Science.gov

Sample records for maintaining social order

  1. Evaluating the Rank-Ordering Method for Standard Maintaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramley, Tom; Gill, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The rank-ordering method for standard maintaining was designed for the purpose of mapping a known cut-score (e.g. a grade boundary mark) on one test to an equivalent point on the test score scale of another test, using holistic expert judgements about the quality of exemplars of examinees' work (scripts). It is a novel application of an old…

  2. SocialWiki: Bring Order to Wiki Systems with Social Context

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    SocialWiki: Bring Order to Wiki Systems with Social Context Haifeng Zhao, Shaozhi Ye, Prantik,gribble,wu}@cs.ucdavis.edu Abstract. A huge amount of administrative effort is required for large wiki systems to produce and maintain high quality pages with exist- ing naive access control policies. This paper introduces SocialWiki

  3. Body Language and the Social Order; Communication as Behavioral Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheflen, Albert E.

    Human communication, verbal and especially nonverbal, is based upon lower and earlier primate development as well as on extensive culturally learned behavior. Kinesthetic study can discover behaviors which maintain and disrupt social orders of all types--governmental, economic, familial, and personal. Communicational behavior exerts controls and…

  4. Cognitive Factors that Maintain Social Anxiety Disorder: a Comprehensive Model and its Treatment Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2007-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common, distressing and persistent mental illness. Recent studies have identified a number of psychological factors that could explain the maintenance of the disorder. These factors are presented here as part of a comprehensive psychological maintenance model of SAD. This model assumes that social apprehension is associated with unrealistic social standards and a deficiency in selecting attainable social goals. When confronted with challenging social situations, individuals with SAD shift their attention toward their anxiety, view themselves negatively as a social object, overestimate the negative consequences of a social encounter, believe that they have little control over their emotional response, and view their social skills as inadequate to effectively cope with the social situation. In order to avoid social mishaps, individuals with SAD revert to maladaptive coping strategies, including avoidance and safety behaviors, followed by post-event rumination, which leads to further social apprehension in the future. Possible disorder-specific intervention strategies are discussed. PMID:18049945

  5. CAD models are an important step in several engineering projects. In order to maintain

    E-print Network

    Barbosa, Alberto

    Abstract CAD models are an important step in several engineering projects. In order to maintain. Keywords: Virtual Reality, CAD models, Collaborative Virtual Prototyping and Design review. 1. Introduction Nowadays the engineering projects are using CAD (Computer-Aided Design) tools not just to plan

  6. Socially Assistive Robotic Music Therapist for Maintaining Attention of Older Adults with Cognitive Impairments

    E-print Network

    Mataric, Maja J.

    to aging and/or Alzheimer's disease. Introduction Dementia is a progressive brain dysfunction that affectsSocially Assistive Robotic Music Therapist for Maintaining Attention of Older Adults with Cognitive elements of good dementia care. Activities (e.g., music therapy (Carruth 1997, Clair and Ebberts 1997

  7. Maintaining Pedagogical Integrity of a Computer Mediated Course Delivery in Social Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shelley; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming a face to face course to a computer mediated format in social foundations (interdisciplinary field in education), while maintaining pedagogical integrity, involves strategic collaboration between instructional technologists and content area experts. This type of planned partnership requires open dialogue and a mutual respect for prior…

  8. Bechstein's bats maintain individual social links despite a complete reorganisation of their colony structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baigger, A.; Perony, N.; Reuter, M.; Leinert, V.; Melber, M.; Grünberger, S.; Fleischmann, D.; Kerth, G.

    2013-09-01

    Several social mammals, including elephants and some primates, whales and bats, live in multilevel societies that form temporary subgroups. Despite these fission-fusion dynamics, group members often maintain long-term bonds. However, it is unclear whether such individual links and the resulting stable social subunits continue to exist after a complete reorganisation of a society, e.g. following a population crash. Here, we employed a weighted network analysis on 7,109 individual roosting records collected over 4 years in a wild Bechstein's bat colony. We show that, in response to a strong population decline, the colony's two stable social subunits fused into a non-modular social network. Nevertheless, in the first year after the crash, long-term bonds were still detectable, suggesting that the bats remembered previous individual relationships. Our findings are important for understanding the flexibility of animal societies in the face of dramatic changes and for the conservation of social mammals with declining populations.

  9. Social Welfare Orderings for Different Subgroup Utility Scales

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Social Welfare Orderings for Different Subgroup Utility Scales Anna B. Khmelnitskaya SPb Institute-mail: anna@math.huji.ac.il, anna@AK3141.spb.edu) Abstract. This paper characterizes social welfare orderings subgroups scales, every corre- sponding social ordering is fully determined by the opinions of only one

  10. Preserving and maintaining vital Ecosystem Services: the importance of linking knowledge from Geosciences and social-ecological System analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, David; Petursdottir, Thorunn

    2013-04-01

    Human kind has always been curios and motivated to understand and quantify environmental processes in order to predict and anticipate the evolution of vital ecosystem services. Even the very first civilizations used empirical correlations to predict outcomes of rains and subsequent harvest efficiencies. Along with the insights into the functioning of ecosystems, humans also became aware that their anthropogenic activities can have positive and negative impact on ecosystem services. In recent years, geosciences have brought forward new sophisticated observations and modeling tools, with the aim to improve predictions of ecological developments. At the same time, the added value of linking ecological factors to the surrounding social structure has received a growing acceptance among scientists. A social-ecological system approach brings in a holistic understanding of how these systems are inevitably interlinked and how their sustainability can be better maintained. We claim that the biggest challenge for geoscience in the coming decades will be to link these two disciplines in order to establish adequate strategies to preserve natural ecosystems and their services, parallel to their utilization. We will present various case studies from more than a decade of research, ranging from water quality in mountain lakes, climate change impacts on water availability and declining fishing yields in freshwaters and discuss how the studies outcomes could be given added value by interpreting them via social-ecological system analysis. For instance, sophisticated field investigations revealed that deep water mixing in lake Issyk-Kul, Kirgizstan, is intensively distributing pollutants in the entire lake. Although fishery is an important sector in the region, the local awareness of the importance of water quality is low. In Switzerland, strict water protection laws led to ologotrophication of alpine lakes, reducing fishing yields. While local fishermen argued that local fishery is more ecological than importing fish, their calls for artificial lake fertilization were rejected and are socially not accepted. Finally, climate change projections of water availability in the Alps reveal that water may become scarce during summer months due to vanishing glaciers. Financially the hydropower sector is the most important water user. However, other stakeholders, like farmers and the tourism sectors will be all competing for the decreasing resources. In all these three cases, a social-ecological system analysis could give an added value to the geoscience results by identifying solutions that are both ecological and socially suitable. We will conclude our talk by giving an outlook how we intend to link the two disciplines to perform integrative assessments, linking geoscience to the relevant social-ecological system analysis in order to come up with strategies to sustainably preserve vital ecosystem services.

  11. Social support: An approach to maintaining the health of women who have experienced stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Allahdadian, Maryam; Irajpour, Alireza; Kazemi, Ashraf; Kheirabadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stillbirth is one of the deepest losses that can inflict a broad range of cognitive, mental, spiritual, and physical turmoil. Many researchers believe that the failure to provide the care required by health teams during the hard times is the main determinant of maternal mental health in the future. In other words, social support can significantly improve the mental health outcomes of mothers after stillbirth. This study aimed to explore social support to aid mothers in adaptation after the experience of stillbirth. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis in which 15 women who had experienced stillbirth participated. They were selected through purposeful sampling method. Data were gathered by individual interviews recorded on audiotapes, transcribed, and analyzed. Interview transcriptions were coded and then classified. Finally, two main categories and five subcategories emerged. Results: Analysis of participants’ viewpoints and their statements about social support led to the emergence of the two main categories of support from relatives and support from social support systems with two and three subcategories, respectively. Analysis of findings showed that mothers experiencing stillbirth need the support of their spouse and family and friends through sympathizing, in performing everyday activities and to escape loneliness. These women require support from a peer group to exchange experiences and from trauma counseling centers to meet their needs. Conclusions: It seems necessary to revise and modify the care plan in the experience of stillbirth using these results and, of course, to be considered by a panel of experts in order to provide social support to these women. Thus, midwives and healthcare provider can act, based on the development and strengthening of social protection of women experiencing stillbirth, to provide these women with effective and appropriate care. PMID:26257802

  12. Capturing Order in Social Interactions Alessandro Vinciarelli

    E-print Network

    , physiology and neurology, just to mention a few, still investigate how humans are the perfect machines our notice or more than human" (Politika, ca. 328 BC). This is more than an abstract philosophical for social interaction: the muscles of our faces are aimed at expressing our subtlest feelings and emotions

  13. Social Studies and the Social Order: Telling Stories of Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Douglas; Chandler, Prentice

    2009-01-01

    The social studies profession has always been at its weakest in dealing with the analysis of racism and class (Ladson-Billings, 2003; Marshall, 2001), and the new technocratic atmosphere and discourse generated by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) will serve to make such analysis completely absent, despite the rhetoric of the National Council of the…

  14. Application of Herrnstein's hyperbola to time allocation of naturalistic human behavior maintained by naturalistic social reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Scott D.; McDowell, J. J

    1992-01-01

    Five college students talked to an experimenter about various topics. Time spent looking at the experimenter was reinforced by verbal statements of praise and interest on five variable-interval schedules. Herrnstein's hyperbola provided a good description of the time-allocation data for 4 of the 5 subjects, and accounted for 95% of the variance of the median time-allocation data. The hyperbola provided a significantly better description of the data than a two-parameter ramp function with similar differential properties. Estimates of the asymptote, k, of the hyperbola varied among subjects from about 2 to about 15 seconds of eye contact per minute. These estimates were much smaller than the constant 60 seconds of eye contact per minute required by Herrnstein's matching theory. These results support the conclusion that Herrnstein's hyperbola describes naturalistic human behavior maintained by naturalistic social reinforcement as well as it describes the behavior of humans and nonhumans in typical laboratory preparations. The results also indicate that the hyperbolic form of the time-allocation version of Herrnstein's equation is accurate, but that the constant k requirement of matching theory may not hold. PMID:16812651

  15. Self, Womanhood and Social Order in Narayan's Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickramagamage, Carmen

    1990-01-01

    Narayan, in his novels, has exhibited a preference for a stable social order both as a structural device and as a reverential representation of community life. The effect of this predilection on his portrayal of Indian women, who are beginning to enjoy greater autonomy and social mobility, is examined. (JL)

  16. Utilizing An Online e-Community to Maintain Camp Outcomes and Social Connectedness 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yi-Ju

    2015-05-13

    of Internet technology promotes their sense of school and friend connectedness, but not family connectedness. Findings suggest individual’s positive interaction with their social environment and the social groups from their real life are important...

  17. Managing Stress and Maintaining Well-Being: Social Support, Problem-Focused Coping, and Avoidant Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a model that links stress, social support, problem-focused coping, and well-being. First, it looks at how high support significantly moderated the association between stress and well-being. Next, the students' problem-focused coping was seen as mediating this moderated association. Finally, a 3-way interaction of stress, social

  18. Using Videoconferencing to Establish and Maintain a Social Presence in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Robert A.; Wieland, Regi L.

    2010-01-01

    Successful operation of videoconferencing technology for interactive learning demands preparation and scheduling. Well-organized strategies for interaction assist faculty in meeting individual student needs and developing the "social presence" necessary to facilitate quality online learning. Organizations can be proactive by offering this…

  19. Co-existence of learners and stayers maintains the advantage of social foraging

    E-print Network

    Aksnes, Dag L.

    membership. Individuals that move between groups experience reduced foraging time. Travelling may also, 8: 1311­1324 © 2006 Sigrunn Eliassen #12;paradox of social foraging, and the argument relies (Wilson et al., 1999; Chase et al., 2001). In Drosophila melanogaster, `rover' larvae travel lon

  20. SocialWiki: Bring Order to Wiki Systems with Social Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haifeng; Ye, Shaozhi; Bhattacharyya, Prantik; Rowe, Jeff; Gribble, Ken; Wu, S. Felix

    A huge amount of administrative effort is required for large wiki systems to produce and maintain high quality pages with existing naive access control policies. This paper introduces SocialWiki, a prototype wiki system which leverages the power of social networks to automatically manage reputation and trust for wiki users based on the content they contribute and the ratings they receive. SocialWiki also utilizes interests to facilitate collaborative editing. Although a wiki page is visible to everyone, it can only be edited by a group of users who share similar interests and have a certain level of trust with each other. The editing privilege is circulated among these users to prevent/reduce vandalisms and spams, and to encourage user participation by adding social context to the revision process of a wiki page. By presenting the design and implementation of this proof-of-concept system, we show that social context can be used to build an efficient, self-adaptive and robust collaborative editing system.

  1. EXC-5 Controls Intracellular Trafficking in Order to Maintain the Apical Structure of the C. elegans Excretory Canal

    E-print Network

    Mattingly, Brendan Christopher

    2011-04-26

    The goal of this work is to understand how cells form and maintain tubular shapes. The protein EXC-5 is necessary for a small tubular structure in Caenorhabditis elegans to maintain its shape. C. elegans is a small, easily ...

  2. Effect of homosexuality upon public health and social order.

    PubMed

    Cameron, P; Cameron, K; Proctor, K

    1989-06-01

    Are homosexuals "not dangers to society" and is homosexuality "compatible with full health"? To answer these questions 4,340 adult respondents drawn via area probability sampling from 5 metropolitan areas of the USA self-administered an extensive sexuality/public order questionnaire of over 500 items. Bisexuals and homosexuals (about 4% of the sample) as compared to heterosexuals: (1) more frequently exposed themselves to biological hazards (e.g., sadomasochism, fisting, bestiality, ingestion of feces); (2) exposed themselves sexually to more different bodies (e.g., more frequently admitted to participating in orgies, reported considerably larger numbers of sexual partners); (3) more frequently reported participating in socially disruptive sex (e.g., deliberate infection of others, cheating in marriage, making obscene phone calls); and (4) more frequently reported engaging in socially disruptive activities (e.g., criminality, shoplifting, tax cheating). From the standpoints of individual health, public health and social order, participating in homosexual activity could be viewed as dangerous to society and incompatible with full health. PMID:2762461

  3. The Social and Academic Consequences of Birth Order: Real, Artifactual, or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steelman, Lala Carr; Powell, Brian

    1985-01-01

    Examined impact of birth order on social skills and academic performance of children and adolescents (N=3,568). Results revealed no significant relationship between birth order and academic performance but did reveal a significant positive relationship between birth order and social skills. Leadership skills were related to birth order for males.…

  4. UNUSUAL ADAPTATIONS FOR P NUTRITION, IN ORDER TO MAINTAIN N2 FIXATION IN TWO CAPE FLORISTIC REGION (CFR)

    E-print Network

    and N nutrition in the root-nodule physiology of indigenous CFR legume species is poorly understood team member, Prof Alex Valentine, have centred their research on the nodule physiology of two related maintained its P nutrition, photosynthetic costs and increased its nodule allocation to the benefit of N

  5. Social media pecking order : analysing Twitter information streams 

    E-print Network

    Ritterman, Joshua

    2013-11-28

    This thesis investigates how authority is distributed in social media and develops a novel method to validate the finding using prediction markets. By modelling prediction markets with a data corpus comprising of both ...

  6. A single dose of oxytocin nasal spray improves higher-order social cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Adam J; Ward, Philip B; Hickie, Ian B; Shahrestani, Sara; Hodge, Marie Antoinette Redoblado; Scott, Elizabeth M; Langdon, Robyn

    2015-11-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with significant impairments in both higher and lower order social cognitive performance and these impairments contribute to poor social functioning. People with schizophrenia report poor social functioning to be one of their greatest unmet treatment needs. Recent studies have suggested the potential of oxytocin as such a treatment, but mixed results render it uncertain what aspects of social cognition are improved by oxytocin and, subsequently, how oxytocin might best be applied as a therapeutic. The aim of this study was to determine whether a single dose of oxytocin improved higher-order and lower-order social cognition performance for patients with schizophrenia across a well-established battery of social cognition tests. Twenty-one male patients received both a single dose of oxytocin nasal spray (24IU) and a placebo, two weeks apart in a randomized within-subjects placebo controlled design. Following each administration, participants completed the social cognition tasks, as well as a test of general neurocognition. Results revealed that oxytocin particularly enhanced performance on higher order social cognition tasks, with no effects on general neurocognition. Results for individual tasks showed most improvement on tests measuring appreciation of indirect hints and recognition of social faux pas. These results suggest that oxytocin, if combined to enhance social cognition learning, may be beneficial when targeted at higher order social cognition domains. This study also suggests that these higher order tasks, which assess social cognitive processing in a social communication context, may provide useful markers of response to oxytocin in schizophrenia. PMID:26150070

  7. Order from noise: Toward a social theory of geographic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, B.S.; Chrisman, N.R.

    2006-01-01

    In the so-called Information Age, it is surprising that the concept of information is imprecisely defined and almost taken for granted. Historic and recent geographic information science (GIScience) literature relies on two conflicting metaphors, often espoused by the same author in adjacent paragraphs. The metaphor of invariance, derived from telecommunications engineering, defines information as a thing to be transported without loss through a conduit. Another metaphor, originating in the utopian movements of the 19th century, locates information within a hierarchy of refinement-a stopping place on the path to convert mere data into higher forms of knowledge and perhaps to wisdom. Both metaphors rely on long-forgotten debates outside geography and preclude us from seeing that there are important social and ethical concerns in the relationship between geographic information technologies and society. We examine the conflicts between competing metaphors and propose a social theory of geographic information. ?? 2006 by Association of American Geographers.

  8. Language, Parents' Involvement, and Social Justice: The Fight for Maintaining Minority Home Language: A Chinese-Language Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuxiang

    2009-01-01

    English-only policies and the expiration of the "Bilingual Education Act," which is now replaced by "No Child Left Behind," make it clear that English is the official language of schools in the United States with the emphasis moved from the goal of maintaining students' home languages while learning English to a focus of ignoring minority…

  9. Higher Order Thinking in High School Social Studies: An Analysis of Classrooms, Teachers, Students, and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmann, Fred M.; And Others

    The papers in this report present selected findings from one phase of a five-year study on how to enhance higher order thinking skills in high school social studies classes. The study's purposes were to determine why it is difficult to emphasize these skills in social studies curriculums, what the barriers are, and how to overcome them. Five…

  10. Social-Ecological, Motivational and Volitional Factors for Initiating and Maintaining Physical Activity in the Context of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Clemens; Barrio, María Rato; Leach, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Sport and exercise can have several health benefits for people living with HIV. These benefits can be achieved through different types of physical activity, adapting to disease progression, motivation and social-ecological options. However, physical activity levels and adherence to exercise are generally low in people living with HIV. At the same time, high drop-out rates in intervention studies are prevalent; even though they often entail more favourable conditions than interventions in the natural settings. Thus, in the framework of an intervention study, the present study aims to explore social-ecological, motivational and volitional correlates of South African women living with HIV with regard to physical activity and participation in a sport and exercise health promotion programme. The qualitative data was produced in the framework of a non-randomised pre-post intervention study that evaluated structure, processes and outcomes of a 10-week sport and exercise programme. All 25 participants of the programme were included in this analysis, independent of compliance. Data was produced through questionnaires, participatory group discussions, body image pictures, research diaries and individual semi-structured interviews. All participants lived in a low socioeconomic, disadvantaged setting. Hence, the psychological correlates are contextualised and social-ecological influences on perception and behaviour are discussed. The results show the importance of considering social-cultural and environmental influences on individual motives, perceptions and expectancies, the fear of disclosure and stigmatisation, sport and exercise-specific group dynamics and self-supporting processes. Opportunities and strategies to augment physical activity and participation in sport and exercise programmes in the context of HIV are discussed. PMID:26587078

  11. The origin of ethics and social order in a society without state power.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K

    1999-06-01

    How ethics and social order in a society without state power had originated and developed is one of enigmas which human beings have tried to solve for a long time. Several theories on the origin of social order have been proposed since the "Social Contract" theory of Thomas Hobbes. According to Hobbes, as a society without state power is in a condition called war, a social contract among men is the origin of social order in a society where every man is against every man. Rousseau says that when human beings reach the stage in which they live in a permanent neighborhood, a property system is introduced. Then, too much ambition and avarice of man who has possessions compel him to propose the formation of a political institution, providing social order which enables him to keep his possessions. According to Nietzsche, the principle of equilibrium, that is, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth is an important concept for the oldest theory of low and morality as well as the basis of justice. The sense of superiority and nobility which a strong man brave enough to take revenge feels is the origin of the antithesis "good" and "bad". Girard says that the sacred violence wielded by the community to sacrifice a surrogate victim brings about social order in a society without state power. All the aforementioned theories seem to have failed to find out that a society without state power has its own ethics that had spontaneously developed on the pagan culture. Previously, I indicated that a society without state power or a society where state power cannot function well, such as the tribal society in northern Albania, has ethics which is based on the ancient concepts of "Guest-god", "food (commensality)" and "blood". In the present paper, I propose a new theory on the origin of ethics and social order, using the model of ethics of the Kanun. PMID:10402726

  12. Care Orders as Successful Interventions: The Social Workers' Point of View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pösö, Tarja; Eronen, Tuija

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the outcomes of care orders from the point of view of social workers. The aim is to cast light on the "black box" of substitute care by analysing the practice-based view on outcome in order to contribute to the complex debate on the relations of care and outcome. The article is based on a study using a survey, focus…

  13. Incorporating social groups' responses in a descriptive model for second- and higher-order impact identification

    SciTech Connect

    Sutheerawatthana, Pitch; Minato, Takayuki

    2010-02-15

    The response of a social group is a missing element in the formal impact assessment model. Previous discussion of the involvement of social groups in an intervention has mainly focused on the formation of the intervention. This article discusses the involvement of social groups in a different way. A descriptive model is proposed by incorporating a social group's response into the concept of second- and higher-order effects. The model is developed based on a cause-effect relationship through the observation of phenomena in case studies. The model clarifies the process by which social groups interact with a lower-order effect and then generate a higher-order effect in an iterative manner. This study classifies social groups' responses into three forms-opposing, modifying, and advantage-taking action-and places them in six pathways. The model is expected to be used as an analytical tool for investigating and identifying impacts in the planning stage and as a framework for monitoring social groups' responses during the implementation stage of a policy, plan, program, or project (PPPPs).

  14. Schooling for Social Order: Democracy, Equality and Social Mobility in Education. Sociology of the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Lawrence

    This monograph examines fundamental themes of equality and democracy prominent in Australian educational discourse and reform efforts during the past century, particularly since World War II. The first section argues that these ideals, while representing positive and progressive intentions, have not contributed to social justice but have led to…

  15. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS In order to be eligible for a Social Security Number (SSN) you will need to present evidence of work authorization

    E-print Network

    SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS In order to be eligible for a Social Security Number (SSN) you will need to apply for a Social Security Number on line or via an agency. You must have a personal interview holders are not eligible for an SSN unless they have on-campus employment or off-campus work permission

  16. EMPLOYMENT LETTER REQUIREMENT FOR SOCIAL SECURITY CARD: In order to be hired at the University of Florida, international students must have a Social Security

    E-print Network

    Sin, Peter

    of Florida, international students must have a Social Security Number (SSN). If they do not already have one OF FOREIGN NATIONALS : Nonresident Aliens must have either a U.S. Social Security Number (SSN) or an IRS and the Social Security Office in order to submit an application for an SSN card. SSN REQUIREMENTS FOR EMPLOYMENT

  17. "Standing Porter at the Door of Thought": The Social Order of the Christian Science Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Douglas J.

    This examination of the social order of the Church of Christ, Scientist, provides a valuable learning opportunity for leaders of any organizational entity--or for any student of organizational communication/behavior. The study addresses labor, trust, power, and legitimization of activity within the church. It raises the issue of whether Christian…

  18. Dare the NEA Build a New Social Order?: Harold Rugg and the 1934 Annual Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Karen L.; Brown, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Far from being the lone voice for a new social order, Harold Rugg was one many educators throughout the United States who believed that education should offer more to the American way of life than graduating students with some form of common knowledge, but with little ability to effect necessary change. And in 1934, few Americans would disagree…

  19. The Relationship between Second-Order False Belief and Display Rules Reasoning: The Integration of Cognitive and Affective Social Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naito, Mika; Seki, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relation between cognitive and affective social understanding, Japanese 4- to 8-year-olds received tasks of first- and second-order false beliefs and prosocial and self-presentational display rules. From 6 to 8 years, children comprehended display rules, as well as second-order false belief, using social pressures justifications…

  20. . . . that the social order prevails: death, ritual and the 'Roman' nurse.

    PubMed

    Goopy, Suzanne

    2006-06-01

    In this article, the importance of ritual as a collective response to death is discussed. A case example, taken from a larger ethnographic study, is used to explore the responses and reactions of a group of Italian nurses to death as it occurs within an intensive care unit in Rome, Italy. The material presented is used to analyse the significance that cultural, religious and social beliefs and quasi-beliefs can have in nursing practice. The issues highlighted in this examination of the place of ritual in death are located and discussed within their highly specific cultural context and suggest that, where emphasis remains on nurses as a collective rather than on the individual nurse, ritual acts to ensure that social and moral order prevails. PMID:16700754

  1. First Order Models of Human Crowds with Behavioral-Social Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Bellomo, Nicola; Gibelli, Livio; Pieri, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to behavioral-social dynamics of human crowds. First order models are derived based on mass conservation at the macroscopic scale, while methods of the kinetic theory are used to model the decisional process by which walking individuals select their velocity direction. Crowd heterogeneity is modeled by dividing the whole system into subsystems identified by different features. The passage from one subsystem to the other is induced by interactions. It is shown how heterogeneous individual behaviors can modify the collective dynamics, as well as how local unusual behaviors can propagate in the crowd. The paper also proposes a system approach to the modeling of the dynamics in complex venues, where individuals move through areas with different features.

  2. More than mere numbers: the impact of lethal control on the social stability of a top-order predator.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Ritchie, Euan G; Read, John; O'Neill, Adam J

    2009-01-01

    Population control of socially complex species may have profound ecological implications that remain largely invisible if only their abundance is considered. Here we discuss the effects of control on a socially complex top-order predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). Since European occupation of Australia, dingoes have been controlled over much of the continent. Our aim was to investigate the effects of control on their abundance and social stability. We hypothesized that dingo abundance and social stability are not linearly related, and proposed a theoretical model in which dingo populations may fluctuate between three main states: (A) below carrying capacity and socially fractured, (B) above carrying capacity and socially fractured, or (C) at carrying capacity and socially stable. We predicted that lethal control would drive dingoes into the unstable states A or B, and that relaxation of control would allow recovery towards C. We tested our predictions by surveying relative abundance (track density) and indicators of social stability (scent-marking and howling) at seven sites in the arid zone subject to differing degrees of control. We also monitored changes in dingo abundance and social stability following relaxation and intensification of control. Sites where dingoes had been controlled within the previous two years were characterized by low scent-marking activity, but abundance was similar at sites with and without control. Signs of social stability steadily increased the longer an area was allowed to recover from control, but change in abundance did not follow a consistent path. Comparison of abundance and stability among all sites and years demonstrated that control severely fractures social groups, but that the effect of control on abundance was neither consistent nor predictable. Management decisions involving large social predators must therefore consider social stability to ensure their conservation and ecological functioning. PMID:19724642

  3. From higher order thinking to higher order behavior: exploring the relationship between early cognitive skills and social competence in black boys.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kristin M; Barbarin, Oscar A; Brown, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relations of higher order (i.e., abstract) thinking (HOT) skills to specific domains of social competence in Black boys (n = 108) attending publicly sponsored prekindergarten (pre-K) programs. Data for the study were collected as part of the National Center for Early Development and Learning (NCEDL) Multi-State Study, a national, longitudinal study examining the quality and outcomes in a representative sample of publicly sponsored pre-K programs in six states (N = 240). Pre-K and kindergarten teachers rated randomly selected children on measures of abstract thinking, self-regulation, and social functioning at the beginning and end of each school year. Applying structural equation modeling, compared with earlier time points, HOT measured in the fall of kindergarten significantly predicted each of the domains of social competence in the spring of kindergarten, with the exception of peer social skills, while controlling for general cognitive ability. Results suggest that early intervention to improve HOT may be an effective and more focused approach to address concerns about Black boys' early social competencies in specific domains and potentially reduce the risk of later social difficulties. PMID:23889011

  4. LSUHSC School of Allied Health Professions Social Media Policy

    E-print Network

    LSUHSC School of Allied Health Professions Social Media Policy SUMMARY STATEMENT OF SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY LSUHSC School of Allied Health Professions maintains a presence on social media in order resources and information that we think will be of use to our audiences on our social media sites. These may

  5. LSUHSC School of Dentistry Social Media Account Policy

    E-print Network

    LSUHSC School of Dentistry Social Media Account Policy SUMMARY STATEMENT OF SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY LSUHSC School of Dentistry maintains a presence on social media in order to provide information that we think will be of use to our audiences on our social media sites. These may include blogs, news

  6. Maintaining Children's Safety

    E-print Network

    Molinari, Marc

    Maintaining Children's Safety and Security on the Premises Policy V.2 June 18 2014 Owned by: Tracy/DepartmentResources/StudentServicesPoliciesandProcedures/EarlyYearsCentre /MaintainingChildren'sSafetyandSecurityonthePremisesPolicy June 2012 V.2 Impact Assessed: Update due: May 2015 #12;Policy 1 Title: Maintaining Children's Safety and Security on the Premises From: Early Years

  7. First- and second-order sociality determine survival and reproduction in cooperative cichlids.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Arne; Taborsky, Michael

    2015-11-22

    Cooperative breeders serve as a model to study the evolution of cooperation, where costs and benefits of helping are typically scrutinized at the level of group membership. However, cooperation is often observed in multi-level social organizations involving interactions among individuals at various levels. Here, we argue that a full understanding of the adaptive value of cooperation and the evolution of complex social organization requires identifying the effect of different levels of social organization on direct and indirect fitness components. Our long-term field data show that in the cooperatively breeding, colonial cichlid fish Neolamprologus pulcher, both large group size and high colony density significantly raised group persistence. Neither group size nor density affected survival at the individual level, but they had interactive effects on reproductive output; large group size raised productivity when local population density was low, whereas in contrast, small groups were more productive at high densities. Fitness estimates of individually marked fish revealed indirect fitness benefits associated with staying in large groups. Inclusive fitness, however, was not significantly affected by group size, because the direct fitness component was not increased in larger groups. Together, our findings highlight that the reproductive output of groups may be affected in opposite directions by different levels of sociality, and that complex forms of sociality and costly cooperation may evolve in the absence of large indirect fitness benefits and the influence of kin selection. PMID:26582022

  8. Poverty, Inequality and the Future of Social Policy: Western States in the New World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFate, Katherine, Ed.; Lawson, Roger, Ed.; Wilson, William Julius, Ed.

    This book analyzes forces fraying the social fabric of many countries, and the reasons why some Western countries have been more successful than others in addressing these trends. Part 1, "Poverty, Income Inequality, and Labor Market Insecurity: A Comparative Perspective," includes (1) "Markets and States: Poverty Trends and Transfer System…

  9. Collective Weibull behavior of social atoms: Application of the rank-ordering statistics to historical extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Telesca, Luciano; Chi, Sung-Ching; Sun, Li-Chung

    2012-02-01

    Analogous to crustal earthquakes in natural fault systems, we here consider the dynasty collapses as extreme events in human society. Duration data of ancient Chinese and Egyptian dynasties provides a good chance of exploring the collective behavior of the so-called social atoms. By means of the rank-ordering statistics, we demonstrate that the duration data of those ancient dynasties could be described with good accuracy by the Weibull distribution. It is thus amazing that the distribution of time to failure of human society, i.e. the disorder of a historical dynasty, follows the widely accepted Weibull process as natural material fails.

  10. Maintain Combustion Systems 

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Energy is consumed, and wasted, in liberal amounts in the combustion processes which supply heat energy to boilers and process heaters. Close attention to combustion systems can be extremely beneficial: Optimum air to fuel ratios, i.e., maintaining...

  11. Demystifying Maintainability Manfred Broy

    E-print Network

    Broy, Manfred

    . In fact, every software organization of significant size seems to have its own definition of maintainability. We address this problem by defining an unique two-dimensional quality model that associates with the incremental development of the quality model and its application to large scale com- mercial software projects

  12. Maintaining Medicinal Plant Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For all plant genetic resources collections, including medicinal plant germplasm, maintaining the genetic integrity of material held ex situ is of major importance. This holds true for all intended end uses of the material whether it is as a source for crop improvement, medical research, as voucher...

  13. Investment in higher order central processing regions is not constrained by brain size in social insects

    PubMed Central

    Muscedere, Mario L.; Gronenberg, Wulfila; Moreau, Corrie S.; Traniello, James F. A.

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which size constrains the evolution of brain organization and the genesis of complex behaviour is a central, unanswered question in evolutionary neuroscience. Advanced cognition has long been linked to the expansion of specific brain compartments, such as the neocortex in vertebrates and the mushroom bodies in insects. Scaling constraints that limit the size of these brain regions in small animals may therefore be particularly significant to behavioural evolution. Recent findings from studies of paper wasps suggest miniaturization constrains the size of central sensory processing brain centres (mushroom body calyces) in favour of peripheral, sensory input centres (antennal and optic lobes). We tested the generality of this hypothesis in diverse eusocial hymenopteran species (ants, bees and wasps) exhibiting striking variation in body size and thus brain size. Combining multiple neuroanatomical datasets from these three taxa, we found no universal size constraint on brain organization within or among species. In fact, small-bodied ants with miniscule brains had mushroom body calyces proportionally as large as or larger than those of wasps and bees with brains orders of magnitude larger. Our comparative analyses suggest that brain organization in ants is shaped more by natural selection imposed by visual demands than intrinsic design limitations. PMID:24741016

  14. Nuclear power plant maintainability.

    PubMed

    Seminara, J L; Parsons, S O

    1982-09-01

    In the mid-1970s a general awareness of human factors engineering deficiencies associated with power plant control rooms took shape and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) awarded the Lockheed Corporation a contract to review the human factors aspects of five representative operational control rooms and their associated simulators. This investigation revealed a host of major and minor deficiencies that assumed unforeseen dimensions in the post- Three Mile Island accident period. In the course of examining operational problems (Seminara et al, 1976) and subsequently the methods for overcoming such problems (Seminara et al, 1979, 1980) indications surfaced that power plants were far from ideal in meeting the needs of maintenance personnel. Accordingly, EPRI sponsored an investigation of the human factors aspects of power plant maintainability (Seminara, 1981). This paper provides an overview of the maintainability problems and issues encountered in the course of reviewing five nuclear power plants. PMID:15676441

  15. Establishing and Maintaining Long-Term Human-Computer Relationships

    E-print Network

    , maintaining, and evaluating such relationships, based on research in social psychology, sociolinguistics, communication and other social sciences. Contexts in which relationships are particularly important-term social-emotional relationships with their users. We construct the first such agent, and evaluate

  16. Maintaining Bermudagrass Lawns 

    E-print Network

    Chalmers, David; McAfee, James; Havlak, Roger

    2006-08-08

    stream_source_info pdf_1125.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11189 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name pdf_1125.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 David R. Chalmers, Associate... Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist James A. McAfee, Associate Professor and Extension Turfgrass Specialist Roger Havlak, Extension Program Specialist?Turfgrass and Water Management The Texas A&M University System Maintaining Bermudagrass L a w ns L...

  17. Reagan: Maintain Antarctic program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan has decided that the United States should maintain an ‘active and influential presence’ in Antarctica to support the nation's interests. Following a review of a study by the Antarctica Policy Group, Reagan issued a memorandum, dated February 5, to the heads of 14 government agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Office of Management and Budget.The U.S. presence in Antarctica ‘shall include the conduct of scientific activities in major disciplines; year-round occupation of the South Pole and two coastal stations; and availability of related necessary logistics support,’ wrote the President. In addition, NSF should continue to budget for the entire U.S. program in Antarctica. Short-term programs by other agencies require the recommendation of the Antarctica Policy Group and should be coordinated within the framework of NSF logistics support.

  18. Social Orders and Interactions among Children in Age-Mixed Classes in Primary Schools--New Perspectives from a Synthesis of Ethnographic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huf, Christina; Raggl, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The article synthesises data from two ethnographic projects, which both explore interactions of children in age-mixed groups in primary schools. It illuminates critical perspectives on social orders and children's interactions in age-mixed classes by showing how pupils in age-mixed groups become involved in power relations and how the teacher's…

  19. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  20. A review of "Law, Crime and English Society, 1660-1830" by Norma Landau and "Crime, Gender and Social Order in Early Modern England" by Garthine Walker 

    E-print Network

    Sherman, Donovan

    2010-01-01

    with the Mosaic distinction? in that he moves away from allegory that Spenser uses as his defense and is thus left exposed (316). Norma Landau, ed. Law, Crime and English Society, 1660-1830. Cambridge: CambridgeUniversity Press, 2002. xii + 264 pp. $60....00. Garthine Walker. Crime, Gender and Social Order in Early Modern England. Cambridge: CambridgeUniversity Press, 2003. xvi + 310 pp. $60.00. Review by donovan sherman, university of california, irvine. The tension between postmodern philosophy...

  1. Experimental Evidence that Social Relationships Determine Individual Foraging Behavior.

    PubMed

    Firth, Josh A; Voelkl, Bernhard; Farine, Damien R; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-12-01

    Social relationships are fundamental to animals living in complex societies [1-3]. The extent to which individuals base their decisions around their key social relationships, and the consequences this has on their behavior and broader population level processes, remains unknown. Using a novel experiment that controlled where individual wild birds (great tits, Parus major) could access food, we restricted mated pairs from being allowed to forage at the same locations. This introduced a conflict for pair members between maintaining social relationships and accessing resources. We show that individuals reduce their own access to food in order to sustain their relationships and that individual foraging activity was strongly influenced by their key social counterparts. By affecting where individuals go, social relationships determined which conspecifics they encountered and consequently shaped their other social associations. Hence, while resource distribution can determine individuals' spatial and social environment [4-8], we illustrate how key social relationships themselves can govern broader social structure. Finally, social relationships also influenced the development of social foraging strategies. In response to forgoing access to resources, maintaining pair bonds led individuals to develop a flexible "scrounging" strategy, particularly by scrounging from their pair mate. This suggests that behavioral plasticity can develop to ameliorate conflicts between social relationships and other demands. Together, these results illustrate the importance of considering social relationships for explaining behavioral variation due to their significant impact on individual behavior and demonstrate the consequences of key relationships for wider processes. PMID:26585280

  2. What Does God Know? Supernatural Agents' Access to Socially Strategic and Non-Strategic Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purzycki, Benjamin G.; Finkel, Daniel N.; Shaver, John; Wales, Nathan; Cohen, Adam B.; Sosis, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about…

  3. Maintaining Order--and the Rights of Citizens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, John S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the constitutional protection of individual rights, particularly how they relate to the conduct of law enforcement. Summarizes a number of Supreme Court decisions and the legal precedents they established. Considers the various jurisdictions and duties of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. (MJP)

  4. Issues in Purchasing and Maintaining Intrinsic Standards

    SciTech Connect

    PETTIT,RICHARD B.; JAEGER,KLAUS; EHRLICH,CHARLES D.

    2000-09-12

    Intrinsic standards are widely used in the metrology community because they realize the best level uncertainty for many metrology parameters. For some intrinsic standards, recommended practices have been developed to assist metrologists in the selection of equipment and the development of appropriate procedures in order to realize the intrinsic standard. As with the addition of any new standard, the metrology laboratory should consider the pros and cons relative to their needs before purchasing the standard so that the laboratory obtains the maximum benefit from setting up and maintaining these standards. While the specific issues that need to be addressed depend upon the specific intrinsic standard and the level of realization, general issues that should be considered include ensuring that the intrinsic standard is compatible with the laboratory environment, that the standard is compatible with the current and future workload, and whether additional support standards will be required in order to properly maintain the intrinsic standard. When intrinsic standards are used to realize the best level of uncertainty for a specific metrology parameter, they usually require critical and important maintenance activities. These activities can including training of staff in the system operation, as well as safety procedures; performing periodic characterization measurements to ensure proper system operation; carrying out periodic intercomparisons with similar intrinsic standards so that proper operation is demonstrated; and maintaining control or trend charts of system performance. This paper has summarized many of these important issues and therefore should be beneficial to any laboratory that is considering the purchase of an intrinsic standard.

  5. “Confinement of the Higher Orders”: The Social Role of Private Lunatic Asylums in Ireland, c. 1820–60

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Alice

    2012-01-01

    The period 1820–60 marked an era of transition and diversity in Ireland that rapidly transformed the face of Irish society. Inextricably linked with these processes was the expansion of Ireland's private asylum system. This system diverged from its British counterpart both in the socioeconomic cohort it served and in the role it played within the mental health-care system as a whole. The implementation of the 1842 Private Asylums (Ireland) Act, the first legislative measure geared exclusively toward the system, highlighted the growing importance of private care in Ireland as well as providing for the licensing and regulation of these institutions for the first time. To date, historians of Irish medicine have focused almost exclusively on the pauper insane. This article aims to shift this emphasis toward other categories of the Irish insane through exploration of the Irish private asylum system, its growth throughout the period, and the social profile of private patients. I shall also interrogate the trade in lunacy model through exploration of financial considerations, discharge and recovery rates, and conditions of care and argue that while Irish private institutions were a lucrative business venture, the quality of care upheld was apparently high. Finally, I shall argue that Irish private asylums catered primarily for the upper classes and briefly explore alternative provisional measures for other non-pauper sectors of society. PMID:21355010

  6. Maintaining Sustainability for Green Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The promise of sustainably designed school facilities is that they will operate more efficiently and last longer than buildings constructed in more traditional ways. But that promise comes with a big if. The payoff is delivered only if the facility managers operate and maintain the buildings in ways that adhere to sustainable strategies called for…

  7. [Maintaining patients' autonomy at home].

    PubMed

    Niang, Bénédicte; Coudre, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To maintain the flow of hospital discharges, the patient's return home with support from a home nursing service is important. If any difficulties are identified, there are various programmes or good practices which can be put into place. The future law on adapting society to ageing also comprises a scheme combining home assistance and nursing care. PMID:26144953

  8. Maintaining Family Ties: Inclusive Practice in Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Sally E.

    Loss and uprootedness are core problems of enforced separation, and are especially hard on children. Children in out-of-home care need help in dealing with separation, particularly in maintaining ties with family. This report details a study of how 36 social workers in 2 Canadian child protection agencies have managed separation issues with the…

  9. Heartwarming memories: Nostalgia maintains physiological comfort.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinyue; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Chen, Xiaoxi; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M

    2012-08-01

    Nostalgia, a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past, is a predominantly positive and social emotion. Recent evidence suggests that nostalgia maintains psychological comfort. Here, we propose, and document in five methodologically diverse studies, a broader homeostatic function for nostalgia that also encompasses the maintenance of physiological comfort. We show that nostalgia--an emotion with a strong connotation of warmth--is triggered by coldness. Participants reported stronger nostalgia on colder (vs. warmer) days and in a cold (vs. neutral or warm) room. Nostalgia, in turn, modulates the interoceptive feeling of temperature. Higher levels of music-evoked nostalgia predicted increased physical warmth, and participants who recalled a nostalgic (vs. ordinary autobiographical) event perceived ambient temperature as higher. Finally, and consistent with the close central nervous system integration of temperature and pain sensations, participants who recalled a nostalgic (vs. ordinary autobiographical) event evinced greater tolerance to noxious cold. PMID:22390713

  10. Maintaining technical excellence requires a national plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    To meet the challenge of technical excellence, AIA established a rocket propulsion committee to develop the National Rocket Propulsion Strategic Plan. Developing such a plan required a broad spectrum of experience and disciplines. The Strategic Plan team needed the participation of industry, government, and academia. The plan provides, if followed, a means for the U.S. to maintain technical excellence and world leadership in rocket propulsion. To implement the National Rocket Propulsion Strategic Plan is to invest in the social, economic, and technological futures of America. The plan lays the basis for upgrading existing propulsion systems and a firm base for future full scale development, production, and operation of rocket propulsion systems for space, defense, and commercial applications.

  11. NMG documentation, part 3: maintainer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    This is the third of a three-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. Part I is aimed at the user of the systenL It contains an introduction, with an out- line of the complete report, and Chapter 1, User`s Point of View. Part II is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, How It Works. Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and contains Chapter 3, Maintenance, and Chapter 4, Validation. Because its contents are so specialized, Part III will receive only limited distribution. Note that each chapter has its own page numbering and table of contents.

  12. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a)...

  13. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a)...

  14. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  15. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  16. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  17. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  18. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  19. Explicit feedback maintains implicit knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mealor, Andy D; Dienes, Zoltan

    2013-09-01

    The role of feedback was investigated with respect to conscious and unconscious knowledge acquired during artificial grammar learning (AGL). After incidental learning of training sequences, participants classified further sequences in terms of grammaticality and reported their decision strategy with or without explicit veridical feedback. Sequences that disobeyed the learning structure conformed to an alternative structure. Feedback led to an increase in the amount of reported conscious knowledge of structure (derived rules and recollections) but did not increase its accuracy. Conversely, feedback maintained the accuracy of unconscious knowledge of structure (intuition or familiarity-based responses) which otherwise degraded. Results support a dual-process account of AGL. They suggest that implicit learning of the to-be-rejected structure at test contaminates familiarity-based classifications whereas feedback allows competing familiarity signals to be contextualised, which is incompatible with theories that consider familiarity context-insensitive. PMID:23770696

  20. Maintaining integrity on buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    This article outlines options available to the pipeline operator for monitoring the external corrosion protection systems applied to pipelines and describes the practices used by the British Pipeline Agency to maintain the integrity of some 2,500 km of pipelines. More than half of the network was constructed in the 1940s and water later replaced during the 1960s and 1970s with coated and welded pipe. Until the late 1970s, the lines were coated with either a conventional hot bitumen or coal tar flood coat enamel with a fiber glass insert and impregnated outer wrap. Later, extruded polyethylene was used. Welded joints were coated with either hot- or cold-applied tapes. Cathodic protection (CP) was gradually applied from the mid-1950s until the entire network was completed in 1970.

  1. Installing and maintaining gear pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmire, K.

    1996-03-01

    While not as common as centrifugal pumps in the CPI, gear pumps play important roles in handling many of today`s more difficult-to-pump fluids. Because they operate at lower speeds -- generally, 900 rpm or less -- their seals and bearings tend to last longer than those of centrifugal models. In addition, unlike centrifugal pumps, gear pumps` flows are independent of their systems` pressure curves, and they can handle a wider range of viscosities. Although high-flow, low-head applications remain the domain of centrifugal pumps, the use of gear pumps is increasing in the chemical process industries (CPI). While some application boundaries between gears and centrifugals are blurring, there are some crucial differences between the way the two are operated and maintained -- for example, where pressure relief is concerned. This article provides a general summary of gear pump characteristics and applications, highlighting critical aspects of installation, operation and maintenance.

  2. When to maintain centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Karassik, I.J.

    1993-04-01

    Centrifugal pumps comprise critical maintenance equipment. The rationale of when to maintain them relates to a spreading tendency to contain costs in the face of tight money. Plant managers are thus entitled to a thorough analysis of whether reduced expenditures truly lower costs or actually hinder maintenance and increase costs. Absence of such an analysis hides the fact that proper and timely maintenance has a double effect: it not only reduces power consumption but also extends equipment life, and thus reduces the frequency of labor and material expenditures for scheduled or crisis maintenance. Centrifugal pump maintenance can demonstrate well the validity of this observation. The paper discusses: restoring internal clearances; real cost of renewing clearances; and monitoring clearances and pump performance.

  3. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  4. Maintaining polarization in polarimetric multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Erik; Turcotte, Raphaël; Daradich, Amy; Sadetsky, Grégory; Gravel, Pierre; Bachand, Karine; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel C

    2015-11-01

    Polarimetric measurements in multiphoton microscopy can reveal information about the local molecular order of a sample. However, the presence of a dichroic through which the excitation beam propagates will generally scramble its polarization. We propose a simple scheme whereby a second properly-oriented compensation dichroic is used to negate any alteration regardless of the wavelength and the initial polarization. We demonstrate how this robust and rapid approach simplifies polarimetric measurements in second-harmonic generation, two-photon excited fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Illustration of the polarization maintaining strategy with the compensating dichroic oriented such that its s- and p-axes are interchanged with these of the primary dichroic. PMID:25691172

  5. SOCIAL SCIENCE University College Dublin

    E-print Network

    Order path Social Media path DN550 #12;*Psychology is not available as a Joint Major subject in Stage 2 rightS, JuStice & Society Path Social meDia Path crime & Social orDer Path eNviroNmeNtal Policy Path of society. Social Science at UCD: > Small-group teaching exclusively for Social Science students > Supports

  6. This major integrates all of the necessary science, social science, humanities, and critical thinking concepts, as well as field experience, needed in order to educate

    E-print Network

    Krylov, Anna I.

    medical student. Students in this major will understand how psychological, cultural, social, economic for students and faculty who work with nonlinear editing systems and interactive media in anthropology. NotableThis major integrates all of the necessary science, social science, humanities, and critical

  7. Classifiers and social control in wheelchair rugby.

    PubMed

    Wu, S K

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the features of wheelchair rugby classifiers in order to maintain social control in wheelchair rugby. The examination centered on the theme-resources used by classifiers to maintain the authority of International Wheelchair Rugby Federation (IWRF). Data were collected using participant observation methodology at national and international wheelchair rugby championships and a survey of the 14 IWRF authorized classifiers. The results of this study identified five essential features of IWRF classifiers. In particular, they need to have a background in medicine or physical therapy. In addition, IWRF classifiers use their medical and sporting knowledge and experience to control the wheelchair rugby classification process and to maintain fairness of competition. The results of this study may help to train Taiwanese professionals with medical or sporting backgrounds to become international classifiers and also to develop appropriate training programs for national classifiers. PMID:11416963

  8. 48 CFR 6.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... continuous availability of a reliable source of supplies or services; (5) Satisfy projected needs based on a... particular source from a contract action in order to establish or maintain an alternative source or sources... all necessary data to support their recommendation to exclude a particular source. (3) When...

  9. 48 CFR 6.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... continuous availability of a reliable source of supplies or services; (5) Satisfy projected needs based on a... particular source from a contract action in order to establish or maintain an alternative source or sources... all necessary data to support their recommendation to exclude a particular source. (3) When...

  10. 48 CFR 6.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... continuous availability of a reliable source of supplies or services; (5) Satisfy projected needs based on a... particular source from a contract action in order to establish or maintain an alternative source or sources... all necessary data to support their recommendation to exclude a particular source. (3) When...

  11. 48 CFR 6.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... continuous availability of a reliable source of supplies or services; (5) Satisfy projected needs based on a... particular source from a contract action in order to establish or maintain an alternative source or sources... all necessary data to support their recommendation to exclude a particular source. (3) When...

  12. Breaking the Sound Barrier: Starting and Maintaining an Audiobook Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Sheldon; Baxter, Beth

    1994-01-01

    Discusses factors for libraries to consider when starting and maintaining an audiobook collection, including patron profiles; funding and budgeting; selection and ordering; listener preferences, including abridged versus unabridged titles; packaging and appearance; shelving and location; and future possibilities. A sidebar provides detailed…

  13. Social Work Experience and Development in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibin, Wang

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the experience and limitations of government-run social work and the nonprofessional nature of social work, and suggests that the rapid development of social work and its professionalization are the inevitable results of the reform in the system. The author maintains that under market socialism, social work requires the…

  14. Explaining Social Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keaton, Shaughan A.; Bodie, Graham D.

    2011-01-01

    Many versions of social constructivism (SC) maintain that objects exist only after they enter communicative space. At one level an object's existence is determined through an individual's sensory perception; through communicative acts, both intra- and interpersonally, they are defined and eventually embody meaning. The social process of defining…

  15. Addressing Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoebel, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that advertising can help people become more aware of social responsibilities. Describes a successful nationwide newspaper advertising competition for college students in which ads address social issues such as literacy, drugs, teen suicide, and teen pregnancy. Notes how the ads have helped grassroots programs throughout the United…

  16. Making views self-maintainable for data warehousing

    SciTech Connect

    Quass, D.; Widom, J.; Gupta, A.; Mumick, I.S.

    1996-12-31

    A data warehouse stores materialized views over data from one or more sources in order to provide fast access to the integrated data, regardless of the availability of the data sources. Warehouse views need to be maintained in response to changes to the base data in the sources. Except for very simple views, maintaining a warehouse view requires access to data that is not available in the view itself. Hence, to maintain the view, one either has to query the data sources or store auxiliary data in the warehouse. We show that by using key and referential integrity constraints, we often can maintain a select-project-join view without going to the data sources or replicating the base relations in their entirety in the warehouse. We derive a set of auxiliary views such that the warehouse view and the auxiliary views together are self-maintainable-they can be maintained without going to the data sources or replicating all base data. In addition, our technique can be applied to simplify traditional materialized view maintenance by exploiting key and referential integrity constraints.

  17. Analyzing Determinations: Understanding and Evaluating the Production of Social Outcomes in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apple, Michael W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the need to relate an understanding of the experience of schooling to the cultural and economic conditions of society. The work of Paul Willis is used to exemplify the processes by which a dominant class establishes ideological hegemony and legitimates and maintains an existing social order. (Author/MLF)

  18. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Uchida, Satoshi; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustainable by punishing the second-order free riders. This suggests that considering the interdependence of reward and punishment may help to better understand the origins and transitions of social norms and institutions. PMID:25753335

  19. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Uchida, Satoshi; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-03-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustainable by punishing the second-order free riders. This suggests that considering the interdependence of reward and punishment may help to better understand the origins and transitions of social norms and institutions.

  20. [Social medicine and social engineering].

    PubMed

    Qvarsell, R

    1995-01-01

    In a rather complicated process starting at the middle of the 19th century and ending hundred years later social medicine was established as a science. Different theories on the social origin of the diseases and even different perspectives on the role of medicine in society did influence and shape the new discipline. The tradition from Rudolf Virchow and Alfred Grotjahn emphasizing the importance of the social causes of the diseases and the tradition from social hygiene with its stress on the hereditarian background of many diseases was mixed together in the early history of social medicine. Many of those trying to establish the new discipline thought that it could be used in order to prevent the spreading of diseases in society and also hinder the development of social maladjustments of different kinds, as for instance criminality and vagrancy. The political framework of social medicine was very much related to what in the Swedish debate later on was to be called social engineering. Both within the tradition of social liberalism and the social democratic party the ideals of a rational society governed by experts was very influential in the period between the two world wars. Some of the advocates for social medicine did even try to formulate a political programme with the new science as a base. The most influential of those was the forensic pspychiatrist Olof Kinberg (1873-1960). In a series of books and articles during the first half of the 19th century Kinberg developed a theory of a society governed by doctors educated within this new branch of science. He thought that almost every kind of social problem could be handled by these experts. Social maladjustment, criminality and even car accidents could be reduced to a minimum if only the new knowledge of the biological and medical causes of human behavior was allowed to influence the social and political organization of the society. Especially during the 1930s some politicians and also social scientists thought that politics in the future had to be some kind of applied science. In order to govern a complicated society it was necessary to use the knowledge developed within the sciences dealing with the relation between man and society. After the second world war this way of thinking was a little bit obsolete, but it did influence many of those working within the public sphere as administrators and experts. PMID:11624759

  1. Neurosteroids; potential underpinning roles in maintaining homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Behrouz; Ghasemi, Rasoul; Dargahi, Leila; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Haeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The neuroactive steroids which are synthesized in the brain and nervous system are known as "Neurosteroids". These steroids have crucial functions such as contributing to the myelination and organization of the brain connectivity. Under the stressful circumstances, the concentrations of neurosteroid products such as allopregnanolone (ALLO) and allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC) alter. It has been suggested that these stress-derived neurosteroids modulate the physiological response to stress. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis mediates the physiological adaptation following stress in order to maintain homeostasis. Although several regulatory pathways have been introduced, the exact role of neurosteroids in controlling HPA axis is not clear to date. In this review, we intend to discern specific pathways associated with regulation of HPA axis in which neuroactive steroids have the main role. In this respect, we propose pathways that may be initiated after neurosteroidogenesis in different brain subregions following acute stress which are potentially capable of activating or inhibiting the HPA axis. PMID:26432100

  2. Designing for Maintainability and System Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, Vincent R.; Packard, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The final goal for a delivered system (whether a car, aircraft, avionics box or computer) should be its availability to operate and perform its intended function over its expected design life. Hence, in designing a system, we cannot think in terms of delivering the system and just walking away. The system supplier needs to provide support throughout the operating life of the product. Here, supportability requires an effective combination of reliability, maintainability, logistics and operations engineering (as well as safety engineering) to have a system that is available for its intended use throughout its designated mission lifetime. Maintainability is a key driving element in the effective support and upkeep of the system as well as providing the ability to modify and upgrade the system throughout its lifetime. This paper then, will concentrate on maintainability and its integration into the system engineering and design process. The topics to be covered include elements of maintainability, the total cost of ownership, how system availability, maintenance and logistics costs and spare parts cost effect the overall program costs. System analysis and maintainability will show how maintainability fits into the overall systems approach to project development. Maintainability processes and documents will focus on how maintainability is to be performed and what documents are typically generated for a large scale program. Maintainability analysis shows how trade-offs can be performed for various alternative components. The conclusions summarize the paper and are followed by specific problems for hands-on training.

  3. A New Communication Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Ilana

    This paper argues that literacy needs to be conceived within a broad social order, what Street and others have called a "new communicative order." This new order takes account of the literacy practices associated with screen-based technologies. It recognizes that print-based reading and writing is now only part of what people have to learn to be…

  4. Climbing social media in medicine's hierarchy of needs.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Katherine C; Kind, Terry

    2014-10-01

    The social media and medicine landscape is evolving rapidly. Early research, social media policies, and educational efforts focused on risk avoidance, while more current efforts have encouraged reflection and explored opportunities. This trajectory has affirmed physicians' professional commitment to maintaining public trust in the face of new challenges in the digital age. In this Commentary, the authors propose viewing physicians' social media use as a hierarchy of needs, similar to Maslow's psychological theory which posits that more basic levels of needs must be met before higher, aspirational levels can be fully attained. The three levels in the social media in medicine's hierarchy of needs are Security, Reflection, and Discovery. Critical to this model is respecting the essential need for Security in order to move towards Reflection and into Discovery. The social media in medicine hierarchy of needs pyramid rests on a foundation of Public Trust. How physicians as a profession have responded to past--and continue to respond to present and future--social media challenges to professionalism reveals what matters most: maintaining public trust and honoring the physicians' contract with society. A victory for online professionalism would be providing trainees with the tools and guidance needed to ascend to Discovery, while ensuring that their basic social media needs are first met. To do this, physician educators need to continue increasing trainees' awareness through designing relevant curricula, encouraging reflection, and providing positive role modeling and effective mentorship. PMID:25076202

  5. PRODUCING SALMON TO MAINTAIN COMMERCIAL AND

    E-print Network

    THIS IS A SALMO HATCH PRODUCING SALMON TO MAINTAIN COMMERCIAL AND SPORT FISHERIES SHKT* illiiniltiiiii SALMON HATCHERY? To maintain the resource, enough of the mature salmon entering and destroyed young salmon. To counteract the effects of these, salmon hatcheries are necessary. Hatchery salmon

  6. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  7. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hamilton, Melinda A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Benson, Jennifer (Cockermouth, GB); Green, Martin J. (Wooton, GB); Milner, Timothy N. (Centerville, VA)

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  8. We Call It "Our Language": A Children's Swahili Pidgin Transforms Social and Symbolic Order on a Remote Hillside in Up-Country Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Perry

    2011-01-01

    This study describes a rare Swahili pidgin created by two five-year-old boys, one American and one African. The discussion examines the linguistic and social factors affecting the "origins, maintenance, change and loss" (Hymes 1971) of their language and the place it created for their friendship. This place, constructed by and through language,…

  9. The Lower-Order Expectations of High-Stakes Tests: A Four-State Analysis of Social Studies Standards and Test Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Scott W.; Patterson, Nancy; Blankenship, Whitney; Blevins, Brooke; DiCamillo, Lorrei; Gerwin, David; Gradwell, Jill M.; Gunn, John; Maddox, Lamont; Salinas, Cinthia; Saye, John; Stoddard, Jeremy; Sullivan, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    This study indicates that the state-mandated high-stakes social studies assessments in four states do not require students to demonstrate that they have met the cognitive demands articulated in the state-mandated learning standards. Further, the assessments do not allow students to demonstrate the critical thinking skills required by the…

  10. Existing computer applications, maintain or redesign: how to decide

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, L.

    1981-01-01

    Maintenance of large applications programs is an aspect of performance management that has been largely ignored by those studies that attempt to bring structure to the software production environment. Maintenance in this paper means: fixing bugs, modifying current design features, adding enhancements, and porting applications to other computer systems. It is often difficult to decide whether to maintain or redesign. One reason for the difficulty is that good models and methods do not exist for differentiating between those programs that should be maintained and those that should be redesigned. This enigma is illustrated by the description of a large application case study. The application was monitored for maintenance effort, thereby providing some insight into the redesign/maintain decision. Those tools which currently exist for the collection and measurement of performance data are highlighted. Suggestions are then made for yet other categories of data, difficult to collect and measure, yet ultimately necessary for the establishment of accurate predictions about the value of maintaining versus the value of redesigning. Finally, it is concluded that this aspect of performance management deserves increased attention in order to establish better guidelines with which to aid management in making the necessary but difficult decision: maintain or redesign.

  11. Maintaining patient satisfaction in a hospital reorganization.

    PubMed

    Keating, T P; Arana, G A

    1995-01-01

    A review of inpatient satisfaction data for MUSC provides both comfort and cause for additional study. Although overall satisfaction rates of 89 and 88 during the period of organizational change indicate stable patient perceptions, one must reflect upon these scores in greater detail. For example, although survey response rates in the 36 percent to 28 percent range appear customary for this type of survey, absolute numbers of discharge responses averaged 496 for the four quarters reported. Some confidence can be taken in the fact that overall survey scores were highly consistent in the 89 to 88 range for the entire reporting period. Moreover, the fact that workforce performance variables such as medication errors and patient occurrence reports did not change indicates that patient care did not deteriorate during this period. Although one could argue that in a time of workforce reduction, employees may work more diligently in order to ensure job security, and that work deterioration may be more apparent over a longer period of observation, this limited view suggests that, at least in the acute phase, work performance was maintained. Future studies should review the relative effectiveness of the specific strategies adopted by MUSC management to ensure high levels of patient care. For example, although MUSC adopted a fairly comprehensive communications effort, it is difficult to discern whether timeliness, variety, or repetition contributed more to the effectiveness of the communications program. Such information could help managers develop focused change implementation strategies. It appears from the inpatient survey data collected by UHC and from the two work performance monitors that MUSC's approach to change management has been able to preserve acceptable levels of patient satisfaction in the face of significant organizational change. Furthermore, these strategies may have been helpful in countering the turbulence caused by large scale change or, at the very least, insulating the care site from potentially negative effects. PMID:10154276

  12. Social disorder and diagnostic order: the US Mental Hygiene Movement, the Midtown Manhattan study and the development of psychiatric epidemiology in the 20th century

    PubMed Central

    March, Dana; Oppenheimer, Gerald M

    2014-01-01

    Recent scholarship regarding psychiatric epidemiology has focused on shifting notions of mental disorders. In psychiatric epidemiology in the last decades of the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century, mental disorders have been perceived and treated largely as discrete categories denoting an individual’s mental functioning as either pathological or normal. In the USA, this grew partly out of evolving modern epidemiological work responding to the State’s commitment to measure the national social and economic burdens of psychiatric disorders and subsequently to determine the need for mental health services and to survey these needs over time. Notably absent in these decades have been environmentally oriented approaches to cultivating normal, healthy mental states, approaches initially present after World War II. We focus here on a set of community studies conducted in the 1950s, particularly the Midtown Manhattan study, which grew out of a holistic conception of mental health that depended on social context and had a strong historical affiliation with: the Mental Hygiene Movement and the philosophy of its founder, Adolf Meyer; the epidemiological formation of field studies and population surveys beginning early in the 20th century, often with a health policy agenda; the recognition of increasing chronic disease in the USA; and the radical change in orientation within psychiatry around World War II. We place the Midtown Manhattan study in historical context—a complex narrative of social institutions, professional formation and scientific norms in psychiatry and epidemiology, and social welfare theory that begins during the Progressive era (1890-1920) in the USA. PMID:25031047

  13. Mechanisms maintaining grassland biodiversity and ecosystem stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologists need to know how particular processes influence biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We demonstrate how data from biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiments can be used to identify and quantify the classes of mechanisms maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We predicted...

  14. 7 CFR 1430.508 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DAIRY PRODUCTS Dairy Market Loss Assistance Program § 1430.508 Maintaining records. Dairy operations making application for benefits under this program...

  15. Ecology: Tribal Warfare Maintains Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Greig, Duncan; Goddard, Matthew

    2015-07-20

    When two tribes of Myxococcus bacteria attack each other, the most numerous usually wins. Established colonies can therefore resist invaders by outnumbering them. This shows how positive frequency dependence can maintain diversity across spatially structured environments. PMID:26196492

  16. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  17. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  18. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  19. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  20. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining records... accounts must be retained for 3 years after the date of payment to the sheep and lamb operations under...

  1. 7 CFR 1429.113 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ASPARAGUS REVENUE MARKET LOSS ASSISTANCE PAYMENT PROGRAM § 1429...Maintaining records. Producers applying for payment through the Asparagus Revenue Market Loss Assistance Payment Program must...

  2. 7 CFR 1429.113 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ASPARAGUS REVENUE MARKET LOSS ASSISTANCE PAYMENT PROGRAM § 1429...Maintaining records. Producers applying for payment through the Asparagus Revenue Market Loss Assistance Payment Program must...

  3. 7 CFR 1429.113 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ASPARAGUS REVENUE MARKET LOSS ASSISTANCE PAYMENT PROGRAM § 1429...Maintaining records. Producers applying for payment through the Asparagus Revenue Market Loss Assistance Payment Program must...

  4. Creating & Maintaining a Diversity Certificate Program

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Business Development Center · The Culture Building Institute · Diversity Certificate · Customized Diversity hours of employee professional development resulting in a University supported certificate. #12;TheCreating & Maintaining a Diversity Certificate Program Dr. Shanda Gore Associate Vice President

  5. [Comparison of the effects of exchange forms on social solidarity].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Misato; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2012-04-01

    Although social solidarity is an essential component that helps maintaining social order, what produces solidarity and how does it work have not been fully investigated. We conducted an experiment to examine whether experiencing different forms of social exchange produces different levels of solidarity. We compared four forms of social exchange: reciprocal exchange (exchange resources without negotiation), negotiated exchange (with negotiation), pure-generalized exchange (giver can choose who to give) and chain-generalized exchange (giver cannot choose who to give). Two dimensions classify these exchanges: the number of players (two vs. more than two), and involvement of negotiation. Reciprocal and negotiated exchanges occur within dyads, while pure- and chain-generalized exchanges involve three or more players. Only the negotiated exchange involves negotiation process; the other exchanges are purely unilateral giving. Participants played a one-shot social dilemma game (SDG) before and after social exchange session. The more the players cooperated in SDG, the stronger the social solidarity. Results show that the cooperation rate in SDG increased more in the reciprocal, pure- and chain-generalized exchange conditions than that in the negotiated exchange condition, suggesting that social solidarity is facilitated by experiencing social exchange which does not involve negotiation. PMID:22715536

  6. Predictors of maintained high-risk behaviors among impoverished women.

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, A M; Bennett, C; Leake, B

    1995-01-01

    The researchers sought to explore and describe the demographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and behavioral factors associated with the continued risky behavior of a convenience sample of homeless and drug-addicted women two to four weeks after they had completed an AIDS education program. The sample included 942 crack users and 767 women who had multiple sex partners. Analyses revealed that impoverished women who maintained multiple sexual partners were less likely to be in drug recovery programs than in homeless shelters. They were more likely to share needles and be involved sexually with male injection drug users compared with impoverished women who did not maintain multiple sexual partners. Persistent crack users were older than those who reported cessation of crack use, were more often African American, and were more likely to have sex partners who were injecting drug users. Women who demonstrated less improvement in depression and distress scores, concerns, use of affective coping, appraisal of threat, and social support were more likely to maintain crack use and multiple partners. The study's implications for the design of intervention programs aimed at risk reduction based on ethnicity are discussed. PMID:7480615

  7. Social Norms Social Preferences?

    E-print Network

    Strien, Sebastian van

    Social Norms or Social Preferences? Ken Binmore Economics Department University College London economists argue that the hon- oring of social norms can be adequately modeled as the op- timization of social utility functions in which the welfare of others appears as an explicit argument. This paper

  8. An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Recruitment Patterns on RDS Estimates among a Socially Ordered Population of Female Sex Workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Yamanis, Thespina J.; Merli, M. Giovanna; Neely, William Whipple; Tian, Felicia Feng; Moody, James; Tu, Xiaowen; Gao, Ersheng

    2013-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a method for recruiting “hidden” populations through a network-based, chain and peer referral process. RDS recruits hidden populations more effectively than other sampling methods and promises to generate unbiased estimates of their characteristics. RDS’s faithful representation of hidden populations relies on the validity of core assumptions regarding the unobserved referral process. With empirical recruitment data from an RDS study of female sex workers (FSWs) in Shanghai, we assess the RDS assumption that participants recruit nonpreferentially from among their network alters. We also present a bootstrap method for constructing the confidence intervals around RDS estimates. This approach uniquely incorporates real-world features of the population under study (e.g., the sample’s observed branching structure). We then extend this approach to approximate the distribution of RDS estimates under various peer recruitment scenarios consistent with the data as a means to quantify the impact of recruitment bias and of rejection bias on the RDS estimates. We find that the hierarchical social organization of FSWs leads to recruitment biases by constraining RDS recruitment across social classes and introducing bias in the RDS estimates. PMID:24288418

  9. Making multiple views self-maintainable in a data warehouse Weifa Liang a,1

    E-print Network

    Liang, Weifa

    Making multiple views self-maintainable in a data warehouse Weifa Liang a,1 , Hui Li b,2 , Hui Wang of Queensland, St. Lucia QLD 4072, Australia Abstract A data warehouse collects and maintains a large amount-project-join (SPJ) views, how can we ®nd and minimize the auxiliary data stored in a data warehouse in order to make

  10. Page 1 of 3 Revised 06/11/07 Southeast Regional Best Management Practices for Maintaining

    E-print Network

    Delaplane, Keith S.

    . 9. One European drone source colony should be maintained for every 10 colonies in order to reduce supercedure queens mating with AHB drones. A drone source is defined as a colony specifically maintained with 3 to 5 frames of 90% drone comb. #12;Page 2 of 3 Revised 06/11/07 10. To prevent potential

  11. SocialAnthropology Social Anthropology

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    156 SocialAnthropology Social Anthropology Degree options MA (Single Honours Degree) Social Anthropology MA (Joint Honours Degrees) Social Anthropology and one of: Ancient History Arabic Art History Anthropology Geography with Social Anthropology Social Anthropology with Geography Entrance Requirements (see

  12. SocialAnthropology Social Anthropology

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    146 SocialAnthropology Social Anthropology Degree options MA (Single Honours Degree) Social Anthropology MA (Joint Honours Degrees) Social Anthropology and one of: Ancient History Arabic Art History Anthropology Geography with Social Anthropology Social Anthropology with Geography Entrance Requirements (see

  13. Undergraduate Sustainable Development Research Funding for Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 In order to understand thedynamics of globalization and the interconnectedness of our social and natural systems,

    E-print Network

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Undergraduate Sustainable Development Research Funding for Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 In order application deadline is: October 26, 2015 Spring/Summer 2016 application deadline is: February 15, 2016University, through a generousgift, to support fieldresearch for current Columbia University undergraduates studying

  14. Automated Methods to Maintain Aircraft Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauderdale, Todd

    2011-01-01

    The air traffic control system in the United States has a great track-record for safety. As more aircraft enter the system at a given time, the situation becomes more complex though. Researchers at NASA are attempting to leverage advances in many fields including optimization, data mining, and numerical modeling of systems to improve the air-transportation system maintaining safety while increasing throughput and reducing delays. This talk will give a brief overview of the research at NASA towards modernizing the air-transportation system. It will then focus on the specific area of automation tools for maintaining physical separation between aircraft known as Separation Assurance.

  15. Domain specificity in social interactions, social thought, and social development.

    PubMed

    Turiel, Elliot

    2010-01-01

    J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) have taken good steps in formulating a domain-specific view of parent-child interactions. This commentary supports the introduction of domain specificity to analyses of parenting. Their formulation is an advance over formulations that characterized parental practices globally. This commentary calls for inclusion of definitions of the classification system of domain-specific interactions and criteria for each domain. It is also maintained that Grusec and Davidov's domains of social interaction imply that processes of development are involved, along with socialization; that bidirectionality in parent-child relations needs to be extended to include mutual influences and the construction of domains of social thought; and that conflicts and opposition within families coexist with compliance and social harmony. PMID:20573100

  16. Training Worksheet Job Aid Maintained by Corporate Education, Development & Training (CEDT)

    E-print Network

    Siefert, Chris

    Training Worksheet Job Aid Maintained by Corporate Education, Development & Training (CEDT) Purchase Order A. General Awareness Sandia-Specific Training -- Initial and Refresher Training Program/ Hazards Title Course Number Annual Counterintelligence Training Members of the Workforce who process

  17. Study of eliminating fire dampers to maintain process confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.L. ); Walling, R.C.; Patel, J.B.; Strunk, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fire dampers are required by NFPA 90A to maintain the integrity of fire areas. However, several fire dampers in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Vitrification Building at the Savannah River site are proposed to be eliminated in order to maintain the integrity of the process confinement system. In accordance with NFPA (1989), the closing operation of each fire damper should be tested biannually. Fire damper testing must consider the situation where there is a damper hangup in tripping or resetting taking several minutes or more. A fire will also close these dampers. Bechtel performed a fire damper simulation study of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system with a computer model. The study showed that 39 of 103 fire dampers, closed one at a time, causes ventilation system backflow, which upsets the integrity of the process confinement system. Elimination of the fire dampers will prevent a backflow upset.

  18. Social Networking and the Social and Emotional Wellbeing of Adolescents in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Amanda; Bower, Julie; Carroll, Annemaree

    2014-01-01

    Technology and social networking tools and sites are changing the way young people build and maintain their social connections with others (Boyd & Ellison, 2008). This study utilised a new measure, The Self in a Social Context, Virtual Connectedness subscale (SSC-VC subscale), to examine the effects of social networking tools and sites on…

  19. Halema'uma'u Maintains Basic Geometry

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The lava lake at Halema'uma'u has maintained the same basic geometry since February of this year. This thermal image was taken during a helicopter overflight, and shows the lava surface deep within the vent cavity. The lava surface is kidney-shaped and approximately 60 x 90 meters in size, and situa...

  20. Maintaining ideal body weight counseling sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, S.H.

    1980-10-09

    The purpose of this program is to provide employees with the motivation, knowledge and skills necessary to maintain ideal body weight throughout life. The target audience for this program, which is conducted in an industrial setting, is the employee 40 years of age or younger who is at or near his/her ideal body weight.

  1. How Do Positive Views Maintain Life Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Tsai, Ying-Mei; Chen, Lung Hung

    2009-01-01

    This study proposes three mediation pathways to explain how the positive views (perceived control, optimism and self-enhancement) proposed by Cummins and Nistico (Journal of Happiness Studies 3:37-69 2002) maintain life satisfaction. The three pathways were enhancing self-esteem, reducing have-want discrepancy and changing importance perceptions.…

  2. Maintaining Clones through Eclipse Refactoring Extensions

    E-print Network

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Maintaining Clones through Eclipse Refactoring Extensions Robert Tairas (tairasr@cis.uab.edu) Jeff and Information Sciences University of Alabama at Birmingham · Clone detection tools provide an automated way to discover sections of duplicated code. · Clone analysis helps determine a group of clones to remove

  3. Can punishment maintain sex? Daniel J. Rankin

    E-print Network

    Rankin, Daniel

    as they are able to reproduce twice as fast. Explaining why sexual reproduction is favoured over asexual be one way in which sexual reproduction could be maintained in groups of animals; in light of recent (Maynard Smith 1978). Sexual reproduction represents a paradox, because any allele which reproduces

  4. Service Center Billing Maintaining Accounts Receivable for

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    Service Center Billing Procedures Maintaining Accounts Receivable for External Customers 1 #12;LOG on "Approve" 13 #12;INITIALIZE A REQUEST · SELF SERVICE · A customer reserving machine time may be "self service". · After a customer submits an initial request for machine time, the request will be marked

  5. Maintaining Interest in Operator Requal Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, H. J., Jr.

    A study reviewed operator training programs at Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station to determine their interface with plant operations and to devise new ways of maintaining interest in requalification (requal) training. The operator training review committee that was formed to implement the review documented over 100 issues and concerns…

  6. [Social pain].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2011-09-01

    This chapter focuses on what social pain is and how it should be managed. In order to understand social pain in a cancer patient, it is necessary to recognize the change in the patient's daily life after the diagnosis of cancer. Because the degree of suffering and the relationships with family members and the people he or she worked with differ from patient to patient, it is important to note that the context of social pain is different in each patient. Five points shown below are essential in managing social pain. 1. Economical suffering may be alleviated by utilization of the social security system while taking into account each patient's standard of living. 2. Burdens on family members should be lessened, such as by not having them stay at the patient's bedside every day and letting them go home occasionally. 3. The normal patterns of communication, support, and conflict in the family should be identified, and the extent to which they have been disrupted by the illness should be assessed. 4. It is important to understand the ethnic, cultural, and religious background of the patient and the potential impact of their influence on the individual and the illness. 5. Practical or emotional unfinished business that the patient has needs to be identified, and efforts should be made to support fulfillment. PMID:21950034

  7. Effects of Multisensory Environments on Stereotyped Behaviours Assessed as Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Lindsay; Trusler, Karen; Furniss, Frederick; Lancioni, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the sensory equipment provided in a multi-sensory environment (MSE) and the level of social contact provided on levels of stereotyped behaviours assessed as being maintained by automatic reinforcement. Method: Stereotyped and engaged behaviours of two young people with severe…

  8. Furloughs and Faculty Management of Time: Maintaining Quality in an Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Loring; Hohman, Melinda; Mathiesen, Sally; Finnegan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An anonymous Web-based survey was used to gather the perceptions and experiences from 114 faculty members teaching in 16 social work programs in the California State University system about the effect of severe budget cuts on their educational activities. Most respondents reported they worked on their furlough days and maintained the same or…

  9. Managing your health and Maintaining mental Kate Thomas (GP) and Joanna Blakely (wellbeing consultant)

    E-print Network

    Buckling, Angus

    to include exercise, sleep, social life, study, relaxation into your time · If you have sex be carefulManaging your health and Maintaining mental wellbeing Kate Thomas (GP) and Joanna Blakely (wellbeing consultant) #12;Student Health Centre · Reed Mews, opposite Wellbeing Centre · Branch surgery

  10. Influence of Reciprocal links in Social Networks

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Yu-Xiao; Sun, Gui-Quan; Tang, Ming; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we empirically study the influence of reciprocal links, in order to understand its role in affecting the structure and function of directed social networks. Experimental results on two representative datesets, Sina Weibo and Douban, demonstrate that the reciprocal links indeed play a more important role than non-reciprocal ones in both spreading information and maintaining the network robustness. In particular, the information spreading process can be significantly enhanced by considering the reciprocal effect. In addition, reciprocal links are largely responsible for the connectivity and efficiency of directed networks. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding and application of the reciprocal effect in directed online social networks.

  11. Transformative Pedagogy for Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores ways in which pedagogy for an elaborated form of transformative learning can be a useful catalyst for the development of social capital in community and workplace groups and networks. I begin with an example and then explore ideas of learning challenges embedded in building and maintaining social capital. I consider the…

  12. Mental Models in Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo; Santamaria, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors introduce a new way to analyze cognitive change during social interactions, based on the mental model theory of reasoning. From this approach, cognitive performance can be improved for solving problems that require multiple models when participants in a social interaction group maintain qualitatively different models of…

  13. Teaching and Maintaining Ethical Behavior in a Professional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Brodhead, Matthew T.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to continuing education mandates by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), behavior-analytic professional organizations may adopt systems that teach and maintain ethical behavior in its employees. Systems of ethical supervision and management may allow for an organization to customize training that prevents ethical misconduct by employees. These systems may also allow supervisors to identify ethical problems in their infancy, allowing the organization to mitigate concerns before they further develop. Systems of ethical management and supervision also may help to improve services and promote consumer protection. Additional benefits might include both avoiding litigation and loss of consumers and income. These systems may promote the field of Behavior Analysis as a desirable, consumer-friendly approach to solving socially significant behavior problems. PMID:23730470

  14. Autophagy maintains stemness by preventing senescence.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Ortet, Laura; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Rebollo, Elena; Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanessa; Gutarra, Susana; Ballestar, Esteban; Serrano, Antonio L; Sandri, Marco; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    During ageing, muscle stem-cell regenerative function declines. At advanced geriatric age, this decline is maximal owing to transition from a normal quiescence into an irreversible senescence state. How satellite cells maintain quiescence and avoid senescence until advanced age remains unknown. Here we report that basal autophagy is essential to maintain the stem-cell quiescent state in mice. Failure of autophagy in physiologically aged satellite cells or genetic impairment of autophagy in young cells causes entry into senescence by loss of proteostasis, increased mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, resulting in a decline in the function and number of satellite cells. Re-establishment of autophagy reverses senescence and restores regenerative functions in geriatric satellite cells. As autophagy also declines in human geriatric satellite cells, our findings reveal autophagy to be a decisive stem-cell-fate regulator, with implications for fostering muscle regeneration in sarcopenia. PMID:26738589

  15. Maintaining professional resilience through group restorative supervision.

    PubMed

    Wallbank, Sonya

    2013-08-01

    Restorative clinical supervision has been delivered to over 2,500 professionals and has shown to be highly effective in reducing burnout, stress and increasing compassion satisfaction. Demand for the programme has shown that a sustainable model of implementation is needed for organisations who may not be able to invest in continued individual sessions. Following the initial six sessions, group restorative supervision has been developed and this paper reports on the programme's success in maintaining and continuing to improve compassion satisfaction, stress and burnout through the process of restorative group supervision. This means that organisations can continue to maintain the programme once the initial training has been completed and have confidence within the restorative group supervision to support professionals in managing the emotional demands of their role. The restorative groups have also had inadvertent positive benefits in workplace functioning. The paper outlines how professionals have been able to use this learning to support them in being more effective. PMID:23986988

  16. What does God know? Supernatural agents' access to socially strategic and non-strategic information.

    PubMed

    Purzycki, Benjamin G; Finkel, Daniel N; Shaver, John; Wales, Nathan; Cohen, Adam B; Sosis, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about supernatural agents' socially strategic knowledge more quickly than non-strategic knowledge. Furthermore, agents' knowledge of immoral and uncooperative social behaviors should be especially accessible to people. To examine these hypotheses, we measured response-times to questions about the knowledge attributed to four different agents--God, Santa Claus, a fictional surveillance government, and omniscient but non-interfering aliens--that vary in their omniscience, moral concern, ability to punish, and how supernatural they are. As anticipated, participants respond more quickly to questions about agents' socially strategic knowledge than non-strategic knowledge, but only when agents are able to punish. PMID:22462490

  17. How the past weighs on the present: social representations of history and their role in identity politics.

    PubMed

    Liu, James H; Hilton, Denis J

    2005-12-01

    Socially shared representations of history have been important in creating, maintaining and changing a people's identity. Their management and negotiation are central to interethnic and international relations. We present a narrative framework to represent how collectively significant events become (selectively) incorporated in social representations that enable positioning of ethnic, national and supranational identities. This perspective creates diachronic (temporal) links between the functional (e.g. realistic conflict theory), social identity, and cognitive perspectives on intergroup relations. The charters embedded in these representations condition nations with similar interests to adopt different political stances in dealing with current events, and can influence the perceived stability and legitimacy of social orders. They are also instrumental in determining social identity strategies for reacting to negative social comparisons, and can influence the relationships between national and ethnic identities. PMID:16368018

  18. Interventions to Maintain Mobility: What Works?

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lesley A.; Schmidt, Erica L.; Ball, Karlene

    2012-01-01

    Mobility, in broad terms, includes everything from the ability to move within your immediate environment (e.g., get out of bed) to the ability to drive across the country. Mobility is essential to maintaining independence and wellbeing, particularly for older adults. This is highlighted by the large number of interventions developed for older adults with the goal of maintaining such mobility. The current paper reviews the state of the science with respect to mobility interventions. Inclusion criteria for the review were: (1) articles must have been peer-reviewed; (2) interventions were evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT); (3) studies included a mobility outcome such as lifespace, driving, or walking ability, (4) studies included a sample of healthy community-dwelling older adults (e.g., not investigations of disease conditions); and (5) studies reported enough empirical data and detail such that results could potentially be replicated. Three main types of interventions were identified: cognitive training, educational interventions, and exercise interventions. A detailed summary and evaluation of each type of intervention, and the current evidence regarding its effectiveness in maintaining mobility, are discussed. Several interventions show clear evidence of effectiveness, and thus are prime areas for translation of results to the older population. Needs and issues for future intervention research are also detailed. PMID:23083492

  19. Alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) while driving.

    PubMed

    Oron-Gilad, Tal; Ronen, Adi; Shinar, David

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of alertness maintaining tasks (AMTs) on driver performance, subjective feelings, and psychophysiological state in monotonous simulated driving in two experiments. In the first experiment, 12 professional truck drivers participated in five sessions of simulated driving: driving only, driving with one of three AMTs (counterbalanced), and driving while listening to music. AMTs were not equally effective in maintaining alertness. The trivia AMT prevented driving performance deterioration, and increased alertness (measured by standardized HRV). The choice reaction time AMT was least demanding but also increased subjective sleepiness and reduced arousal (measured by alpha/beta ratio). The working memory AMT caused a significant decrement in driving speed, increased subjective fatigue, and was regarded by the participants as detrimental to driving. Trivia was preferred by the majority of the drivers over the other two AMTs. Experiment 2 further examined the utility of the trivia AMT. When the drivers engaged in the trivia AMT they maintained better driving performance and perceived the driving duration as shorter than the control condition. The two experiments demonstrated that AMTs can have a positive effect on alertness. The effect is localized in the sense that it does not persist beyond the period of the AMT activation. PMID:18460351

  20. The role of infrasounds in maintaining whale herds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Roger S.

    2001-05-01

    For whales and dolphins a basic social unit is the herd. In several species, herds have been observed to maintain the same speed, direction, and membership overnight, and while swimming in waters of near-zero visibility-evidence that individuals can stay together using nonvisual cues. The most likely such cue is sound. If whale herds are held together with sound, yet we define herds as groups of whales seen moving together, then we are using visual criteria to judge what is an acoustic phenomenon, and our conclusions about a most basic unit of cetacean social structure, the herd, are at least incomplete, and, quite possibly, worthless. By calling herds, heards, we remind ourselves that sound controls herd size. We then consider that some whale infrasound can propagate across deep water at useful intensities (even in today's ship-noise-polluted ocean) for thousands of kilometers. The distance to which blue and fin whale sounds propagate before falling below background noise is given, and the possible advantages these whales obtain from such sounds is explored. The conclusion is that by sharing information on food finds infrasonically, fin and blue whales may have developed a way to divide up the food resources of an entire ocean.

  1. Design guidelines for remotely maintainable equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Margaret M.; Manouchehri, Davoud

    1988-01-01

    The quantity and complexity of on-orbit assets will increase significantly over the next decade. Maintaining and servicing these costly assets represent a difficult challenge. Three general methods are proposed to maintain equipment while it is still in orbit: an extravehicular activity (EVA) crew can perform the task in an unpressurized maintenance area outside any space vehicle; an intravehicular activity (IVA) crew can perform the maintenance in a shirt sleeve environment, perhaps at a special maintenance work station in a space vehicle; or a telerobotic manipulator can perform the maintenance in an unpressurized maintenance area at a distance from the crew (who may be EVA, IVA, or on the ground). However, crew EVA may not always be possible; the crew may have other demands on their time that take precedence. In addition, the orbit of the tasks themselves may be impossible for crew entry. Also crew IVA may not always be possible as option for equipment maintenance. For example, the equipment may be too large to fit through the vehicle airlock. Therefore, in some circumstances, the third option, telerobotic manipulation, may be the only feasible option. Telerobotic manipulation has, therefore, an important role for on-orbit maintenance. It is not only used for the reasons outlined above, but also used in some cases as backup to the EVA crew in an orbit that they can reach.

  2. To Grow, Nurture, and Maintain: Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, I.; Lam, K.; Hennelly, L. O.; Archie, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The importance and difficulties encountered in a sustainable urban farm can be witnessed at the Stanford Earth Systems Educational Garden, in the growth, maintenance, and nurturing of the soil. Techniques and chemicals developed in the mid to late 1900's have infiltrated the traditional farming techniques that allowed humans to continuously farm for hundreds of years. The sudden spur of interest in sustainability has lead many, including Stanford Earth Systems, to reincorporate traditional methods in conjunction with modern technology. To override the damage made by chemicals and industrial farming, we had to recognize that healthy crops originated from healthy soil; thus we began investigating how to nourish soil. We began to research the ideal composition and structure of soil and methods to create and maintain fertile soil. Secondly, we prioritized the importance of nurturing plants and fed the plants with a plethora of natural fertilizers. We also created a compost pile so that the soil could rehabilitate and refill with nutrients with help provided by bacteria. Lastly, we had to maintain the soil to keep the soil viable for future crops. To do this, we had to acknowledge the chemical composition of the soil and plant cover crops to ensure that the nutrients are replenished. Our experiences enabled us to understand the time and effort required to manage suitable crops, animals, and structures for an urban farm.

  3. Maintaining heterokaryosis in pseudo-homothallic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Grognet, Pierre; Silar, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among all the strategies displayed by fungi to reproduce and propagate, some species have adopted a peculiar behavior called pseudo-homothallism. Pseudo-homothallic fungi are true heterothallics, i.e., they need 2 genetically-compatible partners to mate, but they produce self-fertile mycelium in which the 2 different nuclei carrying the compatible mating types are present. This lifestyle not only enables the fungus to reproduce without finding a compatible partner, but also to cross with any mate it may encounter. However, to be fully functional, pseudo-homothallism requires maintaining heterokaryosis at every stage of the life cycle. We recently showed that neither the structure of the mating-type locus nor hybrid-enhancing effect due to the presence of the 2 mating types accounts for the maintenance of heterokaryosis in the pseudo-homothallic fungus P. anserina. In this addendum, we summarize the mechanisms creating heterokaryosis in P. anserina and 2 other well-known pseudo-homothallic fungi, Neurospora tetrasperma and Agaricus bisporus. We also discuss mechanisms potentially involved in maintaining heterokaryosis in these 3 species. PMID:26479494

  4. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research. PMID:26078711

  5. What is social about social perception research?

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, Christoph; von dem Hagen, Elisabeth; Plaisted-Grant, Kate C.; Edmonds, James J.; Ayorinde, John O.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Davis, Greg

    2012-01-01

    A growing consensus in social cognitive neuroscience holds that large portions of the primate visual brain are dedicated to the processing of social information, i.e., to those aspects of stimuli that are usually encountered in social interactions such as others' facial expressions, actions, and symbols. Yet, studies of social perception have mostly employed simple pictorial representations of conspecifics. These stimuli are social only in the restricted sense that they physically resemble objects with which the observer would typically interact. In an equally important sense, however, these stimuli might be regarded as “non-social”: the observer knows that they are viewing pictures and might therefore not attribute current mental states to the stimuli or might do so in a qualitatively different way than in a real social interaction. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of such higher-order conceptualization of the stimulus for social perceptual processing. Here, we assess the similarity between the various types of stimuli used in the laboratory and object classes encountered in real social interactions. We distinguish two different levels at which experimental stimuli can match social stimuli as encountered in everyday social settings: (1) the extent to which a stimulus' physical properties resemble those typically encountered in social interactions and (2) the higher-level conceptualization of the stimulus as indicating another person's mental states. We illustrate the significance of this distinction for social perception research and report new empirical evidence further highlighting the importance of mental state attribution for perceptual processing. Finally, we discuss the potential of this approach to inform studies of clinical conditions such as autism. PMID:23355814

  6. How do we make friends and why: An investigation into the human social brain 

    E-print Network

    Brockerhoff, Maja Andrea

    2008-06-27

    The Social Brain Hypothesis regards large social groups of primates and particularly in humans as the result of the development of cognitive skills necessary for social interactions. However, it has not yet been discovered how humans can maintain...

  7. Social and Cognitive Correlates of Children’s Lying Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Victoria; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    The relation between children’s lie-telling and their social and cognitive development was examined. Children (3 - 8 years) were told not to peek at a toy. Most children peeked and later lied about peeking. Children’s subsequent verbal statements were not always consistent with their initial denial and leaked critical information revealing their deceit. Children’s conceptual moral understanding of lies, executive functioning, and theory-of-mind understanding were also assessed. Children’s initial false denials were related to their first-order belief understanding and their inhibitory control. Children’s ability to maintain their lies was related to their second-order belief understanding. Children’s lying was related to their moral evaluations. These finding suggest that social and cognitive factors may play an important role in children’s lie-telling abilities. PMID:18717895

  8. Censorship in Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiferth, Berniece B.

    In order to determine how much censorship was taking place in Illinois social studies classes, 200 principals were asked to respond to a questionnaire regarding censorship of teaching methods and social studies textbooks. The principals were asked to respond to the following topics concerning the degree of censorship encountered for each item:…

  9. Social Maladjustment: An Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center, David B.

    The exclusionary term, "social maladjustment," the definition in Public Law 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act) of serious emotional disturbance, has been an enigma for special education. This paper attempts to limit the interpretation of social maladjustment in order to counter effects of such decisions as "Honig vs. Doe" in…

  10. Work Adjustment of the Methadone-Maintained Corporate Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankowitz, Robert; Randell, Joan

    1977-01-01

    The work adjustment of 26 methadone-maintained corporate employees was evaluated. Results indicated: (a) relative to their nonmethadone-maintained coworkers, the methadone-maintained employees had comparable job performance and superior punctuality and attendance; and (b) the methadone-maintained skilled laborers were satisfied with their…

  11. Maintaining human productivity during Mars transit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C.; Billings, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the special nature of the human-machine relationship during a trip to Mars. In particular, the potential for monotony and boredom during a long-duration space voyage and the effect on motivation and productivity can be important considerations to the health and welfare of the crew. For the voyage to Mars, a design may be considered that will purposefully maintain some level of workload for the crew as a preventive measure for the deterioration of productivity that comes with boredom. This paper speculates on these considerations, on the appropriate level of workload for maximum productivity, and on what might be done during the mission to alleviate the problems caused by monotony and boredom.

  12. Sleep disturbances among methadone maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Herman, Debra S; Bishop, Shaughna; Lassor, Joanna A; Weinstock, Marjorie; Anthony, Jennifer; Anderson, Bradley J

    2004-04-01

    We examined the relationship of sleep disturbance and demographic, mental health, drug use and other factors among 225 methadone-maintained individuals. The cohort was 78% Caucasian and 54% male with a mean age of 41 years. Sleep disturbance was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) with a score >5 indicating poor global sleep quality. Eighty-four percent of subjects had PSQI scores of six or higher. In multivariate analysis, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, greater nicotine dependence, bodily pain, and unemployment were associated with poorer global sleep quality (p <.01). Targeting modifiable psychological and medical risk factors that are most strongly associated with sleep disturbance may improve quality of life in drug treatment. PMID:15063910

  13. Maintaining older brain functionality: A targeted review.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Kraft, Eduard; Santana, Silvina; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2015-08-01

    The unprecedented growth in the number of older adults in our society is accompanied by the exponential increase in the number of elderly people who will suffer cognitive decline and dementia in the next decades. This will create an enormous cost for governments, families and individuals. Brain plasticity and its role in brain adaptation to the process of aging is influenced by other changes as a result of co-morbidities, environmental factors, personality traits (psychosocial variables) and genetic and epigenetic factors. This review summarizes recent findings obtained mostly from interventional studies that aim to prevent and/or delay age-related cognitive decline in healthy adults. There are a multitude of such studies. In this paper, we focused our review on physical activity, computerized cognitive training and social enhancement interventions on improving cognition, physical health, independent living and wellbeing of older adults. The methodological limitations of some of these studies, and the need for new multi-domain synergistic interventions, based on current advances in neuroscience and social-brain theories, are discussed. PMID:26054789

  14. Maintaining good morale in old age.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M D

    1997-01-01

    Traditional aging studies have seen life's later years as a time of inevitable biological and social decline. Psychological decline might also be expected, but this is not true for most older people, according to epidemiologic studies. Thus, we must ask: Why is aging not as emotionally threatening as might be expected? Why do some older people do better than others? How should medicine address these issues? It is only possible to understand the successful emotional aging of most elders if the customary diathesis-stress model is supplemented by a developmental perspective. Expectations as well as capacities diminish with aging. This means that subjective health appears more tightly linked with morale than objective health. Some older people experience recurrence of mental disorders (for example, major depression) first present earlier in life. Others experience new disorders such as minor depression in response to biological or social losses. As geriatric medicine comes to increasingly focus on chronic disease, attention to morale is an important strategy for maximizing quality of life. Physicians will need improved skills in the detection and treatment of problems in morale if they are to provide optimum care for their older patients. PMID:9348760

  15. 20 CFR 422.103 - Social security numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Social security numbers. 422.103 Section 422.103 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES General Procedures § 422.103 Social security numbers. (a) General. The Social Security Administration (SSA) maintains a record of the earnings reported for...

  16. Transposition as a mechanism for maintaining telomere length in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Biessmann, H.

    1993-12-31

    Telomeres are structures at the termini of linear chromosomes that serve to maintain the stability of those ends. Several functions have been attributed to telomeres, at least two of these are vital. The vital functions are (a) to {open_quotes}cap{close_quotes} the natural chromosome ends in order to distinguish them from broken ends and, thus, to protect them from recombination, repair, and degradation, and (b) to maintain chromosome length by periodic elongation and, thus, to counteract the inability of DNA polymerases to replicate linear chromosomes completely. While very little is known about capping, the mechanisms of telomere elongation in a number of organisms are being elucidated. Several models for elongation have been proposed. Recent evidence suggests that two of these may operate in different organisms or under different conditions. In many species elongation is accomplished by the interaction of two telomeric DNA repeats. The repeating unit is generally 6-8 basepairs (bp) long and guanine-rich on one strand. The sequence of the repeating unit is evolutionarily conserved, being very similar in ciliated protozoa, flowering plants and vertebrates. The second component is an enzyme, telomerase, that adds more copies of the repeating unit at the terminus. Telomerase resembles reverse transcriptases in structure and carries an associated RNA that is used as a template for the telomere extension.

  17. Oligodendroglia metabolically support axons and maintain structural integrity

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brett M.; Lee, Youngjin; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Axons are specialized extensions of neurons that are critical for the organization of the nervous system. In order to maintain function in axons that often extend some distance from the cell body, specialized mechanisms of energy delivery are likely necessary. Over the last decade, greater understanding of human demyelinating diseases and the development of animal models have suggested that oligodendroglia are critical for maintaining the function of axons. In this review, we will discuss evidence for the vulnerability of neurons to energy deprivation, the importance of oligodendrocytes for axon function and survival, and very recent data suggesting that transfer of energy metabolites from oligodendroglia to axons through monocarboxylate transporter 1 may be critical for the survival of axons. This pathway has important implications both for the basic biology of the nervous system as well as for human neurologic disease. New insights into the role of oligodendroglial biology provide an exciting opportunity for revisions in nervous system biology, understanding myelin-based disorders and in therapeutics development. PMID:23988427

  18. Science, Technology and the Social Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehouse, Ward, Ed.

    The collective theme of these seven essays calls for a new perspective on science and technology so that they are dedicated to the pursuit of truth and human liberties rather than to power, control, and exploitation. The authors of the essays are with various international development and research centers and projects in seven countries. John…

  19. Emotional intelligence, personality, social networks, and social perception 

    E-print Network

    DeBusk, Kendra Portia Adrienne Howard

    -being, such as social network quality. In order to examine how EI related to social networks, both trait and ability EI were measured along with the Big Five factors of personality and social network quality and size. A study of 268 participants investigated...

  20. Communicating contentious geoscience issues and maintaining impartiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nice, S. E.; Mitchell, C.

    2013-12-01

    Shale Gas exploration in the UK has been major and often controversial news in the British media over the last 2 years. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has been an integral part of this story as the UK Governments independent and impartial advisor on geosciences. BGS has been involved in writing policy on fracking and induced earthquakes as well as researching potential quantities of shale gas in the UK and also researching natural methane levels in groundwater before large scale fracking activities begin. Shale Gas in the UK, as in the US and Europe has caused much controversy and as a result has many pro and anti fracking campaigns. The challenge for BGS has been to deliver front line science, whilst maintaining complete impartiality on the subject. The BGS communications team developed a strategy over this period to ensure that our message was clear and strong. This involved working closely with the scientists involved to formulate key messages that could delivered through controlled statements on the BGS webpages, press releases, at press conferences as well as on broadcast and print media. Our scientists were media trained during this time to ensure that they stayed en message and wouldn't be caught by the press or opponents of fracking into making statements that could have been used to either scare up the position or give the antagonist room to cast doubt on our impartiality. This strategy proved highly successful and BGS managed to communicate the facts, remain impartial whilst avoiding attempts to undermine the potential for Shale gas exploitation in the UK. The success of this communication strategy was due to the cooperation of the scientists, a clear strategy from the communications team and the unequivocal support of the senior executive at BGS. This abstract will conclude how the BGS has developed its communication strategy to be more streamlined and open. BGS must allow it's scientists to talk to the media about the science that they do. Much of the research that we do is paid for by the British taxpayer and it's our obligation to make sure we communicate what we're doing and why we're doing it to the public in a transparent and easy to understand way whilst ensuring that we maintain our reputation for being a trusted, independent and impartial source of expert advice.

  1. Nutritional ecology beyond the individual: a conceptual framework for integrating nutrition and social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Buhl, Jerome; Charleston, Michael A; Sword, Gregory A; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, modelling approaches from nutritional ecology (known as Nutritional Geometry) have been increasingly used to describe how animals and some other organisms select foods and eat them in appropriate amounts in order to maintain a balanced nutritional state maximising fitness. These nutritional strategies profoundly affect the physiology, behaviour and performance of individuals, which in turn impact their social interactions within groups and societies. Here, we present a conceptual framework to study the role of nutrition as a major ecological factor influencing the development and maintenance of social life. We first illustrate some of the mechanisms by which nutritional differences among individuals mediate social interactions in a broad range of species and ecological contexts. We then explain how studying individual- and collective-level nutrition in a common conceptual framework derived from Nutritional Geometry can bring new fundamental insights into the mechanisms and evolution of social interactions, using a combination of simulation models and manipulative experiments. PMID:25586099

  2. Virus Movement Maintains Local Virus Population Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Snyder; B. Wiedenheft; M. Lavin; F. Roberto; J. Spuhler; A. Ortmann; T. Douglas; M. Young

    2007-11-01

    Viruses are the largest reservoir of genetic material on the planet, yet little is known about the population dynamics of any virus within its natural environment. Over a 2-year period, we monitored the diversity of two archaeal viruses found in hot springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Both temporal phylogeny and neutral biodiversity models reveal that virus diversity in these local environments is not being maintained by mutation but rather by high rates of immigration from a globally distributed metacommunity. These results indicate that geographically isolated hot springs are readily able to exchange viruses. The importance of virus movement is supported by the detection of virus particles in air samples collected over YNP hot springs and by their detection in metacommunity sequencing projects conducted in the Sargasso Sea. Rapid rates of virus movement are not expected to be unique to these archaeal viruses but rather a common feature among virus metacommunities. The finding that virus immigration rather than mutation can dominate community structure has significant implications for understanding virus circulation and the role that viruses play in ecology and evolution by providing a reservoir of mobile genetic material.

  3. Practical considerations for maintaining germplasm in maize.

    PubMed

    Crossa, J; Taba, S; Eberhart, S A; Bretting, P; Vencovsky, R

    1994-09-01

    The main goals of genetic resource management are to acquire, maintain, distribute, characterize, regenerate, preserve, evaluate, and utilize the genetic diversity of crops and their wild relatives. The objectives of this study for ex-situ conservation of maize (Zea mays L.) are to review and describe: (1) practical regeneration methods that are based on population genetic theory; (2) practical problems encountered in choosing core subsets of a maize collection. Whenever possible, regeneration procedures should control the number of pollen parents (male gametes; through controlled hand pollination) and the number of female parent gametes (by harvesting equal numbers of kernels from each seed plant). When the number of pollen and seed parents are controlled during regeneration, the effective population size (Ne) is twice the size of the original population (N). Examples of practical methods for controlling the number of male and female parents are presented. The procedure involves random-paired plant crosses and taking equal numbers of seeds from each maize ear. To form a core subset, accessions of a maize race are subdivided through a stratified sampling procedure. Delineation of a core subset from a Tuxpeño racial collection is described as an example. PMID:24177775

  4. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  5. Design and Application of the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stromgren, Chel; Terry, Michelle; Crillo, William; Goodliff, Kandyce; Maxwell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conducting human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will present unique challenges in the areas of supportability and maintainability. The durations of proposed missions can be relatively long and re-supply of logistics, including maintenance and repair items, will be limited or non-existent. In addition, mass and volume constraints in the transportation system will limit the total amount of logistics that can be flown along with the crew. These constraints will require that new strategies be developed with regards to how spacecraft systems are designed and maintained. NASA is currently developing Design Reference Missions (DRMs) as an initial step in defining future human missions. These DRMs establish destinations and concepts of operation for future missions, and begin to define technology and capability requirements. Because of the unique supportability challenges, historical supportability data and models are not directly applicable for establishing requirements for beyond LEO missions. However, supportability requirements could have a major impact on the development of the DRMs. The mass, volume, and crew resources required to support the mission could all be first order drivers in the design of missions, elements, and operations. Therefore, there is a need for enhanced analysis capabilities to more accurately establish mass, volume, and time requirements for supporting beyond LEO missions. Additionally, as new technologies and operations are proposed to reduce these requirements, it is necessary to have accurate tools to evaluate the efficacy of those approaches. In order to improve the analysis of supportability requirements for beyond LEO missions, the Space Missions Analysis Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing the Exploration Maintainability Analysis Tool (EMAT). This tool is a probabilistic simulator that evaluates the need for repair and maintenance activities during space missions and the logistics and crew requirements to support those activities. Using a Monte Carlo approach, the tool simulates potential failures in defined systems, based on established component reliabilities, and then evaluates the capability of the crew to repair those failures given a defined store of spares and maintenance items. Statistical analysis of Monte Carlo runs provides probabilistic estimates of overall mission safety and reliability. This paper will describe the operation of the EMAT, including historical data sources used to populate the model, simulation processes, and outputs. Analysis results are provided for a candidate exploration system, including baseline estimates of required sparing mass and volume. Sensitivity analysis regarding the effectiveness of proposed strategies to reduce mass and volume requirements and improve mission reliability is included in these results.

  6. Measuring and assessing maintainability at the end of high level design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briand, Lionel C.; Morasca, Sandro; Basili, Victor R.

    1993-01-01

    Software architecture appears to be one of the main factors affecting software maintainability. Therefore, in order to be able to predict and assess maintainability early in the development process we need to be able to measure the high-level design characteristics that affect the change process. To this end, we propose a measurement approach, which is based on precise assumptions derived from the change process, which is based on Object-Oriented Design principles and is partially language independent. We define metrics for cohesion, coupling, and visibility in order to capture the difficulty of isolating, understanding, designing and validating changes.

  7. Maintaining Homeostasis by Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Christoph W.; Bach, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms need to maintain energetic homeostasis. For many species, this implies taking actions with delayed consequences. For example, humans may have to decide between foraging for high-calorie but hard-to-get, and low-calorie but easy-to-get food, under threat of starvation. Homeostatic principles prescribe decisions that maximize the probability of sustaining appropriate energy levels across the entire foraging trajectory. Here, predictions from biological principles contrast with predictions from economic decision-making models based on maximizing the utility of the endpoint outcome of a choice. To empirically arbitrate between the predictions of biological and economic models for individual human decision-making, we devised a virtual foraging task in which players chose repeatedly between two foraging environments, lost energy by the passage of time, and gained energy probabilistically according to the statistics of the environment they chose. Reaching zero energy was framed as starvation. We used the mathematics of random walks to derive endpoint outcome distributions of the choices. This also furnished equivalent lotteries, presented in a purely economic, casino-like frame, in which starvation corresponded to winning nothing. Bayesian model comparison showed that—in both the foraging and the casino frames—participants’ choices depended jointly on the probability of starvation and the expected endpoint value of the outcome, but could not be explained by economic models based on combinations of statistical moments or on rank-dependent utility. This implies that under precisely defined constraints biological principles are better suited to explain human decision-making than economic models based on endpoint utility maximization. PMID:26024504

  8. 49 CFR 40.111 - When and how must a laboratory disclose statistical summaries and other information it maintains?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...statistical summaries and other information it maintains? 40.111 Section 40.111...statistical summaries and other information it maintains? (a) As a laboratory...In order to avoid sending data from which it is likely that information about an...

  9. 49 CFR 40.111 - When and how must a laboratory disclose statistical summaries and other information it maintains?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...statistical summaries and other information it maintains? 40.111 Section 40.111...statistical summaries and other information it maintains? (a) As a laboratory...In order to avoid sending data from which it is likely that information about an...

  10. Maintaining connectivity in a mobile ad hoc network 

    E-print Network

    Reuben, Ron S.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the problem of maintaining graphics. connectivity in a mobile ad hoc network. Mobile ad hoc networks are without a fixed topology and are dynamically changing. This makes the problem of maintaining connectivity among all nodes...

  11. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) Maintain Learning Set Despite Second-Order Stimulus-Response Spatial Discontiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    In many discrimination-learning tests, spatial separation between stimuli and response loci disrupts performance in rhesus macaques. However, monkeys are unaffected by such stimulus-response spatial discontiguity when responses occur through joystick-based computerized movement of a cursor. To examine this discrepancy, five monkeys were tested on…

  12. 34 CFR 668.163 - Maintaining and accounting for funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maintaining and accounting for funds. 668.163 Section... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.163 Maintaining and accounting for funds. (a)(1) Bank or investment account. An institution must maintain title...

  13. 34 CFR 668.163 - Maintaining and accounting for funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maintaining and accounting for funds. 668.163 Section... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.163 Maintaining and accounting for funds. (a)(1) Bank or investment account. An institution must maintain title...

  14. 34 CFR 668.163 - Maintaining and accounting for funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maintaining and accounting for funds. 668.163 Section... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.163 Maintaining and accounting for funds. (a)(1) Bank or investment account. An institution must maintain title...

  15. 34 CFR 668.163 - Maintaining and accounting for funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maintaining and accounting for funds. 668.163 Section... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.163 Maintaining and accounting for funds. (a)(1) Bank or investment account. An institution must maintain title...

  16. Aim for a Healthy Weight Maintaining a Healthy

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    Aim for a Healthy Weight Maintaining a Healthy Weight On the Go A Pocket Guide #12;#12;Aim for a Healthy Weight Maintaining a Healthy Weight On the Go A Pocket Guide NIH Publication No. 10-7415 April on healthy choices will help you maintain a healthy weight. Why Is a Healthy Weight Important? Reaching

  17. Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatments Living With Clinical Trials Social Phobia (Social Anxiety Disorder) Causes Social phobia sometimes runs in families, ... of the brain are involved in fear and anxiety. By learning more about fear and anxiety in ...

  18. The key actors maintaining elders in functional autonomy in Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Globally, a significant increase in functional disability among the elderly is expected in the near future. It is therefore vital to begin considering how Sub-Saharan Africa countries can best start building or strengthening the care and support system for that target population. Study objectives are: 1) identify the key actors of the social system who maintain elders in functional autonomy at home in Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso) and 2) to describe the functional status of older people living at home. Methods We conducted a longitudinal descriptive study among the elderly aged 60 and above (351). Their functional status was evaluated using the Functional Autonomy Measurement System (SMAF). Data analysis was done using the statistical software package STATA (SE11). Results In Bobo-Dioulasso, 68% of seniors have good functional capacity or a slight incapacity and 32% have moderate to severe incapacities. Older people die before (3%) or during (14%) moderate to severe disabilities. This would mean that the quality of medical and/or social care is not good for maintaining functional autonomy of older people with moderate to severe disabilities. Two main groups of people contribute to maintain elders in functional autonomy: the elderly themselves and their family. Community, private or public structures for maintaining elders in functional autonomy are non-existent. The social system for maintaining elders in functional autonomy is incomplete and failing. In case of functional handicap at home, the elders die. But stakeholders are not conscious of this situation; they believe that this system is good for maintaining elders in functional autonomy. Conclusion It is likely that the absence of formal care and support structure likely shortens the lifespan of severely disabled older people. Stakeholders have not yet looked at this possibility. The stakeholders should seriously think about: 1) how to establish the third level of actors who can fulfill the needs to maintain elders in functional autonomy that are not satisfied by others (family members or the older individuals themselves), and 2) how to reinforce the role of each actor and the collaboration between the different groups of people of this system. PMID:24997509

  19. Guide to Operating and Maintaining EnergySmart Schools

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Through a commitment to high performance, school districts are discovering that smart energy choices can create lasting benefits for students, communities, and the environment. For example, an energy efficient school district with 4,000 students can save as much as $160,000 a year in energy costs. Over 10 years, those savings can reach $1.6 million, translating into the ability to hire more teachers, purchase more textbooks and computers, or invest in additional high performance facilities. Beyond these bottomline benefits, schools can better foster student health, decrease absenteeism, and serve as centers of community life. The U.S. Department of Energy's EnergySmart Schools Program promotes a 30 percent improvement in existing school energy use. It also encourages the building of new schools that exceed code (ASHRAE 90.11999) by 50 percent or more. The program provides resources like this Guide to Operating and Maintaining EnergySmart Schools to assist school decisionmakers in planning, financing, operating, and maintaining energy efficient, high performance schools. It also offers education and training for building industry professionals. Operations and maintenance refer to all scheduled and unscheduled actions for preventing equipment failure or decline with the goal of increasing efficiency, reliability, and safety. A preventative maintenance program is the organized and planned performance of maintenance activities in order to prevent system or production problems or failures from occurring. In contrast, deferred maintenance or reactive maintenance (also called diagnostic or corrective maintenance) is conducted to address an existing problem. This guide is a primary resource for developing and implementing a districtor schoolwide operations and maintenance (O&M) program that focuses on energy efficiency. The EnergySmart Schools Solutions companion CD contains additional supporting information for design, renovation, and retrofit projects. The objective of this guide is to provide organizational and technical information for integrating energy and high performance facility management into existing O&M practices. The guide allows users to adapt and implement suggested O&M strategies to address specific energy efficiency goals. It recognizes and expands on existing tools and resources that are widely used throughout the high performance school industry. External resources are referenced throughout the guide and are also listed within the EnergySmart Schools O&M Resource List (Appendix J). While this guide emphasizes the impact of the energy efficiency component of O&M, it encourages taking a holistic approach to maintaining a high-performance school. This includes considering various environmental factors where energy plays an indirect or direct role. For example, indoor air quality, site selection, building orientation, and water efficiency should be considered. Resources to support these overlapping aspects will be cited throughout the guide.

  20. Order Nidovirales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter, entitled "Order Nidovirales", is for inclusion in the Ninth Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), to be published as both a single volume text and online. The chapter details the taxonomy of members of the Nidovirus order, including family Arteriviridae o...

  1. Background for Community-Level Work on Social Competency in Adolescence: Reviewing the Literature on Contributing Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hair, Elizabeth C.; Jager, Justin; Garrett, Sarah

    Because social competency is an important element for adolescents' healthy development, a central question is what can be done to help adolescents achieve and maintain social competency. This report details antecedents of two key aspects of social competency: quality social relationships and good social skills. For each social relationship and…

  2. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... DMEPOS or referred home health, laboratory, imaging, or specialist services is required to maintain... eligible professional who ordered or referred the DMEPOS, laboratory, imaging, or specialist...

  3. Partitioned Auxiliary Views for SelfMaintainable Data Warehouses Mala Rajamani Karen C. Davis \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Song, Il-Yeol

    Partitioned Auxiliary Views for Self­Maintainable Data Warehouses Mala Rajamani Karen C. Davis­0030 Abstract Recent research gives the minimal auxiliary data that has to be stored at a warehouse in order, and data at the sources. Of these, the view definition and its data are available at the warehouse

  4. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This rule involves no policies that have ] federalism....C. 4001 et seq., Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management...

  5. Linking Social and Vocal Brains: Could Social Segregation Prevent a Proper Development of a Central Auditory Area in a Female Songbird?

    PubMed Central

    Cousillas, Hugo; George, Isabelle; Henry, Laurence; Richard, Jean-Pierre; Hausberger, Martine

    2008-01-01

    Direct social contact and social interaction affect speech development in human infants and are required in order to maintain perceptual abilities; however the processes involved are still poorly known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that social segregation during development would prevent the proper development of a central auditory area, using a “classical” animal model of vocal development, a songbird. Based on our knowledge of European starling, we raised young female starlings with peers and only adult male tutors. This ensured that female would show neither social bond with nor vocal copying from males. Electrophysiological recordings performed when these females were adult revealed perceptual abnormalities: they presented a larger auditory area, a lower proportion of specialized neurons and a larger proportion of generalist sites than wild-caught females, whereas these characteristics were similar to those observed in socially deprived (physically separated) females. These results confirmed and added to earlier results for males, suggesting that the degree of perceptual deficiency reflects the degree of social separation. To our knowledge, this report constitutes the first evidence that social segregation can, as much as physical separation, alter the development of a central auditory area. PMID:18493580

  6. Social Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slover-Linett, Cheryl; Stoner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Earlier this year, CASE formed a social media task force to explore what educational institutions are trying to achieve with social media presence and learn about social media engagements at member institutions. CASE, in partnership with mStoner and Slover Linett Strategies, in June launched a benchmarking survey on social media in advancement by…

  7. 25 CFR 20.200 - What contact will the Bureau maintain with State, tribal, county, local, and other Federal agency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What contact will the Bureau maintain with State, tribal, county, local, and other Federal agency programs? 20.200 Section 20.200 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Welfare...

  8. 25 CFR 20.200 - What contact will the Bureau maintain with State, tribal, county, local, and other Federal agency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What contact will the Bureau maintain with State, tribal, county, local, and other Federal agency programs? 20.200 Section 20.200 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Welfare...

  9. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  10. Boosting Social and Emotional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Beland maintains that high school students will need a high level of skill in the social and emotional arena to be ready for competitive employment in the 21st century. In a 2006 survey, human resource professionals said five skills were most crucial to high school graduates' success: professionalism/work ethic; teamwork; oral communications;…

  11. Social Justice and Political Orthodoxy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukianoff, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003, the Teachers College of Columbia University has maintained a policy of evaluating students based on their "commitment to social justice." Before last summer, Columbia could blame the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the main accrediting body for schools of education, for those evaluation criteria. The council…

  12. Social Networking: Keeping It Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2011-01-01

    The need to maintain an unpolluted learning environment is no easy task for schools and districts that have incorporated social networking sites into their educational life. The staff and teachers at Blaine High School in Minnesota's Anoka-Hennepin District 11 had been considering the pros and cons of establishing a school Facebook page when the…

  13. Social network and addiction.

    PubMed

    La Barbera, Daniele; La Paglia, Filippo; Valsavoia, Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades, the rapid development of innovative Internet-based communication technologies created a new field of academic study among scholars. Particularly, the attention of researchers is focusing on new ways to form relationship-thought social web. Social Network sites constitute a new form of web communities, where people meet and share interests and activities. Due to exponential growth of these sites, an increasing number of scholars are beginning to study the emergent phenomena in order to identify any psychopathological risk related to use of social web, such as addiction. This article examines the recent literature about this issue. PMID:19592725

  14. Issues and Methods for Assessing COTS Reliability, Maintainability, and Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneidewind, Norman F.; Nikora, Allen P.

    1998-01-01

    Many vendors produce products that are not domain specific (e.g., network server) and have limited functionality (e.g., mobile phone). In contrast, many customers of COTS develop systems that am domain specific (e.g., target tracking system) and have great variability in functionality (e.g., corporate information system). This discussion takes the viewpoint of how the customer can ensure the quality of COTS components. In evaluating the benefits and costs of using COTS, we must consider the environment in which COTS will operate. Thus we must distinguish between using a non-mission critical application like a spreadsheet program to produce a budget and a mission critical application like military strategic and tactical operations. Whereas customers will tolerate an occasional bug in the former, zero tolerance is the rule in the latter. We emphasize the latter because this is the arena where there are major unresolved problems in the application of COTS. Furthermore, COTS components may be embedded in the larger customer system. We refer to these as embedded systems. These components must be reliable, maintainable, and available, and must be with the larger system in order for the customer to benefit from the advertised advantages of lower development and maintenance costs. Interestingly, when the claims of COTS advantages are closely examined, one finds that to a great extent these COTS components consist of hardware and office products, not mission critical software [1]. Obviously, COTS components are different from custom components with respect to one or more of the following attributes: source, development paradigm, safety, reliability, maintainability, availability, security, and other attributes. However, the important question is whether they should be treated differently when deciding to deploy them for operational use; we suggest the answer is no. We use reliability as an example to justify our answer. In order to demonstrate its reliability, a COTS component must pass the same reliability evaluations as the custom components, otherwise the COTS components will be the weakest link in the chain of components and will be the determinant of software system reliability. The challenge is that there will be less information available for evaluating COTS components than for custom components but this does not mean we should despair and do nothing. Actually, there is a lot we can do even in the absence of documentation on COTS components because the customer will have information about how COTS components are to be used in the larger system. To illustrate our approach, we will consider the reliability, maintainability, and availability (RMA) of COTS components as used in larger systems. Finally, COTS suppliers might consider increasing visibility into their products to assist customers in determining the components' fitness for use in a particular application. We offer ideas of information that would be useful to customers, and what vendors might do to provide it.

  15. How many TCR clonotypes does a body maintain?

    PubMed

    Lythe, Grant; Callard, Robin E; Hoare, Rollo L; Molina-París, Carmen

    2016-01-21

    We consider the lifetime of a T cell clonotype, the set of T cells with the same T cell receptor, from its thymic origin to its extinction in a multiclonal repertoire. Using published estimates of total cell numbers and thymic production rates, we calculate the mean number of cells per TCR clonotype, and the total number of clonotypes, in mice and humans. When there is little peripheral division, as in a mouse, the number of cells per clonotype is small and governed by the number of cells with identical TCR that exit the thymus. In humans, peripheral division is important and a clonotype may survive for decades, during which it expands to comprise many cells. We therefore devise and analyse a computational model of homeostasis of a multiclonal population. Each T cell in the model competes for self pMHC stimuli, cells of any one clonotype only recognising a small fraction of the many subsets of stimuli. A constant mean total number of cells is maintained by a balance between cell division and death, and a stable number of clonotypes by a balance between thymic production of new clonotypes and extinction of existing ones. The number of distinct clonotypes in a human body may be smaller than the total number of naive T cells by only one order of magnitude. PMID:26546971

  16. Flower color polymorphism maintained by overdominant selection in Sisyrinchium sp.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuma; Takakura, Koh-Ichi; Kawata, Masakado

    2015-11-01

    Negative frequency-dependent selection derived from positive frequency-dependent foraging is the best-known selection force maintaining genetic polymorphism within a population. However, in flowering plants, positive frequency-dependent foraging by pollinators is expected to accelerate the loss of low-frequency morphs by conferring a fitness advantage to the common morph, leading to monomorphism. In Japan, a non-native species, Sisyrinchium sp., exhibits conspicuous flower color polymorphism within a population comprising both purple morphs (homozygous recessive) and white morphs (heterozygous or homozygous dominant). Here we quantified genotype-specific reproductive success in order to reveal the contribution of overdominant selection on the maintenance of flower color polymorphism in this species. In artificial pollination experiments using individuals with identified genotypes, female reproductive success was higher in the heterozygote than in either homozygote. The frequency of purple morphs in natural populations (ca. 31 %) is similar to the frequency predicted by overdominant selection (25 %). Our results suggest that overdominant selection contributes to the maintenance of color morphs in the natural population of this species. PMID:26354759

  17. Maintaining artificial recharge ponds under uncertainty: a probabilistic approach for

    E-print Network

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Maintaining artificial recharge ponds under uncertainty: a probabilistic approach for engineering - University of California, San Diego USA Seminario GHS - Feb. 17th, 2011 #12;Outline Artificial recharge

  18. Social Category Construction as a Persuasive Tool in Complaining 

    E-print Network

    Regan, Daryl

    2010-06-30

    This paper examines how social categories can be treated as an interactional discursive resource in order to accomplish a specific social action. Traditional studies have treated social categories as matters of cognitive perceptual reality. However...

  19. Ghetto Social Structure: A Survey of Black Bostonians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feagin, Joe R.

    This report on ghetto social structure, surveying a sample of 120 black women from Boston, is an examination of the extent to which black urbanites maintain personal ties within the ghetto area. Nine chapters listed as follows constitute the document: social organization in the black ghetto; Boston-the city and the sample, primary social ties,…

  20. Desirable factors for maintaining normal BMI of urban affluent women of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anu Taneja; Siddhu, Anupa

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to identify desirable social, familial, reproductive, dietary, and lifestyle factors for maintaining normal body mass index (BMI) of urban affluent women (25-45 years) in Delhi, India. A total of 387 urban affluent women with at least one living child participated in this cross-sectional study conducted from March 2008 to April 2010. Women were classified into four BMI categories on the basis of World Health Organization (WHO; 2004) classification for Asians. Significant factors for maintaining normal BMI were: Younger age, less parity, nuclear family, normal weight status of parents, postpartum weight gain between 2 and 3 kg, regularity in taking meals, fixed meal size, self-perceived normal weight, and shorter sitting time and television viewing time. Multivariate regression analysis identified five determining factors for maintaining BMI, which are normal weight of father, self-perceived normal weight, fixed meal size, sitting time less than 6 h/day, and television viewing time less than 1 h/day. By small lifestyle modifications, normal BMI can be maintained. PMID:25758732

  1. The neural circuitry of expertise: perceptual learning and social cognition.

    PubMed

    Harré, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While this is an enormous task, we may already have at hand many of the tools we need. This article is intended to review some of the recent results in neuro-cognitive research and show how they can be extended to two very specific and interrelated types of expertise: perceptual expertise and social cognition. These two cognitive skills span a vast range of our genetic heritage. Perceptual expertise developed very early in our evolutionary history and is a highly developed part of all mammals' cognitive ability. On the other hand social cognition is most highly developed in humans in that we are able to maintain larger and more stable long term social connections with more behaviorally diverse individuals than any other species. To illustrate these ideas I will discuss board games as a toy model of social interactions as they include many of the relevant concepts: perceptual learning, decision-making, long term planning and understanding the mental states of other people. Using techniques that have been developed in mathematical psychology, I show that we can represent some of the key features of expertise using stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Such models demonstrate how an expert's long exposure to a particular context influences the information they accumulate in order to make a decision.These processes are not confined to board games, we are all experts in our daily lives through long exposure to the many regularities of daily tasks and social contexts. PMID:24381550

  2. Social network.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The Better Care Exchange is a social network for health and social care professionals that enables information and knowledge sharing on good practice and better integrated care, and the implementation of Better Care Fund plans. PMID:26419571

  3. Student Perceptions of Social Presence and Attitudes toward Social Media: Results of a Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leafman, Joan S.; Mathieson, Kathleen M.; Ewing, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Establishing and maintaining social presence in an online environment that depends on a learning management system (LMS) can be challenging. While students believe social presence to be important, LMS platforms have yet to discover a way to deliver this expectation. The growth of social media tools presents opportunities outside an LMS to foster…

  4. Object Representations Maintain Attentional Control Settings across Space and Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreij, Daniel; Olivers, Christian N. L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that we create and maintain mental representations for perceived objects on the basis of their spatiotemporal continuity. An important question is what type of information can be maintained within these so-called object files. We provide evidence that object files retain specific attentional control settings for…

  5. A "Future-Proof" Postgraduate Software Engineering Programme: Maintainability Issues

    E-print Network

    Gibson, J. Paul

    A "Future-Proof" Postgraduate Software Engineering Programme: Maintainability Issues J Paul Gibson of a software engineering programme for Masters students. Maintainability of educational programmes is critical are "future proof". Conse- quently, we followed a traditional software engineering life- cycle process

  6. 31 CFR 205.24 - How are accurate estimates maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are accurate estimates maintained... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.24 How are accurate estimates maintained? (a) If a State has knowledge that an estimate does not reasonably correspond to the State's cash needs for a Federal assistance...

  7. Cancer Cell Survival of Cancer Cells Is Maintained

    E-print Network

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    Cancer Cell Article Survival of Cancer Cells Is Maintained by EGFR Independent of Its Kinase- tic efficacy. We report here that in human cancer cells, the function of kinase-independent EGFR- pendent of its kinase activity, EGFR prevents cancer cells from autophagic cell death by maintaining

  8. 7 CFR 3560.625 - Maintaining the physical asset.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintaining the physical asset. 3560.625 Section 3560.625 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Maintaining the physical asset. On-farm labor housing must meet state and local building and occupancy codes....

  9. 7 CFR 3560.625 - Maintaining the physical asset.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintaining the physical asset. 3560.625 Section 3560.625 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE... Maintaining the physical asset. On-farm labor housing must meet state and local building and occupancy codes....

  10. Species interaction mechanisms maintain grassland plant species diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theory has outpaced empirical research in pursuit of identifying mechanisms maintaining species diversity. Here we demonstrate how data from diversity-ecosystem functioning experiments can be used to test maintenance of diversity theory. We predict that grassland plant diversity can be maintained by...

  11. 48 CFR 906.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... maintaining alternative sources. 906.202 Section 906.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition After Exclusion of Sources 906.202 Establishing or maintaining alternative sources. (b)(1) Every proposed...

  12. 19 CFR 163.2 - Persons required to maintain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Persons required to maintain records. 163.2 Section 163.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.2 Persons required to maintain records. (a) General. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph...

  13. Infant-like Social Interactions between a Robot and a Human Caregiver p.1 Infant-like Social Interactions between a Robot and a

    E-print Network

    Infant-like Social Interactions between a Robot and a Human Caregiver p.1 Infant-like Social-0039 email: cynthia@ai.mit.edu and scaz@ai.mit.edu #12;Infant-like Social Interactions between a Robot-cursor to this type of social learning is the ability to maintain interaction levels that are neither overwhelming nor

  14. Social Support, Negative Social Interactions, and Psychological Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining the relationship between social support and psychological well-being has largely ignored the negative side of social interactions. However, empirical evidence suggests that negative interactions can potentially be more harmful than social support is helpful. This article critically reviews the literature investigating the relationship between social support and negative social interactions and their simultaneous effect on psychological well-being. A review of 28 studies revealed that there are conceptual, theoretical, and methodological limitations associated with this body of research. In order to unravel some of these limitations, studies are grouped according to three conceptual models: the additive effects model, the moderator model, and the domain-specific model. Finally, the article discusses directions social work practice research should take to tackle and fully appreciate the complexities of the relationship between social support and psychological well-being.

  15. Stigmatised Choices: Social Class, Social Exclusion and Secondary School Markets in the Inner City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reay, Diane; Lucey, Helen

    2004-01-01

    The transition to secondary school is rarely conceptualised as an important influence in maintaining and contributing to wider processes of social exclusion in the inner city. This article argues that the seeds of social exclusion are sown in under-resourced, struggling inner-city schooling, and their germination is found in class practices,…

  16. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2

    E-print Network

    UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2, one closely tied to conservation. Sustainable development has been famously defined by the Brundtland The Oxford English Dictionary defines `Sustainable' as, "able to be upheld or defended; able to be maintained

  17. [Social causes and social therapy].

    PubMed

    Strotzka, H

    1980-01-01

    Sociogenesis is divided into primary sociogenesis (direct connection between social conditions and mental disorders), secondary sociogenesis (indirect connection), and tertiary sociogenesis (social consequences of a disorder according to the degree of acceptance). It has to be interpreted in a system network with organo- and psychogenesis. Social therapy is, according to that, an integration of social work, psychotherapy and pedagogics. Its main instrument is the therapeutic community. PMID:7244283

  18. Temporal regulation of kin recognition maintains recognition-cue diversity and suppresses cheating.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsing-I; Shaulsky, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Kin recognition, the ability to distinguish kin from non-kin, can facilitate cooperation between relatives. Evolutionary theory predicts that polymorphism in recognition cues, which is essential for effective recognition, would be unstable. Individuals carrying rare recognition cues would benefit less from social interactions than individuals with common cues, leading to loss of the genetic-cue diversity. We test this evolutionary hypothesis in Dictyostelium discoideum, which forms multicellular fruiting bodies by aggregation and utilizes two polymorphic membrane proteins to facilitate preferential cooperation. Surprisingly, we find that rare recognition variants are tolerated and maintain their frequencies among incompatible majority during development. Although the rare variants are initially excluded from the aggregates, they subsequently rejoin the aggregate and produce spores. Social cheating is also refrained in late development, thus limiting the cost of chimerism. Our results suggest a potential mechanism to sustain the evolutionary stability of kin-recognition genes and to suppress cheating. PMID:26018043

  19. Methadone Anonymous: A 12-Step Program for Methadone Maintained Heroin Addicts.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Stephen M.; Galanter, Marc; Dermatis, Helen

    2001-12-01

    Methadone Anonymous (MA) is a new 12-step fellowship developed for methadone maintained heroin addicts. A total of 53 MA members completed a survey assessing factors related to methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) entry, drug use, MA participation, beliefs concerning effectiveness of MMTP and MA, and level of social cohesiveness. Length of time in MA was associated with a decreased use of alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana. Clients rated components of MA to be significantly more helpful to recovery than MMTP treatment components. Affiliation to five MA members known best by the respondents was significantly greater than affiliation to non-MA members. Length of time in MA was positively associated with MA affiliation. Social affiliation and endorsement of 12-step principles were positively correlated. These findings suggest that MA participation has benefits not available in professionally driven MMTP, and should be further studied. PMID:12466684

  20. Temporal regulation of kin recognition maintains recognition-cue diversity and suppresses cheating

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsing-I; Shaulsky, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Kin recognition, the ability to distinguish kin from non-kin, can facilitate cooperation between relatives. Evolutionary theory predicts that polymorphism in recognition cues, which is essential for effective recognition, would be unstable. Individuals carrying rare recognition cues would benefit less from social interactions than individuals with common cues, leading to loss of the genetic-cue diversity. We test this evolutionary hypothesis in Dictyostelium discoideum, which forms multicellular fruiting bodies by aggregation and utilizes two polymorphic membrane proteins to facilitate preferential cooperation. Surprisingly, we find that rare recognition variants are tolerated and maintain their frequencies among incompatible majority during development. Although the rare variants are initially excluded from the aggregates, they subsequently rejoin the aggregate and produce spores. Social cheating is also refrained in late development, thus limiting the cost of chimerism. Our results suggest a potential mechanism to sustain the evolutionary stability of kin-recognition genes and to suppress cheating. PMID:26018043

  1. Social Indicators and Social Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, Robert; Seidman, David

    1978-01-01

    Describes the several research traditions which combine to form the social indicators movement. All the traditions share concern for measurement, analysis, and reporting of aspects of social conditions to a general audience. Journal available from: American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania…

  2. Maintaining a Social-Emotional Intervention and Its Benefits for Institutionalized Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Robert B.; Groark, Christina J.; Fish, Larry; Muhamedrahimov, Rifkat J.; Palmov, Oleg I.; Nikiforova, Natalia V.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the maintenance of one of the largest interventions conducted in St. Petersburg (Russian Federation) orphanages for children birth to 4 years using regular caregiving staff. One orphanage received training plus structural changes, another training only, and a third business as usual. The intervention produced substantial…

  3. Alzheimer's disease and language impairments: social intervention and medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Blanka; Maresova, Petra; Valis, Martin; Hort, Jakub; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Communication is very important for people to be successfully integrated into social environment and make and maintain relationship. Particularly, language difficulties lead to social exclusion of the people affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and contribute to a significant decrease in the quality of their life and also have a big impact on their family members who in most cases become their caregivers who need to communicate with their loved ones in order to meet their needs. Therefore, the goal of this study is to describe language impairments in the individual phases of AD and discuss their improvement with respect to AD on the basis of literature review. The authors of this article use traditional research methods in order to achieve the goal set mentioned earlier. First, a method of literature review of available sources describing language impairments in the individual phases of AD is exploited. Second, to show how informal caregivers and relevant drugs can successfully intervene in the improvement of these language impairments, a method of comparison of different research studies exploring such social intervention and medical treatment is used. PMID:26346123

  4. Building and Maintaining Relationships in the Digital Age: Using Social Penetration Theory to Explore Communication through Social Networking Sites

    E-print Network

    Pennington, Natalie

    2015-05-31

    in relation to communication online. The first study, discussed in Chapter Three, used a combination of survey and quantitative content analysis of Facebook profiles (N = 103) to look at the depth and breadth of communication across the various stages...

  5. * Disclosure of your social security number (SSN) is requested from you to help the military locate your official records in order to complete this certification. No statute or other authority requires that you disclose this SSN for that purpose. Failure

    E-print Network

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    * Disclosure of your social security number (SSN) is requested from you to help the military locate that you disclose this SSN for that purpose. Failure to provide your SSN, however, may result in delays in obtaining your certification. Further disclosure of your SSN is governed by the Public Information Act

  6. Social Ferment and School Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Walter G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the nature of contemporary society in terms of gross or general changes observed during the past twenty years in order to consider possible breakthroughs of school finance as products of social ferment. (Author/AN)

  7. Components for Maintaining and Publishing Earth Science Vocabularies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J. D.; Yu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Shared vocabularies are an important aid to geoscience data interoperability. Many organizations maintain useful vocabularies, with Geologic Surveys having a particularly long history of vocabulary and lexicon development. However, the mode of publication is heterogeneous, ranging from PDFs and HTML web pages, spreadsheets and CSV, through various user-interfaces and APIs. Update and maintenance ranges from tightly-governed and externally opaque, through various community processes, all the way to crowd-sourcing ('folksonomies'). A general expectation, however, is for greater harmonization and vocabulary re-use. In order to be successful this requires (a) standardized content formalization and APIs (b) transparent content maintenance and versioning. We have been trialling a combination of software dealing with registration, search and linking. SKOS is designed for formalizing multi-lingual, hierarchical vocabularies, and has been widely adopted in earth and environmental sciences. SKOS is an RDF vocabulary, for which SPARQL is the standard low-level API. However, for interoperability between SKOS vocabulary sources, a SKOS-based API (i.e. based on the SKOS predicates prefLabel, broader, narrower, etc) is required. We have developed SISSvoc for this purpose, and used it to deploy a number of vocabularies on behalf of the IUGS, ICS, NERC, OGC, the Australian Government, and CSIRO projects. SISSvoc Search provides simple search UI on top of one or more SISSvoc sources. Content maintenance is composed of many elements, including content-formalization, definition-update, and mappings to related vocabularies. Typically there is a degree of expert judgement required. In order to provide confidence in users, two requirements are paramount: (i) once published, a URI that denotes a vocabulary item must remain dereferenceable; (ii) the history and status of the content denoted by a URI must be available. These requirements match the standard 'registration' paradigm which is implemented in the Linked Data Registry, which is currently used by WMO and the UK Environment Agency for publication of vocabularies. Together, these components provide a powerful and flexible system for providing earth science vocabularies for the community, consistent with semantic web and linked-data principles.

  8. Relative Efficacy of Human Social Interaction and Food as Reinforcers for Domestic Dogs and Hand-Reared Wolves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feuerbacher, Erica; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the intimate relationship dogs share with humans in Western society, we know relatively little about the variables that produce and maintain dog social behavior towards humans. One possibility is that human social interaction is itself a reinforcer for dog behavior. As an initial assessment of the variables that might maintain dog social

  9. Software Maintainability Improvement: Integrating Standards and Models William C. Chu,

    E-print Network

    Chung, Yeh-Ching

    Software Maintainability Improvement: Integrating Standards and Models William C. Chu, Dpt Science and Engineering, Southeast University, China National Key Laboratory of Software Engineering, Wuhan University, China Abstract Software standards are highly recommended because they promise faster

  10. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...as part of the mobilization base, shall be maintained to the...supporting the mobilization base within authorities and funds available. (2) Data assembled on essential mobilization...essential to the mobilization base is considered to be in the...

  11. Rearing and Maintaining Midge Cultures (Chironomus tentans) for Laboratory Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, John; Mahadeva, Madhu N.

    1992-01-01

    The life history of the Chironomus tentans can be observed in easily established and maintained laboratory cultures. Projects for the classroom include observing hydration of an egg mass; embryonic development, hatching and larval feeding; larval activity; and mating activity. (MDH)

  12. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS MAINTENANCE OF THE MOBILIZATION BASE (DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE...and maintain plans for alternate production capacity in case disaster destroys current facilities, such capacity to be...

  13. Control circuit maintains unity power factor of reactive load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, M.; Martinage, L. H.

    1966-01-01

    Circuit including feedback control elements automatically corrects the power factor of a reactive load. It maintains power supply efficiency where negative load reactance changes and varies by providing corrective error signals to the control windings of a power supply transformer.

  14. 40 CFR 63.2998 - What records must I maintain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wet-Formed Fiberglass Mat Production Notifications, Reports, and Records § 63.2998 What records must I maintain? You must...

  15. 40 CFR 63.2998 - What records must I maintain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wet-Formed Fiberglass Mat Production Notifications, Reports, and Records § 63.2998 What records must I maintain? You must...

  16. 40 CFR 63.2998 - What records must I maintain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wet-Formed Fiberglass Mat Production Notifications, Reports, and Records § 63.2998 What records must I maintain? You must...

  17. 40 CFR 63.2998 - What records must I maintain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wet-Formed Fiberglass Mat Production Notifications, Reports, and Records § 63.2998 What records must I maintain? You must...

  18. 40 CFR 63.2998 - What records must I maintain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wet-Formed Fiberglass Mat Production Notifications, Reports, and Records § 63.2998 What records must I maintain? You must...

  19. Integrating reliability and maintainability into a concurrent engineering environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Clifton B.; Peterson, Robert R.

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes the results of a reliability and maintainability study conducted at the University of California, San Diego and supported by private industry. Private industry thought the study was important and provided the university access to innovative tools under cooperative agreement. The current capability of reliability and maintainability tools and how they fit into the design process is investigated. The evolution of design methodologies leading up to today's capability is reviewed for ways to enhance the design process while keeping cost under control. A method for measuring the consequences of reliability and maintainability policy for design configurations in an electronic environment is provided. The interaction of selected modern computer tool sets is described for reliability, maintainability, operations, and other elements of the engineering design process. These tools provide a robust system evaluation capability that brings life cycle performance improvement information to engineers and their managers before systems are deployed, and allow them to monitor and track performance while it is in operation.

  20. Strategies for Buying and Maintaining Audio Visual Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalmbach, John A.; Kruzel, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    Presents guidelines for purchasing and maintaining audiovisual equipment most often used in the classroom. Highlights include selecting a vendor; purchasing associations; preventive maintenance; optical equipment, including overhead projectors, slide projectors, movie projectors, and filmstrip projectors; and electromagnetic equipment, including…

  1. ELECTRIC HOLDING FURNACE IN THE MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MAINTAINS CONSTANT TEMPERATURES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ELECTRIC HOLDING FURNACE IN THE MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MAINTAINS CONSTANT TEMPERATURES FOR IRON PRIOR TO FILLING MOBILE LADLES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Maintain a Healthy State of Mind: High School Students

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Maintain a Healthy State of Mind: High School Students Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Disasters like ... health clinic. Mental health groups (found on the Internet or in the phone book). What should I ...

  3. Increasing Maintainability of a Wastewater-Recovery Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehner, G. F.; Brose, H. F.

    1987-01-01

    Modified system leaks less and easier to disassemble for maintenance. Redesign of wastewater-recovery system separates water from urine: improved operation and system easier to maintain. Details of redesign, chiefly affected hollow-fiber-membrane evaporator, described in report.

  4. 19 CFR 163.2 - Persons required to maintain records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...territory of the United States, files a drawback claim, or transports or stores merchandise carried or held under bond, or ...detailed specifications from which imported subway cars or busses were manufactured would be required to maintain...

  5. 48 CFR 6.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... emergency or industrial mobilization; (3) Be in the interest of national defense in establishing or maintaining an essential engineering, research, or development capability to be provided by an educational...

  6. An Examination of Characteristics Related to the Social Skills of Youths with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    From an early age, children with visual impairments can be at a disadvantage for developing social skills. Since vision plays a role in the early development of social behaviors and of social cognition, the lack of visual cues could lead to difficulties in initiating and maintaining social interactions. The study presented here investigated…

  7. Social capital's dark side: knowledge, reciprocity, and the liability of relationships 

    E-print Network

    Collins, Jamie D.

    2009-05-15

    .............................................................................31 The Key Role of Trust ..................................................................................35 Undesirable Behavior by Partner Firms........................................................38 Social Capital?s Risks.... Then I provide a review of the literature regarding the vital role of trust in establishing and maintaining social capital. The chapter concludes with a review of the potential for social capital to hold risks for its owner(s). Social Capital Theory...

  8. Functional Analysis of Inappropriate Social Interactions in Students with Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roantree, Christina F.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the inappropriate social interactions of 3 students with Asperger's syndrome whose behavior was maintained by social positive reinforcement. We tested whether inappropriate social behavior was sensitive to social positive reinforcement contingencies and whether such contingencies could be reversed to increase the probability of…

  9. Order and chaos : articulating support, housing transformation

    E-print Network

    Boehm, William Hollister

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents an exploration on the theme of order and chaos, as a formal and social phenomenon, particularly as it relates to housing. The work stems from an attraction to the messy vitality we find in certain ...

  10. Roles of Extension Officers to Promote Social Capital in Japanese Agricultural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, Kosuke; Uchida, Yukiko; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2014-01-01

    Social capital has been found to be correlated with community welfare, but it is not easy to build and maintain it. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the role of professional coordinators of social relationships to create and maintain social capital in a community. We focused on extension officers in Japanese agricultural communities, who help farmers in both technical and social matters. A large nation-wide survey of extension officers as well as two supplementary surveys were conducted. We found that (1) social capital-related activities (e.g., assistance for building organizations among farmers) were particularly effective for solving problems; (2) social capital (trust relationships) among community residents increased their life quality; (3) social capital in local communities was correlated with extension officers' own communication skills and harmonious relationships among their colleagues. In sum, social capital in local communities is maintained by coordinators with professional social skills. PMID:24642575

  11. Maintaining Product-Process Balance in Community Antipoverty Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Antipoverty initiatives strive to improve distressed communities by producing outputs, such as housing, new businesses, and enhanced social services, and by building the capacity of communities to address their own problems. Although crucial for addressing the social and cultural factors contributing to community problems and for the…

  12. The Youth Culture and the Socially Concerned Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Armand

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties associated with maintaining the absolutely essential flow of independent and socially aware minds into science, especially those created by the tendencies to scientism in existing science.'' (Author/AL)

  13. Positively Frequency-Dependent Interference Competition Maintains Diversity and Pervades a Natural Population of Cooperative Microbes.

    PubMed

    Rendueles, Olaya; Amherd, Michaela; Velicer, Gregory J

    2015-06-29

    Positively frequency-dependent selection is predicted from theory to promote diversity in patchily structured populations and communities, but empirical support for this prediction has been lacking. Here, we investigate frequency-dependent selection among isolates from a local natural population of the highly social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Upon starvation, closely related cells of M. xanthus cooperate to construct multicellular fruiting bodies, yet recently diverged genotypes co-residing in a local soil population often antagonize one another during fruiting-body development in mixed groups. In the experiments reported here, both fitness per se and strong forms of interference competition exhibit pervasive and strong positive frequency dependence (PFD) among many isolates from a centimeter-scale soil population of M. xanthus. All strains that compete poorly at intermediate frequency are shown to be competitively dominant at high frequency in most genotype pairings during both growth and development, and strongly so. Interference competition is often lethal and appears to be contact dependent rather than mediated by diffusible compounds. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate that positively frequency-dependent selection maintains diversity when genotype frequencies vary patchily in structured populations. These results suggest that PFD contributes to the high levels of local diversity found among M. xanthus social groups in natural soil populations by reinforcing social barriers to cross-territory invasion and thereby also promotes high within-group relatedness. More broadly, our results suggest that potential roles of PFD in maintaining patchily distributed diversity should be investigated more extensively in other species. PMID:26051889

  14. Cultural Aspects in Social Anxiety and Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Asnaani, Anu; Hinton, Devon E.

    2010-01-01

    To examine cultural aspects in social anxiety and social anxiety disorder (SAD), we reviewed the literature on the prevalence rates, expressions, and treatments of social anxiety/SAD as they relate to culture, race, and ethnicity. We further reviewed factors that contribute to the differences in social anxiety/SAD between different cultures, including individualism/collectivism, perception of social norms, self-construal, gender roles, and gender role identification. Our review suggests that the prevalence and expression of social anxiety/SAD depends on the particular culture. Asian cultures typically show the lowest rates, whereas Russian and US samples show the highest rates, of SAD. Taijin kyofusho is discussed as a possible culture-specific expression of social anxiety, although the empirical evidence concerning the validity of this syndrome has been mixed. It is concluded that the individual's social concerns need to be examined in the context of the person's cultural, racial, and ethnic background in order to adequately assess the degree and expression of social anxiety and social anxiety disorder. This has direct relevance for the upcoming DSM-V. PMID:21132847

  15. A Simple Self-Maintaining Metabolic System: Robustness, Autocatalysis, Bistability

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Montero, Francisco; Morán, Federico; Cárdenas, María Luz; Cornish-Bowden, Athel

    2010-01-01

    A living organism must not only organize itself from within; it must also maintain its organization in the face of changes in its environment and degradation of its components. We show here that a simple (M,R)-system consisting of three interlocking catalytic cycles, with every catalyst produced by the system itself, can both establish a non-trivial steady state and maintain this despite continuous loss of the catalysts by irreversible degradation. As long as at least one catalyst is present at a sufficient concentration in the initial state, the others can be produced and maintained. The system shows bistability, because if the amount of catalyst in the initial state is insufficient to reach the non-trivial steady state the system collapses to a trivial steady state in which all fluxes are zero. It is also robust, because if one catalyst is catastrophically lost when the system is in steady state it can recreate the same state. There are three elementary flux modes, but none of them is an enzyme-maintaining mode, the entire network being necessary to maintain the two catalysts. PMID:20700491

  16. 21 CFR 1305.27 - Preservation of electronic orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preservation of electronic orders. 1305.27 Section... II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.27 Preservation of electronic orders. (a) A... two years. (c) If electronic order records are maintained on a central server, the records must...

  17. "Thousands Waiting at Our Gates": Moral Character, Legitimacy and Social Justice in Irish Elite Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtois, Aline

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how Irish elite schools negotiate change and maintain their legitimacy in times of economic turmoil and rising social inequality. The paper argues that they have not bowed before the demands of democratisation or economic globalisation. Instead they continue to maintain a high level of social closure and control diversity…

  18. Increasing Social Interaction Using Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching with Nonverbal School-Age Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, Jessica H.; Davis, Barbara L.; Davis, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Children with autism display marked deficits in initiating and maintaining social interaction. Intervention using play routines can create a framework for developing and maintaining social interaction between these children and their communication partners. Method: Six nonverbal 5- to 8-year-olds with autism were taught to engage in…

  19. Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability (RMS) education in engineering schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Gregory T.; Kinter, Barry N.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to show how engineering schools, as a whole, perceive the role of reliability, maintainability, and supportability in the engineering field. This includes the degree to which these concepts are included in their curricula, whether industry recruiters look for reliability, maintainability, and supportability training when they visit college campuses and to what degree college faculties are teaching reliability, maintainability, and supportability. This is done through research of existing literature and the analysis of data from a survey completed by engineering schools. General analyses are presented of the overall responses and detailed analysis of contrasts and similarities between the responses from private and public institutions are presented. Based upon the knowledge gained in conducting this research, conclusions on the state of RMS education in engineering institutions are forwarded.

  20. Fiber Optic Repair and Maintainability (FORM) Program Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advanced aircraft will employ fiber-optic interconnection components to transmit information from airframe and propulsion sensors to the flight control computers. Although these optical interconnects have been rigorously tested under laboratory conditions to determine their operating and environmental limits, there is concern as to their repairability and maintainability when placed in actual service. The Fiber Optic Repair and Maintainability (FORM) flight test program will provide data to enable designers to improve these fiber-optic interconnection systems for the next generation of aircraft. FORM is identifying critical problems in installing, maintaining, testing, and repairing fiber-optic interconnection systems in an operational avionics environment. This program is a cooperative Government/industry effort to evaluate optical component acceptability and installation techniques for aircraft.

  1. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  2. Social phobia.

    PubMed

    Filakovi?, Pavo; Dordevi?, Veljko; Koi?, Elvira; Muzini?, Lana

    2003-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) is an irrational fear of being observed and judged by other people in various social settings. The individual is afraid that he or she will act in a way that will be humiliating or embarrassing. It is often a chronic, disabling condition that is characterized by a phobic avoidance of most social situations. Social anxiety disorder is the most frequent anxiety disorder (10-15%) that occurs in two subtypes--generalized and specific. It is a disorder that occurs during the adolescence and reflects negatively to the quality of life of an individual. Neurobiological basis of this disorder has not been explored yet. The disorder is frequently burdened with comorbidity with other anxiety disorders, depression and substance-related disorders. Only cognitive-behavioral techniques are desirable in the psychotherapeutic treatment of the disorder and the best results are achieved in combination with pharmacotherapy. The medicaments of choice in the treatment of social anxiety disorder are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Anxiolytics should be used only as a supplementary in the acute phase. Treatment of social anxiety disorder should last at least 3 months up to one year. PMID:12955904

  3. Charged Probes, Bourdon Tubes Maintain Cryogenic Liquid Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, Mylo J.

    1966-01-01

    The problem: To design a system that automatically maintains the fluid level in a liquid nitrogen cold trap. It is frequently necessary to operate a vacuum system using one or more cold traps for a prolonged period with the cold trap liquid level maintained between set limits. Electronic devices have been subject to failure due to the effect on components of cryogenic temperatures. The solution: An automatic liquid nitrogen dispensing system that uses gas filled probes, driving Bourdon tube gauges equipped with microswitches that, through a relay, control a solenoid valve in the liquid nitrogen storage line.

  4. Maintainability design criteria for packaging of spacecraft replaceable electronic equipment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kappler, J. R.; Folsom, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Maintainability must be designed into long-duration spacecraft and equipment to provide the required high probability of mission success with the least cost and weight. The ability to perform repairs quickly and easily in a space environment can be achieved by imposing specific maintainability design criteria on spacecraft equipment design and installation. A study was funded to investigate and define design criteria for electronic equipment that would permit rapid removal and replacement in a space environment. The results of the study are discussed together with subsequent simulated zero-g demonstration tests of a mockup with new concepts for packaging.

  5. Social isolation and perceived barriers to establishing social networks among Latina immigrants.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Gonzales, Felisa A; Serrano, Adriana; Kaltman, Stacey

    2014-03-01

    Research has identified numerous mechanisms through which perceived social isolation and lack of social support negatively impact health. Little research attention has been dedicated to factors that influence the development of social networks, which have the potential to decrease perceptions of social isolation and provide social support. There is mixed evidence concerning the availability of supportive social networks for Latinos in the US. This study explores trauma-exposed Latina immigrants' experiences of social isolation in the US and its perceived causes. Twenty-eight Latina immigrant women participated in an interview about traumatic experiences. Informal help seeking and the availability of friendships in the US were also queried. Frequent comparisons between experiences in their home countries and in the US shaped the emerging themes of social isolation and lack of social support. Women reported feeling lonely, isolated, closed-in, and less free in the US due to family separation and various obstacles to developing and maintaining relationships. Socioeconomic, environmental, and psychosocial barriers were offered as explanations for their limited social networks in the US. Understanding experiences of social isolation as well as barriers to forging social networks can help inform the development of social support interventions that can contribute to improved health among Latinos. PMID:24402726

  6. Research on Space Environment Preservation System with Mechanism of Maintaining Satellites and Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Kazuo; Iwata, Toshiaki; Toda, Yoshitsugu; Nishida, Shin-Ichiro; Ooi, Yoshitaka; Sugita, Mikihiro

    This paper presents the new concept of a robot-oriented space system called “Space Environment Preservation System” that operates to maintain the satellite constellation and orbit by robots, and presents the technology development. The orbit maintenance vehicle requires the robots to assemble and capture the satellite, to diagnose, repair or replace malfunctioning units of the satellite in orbit, and to collect and carry the satellites out of the orbit at the end of life span. In order to realize the system, a new type of modularized satellite that can be easily assembled, maintained and disassembled by the robot is proposed. We developed the ground model of such a satellite, and the orbit maintenance vehicle that has the multifunctions of in-orbit satellite assembling factory and servicing station, as well as satellite capturing and disassembling. These functions were demonstrated in the simulated space condition.

  7. Social learning in cooperative dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Shakti

    2014-07-22

    Helping is a cornerstone of social organization and commonplace in human societies. A major challenge for the evolutionary sciences is to explain how cooperation is maintained in large populations with high levels of migration, conditions under which cooperators can be exploited by selfish individuals. Cultural group selection models posit that such large-scale cooperation evolves via selection acting on populations among which behavioural variation is maintained by the cultural transmission of cooperative norms. These models assume that individuals acquire cooperative strategies via social learning. This assumption remains empirically untested. Here, I test this by investigating whether individuals employ conformist or payoff-biased learning in public goods games conducted in 14 villages of a forager-horticulturist society, the Pahari Korwa of India. Individuals did not show a clear tendency to conform or to be payoff-biased and are highly variable in their use of social learning. This variation is partly explained by both individual and village characteristics. The tendency to conform decreases and to be payoff-biased increases as the value of the modal contribution increases. These findings suggest that the use of social learning in cooperative dilemmas is contingent on individuals' circumstances and environments, and question the existence of stably transmitted cultural norms of cooperation. PMID:24870041

  8. Social Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esser, Aristide Henri

    1971-01-01

    Social pollution provides the matrix for the pollution of the physical environment. This stems from man's present inability to function synergistically. To find new freedoms in purposeful evolution, we will have to start cleansing our Mind. (Author/SD)

  9. Enabling Community Through Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Haythornthwaite, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Background Social network analysis provides a perspective and method for inquiring into the structures that comprise online groups and communities. Traces from interaction via social media provide the opportunity for understanding how a community is formed and maintained online. Objective The paper aims to demonstrate how social network analysis provides a vocabulary and set of techniques for examining interaction patterns via social media. Using the case of the #hcsmca online discussion forum, this paper highlights what has been and can be gained by approaching online community from a social network perspective, as well as providing an inside look at the structure of the #hcsmca community. Methods Social network analysis was used to examine structures in a 1-month sample of Twitter messages with the hashtag #hcsmca (3871 tweets, 486 unique posters), which is the tag associated with the social media–supported group Health Care Social Media Canada. Network connections were considered present if the individual was mentioned, replied to, or had a post retweeted. Results Network analyses revealed patterns of interaction that characterized the community as comprising one component, with a set of core participants prominent in the network due to their connections with others. Analysis showed the social media health content providers were the most influential group based on in-degree centrality. However, there was no preferential attachment among people in the same professional group, indicating that the formation of connections among community members was not constrained by professional status. Conclusions Network analysis and visualizations provide techniques and a vocabulary for understanding online interaction, as well as insights that can help in understanding what, and who, comprises and sustains a network, and whether community emerges from a network of online interactions. PMID:24176835

  10. Magic Maintainer's Manual #2: The Technology File Walter Scott

    E-print Network

    Martin, Alain

    Magic Maintainer's Manual #2: The Technology File Walter Scott Special Studies Program Lawrence, CA 94720 (Updated by various folks.) This tutorial corresponds to Magic version 6; technology suffix and Selection Magic Tutorial #6: Design­Rule Checking You should also read at least the first, and probably all

  11. Maintaining the Landscape. Competency Based Teaching Materials in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legacy, Jim; And Others

    This competency-based curriculum unit on maintaining the landscape is one of five developed for classroom use in teaching the landscape/nursery area of horticulture. The five sections are each divided into teaching content (in a question-and-answer format) and student skills that outline steps and factors for consideration. Topics covered include…

  12. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.; Brooks, A.; Commerford, S.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The possible genetic (dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and cytogenetic changes in the regenerating liver) and somatic (hematopoietic stem cell changes, growth and nonspecific life time shortening) effects in mice maintained on tritiated water (HTO) over two generations was investigated. Results to date are summarized. (ACR)

  13. PULMONARY CELL POPULATIONS IN HAMSTERS MAINTAINED UNDER EGYPTIAN LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study was conducted to obtain baseline values for pulmonary cells in golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) bred and maintained under the laboratory conditions of Al-Azhar University in Egypt. An improvised technique is presented for measuring pulmonary cells obtained by lung...

  14. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte p duetoanodicproton-generatingoxidationreactionsandcathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now-cathode MFC, CO2 addition resulted in a stable catholyte film pH of 6.61 ( 0.12 and a 152% increase in steady

  15. Using Temporal Hierarchies to Efficiently Maintain Large Temporal Databases

    E-print Network

    Dean, Thomas

    Using Temporal Hierarchies to Efficiently Maintain Large Temporal Databases THOMAS DEAN Brown in the causal relationships between events and the dependencies between planned activities. This local structure be efficiently handled. Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.3.3 [Information Storage and Retrieval

  16. 24 CFR 570.506 - Records to be maintained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Records to be maintained. 570.506 Section 570.506 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY...

  17. GENETIC ENGINEERING PRODUCER FACT SHEET 2 Methods to Maintain Genetic

    E-print Network

    Bradford, Kent

    GENETIC ENGINEERING PRODUCER FACT SHEET 2 Methods to Maintain Genetic Purity of Seed Stocks KENT J yield. Seeds carry the genetic traits incorporated by years of breeding and selection to create quality. The genetic purity of seeds (i.e., the percentage of contamination by seeds or genetic material

  18. Maintaining of a Minimum Spanning Forest in a Dynamic

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    ;Splice #12;Merge in the dual #12;Merge #12;Merge #12;Splice in the dual #12;Merge (splice in the dual) #12;Merge between components #12;Merge between components #12;Maintaining a Minimum Spanning Forest and add to the primal But we still need to split the node without too many links/cuts #12;Splice/Merge #12

  19. Nuclear policy impacts at the national laboratories: maintaining the deterrence

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, James Bradley

    2010-08-24

    In this presentation, the author will discuss recent nuclear policy impacts, including the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review, and the impacts they have on maintaining the nuclear deterrent. Specifically, he will highlight some of the remaining questions and challenges that remain to the nation and to the national laboratories. (auth)

  20. Assessment and Treatment of Elopement Maintained by Access to Stereotypy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Roane, Henry S.; Feeney, Brian J.; Stephenson, Kasey M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated a treatment for elopement maintained by access to stereotypic door play. First, we conducted a functional analysis of elopement that produced undifferentiated results. Next, we conducted an assessment in which we evaluated the relation between elopement and door play. Results suggested a functional relation between the 2 behaviors…

  1. TECHNIQUE FOR SCREENING AND MAINTAINING SMALLER GENOMIC LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique for screening and simultaneously maintaining individual clones of the gene library for long-term storage is described. his method is particularly useful for identification and cloning of genes from cosmid-based genomic libraries of prokaryotes that constitute a smalle...

  2. Maintaining Coherency of Dynamic Data in Cooperating Repositories

    E-print Network

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    Maintaining Coherency of Dynamic Data in Cooperating Repositories Shetal Shah Krithi Ramamritham and Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Amherst, MA 01003, USA that cooperation among repositories--- where each repository pushes updates of data items to other repositories

  3. Guide to Operating and Maintaining EnergySmart Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The guide allows users to adapt and implement suggested O&M (operating and maintaining) strategies to address specific energy efficiency goals. It recognizes and expands on existing tools and resources that are widely used throughout the high-performance school industry. The guide is organized into the following sections: (1) Chapter 1:…

  4. Self-maintained Movements of Droplets with Convection Flow

    E-print Network

    Ikegami, Takashi

    Self-maintained Movements of Droplets with Convection Flow Hiroki Matsuno1 , Martin M. Hanczyc2, accompanied with convection flow. This convection flow con- tributes sustaining the chemical gradient, making representa- tion of the droplet with convection flow inside. This droplet moves to the right. abstract model

  5. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maintaining the mobilization base. 321.3 Section 321.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS MAINTENANCE OF THE MOBILIZATION BASE (DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME...

  6. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maintaining the mobilization base. 321.3 Section 321.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS MAINTENANCE OF THE MOBILIZATION BASE (DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME...

  7. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maintaining the mobilization base. 321.3 Section 321.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY..., Amendment 1. (ii) Privately-owned facilities and government-owned tools. (A) Arrange with management...

  8. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Maintaining the mobilization base. 321.3 Section 321.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY..., Amendment 1. (ii) Privately-owned facilities and government-owned tools. (A) Arrange with management...

  9. INTRODUCTION Terrestrial animals face the challenge of maintaining an adequate

    E-print Network

    Williams, Jos. B.

    1690 INTRODUCTION Terrestrial animals face the challenge of maintaining an adequate state of hydration of internal tissues while being exposed to a desiccating external environment. Among important evolutionary innovations of animals that became terrestrial were mechanisms that reduced overall water loss

  10. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Publishedbythe. ONeill, Harold A. Mooney, Osvaldo E. Sala, Amy J. Symstad, and David Tilman Biodiversity and Ecosystem biodiversity of the earth can therefore alter ecological functions and life support services that are vital

  11. Authoring and Maintaining of Educational Applications on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helic, Denis; Maurer, Hermann; Scherbakov, Nick

    This paper discusses problems concerning the design of educational applications in general, as well as specific problems connected with educational applications meant to be published on the Web. A new approach to the authoring and maintaining of Web-based educational applications is proposed which is based on the concept of hypermedia composites.…

  12. 34 CFR 668.163 - Maintaining and accounting for funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.163..., ACG, National SMART Grant, TEACH Grant, FSEOG, and FWS program funds in an interest-bearing bank... not have to maintain Direct Loan, Federal Pell Grant, ACG, National SMART Grant, TEACH Grant,...

  13. Maintaining or Disrupting Inequality: Diversity Statements in the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkl, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of my study was to identify whether university Diversity Statements aid in maintaining or disrupting inequality in the university. Using critical discourse analysis, I analyzed an initial sample of eleven Diversity Statements to develop a list of common themes found within the diversity statements. Using a maximum variation method, I…

  14. Maintaining the closed magneticfieldline topology of a fieldreversed configuration (FRC)

    E-print Network

    magnetic­field geometry, the field­ reversed configuration (FRC). 1 Our interest in this device is based. Larger experiments, 4 at higher power, are in progress. These may produce higher temperature plasmas, far1 Maintaining the closed magnetic­field­line topology of a field­reversed configuration (FRC

  15. Maintaining Paranormal Belief in the Face of Fraud 

    E-print Network

    Hepburn, Joanna

    2012-06-27

    specifically in relation to fraud. The current study’s objective was to use DA in exploring how individuals express and maintain a paranormal belief, whilst discursively overcoming the issue of fraud. Four common themes emerged from the data, which were all...

  16. 9 CFR 439.20 - Criteria for maintaining accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ACT ACCREDITATION OF NON-FEDERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES § 439.20 Criteria for maintaining...: (A) Determine the CUSUM-P increment for the sample. (1) The CUSUM-P increment for food chemistry, as... the new CUSUM-P value. The new CUSUM-P value must not exceed: (1) 5.2 for food chemistry. (2) 4.8...

  17. 9 CFR 439.20 - Criteria for maintaining accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criteria for maintaining accreditation. 439.20 Section 439.20 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE FEDERAL MEAT INSPECTION ACT AND THE POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT ACCREDITATION OF...

  18. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  19. 2 CFR 180.40 - How are these guidelines maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How are these guidelines maintained? 180.40 Section 180.40 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved OMB GUIDELINES TO AGENCIES ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND...

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Maintaining connections in children's grief narratives in popular film.

    PubMed

    Sedney, Mary Anne

    2002-04-01

    Children's grief narratives in popular films were examined for their portrayal of connection-maintaining strategies with the deceased. Comparisons were made between strategies found in actual parentally bereaved children and in child characters in films. Implications of these filmed grief narratives for models of grieving and for practice are discussed. PMID:15792067

  2. Maintaining Communication Between an Explorer and a Base Station

    E-print Network

    Lorek, Pawel

    controlled strategy incuring a substantial communication load. Thus we are looking for simple distributed local information. We introduce a strategy, our Go-To-The-Middle, which does not use any communicationMaintaining Communication Between an Explorer and a Base Station Miroslaw Dynia1 , Jaroslaw

  3. Guidelines for Beginning and Maintaining a Toy Lending Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettig, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Toy-lending libraries provide parents and professionals with opportunities for shared play and the loan of toys. This article reviews the history of toy-lending libraries and the purpose of Lekoteks, the Swedish toy library. Guidelines and suggestions for developing and maintaining a toy-lending library are discussed. (JPB)

  4. Small mammal herbivory: Feedbacks that help maintain desertified ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the hypothesis that herbivores contribute to feedbacks maintaining arid ecosystems in a degraded state. We studied small mammal herbivory on a subshrub, broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae), and perennial grasses at three sites: (1) ungrazed black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) grassland; (...

  5. 30 CFR 285.602 - What records must I maintain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records must I maintain? 285.602 Section 285.602 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and...

  6. 7 CFR 3560.103 - Maintaining housing proj-ects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... housing project must have an adequate and safe water supply, a functional and safe waste disposal system... maintenance are the following: (i) Provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing; and (ii) Maintain the security..., decent, safe, and sanitary housing. Agency design requirements are discussed in § 3560.60. The...

  7. 7 CFR 3560.103 - Maintaining housing projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... housing project must have an adequate and safe water supply, a functional and safe waste disposal system... maintenance are the following: (i) Provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing; and (ii) Maintain the security..., decent, safe, and sanitary housing. Agency design requirements are discussed in § 3560.60. The...

  8. 7 CFR 3560.103 - Maintaining housing projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... housing project must have an adequate and safe water supply, a functional and safe waste disposal system... maintenance are the following: (i) Provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing; and (ii) Maintain the security..., decent, safe, and sanitary housing. Agency design requirements are discussed in § 3560.60. The...

  9. 7 CFR 3560.103 - Maintaining housing projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... housing project must have an adequate and safe water supply, a functional and safe waste disposal system... maintenance are the following: (i) Provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing; and (ii) Maintain the security..., decent, safe, and sanitary housing. Agency design requirements are discussed in § 3560.60. The...

  10. Long-term morphological stasis maintained by a plantpollinator mutualism

    E-print Network

    Davis, Charles

    Long-term morphological stasis maintained by a plant­pollinator mutualism Charles C. Davisa,1 present evidence that the conserved floral morphology of a species-rich flowering plant clade- pighiaceae show a burst in species diversification coinciding with the origin of this plant

  11. Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Polarization-Maintaining Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Ally, A.; Barnes, S.; Watkins, L.; Cuddihy, E.

    1996-01-01

    Polarization-maintaining optical fibers, referred to as PANDA fibers, were subjected to Cobalt 60 radiation (300,000 Rad). The mechanical properties of the PANDA fibers were measured after exposure to gamma radiation and compared to non-irradiated PANDA fibers.

  12. Maintaining Healthy Behaviors Following Weight Loss: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zunker, Christie; Cox, Tiffany L.; Ard, Jamy D.; Ivankova, Nataliya V.; Rutt, Candace D.; Baskin, Monica L.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the process of how women maintained their healthy behaviors after a weight management program using a grounded theory approach. We conducted 2 focus groups and 23 interviews with a purposeful sample of African American and Caucasian women aged 30 and older who lost greater than 5% of their body weight during a weight management…

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Pollen flow in fragmented landscapes maintains genetic

    E-print Network

    White, Andrew

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Pollen flow in fragmented landscapes maintains genetic diversity following stand selfing rates and lower pollen diversity in old growth forest populations. In secondary forest, where more closely related pollen donors occur, an increase in biparental inbreeding is a potential problem. Here, we

  14. 48 CFR 906.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... action under the authority of 48 CFR 6.202(a) shall be supported by a determination and finding (D&F... maintaining alternative sources. 906.202 Section 906.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition...

  15. 48 CFR 906.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... action under the authority of 48 CFR 6.202(a) shall be supported by a determination and finding (D&F... maintaining alternative sources. 906.202 Section 906.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition...

  16. 48 CFR 906.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... action under the authority of 48 CFR 6.202(a) shall be supported by a determination and finding (D&F... maintaining alternative sources. 906.202 Section 906.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition...

  17. 48 CFR 906.202 - Establishing or maintaining alternative sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... action under the authority of 48 CFR 6.202(a) shall be supported by a determination and finding (D&F... maintaining alternative sources. 906.202 Section 906.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Full and Open Competition...

  18. Do Design Patterns Create More Maintainable James M. Bieman

    E-print Network

    Bieman, James M.

    Do Design Patterns Create More Maintainable Systems? James M. Bieman Department of Computer Science-oriented design patterns have captured the attention of a great number of software professionals. I nd a copy of Gamma, Helm, Johnson , and Vlissides's The Gang of Four" popular book on design patterns 1

  19. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    APPENDIX I UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure for Non radiation exposures (individual and collective) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In accordance will perform a review to determine methods by which exposures might be lowered. This review shall include

  20. 49 CFR 1310.2 - Requirement to maintain tariffs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...this part must be available for inspection by the Board, and must be provided to the Board promptly and free of charge, upon request, by mail or other delivery service. (c) A carrier that maintains a tariff pursuant to this part may not...

  1. 49 CFR 1310.2 - Requirement to maintain tariffs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...this part must be available for inspection by the Board, and must be provided to the Board promptly and free of charge, upon request, by mail or other delivery service. (c) A carrier that maintains a tariff pursuant to this part may not...

  2. 49 CFR 1310.2 - Requirement to maintain tariffs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...this part must be available for inspection by the Board, and must be provided to the Board promptly and free of charge, upon request, by mail or other delivery service. (c) A carrier that maintains a tariff pursuant to this part may not...

  3. 49 CFR 1310.2 - Requirement to maintain tariffs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...this part must be available for inspection by the Board, and must be provided to the Board promptly and free of charge, upon request, by mail or other delivery service. (c) A carrier that maintains a tariff pursuant to this part may not...

  4. 49 CFR 1310.2 - Requirement to maintain tariffs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...this part must be available for inspection by the Board, and must be provided to the Board promptly and free of charge, upon request, by mail or other delivery service. (c) A carrier that maintains a tariff pursuant to this part may not...

  5. 76 FR 38046 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS); Assignment of Order Codes (DFARS Case...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ...Regulation Supplement (DFARS); Assignment of Order Codes (DFARS Case 2011-D004) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition...as the office responsible for maintaining order code assignments. The order code procedures are moved from the DFARS to its...

  6. Mechanical properties of different types of space maintainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beldiman, M.-A.; Mâr?u, I.; Lei?oiu, B.; Luchian, I.; Lupescu, O.; Bârc?, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    Currently, inside the oral cavity, the dental space maintainers are subjected to forces exerted on them when performing various functions; therefore, it is important to know how each of these mechanisms behave and respond to forces that are applied directly to them. The mechanical properties of the materials used in dentistry are defined by a set of characteristics representing the behaviour of their particular working conditions and it is qualitatively expressed by a number of parameters.The study aimed to determine the pressing force that can be taken by four 4 types of space maintainers frequently used in practice - fixed and removable, applied on four samples realized with human teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Static tests were carried out on a machine type short WDW-5 EC with a maximum force of 5 kN and a loading speed of 5 mm/min by a special testing machine, with an innovative appliance; data recording was automatically performed, using a computer with a special program that present the specific diagrams. Experimental determinations included the following aspects: to determine the maximum force that can be supported by each sample, and to observe the deformations. The values obtained indicate that the best option in terms of behavior under the conditions specified is the removable appliance, and the less functional version is the fixed space maintainer using brackets. According to tests conducted, the fracture strength was found to be more important for fixed space maintainers (band and loop, for example) so, in practice is using more frequent these types of space maintainers.

  7. The HyperSkript Authoring Environment--An Integrated Approach for Producing, Maintaining, and Using Multimedia Lecture Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennecke, Andreas; Selke, Harald

    Based on a technical infrastructure that supports face-to-face university teaching, an environment that enables small groups of lecturers to develop and maintain lecture material cooperatively was developed. In order to allow for a flexible use, only a few formal workshops are imposed on the users while cooperation is supported by easy-to-use…

  8. The social, cosmopolitanism and beyond.

    PubMed

    Schillmeier, Michael

    2009-04-01

    First, this article will outline the metaphysics of "the social" that implicitly and explicitly connects the work of classical and contemporary cosmopolitan sociologists as different as Durkheim, Weber, Beck and Luhmann. In a second step, I will show that the cosmopolitan outlook of classical sociology is driven by exclusive differences. In understanding human affairs, both classical sociology and contemporary cosmopolitan sociology reflect a very modernist outlook of epistemological, conceptual, methodological and disciplinary rigour that separates the cultural sphere from the natural objects of concern. I will suggest that classical sociology -- in order to be cosmopolitan -- is forced (1) to exclude "non-social and non-human objects" as part of its conceptual and methodological rigour, and (2) consequently and methodologically to rule out the non-social and the non-human. Cosmopolitan sociology imagines "the social" as a global, universal "explanatory device" to conceive and describe the non-social and non-human. In a third and final step the article draws upon the work of the French sociologist Gabriel Tarde and offers a possible alternative to the modernist social and cultural other-logics of social sciences. It argues for a inclusive conception of "the social" that gives the non-social and non-human a cosmopolitan voice as well. PMID:19999833

  9. Teachers' Views on Teaching Current Events in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deveci, Handan

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve its goals, the Social Studies course should convey social events, which took place within or out of the school context, into the classroom environment. Current events can be very beneficial so as to transfer the social events into classroom environment in the Social Studies courses. In this study, semi structured interview…

  10. The Exploring Diversity Initiative THE EXPLORING DIVERSITY INITIATIVE Williams College is committed to creating and maintaining a curriculum, faculty, and student body that reflects and

    E-print Network

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    to creating and maintaining a curriculum, faculty, and student body that reflects and explores a diverse simply focus on the study of specific peoples, cultures, or regions of the world, in the past or present. These courses explore diverse human feelings, thoughts, and actions by recreating the social, political

  11. Questioning the Social Powers of Art: Toward a Pragmatic Aesthetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Joli

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes and critiques the faith in the social powers of the arts which allows American intellectuals to maintain a loyalty to democracy in the abstract while deploring people's concrete cultural practices. Offers John Dewey's belief in "art as experience" as an alternative that can refigure and benefit American social thought. (SR)

  12. Higher Education and Social Progress: A Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkin, Harold J.

    1998-01-01

    Highlights the three social revolutions characterizing the Third Revolution as the revolution of the professionals who provide expert services that the high living standards and other aspects of society depend upon to continue. Focuses on the role of higher education in the Third Revolution and in maintaining social progress. (CMK)

  13. Tools for Monitoring Social Media: A Marketing Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeck, Ann; Hoger, Beth

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of how to effectively monitor social media is an increasingly valued marketing research skill. This study tests an approach for adding social media content to an undergraduate marketing research class team project. The revised project maintains the expected objectives and parameters of a traditional research project, while integrating…

  14. Developing the Social Skills of Young Adult Special Olympics Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Melissa G. F.; Dummer, Gail M.; Smeltzer, Ashley; Denton, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if young adult Special Olympics participants could develop, generalize, and maintain target social skills (eye contact, contributing relevant information, and turn taking) as a result of a 14-week Social Skills and Sports (S[superscript 3]) Program that combined classroom instruction with soccer…

  15. A Social Constructivist Approach to Computer-Mediated Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pear, Joseph J.; Crone-Todd, Darlene E.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a computer-mediated teaching system called computer-aided personalized system of instruction (CAPSI) that incorporates a social constructivist approach, maintaining that learning occurs primarily through a socially interactive process. Discusses use of CAPSI in an undergraduate course at the University of Manitoba that showed students…

  16. National PTA Gets Connected with Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Derek

    2011-01-01

    People are busy, we all know that. Getting their attention is harder and harder all the time. That's especially true for member organizations and advocacy groups. The National PTA is both and has adapted some social media practices to reach out and maintain contact with more than 5 million volunteers in 25,000 local units. James Martinez, senior…

  17. [Social cohesion and regional integration: the MERCOSUR social agenda and the integrationist social policy major challenges].

    PubMed

    Draibe, Sônia Miriam

    2007-01-01

    In the consolidation of the Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR), social policies are still in the embryonic stage. However, since the latter half of the 1990s there has been a speedup in the creation of institutions dedicated to such policies with the Common Market's framework. This article focuses on health policy and the broader social policy system in order to identify the reasons for the imbalance, through three movements: reconstitution of the history of the institutional construction of social policies in MERCOSUR; identification and comparison of the successive strategies for the formulation and implementation of the social integration agenda; and reflection on the current dilemmas and challenges faced by the process. According to the study, MERCOSUR operates with strategies that are difficult to mutually reconcile. On the institutional level, it follows a minimalist strategy, while on the conceptual/ discursive level it adopts a maximalist strategy for supranational unification of social policies. The fact is that it operates a minimalist social policy strategy, since it fails to bring to the field of social integration the debate and proposals on economic and social development models that could sustain the effective construction of regional social citizenship. PMID:17625644

  18. Do Consumers Expect Companies To Be Socially Responsible? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Buying Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Lois A.; Webb, Deborah J.; Harris, Katherine E.

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 48 consumers found that they desired moderate to high levels of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Precontemplators (n=16) did not base purchasing on CSR and contemplators (n=11) only moderately. The action group (n=8) had stronger beliefs about CSR but did not always purchase accordingly. Maintainers (n=9) practiced socially

  19. PA01.44. Applied aspect of Pranayama in maintaining health

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishvender; Rao, Prasanna N; Shailaja, U; Reena, K

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pranayama is the science of breathing and essence of being alive. It is the axis around which the entire life cycle resolves. Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well being and not merely an absence of disease or infirmity. Pranayama is compound word consisting Prana and Ayam, Prana means vital energy, breath, air etc. Prana is the vital life force that acts as a catalyst in all Physiological function and Ayama the expansion or control of this force. Method: Pranayama is a relatively simple, rhythmic, low cost intervention that can be incorporated into people's daily routine and have a positive impact on health. Maharishi Patanjali places Pranayama as the fourth limb of Ashtanga yoga. Prana is the fundamental basis of whatever is, was and will be. It consists three phase Purak, Kumbhak, Rechak. Result: Many researches show that breathing exercisesimprove respiratory physiology by increasing vital capacity and maintain homeostasis in blood. Researches show that pranayama is also helpful in improving the digestive activity by boosting enzymes action and promotes clearance of subtle metabolic wastes from the body. Conclusion: The process of breathing, vertical breathing is the more efficient way to inhale air than horizontal way. The present paper is high light the importance of pranayama in maintaining health, through previous research and contemporary concept.

  20. Polarization maintaining linear cavity Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heesuk; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Kim, Seungman; Lee, Keunwoo; Han, Seongheum; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    We present a polarization-maintaining (PM) type of Er-doped fiber linear oscillator designed to produce femtosecond laser pulses with high operational stability. Mode locking is activated using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) attached to one end of the linear PM oscillator. To avoid heat damage, the SESAM is mounted on a copper-silicon-layered heat sink and connected to the linear oscillator through a fiber buffer dissipating the residual pump power. A long-term stability test is performed to prove that the proposed oscillator design maintains a soliton-mode single-pulse operation without breakdown of mode locking over a week period. With addition of an Er-doped fiber amplifier, the output power is raised to 180 mW with 60 fs pulse duration, from which an octave-spanning supercontinuum is produced.

  1. Professionals' perceptions of maintaining personhood in hospice care.

    PubMed

    Kabel, Allison; Roberts, Dai

    2003-07-01

    This qualitative study examines the attempts made by hospice staff to support and maintain the personhood of hospice patients. The study was conducted over a six-month period at two hospice facilities in northwest England. Thirty staff members were interviewed about their interpretation of the hospice philosophy and how this influences their work with regard to patient personhood. Staff employed methods of normalizing the often-distressing symptoms that accompany serious illness, with the aim of maintaining personhood and dignity. Related to the support of personhood, is the concept of the "special" patient. Staff members discussed feelings of attachment towards particular patients that had developed out of the care-giving relationship. There was no suggestion that staff perceived special patients as receiving preferential treatment at the expense of other patients. However, experiences with "special" patients positively impacted staff members by reinforcing occupational choice and the inherent rewards of the profession. PMID:12920448

  2. Using GPS and VLBI technology to maintain 14 digit synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    To facilitate the navigation of spacecraft to the outer planets, Jupiter and beyond, the JPL-NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) has implemented three ensembles of atomic clocks at widely separated locations. These clocks must be maintained, synchronized, to with a few parts in 10 to the 13th power of each other and, the entire group must be maintained, to a lesser degree, in synchronism with Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)NBS/USNO. Over the last 1 1/2 years the DSN has been using Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technology to perform these critical Frequency and Time (F&T) synchronization tasks. A year of F&T synchronization data collected from the intercomparison of 3 sets of cesium and hydrogen maser driven clock ensembles through the use of GPS and VLBI techniques are covered. Also covered, are some of the problems met and limitations of these two techniques at their present level of technology.

  3. Maintaining Engagement in Long-term Interventions with Relational Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bickmore, Timothy; Schulman, Daniel; Yin, Langxuan

    2011-01-01

    We discuss issues in designing virtual humans for applications which require long-term voluntary use, and the problem of maintaining engagement with users over time. Concepts and theories related to engagement from a variety of disciplines are reviewed. We describe a platform for conducting studies into long-term interactions between humans and virtual agents, and present the results of two longitudinal randomized controlled experiments in which the effect of manipulations of agent behavior on user engagement was assessed. PMID:21318052

  4. Memory T cells maintain protracted protection against malaria.

    PubMed

    Krzych, Urszula; Zarling, Stasya; Pichugin, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Immunologic memory is one of the cardinal features of antigen-specific immune responses, and the persistence of memory cells contributes to prophylactic immunizations against infectious agents. Adequately maintained memory T and B cell pools assure a fast, effective and specific response against re-infections. However, many aspects of immunologic memory are still poorly understood, particularly immunologic memory inducible by parasites, for example, Plasmodium spp., the causative agents of malaria. For example, memory responses to Plasmodium antigens amongst residents of malaria endemic areas appear to be either inadequately developed or maintained, because persons who survive episodes of childhood malaria remain vulnerable to intermittent malaria infections. By contrast, multiple exposures of humans and laboratory rodents to radiation-attenuated Plasmodium sporozoites (?-spz) induce sterile and long-lasting protection against experimental sporozoite challenge. Multifactorial immune mechanisms maintain this protracted and sterile protection. While the presence of memory CD4 T cell subsets has been associated with lasting protection in humans exposed to multiple bites from Anopheles mosquitoes infected with attenuated Plasmodium falciparum, memory CD8 T cells maintain protection induced with Plasmodium yoelii and Plasmodium berghei ?-spz in murine models. In this review, we discuss our observations that show memory CD8 T cells specific for antigens expressed by P. berghei liver stage parasites as an indispensable component for the maintenance of protracted protective immunity against experimental malaria infection; moreover, the provision of an Ag-depot assures a quick recall of memory T cells as IFN-?-producing effector CD8 T cells and IL-4- producing CD4 T cells that collaborate with B cells for an effective antibody response. PMID:24709142

  5. The role of moisture in the nest thermoregulation of social wasps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingner, R.; Richter, K.; Schmolz, E.; Keller, B.

    2005-09-01

    Paper nests of social wasps are intriguing constructions for both, biologists and engineers. We demonstrate that moisture and latent heat significantly influence the thermal performance of the nest construction. Two colonies of the hornet Vespa crabro were investigated in order to clarify the relation of the temperature and the moisture regime inside the nest. Next to fairly stable nest temperatures the hornets maintain a high relative humidity inside the nest. We found that in consequence a partial vapor-pressure gradient between nest and ambient drives a constant vapor flux through the envelope. The vapor flux is limited by the diffusion resistance of the envelope. The driving force of vapor flux is heat, which is consumed through evaporation inside the nest. The colony has to compensate this loss with metabolic heat production in order to maintain a stable nest temperature. However, humidity fluctuations inside the nest induce circadian adsorption and desorption cycles, which stabilize the nest temperature and thus contribute significantly to temperature homeostasis. Our study demonstrates that both mechanisms influence nest thermoregulation and need to be considered to understand the thermodynamic behavior of nests of wasps and social insects in general.

  6. The social perceptual salience effect.

    PubMed

    Inderbitzin, Martin P; Betella, Alberto; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo P; Bernardet, Ulysses; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2013-02-01

    Affective processes appraise the salience of external stimuli preparing the agent for action. So far, the relationship between stimuli, affect, and action has been mainly studied in highly controlled laboratory conditions. In order to find the generalization of this relationship to social interaction, we assess the influence of the salience of social stimuli on human interaction. We constructed reality ball game in a mixed reality space where pairs of people collaborated in order to compete with an opposing team. We coupled the players with team members with varying social salience by using both physical and virtual representations of remote players (i.e., avatars). We observe that, irrespective of the team composition, winners and losers display significantly different inter- and intrateam spatial behaviors. We show that subjects regulate their interpersonal distance to both virtual and physical team members in similar ways, but in proportion to the vividness of the stimulus. As an independent validation of this social salience effect, we show that this behavioral effect is also displayed in physiological correlates of arousal. In addition, we found a strong correlation between performance, physiology, and the subjective reports of the subjects. Our results show that proxemics is consistent with affective responses, confirming the existence of a social salience effect. This provides further support for the so-called law of apparent reality, and it generalizes it to the social realm, where it can be used to design more efficient social artifacts. PMID:22612058

  7. Computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems are designed to replace a hospital's paper-based ordering system. They allow users to electronically write the full range of orders, maintain an online medication administration record, and review changes made to an order by successive personnel. They also offer safety alerts that are triggered when an unsafe order (such as for a duplicate drug therapy) is entered, as well as clinical decision support to guide caregivers to less expensive alternatives or to choices that better fit established hospital protocols. CPOE systems can, when correctly configured, markedly increase efficiency and improve patient safety and patient care. However, facilities need to recognize that currently available CPOE systems require a tremendous amount of time and effort to be spent in customization before their safety and clinical support features can be effectively implemented. What's more, even after they've been customized, the systems may still allow certain unsafe orders to be entered. Thus, CPOE systems are not currently a quick or easy remedy for medical errors. ECRI's Evaluation of CPOE systems--conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP)--discusses these and other related issues. It also examines and compares CPOE systems from three suppliers: Eclipsys Corp., IDX Systems Corp., and Siemens Medical Solutions Health Services Corp. Our testing focuses primarily on the systems' interfacing capabilities, patient safeguards, and ease of use. PMID:11696968

  8. Method and apparatus for maintaining thermal control in plasma conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for determining the effects of exposure of oxygen plasma on a thin film polymer whose bulk is maintained at a predetermined temperature. The apparatus includes a chamber having a specimen therein. A plasma environment is provided in the chamber. A closure member is provided for sealing the chamber after the specimen is introduced into the chamber. The closure member also serves as a support for the test apparatus which includes a cooling coil. A platform having the test specimen thereon is supported on the cooling coil to be cooled by coolant flowing through the cooling coils. A thermoelectric module is supported on the platform to assist in maintaining a low test temperature for the test samples. The temperature of the sample is monitored by a thermocouple probe which is in contact with the sample. Any change in bulk sample temperature caused by the thermocouple probe is quickly adjusted to maintain the initial bulk temperature by the thermoelectric module.

  9. A Tale of Two Threats: Social Anxiety and Attention to Social Threat as a Function of Social Exclusion and Non-Exclusion Threats.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Julia D; Dewall, C Nathan; Schmidt, Norman B; Maner, Jon K

    2010-10-01

    To attain and maintain social acceptance, people may attend to cues of possible social rejection or exclusion. Attention to such cues can be influenced by social anxiety. Two competing theories address social anxiety and attention: hypervigilance to versus avoidance of negative social cues. We propose a synthesis of these models such that, in the absence of social exclusion, socially anxious people may be hypervigilant to negative social cues. However, after experiencing social exclusion, they may avoid negative cues in favor of cues signaling social acceptance. Eyetracking was used to examine attention to negative, happy, and neutral faces after social exclusion threat or a non-exclusion threat (N = 27, 69.2% female). Fear of negative evaluation, a core component of social anxiety, was assessed using the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation (BFNE) scale (Leary 1983). Among individuals with high BFNE, non-exclusion threat elicited greater attention toward negative faces than did social exclusion threat. However, social exclusion threat relative to non-exclusion threat was related to greater attention to positive faces among those with high BFNE. These effects were not observed among those with low BFNE. Thus, data provide preliminary support for a synthesized model. PMID:20877581

  10. Maintaining the Status Quo: Symbolic Violence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jo; Widin, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Government policies and financial imperatives have fostered growing heterogeneity in student bodies in UK and Australian higher education (HE), but the underpinning logic of practice in these long-established social fields is far slower to change. Drawing on empirical evidence from case studies in each nation, this paper examines the tensions…

  11. Facebook: Maintaining Ethical Practice in the Cyberspace Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birky, Ian; Collins, Wanda

    2011-01-01

    Current technology provides counseling center clinicians regular and immediate access to the students they work with via social networking. Focusing on Facebook in particular, this article discusses the opportunities and challenges this access creates and specifically explores how utilization of ethical, clinical, and cultural lenses might affect…

  12. Intra-regional assortative sociality may be better explained by social network dynamics rather than pathogen risk avoidance.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Coulombe, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) model is not entirely supported by common patterns of affect behaviors among people who live under varying climatic conditions and among people who endorse varying levels of (Western) religiosity and conservative political ideals. The authors' model is also unable to account for intra-regional heterogeneity in assortative sociality, which, we argue, can be better explained by a framework that emphasizes the differential expression of fundamental social cues for maintaining distinct social network structures. PMID:22289188

  13. Unexpected Acceptance? Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder Manifest their Social Expectancy in ERPs During Social Feedback Processing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianqin; Gu, Ruolei; Bi, Xuejing; Zhu, Xiangru; Wu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on social anxiety have demonstrated negative-expectancy bias in social contexts. In this study, we used a paradigm that employed self-relevant positive or negative social feedback, in order to test whether this negative expectancy manifests in event-related potentials (ERPs) during social evaluation among socially anxious individuals. Behavioral data revealed that individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) showed more negative expectancy of peer acceptance both in the experiment and in daily life than did the healthy control participants. Regarding ERP results, we found a overally larger P2 for positive social feedback and also a group main effect, such that the P2 was smaller in SAD group. SAD participants demonstrated a larger feedback-related negativity (FRN) to positive feedback than to negative feedback. In addition, SAD participants showed a more positive ?FRN (?FRN = negative – positive). Furthermore, acceptance expectancy in daily life correlated negatively with ?FRN amplitude, while the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) score correlated positively with the ?FRN amplitude. Finally, the acceptance expectancy in daily life fully mediated the relationship between the IAS and ?FRN. These results indicated that both groups could differentiate between positive and negative social feedback in the early stage of social feedback processing (reflected on the P2). However, the SAD group exhibited a larger FRN to positive social feedback than to negative social feedback, demonstrating their dysfunction in the late stage of social feedback processing. In our opinion, such dysfunction is due to their greater negative social feedback expectancy. PMID:26635659

  14. 48 CFR 204.7005 - Assignment of order codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assignment of order codes... Identification Numbers 204.7005 Assignment of order codes. (a) Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Program Development and Implementation, maintains the order code assignments for use in the first...

  15. 48 CFR 204.7005 - Assignment of order codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assignment of order codes... Identification Numbers 204.7005 Assignment of order codes. (a) Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Program Development and Implementation, maintains the order code assignments for use in the first...

  16. 48 CFR 204.7005 - Assignment of order codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assignment of order codes... Identification Numbers 204.7005 Assignment of order codes. (a) Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Program Development and Implementation, maintains the order code assignments for use in the first...

  17. 48 CFR 204.7005 - Assignment of order codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assignment of order codes... Identification Numbers 204.7005 Assignment of order codes. (a) Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy, Program Development and Implementation, maintains the order code assignments for use in the first...

  18. Social Work and Applied Social Studies

    E-print Network

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Social Work and Applied Social Studies Undergraduate #12;Undergraduate Social and Policy Sciences 2, social policy, international development and social work. Many of our staff are at the forefront, in 2011 we were awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for our work on poverty and vulnerable people

  19. Social Engineering hits Social Commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenhardt, Werner; Wiele, Johannes

    Looking at social commerce, a bunch of bewildering phenomena attracts the attention of social psychologists. The way customers participate today shows attitudes and ethical behavior which cannot be explained from the inherent conditions of Web 2.0 environments alone. Fraud often succeeds, when you do not expect it, and honesty can be found under circumstances that do not support honesty at all. The current situation seems to result from customers assigning experience and ethics from real world business to virtual business environments. But there are indications that this situation may change. Social commerce could suffer as soon as customers would use its inherent weaknesses to their own advantage. The following article outlines first approaches to research into this topic.

  20. Socials Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2013-01-01

    Eric Sheninger, the principal at New Milford High School in Bergen County, NJ, is well-known in ed tech circles as an evangelist for the use of web 2.0 tools in K-12 education. New Milford has made collaboration a pillar of its educational platform, and Sheninger believes that social media helps students learn how to collaborate. In fact, he…

  1. Social medicine and social policy.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Social medicine as a term has achieved acceptance in medical education and medical practice, although there is still some question as to its acceptance in reality. The term had its origin in the vigorous nineteenth-century efforts at both medical and social reform, combining the two in a recognition of the intimate connection between social factors and the causation of disease. Henry Ernest Sigerist, a Swiss physician and noted scholar of medical history, formulated the broadest concept in the 1930s, attracting students and a latent American reform movement toward the idea of restructuring medical education as one part of social reform, and indicating ways of restructuring medical practice as another element in improving medical care at the same time. In addition to promulgating the doctrine, he established the policy of examining and describing systems of medical education and medical care in other parts of the world, not only to assist in improving medical care in countries with well-organized systems, but to assist countries with poor resources and lesser organizational capability in meeting the goals of social medicine. Doubt as to the durability of the concept has been expressed, insofar as the recommended improvements have lagged behind the expression, and because so many changes have taken place in the nature of medical practice, medical discoveries, and advances in technology. A closer examination of Sigerist's writings on the subject and evaluation of the circumstances around present-day problems would seem to indicate that the flaw is not in the doctrine, but in the lack of social application. PMID:6537694

  2. The Effects of Creative Drama on Social and Oral Language Skills of Children with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Rey E.; Lian, Ming-Gon John; Morreau, Lanny E.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates quantitatively that children with learning disabilities can improve and maintain social and oral expressive language (speaking) skills through a creative drama program with an emphasis on specific social and oral language usage. Demonstrates how social skills may be targeted successfully by developing instruments appropriate to…

  3. Rescripting Early Memories Linked to Negative Images in Social Phobia: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Jennifer; Hackmann, Ann; Clark, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Negative self-images are a maintaining factor in social phobia. A retrospective study (Hackmann, A., Clark, D.M., McManus, F. (2000). Recurrent images and early memories in social phobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38, 601-610) suggested that the images may be linked to early memories of unpleasant social experiences. This preliminary study…

  4. Theorizing Social Justice Ambiguities in an Era of Neoliberalism: The Case of Postapartheid South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subreenduth, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, Sharon Subreenduth explores how social justice policies have both global-local and historical dynamics and maintains that, as a result, dominant Western models of social justice limit engagement with alternative modes of understanding social justice in non-Western locations. She uses the South African experience as a case study for…

  5. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ...Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop...Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose...potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in blood donors. The public...

  6. 9 CFR 307.3 - Inspectors to furnish and maintain implements in a sanitary condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. 307.3 Section...INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES FOR INSPECTION § 307.3...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. Inspectors...maintain their implements in sanitary condition as prescribed...

  7. 9 CFR 307.3 - Inspectors to furnish and maintain implements in a sanitary condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. 307.3 Section...INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES FOR INSPECTION § 307.3...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. Inspectors...maintain their implements in sanitary condition as prescribed...

  8. 9 CFR 307.3 - Inspectors to furnish and maintain implements in a sanitary condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. 307.3 Section...INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES FOR INSPECTION § 307.3...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. Inspectors...maintain their implements in sanitary condition as prescribed...

  9. 9 CFR 307.3 - Inspectors to furnish and maintain implements in a sanitary condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. 307.3 Section...INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES FOR INSPECTION § 307.3...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. Inspectors...maintain their implements in sanitary condition as prescribed...

  10. 9 CFR 307.3 - Inspectors to furnish and maintain implements in a sanitary condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. 307.3 Section...INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION FACILITIES FOR INSPECTION § 307.3...and maintain implements in a sanitary condition. Inspectors...maintain their implements in sanitary condition as prescribed...

  11. 36 CFR 1236.26 - What actions must agencies take to maintain electronic information systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...take to maintain electronic information systems? 1236.26 Section 1236...take to maintain electronic information systems? (a) Agencies must maintain inventories of electronic information systems and review the...

  12. 36 CFR 1236.26 - What actions must agencies take to maintain electronic information systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...take to maintain electronic information systems? 1236.26 Section 1236...take to maintain electronic information systems? (a) Agencies must maintain inventories of electronic information systems and review the...

  13. 36 CFR 1236.26 - What actions must agencies take to maintain electronic information systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...take to maintain electronic information systems? 1236.26 Section 1236...take to maintain electronic information systems? (a) Agencies must maintain inventories of electronic information systems and review the...

  14. 36 CFR 1236.26 - What actions must agencies take to maintain electronic information systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...take to maintain electronic information systems? 1236.26 Section 1236...take to maintain electronic information systems? (a) Agencies must maintain inventories of electronic information systems and review the...

  15. 36 CFR 1236.26 - What actions must agencies take to maintain electronic information systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...take to maintain electronic information systems? 1236.26 Section 1236...take to maintain electronic information systems? (a) Agencies must maintain inventories of electronic information systems and review the...

  16. Switchable UWB pulse generation using a polarization maintaining fiber Bragg grating as frequency discriminator.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhuan; Li, Zhaohui; Guan, Bai-Ou; Lu, C; Tam, H Y; Wai, P K A

    2010-02-15

    We propose and successfully demonstrate a novel approach to optically generate ultrawideband (UWB) pulse with switchable shape and polarity by using a polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) as frequency discriminator. Depending on the shape of the reflective spectrum of the PM-FBG, the system can function as a first- or second-order differentiator for the generation of Gaussian UWB monocycle or doublet pulses. Consequently, the shape and the polarity of the generated UWB pulse can be switched by simple adjustment of a polarization controller (PC). Gaussian monocycle and doublet pulses were successfully obtained with fractional bandwidths of about 188% and 152%, respectively. Higher-order UWB pulses with spectrum covering from 2.9 GHz to 9.8 GHz have also been obtained through adjustment of the PC. PMID:20389374

  17. Sibling-Implemented Intervention for Improving Social Interaction Skills of Young Children who Have Difficulties with Socialization

    E-print Network

    Kim, Taeyoung

    2010-10-27

    The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of siblings as an important intervention agent by systematically teaching them appropriate social skills and strategies in order to improve the social interaction skills of their siblings who have...

  18. Diets, equipment, and techniques for maintaining crawfish in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarshis, I.B.

    1978-01-01

    One commercial and 4 laboratory prepared extruded, water-stable diets were fed 3 times a week in 1-g portions to juvenile male and female White River crawfish, Procambarus acutus acutus (Girard), for 10 weeks. The. binding material in the laboratory preparation was alginate (Kelgin), whereas that in the commercial preparation was starch. No statistically significant weight differences developed between the groups of crawfish at the end of the 10-week period; all 5 diets were found satisfactory for feeding and maintaining P. acutus acutus in the laboratory, and all test crawfish survived throughout the experimental period. Weight gains were highest in a diet containing 50.5% protein; intermediate in those fed a diet with 46.0% protein; and lowest in those fed diets with 31.7 or 36.3% protein. Crawfish fed the commercial preparation of one of the 46.0% protein diets showed a slightly but not significantly higher weight gain than those fed the laboratory preparation of the diet. In an evaluation of the water stability of 5 commercially prepared animal chow diets and the commercial extruded diet, 2 of the commercial diets disintegrated after one hour exposure in water and the other 3 became bloated after one hour and remained on the surface throughout the 24-hour test. The commercial extruded diet maintained its water stability for the full 24 hours. The commercial preparation of the 46.0% protein diet was successfully used under laboratory conditions for feeding and maintaining the following crawfishes: Cambarellus shufeldtii (Faxon), Cambarus acuminatus Faxon, Orconectes limosus (Rafinesque), O. virilis (Hagen), Procambarus clarkii (Girard), and P. spiculifer (Le conte). In longevity experiments Cambarus diogenes diogenes Girard and Procambarus hinei (Ortmann) now have survived for 8 months on this diet in the laboratory.

  19. Managers' duty to maintain good workplace communications skills.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental element of care at every level of nursing practice. It is important, therefore, for nurse managers to create environments that promote and encourage good communication, and help nurses to develop their communication skills formally and informally. This article discusses the effects of communication on the quality of care. It examines nurses' professional duty to maintain good communication skills and how managers can help them do this. It also discusses nurse managers' communication skills in the context of leadership style, conflict resolution and self-awareness. Finally, it considers the notion of shared governance as good practice. PMID:21736171

  20. The Importance of Maintaining Protected Zone Status against Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Vänninen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major pest of economically important crops worldwide. Both the United Kingdom (UK) and Finland hold Protected Zone status against this invasive pest. As a result B. tabaci entering these countries on plants and plant produce is subjected to a policy of eradication. The impact of B. tabaci entering, and becoming established, is that it is an effective vector of many plant viruses that are not currently found in the protected zones. The Mediterranean species is the most commonly intercepted species of B. tabaci entering both the UK and Finland. The implications of maintaining Protected Zone status are discussed. PMID:26463194

  1. The Importance of Maintaining Protected Zone Status against Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.; Vänninen, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major pest of economically important crops worldwide. Both the United Kingdom (UK) and Finland hold Protected Zone status against this invasive pest. As a result B. tabaci entering these countries on plants and plant produce is subjected to a policy of eradication. The impact of B. tabaci entering, and becoming established, is that it is an effective vector of many plant viruses that are not currently found in the protected zones. The Mediterranean species is the most commonly intercepted species of B. tabaci entering both the UK and Finland. The implications of maintaining Protected Zone status are discussed. PMID:26463194

  2. Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ)

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  3. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  4. Social Goals, Social Behavior, and Social Status in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodkin, Philip C.; Ryan, Allison M.; Jamison, Rhonda; Wilson, Travis

    2013-01-01

    This study examines motivational precursors of social status and the applicability of a dual-component model of social competence to middle childhood. Concurrent and longitudinal relationships between self-reported social goals (social development, demonstration-approach, demonstration-avoid goal orientations), teacher-rated prosocial and…

  5. Solving the viscous hydrodynamics order by order

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method of solving the viscous hydrodynamics order by order in a derivative expansion. In such method, the zero order solution is just the one of the ideal hydrodynamics. All the other higher order corrections satisfy the same first-order partial differential equations but with different inhomogeneous terms. We therefore argue that our method could be easily extended to any orders. The problem of causality and stability will be released if the gradient expansion is guaranteed. This method might be of great help to both theoretical and numerical calculations of relativistic hydrodynamics.

  6. Connectibles : tangible social networking

    E-print Network

    Kalanithi, Jeevan James

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents "Connectibles," an instantiation of a tangible social network, a new type of social network application rooted in physical objects and real world social behavior. This research is inspired by social ...

  7. Social Aspects of Osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You are here Home » Social Aspects of Osteoporosis Social Aspects of Osteoporosis Of all the ways osteoporosis affects your quality of life, the social consequences may be the least recognized. Managing social ...

  8. How bacteria maintain location and number of flagella?

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Jan S; Thormann, Kai M; Bange, Gert

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria differ in number and location of their flagella that appear in regular patterns at the cell surface (flagellation pattern). Despite the plethora of bacterial species, only a handful of these patterns exist. The correct flagellation pattern is a prerequisite for motility, but also relates to biofilm formation and the pathogenicity of disease-causing flagellated bacteria. However, the mechanisms that maintain location and number of flagella are far from being understood. Here, we review our knowledge on mechanisms that enable bacteria to maintain their appropriate flagellation pattern. While some peritrichous flagellation patterns might occur by rather simple stochastic processes, other bacterial species appear to rely on landmark systems to define the designated flagellar position. Such landmarks are the Tip system of Caulobacter crescentus or the signal recognition particle (SRP)-GTPase FlhF and the MinD/ParA-type ATPase FlhG (synonyms: FleN, YlxH and MinD2). The latter two proteins constitute a regulatory circuit essential for diverse flagellation patterns in many Gram-positive and negative species. The interactome of FlhF/G (e.g. C-ring proteins FliM, FliN, FliY or the transcriptional regulator FleQ/FlrA) seems evolutionary adapted to meet the specific needs for a respective pattern. This variability highlights the importance of the correct flagellation pattern for motile species. PMID:26195616

  9. Viability of fungal cultures maintained at -70 degrees C.

    PubMed Central

    Pasarell, L; McGinnis, M R

    1992-01-01

    One thousand four hundred forty-seven clinical and environmental isolates of molds, yeasts, aerobic actinomycetes, and algae belonging to 164 genera (382 taxa) maintained on potato dextrose agar at -70 degrees C for periods ranging from 6 months to 13 years were subcultured and then incubated at 25 degrees C to determine their viabilities. Thirty-three isolates, Alternaria alternata (n = 1), Apophysomyces elegans (n = 1), Bipolaris spicifera (n = 1), Blastomyces dermatitidis (n = 4), Cokeromyces recurvatus (n = 1), Coremiella cubispora (n = 1), Cryptococcus ater (n = 1), Curvularia sp. (n = 1), Exserohilum monoceras (n = 1), Exserohilum pedicillatum (n = 1), Exserohilum rostratum (n = 1), Filobasidium floriforme (n = 1), Madurella mycetomatis (n = 1), Oedocephalum spp. (n = 2), Penicillium marneffei (n = 1), Pseudomicrodochium spp. (n = 4), Saksenaea vasiformis (n = 1), Sporothrix sp. (n = 1), and Mycelia Sterilia (n = 8), did not grow after repeated attempts at subculturing. Neither time in storage nor taxonomic classification was associated with a lack of viability. Storage at low temperature for either short or long periods of time is an excellent method for maintaining most medically important fungi. PMID:1572955

  10. Successive bioanode regenerations to maintain efficient current production from biowaste.

    PubMed

    Bridier, A; Desmond-Le Quemener, E; Bureau, C; Champigneux, P; Renvoise, L; Audic, J-M; Blanchet, E; Bergel, A; Bouchez, T

    2015-12-01

    The long-term operation of efficient bioanodes supplied with waste-derived organics is a key challenge for using bioelectrochemical systems as a waste valorization technology. Here, we describe a simple procedure that allowed maintaining highly efficient bioanodes supplied with biowaste. Current densities up to 14.8 A/m(2) were obtained with more than 40% of the electrons introduced as biowaste being recovered in the electrical circuit. Three fed-batch reactors were started at different biowaste loading rates. A decline of coulombic efficiencies between 22 and 31% was recorded depending on the reactor over the first 3 weeks of operation. A renewal procedure of the anode was thereafter implemented, which led to a recovery of initial performances. The second and the third renewal, allowed maintaining stable high level performances with coulombic efficiency of approximately 40% over at least 3 weeks. Electroactive biofilm dynamics were monitored using 16S rRNA-gene amplicon sequencing. Retrieved sequences were dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens-related reads (37% of total sequences), which proportion however varied along the experiment. Interestingly, sequences affiliated to various Bacteroidetes groups were also abundant, suggesting an adaptation of the anodic biofilm to the degradation of biowaste through metabolic interactions between microbial community members. PMID:26026839

  11. Test, monitor, and maintain above ground tanks properly

    SciTech Connect

    Rorty, M. ); McLearn, M.E. )

    1993-12-01

    Above ground storage tanks (ASTs) are coming under increasing scrutiny at the federal, state, and local levels, and ongoing federal and state activity could result in more comprehensive regulations for ASTs. This article outlines the equipment and services available to test, monitor, and maintain ASTs. It also provides guidance on the elements of an inspection and maintenance program, such as what to check and how often. Of course, new technologies and equipment refinements are always under development, and new AST regulations are being considered at the federal level. Thus, it is imperative that the AST owner/operator remain aware of changes and developments in this field. The article is based on a study of ASTs in the electric utility industry funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Most of the tanks in the electric utility industry store petroleum products such as fuel oil, motor fuels, lubricating oil, waste oil, and mineral oil. Many of the technologies for testing, monitoring, and maintaining ASTs covered in the study are also applicable to the chemical process industries (CPI). The regulatory requirements, however, vary depending upon what is stored in the tank.

  12. Identifying the variables maintaining self-injurious behavior.

    PubMed

    Durand, V M; Crimmins, D B

    1988-03-01

    Reliability and validity data are reported for an instrument designed to identify variables maintaining self-injurious behavior. The Motivation Assessment Scale (MAS) is a 16-item questionnaire that addresses the situational determinants of self-injurious behavior in persons with autism and other developmental disorders. The reliability study indicated that teachers of 50 developmentally disabled persons could agree on the variables presumably maintaining their student's self-injury (interrater reliability), and that they would be in agreement again 30 days later (test-retest reliability). The validity study indicated that teacher's ratings on the MAS of 8 subjects' self-injury predicted how their students would behave in analogue situations. Specifically, the MAS predicted the subjects' self-injurious behavior in situations with decreased adult attention, with increased academic demands, with restricted access to tangibles, and in unstructured settings. The MAS is presented as an alternative or adjunct to more formal functional analyses in efforts to identify the variables controlling self-injurious behavior. PMID:3372462

  13. Bbof1 is required to maintain cilia orientation

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yuan-Hung; Werner, Michael E.; Stubbs, Jennifer; Joens, Matt S.; Li, Julie; Chien, Shu; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Mitchell, Brian J.; Kintner, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Multiciliate cells (MCCs) are highly specialized epithelial cells that employ hundreds of motile cilia to produce a vigorous directed flow in a variety of organ systems. The production of this flow requires the establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) whereby MCCs align hundreds of beating cilia along a common planar axis. The planar axis of cilia in MCCs is known to be established via the PCP pathway and hydrodynamic cues, but the downstream steps required for cilia orientation remain poorly defined. Here, we describe a new component of cilia orientation, based on the phenotypic analysis of an uncharacterized coiled-coil protein, called bbof1. We show that the expression of bbof1 is induced during the early phases of MCC differentiation by the master regulator foxj1. MCC differentiation and ciliogenesis occurs normally in embryos where bbof1 activity is reduced, but cilia orientation is severely disrupted. We show that cilia in bbof1 mutants can still respond to patterning and hydrodynamic cues, but lack the ability to maintain their precise orientation. Misexpression of bbof1 promotes cilia alignment, even in the absence of flow or in embryos where microtubules and actin filaments are disrupted. Bbof1 appears to mediate cilia alignment by localizing to a polar structure adjacent to the basal body. Together, these results suggest that bbof1 is a basal body component required in MCCs to align and maintain cilia orientation in response to flow. PMID:23900544

  14. Maintaining Aura's Orbit Requirements Under New Maneuver Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Megan; Petersen, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Afternoon Constellation consists of five member missions (GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and Aura), each of which maintain a frozen, sun-synchronous orbit with a 16-day repeating ground track that follows the Worldwide Reference System-2 (WRS-2). Under nominal science operations for Aura, the propulsion system is oriented such that the resultant thrust vector is aligned 13.493 degrees away from the velocity vector along the yaw axis. When performing orbit maintenance maneuvers, the spacecraft performs a yaw slew to align the thrust vector in the appropriate direction. A new Drag Make Up (DMU) maneuver operations scheme has been implemented for Aura alleviating the need for the 13.493 degree yaw slew. The focus of this investigation is to assess the impact that no-slew DMU maneuver operations will have on Auras Mean Local Time (MLT) which drives the required along track separation between Aura and the constellation members, as well as Auras frozen orbit properties, eccentricity and argument of perigee. Seven maneuver strategies were analyzed to determine the best operational approach. A mirror pole strategy, with maneuvers alternating at the North and South poles, was implemented operationally to minimize impact to the MLT. Additional analysis determined that the mirror pole strategy could be further modified to include frozen orbit maneuvers and thus maintain both MLT and the frozen orbit properties under no-slew operations

  15. Constructing, Perceiving, and Maintaining Scenes: Hippocampal Activity and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeidman, Peter; Mullally, Sinéad L.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has accumulated to suggest the hippocampus plays a role beyond memory. A strong hippocampal response to scenes has been noted, and patients with bilateral hippocampal damage cannot vividly recall scenes from their past or construct scenes in their imagination. There is debate about whether the hippocampus is involved in the online processing of scenes independent of memory. Here, we investigated the hippocampal response to visually perceiving scenes, constructing scenes in the imagination, and maintaining scenes in working memory. We found extensive hippocampal activation for perceiving scenes, and a circumscribed area of anterior medial hippocampus common to perception and construction. There was significantly less hippocampal activity for maintaining scenes in working memory. We also explored the functional connectivity of the anterior medial hippocampus and found significantly stronger connectivity with a distributed set of brain areas during scene construction compared with scene perception. These results increase our knowledge of the hippocampus by identifying a subregion commonly engaged by scenes, whether perceived or constructed, by separating scene construction from working memory, and by revealing the functional network underlying scene construction, offering new insights into why patients with hippocampal lesions cannot construct scenes. PMID:25405941

  16. Acquiring and maintaining a normal oral microbiome: current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaura, Egija; Nicu, Elena A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Keijser, Bart J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiota survives daily physical and chemical perturbations from the intake of food and personal hygiene measures, resulting in a long-term stable microbiome. Biological properties that confer stability in the microbiome are important for the prevention of dysbiosis—a microbial shift toward a disease, e.g., periodontitis or caries. Although processes that underlie oral diseases have been studied extensively, processes involved in maintaining of a normal, healthy microbiome are poorly understood. In this review we present our hypothesis on how a healthy oral microbiome is acquired and maintained. We introduce our view on the prenatal development of tolerance for the normal oral microbiome: we propose that development of fetal tolerance toward the microbiome of the mother during pregnancy is the major factor for a successful acquisition of a normal microbiome. We describe the processes that influence the establishment of such microbiome, followed by our perspective on the process of sustaining a healthy oral microbiome. We divide microbiome-maintenance factors into host-derived and microbe-derived, while focusing on the host. Finally, we highlight the need and directions for future research. PMID:25019064

  17. Landscape irrigation management for maintaining an aquifer and economic returns.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Kent Forrest; Mancini, Mattia; West, Grant

    2015-09-01

    Expanding irrigated agriculture and dryer climatic conditions has led to large-scale withdrawals of groundwater and the decline in shallow aquifers. Policy makers must wrestle with the challenge of maintaining economic growth while conserving the groundwater resource. A spatially explicit landscape level model analyzes consequences of optimally chosen crop mix patterns on an aquifer and economic returns. The model of the groundwater use incorporates irrigation needs of the crops grown, initial aquifer thickness, hydro-conductivity of the aquifer, and distance to surrounding grid cells. The economic model incorporates the site specific yield, crop mix, and irrigation practice investments to predict economic returns. A tradeoff occurs between the volume of the aquifer and economic returns due to groundwater withdrawal for irrigation, but the farm's ability to grow profitable lower irrigation crops dampens the intensity of this tradeoff. Allowing for multiple unconventional irrigation practices that are yield increasing and water conserving significantly increases the economic returns of a given crop mix while maintaining the aquifer. PMID:26144558

  18. FRENCH ORDER WITHOUT ORDER* Gabriel G. B~

    E-print Network

    FRENCH ORDER WITHOUT ORDER* Gabriel G. B~ Universit6 Blaise Pascal - Clermont II, Formation Universit6 Blaise Pascal -Clermont II and University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Science, 2 Buccleuch

  19. Testing social acoustic memory in rats: effects of stimulus configuration and long-term memory on the induction of social approach behavior by appetitive 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, Markus; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2012-09-01

    Rats emit distinct types of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), which serve as situation-dependent affective signals. In appetitive situations, such as rough-and-tumble-play, high-frequency 50-kHz USVs occur, whereas low-frequency 22-kHz USVs can be observed in aversive situations, such as social defeat. USVs serve distinct communicative functions and induce call-specific behavioral responses in the receiver. While aversive 22-kHz USVs serve as alarm calls and induce behavioral inhibition, appetitive 50-kHz USVs have a pro-social communicative function and elicit social approach behavior, supporting the notion that they serve as social contact calls to (re)establish or maintain contact among conspecifics. The aim of the present study was to use the rat's ability to communicate in the ultrasonic range via high-frequency 50-kHz USVs in order to develop a test for social acoustic memory in rats with relevance for human verbal memory. Verbal learning and memory is among the seven cognitive domains identified as commonly deficient in human schizophrenia patients, but particularly difficult to model. We therefore tested whether the induction of social approach behavior by playback of appetitive 50-kHz USVs is dependent on (1) acoustic stimulus configuration and (2) social long-term memory, and whether (3) social long-term memory effects can be blocked by the administration of scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine antagonist producing amnesia. Results show that social approach behavior in response to playback of natural 50-kHz USVs depends on acoustic stimulus configuration and occurs only when sound energy is concentrated to a critical frequency band in the ultrasonic range. Social approach behavior was detected during the first exposure to playback of 50-kHz USVs, whereas no such response was observed during the second exposure 1week later, indicating a stable memory trace. In contrast, when memory formation was blocked by i.p. administration of scopolamine (0.5mg/kg or 1.5mg/kg) immediately after the first exposure, rats displayed social approach behavior during the second exposure as well. Induction of social approach behavior in response to repeated playback of natural 50-kHz USVs may therefore provide a new and rather unique approach for testing social acoustic memory in rats with relevance to human verbal memory. PMID:22677211

  20. 19th Century Spiritualism: How proponents deploy particular arguments in order to maintain belief despite negative evidence 

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Victoria

    2013-03-13

    reveals those defending the truth of Spiritualism either dismiss negative evidence and argue that fraud was impossible, express that fraudulent manifestations did not mean that others were not genuine or establish that failures were the result of spirits...

  1. Social organization in Eulipotyphla: evidence for a social shrew.

    PubMed

    Valomy, M; Hayes, L D; Schradin, C

    2015-11-01

    Shrews and their close relatives (order Eulipotyphla) are typically considered to be solitary. This impacts our understanding of mammalian social evolution: (i) the ancestor of mammals is believed to have been shrew-like, and even though Eulipotyphla are not more basal than other mammalian orders, this might have been one reason why the first mammals have been assumed to be solitary-living; (ii) Eulipotyphla are the third largest mammalian order, with hundreds of species entering comparative analyses. We review primary field studies reporting the social organization of Eulipotyphla, doing a literature research on 445 species. Primary literature was only available for 16 of the 445 species. We found 56% of the studied species to be social (38% were living in pairs), which is in sharp contrast to the 0.5 and 8% reported in other databases. We conclude that the available information indicates that shrews are more sociable than generally believed. An interesting alternative hypothesis is that the mammalian ancestor might have been pair-living. To understand the social evolution of mammals, comparative studies must be based on reliable and specific information, and more species of all orders must be studied in the field. PMID:26559515

  2. The ultra-social animal

    PubMed Central

    Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In evolutionary perspective, what is most remarkable about human sociality is its many and diverse forms of cooperation. Here, I provide an overview of some recent research, mostly from our laboratory, comparing human children with their nearest living relatives, the great apes, in various tests of collaboration, prosocial behavior, conformity, and group-mindedness (e.g., following and enforcing social norms). This is done in the context of a hypothetical evolutionary scenario comprising two ordered steps: a first step in which early humans began collaborating with others in unique ways in their everyday foraging and a second step in which modern humans began forming cultural groups. Humans' unique forms of sociality help to explain their unique forms of cognition and morality. © 2014. The Authors. European Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25641998

  3. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  4. Alzheimer’s disease and language impairments: social intervention and medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Klimova, Blanka; Maresova, Petra; Valis, Martin; Hort, Jakub; Kuca, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Communication is very important for people to be successfully integrated into social environment and make and maintain relationship. Particularly, language difficulties lead to social exclusion of the people affected with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and contribute to a significant decrease in the quality of their life and also have a big impact on their family members who in most cases become their caregivers who need to communicate with their loved ones in order to meet their needs. Therefore, the goal of this study is to describe language impairments in the individual phases of AD and discuss their improvement with respect to AD on the basis of literature review. The authors of this article use traditional research methods in order to achieve the goal set mentioned earlier. First, a method of literature review of available sources describing language impairments in the individual phases of AD is exploited. Second, to show how informal caregivers and relevant drugs can successfully intervene in the improvement of these language impairments, a method of comparison of different research studies exploring such social intervention and medical treatment is used. PMID:26346123

  5. Preschoolers' Social Skills Steer Life Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clarissa A.; Schiller, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Children begin forming social and emotional intelligence at birth. They need the support of a caring adult at first, and then later interactions with peers, in order to encounter the experiences that will guide their brain development in the social and emotional domains. With the help and input of others, children begin to understand, express, and…

  6. Social Capital: Its Constructs and Survey Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enfield, Richard P.; Nathaniel, Keith C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on experiences and methods of adapting a valid adult social capital assessment to youth audiences in order to measure social capital and sense of place. The authors outline the process of adapting, revising, prepiloting, piloting, and administering a youth survey exploring young people's sense of community, involvement in…

  7. Improving Social Skills through Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, LaQuita D.; Coleman, Lisa D.; Haizel, Michelle D.; Michalowski, Lawrence A.

    This report describes a program for improving adolescent social skills in order to reduce inappropriate behavioral choices in the classroom setting. The targeted population consisted of third, fifth, and sixth grade students expanding from lower to middle class communities. The lack of social skills in their learning environment was recorded…

  8. Evaluating Function-Based Social Stories™ With Children With Autism.

    PubMed

    Pane, Heather M; Sidener, Tina M; Vladescu, Jason C; Nirgudkar, Anjalee

    2015-11-01

    Social Stories™ are often used with children with autism to provide information about appropriate behaviors in specific contexts. Although Social Stories™ often target reduction of problem behavior, there is limited research evaluating function-based Social Stories™ based on the results of experimental functional analyses. This study used a brief functional analysis to assist in developing a Social Story™ that matched the function of the target behavior for two boys with autism. The differential effects of a Social Story™ that matched the function of the behavior, a Social Story™ that did not match the function of the behavior, and a Social Story™ that described baseline were compared in an alternating treatments design. Results indicated that (a) the function-based Social Story™ plus functional communication training (FCT) was effective in decreasing target problem behavior and increasing target mands for both participants, (b) both participants selected the function-based Social Story™ during treatment preference evaluations, and (c) both participants maintained low levels of target problem behavior and maintained target mands when the Social Stories™ were removed. PMID:26342012

  9. Teachers, Social Class and Underachievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mairead; Gazeley, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Addressing the "the social class attainment gap" in education has become a government priority in England. Despite multiple initiatives, however, little has effectively addressed the underachievement of working-class pupils within the classroom. In order to develop clearer understandings of working-class underachievement at this level, this small…

  10. The Social Perceptual Salience Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inderbitzin, Martin P.; Betella, Alberto; Lanata, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo P.; Bernardet, Ulysses; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Affective processes appraise the salience of external stimuli preparing the agent for action. So far, the relationship between stimuli, affect, and action has been mainly studied in highly controlled laboratory conditions. In order to find the generalization of this relationship to social interaction, we assess the influence of the salience of…

  11. Advantageous diversity maintained by balancing selection in humans.

    PubMed

    Key, Felix M; Teixeira, João C; de Filippo, Cesare; Andrés, Aida M

    2014-12-01

    Most human polymorphisms are neutral or slightly deleterious, but some genetic variation is advantageous and maintained in populations by balancing selection. Considered a rarity and overlooked for years, balanced polymorphisms have recently received renewed attention with several lines of evidence showing their relevance in human evolution. From theoretical work on its role in adaptation to empirical studies that identify its targets, recent developments have showed that balancing selection is more prevalent than previously thought. Here we review these developments and discuss their implications in our understanding of the influence of balancing selection in human evolution. We also review existing evidence on the biological functions that benefit most from advantageous diversity, and the functional consequences of these variants. Overall, we argue that balancing selection must be considered an important selective force in human evolution. PMID:25173959

  12. What are the molecular ties that maintain genomic loops?

    PubMed

    Marenduzzo, Davide; Faro-Trindade, Inês; Cook, Peter R

    2007-03-01

    The formation of genomic loops by proteins bound at sites scattered along a chromosome has a central role in many cellular processes, such as transcription, recombination and replication. Until recently, few such loops had been analyzed in any detail, and there was little agreement about the nature of the molecular ties maintaining these loops. Recent evidence suggests that loops are found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and that the transcription machinery is a molecular tie. In addition, results obtained using site-specific recombination in bacteria and chromosome conformation capture in eukaryotes support the idea that active transcription units are in close contact. These data are consistent with a model for genome organization in which active polymerases cluster into transcription 'factories', which, inevitably, loops the intervening DNA. They are also consistent with the ties functioning as barriers, silencers, enhancers or locus control regions, depending on their positions relative to other genes. PMID:17280735

  13. Maintaining consistency between planning hierarchies: Techniques and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoch, David R.

    1987-01-01

    In many planning and scheduling environments, it is desirable to be able to view and manipulate plans at different levels of abstraction, allowing the users the option of viewing and manipulating either a very detailed representation of the plan or a high-level more abstract version of the plan. Generating a detailed plan from a more abstract plan requires domain-specific planning/scheduling knowledge; the reverse process of generating a high-level plan from a detailed plan Reverse Plan Maintenance, or RPM) requires having the system remember the actions it took based on its domain-specific knowledge and its reasons for taking those actions. This reverse plan maintenance process is described as implemented in a specific planning and scheduling tool, The Mission Operations Planning Assistant (MOPA), as well as the applications of RPM to other planning and scheduling problems; emphasizing the knowledge that is needed to maintain the correspondence between the different hierarchical planning levels.

  14. Culturing and Maintaining Clostridium difficile in an Anaerobic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Adrianne N.; Suárez, Jose M.; McBride, Shonna M.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, sporogenic bacterium that is primarily responsible for antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) and is a significant nosocomial pathogen. C. difficile is notoriously difficult to isolate and cultivate and is extremely sensitive to even low levels of oxygen in the environment. Here, methods for isolating C. difficile from fecal samples and subsequently culturing C. difficile for preparation of glycerol stocks for long-term storage are presented. Techniques for preparing and enumerating spore stocks in the laboratory for a variety of downstream applications including microscopy and animal studies are also described. These techniques necessitate an anaerobic chamber, which maintains a consistent anaerobic environment to ensure proper conditions for optimal C. difficile growth. We provide protocols for transferring materials in and out of the chamber without causing significant oxygen contamination along with suggestions for regular maintenance required to sustain the appropriate anaerobic environment for efficient and consistent C. difficile cultivation. PMID:24084491

  15. Hierarchically nanotextured surfaces maintaining superhydrophobicity under severely adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Auf der Mauer, Matthias; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically nanostructured, environmentally friendly, metal-based (aluminum) superhydrophobic surfaces, which maintain their performance under severely adverse conditions. Based on their functionality, we superpose selected hydrophobic layers (i.e. self-assembled monolayers, thin films, or nanofibrous coatings) on hierarchically textured aluminum surfaces, collectively imparting high level robustness of superhydrophobicity under adverse conditions. These surfaces simultaneously exhibit chemical stability, mechanical durability and droplet impalement resistance. They impressively maintained their superhydrophobicity after exposure to severely adverse chemical environments like strong alkaline (pH ~ 9-10), acidic (pH ~ 2-3), and ionic solutions (3.5 weight% of sodium chloride), and could simultaneously resist water droplet impalement up to an impact velocity of 3.2 m s-1 as well as withstand standard mechanical durability tests.Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically nanostructured, environmentally friendly, metal-based (aluminum) superhydrophobic surfaces, which maintain their performance under severely adverse conditions. Based on their functionality, we superpose selected hydrophobic layers (i.e. self-assembled monolayers, thin films, or nanofibrous coatings) on hierarchically textured aluminum surfaces, collectively imparting high level robustness of superhydrophobicity under adverse conditions. These surfaces simultaneously exhibit chemical stability, mechanical durability and droplet impalement resistance. They impressively maintained their superhydrophobicity after exposure to severely adverse chemical environments like strong alkaline (pH ~ 9-10), acidic (pH ~ 2-3), and ionic solutions (3.5 weight% of sodium chloride), and could simultaneously resist water droplet impalement up to an impact velocity of 3.2 m s-1 as well as withstand standard mechanical durability tests. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Contact angles on intermediate surfaces; changes in PDMS film thickness with n-hexane immersion; the chemical stability of surfaces with (C3) and without PDMS film (C2) and the impalement pressure balance. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01368a

  16. Elimination of unfit cells maintains tissue health and prolongs lifespan.

    PubMed

    Merino, Marisa M; Rhiner, Christa; Lopez-Gay, Jesus M; Buechel, David; Hauert, Barbara; Moreno, Eduardo

    2015-01-29

    Viable yet damaged cells can accumulate during development and aging. Although eliminating those cells may benefit organ function, identification of this less fit cell population remains challenging. Previously, we identified a molecular mechanism, based on "fitness fingerprints" displayed on cell membranes, which allows direct fitness comparison among cells in Drosophila. Here, we study the physiological consequences of efficient cell selection for the whole organism. We find that fitness-based cell culling is naturally used to maintain tissue health, delay aging, and extend lifespan in Drosophila. We identify a gene, azot, which ensures the elimination of less fit cells. Lack of azot increases morphological malformations and susceptibility to random mutations and accelerates tissue degeneration. On the contrary, improving the efficiency of cell selection is beneficial for tissue health and extends lifespan. PMID:25601460

  17. A simple method of maintaining cannula patency for repeated hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    CHUNG, W B; PRICE, J D

    1963-06-01

    Hemodialysis requires repeated arterial and venous cut-downs unless Scribner's bypass technique is used. Infusion of large volumes of fluid causes further attrition of vessels; cardiac decompensation is a contraindication for an arteriovenous bypass. To overcome these problems a simple method of maintaining indwelling arterial and venous cannula patency by gravity infusion of 20 mg. heparin in 500 mg. of solution has been devised. The solution is suspended from a ceiling hook, the height being adjusted by pulley, according to the patient's blood pressure. A minimum infusion rate of 500 ml. per day keeps the cannula open indefinitely. In three patients dialyzed repeatedly the cannulae remained patent up to 13 days and were still open when removed. The method also facilitates connection of the patient to a dialyzer. PMID:14021246

  18. Rewarding peer reviewers: maintaining the integrity of science communication.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Voronov, Alexander A; Kitas, George D

    2015-04-01

    This article overviews currently available options for rewarding peer reviewers. Rewards and incentives may help maintain the quality and integrity of scholarly publications. Publishers around the world implemented a variety of financial and nonfinancial mechanisms for incentivizing their best reviewers. None of these is proved effective on its own. A strategy of combined rewards and credits for the reviewers1 creative contributions seems a workable solution. Opening access to reviews and assigning publication credits to the best reviews is one of the latest achievements of digitization. Reviews, posted on academic networking platforms, such as Publons, add to the transparency of the whole system of peer review. Reviewer credits, properly counted and displayed on individual digital profiles, help distinguish the best contributors, invite them to review and offer responsible editorial posts. PMID:25829801

  19. Maintaining Atmospheric Mass and Water Balance Within Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max; Todling, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the modifications implemented into the Goddard Earth Observing System Version-5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (ADAS) to maintain global conservation of dry atmospheric mass as well as to preserve the model balance of globally integrated precipitation and surface evaporation during reanalysis. Section 1 begins with a review of these global quantities from four current reanalysis efforts. Section 2 introduces the modifications necessary to preserve these constraints within the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis procedure, and the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) algorithm. Section 3 presents experiments quantifying the impact of the new procedure. Section 4 shows preliminary results from its use within the GMAO MERRA-2 Reanalysis project. Section 5 concludes with a summary.

  20. How unrealistic optimism is maintained in the face of reality.

    PubMed

    Sharot, Tali; Korn, Christoph W; Dolan, Raymond J

    2011-11-01

    Unrealistic optimism is a pervasive human trait that influences domains ranging from personal relationships to politics and finance. How people maintain unrealistic optimism, despite frequently encountering information that challenges those biased beliefs, is unknown. We examined this question and found a marked asymmetry in belief updating. Participants updated their beliefs more in response to information that was better than expected than to information that was worse. This selectivity was mediated by a relative failure to code for errors that should reduce optimism. Distinct regions of the prefrontal cortex tracked estimation errors when those called for positive update, both in individuals who scored high and low on trait optimism. However, highly optimistic individuals exhibited reduced tracking of estimation errors that called for negative update in right inferior prefrontal gyrus. These findings indicate that optimism is tied to a selective update failure and diminished neural coding of undesirable information regarding the future. PMID:21983684

  1. Remote Sensing and Control for Establishing and Maintaining Digital Irrigation

    E-print Network

    cellatoglu, Akin

    2012-01-01

    The remotely sensed data from an unknown location is transmitted in real time through internet and gathered in a PC. The data is collected for a considerable period of time and analyzed in PC as to assess the suitability and fertility of the land for establishing an electronic plantation in that area. The analysis also helps deciding the plantation of appropriate plants in the location identified. The system performing this task with appropriate transducers installed in remote area, the methodologies involved in transmission and data gathering are reported.. The second part of the project deals with data gathering from remote site and issuing control signals to remote appliances in the site; all performed through internet. Therefore, this control scheme is a duplex system monitoring the irrigation activities by collecting data in one direction and issuing commands on the opposite direction. This scheme maintains the digital irrigation systems effectively and efficiently as to utilize the resources optimally f...

  2. Maintaining and improving the oral health of young children.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    Oral health is an integral part of the overall health of children. Dental caries is a common and chronic disease process with significant short- and long-term consequences. The prevalence of dental caries for the youngest of children has not decreased over the past decade, despite improvements for older children. As health care professionals responsible for the overall health of children, pediatricians frequently confront morbidity associated with dental caries. Because the youngest children visit the pediatrician more often than they visit the dentist, it is important that pediatricians be knowledgeable about the disease process of dental caries, prevention of the disease, and interventions available to the pediatrician and the family to maintain and restore health. PMID:25422016

  3. Rewarding Peer Reviewers: Maintaining the Integrity of Science Communication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article overviews currently available options for rewarding peer reviewers. Rewards and incentives may help maintain the quality and integrity of scholarly publications. Publishers around the world implemented a variety of financial and nonfinancial mechanisms for incentivizing their best reviewers. None of these is proved effective on its own. A strategy of combined rewards and credits for the reviewers1 creative contributions seems a workable solution. Opening access to reviews and assigning publication credits to the best reviews is one of the latest achievements of digitization. Reviews, posted on academic networking platforms, such as Publons, add to the transparency of the whole system of peer review. Reviewer credits, properly counted and displayed on individual digital profiles, help distinguish the best contributors, invite them to review and offer responsible editorial posts. PMID:25829801

  4. Microtomography of the polarization-maintaining fiber by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhelang; Liang, Zhiqiang; Li, Shiping; Weng, Jiawen; Zhong, Jingang

    2015-03-01

    We report the experimental results of structural parameters measurement of the polarization-maintaining fiber (PMF) by the use of digital holographic microtomography. First, digital holography (DH) in microscopy configuration is used to record complex transmitted fields under various angles of incidence, and then the Fourier diffraction tomography algorithm is applied to reconstruct the 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of the PMF. According to the 3-D map of RI, we can further get geometric parameters of the PMF by the related edge detection algorithm of image processing. The experimental results show that, the diffraction tomography algorithm is superior to the reconstruction algorithm based on Fourier slice theorem in terms of exhibiting reasonable RI distribution and respecting the dimensions of the PMF. It provides a new way for the non-destructive micromeasurement of the PMF.

  5. Study on eliminating fire dampers to maintain process confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.C.; Patel, J.B.; Strunk, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    The DOE General Design Criteria for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) requires the NFPA National Fire Codes to be incorporated into the design and simultaneously maintain process confinement integrity to prevent the release of radioactivity. Although the NFPA Standard for the Installation of Air Conditioning and Ventilation Systems, NFPA 90, requires fire dampers (FD) in HVAC duct penetrations of two hour rated fire barriers, closure of fire dampers at DWPF may compromise the integrity of the process confinement system. This leads to the need for an overall risk assessment to determine the value of 39 fire dampers that are identified later in the study as capable of a confinement system upset.

  6. Study on eliminating fire dampers to maintain process confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.C.; Patel, J.B.; Strunk, A.J.

    1991-12-31

    The DOE General Design Criteria for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) requires the NFPA National Fire Codes to be incorporated into the design and simultaneously maintain process confinement integrity to prevent the release of radioactivity. Although the NFPA Standard for the Installation of Air Conditioning and Ventilation Systems, NFPA 90, requires fire dampers (FD) in HVAC duct penetrations of two hour rated fire barriers, closure of fire dampers at DWPF may compromise the integrity of the process confinement system. This leads to the need for an overall risk assessment to determine the value of 39 fire dampers that are identified later in the study as capable of a confinement system upset.

  7. Research Report Toward socially inspired social neuroscience

    E-print Network

    Todorov, Alex

    some major opportunities from social psychology--the power of social context and social motives, Susan T. Fiske Psychology Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA A R T I C L E I N F in multiple disciplines. This paper argues that it needs a firmer base in social psychology. First, we outline

  8. Social Work Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work Social work engages with individuals, families, communities and societies to improve and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork A Bachelor of Social Work degree can lead to careers and advocacy associations. A Rigorous, Enriching Program The mission of the School of Social Work is to promote

  9. Social Work Social work engages with individuals,

    E-print Network

    Social Work Social work engages with individuals, families, communities and societies to improve and professional development. www.uwindsor.ca/socialwork A Bachelor of Social Work degree can lead to careers societies, residential centres, homeless services, disability organizations, social planning bodies

  10. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Li, Yan Chun; Toback, F. Gary

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-? identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-?. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-?. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD. PMID:25919700

  11. Statistics of the maintained discharge of cat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frishman, L J; Levine, M W

    1983-01-01

    Action potentials were recorded from single fibres in the optic tracts of anaesthetized cats. Continuous records were obtained at various levels of scotopic and mesopic retinal illumination. In some cases, the light intensity was modulated by a pseudorandom Gaussian white-noise signal. The maintained discharge of on-centre neurones increased while the maintained discharge of off-centre neurons decreased with increased illumination of the receptive field centre. For both cell types, the coefficient of variation declined with increased rate of discharge. There was minimal short-term dependency in the firing patterns, and it was unaffected by the level of retinal illumination. Virtually all of the structure revealed by the normalized autocovariance functions could be attributed to the shape of the interval distributions. The first few coefficients of the serial correlogram were slightly negative. The magnitude of this negativity was not related to illumination. Long-term dependency in the firing pattern was also quite small; the standard deviations of the mean rate in samples of about 1 sec duration were only slightly less than would be predicted from the interval distributions. This dependency tended to increase at higher retinal illuminations. Neural discharges elicited by Gaussian modulation of the light were strikingly different from those elicited by steady light. Modulation caused the first coefficient of the serial correlogram to become more positive, while the next several coefficients became more negative. A corresponding pattern could be seen in the normalized autocovariance functions, and in the differences between the normalized autocovariance and normalized autoconvolution. Long-term dependency also increased dramatically, such that the standard deviations of mean rate were about 60% of what would be expected given the interval distributions observed. These results place a number of constraints upon the ways in which intrinsic noise in the retina may enter the visual processing network. Two alternative models consistent with the data are presented. PMID:6887030

  12. Environmentally Driven Migration in a Social Network Game.

    PubMed

    Takano, Masanori; Wada, Kazuya; Fukuda, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative behaviors are common in humans, and they are the fundamental basis of our society. Theoretical and experimental studies have modeled environments where the behaviors of humans, or agents, have been restricted to analyze their social behavior. However, it is important that such studies can be generalized to a less restrictive environment in order to understand human society. Social network games (SNGs) provide a powerful tool for the quantitative study of human behavior using a less restrictive environment than in previous studies. We focused on multilevel selection, one of the theoretical frameworks used to study the evolution of cooperation. The evolution of cooperation by multilevel selection requires that the continual assortment between cooperators and noncooperators is generated; thus, humans may have acquired mechanisms that ensure assortment (e.g., migration between groups). This study aims to investigate this mechanism in a less restrictive environment. For this purpose, we researched the effect of migration based on data analysis in an SNG where the players could behave more freely than was possible in the environments used in the previous studies. We showed that players maintained assortment between cooperators and defectors in this SNG, where it appears that environmentally driven migration generated the assortment. PMID:26216290

  13. Teaching human poses interactively to a social robot.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pacheco, Victor; Malfaz, Maria; Fernandez, Fernando; Salichs, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    The main activity of social robots is to interact with people. In order to do that, the robot must be able to understand what the user is saying or doing. Typically, this capability consists of pre-programmed behaviors or is acquired through controlled learning processes, which are executed before the social interaction begins. This paper presents a software architecture that enables a robot to learn poses in a similar way as people do. That is, hearing its teacher's explanations and acquiring new knowledge in real time. The architecture leans on two main components: an RGB-D (Red-, Green-, Blue- Depth) -based visual system, which gathers the user examples, and an Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system, which processes the speech describing those examples. The robot is able to naturally learn the poses the teacher is showing to it by maintaining a natural interaction with the teacher. We evaluate our system with 24 users who teach the robot a predetermined set of poses. The experimental results show that, with a few training examples, the system reaches high accuracy and robustness. This method shows how to combine data from the visual and auditory systems for the acquisition of new knowledge in a natural manner. Such a natural way of training enables robots to learn from users, even if they are not experts in robotics. PMID:24048336

  14. Environmentally Driven Migration in a Social Network Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masanori; Wada, Kazuya; Fukuda, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Cooperative behaviors are common in humans, and they are the fundamental basis of our society. Theoretical and experimental studies have modeled environments where the behaviors of humans, or agents, have been restricted to analyze their social behavior. However, it is important that such studies can be generalized to a less restrictive environment in order to understand human society. Social network games (SNGs) provide a powerful tool for the quantitative study of human behavior using a less restrictive environment than in previous studies. We focused on multilevel selection, one of the theoretical frameworks used to study the evolution of cooperation. The evolution of cooperation by multilevel selection requires that the continual assortment between cooperators and noncooperators is generated; thus, humans may have acquired mechanisms that ensure assortment (e.g., migration between groups). This study aims to investigate this mechanism in a less restrictive environment. For this purpose, we researched the effect of migration based on data analysis in an SNG where the players could behave more freely than was possible in the environments used in the previous studies. We showed that players maintained assortment between cooperators and defectors in this SNG, where it appears that environmentally driven migration generated the assortment.

  15. Environmentally Driven Migration in a Social Network Game

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Masanori; Wada, Kazuya; Fukuda, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative behaviors are common in humans, and they are the fundamental basis of our society. Theoretical and experimental studies have modeled environments where the behaviors of humans, or agents, have been restricted to analyze their social behavior. However, it is important that such studies can be generalized to a less restrictive environment in order to understand human society. Social network games (SNGs) provide a powerful tool for the quantitative study of human behavior using a less restrictive environment than in previous studies. We focused on multilevel selection, one of the theoretical frameworks used to study the evolution of cooperation. The evolution of cooperation by multilevel selection requires that the continual assortment between cooperators and noncooperators is generated; thus, humans may have acquired mechanisms that ensure assortment (e.g., migration between groups). This study aims to investigate this mechanism in a less restrictive environment. For this purpose, we researched the effect of migration based on data analysis in an SNG where the players could behave more freely than was possible in the environments used in the previous studies. We showed that players maintained assortment between cooperators and defectors in this SNG, where it appears that environmentally driven migration generated the assortment. PMID:26216290

  16. Teaching Human Poses Interactively to a Social Robot

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Pacheco, Victor; Malfaz, Maria; Fernandez, Fernando; Salichs, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The main activity of social robots is to interact with people. In order to do that, the robot must be able to understand what the user is saying or doing. Typically, this capability consists of pre-programmed behaviors or is acquired through controlled learning processes, which are executed before the social interaction begins. This paper presents a software architecture that enables a robot to learn poses in a similar way as people do. That is, hearing its teacher's explanations and acquiring new knowledge in real time. The architecture leans on two main components: an RGB-D (Red-, Green-, Blue- Depth) -based visual system, which gathers the user examples, and an Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) system, which processes the speech describing those examples. The robot is able to naturally learn the poses the teacher is showing to it by maintaining a natural interaction with the teacher. We evaluate our system with 24 users who teach the robot a predetermined set of poses. The experimental results show that, with a few training examples, the system reaches high accuracy and robustness. This method shows how to combine data from the visual and auditory systems for the acquisition of new knowledge in a natural manner. Such a natural way of training enables robots to learn from users, even if they are not experts in robotics. PMID:24048336

  17. State of the (net)work address Developing criteria for applying social networking to the work environment.

    PubMed

    Valdez, André Calero; Schaar, Anne Kathrin; Ziefle, Martina

    2012-01-01

    In an increasingly faster paced innovative world, maintaining the ability to innovate in spite of an aging work force will become every company's strongest leverage for success. Tapping the latent knowledge resources and creativity of overlooked employees and persisting crucial information for business conduct are promising results for social networking sites (SNS) in a working context. Usability and usefulness are exponential factors in creating a successful SNS. In order to make a SNS usable for a heterogeneous user group, analyses of user diversity in regard to social media need to be done. Furthermore differences in communication medium and frequency in regard to age, content, hierarchy position, departmental thresholds and company size need to be analyzed. For analysis purposes both qualitative and quantitative research methods were applied. Strong effects of age and communication content were found in survey with 194 participants. PMID:22317248

  18. Motivation to maintain sobriety among residents of sober living recovery homes

    PubMed Central

    Polcin, Douglas L; Korcha, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background The study of motivation in the substance abuse field has typically examined the extent to which substance users want to quit or reduce substance use. Less frequently examined is the desire to maintain sobriety after achieving abstinence. The current study examined motivation to maintain sobriety among residents of sober living houses (SLHs), a type of recovery home for individuals with alcohol and drug problems. Previous research on this population showed favorable longitudinal outcomes over 18 months. Resident views about the costs of not using substances (ie, the difficulties encountered when not using), as well as the perceived benefits of not using, were strong predictors of substance use outcomes. Methods This study adds to these findings by conducting two focus groups with individuals familiar with the structure and day-to-day operations of SLHs, including administrators of SLH organizations, owners, and peer managers. Results Focus group results supported the importance of costs and benefits as motivational forces influencing abstinence. However, participants also emphasized characteristics of the sober living recovery environment as important factors influencing motivation. Interactions among recovering peers offer unique opportunities for feeling understood, recognizing vulnerability in others, identifying with the recovery processes of others, receiving supportive confrontation, and engaging in mutual accountability. These experiences are important elements of motivation that become activated by involvement in the SLH environment and are difficult to replicate outside of that context. Conclusion In addition to recognizing how motivation can be enhanced by addressing costs and benefits experienced by individuals, operators of recovery homes need to understand motivation as a function of the recovery home social environment. Additional studies are needed on motivation as a longitudinal construct in a variety of peer-oriented environments. Studies are also needed to better specify interactions within SLHs that increase and hinder motivation among different types of residents. PMID:26392791

  19. 78 FR 24449 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BOX Options Exchange, LLC; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ...proposed to be defined as the electronic book of Complex Orders maintained...that these terms refer to the electronic book of orders on each single option...between, respectively, the electronic book of orders on single option...

  20. [Social marketing and public health].

    PubMed

    Arcaro, P; Mannocci, A; Saulle, R; Miccoli, S; Marzuillo, C; La Torre, G

    2013-01-01

    Social marketing uses the principles and techniques of commercial marketing by applying them to the complex social context in order to promote changes (cognitive; of action; behavioral; of values) among the target population in the public interest. The advent of Internet has radically modified the communication process, and this transformation also involved medical-scientific communication. Medical journals, health organizations, scientific societies and patient groups are increasing the use of the web and of many social networks (Twitter, Facebook, Google, YouTube) as channels to release scientific information to doctors and patients quickly. In recent years, even Healthcare in Italy reported a considerable application of the methods and techniques of social marketing, above all for health prevention and promotion. Recently the association for health promotion "Social marketing and health communication" has been established to promote an active dialogue between professionals of social marketing and public health communication, as well as among professionals in the field of communication of the companies involved in the "health sector". In the field of prevention and health promotion it is necessary to underline the theme of the growing distrust in vaccination practices. Despite the irrefutable evidence of the efficacy and safety of vaccines, the social-cultural transformation together with the overcoming of compulsory vaccination and the use of noninstitutional information sources, have generated confusion among citizens that tend to perceive compulsory vaccinations as needed and safe, whereas recommended vaccinations as less important. Moreover, citizens scarcely perceive the risk of disease related to the effectiveness of vaccines. Implementing communication strategies, argumentative and persuasive, borrowed from social marketing, also for the promotion of vaccines is a priority of the health system. A typical example of the application of social marketing, as mentioned in the manuscript, is the campaign to promote the proper practice of HPV vaccination through the use of effective and cost-saving communication strategies. PMID:23598808

  1. Can Computers be Social?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Bertil

    2002-09-01

    Of main concern in agent based computing is the conception that software agents can attain socially responsible behavior. This idea has its origin in the need for agents to interact with one another in a cooperating manner. Such interplay between several agents can be seen as a combinatorial play where the rules are fixed and the actors are supposed to closely analyze the play in order to behave rational. This kind of rationality has successfully being mathematically described. When the social behavior is extended beyond rational behavior, mere mathematical analysis falls short. For such behavior language is decisive for transferring concepts and language is a holistic entity that cannot be analyzed and defined mathematically. Accordingly, computers cannot be furnished with a language in the sense that meaning can be conveyed and consequently they lack all the necessary properties to be made social. The attempts to postulate mental properties to computer programs are a misconception that is blamed the lack of true understanding of language and especially the relation between formal system and its semantics.

  2. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Anthers between Cytoplasmic Male Sterile and Maintainer Lines in Capsicum annuum L

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Qin, Cheng; Hu, Zhiqun; Yin, Caixia; Hu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), widely used in the production of hybrid seeds, is a maternally inherited trait resulting in a failure to produce functional pollen. In order to identify some specific proteins associated with CMS in pepper, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was applied to proteomic analysis of anthers/buds between a CMS line (designated NA3) and its maintainer (designated NB3) in Capsicum annuum L. Thirty-three spots showed more than 1.5-fold in either CMS or its maintainer. Based on mass spectrometry, 27 spots representing 23 distinct proteins in these 33 spots were identified. Proteins down-regulated in CMS anthers/buds includes ATP synthase D chain, formate dehydrogenase, alpha-mannosidas, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein subunit beta, chloroplast manganese stabilizing protein-II, glutathione S-transferase, adenosine kinase isoform 1T-like protein, putative DNA repair protein RAD23-4, putative caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, glutamine synthetase (GS), annexin Cap32, glutelin, allene oxide cyclase, etc. In CMS anthers/buds, polyphenol oxidase, ATP synthase subunit beta, and actin are up-regulated. It was predicted that male sterility in NA3 might be related to energy metabolism turbulence, excessive ethylene synthesis, and suffocation of starch synthesis. The present study lays a foundation for future investigations of gene functions associated with pollen development and cytoplasmic male sterility, and explores the molecular mechanism of CMS in pepper. PMID:24264042

  3. The right temporoparietal junction plays a causal role in maintaining the internal representation of verticality.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Francesca; Candidi, Matteo; Acciarino, Adriano; David, Nicole; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-11-01

    Perception of the visual vertical is strongly based on our ability to match visual inflow with vestibular, proprioceptive, tactile, and even visceral information that contributes to maintaining an internal representation of the vertical. An important cortical region implicated in multisensory integration is the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ), which also is involved in higher order forms of body- and space-related cognition. To test whether this region integrates body-related multisensory information necessary for establishing the subjective visual vertical, we combined a psychophysical task (the rod-and-frame test) with transient inhibition of the rTPJ via continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS). A Gabor patch visual detection task was used as a control visual task. cTBS of early visual cortex (V1-V3) was used to test whether early visual cortices played any role in verticality estimation. We show that inhibition of rTPJ activity selectively impairs the ability to evaluate the rod's verticality when no contextual visual information, such as a frame surrounding the rod, is provided. Conversely, transient inhibition of V1-V3 selectively disrupts the ability to visually detect Gabor patch orientation. This anatomofunctional dissociation supports the idea that the rTPJ plays a causal role in integrating egocentric sensory information encoded in different reference systems (i.e., vestibular and somatic) to maintain an internal representation of verticality. PMID:26400254

  4. Primary afferent input critical for maintaining spontaneous pain in peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Haroutounian, Simon; Nikolajsen, Lone; Bendtsen, Thomas F; Finnerup, Nanna B; Kristensen, Anders D; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen B; Jensen, Troels S

    2014-07-01

    Central sensitization after peripheral nerve injury may result in ectopic neuronal activity in the spinal cord dorsal horn, implying a potential autonomous pain-generating mechanism. This study used peripheral nerve blockade and systemic lidocaine administration, with detailed somatosensory assessment, to determine the contribution of primary afferent input in maintaining peripheral neuropathic pain. Fourteen patients with neuropathic pain (7 with unilateral foot pain due to peripheral nerve injury and 7 with bilateral pain in the feet due to distal polyneuropathy) underwent comprehensive characterization of somatosensory function by quantitative sensory testing. Patients were then administered an ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block with lidocaine and intravenous lidocaine infusion in randomized order. The effect of these interventions on spontaneous pain intensity and on evoked cold, warm, pinprick, and brush responses was assessed at each session. All patients had sensory disturbances at baseline. The peripheral nerve block resulted in a complete abolition of ipsilateral pain within 10 min (median) in all patients, with lidocaine plasma concentrations being too low to account for a systemic effect of the drug. Intravenous lidocaine infusion reduced the spontaneous pain by 45.5% (±31.7%), and it reduced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in most patients who displayed such signs. However, the improvement in evoked hypersensitivity was not related to the effect of the drug on spontaneous pain intensity. This study demonstrated that regardless of the individual somatosensory phenotype and signs of central sensitization, primary afferent input is critical for maintaining neuropathic pain in peripheral nerve injury and distal polyneuropathy. PMID:24704366

  5. Recommended techniques for effective maintainability. A continuous improvement initiative of the NASA Reliability and Maintainability Steering Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This manual presents a series of recommended techniques that can increase overall operational effectiveness of both flight and ground based NASA systems. It provides a set of tools that minimizes risk associated with: (1) restoring failed functions (both ground and flight based); (2) conducting complex and highly visible maintenance operations; and (3) sustaining a technical capability to support the NASA mission using aging equipment or facilities. It considers (1) program management - key elements of an effective maintainability effort; (2) design and development - techniques that have benefited previous programs; (3) analysis and test - quantitative and qualitative analysis processes and testing techniques; and (4) operations and operational design techniques that address NASA field experience. This document is a valuable resource for continuous improvement ideas in executing the systems development process in accordance with the NASA 'better, faster, smaller, and cheaper' goal without compromising safety.

  6. 106 Faculty of Social Sciences Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) in Social Work

    E-print Network

    Cheung, Yiu-ming

    justice in social issues, social work practice and social policy; and (e) transfer social work knowledge & Programme Evaluation 3 units Social Work, Law & Social Justice 2 units #12;107Faculty of Social Sciences106 Faculty of Social Sciences Master of Social Sciences (MSocSc) in Social Work (Two-year Part

  7. Low-level vibrations maintain the intervertebral disc during unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holguin, Nilsson

    Changes in intervertebral disc (IVD) biochemistry, morphology and mechanics have been characterized only incompletely in the rat hindlimb unloading (HU) model. Although exposure to chronic vibrations can be damaging, low-magnitude vibrations can attenuate the geometric changes of the IVD due to altered spinal loading. Here, we tested the hypothesis that low-magnitude, high-frequency vibrations will mitigate the hypotrophy, biochemical degradation and deconditioning of the IVD during HU. When applied as whole-body vibrations through all four paws, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to HU and exposed to daily periods (15min/d) of either ambulatory activities (HU+AMB) or whole body vibrations superimposed upon ambulation (HU+WBV; WBV at 45Hz, 0.3g). After 4wks and, compared to age-matched control rats (AC), the lumbar IVD of HU+AMB had a 22% smaller glycosaminoglycans/collagen ratio, 12% smaller posterior IVD height, and 13% smaller cross-sectional area. Compared to HU+AMB rats, the addition of low-level vibratory loading did not significantly alter IVD biochemistry, posterior height, area, or volume, but directionally altered IVD geometry. When subjected to upright vibrations through the hindpaws, rats were HU for 4wks. A subset of HU rats stood in an upright posture on a vertically oscillating plate (0.2g) at 45- or 90-Hz (HU+45 or HU+90). After 4wks, regardless of sham (HU+SC) loading (HU+/-SC) and, compared to AC, IVD of HU+/-SC had 10% less height, 39% smaller nucleus pulposus area, less glycosaminoglycans in the nucleus pulposus (21%), anterior annulus fibrosus (16%) and posterior annulus fibrosus (19%), 76% less tension-compression neutral zone (NZ) modulus, 26% greater compressive modulus, 25% greater initial elastic damping modulus, 26% less torsional NZ stiffness, no difference in collagen content and a weaker relationship between tension-compression NZ modulus and posterior height change. Exogenously introduced oscillations maintained the morphology, glycosaminoglycan content and axial elastic properties of IVD. Compared to HU+/-SC, the IVD of HU+90 had 8% larger average height, 35% greater nucleus pulposus area, more glycosaminoglycans in the nucleus pulposus (24%), anterior annulus fibrosus (17%) and posterior annulus fibrosus (19%), 339% greater tension-compression NZ modulus, 18% smaller compressive modulus, and maintained the relationship between tension-compression NZ modulus and posterior height change, but no difference in torsional NZ stiffness or initial elastic damping modulus. In summary, very brief, small mechanical signals partially protected the IVD during hindlimb unloading.

  8. A global perspective of the richness and evenness of traditional crop-variety diversity maintained by farming communities

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Devra I.; Brown, Anthony H. D.; Cuong, Pham Hung; Collado-Panduro, Luis; Latournerie-Moreno, Luis; Gyawali, Sanjaya; Tanto, Tesema; Sawadogo, Mahamadou; Mar, Istvan; Sadiki, Mohammed; Hue, Nguyen Thi-Ngoc; Arias-Reyes, Luis; Balma, Didier; Bajracharya, Jwala; Castillo, Fernando; Rijal, Deepak; Belqadi, Loubna; Rana, Ram; Saidi, Seddik; Ouedraogo, Jeremy; Zangre, Roger; Rhrib, Keltoum; Chavez, Jose Luis; Schoen, Daniel; Sthapit, Bhuwon; De Santis, Paola; Fadda, Carlo; Hodgkin, Toby

    2008-01-01

    Varietal data from 27 crop species from five continents were drawn together to determine overall trends in crop varietal diversity on farm. Measurements of richness, evenness, and divergence showed that considerable crop genetic diversity continues to be maintained on farm, in the form of traditional crop varieties. Major staples had higher richness and evenness than nonstaples. Variety richness for clonal species was much higher than that of other breeding systems. A close linear relationship between traditional variety richness and evenness (both transformed), empirically derived from data spanning a wide range of crops and countries, was found both at household and community levels. Fitting a neutral “function” to traditional variety diversity relationships, comparable to a species abundance distribution of “neutral ecology,” provided a benchmark to assess the standing diversity on farm. In some cases, high dominance occurred, with much of the variety richness held at low frequencies. This suggested that diversity may be maintained as an insurance to meet future environmental changes or social and economic needs. In other cases, a more even frequency distribution of varieties was found, possibly implying that farmers are selecting varieties to service a diversity of current needs and purposes. Divergence estimates, measured as the proportion of community evenness displayed among farmers, underscore the importance of a large number of small farms adopting distinctly diverse varietal strategies as a major force that maintains crop genetic diversity on farm. PMID:18362337

  9. Review of concepts useful for maintaining quality of male reproductive field samples for laboratory study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations into cellular and molecular characteristics of male gametes obtained from fish in natural ecosystems require careful sample handling and shipping in order to minimize artifacts. Maintaining sample integrity engenders confident assessments of ecosystem health, whereby animal condition is often reflected by gamete biomarkers - indicators that respond in measurable ways to changes. A number of our investigations have addressed the hypothesis that biomarkers from fish along a pollution gradient are reflective of site location. Species biology and the selected biological endpoints direct choice of parameters such as: temperature, buffer osmolality, time in transit, fixation, cryoprotectants, protease inhibition, and antibiotic inclusion in extender. This paper will highlight case studies, and outline parameters and thoughts on approaches for use by field and laboratory researchers.

  10. Continuous-wave parametric oscillation in polarisation-maintaining optical fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobina, E A; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2011-09-30

    Continuous-wave parametric oscillation in a polarisation-maintaining optical fibre has been achieved for the first time using polarisation phase matching. Up-conversion with a frequency shift of {approx}8.6 THz has been demonstrated experimentally. The single-pass optical power generated at 1017 nm in a 85-m-long Nufern PM980-XP fibre exceeded 40 mW. The conversion efficiency was 3.3%, which is an order of magnitude higher than that reported previously for cw parametric up-conversion in the 1-{mu}m spectral region. We compare theoretical predictions with experimental data and analyse factors that may influence output power saturation with increasing signal and pump powers.

  11. A Multi Targeting Conditionally Replicating Adenovirus Displays Enhanced Oncolysis while Maintaining Expression of Immunotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, G. Clement; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.; Gillespie, G. Yancey

    2015-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that oncolytic adenoviruses based on a 24 base pair deletion in the viral E1A gene (D24) may be promising therapeutics for treating a number of cancer types. In order to increase the therapeutic potential of these oncolytic viruses, a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus targeting multiple receptors upregulated on tumors was generated by incorporating an Ad5/3 fiber with a carboxyl terminus RGD ligand. The virus displayed full cytopathic effect in all tumor lines assayed at low titers with improved cytotoxicity over Ad5-RGD D24, Ad5/3 D24 and an HSV oncolytic virus. The virus was then engineered to deliver immunotherapeutic agents such as GM-CSF while maintaining enhanced heterogenic oncolysis. PMID:26689910

  12. An accurate method for alignment of polarization-maintaining fiber with CCD micro-imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-jie; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Chun-xi; Yang, Yuan-hong; Yang, De-wei

    2009-07-01

    Polarization-Maintaining(PM) optical fiber connector is widely used in various kinds of optic fiber sensors and communication equipments. The alignment of PM fiber polarization axis with the orientation key axis is one of the most important factors determining the extinction ratio of the connector. In order to ensure high accurate alignment of these two axises, CCD micro-imaging system is employed to take the cross-section image of Panda PM fiber, the edge points of stress rods are extracted by sub-pixel edge detection algorithm based on Hessian matrix. Consequently, the automatic detection of the polarization axis and the accurate calculation of the angle ? between the two axises are realized. Experiment results indicate that the method, combining CCD micro-imaging system and an accurate calculation of the angle ?, is effective to improve the alignment precision, which can reach +/-0.5°. The work lays the foundation for realizing the auto-manufacture of PM optical fiber connector.

  13. Energy usage while maintaining thermal comfort: A case study of a UNT dormitory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambrell, Dusten

    Campus dormitories for the University of North Texas house over 5500 students per year; each one of them requires certain comfortable living conditions while they live there. There is an inherit amount of money required in order to achieve minimal comfort levels; the cost is mostly natural gas for water and room heating and electricity for cooling, lighting and peripherals. The US Department of Energy has developed several programs to aid in performing energy simulations to help those interested design more cost effective building designs. Energy-10 is such a program that allows users to conduct whole house evaluations by reviewing and altering a few parameters such as building materials, solar heating, energy efficient windows etc. The idea of this project was to recreate a campus dormitory and try to emulate existent energy consumption then try to find ways of lowering that usage while maintaining a high level of personal comfort.

  14. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations

    E-print Network

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustai...

  15. Maintaining quality of care while reducing charges in the ICU. Ten ways.

    PubMed Central

    Civetta, J M; Hudson-Civetta, J A

    1985-01-01

    We believed that the dilemma of controlling costs yet maintaining quality of care might be approached in 10 ways designed to improve efficiency of care: principles of management, elimination of standing orders, classification of patients, written guidelines, mandatory communication, no repetitive orders, single order for single test, removal of monitoring catheters, constant administrative attention, and feedback. We monitored quality of care using the therapeutic intervention scoring system (TISS), mortality, utilization of bed days in the ICU, and the total hospitalization of 50 patients treated in April 1983 and, 8 months after the interventions, 50 patients treated in February 1984. There were no differences in the patient population, severity, outcome, or days. The total lab bills were $10,000 in 1983 and $6300 in 1984 (p less than 0.01). The total number of tests decreased by 2803 (42%) from 6685 to 3882, or 56 per patient per admission. Calculated ICU laboratory charges per patient decreased $3226 (53%) from $6210 to $2894. In 1983, while patients spent 15% of their hospital days in the ICU, they accumulated 61% of their total laboratory charges. In 1984, ICU days were 19% and ICU laboratory charges were 46% of the total. If the decrease of $3226 per patient is extrapolated to a year's population, this would decrease charges by over $2,000,000 in one 12-bed surgical ICU. PMID:4051601

  16. Reliability and Maintainability Engineering - A Major Driver for Safety and Affordability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.

    2011-01-01

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is in the midst of an effort to design and build a safe and affordable heavy lift vehicle to go to the moon and beyond. To achieve that, NASA is seeking more innovative and efficient approaches to reduce cost while maintaining an acceptable level of safety and mission success. One area that has the potential to contribute significantly to achieving NASA safety and affordability goals is Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) engineering. Inadequate reliability or failure of critical safety items may directly jeopardize the safety of the user(s) and result in a loss of life. Inadequate reliability of equipment may directly jeopardize mission success. Systems designed to be more reliable (fewer failures) and maintainable (fewer resources needed) can lower the total life cycle cost. The Department of Defense (DOD) and industry experience has shown that optimized and adequate levels of R&M are critical for achieving a high level of safety and mission success, and low sustainment cost. Also, lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program clearly demonstrated the importance of R&M engineering in designing and operating safe and affordable launch systems. The Challenger and Columbia accidents are examples of the severe impact of design unreliability and process induced failures on system safety and mission success. These accidents demonstrated the criticality of reliability engineering in understanding component failure mechanisms and integrated system failures across the system elements interfaces. Experience from the shuttle program also shows that insufficient Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability (RMS) engineering analyses upfront in the design phase can significantly increase the sustainment cost and, thereby, the total life cycle cost. Emphasis on RMS during the design phase is critical for identifying the design features and characteristics needed for time efficient processing, improved operational availability, and optimized maintenance and logistic support infrastructure. This paper discusses the role of R&M in a program acquisition phase and the potential impact of R&M on safety, mission success, operational availability, and affordability. This includes discussion of the R&M elements that need to be addressed and the R&M analyses that need to be performed in order to support a safe and affordable system design. The paper also provides some lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program on the impact of R&M on safety and affordability.

  17. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  18. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  19. Cheating in Cyberspace: Maintaining Quality in Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Mary Anne

    2004-01-01

    Professors in higher education are experimenting with a wide array of techniques in order to preserve integrity of the academic evaluation process in the online environment. Current instructors perceive some increased risk of "cheating" in cyberspace classrooms, and some changes in the forms these incidents take. We anticipate the continuing…

  20. A General Incremental Technique for Maintaining Discovered Association Rules

    E-print Network

    Cheung, David Wai-lok

    than the traditional approach of mining the whole updated database. Keywords: Association Rules, Data, discriminant rules, etc. [9] Of the various data mining problems, mining of association rules is an important of association rules [2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14]. A feature of data mining problems is that in order to have

  1. Maintaining mesh connectivity using a simplex-based data structure

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    with pointers--is stored, and its abstract definition--ordered sequences of vertices. It applies to simplicial general complexes of polyhedral cells, are usually represented by objects connected with pointers. Many a data structure that can represent general complexes of cells. The cells can have any shape and may

  2. The nucleus accumbens is involved in both the pursuit of social reward and the avoidance of social punishment

    PubMed Central

    Kohls, Gregor; Perino, Michael T.; Taylor, James M.; Madva, Elizabeth N.; Cayless, Sarah J.; Troiani, Vanessa; Price, Elinora; Faja, Susan; Herrington, John D.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Human social motivation is characterized by the pursuit of social reward and the avoidance of social punishment. The ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/Nacc), in particular, has been implicated in the reward component of social motivation, i.e., the ‘wanting’ of social incentives like approval. However, it is unclear to what extent the VS/Nacc is involved in avoiding social punishment like disapproval, an intrinsically pleasant outcome. Thus, we conducted an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a social incentive delay task with dynamic video stimuli instead of static pictures as social incentives in order to examine participants' motivation for social reward gain and social punishment avoidance. As predicted, the anticipation of avoidable social punishment (i.e., disapproval) recruited the VS/Nacc in a manner that was similar to VS/Nacc activation observed during the anticipation of social reward gain (i.e., approval). Stronger VS/Nacc activity was accompanied by faster reaction times of the participants to obtain those desired outcomes. This data support the assumption that dynamic social incentives elicit robust VS/Nacc activity, which likely reflects motivation to obtain social reward and to avoid social punishment. Clinical implications regarding the involvement of the VS/Nacc in social motivation dysfunction in autism and social phobia are discussed. PMID:23911778

  3. Abuse liability of prescription opioids compared to heroin in morphine-maintained heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Sullivan, Maria A; Whittington, Robert A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Kowalczyk, William J

    2008-04-01

    Abuse of prescription opioid medications has increased dramatically in the United States during the past decade, as indicated by a variety of epidemiological sources. However, few studies have systematically examined the relative reinforcing effects of commonly abused opioid medications. The current double-blind, placebo-controlled in-patient study was designed to compare the effects of intravenously delivered fentanyl (0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.187, and 0.250 mg/70 kg), oxycodone (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg), morphine (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg), buprenorphine (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 mg/70 kg), and heroin (0, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/70 kg) in morphine-maintained heroin abusers (N=8 completers maintained on 120 mg per day oral morphine in divided doses (30 mg q.i.d.)). All of the participants received all of the drugs tested; drugs and doses were administered in non-systematic order. All of the drugs produced statistically significant, dose-related increases in positive subjective ratings, such as 'I feel a good drug effect' and 'I like the drug.' In general, the order of potency in producing these effects, from most to least potent, was fentanyl>buprenorphine>or=heroin >morphine=oxycodone. In contrast, buprenorphine was the only drug that produced statistically significant increases in ratings of 'I feel a bad drug effect' and it was the only drug that was not self-administered above placebo levels at any dose tested. These data suggest that the abuse liability of buprenorphine in heroin-dependent individuals may be low, despite the fact that it produces increases in positive subjective ratings. The abuse liabilities of fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, and heroin, however, appear to be similar under these experimental conditions. PMID:17581533

  4. Arsenite maintains germinative state in cultured human epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Reznikova, Tatiana V.; Phillips, Marjorie A.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-22

    Arsenic is a well-known carcinogen for human skin, but its mechanism of action and proximal macromolecular targets remain to be elucidated. In the present study, low micromolar concentrations of sodium arsenite maintained the proliferative potential of epidermal keratinocytes, decreasing their exit from the germinative compartment under conditions that promote differentiation of untreated cells. This effect was observed in suspension and in post-confluent surface cultures as measured by colony-forming ability and by proportion of rapidly adhering colony-forming cells. Arsenite-treated cultures exhibited elevated levels of {beta}1-integrin and {beta}-catenin, two proteins enriched in cells with high proliferative potential. Levels of phosphorylated (inactive) glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} were higher in the treated cultures, likely accounting for the increased levels of transcriptionally available {beta}-catenin. These findings suggest that arsenic could have co-carcinogenic and tumor co-promoting activities in the epidermis as a result of increasing the population and persistence of germinative cells targeted by tumor initiators and promoters. These findings also identify a critical signal transduction pathway meriting further exploration in pursuit of this phenomenon.

  5. Resilient Practices in Maintaining Safety of Health Information Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health record systems (EHRs) can improve safety and reliability of health care, but they can also introduce new vulnerabilities by failing to accommodate changes within a dynamic EHR-enabled health care system. Continuous assessment and improvement is thus essential for achieving resilience in EHR-enabled health care systems. Given the rapid adoption of EHRs by many organizations that are still early in their experiences with EHR safety, it is important to understand practices for maintaining resilience used by organizations with a track record of success in EHR use. We conducted interviews about safety practices with 56 key informants (including information technology managers, chief medical information officers, physicians, and patient safety officers) at two large health care systems recognized as leaders in EHR use. We identified 156 references to resilience-related practices from 41 informants. Framework analysis generated five categories of resilient practices: (a) sensitivity to dynamics and interdependencies affecting risks, (b) basic monitoring and responding practices, (c) management of practices and resources for monitoring and responding, (d) sensitivity to risks beyond the horizon, and (e) reflecting on risks with the safety and quality control process itself. The categories reflect three functions that facilitate resilience: reflection, transcending boundaries, and involving sharp-end practitioners in safety management. PMID:25866492

  6. Nutritional support to maintain proper immune status during intense training.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune function which can increase the risk of picking up minor infections. To maintain robust immunity, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy, carbohydrate, protein, and micronutrient requirements. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction and an adequate intake of iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important in the maintenance of immune function. Consuming carbohydrate during prolonged strenuous exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Similar effects can be seen with daily ingestion of high-dose antioxidant vitamin supplements, though concerns have been expressed that excessive antioxidant intake may impair exercise training adaptations. It is safe to say with reasonable confidence that individual amino acids, colostrum, Echinacea, and zinc are unlikely to boost immunity or reduce infection risk in athletes. The ingestion of carbohydrate during exercise and daily consumption of probiotic and plant polyphenol (e.g. quercetin)-containing supplements or foodstuffs (e.g. non-alcoholic beer) currently offer the best chance of success. This approach is likely to be most effective for individuals who are particularly prone to illness. PMID:23765353

  7. Mitofusin 2 is required to maintain mitochondrial coenzyme Q levels

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Arnaud; Motori, Elisa; Brandt, Tobias; Lagouge, Marie; Atanassov, Ilian; Galinier, Anne; Rappl, Gunter; Brodesser, Susanne; Hultenby, Kjell; Dieterich, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic network within the cell as a result of balanced fusion and fission. Despite the established role of mitofusins (MFN1 and MFN2) in mitochondrial fusion, only MFN2 has been associated with metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, which suggests that MFN2 is needed to maintain mitochondrial energy metabolism. The molecular basis for the mitochondrial dysfunction encountered in the absence of MFN2 is not understood. Here we show that loss of MFN2 leads to impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production, and that this defective oxidative phosphorylation process unexpectedly originates from a depletion of the mitochondrial coenzyme Q pool. Our study unravels an unexpected and novel role for MFN2 in maintenance of the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway, which is necessary for mitochondrial coenzyme Q biosynthesis. The reduced respiratory chain function in cells lacking MFN2 can be partially rescued by coenzyme Q10 supplementation, which suggests a possible therapeutic strategy for patients with diseases caused by mutations in the Mfn2 gene. PMID:25688136

  8. Maintaining relationships with your patients by maximizing your online presence.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, John; Kaaihue, Maarit

    2011-01-01

    Medical practices that take full advantage of today's online consumer-driven culture will leave other practices in their wake. With today's modern consumers looking to the Internet more and more for finding medical solutions for their family, it is imperative that your practice uses all of the tools available for creating and maintaining its online presence. We all know that having a functional Web site these days is a necessity for practically any business in any industry; however, taking your online presence further by using a few techniques can set up your practice for great success. Your online marketing should help your practice with managing patient relationships at all levels. To best reach this goal, continually analyzing data and updating your online marketing approach will help further drive leads and conversions. Using a few search engine optimization techniques as well as optimal design and marketing methods will allow you to more easily find prospective patients, build trust and credibility with your current patients, and manage your reputation. PMID:21936434

  9. GABA-independent GABAA Receptor Openings Maintain Tonic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I.; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Herd, Murray B.; Kersanté, Flavie; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Linthorst, Astrid C.E.; Semyanov, Alexey; Belelli, Delia; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) produces two forms of inhibition: ‘phasic’ inhibition generated by the rapid, transient activation of synaptic GABAARs by presynaptic GABA release, and tonic inhibition generated by the persistent activation of peri- or extrasynaptic GABAARs which can detect extracellular GABA. Such tonic GABAAR-mediated currents are particularly evident in dentate granule cells in which they play a major role in regulating cell excitability. Here we show that in rat dentate granule cells in ex-vivo hippocampal slices, tonic currents are predominantly generated by GABA-independent GABAA receptor openings. This tonic GABAAR conductance is resistant to the competitive GABAAR antagonist SR95531, which at high concentrations acts as a partial agonist, but can be blocked by an open channel blocker picrotoxin. When slices are perfused with 200 nM GABA, a concentration that is comparable to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations but is twice that measured by us in the hippocampus in vivo using zero-net-flux microdialysis, negligible GABA is detected by dentate granule cells. Spontaneously opening GABAARs, therefore, maintain dentate granule cell tonic currents in the face of low extracellular GABA concentrations. PMID:23447601

  10. Maintaining the presynaptic glutamate supply for excitatory neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Marx, Mari-Carmen; Billups, Daniela; Billups, Brian

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate released from synapses during excitatory neurotransmission must be rapidly recycled to maintain neuronal communication. This review evaluates data from physiological experiments at hippocampal CA3 to CA1 synapses and the calyx of Held synapse in the brainstem to analyze quantitatively the rates of release and resupply of glutamate required to sustain neurotransmission. We calculate that, without efficient recycling, the presynaptic glutamate supply will be exhausted within about a minute of normal synaptic activity. We also discuss replenishment of the presynaptic pool by diffusion from the soma, direct uptake of glutamate back into the presynaptic terminal, and uptake of glutamate precursor molecules. Diffusion of glutamate from the soma is calculated to be fast enough to resupply presynaptic glutamate in the hippocampus but not at the calyx of Held. However, because the somatic cytoplasm will also quickly run out of glutamate and synapses can function continually even if the presynaptic axon is severed, mechanisms other than diffusion must be present to resupply glutamate for release. Direct presynaptic uptake of glutamate is not present at the calyx of Held but may play a role in glutamate recycling in the hippocampus. Alternatively, glutamine or tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates released from glia can serve as a precursor for glutamate in synaptic terminals, and we calculate that the magnitude of presynaptic glutamine uptake is sufficient to supply enough glutamate to sustain neurotransmission. The nature of these mechanisms, their relative abundance, and the co-ordination between them remain areas of intensive investigation. PMID:25648608

  11. Maintaining Moore's law: enabling cost-friendly dimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Arindam; Ryckaert, Julien; Mercha, Abdelkarim; Verkest, Diederik; Ronse, Kurt; Thean, Aaron

    2015-03-01

    Moore's Law (Moore's Observation) has been driving the progress in semiconductor technology for the past 50 years. The semiconductor industry is at a juncture where significant increase in manufacturing cost is foreseen to sustain the past trend of dimensional scaling. At N10 and N7 technology nodes, the industry is struggling to find a cost-friendly solution. At a device level, technologists have come up with novel devices (finFET, Gate-All-Around), material innovations (SiGe, Ge) to boost performance and reduce power consumption. On the other hand, from the patterning side, the relative slow ramp-up of alternative lithography technologies like EUVL and DSA pushes the industry to adopt a severely multi-patterning-based solution. Both of these technological transformations have a big impact on die yield and eventually die cost. This paper is aimed to analyze the impact on manufacturing cost to keep the Moore's law alive. We have proposed and analyzed various patterning schemes that can enable cost-friendly scaling. We evaluated the impact of EUVL introduction on tackling the high cost of manufacturing. The primary objective of this paper is to maintain Moore's scaling from a patterning perspective and analyzing EUV lithography introduction at a die level.

  12. Evolution of design concepts for remotely maintainable equipment racks

    SciTech Connect

    Peishel, F.L.; Mouring, R.W.; Schrock, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Equipment racks have been used to support process equipment in radioactive facilities for many years. Improvements in the design of these racks have evolved relatively slowly primarily as a result of limitations in the capabilities of maintenance equipment; that is, tasks could only be approached from above using bridge cranes with viewing primarily through periscopes. In recent years, however, technological advances have been made by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in bridge-mounted servomanipulators with onboard auxiliary hoists and television viewing systems. These advances permit full cell coverage by the manipulator arms which, in turn, allow maintenance tasks to be approached horizontally as well as from above. Maintainable equipment items can be stacked vertically on a rack because total overhead access is less important and maintenance tasks that would not have been attempted in the past can now be performed. These advances permit greater flexibility in the design and cell layout of the racks and lead to concepts that could significantly increase the availability of a facility. The evolution of rack design and a description of the alternative concepts based on present maintenance systems capabilities are presented in this paper. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Cook Inlet maintaining oil flow in spite of budget reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-20

    Operators in Alaska's Cook Inlet area are shifting focus from exploration to maintaining production in the face of budget cuts. That follows last year's flurry of exploration that came on the heels of what at first appeared to be a world class discovery, sunfish, in an area that is the cradle of alaska's commercial oil industry. Disappointing follow-up results dampened Cook Inlet exploration excitement, matching industry's recent experience on the North Slope. In Cook Inlet, overall production in the first quarter largely held its own. Seven fields--McArthur River, Middle Ground Shoal, Granite Point, Swanson River, Trading Bay, West McArthur River, and Beaver Creek--produced an average 39,640 b/d, down only 0.2% from last year's 39,700 b/d. That compares with a high of about 72,000 b/d in 1983 but is down only slightly from 41,575 b/d in 1992. Although slowed by budget cuts, Unocal Corp. continues as the major player in the inlet with its Chakachatna project. The project involves development of what Unocal has described as significant bypassed reserves from Platforms Bruce and Anna in the northern portion of Granite Point field and Platforms Baker and Dillon in Middle Ground Shoal field. Trends are discussed.

  14. Mechanosensitive ATP Release Maintains Proper Mucus Hydration of Airways

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F.; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal auto-crine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  15. Mechanosensitive ATP release maintains proper mucus hydration of airways.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-06-11

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal autocrine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  16. Intermittent ischaemia maintains function after ischaemia reperfusion in steatotic livers

    PubMed Central

    Steenks, Mathilde; van Baal, Mark CPM; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; de Bruijn, Menno T; Schiesser, Marc; Teo, Mike H; Callahan, Tom; Padbury, Rob TA; Barritt, Greg J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) and intermittent ischaemia (INT) reduce liver injury after ischaemia reperfusion (IR). Steatotic livers are at a higher risk of IR injury, but the protection offered by IPC and INT is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of IPC and INT in maintaining liver function in steatotic livers. Material and methods: A model of segmental hepatic ischaemia (45 min) and reperfusion (60 min) was employed using lean and obese Zucker rats. Bile flow recovery was measured to assess dynamic liver function, hepatocyte fat content quantified and blood electrolytes, metabolites and bile calcium measured to assess liver and whole body physiology. Liver marker enzymes and light and electron microscopy were employed to assess hepatocyte injury. Results: IPC was not effective in promoting bile flow recovery after IR in either lean or steatotic livers, whereas INT promoted good bile flow recovery in steatotic as well as lean livers. However, the bile flow recovery in steatotic livers was less than that in lean livers. In steatotic livers, ischaemia led to a rapid and substantial decrease in fat content. Steatotic livers were more susceptible to IR injury than lean livers, as indicated by increased blood ALT concentrations and major histological injury. Conclusion: INT is more effective than IPC in restoring liver function in the acute phase of IR in steatotic livers. In obese patients, INT may be useful in promoting better liver function after IR after liver resection. PMID:20590895

  17. The Lkb1 metabolic sensor maintains haematopoietic stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthy, Sushma; Xie, Stephanie Z; Alagesan, Brinda; Kim, Judith; Yusuf, Rushdia Z; Saez, Borja; Tzatsos, Alexandros; Ozsolak, Fatih; Milos, Patrice; Ferrari, Francesco; Park, Peter J; Shirihai, Orian S; Scadden, David T; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2010-12-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can convert between growth states that have marked differences in bioenergetic needs. Although often quiescent in adults, these cells become proliferative upon physiological demand. Balancing HSC energetics in response to nutrient availability and growth state is poorly understood, yet essential for the dynamism of the haematopoietic system. Here we show that the Lkb1 tumour suppressor is critical for the maintenance of energy homeostasis in haematopoietic cells. Lkb1 inactivation in adult mice causes loss of HSC quiescence followed by rapid depletion of all haematopoietic subpopulations. Lkb1-deficient bone marrow cells exhibit mitochondrial defects, alterations in lipid and nucleotide metabolism, and depletion of cellular ATP. The haematopoietic effects are largely independent of Lkb1 regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. Instead, these data define a central role for Lkb1 in restricting HSC entry into cell cycle and in broadly maintaining energy homeostasis in haematopoietic cells through a novel metabolic checkpoint. PMID:21124451

  18. The Lkb1 metabolic sensor maintains haematopoietic stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Gurumurthy, Sushma; Xie, Stephanie Z.; Alagesan, Brinda; Kim, Judith; Yusuf, Rushdia Z.; Saez, Borja; Tzatsos, Alexandros; Ozsolak, Fatih; Milos, Patrice; Ferrari, Francesco; Park, Peter J.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Scadden, David T.; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2011-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can convert between growth states that have marked differences in bioenergetic needs. Although often quiescent in adults, these cells become proliferative upon physiological demand. Balancing HSC energetics in response to nutrient availability and growth state is poorly understood, yet essential for the dynamism of the haematopoietic system. Here we show that the Lkb1 tumour suppressor is critical for the maintenance of energy homeostasis in haematopoietic cells. Lkb1 inactivation in adult mice causes loss of HSC quiescence followed by rapid depletion of all haematopoietic subpopulations. Lkb1-deficient bone marrow cells exhibit mitochondrial defects, alterations in lipid and nucleotide metabolism, and depletion of cellular ATP. The haematopoietic effects are largely independent of Lkb1 regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. Instead, these data define a central role for Lkb1 in restricting HSC entry into cell cycle and in broadly maintaining energy homeostasis in haematopoietic cells through a novel metabolic checkpoint. PMID:21124451

  19. Lifelong Bilingualism Maintains Neural Efficiency for Cognitive Control in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Brian T.; Kim, Chobok; Johnson, Nathan F.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Smith, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent behavioral data have shown that lifelong bilingualism can maintain youthful cognitive control abilities in aging. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of a neural basis for the bilingual cognitive control boost in aging. Two experiments were conducted, using a perceptual task switching paradigm, and including a total of 110 participants. In Experiment 1, older adult bilinguals showed better perceptual switching performance than their monolingual peers. In Experiment 2, younger and older adult monolinguals and bilinguals completed the same perceptual task switching experiment while fMRI was performed. Typical age-related performance reductions and fMRI activation increases were observed. However, like younger adults, bilingual older adults outperformed their monolingual peers while displaying decreased activation in left lateral frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. Critically, this attenuation of age-related over-recruitment associated with bilingualism was directly correlated with better task switching performance. In addition, the lower BOLD response in frontal regions accounted for 82% of the variance in the bilingual task switching reaction time advantage. These results suggest that lifelong bilingualism offsets age-related declines in the neural efficiency for cognitive control processes. PMID:23303919

  20. Splicing regulator SLU7 is essential for maintaining liver homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Elizalde, María; Urtasun, Raquel; Azkona, María; Latasa, María U.; Goñi, Saioa; García-Irigoyen, Oihane; Uriarte, Iker; Segura, Victor; Collantes, María; Di Scala, Mariana; Lujambio, Amaia; Prieto, Jesús; Ávila, Matías A.; Berasain, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    A precise equilibrium between cellular differentiation and proliferation is fundamental for tissue homeostasis. Maintaining this balance is particularly important for the liver, a highly differentiated organ with systemic metabolic functions that is endowed with unparalleled regenerative potential. Carcinogenesis in the liver develops as the result of hepatocellular de-differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation. Here, we identified SLU7, which encodes a pre-mRNA splicing regulator that is inhibited in hepatocarcinoma, as a pivotal gene for hepatocellular homeostasis. SLU7 knockdown in human liver cells and mouse liver resulted in profound changes in pre-mRNA splicing and gene expression, leading to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, refractoriness to key metabolic hormones, and reversion to a fetal-like gene expression pattern. Additionally, loss of SLU7 also increased hepatocellular proliferation and induced a switch to a tumor-like glycolytic phenotype. Slu7 governed the splicing and/or expression of multiple genes essential for hepatocellular differentiation, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (Srsf3) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4? (Hnf4?), and was critical for cAMP-regulated gene transcription. Together, out data indicate that SLU7 is central regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. PMID:24865429