneous ventilation, mechanical compression at 60/min with simultaneous ventilation and either systolic or diastolic abdominal compression, and pneumatic vest compression at 60/min. Eight dogs were chronically instrumented with electromagnetic flow probes in the ascending and descending aorta while matched micromanometers measured aortic, left ventricular, and pleural pressures. At study, each dog was anesthetized with morphine, intubated, and the heart was fibrillated by rapid ventricular pacing. The five cardiopulmonary resuscitation methods were performed randomly in each preparation within 7 to 10 minutes of arrest. In four dogs, brachiocephalic blood flow was computed as total cardiac output minus descending aortic blood flow, and in all dogs coronary perfusion pressure was calculated as mean diastolic aortic pressure minus mean diastolic left ventricular pressure. Average cardiac output for seven studies was 662 +/- 61 ml/min with high-impulse manual compression, 340 +/- 46 ml/min with mechanical compression and simultaneous ventilation, 336 +/- 45 ml/min with mechanical compression and simultaneous ventilation with systolic abdominal compression, 366 +/- 52 ml/min with mechanical compression and simultaneous ventilation with diastolic abdominal compression, and 196 +/- 29 ml/min with vest resuscitation (high-impulse manual compression significantly greater than other techniques by multivariate analysis, p less than 0.05). Brachiocephalic blood flow generally followed cardiac output and was statistically the greatest with high-impulse manual compression at 273 +/- 47 ml/min (p less than 0.05). Finally, high-impulse manual compression provided the highest coronary perfusion pressure of 31 +/- 4 mm Hg (p less than 0.05) compared to 23 +/- 2 mm Hg for mechanical compression and simultaneous ventilation, 23 +/- 2 mm Hg for mechanical compression and simultaneous ventilation with systolic abdominal compression, 23 +/- 3 mm Hg for mechanical compression and simultaneous ventilation with diastolic abdominal compression, and 11 +/- 2 mm Hg for vest resuscitation. These data demonstrate that high-impulse manual compression generated physiologically and statistically superior hemodynamics when compared with other methods in this model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:3361936

  1. Combined GaAs laser outputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    Technique for combining outputs of array of small semiconductor lasers increases total output power while relaxing fabrication tolerances to make manufacture potentially less costly. Advantage of free-running mode is that spacing between junction-diode lasers is less critical than for conventional, phase-coherently coupled arrays.

  2. Adjoint Error Correction for Integral Outputs

    E-print Network

    Pierce, Niles A.

    that in many cases the most im- portant engineering outputs of CFD calculations are one or two integral.1 Output functionals Why do engineers perform CFD calculations? In the case of a transport air- craft gradient near the leading edge of the wing, causing boundary layer separation and premature transition

  3. Computer Output Microfilm and Library Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Richard W.

    Early computers dealt with mathematical and scientific problems requiring very little input and not much output, therefore high speed printing devices were not required. Today with increased variety of use, high speed printing is necessary and Computer Output Microfilm (COM) devices have been created to meet this need. This indirect process can…

  4. DIST/AVC Out-Put Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Gene L.

    The first stage of development of a management information system for DIST/AVC (Division of Instructional Technology/Audio-Visual Center) is the definition of out-put units. Some constraints on the definition of output units are: 1) they should reflect goals of the organization, 2) they should reflect organizational structure and procedures, and…

  5. Programmed Evolution for Optimization of Orthogonal Metabolic Output in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Eckdahl, Todd T.; Campbell, A. Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J.; Poet, Jeffrey L.; Blauch, David N.; Snyder, Nicole L.; Atchley, Dustin T.; Baker, Erich J.; Brown, Micah; Brunner, Elizabeth C.; Callen, Sean A.; Campbell, Jesse S.; Carr, Caleb J.; Carr, David R.; Chadinha, Spencer A.; Chester, Grace I.; Chester, Josh; Clarkson, Ben R.; Cochran, Kelly E.; Doherty, Shannon E.; Doyle, Catherine; Dwyer, Sarah; Edlin, Linnea M.; Evans, Rebecca A.; Fluharty, Taylor; Frederick, Janna; Galeota-Sprung, Jonah; Gammon, Betsy L.; Grieshaber, Brandon; Gronniger, Jessica; Gutteridge, Katelyn; Henningsen, Joel; Isom, Bradley; Itell, Hannah L.; Keffeler, Erica C.; Lantz, Andrew J.; Lim, Jonathan N.; McGuire, Erin P.; Moore, Alexander K.; Morton, Jerrad; Nakano, Meredith; Pearson, Sara A.; Perkins, Virginia; Parrish, Phoebe; Pierson, Claire E.; Polpityaarachchige, Sachith; Quaney, Michael J.; Slattery, Abagael; Smith, Kathryn E.; Spell, Jackson; Spencer, Morgan; Taye, Telavive; Trueblood, Kamay; Vrana, Caroline J.; Whitesides, E. Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields – evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in energy, pharmaceuticals, chemical commodities, biomining, and bioremediation. PMID:25714374

  6. Cardiac mechanics: Physiological, clinical, and mathematical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirsky, I. (editor); Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    Recent studies concerning the basic physiological and biochemical principles underlying cardiac muscle contraction, methods for the assessment of cardiac function in the clinical situation, and mathematical approaches to cardiac mechanics are presented. Some of the topics covered include: cardiac ultrastructure and function in the normal and failing heart, myocardial energetics, clinical applications of angiocardiography, use of echocardiography for evaluating cardiac performance, systolic time intervals in the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular performance in man, evaluation of passive elastic stiffness for the left ventricle and isolated heart muscle, a conceptual model of myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, application of Huxley's sliding-filament theory to the mechanics of normal and hypertrophied cardiac muscle, and a rheological modeling of the intact left ventricle. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  7. Arginylation regulates myofibrils to maintain heart function and prevent dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Satoshi; Leu, N. Adrian; Pavlov, Ivan; Han, Xuemei; Ribeiro, Paula Aver Bretanha; Xu, Tao; Bunte, Ralph; Saha, Sougata; Wang, Junling; Cornachione, Anabelle; Mai, Wilfried; Yates, John R; Rassier, Dilson E.; Kashina, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Protein arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) is essential for heart formation during embryogenesis, however its cell-autonomous role in cardiomyocytes and the differentiated heart muscle has never been investigated. To address this question, we generated cardiac muscle-specific Ate1 knockout mice, in which Ate1 deletion was driven by ?-myosin heavy chain promoter (?MHC-Ate1 mouse). These mice were initially viable, but developed severe cardiac contractility defects, dilated cardiomyopathy, and thrombosis over time, resulting in high rates of lethality after 6 months of age. These symptoms were accompanied by severe ultrastructural defects in cardiac myofibrils, seen in the newborns and far preceding the onset of cardiomyopathy, suggesting that these defects were primary and likely underlay the development of the future heart defects. Several major sarcomeric proteins were arginylated in vivo. Moreover, Ate1 deletion in the hearts resulted in a significant reduction of active and passive myofibril forces, suggesting that arginylation is critical for both myofibril structural integrity and contractility. Thus, arginylation is essential for maintaining the heart function by regulation of the major myofibril proteins and myofibril forces, and its absence in the heart muscle leads to progressive heart failure through cardiomyocyte-specific defects. PMID:22626847

  8. Sudden cardiac death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Schmied, C; Borjesson, M

    2014-02-01

    A 'paradox of sport' is that in addition to the undisputed health benefits of physical activity, vigorous exertion may transiently increase the risk of acute cardiac events. In general, the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) approximately doubles during physical activity and is 2- to 3-fold higher in athletes compared to nonathletes. The incidence of SCD in young athletes is in fact very low, at around 1-3 per 100,000, but attracts much public attention. Variations in incidence figures may be explained by the methodology used for data collection and more importantly by differences between subpopulations of athletes. The incidence of SCD in older (? 35 years) athletes is higher and may be expected to rise, as more and older individuals take part in organized sports. SCD is often the first clinical manifestation of a potentially fatal underlying cardiovascular disorder and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. In the young (<35 years), SCD is mainly due to congenital/inherited cardiac abnormalities, whilst coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause in older athletes. Cardiac screening including family/personal history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG) may identify individuals at risk and has the potential to decrease the risk of SCD in young athletes. Screening including the ECG has a high sensitivity for underlying disease in young athletes, but the specificity needs to be improved, whereas the sensitivity of screening without the use of ECG is very low. The screening modality recommended for young athletes is of limited value in older athletes, who should receive individualized screening with cardiac stress testing for patients with high risk of underlying CAD. As cardiovascular screening will never be able to identify all athletes at risk, adequate preparedness is vital in case of a potentially fatal event at the sporting arena/facility. Firstly, we will review the magnitude of the problem of SCD in athletes of different ages, as well as the aetiology. Secondly, we will focus on how to prevent SCD in athletes of all ages, reviewing cardiovascular screening recommendations as well as emergency preparedness and arena safety. PMID:24350833

  9. Disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Bharat K; Sankhe, Shilpa S; Agrawal, Mukta D; Naphade, Prashant S

    2010-11-01

    Pulmonary and cardiac involvement by cysticercosis is extremely rare, and is usually asymptomatic. We report the case of a 19-year-old boy who presented with a history of headache and vomiting and was found to have disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement; the emphasis is on the rare occurrence of pulmonary, cardiac, pancreatic, intraocular, and extradural spinal canal involvement in the same patient. This case demonstrates the extent to which cysticercosis can be disseminated. PMID:21423911

  10. Disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Bharat K; Sankhe, Shilpa S; Agrawal, Mukta D; Naphade, Prashant S

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary and cardiac involvement by cysticercosis is extremely rare, and is usually asymptomatic. We report the case of a 19-year-old boy who presented with a history of headache and vomiting and was found to have disseminated cysticercosis with pulmonary and cardiac involvement; the emphasis is on the rare occurrence of pulmonary, cardiac, pancreatic, intraocular, and extradural spinal canal involvement in the same patient. This case demonstrates the extent to which cysticercosis can be disseminated. PMID:21423911

  11. Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome presenting with cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Moza, Ankush; Sheikh, Mujeeb; Rock-Willoughby, Jayme; Cooper, Christopher; Kanjwal, Yousuf

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) is a rare clinical disorder associated with blood and tissue infiltration by eosinophils. Cardiac involvement in patients with IHES can have varied presentations, and is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, cardiac tamponade is a very rare presentation of IHES, and few anecdotal cases exist in literature. We report on IHES in a patient who presented with cardiac tamponade. PMID:22770997

  12. Congestive cardiac failure following laxative withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, J. A.; Brown, A. R.; Walker, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with weakness and hypokalaemia due to excessive use of laxatives. When the laxatives were withdrawn, she developed severe congestive cardiac failure requiring treatment with a diuretic and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. There was no underlying cardiac abnormality, and these drugs were eventually stopped with no recurrence of the cardiac failure. The possible mechanisms of heart failure following laxative withdrawal is discussed. PMID:8796216

  13. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  14. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Yulia; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue.

  15. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and Causal Attributions as Predictors of Health and Risk Factor Status after Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkimer, John C.; And Others

    Compliance with many health-promoting regimens is often poor, even among individuals with known chronic disease. Lifestyle changes recommended by cardiac rehabilitation educators are often not adopted or not maintained by clients having suffered myocardial infarction and/or coronary graft bypass surgery. Subjects were graduates (N=117) of a Phase…

  16. TBX1 Represses Vegfr2 Gene Expression and Enhances the Cardiac Fate of VEGFR2+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lania, Gabriella; Ferrentino, Rosa; Baldini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor TBX1 has critical roles in maintaining proliferation and inhibiting differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells of the second heart field (SHF). Haploinsufficiency of the gene that encodes it is a cause of congenital heart disease. Here, we developed an embryonic stem (ES) cell-based model in which Tbx1 expression can be modulated by tetracycline. Using this model, we found that TBX1 down regulates the expression of VEGFR2, and we confirmed this finding in vivo during embryonic development. In addition, we found a Vegfr2 domain of expression, not previously described, in the posterior SHF and this expression is extended by loss of Tbx1. VEGFR2 has been previously described as a marker of a subpopulation of cardiac progenitors. Clonal analysis of ES-derived VEGFR2+ cells indicated that 12.5% of clones expressed three markers of cardiac lineage (cardiomyocyte, smooth muscle and endothelium). However, a pulse of Tbx1 expression was sufficient to increase the percentage to 20.8%. In addition, the percentage of clones expressing markers of multiple cardiac lineages increased from 41.6% to 79.1% after Tbx1 pulse. These results suggest that TBX1 plays a role in maintaining a progenitor state in VEGFR2+ cells. PMID:26382615

  17. Cypher and Enigma Homolog Protein Are Essential for Cardiac Development and Embryonic Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yongxin; Jing, Ran; Peter, Angela K; Lange, Stephan; Lin, Lizhu; Zhang, Jianlin; Ouyang, Kunfu; Fang, Xi; Veevers, Jennifer; Zhou, Xinmin; Evans, Sylvia M; Cheng, Hongqiang; Chen, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Background The striated muscle Z-line, a multiprotein complex at the boundary between sarcomeres, plays an integral role in maintaining striated muscle structure and function. Multiple Z-line-associated proteins have been identified and shown to play an increasingly important role in the pathogenesis of human cardiomyopathy. Cypher and its close homologue, Enigma homolog protein (ENH), are 2 Z-line proteins previously shown to be individually essential for maintenance of postnatal cardiac function and stability of the Z-line during muscle contraction, but dispensable for cardiac myofibrillogenesis and development. Methods and Results The current studies were designed to test whether Cypher and ENH play redundant roles during embryonic development. Here, we demonstrated that mice lacking both ENH and Cypher exhibited embryonic lethality and growth retardation. Lethality in double knockout embryos was associated with cardiac dilation and abnormal Z-line structure. In addition, when ENH was ablated in conjunction with selective ablation of either Cypher short isoforms (CypherS), or Cypher long isoforms (CypherL), only the latter resulted in embryonic lethality. Conclusions Cypher and ENH redundantly play an essential role in sustaining Z-line structure from the earliest stages of cardiac function, and are redundantly required to maintain normal embryonic heart function and embryonic viability. PMID:25944877

  18. 21 CFR 870.5200 - External cardiac compressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Therapeutic Devices § 870.5200 External cardiac compressor. (a) Identification. An external cardiac compressor is an external device...the heart to provide blood flow during cardiac arrest. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. High Output Piezo/Triboelectric Hybrid Generator

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Kang, Min-Gyu; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesting devices have been developed to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Especially, it is well known that triboelectric nanogenerators have a simple structure and a high output voltage. However, whereas nanostructures improve the output of triboelectric generators, its fabrication process is still complicated and unfavorable in term of the large scale and long-time durability of the device. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid generator which does not use nanostructure but generates much higher output power by a small mechanical force and integrates piezoelectric generator into triboelectric generator, derived from the simultaneous use of piezoelectric and triboelectric mechanisms in one press-and-release cycle. This hybrid generator combines high piezoelectric output current and triboelectric output voltage, which produces peak output voltage of ~370?V, current density of ~12??A·cm?2, and average power density of ~4.44?mW·cm?2. The output power successfully lit up 600 LED bulbs by the application of a 0.2 N mechanical force and it charged a 10??F capacitor to 10?V in 25?s. Beyond energy harvesting, this work will provide new opportunities for developing a small, built-in power source in self-powered electronics such as mobile electronics. PMID:25791299

  20. High Output Piezo/Triboelectric Hybrid Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Kang, Min-Gyu; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesting devices have been developed to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Especially, it is well known that triboelectric nanogenerators have a simple structure and a high output voltage. However, whereas nanostructures improve the output of triboelectric generators, its fabrication process is still complicated and unfavorable in term of the large scale and long-time durability of the device. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid generator which does not use nanostructure but generates much higher output power by a small mechanical force and integrates piezoelectric generator into triboelectric generator, derived from the simultaneous use of piezoelectric and triboelectric mechanisms in one press-and-release cycle. This hybrid generator combines high piezoelectric output current and triboelectric output voltage, which produces peak output voltage of ~370 V, current density of ~12 ?A.cm-2, and average power density of ~4.44 mW.cm-2. The output power successfully lit up 600 LED bulbs by the application of a 0.2 N mechanical force and it charged a 10 ?F capacitor to 10 V in 25 s. Beyond energy harvesting, this work will provide new opportunities for developing a small, built-in power source in self-powered electronics such as mobile electronics.

  1. High output piezo/triboelectric hybrid generator.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Kang, Min-Gyu; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesting devices have been developed to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Especially, it is well known that triboelectric nanogenerators have a simple structure and a high output voltage. However, whereas nanostructures improve the output of triboelectric generators, its fabrication process is still complicated and unfavorable in term of the large scale and long-time durability of the device. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid generator which does not use nanostructure but generates much higher output power by a small mechanical force and integrates piezoelectric generator into triboelectric generator, derived from the simultaneous use of piezoelectric and triboelectric mechanisms in one press-and-release cycle. This hybrid generator combines high piezoelectric output current and triboelectric output voltage, which produces peak output voltage of ~370 V, current density of ~12 ?A · cm(-2), and average power density of ~4.44 mW · cm(-2). The output power successfully lit up 600 LED bulbs by the application of a 0.2 N mechanical force and it charged a 10 ?F capacitor to 10 V in 25 s. Beyond energy harvesting, this work will provide new opportunities for developing a small, built-in power source in self-powered electronics such as mobile electronics. PMID:25791299

  2. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac morphology and function in mutant dwarf rats.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, S; Cittadini, A; Strömer, H; Katz, S E; Grossman, J D; Clark, R G; Morgan, J P; Douglas, P S

    2000-10-01

    Although the mutant dwarf rat has been proposed as a model of growth hormone (GH) deficiency, few studies have addressed its cardiovascular abnormalities. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate cardiac structure and function in mutant dwarf rats in vivo before and after chronic GH administration, by means of transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. To this purpose, forty 90-day-old female dwarf rats were randomized to receive either GH treatment or placebo. Twenty age-and sex-matched Lewis rats (200-250 g) served as the control group. All rats underwent echocardiograms before receiving any drug and after 3 weeks of therapy. Echocardiographically detected left ventricular mass indexed to tibial length was reduced by 41% in dwarf rats compared to the control group. Such relative cardiac atrophy was also evident at the myocyte level, and was fully reversible after GH therapy. In contrast to the control group, dwarf rats also showed a reduction of left ventricular diastolic volumes normalized to tibial length and impaired cardiac performance as suggested by the reduction of cardiac index, abnormal stress-shortening relations, and a significant elevation of total peripheral vascular resistance. All these abnormalities were reversible upon GH therapy for 3 weeks. In conclusion, GH plays an important role in maintaining a normal cardiac structure and function. Since the observed changes are similar to those seen in GH-deficient men, the mutant dwarf rat represents a faithful animal model of GH deficiency. PMID:11042020

  3. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  4. Automated Methods to Maintain Aircraft Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauderdale, Todd

    2011-01-01

    The air traffic control system in the United States has a great track-record for safety. As more aircraft enter the system at a given time, the situation becomes more complex though. Researchers at NASA are attempting to leverage advances in many fields including optimization, data mining, and numerical modeling of systems to improve the air-transportation system maintaining safety while increasing throughput and reducing delays. This talk will give a brief overview of the research at NASA towards modernizing the air-transportation system. It will then focus on the specific area of automation tools for maintaining physical separation between aircraft known as Separation Assurance.

  5. High Energy Output Marx Generator Design

    SciTech Connect

    Monty Lehmann

    2011-07-01

    High Energy Output Marx Generator Design a design of a six stage Marx generator that has a unipolar pulse waveform of 200 kA in a 50×500 microsecond waveform is presented. The difficulties encountered in designing the components to withstand the temperatures and pressures generated during the output pulse are discussed. The unique methods and materials used to successfully overcome these problems are given. The steps necessary to increase the current output of this Marx generator design to the meg-ampere region or higher are specified.

  6. Design of hydraulic output Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. M.; Harvey, A. C.; Lee, K.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic output system for the RE-1000 free piston stirling engine (FPSE) was designed. The hydraulic output system can be readily integrated with the existing hot section of RE-1000 FPSE. The system has two simply supported diaphragms which separate the engine gas from the hydraulic fluid, a dynamic balance mechanism, and a novel, null center band hydraulic pump. The diaphragms are designed to endure more than 10 billion cycles, and to withstand the differential pressure load as high as 14 MPa. The projected thermodynamic performance of the hydraulic output version of RE-1000 FPSE is 1.87 kW at 29/7 percent brake efficiency.

  7. Primary Cardiac Allograft Dysfunction—Validation of a Clinical Definition

    PubMed Central

    Dronavalli, Vamsidhar B.; Rogers, Chris A.; Banner, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation is an established treatment for advanced heart failure. Primary allograft dysfunction (PGD) is reported in up to 40% of transplants and is associated with a poor outcome. Methods As part of Heart Evaluation and Retrieval for Transplantation study, an investigation of the assessment of donor hearts for transplantation, we proposed a clinical definition for cardiac PGD comprising severely impaired systolic function affecting one or both ventricles accompanied by hypotension, low cardiac output, and high filling pressures occurring in the first 72 hours (in the absence of hyper acute rejection and technical surgical factors, such as cardiac tamponade). Here, we examine the prospective application of this definition to 290 heart transplants. We compared the clinical outcome of PGD and non-PGD cases. Results Ninety-four of 290 transplants developed PGD (32.4%). Inotrope use (score) was higher in the PGD group at 24, 48, and 72 hours after transplantation (P < 0.01). In the PGD group, there was a greater requirement for, intra-aortic balloon pump (50% vs 15%, P < 0.01), mechanical support (27% vs 0%, P < 0.01), and renal replacement therapy (61% vs 26%, P < 0.01). Intensive care stay was longer for recipients with PGD (median 14 vs 5 days, P < 0.01) and early mortality was higher (37% vs 4% at 30 days, 42% vs 8% at 1 year, P < 0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, our definition of PGD could be applied in a national multicenter study, and the cases it defined had more frequent complications and higher mortality. PMID:25742423

  8. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following SCI. Each type of cardiac disturbance requires specific treatment. PMID:20108532

  9. Ca2+ dependence of loaded shortening in rat skinned cardiac myocytes and skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kerry S

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effects of activator Ca2+ on loaded shortening and power output in skinned rat cardiac myocyte preparations, and fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres at 12 °C.Shortening velocities were slowed at nearly all relative loads when Ca2+ activation levels were reduced to ?70 % maximal isometric force (P4.5) in cardiac myocyte preparations, as well as in fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres.Peak absolute power outputs declined significantly as Ca2+ activation levels were progressively reduced from maximal to 30 %P4.5 in all three striated muscle types, with the greatest change in fast-twitch fibres. In cardiac myocyte preparations, even peak relative power output progressively fell when Ca2+ activation levels were lowered to ?70, 50 and 30 %P4.5. Peak relative power output also progressively fell in fast-twitch fibres as Ca2+ activation levels were lowered from maximal down to 50 %P4.5. However, in slow-twitch fibres, peak relative power output decreased only at 70 %P4.5 and then remained unchanged with further reductions in Ca2+ activation levels. The greater Ca2+ dependence of peak relative power output in cardiac myocytes and fast-twitch fibres may arise from a shared mechanism such as cooperative inactivation of the thin filament, which is likely to be slowest in less cooperative slow-twitch fibres.During submaximal Ca2+ activations, the time course of shortening became markedly curvilinear during isotonic shortening in all three muscle types. The progressive slowdown in shortening velocity during isotonic contractions was greatest in fast-twitch fibres, consistent with the higher degree of cooperativity of Ca2+ activation in fast-twitch fibres. Additionally, fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibre stiffness decreased in concert with the curvature of length traces during loaded shortening. These results are consistent with the idea that cooperative inactivation of the thin filament occurs during loaded shortening and such a mechanism may contribute to the progressive slowing and overall Ca2+ dependence of loaded shortening velocity. PMID:10811735

  10. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  11. Halema'uma'u Maintains Basic Geometry

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The lava lake at Halema'uma'u has maintained the same basic geometry since February of this year. This thermal image was taken during a helicopter overflight, and shows the lava surface deep within the vent cavity. The lava surface is kidney-shaped and approximately 60 x 90 meters in size, and situa...

  12. Maintaining ideal body weight counseling sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, S.H.

    1980-10-09

    The purpose of this program is to provide employees with the motivation, knowledge and skills necessary to maintain ideal body weight throughout life. The target audience for this program, which is conducted in an industrial setting, is the employee 40 years of age or younger who is at or near his/her ideal body weight.

  13. How Do Positive Views Maintain Life Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Tsai, Ying-Mei; Chen, Lung Hung

    2009-01-01

    This study proposes three mediation pathways to explain how the positive views (perceived control, optimism and self-enhancement) proposed by Cummins and Nistico (Journal of Happiness Studies 3:37-69 2002) maintain life satisfaction. The three pathways were enhancing self-esteem, reducing have-want discrepancy and changing importance perceptions.…

  14. Maintaining Clones through Eclipse Refactoring Extensions

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Maintaining Clones through Eclipse Refactoring Extensions Robert Tairas (tairasr@cis.uab.edu) Jeff and Information Sciences University of Alabama at Birmingham · Clone detection tools provide an automated way to discover sections of duplicated code. · Clone analysis helps determine a group of clones to remove

  15. Can punishment maintain sex? Daniel J. Rankin

    E-print Network

    Rankin, Daniel

    as they are able to reproduce twice as fast. Explaining why sexual reproduction is favoured over asexual be one way in which sexual reproduction could be maintained in groups of animals; in light of recent (Maynard Smith 1978). Sexual reproduction represents a paradox, because any allele which reproduces

  16. Service Center Billing Maintaining Accounts Receivable for

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Service Center Billing Procedures Maintaining Accounts Receivable for External Customers 1 #12;LOG on "Approve" 13 #12;INITIALIZE A REQUEST · SELF SERVICE · A customer reserving machine time may be "self service". · After a customer submits an initial request for machine time, the request will be marked

  17. Maintaining Interest in Operator Requal Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, H. J., Jr.

    A study reviewed operator training programs at Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station to determine their interface with plant operations and to devise new ways of maintaining interest in requalification (requal) training. The operator training review committee that was formed to implement the review documented over 100 issues and concerns…

  18. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The physical principles and current applications of echocardiography in assessment of heart diseases are reviewed. Technical considerations and unresolved points relative to the use of echocardiography in various disease states are stressed. The discussion covers normal mitral valve motion, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, atrial masses, mitral valve prolapse, and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Other topics concern tricuspic valve abnormalities, aortic valve disease, pulmonic valve, pericardial effusion, intraventricular septal motion, and left ventricular function. The application of echocardiography to congenital heart disease diagnosis is discussed along with promising ultrasonic imaging systems. The utility of echocardiography in quantitative evaluation of cardiac disease is demonstrated.

  19. Cardiac evaluation of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Fillipps, Donald J; Bucciarelli, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    The physical examination of the term newborn's cardiovascular system is reviewed detailing the normal and abnormal variants that can be found within the first few days after birth. The authors discuss the pathophysiologic changes that occur in the presence of congenital heart disease and how these changes affect the clinical presentation. The major common cardiac defects are described and discussed. Pulse oximetry screening is reviewed in detail indicating its value in the early detection of most cases of critical congenital heart disease. Finally, the reader is given several suggestions on diagnosis, stabilization, and when to refer to specialists. PMID:25836709

  20. Cardiac anomalies in the fetus.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher G B; Tworetzky, Wayne; Wilkins-Haug, Louise E; Jennings, Russell W

    2009-06-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is an attractive target for fetal therapy. With the development of successful neonatal repair for many types of CHD over the last 20 years, fetal therapy has become the next frontier. Concurrent advances in interventional catheterization and fetal imaging provided a foundation for the novel field of fetal cardiac intervention. This article focuses on the current status of in utero catheter interventions for CHD with particular interest in therapy for defects characterized by progressive stenosis or atresia of the semilunar valves, the aortic and pulmonary, with development of subsequent ventricular hypoplasia. PMID:19559330

  1. Generating Multimodal Output -Conditions, Advantages and Problems

    E-print Network

    Generating Multimodal Output - Conditions, Advantages and Problems Dagmar SCHMAUKS, Norbert@sbsvax.uucp Abstract In natural communication situations, multimodal referent specification is frequent and efficient arrows and indices. This paper has two intentions. First, it discusses the advantages of multimodal

  2. Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs

    E-print Network

    Venditti, David A.

    Anisotropic grid–adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

  3. Myofibrillar Architecture in Engineered Cardiac Myocytes

    E-print Network

    Chen, Christopher S.

    such as translation or signal- ing pathways contribute to regulation of muscle growth during cardiac organo in cardiac muscle cells. This is important because the mecha- nisms that regulate muscle growth muscle myocytes. We engineered the shape of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes by culturing them

  4. Influence of cirrhosis in cardiac surgery outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Esteve, Francisco; Javierre, Casimiro; Ventura, Josep L; Mañez, Rafael; Farrero, Elisabet; Torrado, Herminia; Rodríguez-Castro, David; Carrio, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis has evolved an important risk factor for cardiac surgery due to the higher morbidity and mortality that these patients may suffer compared with general cardiac surgery population. The presence of contributing factors for a poor outcome, such as coagulopathy, a poor nutritional status, an adaptive immune dysfunction, a degree of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and a degree of renal and pulmonary dysfunction, have to be taken into account for surgical evaluation when cardiac surgery is needed, together with the degree of liver disease and its primary complications. The associated pathophysiological characteristics that liver cirrhosis represents have a great influence in the development of complications during cardiac surgery and the postoperative course. Despite the population of cirrhotic patients who are referred for cardiac surgery is small and recommendations come from small series, since liver cirrhotic patients have increased their chance of survival in the last 20 years due to the advances in their medical care, which includes liver transplantation, they have been increasingly considered for cardiac surgery. Indeed, there is an expected rise of cirrhotic patients within the cardiac surgical population due to the increasing rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, especially in western countries. In consequence, a more specific approach is needed in the assessment of care of these patients if we want to improve their management. In this article, we review the pathophysiology and outcome prediction of cirrhotic patients who underwent cardiac surgery. PMID:25914775

  5. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  6. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  7. Cardiac Mass and Function Decrease in Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome after Lung Transplantation: Relationship to Physical Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Jan B.; Renne, Julius; Schoenfeld, Christian; Gutberlet, Marcel; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Welte, Tobias; Wacker, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Rationale There is a need to expand knowledge on cardio-pulmonary pathophysiology of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) following lung transplantation (LTx). Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess MRI-derived biventricular cardiac mass and function parameters as well as flow hemodynamics in patients with and without BOS after LTx. Methods Using 1.5T cardiac MRI, measurements of myocardial structure and function as well as measurements of flow in the main pulmonary artery and ascending aorta were performed in 56 lung transplant patients. The patients were dichotomized into two gender matched groups of comparable age range: one with BOS (BOS stages 1–3) and one without BOS (BOS 0/0p). Measurements and Main Results Significantly lower biventricular cardiac mass, right and left ventricular end-diastolic volume, biventricular stroke volume, flow hemodynamics and significant higher heart rate but preserved cardiac output were observed in patients with BOS 1–3 compared to the BOS 0/0p group (p<0.05). In a stepwise logistic regression analysis global cardiac mass (p?=?0.046) and days after LTx (p?=?0.0001) remained independent parameters to predict BOS. In a second model an indicator for the physical fitness level - walking number of stairs - was added to the logistic regression model. In this second model, time after LTx (p?=?0.005) and physical fitness (p?=?0.01) remained independent predictors for BOS. Conclusion The observed changes in biventricular cardiac mass and function as well as changes in hemodynamic flow parameters in the pulmonary trunk and ascending aorta are likely attributed to the physical fitness level of patients after lung transplantation, which in turn is strongly related to lung function. PMID:25479016

  8. Retinal output changes qualitatively with every change in ambient illuminance

    PubMed Central

    Seitter, Hartwig; Hovhannisyan, Anahit; Procyk, Christopher A.; Allen, Annette E.; Schenk, Martin; Lucas, Robert J.; Münch, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    The collective activity pattern of retinal ganglion cells, the retinal code, underlies higher visual processing. How does the ambient illuminance of the visual scene influence this retinal output? We recorded from isolated mouse and pig retina and from mouse dLGN in-vivo at up to seven ambient light levels covering the scotopic to photopic regimes. Across each luminance transition, the majority of ganglion cells exhibited qualitative response changes, while maintaining stable responses within each luminance. Strikingly, we commonly observed the appearance and disappearance of ON responses in OFF cells and vice versa. Such qualitative response changes occurred for a variety of stimuli, including full-field and localized contrast steps, and naturalistic movies. Our results suggest that the retinal code is not fixed but varies with every change of ambient luminance. This finding raises new questions about signal processing within the retina and has intriguing implications for visual processing in higher brain areas. PMID:25485757

  9. Post-cardiac arrest extracorporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Patroniti, Nicolò; Sangalli, Fabio; Avalli, Leonello

    2015-12-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is a complex, life-threatening event involving a multidisciplinary approach. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation, survival rate continues to be low for both in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In refractory cardiac arrest, defined by the absence of return of spontaneous circulation despite resuscitation manoeuvres, mortality approaches 100%. In the last years, an increasing number of case series, and few propensity-matched cohort studies have reported encouraging results on the use of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest. Extracorporeal circulation ensures an adequate blood flow, to perform diagnostic and therapeutic interventions even before a return of spontaneous circulation is achieved and to rest the heart by unloading the ventricle while ensuring myocardial perfusion after return of spontaneous circulation. This study reviews the rational, indications, evidence and management of extracorporeal support for cardiac arrest. PMID:26670820

  10. A neonatal blueprint for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, Enzo R.; Olson, Eric N.

    2014-01-01

    Adult mammals undergo minimal regeneration following cardiac injury, which severely compromises cardiac function and contributes to the ongoing burden of heart failure. In contrast, the mammalian heart retains a transient capacity for cardiac regeneration during fetal and early neonatal life. Recent studies have established the importance of several evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for heart regeneration in lower vertebrates and neonatal mammals including induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation, epicardial cell activation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition and immune cell infiltration. In this review, we provide an up-to-date account of the molecular and cellular basis for cardiac regeneration in lower vertebrates and neonatal mammals. The historical context for these recent findings and their ramifications for the future development of cardiac regenerative therapies are also discussed. PMID:25108892

  11. Cardiac Mechanics Evaluated by Speckle Tracking Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Abduch, Maria Cristina Donadio; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Mathias, Wilson; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz de Campos

    2014-01-01

    Natural myocardial markers, or speckles, originated from constructive and destructive interference of ultrasound in the tissues may provide early diagnosis of myocardial changes and be used in the prediction of some cardiac events. Due to its relatively temporal stability, speckles can be tracked by dedicated software along the cardiac cycle, enabling the analysis of the systolic and diastolic function. They are identified by either conventional 2D grey scale and by 3D echo, conferring independence of the insonation angle, thus allowing assessment of cardiac mechanics in the three spatial planes: longitudinal, circumferential, and radial. The purposes of the present paper are: to discuss the role and the meaning of cardiac strain obtained by speckle tracking during the evaluation of cardiac physiology and to discuss clinical applications of this novel echocardiographic technology. PMID:24844877

  12. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Yunnan Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Kunming 650022 ; Wang, Yanru; Qu, Aijuan

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  13. Cardiac amyloidosis: the great pretender.

    PubMed

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Longhi, Simone; Milandri, Agnese; Gagliardi, Christian; Bartolomei, Ilaria; Salvi, Fabrizio; Maurer, Mathew S

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is often misdiagnosed because of both physician-related and disease-related reasons including: fragmented knowledge among different specialties and subspecialties, shortage of centres and specialists dedicated to disease management, erroneous belief it is an incurable disease, rarity of the condition, intrinsic phenotypic heterogeneity, genotypic heterogeneity in transthyretin-related forms and the necessity of target organ tissue histological diagnosis in the vast majority of cases. Pitfalls, incorrect beliefs and deceits challenge not only the path to the diagnosis of CA but also the precise identification of aetiological subtype. The awareness of this condition is the most important prerequisite for the management of the risk of underdiagnoses and misdiagnosis. Almost all clinical, imaging and laboratory tests can be misinterpreted, but fortunately each of these diagnostic steps can also offer diagnostic "red flags" (i.e. highly suggestive findings that can foster the correct diagnostic suspicion and facilitate early, timely diagnosis). This is especially important because outcomes in CA are largely driven by the severity of cardiac dysfunction and emerging therapies are aimed at preventing further amyloid deposition. PMID:25758359

  14. Global Availability of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Turk-Adawi, Karam; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent non-communicable disease globally, namely cardiovascular disease (CVD), is also the leading cause of mortality, with over 80% of the deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. To lessen the impact of CVDs on individuals and societies, a comprehensive approach is needed. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) involves delivery of structured exercise, education and risk reduction, in a cost-effective manner. Robust evidence demonstrates it reduces mortality up to 25%, improves functional capacity, as well as decreases re-hospitalization. Despite its benefits, and clinical practice guideline recommendations to refer cardiac patients, CR programs are grossly under-used. Worldwide, there is low availability of CR; only 38.8% of countries globally have CR programs. Specifically, 68.0% of high-income and 23% of LMICs (28.2% for middle- and 8.3% for low-income countries) have CR. CR density estimates ranged from 1 program per 0.1–6.4 million inhabitants. CR availability is much lower than that of other evidence-based secondary prevention therapies, such as revascularization and pharmacological therapies. Multi-level strategies to augment CR capacity and availability at national and international levels such as supportive public health policies, systematic referral strategies, and alternative models of delivery are needed. PMID:25027487

  15. Cardiac Syndrome X – Update 2014

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Shilpa; Mehta, Puja K.; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX), a condition characterized by angina-like chest discomfort, ST segment depression during exercise, and normal coronary epicardial arteries at angiography, has the highest prevalence in post-menopausal women. Historically CSX was considered to be a benign condition but recent reports have shown that individuals with CSX have a higher prevalence of adverse cardiovascular events compared to control subjects and a poor quality of life. Diagnosis of CSX is often difficult and expensive because the diagnosis is primarily one of exclusion. Furthermore, treatment of CSX is challenging because the underlying pathogenesis of the condition is not well understood. The two most popular theories of pathogenesis are coronary microvascular dysfunction, in which symptoms are thought to result from myocardial ischemia secondary to abnormal coronary microvasculature function, and abnormal cardiac pain sensitivity, in which symptoms are thought to be a result of myocardial hypersensitivity and exaggerated pain perception. Treatment options include traditional anti-ischemic medications such as nitrates, beta-blockers, and calcium channel antagonists. Furthermore, other anti-ischemic medications such as ranolazine, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins can be used. Analgesic medications such as xanthine derivatives and tricyclic antidepressants have also shown efficacy. Non-pharmacological treatments include cognitive behavioral therapy, enhanced external counterpulsation, neurostimulation, stellate ganglionectomy, and lifestyle modifications. Studies have shown the efficacy of individual treatments but guidelines outlining the best course of therapy are lacking. PMID:25091971

  16. Predictive Modeling of Cardiac Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gary T.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the Contextual Alarms Management System (CALMS) project is to develop sophisticated models to predict the onset of clinical cardiac ischemia before it occurs. The system will continuously monitor cardiac patients and set off an alarm when they appear about to suffer an ischemic episode. The models take as inputs information from patient history and combine it with continuously updated information extracted from blood pressure, oxygen saturation and ECG lines. Expert system, statistical, neural network and rough set methodologies are then used to forecast the onset of clinical ischemia before it transpires, thus allowing early intervention aimed at preventing morbid complications from occurring. The models will differ from previous attempts by including combinations of continuous and discrete inputs. A commercial medical instrumentation and software company has invested funds in the project with a goal of commercialization of the technology. The end product will be a system that analyzes physiologic parameters and produces an alarm when myocardial ischemia is present. If proven feasible, a CALMS-based system will be added to existing heart monitoring hardware.

  17. [Technologies for cardiac valve prostheses].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kiyoharu

    2009-07-01

    To show the technological development of cardiac valve prostheses, a historical review of both mechanical and biological valve prostheses and a current overview of modern cardiac valve devices are provided. Scince the 1st implantation of Starr-Edwards ball valve in 1960, both mechanical and biological valve prostheses have advanced. The valve design, the material of the leaflet and the hausing of mechanical prostheses have improved. Currently, the majority of the mechanical prostheses are bileaflet tilting disc valves made of pyrolytic carbon, which is antithromboembolic. However, anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is still required. As for the bioprostheses, although the fixation and anti-mineralization methods of the tissues improved, the durability of these valves is still limited. For the material of the current biological valves, the porcine aortic valve or bovine pericardium are used. The tissues are fixed by non-pressure or low-pressure method in glutaraldehyde solution. A stented and non-stented valves are available. Epoch-making events in this field are the implantation of new bioprosthetic valves using tissue engineering methods and the development of the transcatheter valve replacement therapies. PMID:20715694

  18. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  19. Reliability and Maintainability model (RAM) user and maintenance manual. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles E.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents the procedures for utilizing and maintaining the Reliability and Maintainability Model (RAM) developed by the University of Dayton for the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The RAM model predicts reliability and maintainability (R&M) parameters for conceptual space vehicles using parametric relationships between vehicle design and performance characteristics and subsystem mean time between maintenance actions (MTBM) and manhours per maintenance action (MH/MA). These parametric relationships were developed using aircraft R&M data from over thirty different military aircraft of all types. This report describes the general methodology used within the model, the execution and computational sequence, the input screens and data, the output displays and reports, and study analyses and procedures. A source listing is provided.

  20. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of cardiac function and myocardial mass in preterm infants: a preliminary study of the impact of patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many pathologies seen in the preterm population are associated with abnormal blood supply, yet robust evaluation of preterm cardiac function is scarce and consequently normative ranges in this population are limited. The aim of this study was to quantify and validate left ventricular dimension and function in preterm infants using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). An initial investigation of the impact of the common congenital defect patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) was then carried out. Methods Steady State Free Procession short axis stacks were acquired. Normative ranges of left ventricular end diastolic volume (EDV), stroke volume (SV), left ventricular output (LVO), ejection fraction (EF), left ventricular (LV) mass, wall thickness and fractional thickening were determined in “healthy” (control) neonates. Left ventricular parameters were then investigated in PDA infants. Unpaired student t-tests compared the 2 groups. Multiple linear regression analysis assessed impact of shunt volume in PDA infants, p-value???0.05 being significant. Results 29 control infants median (range) corrected gestational age at scan 34+6(31+1-39+3) weeks were scanned. EDV, SV, LVO, LV mass normalized by weight and EF were shown to decrease with increasing corrected gestational age (cGA) in controls. In 16 PDA infants (cGA 30+3(27+3-36+1) weeks) left ventricular dimension and output were significantly increased, yet there was no significant difference in ejection fraction and fractional thickening between the two groups. A significant association between shunt volume and increased left ventricular mass correcting for postnatal age and corrected gestational age existed. Conclusion CMR assessment of left ventricular function has been validated in neonates, providing more robust normative ranges of left ventricular dimension and function in this population. Initial investigation of PDA infants would suggest that function is relatively maintained. PMID:25160730

  1. Deletion of MLIP (Muscle-enriched A-type Lamin-interacting Protein) Leads to Cardiac Hyperactivation of Akt/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) and Impaired Cardiac Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Marie-Elodie; Wang, Jessica; Weldrick, Jonathan J; Roeske, Cassandra L; Mak, Esther; Thorn, Stephanie L; DaSilva, Jean N; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldon J; Burgon, Patrick G

    2015-10-30

    Aging and diseases generally result from tissue inability to maintain homeostasis through adaptation. The adult heart is particularly vulnerable to disequilibrium in homeostasis because its regenerative abilities are limited. Here, we report that MLIP (muscle enriched A-type lamin-interacting protein), a unique protein of unknown function, is required for proper cardiac adaptation. Mlip(-/-) mice exhibited normal cardiac function despite myocardial metabolic abnormalities and cardiac-specific overactivation of Akt/mTOR pathways. Cardiac-specific MLIP overexpression led to an inhibition of Akt/mTOR, providing evidence of a direct impact of MLIP on these key signaling pathways. Mlip(-/-) hearts showed an impaired capacity to adapt to stress (isoproterenol-induced hypertrophy), likely because of deregulated Akt/mTOR activity. Genome-wide association studies showed a genetic association between Mlip and early response to cardiac stress, supporting the role of MLIP in cardiac adaptation. Together, these results revealed that MLIP is required for normal myocardial adaptation to stress through integrated regulation of the Akt/mTOR pathways. PMID:26359501

  2. Investigation of Space Interferometer Control Using Imaging Sensor Output Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse A.; Cheng, Victor H. L.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous space interferometry missions are planned for the next decade to verify different enabling technologies towards very-long-baseline interferometry to achieve high-resolution imaging and high-precision measurements. These objectives will require coordinated formations of spacecraft separately carrying optical elements comprising the interferometer. High-precision sensing and control of the spacecraft and the interferometer-component payloads are necessary to deliver sub-wavelength accuracy to achieve the scientific objectives. For these missions, the primary scientific product of interferometer measurements may be the only source of data available at the precision required to maintain the spacecraft and interferometer-component formation. A concept is studied for detecting the interferometer's optical configuration errors based on information extracted from the interferometer sensor output. It enables precision control of the optical components, and, in cases of space interferometers requiring formation flight of spacecraft that comprise the elements of a distributed instrument, it enables the control of the formation-flying vehicles because independent navigation or ranging sensors cannot deliver the high-precision metrology over the entire required geometry. Since the concept can act on the quality of the interferometer output directly, it can detect errors outside the capability of traditional metrology instruments, and provide the means needed to augment the traditional instrumentation to enable enhanced performance. Specific analyses performed in this study include the application of signal-processing and image-processing techniques to solve the problems of interferometer aperture baseline control, interferometer pointing, and orientation of multiple interferometer aperture pairs.

  3. Investigation of Space Interferometer Control Using Imaging Sensor Output Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victore H. L.; Leitner, Jesse A.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous space interferometry missions are planned for the next decade to verify different enabling technologies towards very-long-baseline interferometry to achieve high-resolution imaging and high-precision measurements. These objectives will require coordinated formations of spacecraft separately carrying optical elements comprising the interferometer. High-precision sensing and control of the spacecraft and the interferometer-component payloads are necessary to deliver sub-wavelength accuracy to achieve the scientific objectives. For these missions, the primary scientific product of interferometer measurements may be the only source of data available at the precision required to maintain the spacecraft and interferometer-component formation. A concept is studied for detecting the interferometer's optical configuration errors based on information extracted from the interferometer sensor output. It enables precision control of the optical components, and, in cases of space interferometers requiring formation flight of spacecraft that comprise the elements of a distributed instrument, it enables the control of the formation flying vehicles because independent navigation or ranging sensors cannot deliver the high-precision metrology over the entire required geometry. Since the concept can act on the quality of the interferometer output directly, it can detect errors outside the capability of traditional metrology instruments, and provide the means needed to augment the traditional instrumentation to enable enhanced performance. Specific analyses performed in this study include the application of signal-processing and image-processing techniques to solve the problems of interferometer aperture baseline control, interferometer pointing, and orientation of multiple interferometer aperture pairs.

  4. Exact-Output Tracking Theory for Systems with Parameter Jumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh; Paden, Brad; Rossi, Carlo

    1997-01-01

    We consider the exact output tracking problem for systems with parameter jumps. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived for the elimination of switching-introduced output transient. Previous works have studied this problem by developing a regulator that maintains exact tracking through parameter jumps (switches). Such techniques are, however, only applicable to minimum-phase systems. In contrast, our approach is applicable to non-minimum-phase systems and it obtains bounded but possibly non-causal solutions. If the reference trajectories are generated by an exosystem, then we develop an exact-tracking controller in a feed-back form. As in standard regulator theory, we obtain a linear map from the states of the exosystem to the desired system state which is defined via a matrix differential equation. The constant solution of this differential equation provides asymptotic tracking, and coincides with the feedback law used in standard regulator theory. The obtained results are applied to a simple flexible manipulator with jumps in the pay-load mass.

  5. Exact-Output Tracking Theory for Systems with Parameter Jumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh; Paden, Brad; Rossi, Carlo

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider the exact output tracking problem for systems with parameter jumps. Necessary and sufficient conditions are derived for the elimination of switching-introduced output transient. Previous works have studied this problem by developing a regulator that maintains exact tracking through parameter jumps (switches). Such techniques are, however, only applicable to minimum-phase systems. In contrast, our approach is applicable to nonminimum-phase systems and obtains bounded but possibly non-causal solutions. If the reference trajectories are generated by an exo-system, then we develop an exact-tracking controller in a feedback form. As in standard regulator theory, we obtain a linear map from the states of the exo-system to the desired system state which is defined via a matrix differential equation. The constant solution of this differential equation provides asymptotic tracking, and coincides with the feedback law used in standard regulator theory. The obtained results are applied to a simple flexible manipulator with jumps in the pay-load mass.

  6. Autophagy maintains stemness by preventing senescence.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Ortet, Laura; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Rebollo, Elena; Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanessa; Gutarra, Susana; Ballestar, Esteban; Serrano, Antonio L; Sandri, Marco; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    During ageing, muscle stem-cell regenerative function declines. At advanced geriatric age, this decline is maximal owing to transition from a normal quiescence into an irreversible senescence state. How satellite cells maintain quiescence and avoid senescence until advanced age remains unknown. Here we report that basal autophagy is essential to maintain the stem-cell quiescent state in mice. Failure of autophagy in physiologically aged satellite cells or genetic impairment of autophagy in young cells causes entry into senescence by loss of proteostasis, increased mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, resulting in a decline in the function and number of satellite cells. Re-establishment of autophagy reverses senescence and restores regenerative functions in geriatric satellite cells. As autophagy also declines in human geriatric satellite cells, our findings reveal autophagy to be a decisive stem-cell-fate regulator, with implications for fostering muscle regeneration in sarcopenia. PMID:26738589

  7. Maintaining professional resilience through group restorative supervision.

    PubMed

    Wallbank, Sonya

    2013-08-01

    Restorative clinical supervision has been delivered to over 2,500 professionals and has shown to be highly effective in reducing burnout, stress and increasing compassion satisfaction. Demand for the programme has shown that a sustainable model of implementation is needed for organisations who may not be able to invest in continued individual sessions. Following the initial six sessions, group restorative supervision has been developed and this paper reports on the programme's success in maintaining and continuing to improve compassion satisfaction, stress and burnout through the process of restorative group supervision. This means that organisations can continue to maintain the programme once the initial training has been completed and have confidence within the restorative group supervision to support professionals in managing the emotional demands of their role. The restorative groups have also had inadvertent positive benefits in workplace functioning. The paper outlines how professionals have been able to use this learning to support them in being more effective. PMID:23986988

  8. Issues in Purchasing and Maintaining Intrinsic Standards

    SciTech Connect

    PETTIT,RICHARD B.; JAEGER,KLAUS; EHRLICH,CHARLES D.

    2000-09-12

    Intrinsic standards are widely used in the metrology community because they realize the best level uncertainty for many metrology parameters. For some intrinsic standards, recommended practices have been developed to assist metrologists in the selection of equipment and the development of appropriate procedures in order to realize the intrinsic standard. As with the addition of any new standard, the metrology laboratory should consider the pros and cons relative to their needs before purchasing the standard so that the laboratory obtains the maximum benefit from setting up and maintaining these standards. While the specific issues that need to be addressed depend upon the specific intrinsic standard and the level of realization, general issues that should be considered include ensuring that the intrinsic standard is compatible with the laboratory environment, that the standard is compatible with the current and future workload, and whether additional support standards will be required in order to properly maintain the intrinsic standard. When intrinsic standards are used to realize the best level of uncertainty for a specific metrology parameter, they usually require critical and important maintenance activities. These activities can including training of staff in the system operation, as well as safety procedures; performing periodic characterization measurements to ensure proper system operation; carrying out periodic intercomparisons with similar intrinsic standards so that proper operation is demonstrated; and maintaining control or trend charts of system performance. This paper has summarized many of these important issues and therefore should be beneficial to any laboratory that is considering the purchase of an intrinsic standard.

  9. Interventions to Maintain Mobility: What Works?

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lesley A.; Schmidt, Erica L.; Ball, Karlene

    2012-01-01

    Mobility, in broad terms, includes everything from the ability to move within your immediate environment (e.g., get out of bed) to the ability to drive across the country. Mobility is essential to maintaining independence and wellbeing, particularly for older adults. This is highlighted by the large number of interventions developed for older adults with the goal of maintaining such mobility. The current paper reviews the state of the science with respect to mobility interventions. Inclusion criteria for the review were: (1) articles must have been peer-reviewed; (2) interventions were evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT); (3) studies included a mobility outcome such as lifespace, driving, or walking ability, (4) studies included a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults (e.g., not investigations of disease conditions); and (5) studies reported enough empirical data and detail such that results could potentially be replicated. Three main types of interventions were identified: cognitive training, educational interventions, and exercise interventions. A detailed summary and evaluation of each type of intervention, and the current evidence regarding its effectiveness in maintaining mobility, are discussed. Several interventions show clear evidence of effectiveness, and thus are prime areas for translation of results to the older population. Needs and issues for future intervention research are also detailed. PMID:23083492

  10. Alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) while driving.

    PubMed

    Oron-Gilad, Tal; Ronen, Adi; Shinar, David

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) on driver performance, subjective feelings, and psychophysiological state in monotonous simulated driving in two experiments. In the first experiment, 12 professional truck drivers participated in five sessions of simulated driving: driving only, driving with one of three AMTs (counterbalanced), and driving while listening to music. AMTs were not equally effective in maintaining alertness. The trivia AMT prevented driving performance deterioration, and increased alertness (measured by standardized HRV). The choice reaction time AMT was least demanding but also increased subjective sleepiness and reduced arousal (measured by alpha/beta ratio). The working memory AMT caused a significant decrement in driving speed, increased subjective fatigue, and was regarded by the participants as detrimental to driving. Trivia was preferred by the majority of the drivers over the other two AMTs. Experiment 2 further examined the utility of the trivia AMT. When the drivers engaged in the trivia AMT they maintained better driving performance and perceived the driving duration as shorter than the control condition. The two experiments demonstrated that AMTs can have a positive effect on alertness. The effect is localized in the sense that it does not persist beyond the period of the AMT activation. PMID:18460351

  11. Netrin-1 attenuates cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury and generates alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaogang; Xing, Hui; Mao, Aihua; Jiang, Hong; Cheng, Li; Liu, Yun; Quan, Xiaozhen; Li, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is a major issue in cardiac transplantation and inflammatory processes play a major role in myocardial IR injury. Netrin-1 is a laminin-related protein identified as a neuronal guidance cue and netrin-1 expressed outside the nervous system inhibits migration of leukocytes in vitro and in vivo and attenuates inflammation-mediated tissue injury. In our study, hearts of C57BL/6 mice were flushed and stored in cold Bretschneider solution for 8 h and then transplanted into syngeneic recipient. We found that netrin-1 decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages. Troponin T (TnT) production on 24 h after myocardial IR injury was reduced by netrin-1 administration. Cardiac output at 60 mmHg of afterload pressure was significantly increased in hearts with netrin-1 administration (IR?+?Netrin-1: 59.9?±?5.78 ml/min; IR: 26.2?±?4.3 ml/min; P?cardiac allograft. Furthermore, decreased TnT expression and reduced allograft infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages by netrin-1 was abolished with addition of PPAR? antagonist. In conclusion, netrin-1 attenuates cardiac IR injury and generates AAM which contributes to the protective effect of netrin-1. PMID:24234226

  12. Reflexly evoked coactivation of cardiac vagal and sympathetic motor outflows: observations and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Paton, Julian F R; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Boscan, Pedro; Pickering, Anthony E

    2006-12-01

    1. The purpose of the present review is to highlight the pattern of activity in the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves innervating the heart during their reflex activation. 2. We describe the well-known reciprocal control of cardiac vagal and sympathetic activity during the baroreceptor reflex, but point out that this appears to be the exception rather than the rule and that many other reflexes reviewed herein (e.g. peripheral chemoreceptor, nociceptor, diving response and oculocardiac) involve simultaneous coactivation of both autonomic limbs. 3. The heart rate response during simultaneous activation of cardiac autonomic outflows is unpredictable because it does not simply reflect the summation of opposing influences. Indeed, it can result in bradycardia (peripheral chemoreceptor, diving and corneal), tachycardia (nociceptor) and, in some circumstances, can predispose to malignant arrhythmias. 4. We propose that this cardiac autonomic coactivation may allow greater cardiac output during bradycardia (increased ventricular filling time and stronger contraction) than activation of the sympathetic limb alone. This may be important when pumping blood into a constricted vascular tree, such as is the case during the peripheral chemoreceptor reflex and the diving response. PMID:17184509

  13. The yin and yang of cardiac autonomic control: vago-sympathetic interactions revisited.

    PubMed

    Paton, J F R; Boscan, P; Pickering, A E; Nalivaiko, E

    2005-11-01

    We review the pattern of activity in the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves innervating the heart. Unlike the conventional textbook picture of reciprocal control of cardiac vagal and sympathetic nervous activity, as seen during a baroreceptor reflex, many other reflexes involve simultaneous co-activation of both autonomic limbs. Indeed, even at 'rest', the heart receives tonic drives from both sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac nerves. Autonomic co-activation occurs during peripheral chemoreceptor, diving, oculocardiac, somatic nociceptor reflex responses as well as being evoked from structures within the brain. It is suggested that simultaneous co-activation may lead to a more efficient cardiac function giving greater cardiac output than activation of the sympathetic limb alone; this permits both a longer time for ventricular filling and a stronger contraction of the myocardium. This may be important when pumping blood into a constricted vascular tree such as is the case during the diving response. We discuss that in some instances, high drive to the heart from both autonomic limbs may also be arrhythmogenic. PMID:16269319

  14. Overexpression of myeloid differentiation protein 88 in mice induces mild cardiac dysfunction, but no deficit in heart morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W.; Huang, Z.; Jiang, X.; Li, C.; Gao, X.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling involves changes in heart shape, size, structure, and function after injury to the myocardium. The proinflammatory adaptor protein myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) contributes to cardiac remodeling. To investigate whether excessive MyD88 levels initiate spontaneous cardiac remodeling at the whole-organism level, we generated a transgenic MyD88 mouse model with a cardiac-specific promoter. MyD88 mice (male, 20-30 g, n=?80) were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and demonstrated similar morphology of the heart and cardiomyocytes with that of wild-type controls. Although heart weight was unaffected, cardiac contractility of MyD88 hearts was mildly reduced, as shown by echocardiographic examination, compared with wild-type controls. Moreover, the cardiac dysfunction phenotype was associated with elevation of ANF and BNP expression. Collectively, our data provide novel evidence of the critical role of balanced MyD88 signaling in maintaining physiological function in the adult heart. PMID:26628395

  15. Overexpression of myeloid differentiation protein 88 in mice induces mild cardiac dysfunction, but no deficit in heart morphology.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Huang, Z; Jiang, X; Li, C; Gao, X

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling involves changes in heart shape, size, structure, and function after injury to the myocardium. The proinflammatory adaptor protein myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) contributes to cardiac remodeling. To investigate whether excessive MyD88 levels initiate spontaneous cardiac remodeling at the whole-organism level, we generated a transgenic MyD88 mouse model with a cardiac-specific promoter. MyD88 mice (male, 20-30 g, n=?80) were born at the expected Mendelian ratio and demonstrated similar morphology of the heart and cardiomyocytes with that of wild-type controls. Although heart weight was unaffected, cardiac contractility of MyD88 hearts was mildly reduced, as shown by echocardiographic examination, compared with wild-type controls. Moreover, the cardiac dysfunction phenotype was associated with elevation of ANF and BNP expression. Collectively, our data provide novel evidence of the critical role of balanced MyD88 signaling in maintaining physiological function in the adult heart. PMID:26628395

  16. MMI-0100 inhibits cardiac fibrosis in myocardial infarction by direct actions on cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts via MK2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Yates, Cecelia C.; Lockyer, Pamela; Xie, Liang; Bevilacqua, Ariana; He, Jun; Lander, Cynthia; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte

    2014-01-01

    The cell-permeant peptide inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2), MMI-0100, inhibits MK2 and downstream fibrosis and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that MMI-0100 reduces intimal hyperplasia in a mouse vein graft model, pulmonary fibrosis in a murine bleomycin-induced model and development of adhesions in conjunction with abdominal surgery. MK2 is critical to the pathogenesis of ischemic heart injury as MK2 ?/? mice are resistant to ischemic remodeling. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting MK2 with MMI-0100 would protect the heart after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in vivo. AMI was induced by placing a permanent LAD coronary ligation. When MMI-0100 peptide was given 30 minutes after permanent LAD coronary artery ligation, the resulting fibrosis was reduced/prevented ~50% at a 2 week time point, with a corresponding improvement in cardiac function and decrease in left ventricular dilation. In cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts, MMI-0100 inhibited MK2 to reduce cardiomyocyte caspase 3/7 activity, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast caspase 3/7 activity, which may explain MMI-0100’s salvage of cardiac function and anti-fibrotic effects in vivo. These findings suggest that therapeutic inhibition of MK2 after acute MI, using rationally-designed cell-permeant peptides, inhibits cardiac fibrosis and maintains cardiac function by mechanisms that involve inhibiting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while enhancing primary cardiac fibroblast cell death. PMID:25257914

  17. Plasticity of the prolactin (PRL) axis: mechanisms underlying regulation of output in female mice.

    PubMed

    Le Tissier, P R; Hodson, D J; Martin, A O; Romanò, N; Mollard, P

    2015-01-01

    The output of prolactin (PRL) is highly dynamic with dramatic changes in its secretion from the anterior pituitary gland depending on prevailing physiological status. In adult female mice, there are three distinct phases of output and each of these is related to the functions of PRL at specific stages of reproduction. Recent studies of the changes in the regulation of PRL during its period of maximum output, lactation, have shown alterations at both the level of the anterior pituitary and hypothalamus. The PRL-secreting cells of the anterior pituitary are organised into a homotypic network in virgin animals, facilitating coordinated bouts of activity between interconnected PRL cells. During lactation, coordinated activity increases due to the changes in structural connectivity, and this drives large elevations in PRL secretion. Surprisingly, these changes in connectivity are maintained after weaning, despite reversion of PRL output to that of virgin animals, and result in an augmented output of hormone during a second lactation. At the level of the hypothalamus, tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons, the major inhibitors of PRL secretion, have unexpectedly been shown to remain responsive to PRL during lactation. However, there is an uncoupling between TIDA neuron firing and dopamine secretion, with a potential switch to enkephalin release. Such a process may reinforce hormone secretion through dual disinhibition and stimulation of PRL cell activity. Thus, integration of signalling along the hypothalamo-pituitary axis is responsible for increased secretory output of PRL cells during lactation, as well as allowing the system to anticipate future demands. PMID:25472537

  18. Protecting Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Function during Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest requires reestablishment of aerobic metabolism by reperfusion with oxygenated blood of tissues that have been deprived of oxygen for variables periods of time. However, reperfusion concomitantly activates pathogenic mechanisms known as “reperfusion injury.” At the core of reperfusion injury are mitochondria, playing a critical role as effectors and targets of such injury. Mitochondrial injury compromises oxidative phosphorylation and also prompts release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and bloodstream where it correlates with severity of injury. Main drivers of such injury include Ca2+ overload and oxidative stress. Preclinical work shows that limiting myocardial cytosolic Na+ overload at the time of reperfusion attenuates mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and maintains oxidative phosphorylation yielding functional myocardial benefits that include preservation of left ventricular distensibility. Preservation of left ventricular distensibility enables hemodynamically more effective chest compression. Similar myocardial effect have been reported using erythropoietin hypothesized to protect mitochondrial bioenergetic function presumably through activation of pathways similar to those activated during preconditioning. Incorporation of novel and clinical relevant strategies to protect mitochondrial bioenergetic function are expected to attenuate injury at the time of reperfusion and enhance organ viability ultimately improving resuscitation and survival from cardiac arrest. PMID:22433486

  19. Magnetostrictive torque sensor and its output characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Munekatsu

    1993-05-01

    A magnetostrictive torque sensor which can be installed in an automobile transmission to measure torque has been developed. The sensor shaft consists of two grooved sections. An ac bridge circuit formed by two coils surrounding the grooved sections and two fixed resistors is used to detect torque. The shaft material is a newly developed Cr-Mo steel. The sensitivity of the sensor is stable over a wide temperature range. However, the zero point of the sensor output drifted as much as 10% of the full scale of the sensor when the temperature was uniformly raised by 50 °C. To solve the temperature drift problem, the output characteristics of the bridge circuit were examined. It was found that the output signal (sinusoidal wave) from an initially balanced bridge consisted of torque and temperature components. Each component showed a constant phase angle. The torque phase angle was a fixed value whereas that of the temperature was controllable. A method was devised for separating the temperature phase angle from the torque one by about 90° and then eliminating the temperature component from the output signal. The resulting temperature drift of the sensor was less than 1% of the full measurement scale per 50 °C. This paper describes the shaft material, magnetostrictive properties of the shaft, torque and temperature dependence of coil impedances and output characteristics of the bridge circuit.

  20. Design and Application of the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stromgren, Chel; Terry, Michelle; Crillo, William; Goodliff, Kandyce; Maxwell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conducting human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will present unique challenges in the areas of supportability and maintainability. The durations of proposed missions can be relatively long and re-supply of logistics, including maintenance and repair items, will be limited or non-existent. In addition, mass and volume constraints in the transportation system will limit the total amount of logistics that can be flown along with the crew. These constraints will require that new strategies be developed with regards to how spacecraft systems are designed and maintained. NASA is currently developing Design Reference Missions (DRMs) as an initial step in defining future human missions. These DRMs establish destinations and concepts of operation for future missions, and begin to define technology and capability requirements. Because of the unique supportability challenges, historical supportability data and models are not directly applicable for establishing requirements for beyond LEO missions. However, supportability requirements could have a major impact on the development of the DRMs. The mass, volume, and crew resources required to support the mission could all be first order drivers in the design of missions, elements, and operations. Therefore, there is a need for enhanced analysis capabilities to more accurately establish mass, volume, and time requirements for supporting beyond LEO missions. Additionally, as new technologies and operations are proposed to reduce these requirements, it is necessary to have accurate tools to evaluate the efficacy of those approaches. In order to improve the analysis of supportability requirements for beyond LEO missions, the Space Missions Analysis Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool (EMAT). This tool is a probabilistic simulator that evaluates the need for repair and maintenance activities during space missions and the logistics and crew requirements to support those activities. Using a Monte Carlo approach, the tool simulates potential failures in defined systems, based on established component reliabilities, and then evaluates the capability of the crew to repair those failures given a defined store of spares and maintenance items. Statistical analysis of Monte Carlo runs provides probabilistic estimates of overall mission safety and reliability. This paper will describe the operation of the EMAT, including historical data sources used to populate the model, simulation processes, and outputs. Analysis results are provided for a candidate exploration system, including baseline estimates of required sparing mass and volume. Sensitivity analysis regarding the effectiveness of proposed strategies to reduce mass and volume requirements and improve mission reliability is included in these results.

  1. Web-Based Environment for Maintaining Legacy Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigges, Michael; Thompson, Nelson; Orr, Mark; Fox, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Tool Integration Environment (ATIE) is the name of both a software system and a Web-based environment created by the system for maintaining an archive of legacy software and expertise involved in developing the legacy software. ATIE can also be used in modifying legacy software and developing new software. The information that can be encapsulated in ATIE includes experts documentation, input and output data of tests cases, source code, and compilation scripts. All of this information is available within a common environment and retained in a database for ease of access and recovery by use of powerful search engines. ATIE also accommodates the embedment of supporting software that users require for their work, and even enables access to supporting commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software within the flow of the experts work. The flow of work can be captured by saving the sequence of computer programs that the expert uses. A user gains access to ATIE via a Web browser. A modern Web-based graphical user interface promotes efficiency in the retrieval, execution, and modification of legacy code. Thus, ATIE saves time and money in the support of new and pre-existing programs.

  2. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  3. Cardiac amyloidosis: where are we today?

    PubMed

    Patel, K S; Hawkins, P N

    2015-08-01

    Systemic amyloidosis is generally considered to be rare, but the heart is frequently involved and is a major determinant of prognosis. New diagnostic imaging methods have recently been developed with the capacity to enhance the accuracy of diagnosis, which will be ever more important with the variety of new treatments on the near horizon. Most cases of cardiac amyloidosis are of either monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain (AL) type, which can occur at any age from young adulthood onwards, or transthyretin (ATTR) type, which can be acquired in elderly individuals or inherited at a younger age. Cardiac involvement is the most serious manifestation of AL amyloidosis, and serum cardiac biomarkers have proved to be of great value in staging disease severity and response to an ever increasing array of chemotherapy agents. Cardiac involvement is the dominant manifestation of nonhereditary ATTR amyloidosis, also known as senile cardiac amyloidosis, the prevalence of which is not known but is probably much greater than currently recognized. A genetic variant in the gene for transthyretin (TTR), which is present in 3-4% of African Americans and probably a similar proportion of black individuals of African descent generally, appears to be associated with increased susceptibility to developing cardiac ATTR amyloidosis in older age. Several novel therapies are in the advanced stages of development for ATTR amyloidosis including TTR protein stabilizers and RNA inhibitors that greatly diminish TTR production. Here, we will review recent developments in the diagnosis and management of cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:26077367

  4. Curcumin prevents and reverses murine cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Liang; Liu, Chen; de Couto, Geoffrey; Ouzounian, Maral; Sun, Mei; Wang, Ai-Bing; Huang, Yue; He, Cheng-Wei; Shi, Yu; Chen, Xin; Nghiem, Mai P.; Liu, Youan; Chen, Manyin; Dawood, Fayez; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Zhang, Liyong; Leask, Andrew; Ghosh, Asish K.; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.; Liu, Peter P.

    2008-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling, particularly histone acetylation, plays a critical role in the progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. We hypothesized that curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound abundant in the spice turmeric and a known suppressor of histone acetylation, would suppress cardiac hypertrophy through the disruption of p300 histone acetyltransferase–dependent (p300-HAT–dependent) transcriptional activation. We tested this hypothesis using primary cultured rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts as well as two well-established mouse models of cardiac hypertrophy. Curcumin blocked phenylephrin-induced (PE-induced) cardiac hypertrophy in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, curcumin both prevented and reversed mouse cardiac hypertrophy induced by aortic banding (AB) and PE infusion, as assessed by heart weight/BW and lung weight/BW ratios, echocardiographic parameters, and gene expression of hypertrophic markers. Further investigation demonstrated that curcumin abrogated histone acetylation, GATA4 acetylation, and DNA-binding activity through blocking p300-HAT activity. Curcumin also blocked AB-induced inflammation and fibrosis through disrupting p300-HAT–dependent signaling pathways. Our results indicate that curcumin has the potential to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, and fibrosis through suppression of p300-HAT activity and downstream GATA4, NF-?B, and TGF-?–Smad signaling pathways. PMID:18292803

  5. Blunt traumatic pericardial rupture and cardiac herniation with a penetrating twist: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Blunt Traumatic Pericardial Rupture (BTPR) with resulting cardiac herniation following chest trauma is an unusual and often fatal condition. Although there has been a multitude of case reports of this condition in past literature, the recurring theme is that of a missed injury. Its occurrence in severe blunt trauma is in the order of 0.4%. It is an injury that frequently results in pre/early hospital death and diagnosis at autopsy, probably owing to a combination of diagnostic difficulties, lack of familiarity and associated polytrauma. Of the patients who survive to hospital attendance, the mortality rate is in the order of 57-64%. Methods We present two survivors of BTPR and cardiac herniation, one with a delayed penetrating cardiac injury secondary to rib fractures. With these two cases and literature review, we hope to provide a greater awareness of this injury Conclusion BTPR and cardiac herniation is a complex and often fatal injury that usually presents under the umbrella of polytrauma. Clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for BTPR but, even then, the diagnosis is fraught with difficulty. In blunt chest trauma, patients should be considered high risk for BTPR when presenting with: Cardiovascular instability with no obvious cause Prominent or displaced cardiac silhouette and asymmetrical large volume pneumopericardium Potentially, with increasing awareness of the injury and improved use and availability of imaging modalities, the survival rates will improve and cardiac Herniation could even be considered the 5th H of reversible causes of blunt traumatic PEA arrest. PMID:20003497

  6. Pyruvate stabilizes electrocardiographic and hemodynamic function in pigs recovering from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Williams, Arthur G; Hoxha, Besim; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac electromechanical dysfunction may compromise recovery of patients who are initially resuscitated from cardiac arrest, and effective treatments remain elusive. Pyruvate, a natural intermediary metabolite, energy substrate, and antioxidant, has been found to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. This study tested the hypothesis that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation restores hemodynamic, metabolic, and electrolyte homeostasis following cardiac arrest. Forty-two Yorkshire swine underwent pacing-induced ventricular fibrillation and, after 6?min pre-intervention arrest, 4?min precordial compressions followed by transthoracic countershocks. After defibrillation and recovery of spontaneous circulation, the pigs were monitored for another 4?h. Sodium pyruvate or NaCl were infused i.v. (0.1?mmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)) throughout precordial compressions and the first 60?min recovery. In 8 of the 24 NaCl-infused swine, the first countershock converted ventricular fibrillation to pulseless electrical activity unresponsive to subsequent countershocks, but only 1 of 18 pyruvate-treated swine developed pulseless electrical activity (relative risk 0.17; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.22). Pyruvate treatment also lowered the dosage of vasoconstrictor phenylephrine required to maintain systemic arterial pressure at 15-60?min recovery, hastened clearance of excess glucose, elevated arterial bicarbonate, and raised arterial pH; these statistically significant effects persisted up to 3?h after sodium pyruvate infusion, while infusion-induced hypernatremia subsided. These results demonstrate that pyruvate-enriched resuscitation achieves electrocardiographic and hemodynamic stability in swine during the initial recovery from cardiac arrest. Such metabolically based treatment may offer an effective strategy to support cardiac electromechanical recovery immediately after cardiac arrest. PMID:26088865

  7. Multimedia instruction of cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed Central

    Criley, J. M.; Criley, D.; Zalace, C.

    1997-01-01

    The cardiac physical examination is in itself a multimedia experience. It is an amalgamation of visible, palpable, and audible sensations, preceded by the collection of an appropriate historical context in which to place these multiple sensations. It is unlikely that any electronic media could ever replace the real life experience of admitting, examining, diagnosing, and effectively treating a patient with mitral stenosis who has decompensated because of the onset of atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response, or a patient with sudden, severe aortic regurgitation due to endocarditis. These potentially fatal conditions can be effectively treated only if the suspicion of their presence is seriously raised. Although there is no substitute for first-hand experience, attempts to provide an effective surrogate experience are worth pursuing. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:9108683

  8. Cardiac Regeneration in Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Laurent; Harrison, Michael; Lien, Ching-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of cardiac injury in humans and results in acute loss of large numbers of myocardial cells. Unfortunately, the mammalian heart is unable to replenish the cells that are lost following a myocardial infarction and an eventual progression to heart failure can often occur as a result. Regenerative medicine based approaches are actively being developed; however, a complete blueprint on how mammalian hearts can regenerate is still missing. Knowledge gained from studying animal models, such as zebrafish, newt, and neonatal mice, that can naturally regenerate their hearts after injury have provided an understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in heart repair and regeneration. This research offers novel strategies to overcome the limited regenerative response observed in human patients. PMID:24496965

  9. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  10. Gene therapy in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Praveen, S V; Francis, Johnson; Venugopal, K

    2006-01-01

    Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger. Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed. PMID:16943902

  11. Mind injuries after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rovai, Daniele; Giannessi, Daniela; Andreassi, Maria G; Gentili, Claudio; Pingitore, Alessandro; Glauber, Mattia; Gemignani, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    After cardiac surgery, delirium, cognitive dysfunction, depression, or anxiety disorders frequently occur, and profoundly affect patients' prognosis and quality of life. This narrative review focuses on the main clinical presentations of cognitive and psychological problems ('mind injuries') that occur postoperatively in absence of ascertainable focal neurologic deficits, exploring their pathophysiological mechanisms and possible strategies for prevention and treatment. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a potentially devastating complication that can involve several mechanisms and several predisposing, intraoperative, and postoperative risk factors, which can result in or be associated to cerebral microvascular damage. Postoperative depression is influenced by genetic or psychosocial predisposing factors, by neuroendocrine activation, and by the release of several pro-inflammatory factors. The net effect of these changes is neuroinflammation. These complex biochemical alterations, along with an aspecific response to stressful life events, might target the function of several brain areas, which are thought to represent a trigger factor for the onset of depression. PMID:24933202

  12. PV output smoothing with energy storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2012-03-01

    This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

  13. A Search for Mental Health Output Measures

    PubMed Central

    Black, Gordon C.; Saveanu, Traian I.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a summary of our initial efforts to identify mental health output measures: (1) for estimating change in mental health status (incidence and prevalence) in a given population, (2) for use in monitoring, planning, evaluating and/or assessing quality of programs; and (3) possibly for use in controlling mental health costs. This preliminary work is centered on the concept that routinely generated operational data can be used to develop output measures of mental health service programs and thereby provide a basis for controlling programs through output monitoring. A conceptual framework, study design and methodology are discussed. Patient analysis includes: (1) patterns and trends over time, (2) population at risk and (3) patient outcome. The study concludes that routinely generated data can provide much needed information for managers in these turbulent times. Also, the author's suggested areas that need further study.

  14. Output Multimodal Interaction: The Case of Augmented Surgery

    E-print Network

    Output Multimodal Interaction: The Case of Augmented Surgery Benoît Mansoux, Laurence Nigay La Tronche, France Output multimodal interaction involves choice and combination of relevant on reusable software components for rapidly developing output multimodal interfaces by choosing and combining

  15. New technologies and therapies for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, S

    2010-12-01

    Catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmia has evolved to an important treatment modality for patients with various cardiac rhythm abnormalities. Over the past three decades, the understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms and technology for catheter based diagnostic and ablation procedures have evolved rapidly. New technologies and therapies for treatment of cardiac arrhythmia include ablation catheters designed to destroy targeted tissue with improved precision and safety, robotic systems to guide accurate catheter movements, electrical mapping systems, and improved imaging to complement such systems. This review focuses on improved imaging modalities used in the modern electrophysiology laboratory. PMID:21135812

  16. Racial differences in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Fender, Erin A; Henrikson, Charles A; Tereshchenko, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), in African Americans, the basis of which is likely multifactorial. African Americans have higher rates of traditional cardiac risk factors including hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and heart failure. There are also significant disparities in health care delivery. While these factors undoubtedly affect health outcomes, there is also growing evidence that genetics may have a significant impact as well. In this paper, we discuss data and hypotheses in support of both sides of the controversy around racial differences in SCD/SCA. PMID:25155390

  17. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  18. Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is rare and the clinical characteristics of this entity have been insufficiently elucidated. This article aims to describe the treatment options and the risk factors responsible for the maternal and feto-neonatal prognoses. Methods A comprehensive search of the literature of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy was conducted and 44 articles with 51 patients were included in the present review. Results Transthoracic echocardiography was the most common diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma during pregnancy. Cardiac myxoma resection was performed in 95.9% (47/49); while no surgical resection was performed in 4.1% (2/49) patients (P=0.000). More patients had an isolated cardiac myxoma resection in comparison to those with a concurrent or staged additional cardiac operation [87.2% (41/47) vs. 12.8% (6/47), P=0.000]. A voluntary termination of the pregnancy was done in 7 (13.7%) cases. In the remaining 31 (60.8%) pregnant patients, cesarean section was the most common delivery mode representing 61.3% and vaginal delivery was more common accounting for 19.4%. Cardiac surgery was performed in the first, second and third trimester in 5 (13.9%), 14 (38.9%) and 17 (47.2%) patients, respectively. No patients died. In the delivery group, 20 (76.9%) neonates were event-free survivals, 4 (15.4%) were complicated and 2 (7.7%) died. Neonatal prognoses did not differ between the delivery modes, treatment options, timing of cardiac surgery and sequence of cardiac myxoma resection in relation to delivery. Conclusion The diagnosis of cardiac myxoma in pregnancy is important. Surgical treatment of cardiac myxoma in the pregnant patients has brought about favorable maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes in the delivery group, which might be attributable to the shorter operation duration and non-emergency nature of the surgical intervention. Proper timing of cardiac surgery and improved cardiopulmonary bypass conditions may result in even better maternal and feto-neonatal survivals. PMID:26313731

  19. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  20. Unloaded shortening velocities of rabbit masseter muscle fibres expressing skeletal or alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chains.

    PubMed Central

    Sciote, J J; Kentish, J C

    1996-01-01

    1. Some rabbit masseter fibres express the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC). To compare the biochemical and physiological properties of these fibres with other skeletal fibre types, we examined the histochemical and immunohistochemical staining characteristics, maximum velocity of shortening (V(zero)) and MHC isoform content of fibres from rabbit masseter and soleus muscles. 2. The fibre-type composition of muscle sections was determined with MHC antibodies and myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry. Fibres we designated 'type alpha-cardiac' were different from type I and type II fibres in that they stained positively with the alpha-cardiac MHC antibody and they maintained. ATPase reactivity after acid and alkali pre-incubations. Samples of superficial masseter contained a few type I fibres, with the majority of fibres classified as either type IIA or type alpha-cardiac. Soleus samples contained type I, IIA and IIC fibres. 3. The V(zero) of chemically skinned fibres was determined by the slack-test method. Each fibre was subsequently characterized as type I, IIA, IIC or alpha-cardiac from MHC identification using gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In masseter fibres the V(zero) values were (in muscle lengths s-1): type I, 0.54 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- S.D., n = 3); type IIA, 1.23 +/- 0.34 (n = 27); type alpha-cardiac, 0.78 +/- 0.08 (n = 9). In soleus fibres V(zero) values were: type I, 0.55 +/- 0.06 (n = 14); type IIA, 0.89 +/- 0.04 (n = 8); type IIC, 0.73 (n = 2). 4. We conclude that the rabbit masseter muscle contains an 'alpha-cardiac' fibre type that is distinct from other skeletal fibres. This fibre type expresses only the alpha-cardiac MHC, has unusual myofibrillar ATPase reactivity and has a V(zero) intermediate between type I and type II fibres. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8734979

  1. Heart Regeneration with Embryonic Cardiac Progenitor Cells and Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuo; Liu, Qihai; Gnatovskiy, Leonid; Ma, Peter X.; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent advances in stem cell research hold great potential for heart tissue regeneration through stem cell-based therapy. While multiple cell types have been transplanted into MI heart in preclinical studies or clinical trials, reduction of scar tissue and restoration of cardiac function have been modest. Several challenges hamper the development and application of stem cell-based therapy for heart regeneration. Application of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and cardiac tissue engineering for cell therapy has shown great promise to repair damaged heart tissue. This review presents an overview of the current applications of embryonic CPCs and the development of cardiac tissue engineering in regeneration of functional cardiac tissue and reduction of side effects for heart regeneration. We aim to highlight the benefits of the cell therapy by application of CPCs and cardiac tissue engineering during heart regeneration.

  2. Efficacy of a heparin-coated closed circuit for intractable bleeding in adult cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Tagusari, Osamu; Niwaya, Kazuo; Nakatani, Takeshi; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2010-04-01

    Hemostatic procedures and control of blood pressure concomitant with rapid transfusion of blood products aimed at recovery of coagulability are necessary for intractable bleeding during cardiac surgery. However, when the bleeding is massive and hemostasis is prolonged for several hours, operative maneuvers such as manual compression of the heart can affect hemodynamics, decrease cardiac output, and elevate atrial and venous pressure, with consequent hepatic, renal, and pulmonary dysfunction over time. Herein we present three cases of potentially fatal bleeding during open-heart surgery, in which we used a heparin-coated closed circuit for circulatory support after standard cardiopulmonary bypass. We achieved stable hemodynamics following surgical hemostatic maneuvers and avoided the postoperative multiple organ failure by using a cardiopulmonary support system. PMID:20930669

  3. Evaluation of a novel integrated sensor system for synchronous measurement of cardiac vibrations and cardiac potentials.

    PubMed

    Chuo, Yindar; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Kaminska, Bozena

    2011-08-01

    The measurement of human body vibrations as a result of heart beating, simultaneously with cardiac potentials have been demonstrated in past studies to bring additional value to diagnostic cardiology through the detection of irregularities in the mechanical movement of the heart. The equipment currently available to the medical community is either large and bulky or difficult to synchronize. To address this problem, a novel integrated sensor system has been developed to record cardiac vibration and cardiac potential simultaneously and synchronously from a single compact site on the chest. The developed sensor system is lightweight, small in size, and suitable for mounting on active moving patients. The sensor is evaluated for its adequacy in measuring cardiac vibrations and potentials. In this evaluation, 45 independent signal recording are studied from 15 volunteers, and the morphology of the recorded signals are analyzed qualitatively (by visual inspection) and quantitatively (by computational methods) against larger devices used in established cardiac vibration studies (reference devices). It is found that the cardiac vibration signals acquired by the integrated sensor has 92.37% and 81.76% identically identifiable systolic and diastolic cardiac complexes, respectively, when compared to the cardiac vibration signals recorded simultaneously from the reference device. Further, the cardiac potential signals acquired by the integrated sensor show a high correlation coefficient of 0.8912 and a high estimated signal-to-noise-ratio of 22.00 dB when compared to the reference electrocardiograph (non-standard leads) acquired through a common clinical machine. The results suggest that the tiny, wearable, integrated sensor system that synchronously measures cardiac vibrations and cardiac potentials may be practical for use as an alternative or assistive cardiac diagnostic tool. PMID:20703546

  4. An integrated bioimpedance—ECG gating technique for respiratory and cardiac motion compensation in cardiac PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Fürst, Sebastian; Loher, Simone; Vauhkonen, Marko; Schwaiger, Markus; Hakulinen, Mikko A.

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory motion may degrade image quality in cardiac PET imaging. Since cardiac PET studies often involve cardiac gating by ECG, a separate respiratory monitoring system is required increasing the logistic complexity of the examination, in case respiratory gating is also needed. Thus, we investigated the simultaneous acquisition of both respiratory and cardiac gating signals using II limb lead mimicking electrode configuration during cardiac PET scans of 11 patients. In addition to conventional static and ECG-gated images, bioimpedance technique was utilized to generate respiratory- and dual-gated images. The ability of the bioimpedance technique to monitor intrathoracic respiratory motion was assessed estimating cardiac displacement between end-inspiration and -expiration. The relevance of dual gating was evaluated in left ventricular volume and myocardial wall thickness measurements. An average 7.6? ± ?3.3?mm respiratory motion was observed in the study population. Dual gating showed a small but significant increase (4?ml, p = 0.042) in left ventricular myocardial volume compared to plain cardiac gating. In addition, a thinner myocardial wall was observed in dual-gated images (9.3? ± ?1.3?mm) compared to cardiac-gated images (11.3? ± ?1.3?mm, p = 0.003). This study shows the feasibility of bioimpedance measurements for dual gating in a clinical setting. The method enables simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals using a single device with standard ECG electrodes.

  5. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z.; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J.; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K.; Chung, Daniel C.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2?/cap2? males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2?/cap2? females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  6. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K; Chung, Daniel C; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2(-)/cap2(-) males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2(-)/cap2(-) females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  7. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance associated with relocation of the equipment to a new department. When tested under simulated conditions, the EWMA chart was capable of detecting a sustained 15% increase in average radiation output within 60 cases (<1 month of operation), while a 33% increase would be signaled within 20 cases. Conclusions: This technique offers a valuable enhancement to existing quality assurance programs in radiology that rely upon the testing of equipment radiation output at discrete time frames to ensure performance security.

  8. Design guidelines for remotely maintainable equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Margaret M.; Manouchehri, Davoud

    1988-01-01

    The quantity and complexity of on-orbit assets will increase significantly over the next decade. Maintaining and servicing these costly assets represent a difficult challenge. Three general methods are proposed to maintain equipment while it is still in orbit: an extravehicular activity (EVA) crew can perform the task in an unpressurized maintenance area outside any space vehicle; an intravehicular activity (IVA) crew can perform the maintenance in a shirt sleeve environment, perhaps at a special maintenance work station in a space vehicle; or a telerobotic manipulator can perform the maintenance in an unpressurized maintenance area at a distance from the crew (who may be EVA, IVA, or on the ground). However, crew EVA may not always be possible; the crew may have other demands on their time that take precedence. In addition, the orbit of the tasks themselves may be impossible for crew entry. Also crew IVA may not always be possible as option for equipment maintenance. For example, the equipment may be too large to fit through the vehicle airlock. Therefore, in some circumstances, the third option, telerobotic manipulation, may be the only feasible option. Telerobotic manipulation has, therefore, an important role for on-orbit maintenance. It is not only used for the reasons outlined above, but also used in some cases as backup to the EVA crew in an orbit that they can reach.

  9. To Grow, Nurture, and Maintain: Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, I.; Lam, K.; Hennelly, L. O.; Archie, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The importance and difficulties encountered in a sustainable urban farm can be witnessed at the Stanford Earth Systems Educational Garden, in the growth, maintenance, and nurturing of the soil. Techniques and chemicals developed in the mid to late 1900's have infiltrated the traditional farming techniques that allowed humans to continuously farm for hundreds of years. The sudden spur of interest in sustainability has lead many, including Stanford Earth Systems, to reincorporate traditional methods in conjunction with modern technology. To override the damage made by chemicals and industrial farming, we had to recognize that healthy crops originated from healthy soil; thus we began investigating how to nourish soil. We began to research the ideal composition and structure of soil and methods to create and maintain fertile soil. Secondly, we prioritized the importance of nurturing plants and fed the plants with a plethora of natural fertilizers. We also created a compost pile so that the soil could rehabilitate and refill with nutrients with help provided by bacteria. Lastly, we had to maintain the soil to keep the soil viable for future crops. To do this, we had to acknowledge the chemical composition of the soil and plant cover crops to ensure that the nutrients are replenished. Our experiences enabled us to understand the time and effort required to manage suitable crops, animals, and structures for an urban farm.

  10. Maintaining heterokaryosis in pseudo-homothallic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Grognet, Pierre; Silar, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among all the strategies displayed by fungi to reproduce and propagate, some species have adopted a peculiar behavior called pseudo-homothallism. Pseudo-homothallic fungi are true heterothallics, i.e., they need 2 genetically-compatible partners to mate, but they produce self-fertile mycelium in which the 2 different nuclei carrying the compatible mating types are present. This lifestyle not only enables the fungus to reproduce without finding a compatible partner, but also to cross with any mate it may encounter. However, to be fully functional, pseudo-homothallism requires maintaining heterokaryosis at every stage of the life cycle. We recently showed that neither the structure of the mating-type locus nor hybrid-enhancing effect due to the presence of the 2 mating types accounts for the maintenance of heterokaryosis in the pseudo-homothallic fungus P. anserina. In this addendum, we summarize the mechanisms creating heterokaryosis in P. anserina and 2 other well-known pseudo-homothallic fungi, Neurospora tetrasperma and Agaricus bisporus. We also discuss mechanisms potentially involved in maintaining heterokaryosis in these 3 species. PMID:26479494

  11. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research. PMID:26078711

  12. Cardiac patterning and morphogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yelon, D

    2001-12-01

    Development of the embryonic vertebrate heart requires the precise coordination of pattern formation and cell movement. Taking advantage of the availability of zebrafish mutations that disrupt cardiogenesis, several groups have identified key regulators of specific aspects of cardiac patterning and morphogenesis. Several genes, including gata5, fgf8, bmp2b, one-eyed pinhead, and hand2, have been shown to be relevant to the patterning events that regulate myocardial differentiation. Studies of mutants with morphogenetic defects have indicated at least six genes that are essential for cardiac fusion and heart tube assembly, including casanova, bonnie and clyde, gata5, one-eyed pinhead, hand2, miles apart, and heart and soul. Furthermore, analysis of the jekyll gene has indicated its important role during the morphogenesis of the atrioventricular valve. Altogether, these data provide a substantial foundation for future investigations of cardiac patterning, cardiac morphogenesis, and the relationship between these processes. PMID:11748825

  13. Ultralow-Power Electronics for Cardiac Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Turicchia, Lorenzo

    Ultralow-power electronics for cardiac monitoring make possible the development of new light-weight and low-cost devices that are ideal for long-term medical measurements and home-based tele-monitoring services. Nowadays, ...

  14. What to Expect during Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... liver, brain, and heart. Reduce Risk Factors for Future Heart Problems Your cardiac rehab team will work ... If you smoke, quitting can help you avoid future heart problems. Quitting can lower your blood pressure ...

  15. Depression After a Cardiac Event or Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fit-Friendly Worksites Program Requirements Fit-Friendly Resources Depression After A Cardiac Event or Diagnosis Updated:Jun 16,2014 Cardiovascular disease can trigger depression; counseling and medication can help beat it. When ...

  16. Nanowired three-dimensional cardiac patches

    E-print Network

    Dvir, Tal

    Engineered cardiac patches for treating damaged heart tissues after a heart attack are normally produced by seeding heart cells within three-dimensional porous biomaterial scaffolds1, 2, 3. These biomaterials, which are ...

  17. Biomimetic approach to cardiac tissue engineering

    E-print Network

    Radisic, Milica

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) biochemical and morphological properties in the pretreated group. Finally, in order to mimic capillary structure cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes were co-cultured on a scaffold with a parallel channel array that ...

  18. TRPM4 in cardiac electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Guinamard, Romain; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Hof, Thomas; Liu, Hui; Simard, Christophe; Sallé, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    TRPM4 forms a non-selective cation channel activated by internal Ca(2+). Its functional expression was demonstrated in cardiomyocytes of several mammalian species including humans, but the channel is also present in many other tissues. The recent characterization of the TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol, and the availability of transgenic mice have helped to clarify the role of TRPM4 in cardiac electrical activity, including diastolic depolarization from the sino-atrial node cells in mouse, rat, and rabbit, as well as action potential duration in mouse cardiomyocytes. In rat and mouse, pharmacological inhibition of TRPM4 prevents cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and decreases the occurrence of arrhythmias. Several studies have identified TRPM4 mutations in patients with inherited cardiac diseases including conduction blocks and Brugada syndrome. This review identifies TRPM4 as a significant actor in cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26272755

  19. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  20. Genetic dissection of cardiac growth control pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLellan, W. R.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells exhibit two related but distinct modes of growth that are highly regulated during development and disease. Cardiac myocytes rapidly proliferate during fetal life but exit the cell cycle irreversibly soon after birth, following which the predominant form of growth shifts from hyperplastic to hypertrophic. Much research has focused on identifying the candidate mitogens, hypertrophic agonists, and signaling pathways that mediate these processes in isolated cells. What drives the proliferative growth of embryonic myocardium in vivo and the mechanisms by which adult cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo are less clear. Efforts to answer these questions have benefited from rapid progress made in techniques to manipulate the murine genome. Complementary technologies for gain- and loss-of-function now permit a mutational analysis of these growth control pathways in vivo in the intact heart. These studies have confirmed the importance of suspected pathways, have implicated unexpected pathways as well, and have led to new paradigms for the control of cardiac growth.

  1. microRNAs and Cardiac Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Piubelli, Chiara; Meraviglia, Viviana; Pompilio, Giulio; D’Alessandra, Yuri; Colombo, Gualtiero I.; Rossini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The role of small, non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) has recently emerged as fundamental in the regulation of the physiology of the cardiovascular system. Several specific miRNAs were found to be expressed in embryonic, postnatal, and adult cardiac tissues. In the present review, we will provide an overview about their role in controlling the different pathways regulating cell identity and fate determination. In particular, we will focus on the involvement of miRNAs in pluripotency determination and reprogramming, and specifically on cardiac lineage commitment and cell direct transdifferentiation into cardiomyocytes. The identification of cardiac-specific miRNAs and their targets provide new promising insights into the mechanisms that regulate cardiac development, function and dysfunction. Furthermore, due to their contribution in reprogramming, they could offer new opportunities for developing safe and efficient cell-based therapies for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25100020

  2. Characterizing Output Bottlenecks in a Supercomputer

    E-print Network

    Chase, Jeffrey S.

    of a center-wide shared Lustre parallel file system on the Jaguar supercomputer. We use a statistical. This paper characterizes output burst absorption on Jaguar, a 2.33 petaflop Cray XK6 housed at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Center (OLCF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Storage for Jaguar is provided

  3. Contemporary Mathematics Nonlinear Input-Output Equilibrium

    E-print Network

    Polyak, Roman A.

    of economic activities, planning production, economic prognoses, international trade just to mention a c 0000 bounds for both methods under various assumptions on the input data. 1. Introduction The input-output (IO to the World economy. The main contributor to IO theory and, in particular, to the practical aspects of IO

  4. Understanding Circadian Output Networks in Neurospora Crassa 

    E-print Network

    Dekhang, Rigzin N

    2015-05-05

    in different tissues (Akhtar et al., 2002; McCarthy et al., 2007; Panda et al., 2002; Storch et al., 2002; Ueda et al., 2002; Zvonic et al., 2006). The majority of these rhythmic mRNA outputs are tissue- specific (Panda et al., 2002; Storch et al., 2002; Ueda...

  5. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOEpatents

    Tong, Timothy W. (Tempe, AZ); Sathe, Sanjeev B. (Tempe, AZ); Peck, Robert E. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  6. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  7. Multiple Output Sensory Trainer (MOST). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Automated Functions, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    This final report describes the design, development, and testing of the Multiple Output Sensory Trainer (MOST), a computer-based system which enables the evaluation of students with visual impairments to determine the optimal combination of sensory adaptive aids to meet their needs. The system uses multimedia devices in conjunction with customized…

  8. Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs

    E-print Network

    Peraire, Jaime

    Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs David A. Venditti and David L Anisotropic grid­adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate a single adaptive solution. The underlying adaptive procedure is based on a merging of adjoint error

  9. Improving the recording of surgical drain output

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Nicholas; Heron, Paul; Bethune, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the output from surgical drains is an important part of post-operative care and is often undertaken poorly. Failure to have accurate documentation of daily outputs may delay the removal of drains and increase the risk of complications. Following discussions with medical and nursing staff we listed eight key criteria that should be routinely monitored for surgical drains. A baseline measurement demonstrated only 20% compliance with these criteria. As such we decided to design a chart, after discussing with the multidisciplinary team, with adequate space to document drain output clearly. Post-intervention data collection showed a reasonable uptake of the chart (70%) with overall criteria compliance increasing to 55%. We made further interventions designed to raise awareness of the chart, which increased chart uptake to 79% and compliance to 63%, leading to the adoption of the chart by the department. Twelve months after introducing the chart we conducted a final data collection which demonstrated the chart was now being used in 100% of patients and that overall criteria compliance had increased to 78%. While some of the key criteria are still not documented for all patients, we have demonstrated that the introduction of a simple and well-designed drain chart can significantly improve the documentation of drain output, thereby improving patient safety and discharge efficiency.

  10. The maximum output parameters of an amplitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiburin, V. B.

    1982-05-01

    Using basic energy concepts, analytic relations are obtained for calculating the maximum value of the output high-frequency power and of the anode current of an amplitron amplifier. The results of the calculations are found to be in agreement with experimental data on the power, efficiency, and anode current. A cylindrical model is used, with the emission limited by a space charge.

  11. Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter 

    E-print Network

    Eachempatti, Haritha

    2010-07-14

    to regulate the battery voltage. In an SMPS, maximum area is taken by the passive components such as the inductor and the capacitor. This work demonstrates a single inductor used in a buck converter with two output voltages from an input battery with voltage...

  12. On the output of acoustical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1979-01-01

    Contents: (1) a theoretical basis for local power calculation; (2) source radiation in the presence of a half-plane; (3) radiation from a line source near an edge at which a Kutta condition holds; (4) radiation by a point source above a plane independence boundary; and (5) power output of a point source in a uniform flow.

  13. OUTPUT REGULATION OF NONLINEAR NEUTRAL SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Fridman, Emilia

    OUTPUT REGULATION OF NONLINEAR NEUTRAL SYSTEMS Emilia Fridman1 Department of Electrical Engineering of neutral type nonlinear systems is considered. Reg- ulator equations are derived, which generalize Francis-Byrnes-Isidori equations to the case of neutral systems. It is shown that, under standard assumptions, the reg- ulator

  14. H ESTIMATION OF SYSTEMS WITH IMPLICIT OUTPUTS

    E-print Network

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    H ESTIMATION OF SYSTEMS WITH IMPLICIT OUTPUTS An application to Pose Estimation of Autonomous Vehicles A. Pedro Aguiar Jo~ao P. Hespanha ISR/IST Institute for Systems and Robotics, Instituto and attitude of an autonomous vehicle with respect to a desired coordinate system defined by visual landmarks

  15. Output-Only Techniques for Fault Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Adam John

    Fault detection is relevant to many applications, including structural health monitoring and machine health monitoring. Furthermore, output measurement data may be the only information known about a system. Hence we develop and demonstrate techniques for output-only fault detection. We also investigate implementation issues, including computational complexity and output noise. First, we consider real-time detection of an abrupt change in a noisy signal. Existing techniques exhibit sensitivity to gradual (incipient) changes in the data, as well as detection delays, false alarms, and missed detections. Hence, we propose an adjacent moving window peak detection (AMWPD) approach that uses an approximate low-pass filter and statistical process control techniques to determine whether an abrupt change has occurred. We compare the AMWPD approach with existing techniques for change detection and show that the AMWPD approach exhibits comparable detection speed and number of missed detections while providing fewer false alarms. Second, we consider feature extraction and clustering for classification. For industrial applications, existing methods provide insufficient classification accuracy and require significant training time. Hence, we propose new features that improve classification accuracy and apply a modified tabu search and probabilistic neural network (mTS + PNN) approach to select and cluster the features and thereby classify the data. We compare the mTS + PNN approach with an existing feature selection and clustering technique that employs principal component analysis and a multi-layer perceptron neural network. Using an application example, we demonstrate that the mTS + PNN approach provides higher classification accuracy while requiring less training and classification time. Finally, we consider identification of output-to-output relationships in linear system dynamics. Existing approaches, including operational modal analysis, assume that the excitation signal is a realization of a white random process, which may not be true. Hence, we define and characterize pseudo transfer functions (PTFs), which relate output measurements, and we use changes in the identified PTF to detect faults. We demonstrate the effects of non-zero initial conditions, non-white excitation, unknown model order, and output noise on the accuracy of the identification and fault detection results.

  16. Maternal and zygotic Zfp57 modulate NOTCH signaling in cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Shamis, Yulia; Cullen, Dana E.; Liu, Lizhi; Yang, Guan; Ng, Sheau-Fang; Xiao, Lijuan; Bell, Fong T.; Ray, Chelsea; Takikawa, Sachiko; Moskowitz, Ivan P.; Cai, Chen-Leng; Yang, Xiao; Li, Xiajun

    2015-01-01

    Zfp57 is a maternal–zygotic effect gene that maintains genomic imprinting. Here we report that Zfp57 mutants exhibited a variety of cardiac defects including atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), thin myocardium, and reduced trabeculation. Zfp57 maternal-zygotic mutant embryos displayed more severe phenotypes with higher penetrance than the zygotic ones. Cardiac progenitor cells exhibited proliferation and differentiation defects in Zfp57 mutants. ZFP57 is a master regulator of genomic imprinting, so the DNA methylation imprint was lost in embryonic heart without ZFP57. Interestingly, the presence of imprinted DLK1, a target of ZFP57, correlated with NOTCH1 activation in cardiac cells. These results suggest that ZFP57 may modulate NOTCH signaling during cardiac development. Indeed, loss of ZFP57 caused loss of NOTCH1 activation in embryonic heart with more severe loss observed in the maternal-zygotic mutant. Maternal and zygotic functions of Zfp57 appear to play redundant roles in NOTCH1 activation and cardiomyocyte differentiation. This serves as an example of a maternal effect that can influence mammalian organ development. It also links genomic imprinting to NOTCH signaling and particular developmental functions. PMID:25848000

  17. [Cardiac tumors: CT and MR imaging features].

    PubMed

    Moskovitch, G; Chabbert, V; Escourrou, G; Desloques, L; Otal, P; Glock, Y; Rousseau, H

    2010-09-01

    The CT and MR imaging features of the main cardiac tumors will be reviewed. Cross-sectional imaging features may help differentiate between cardiac tumors and pseudotumoral lesions and identify malignant features. Based on clinical features, imaging findings are helpful to further characterize the nature of the lesion. CT and MR imaging can demonstrate the relationship of the tumor with adjacent anatomical structures and are invaluable in the presurgical work-up and postsurgical follow-up. PMID:20814374

  18. Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) – diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Skalec, Karolina; Litwin, Linda; Drozdz, Katarzyna; Gac, Pawel; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Zymlinski, Robert; Molenda, Wlodzimierz; Szuba, Andrzej; Janczak, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is the very rare disease that is associated with a high mortality rate. A prompt and proper diagnosis may affect the prognosis, and proper treatment may improve life expectancy. This report documents the case of a 74-year-old female with primary cardiac lymphoma. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure on her 23rd day in hospital. PMID:26702288

  19. Optimal Output Trajectory Redesign for Invertible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, S.

    1996-01-01

    Given a desired output trajectory, inversion-based techniques find input-state trajectories required to exactly track the output. These inversion-based techniques have been successfully applied to the endpoint tracking control of multijoint flexible manipulators and to aircraft control. The specified output trajectory uniquely determines the required input and state trajectories that are found through inversion. These input-state trajectories exactly track the desired output; however, they might not meet acceptable performance requirements. For example, during slewing maneuvers of flexible structures, the structural deformations, which depend on the required state trajectories, may be unacceptably large. Further, the required inputs might cause actuator saturation during an exact tracking maneuver, for example, in the flight control of conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. In such situations, a compromise is desired between the tracking requirement and other goals such as reduction of internal vibrations and prevention of actuator saturation; the desired output trajectory needs to redesigned. Here, we pose the trajectory redesign problem as an optimization of a general quadratic cost function and solve it in the context of linear systems. The solution is obtained as an off-line prefilter of the desired output trajectory. An advantage of our technique is that the prefilter is independent of the particular trajectory. The prefilter can therefore be precomputed, which is a major advantage over other optimization approaches. Previous works have addressed the issue of preshaping inputs to minimize residual and in-maneuver vibrations for flexible structures; Since the command preshaping is computed off-line. Further minimization of optimal quadratic cost functions has also been previously use to preshape command inputs for disturbance rejection. All of these approaches are applicable when the inputs to the system are known a priori. Typically, outputs (not inputs) are specified in tracking problems, and hence the input trajectories have to be computed. The inputs to the system are however, difficult to determine for non-minimum phase systems like flexible structures. One approach to solve this problem is to (1) choose a tracking controller (the desired output trajectory is now an input to the closed-loop system and (2) redesign this input to the closed-loop system. Thus we effectively perform output redesign. These redesigns are however, dependent on the choice of the tracking controllers. Thus the controller optimization and trajectory redesign problems become coupled; this coupled optimization is still an open problem. In contrast, we decouple the trajectory redesign problem from the choice of feedback-based tracking controller. It is noted that our approach remains valid when a particular tracking controller is chosen. In addition, the formulation of our problem not only allows for the minimization of residual vibration as in available techniques but also allows for the optimal reduction fo vibrations during the maneuver, e.g., the altitude control of flexible spacecraft. We begin by formulating the optimal output trajectory redesign problem and then solve it in the context of general linear systems. This theory is then applied to an example flexible structure, and simulation results are provided.

  20. Peri-operative cardiac protection for non-cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, S S C; Irwin, M G

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality after non-cardiac surgery. Pre-operative identification of high-risk individuals and appropriate peri-operative management can reduce cardiovascular risk. It is important to continue chronic beta-blocker and statin therapy. Statins are relatively safe and peri-operative initiation may be beneficial in high-risk patients and those scheduled for vascular surgery. The pre-operative introduction of beta-blockers reduces myocardial injury but increases rates of stroke and mortality, possibly due to hypotension. They should only be considered in high-risk patients and the dose should be titrated to heart rate. Alpha-2 agonists may also contribute to hypotension. Aspirin continuation can increase the risk of major bleeding and offset the benefit of reduced myocardial risk. Contrary to the initial ENIGMA study, nitrous oxide does not seem to increase the risk of myocardial injury. Volatile anaesthetic agents and opioids have been shown to be cardioprotective in animal laboratory studies but these effects have, so far, not been conclusively reproduced clinically. PMID:26620144