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Sample records for maintains genomic stability

  1. Maintaining Genome Stability in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Active maintenance of genome stability is a prerequisite for the development and function of the nervous system. The high replication index during neurogenesis and the long life of mature neurons highlight the need for efficient cellular programs to safeguard genetic fidelity. Multiple DNA damage response pathways ensure that replication stress and other types of DNA lesions such as oxidative damage do not impact neural homeostasis. Numerous human neurologic syndromes result from defective DNA damage signaling and compromised genome integrity. These syndromes can involve different neuropathology, which highlights the diverse maintenance roles required for genome stability in the nervous system. Understanding how DNA damage signaling pathways promote neural development and preserve homeostasis is essential for understanding fundamental brain function. PMID:24165679

  2. Pathways controlling dNTP pools to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Sean G; Valerie, Nicholas C K; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Artificially modified nucleotides, in the form of nucleoside analogues, are widely used in the treatment of cancers and various other diseases, and have become important tools in the laboratory to characterise DNA repair pathways. In contrast, the role of endogenously occurring nucleotide modifications in genome stability is little understood. This is despite the demonstration over three decades ago that the cellular DNA precursor pool is orders of magnitude more susceptible to modification than the DNA molecule itself. More recently, underscoring the importance of this topic, oxidation of the cellular nucleotide pool achieved through targeting the sanitation enzyme MTH1, appears to be a promising anti-cancer strategy. This article reviews our current understanding of modified DNA precursors in genome stability, with a particular focus upon oxidised nucleotides, and outlines some important outstanding questions. PMID:27311542

  3. ING2 controls the progression of DNA replication forks to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Delphine; Ythier, Damien; Binet, Romuald; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Sengupta, Sagar; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth 2 (ING2) is a candidate tumour suppressor gene the expression of which is frequently lost in tumours. Here, we identified a new function for ING2 in the control of DNA replication and in the maintenance of genome stability. Global replication rate was markedly reduced during normal S-phase in small interfering RNA (siRNA) ING2 cells, as seen in a DNA fibre spreading experiment. Accordingly, we found that ING2 interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and regulates its amount to the chromatin fraction, allowing normal replication progression and normal cell proliferation. Deregulation of DNA replication has been previously associated with genome instability. Hence, a high proportion of siRNA ING2 cells presented endoreduplication of their genome as well as an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchange. Thus, we propose for the first time that ING2 might function as a tumour suppressor gene by directly maintaining DNA integrity. PMID:19730436

  4. RECG Maintains Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Stability by Suppressing Extensive Recombination between Short Dispersed Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Odahara, Masaki; Masuda, Yuichi; Sato, Mayuko; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Harada, Chizuru; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO) mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8–79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12–63 bp) in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions. PMID:25769081

  5. Homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor Prep1 is required to maintain genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Iotti, Giorgio; Longobardi, Elena; Masella, Silvia; Dardaei, Leila; De Santis, Francesca; Micali, Nicola; Blasi, Francesco

    2011-07-19

    Prep1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential in embryonic development and functions in the adult as a tumor suppressor. We show here that Prep1 is involved in maintaining genomic stability and preventing neoplastic transformation. Hypomorphic homozygous Prep1(i/i) fetal liver cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit increased basal DNA damage and normal DNA damage response after γ-irradiation compared with WT. Cytogenetic analysis shows the presence of numerous chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidy in very early-passage Prep1(i/i) MEFs. In human fibroblasts, acute Prep1 down-regulation by siRNA induces DNA damage response, like in Prep1(i/i) MEFs, together with an increase in heterochromatin-associated modifications: rapid increase of histone methylation and decreased transcription of satellite DNA. Ectopic expression of Prep1 rescues DNA damage and heterochromatin methylation. Inhibition of Suv39 activity blocks the chromatin but not the DNA damage phenotype. Finally, Prep1 deficiency facilitates cell immortalization, escape from oncogene-induced senescence, and H-Ras(V12)-dependent transformation. Importantly, the latter can be partially rescued by restoration of Prep1 level. The results show that the tumor suppressor role of Prep1 is associated with the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:21715654

  6. Alteration/deficiency in activation-3 (Ada3) plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Sameer; Katafiasz, Bryan J; Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Jun; Mohibi, Shakur; Jain, Smrati; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah Basavaraju; Pandita, Tej K; Dave, Bhavana J; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2012-11-15

    Cell cycle regulation and DNA repair following damage are essential for maintaining genome integrity. DNA damage activates checkpoints in order to repair damaged DNA prior to exit to the next phase of cell cycle. Recently, we have shown the role of Ada3, a component of various histone acetyltransferase complexes, in cell cycle regulation, and loss of Ada3 results in mouse embryonic lethality. Here, we used adenovirus-Cre-mediated Ada3 deletion in Ada3(fl/fl) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to assess the role of Ada3 in DNA damage response following exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). We report that Ada3 depletion was associated with increased levels of phospho-ATM (pATM), γH2AX, phospho-53BP1 (p53BP1) and phospho-RAD51 (pRAD51) in untreated cells; however, radiation response was intact in Ada3(-/-) cells. Notably, Ada3(-/-) cells exhibited a significant delay in disappearance of DNA damage foci for several critical proteins involved in the DNA repair process. Significantly, loss of Ada3 led to enhanced chromosomal aberrations, such as chromosome breaks, fragments, deletions and translocations, which further increased upon DNA damage. Notably, the total numbers of aberrations were more clearly observed in S-phase, as compared with G₁ or G₂ phases of cell cycle with IR. Lastly, comparison of DNA damage in Ada3(fl/fl) and Ada3(-/-) cells confirmed higher residual DNA damage in Ada3(-/-) cells, underscoring a critical role of Ada3 in the DNA repair process. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for a novel role for Ada3 in maintenance of the DNA repair process and genomic stability. PMID:23095635

  7. p53 Maintains Genomic Stability by Preventing Interference between Transcription and Replication.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Constance Qiao Xin; Alexander, Irina; Lin, Zhaoru; Lim, Shuhui; Aning, Obed Akwasi; Kumar, Ramesh; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Ho, Vincent H B; Cheok, Chit Fang

    2016-04-01

    p53 tumor suppressor maintains genomic stability, typically acting through cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. We discovered a function of p53 in preventing conflicts between transcription and replication, independent of its canonical roles. p53 deficiency sensitizes cells to Topoisomerase (Topo) II inhibitors, resulting in DNA damage arising spontaneously during replication. Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A)-DNA complexes preferentially accumulate in isogenic p53 mutant or knockout cells, reflecting an increased recruitment of TOP2A to regulate DNA topology. We propose that p53 acts to prevent DNA topological stress originating from transcription during the S phase and, therefore, promotes normal replication fork progression. Consequently, replication fork progression is impaired in the absence of p53, which is reversed by transcription inhibition. Pharmacologic inhibition of transcription also attenuates DNA damage and decreases Topo-II-DNA complexes, restoring cell viability in p53-deficient cells. Together, our results demonstrate a function of p53 that may underlie its role in tumor suppression. PMID:27052176

  8. Histone Chaperone Asf1 Plays an Essential Role in Maintaining Genomic Stability in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tanae, Katsuhiro; Horiuchi, Tomitaka; Matsuo, Yuzy; Katayama, Satoshi; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    The histone H3-H4 chaperone Asf1 is involved in chromatin assembly (or disassembly), histone exchange, regulation of transcription, and chromatin silencing in several organisms. To investigate the essential functions of Asf1 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, asf1-ts mutants were constructed by random mutagenesis using PCR. One mutant (asf1-33(ts)) was mated with mutants in 77 different kinase genes to identify synthetic lethal combinations. The asf1-33 mutant required the DNA damage checkpoint factors Chk1 and Rad3 for its survival at the restrictive temperature. Chk1, but not Cds1, was phosphorylated in the asf1-33 mutant at the restrictive temperature, indicating that the DNA damage checkpoint was activated in the asf1-33 mutant. DNA damage occured in the asf1-33 mutant, with degradation of the chromosomal DNA observed through pulse-field gel electrophoresis and the formation of Rad22 foci. Sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease in the asf1-33 mutant was increased compared to the asf1+ strain at the restrictive temperature, suggesting that asf1 mutations also caused a defect in overall chromatin structure. The Asf1-33 mutant protein was mislocalized and incapable of binding histones. Furthermore, histone H3 levels at the centromeric outer repeat region were decreased in the asf1-33 mutant and heterochromatin structure was impaired. Finally, sim3, which encodes a CenH3 histone chaperone, was identified as a strong suppressor of the asf1-33 mutant. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that Asf1 plays an essential role in maintaining genomic stability in S. pombe. PMID:22291963

  9. Cancer-predisposition gene KLLN maintains pericentric H3K9 trimethylation protecting genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Nizialek, Emily A.; Sankunny, Madhav; Niazi, Farshad; Eng, Charis

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of proper chromatin states and genomic stability is vital for normal development and health across a range of organisms. Here, we report on the role of KLLN in maintenance of pericentric H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and genomic stability. Germline hypermethylation of KLLN, a gene uncovered well after the human genome project, has been linked to Cowden cancer-predisposition syndrome (CS) in PTEN wild-type cases. KLLN first identified as a p53-dependent tumor suppressor gene, was believed to bind randomly to DNA and cause S-phase arrest. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-based sequencing (ChIP-seq), we demonstrated that KLLN binds to DNA regions enriched with H3K9me3. KLLN overexpression correlated with increased H3K9 methyltransferase activity and increased global H3K9me3, while knockdown of KLLN had an opposite effect. We also found KLLN to localize to pericentric regions, with loss of KLLN resulting in dysregulation of pericentric heterochromatin, with consequent chromosomal instability manifested by increased micronuclei formation and numerical chromosomal aberrations. Interestingly, we show that KLLN interacts with DBC1, with consequent abrogation of DBC1 inhibition of SUV39H1, a H3K9 methyltransferase, suggesting the mode of KLLN regulating H3K9me3. These results suggest a critical role for KLLN as a potential regulator of pericentric heterochromatin formation, genomic stability and gene expression. PMID:26673699

  10. Cancer-predisposition gene KLLN maintains pericentric H3K9 trimethylation protecting genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Nizialek, Emily A; Sankunny, Madhav; Niazi, Farshad; Eng, Charis

    2016-05-01

    Maintenance of proper chromatin states and genomic stability is vital for normal development and health across a range of organisms. Here, we report on the role of KLLN in maintenance of pericentric H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and genomic stability. Germline hypermethylation of KLLN, a gene uncovered well after the human genome project, has been linked to Cowden cancer-predisposition syndrome (CS) in PTEN wild-type cases. KLLN first identified as a p53-dependent tumor suppressor gene, was believed to bind randomly to DNA and cause S-phase arrest. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-based sequencing (ChIP-seq), we demonstrated that KLLN binds to DNA regions enriched with H3K9me3. KLLN overexpression correlated with increased H3K9 methyltransferase activity and increased global H3K9me3, while knockdown of KLLN had an opposite effect. We also found KLLN to localize to pericentric regions, with loss of KLLN resulting in dysregulation of pericentric heterochromatin, with consequent chromosomal instability manifested by increased micronuclei formation and numerical chromosomal aberrations. Interestingly, we show that KLLN interacts with DBC1, with consequent abrogation of DBC1 inhibition of SUV39H1, a H3K9 methyltransferase, suggesting the mode of KLLN regulating H3K9me3. These results suggest a critical role for KLLN as a potential regulator of pericentric heterochromatin formation, genomic stability and gene expression. PMID:26673699

  11. Wuho Is a New Member in Maintaining Genome Stability through its Interaction with Flap Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, I-Cheng; Chen, Betty Chamay; Shuai, Hung-Hsun; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Peilin; Hsieh, Tao-shih

    2016-01-01

    Replication forks are vulnerable to wayward nuclease activities. We report here our discovery of a new member in guarding genome stability at replication forks. We previously isolated a Drosophila mutation, wuho (wh, no progeny), characterized by a severe fertility defect and affecting expression of a protein (WH) in a family of conserved proteins with multiple WD40 repeats. Knockdown of WH by siRNA in Drosophila, mouse, and human cultured cells results in DNA damage with strand breaks and apoptosis through ATM/Chk2/p53 signaling pathway. Mice with mWh knockout are early embryonic lethal and display DNA damage. We identify that the flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is one of the interacting proteins. Fluorescence microscopy showed the localization of WH at the site of nascent DNA synthesis along with other replication proteins, including FEN1 and PCNA. We show that WH is able to modulate FEN1’s endonucleolytic activities depending on the substrate DNA structure. The stimulatory or inhibitory effects of WH on FEN1’s flap versus gap endonuclease activities are consistent with the proposed WH’s functions in protecting the integrity of replication fork. These results suggest that wh is a new member of the guardians of genome stability because it regulates FEN1’s potential DNA cleavage threat near the site of replication. PMID:26751069

  12. Dicer promotes transcription termination at sites of replication stress to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Stephane E.; Ren, Jie; Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Chang, An-Yun; Sánchez, Mar; Valbuena, Alberto; Antequera, Francisco; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear RNA interference is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3’ end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25417108

  13. Dicer promotes transcription termination at sites of replication stress to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Castel, Stephane E; Ren, Jie; Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Chang, An-Yun; Sánchez, Mar; Valbuena, Alberto; Antequera, Francisco; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-10-23

    Nuclear RNAi is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe, we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3? end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25417108

  14. TORC2 Is Required to Maintain Genome Stability during S Phase in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrun, Miriam; Kolesnikov, Masha; Kupiec, Martin; Weisman, Ronit

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage can occur due to environmental insults or intrinsic metabolic processes and is a major threat to genome stability. The DNA damage response is composed of a series of well coordinated cellular processes that include activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, transient cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair, and reentry into the cell cycle. Here we demonstrate that mutant cells defective for TOR complex 2 (TORC2) or the downstream AGC-like kinase, Gad8, are highly sensitive to chronic replication stress but are insensitive to ionizing radiation. We show that in response to replication stress, TORC2 is dispensable for Chk1-mediated cell cycle arrest but is required for the return to cell cycle progression. Rad52 is a DNA repair and recombination protein that forms foci at DNA damage sites and stalled replication forks. TORC2 mutant cells show increased spontaneous nuclear Rad52 foci, particularly during S phase, suggesting that TORC2 protects cells from DNA damage that occurs during normal DNA replication. Consistently, the viability of TORC2-Gad8 mutant cells is dependent on the presence of the homologous recombination pathway and other proteins that are required for replication restart following fork replication stalling. Our findings indicate that TORC2 is required for genome integrity. This may be relevant for the growing amount of evidence implicating TORC2 in cancer development. PMID:23703609

  15. A yeast gene, MGS1, encoding a DNA-dependent AAA(+) ATPase is required to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Hishida, T; Iwasaki, H; Ohno, T; Morishita, T; Shinagawa, H

    2001-07-17

    Changes in DNA superhelicity during DNA replication are mediated primarily by the activities of DNA helicases and topoisomerases. If these activities are defective, the progression of the replication fork can be hindered or blocked, which can lead to double-strand breaks, elevated recombination in regions of repeated DNA, and genome instability. Hereditary diseases like Werner's and Bloom's Syndromes are caused by defects in DNA helicases, and these diseases are associated with genome instability and carcinogenesis in humans. Here we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MGS1 (Maintenance of Genome Stability 1), which encodes a protein belonging to the AAA(+) class of ATPases, and whose central region is similar to Escherichia coli RuvB, a Holliday junction branch migration motor protein. The Mgs1 orthologues are highly conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The Mgs1 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase and single-strand DNA annealing activities. An mgs1 deletion mutant has an elevated rate of mitotic recombination, which causes genome instability. The mgs1 mutation is synergistic with a mutation in top3 (encoding topoisomerase III), and the double mutant exhibits severe growth defects and markedly increased genome instability. In contrast to the mgs1 mutation, a mutation in the sgs1 gene encoding a DNA helicase homologous to the Werner and Bloom helicases suppresses both the growth defect and the increased genome instability of the top3 mutant. Therefore, evolutionarily conserved Mgs1 may play a role together with RecQ family helicases and DNA topoisomerases in maintaining proper DNA topology, which is essential for genome stability. PMID:11459965

  16. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds

    PubMed Central

    Waterworth, Wanda M.; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M.; Finch-Savage, William E.; West, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  17. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M; Finch-Savage, William E; West, Christopher E

    2016-08-23

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  18. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  19. Mechanisms maintaining grassland biodiversity and ecosystem stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologists need to know how particular processes influence biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We demonstrate how data from biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiments can be used to identify and quantify the classes of mechanisms maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We predicted...

  20. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  1. Histone H2AX Is Involved in FoxO3a-Mediated Transcriptional Responses to Ionizing Radiation to Maintain Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tarrade, Stephane; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Flegal, Matthew; Bertrand, Lindsey; Velegzhaninov, Ilya; Moskalev, Alexey; Klokov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Histone H2AX plays a crucial role in molecular and cellular responses to DNA damage and in the maintenance of genome stability. It is downstream of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) damage signaling pathway and there is an emerging role of the transcription factor FoxO3a, a regulator of a variety of other pathways, in activating this signaling. We asked whether H2AX may feedback to FoxO3a to affect respective FoxO3a-dependent pathways. We used a genetically matched pair of mouse embryonic fibroblast H2AX+/+ and H2AX−/− cell lines to carry out comprehensive time-course and dose-response experiments and to show that the expression of several FoxO3a-regulated genes was altered in H2AX−/− compared to H2AX+/+ cells at both basal and irradiated conditions. Hspa1b and Gadd45a were down-regulated four- to five-fold and Ddit3, Cdkn1a and Sod2 were up-regulated 2–3-fold in H2AX−/− cells. Using the luciferase reporter assay, we directly demonstrated that transcriptional activity of FoxoO3a was reduced in H2AX−/− cells. FoxO3a localization within the nuclear phospho-ATM (Ser1981) foci in irradiated cells was affected by the H2AX status, as well as its posttranslational modification (phospho-Thr32). These differences were associated with genomic instability and radiosensitivity in H2AX−/− cells. Finally, knockdown of H2AX in H2AX+/+ cells resulted in FoxO3a-dependent gene expression patterns and increased radiosensitivity that partially mimicked those found in H2AX−/− cells. Taken together, our data suggest a role for FoxO3a in the maintenance of genome integrity in response to DNA damage that is mediated by H2AX via yet unknown mechanisms. PMID:26694365

  2. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiayu; Xu, Weijiang; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Neng; Ni, Juan; Zou, Tianning; Liang, Ziqing; Wang, Xu; Fenech, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM) is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6) is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and methionine synthase (MS), in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV). To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene–nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state). SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer. PMID:27347936

  3. The Role of Genetic Polymorphisms as Related to One-Carbon Metabolism, Vitamin B6, and Gene-Nutrient Interactions in Maintaining Genomic Stability and Cell Viability in Chinese Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiayu; Xu, Weijiang; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Neng; Ni, Juan; Zou, Tianning; Liang, Ziqing; Wang, Xu; Fenech, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FMOCM) is linked to DNA synthesis, methylation, and cell proliferation. Vitamin B6 (B6) is a cofactor, and genetic polymorphisms of related key enzymes, such as serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR), and methionine synthase (MS), in FMOCM may govern the bioavailability of metabolites and play important roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and cell viability (GSACV). To evaluate the influences of B6, genetic polymorphisms of these enzymes, and gene-nutrient interactions on GSACV, we utilized the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) techniques in the lymphocytes from female breast cancer cases and controls. GSACV showed a significantly positive correlation with B6 concentration, and 48 nmol/L of B6 was the most suitable concentration for maintaining GSACV in vitro. The GSACV indexes showed significantly different sensitivity to B6 deficiency between cases and controls; the B6 effect on the GSACV variance contribution of each index was significantly higher than that of genetic polymorphisms and the sample state (tumor state). SHMT C1420T mutations may reduce breast cancer susceptibility, whereas MTRR A66G and MS A2756G mutations may increase breast cancer susceptibility. The role of SHMT, MS, and MTRR genotype polymorphisms in GSACV is reduced compared with that of B6. The results appear to suggest that the long-term lack of B6 under these conditions may increase genetic damage and cell injury and that individuals with various genotypes have different sensitivities to B6 deficiency. FMOCM metabolic enzyme gene polymorphism may be related to breast cancer susceptibility to a certain extent due to the effect of other factors such as stress, hormones, cancer therapies, psychological conditions, and diet. Adequate B6 intake may be good for maintaining genome health and preventing breast cancer. PMID:27347936

  4. TECHNIQUE FOR SCREENING AND MAINTAINING SMALLER GENOMIC LIBRARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique for screening and simultaneously maintaining individual clones of the gene library for long-term storage is described. his method is particularly useful for identification and cloning of genes from cosmid-based genomic libraries of prokaryotes that constitute a smalle...

  5. WWOX guards genome stability by activating ATM

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-01-01

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) tend to break upon replication stress and have been suggested to be “hot spots” for genomic instability. Recent evidence, however, implies that in the wake of DNA damage, WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX, the gene product of the FRA16D fragile site), associates with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and regulates its activation to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:27308504

  6. Ghrelin maintains the cardiovascular stability in severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rongqian; Chaung, Wayne W.; Dong, Weifeng; Ji, Youxin; Barrera, Rafael; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Molmenti, Ernesto P.; Coppa, Gene F.; Wang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular dysfunction, characterized by reduced cardiac contractility and depressed endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation, is common in severe sepsis. Although it is known that ghrelin produces beneficial effects following various adverse circulatory conditions, it remains unknown whether ghrelin increases cardiac contractility and improves vascular responsiveness to vasoactive agents in severe sepsis. Methods Male adult rats were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). At 5 h after CLP, a bolus intravenous injection of 2 nmol ghrelin was followed by a continuous infusion of 12 nmol ghrelin via a primed mini-pump over 15 h. At 20 h after CLP (i.e., severe sepsis), the maximal rates of ventricular pressure increase (+dP/dtmax) and decrease (−dP/dtmax) were determined in vivo. In additional groups of animals, the thoracic aortae were isolated at 20 h after CLP. The aortae were cut into rings, and placed in organ chambers. Norepinephrine (NE) was used to induce vascular contraction. Dose responses for an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (ACh), and an endothelium-independent vasodilator, nitroglycerine (NTG) were carried out. Results +dP/dtmax and −dP/dtmax decreased significantly at 20 h after CLP. Treatment with ghrelin significantly increased +dP/dtmax and −dP/dtmax by 36% (P<0.05) and 35% (P<0.05), respectively. Moreover, NE-induced vascular contraction and endothelium-dependent (ACh-induced) vascular relaxation decreased significantly at 20 h after CLP. Administration of ghrelin, however, increased NE-induced vascular contraction and ACh-induced vascular relaxation. In contrast, no significant reduction in NTG-induced vascular relaxation was seen in rats with severe sepsis irrespective of ghrelin treatment. Conclusions Ghrelin may be further developed as a useful agent for maintaining cardiovascular stability in severe sepsis. PMID:22459289

  7. Nuclear Noncoding RNAs and Genome Stability.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, Jasbeer S; Calvo, Isabel A; Joh, Richard I; Hill, Ian T; Motamedi, Mo

    2016-07-01

    In modern molecular biology, RNA has emerged as a versatile macromolecule capable of mediating an astonishing number of biological functions beyond its role as a transient messenger of genetic information. The recent discovery and functional analyses of new classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have revealed their widespread use in many pathways, including several in the nucleus. This Review focuses on the mechanisms by which nuclear ncRNAs directly contribute to the maintenance of genome stability. We discuss how ncRNAs inhibit spurious recombination among repetitive DNA elements, repress mobilization of transposable elements (TEs), template or bridge DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during repair, and direct developmentally regulated genome rearrangements in some ciliates. These studies reveal an unexpected repertoire of mechanisms by which ncRNAs contribute to genome stability and even potentially fuel evolution by acting as templates for genome modification. PMID:27392145

  8. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  9. Recombination and the maintenance of plant organelle genome stability.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Alexandre; Brisson, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Like their nuclear counterpart, the plastid and mitochondrial genomes of plants have to be faithfully replicated and repaired to ensure the normal functioning of the plant. Inability to maintain organelle genome stability results in plastid and/or mitochondrial defects, which can lead to potentially detrimental phenotypes. Fortunately, plant organelles have developed multiple strategies to maintain the integrity of their genetic material. Of particular importance among these processes is the extensive use of DNA recombination. In fact, recombination has been implicated in both the replication and the repair of organelle genomes. Revealingly, deregulation of recombination in organelles results in genomic instability, often accompanied by adverse consequences for plant fitness. The recent identification of four families of proteins that prevent aberrant recombination of organelle DNA sheds much needed mechanistic light on this important process. What comes out of these investigations is a partial portrait of the recombination surveillance machinery in which plants have co-opted some proteins of prokaryotic origin but have also evolved whole new factors to keep their organelle genomes intact. These new features presumably optimized the protection of plastid and mitochondrial genomes against the particular genotoxic stresses they face. PMID:20180912

  10. Maintaining Genome Stability in Defiance of Mitotic DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Gentili, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of decisions affecting cell viability and proliferation is based on prompt detection of the issue to be addressed, formulation and transmission of a correct set of instructions and fidelity in the execution of orders. While the first and the last are purely mechanical processes relying on the faithful functioning of single proteins or macromolecular complexes (sensors and effectors), information is the real cue, with signal amplitude, duration, and frequency ultimately determining the type of response. The cellular response to DNA damage is no exception to the rule. In this review article we focus on DNA damage responses in G2 and Mitosis. First, we set the stage describing mitosis and the machineries in charge of assembling the apparatus responsible for chromosome alignment and segregation as well as the inputs that control its function (checkpoints). Next, we examine the type of issues that a cell approaching mitosis might face, presenting the impact of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the correct and timely functioning of pathways correcting errors or damage before chromosome segregation. We conclude this essay with a perspective on the current status of mitotic signaling pathway inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:27493659

  11. Interleukin 2 maintains biologic stability and sterility over prolonged time.

    PubMed

    Safar, M; Junghans, R P

    2000-09-01

    The FDA approved interleukin 2 (IL2) for clinical use in 1992 in a high-dose bolus intravenous infusion schedule. IL2 administered by continuous low- and intermediate-dose infusion can result in a variety of immunologic effects including the expansion of the Natural Killer (NK) cell pool and immune reconstitution in immune-deficient hosts. These immune modifications are essential for augmentation of both currently available and evolving immunotherapies. The manufacturer's data indicate stability of the IL2 for a period of 6 days. This time frame is not practical for prolonged infusional schemes necessitating frequent changes of drug depots. We tested the biologic stability and sterility of the commercially available recombinant IL2 preparation (aldesleukin; Proleukin, Chiron) under clinical conditions for up to 30 days. Our results confirm that IL2 retains its biologic activity and sterility under these conditions for prolonged periods. This information will simplify IL2 outpatient regimens, allowing for convenient intervals for drug depot renewal, leading to improved patient compliance and conserved health care expenditures. PMID:10996039

  12. The ubiquitin ligase APC(Cdh1) is required to maintain genome integrity in primary human cells.

    PubMed

    Engelbert, D; Schnerch, D; Baumgarten, A; Wäsch, R

    2008-02-01

    Ensuring precise DNA replication and chromosome segregation is essential during cell division in order to provide genomic stability and avoid malignant growth. Proteolytic control of cell cycle regulators by the anaphase-promoting complex, activated by Cdh1 (APC(Cdh1)), is responsible for a stable G1 phase after mitotic exit allowing accurate preparation for DNA replication in the following S phase. APC(Cdh1) target proteins are frequently upregulated in tumor cells and the inactivation of human Cdh1 might interfere with genome integrity by target stabilization. Here we show that APC(Cdh1) is required for maintaining genomic integrity in primary human cells. Lentiviral-delivered strong and stable suppression of Cdh1 by RNA interference (RNAi) causes aberrant accumulation of several APC(Cdh1) target proteins, such as cyclin A, B, Aurora A or Plk1, which control accurate and equal distribution of the genetic information to daughter cells. This induces a premature and prolonged S phase, mitotic-entry delay and defects in chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Cell cycle deregulation by stable knockdown of Cdh1 leads to activation of p53/p21 and genomic instability, which is further increased by codepletion of p53. Thus, stabilization of APC(Cdh1) targets may initiate aberrant DNA replication and chromosome separation, and trigger a p53 response by deregulating G1 in primary human cells. PMID:17700535

  13. Maintenance of genome stability in plants: repairing DNA double strand breaks and chromatin structure stability.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sujit

    2014-01-01

    Plant cells are subject to high levels of DNA damage resulting from plant's obligatory dependence on sunlight and the associated exposure to environmental stresses like solar UV radiation, high soil salinity, drought, chilling injury, and other air and soil pollutants including heavy metals and metabolic by-products from endogenous processes. The irreversible DNA damages, generated by the environmental and genotoxic stresses affect plant growth and development, reproduction, and crop productivity. Thus, for maintaining genome stability, plants have developed an extensive array of mechanisms for the detection and repair of DNA damages. This review will focus recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating plant genome stability in the context of repairing of double stand breaks and chromatin structure maintenance. PMID:25295048

  14. Nuclear organization in genome stability: SUMO connections.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Shigeki; Davoodi, Niloofar; Gasser, Susan M

    2011-03-01

    Recent findings show that chromatin dynamics and nuclear organization are not only important for gene regulation and DNA replication, but also for the maintenance of genome stability. In yeast, nuclear pores play a role in the maintenance of genome stability by means of the evolutionarily conserved family of SUMO-targeted Ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs). The yeast Slx5/Slx8 STUbL associates with a class of DNA breaks that are shifted to nuclear pores. Functionally Slx5/Slx8 are needed for telomere maintenance by an unusual recombination-mediated pathway. The mammalian STUbL RNF4 associates with Promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies and regulates PML/PML-fusion protein stability in response to arsenic-induced stress. A subclass of PML bodies support telomere maintenance by the ALT pathway in telomerase-deficient tumors. Perturbation of nuclear organization through either loss of pore subunits in yeast, or PML body perturbation in man, can lead to gene amplifications, deletions, translocations or end-to-end telomere fusion events, thus implicating SUMO and STUbLs in the subnuclear organization of select repair events. PMID:21321608

  15. USF-1 Is Critical for Maintaining Genome Integrity in Response to UV-Induced DNA Photolesions

    PubMed Central

    Mouchet, Nicolas; Vaulont, Sophie; Prince, Sharon; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2012-01-01

    An important function of all organisms is to ensure that their genetic material remains intact and unaltered through generations. This is an extremely challenging task since the cell's DNA is constantly under assault by endogenous and environmental agents. To protect against this, cells have evolved effective mechanisms to recognize DNA damage, signal its presence, and mediate its repair. While these responses are expected to be highly regulated because they are critical to avoid human diseases, very little is known about the regulation of the expression of genes involved in mediating their effects. The Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is the major DNA–repair process involved in the recognition and removal of UV-mediated DNA damage. Here we use a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays with an intermittent UV-irradiation protocol to investigate the regulation of key players in the DNA–damage recognition step of NER sub-pathways (TCR and GGR). We show an up-regulation in gene expression of CSA and HR23A, which are involved in TCR and GGR, respectively. Importantly, we show that this occurs through a p53 independent mechanism and that it is coordinated by the stress-responsive transcription factor USF-1. Furthermore, using a mouse model we show that the loss of USF-1 compromises DNA repair, which suggests that USF-1 plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:22291606

  16. Menopause: Genome stability as new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Laven, Joop S E; Visser, Jenny A; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2016-10-01

    Menopause is defined as the age-dependent permanent cessation of menstruation and ovulation due to ovarian failure. Menopause occurs on average around the age of 51 years. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 44 genetic variants that are associated with age of onset of natural menopause. Genes linked with menopause can be classified into three major groups: genes implicated in genome stability (DNA repair), immune function and mitochondrial biogenesis. Biological and epidemiological data indicate that reproductive performance, age at menopause and longevity are interlinked through common genetic factors, which play a pivotal role in DNA repair and genome maintenance, which has been linked before with the process of ageing. Consequently, ageing of the soma as a result of inefficient DNA repair appears also to be responsible for failure to reproduce and the subsequent occurrence of menopause. In this way reproductive performance may be strongly linked to the physical condition of the soma and may be a very good predictor of general health in later life. PMID:27621233

  17. Ten years of maintaining and expanding a microbial genome and metagenome analysis system.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Victor M; Chen, I-Min A; Chu, Ken; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-11-01

    Launched in March 2005, the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system is a comprehensive data management system that supports multidimensional comparative analysis of genomic data. At the core of the IMG system is a data warehouse that contains genome and metagenome datasets sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute or provided by scientific users, as well as public genome datasets available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information Genbank sequence data archive. Genomes and metagenome datasets are processed using IMG's microbial genome and metagenome sequence data processing pipelines and are integrated into the data warehouse using IMG's data integration toolkits. Microbial genome and metagenome application specific data marts and user interfaces provide access to different subsets of IMG's data and analysis toolkits. This review article revisits IMG's original aims, highlights key milestones reached by the system during the past 10 years, and discusses the main challenges faced by a rapidly expanding system, in particular the complexity of maintaining such a system in an academic setting with limited budgets and computing and data management infrastructure. PMID:26439299

  18. FANCD2 Maintains Fork Stability in BRCA1/2-Deficient Tumors and Promotes Alternative End-Joining DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Kais, Zeina; Rondinelli, Beatrice; Holmes, Amie; O'Leary, Colin; Kozono, David; D'Andrea, Alan D; Ceccaldi, Raphael

    2016-06-14

    BRCA1/2 proteins function in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair and cooperate with Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins to maintain genomic integrity through replication fork stabilization. Loss of BRCA1/2 proteins results in DNA repair deficiency and replicative stress, leading to genomic instability and enhanced sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recent studies have shown that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors upregulate Polθ-mediated alternative end-joining (alt-EJ) repair as a survival mechanism. Whether other mechanisms maintain genomic integrity upon loss of BRCA1/2 proteins is currently unknown. Here we show that BRCA1/2-deficient tumors also upregulate FANCD2 activity. FANCD2 is required for fork protection and fork restart in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors. Moreover, FANCD2 promotes Polθ recruitment at sites of damage and alt-EJ repair. Finally, loss of FANCD2 in BRCA1/2-deficient tumors enhances cell death. These results reveal a synthetic lethal relationship between FANCD2 and BRCA1/2, and they identify FANCD2 as a central player orchestrating DNA repair pathway choice at the replication fork. PMID:27264184

  19. Cooperativity of the SUMO and Ubiquitin Pathways in Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Minghua; Boddy, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) or SUMO to DNA repair proteins plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. These structurally related polypeptides can be viewed as distinct road signs, with each being read by specific protein interaction motifs. Therefore, via their interactions with selective readers in the proteome, ubiquitin and SUMO can elicit distinct cellular responses, such as directing DNA lesions into different repair pathways. On the other hand, through the action of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) family proteins, ubiquitin and SUMO can cooperate in the form of a hybrid signal. These mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains recruit “effector” proteins such as the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex that contain both ubiquitin and SUMO interaction motifs. This review will summarize recent key findings on collaborative and distinct roles that ubiquitin and SUMO play in orchestrating DNA damage responses. PMID:26927199

  20. Cooperativity of the SUMO and Ubiquitin Pathways in Genome Stability.

    PubMed

    Nie, Minghua; Boddy, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) or SUMO to DNA repair proteins plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. These structurally related polypeptides can be viewed as distinct road signs, with each being read by specific protein interaction motifs. Therefore, via their interactions with selective readers in the proteome, ubiquitin and SUMO can elicit distinct cellular responses, such as directing DNA lesions into different repair pathways. On the other hand, through the action of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) family proteins, ubiquitin and SUMO can cooperate in the form of a hybrid signal. These mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains recruit "effector" proteins such as the AAA⁺ ATPase Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex that contain both ubiquitin and SUMO interaction motifs. This review will summarize recent key findings on collaborative and distinct roles that ubiquitin and SUMO play in orchestrating DNA damage responses. PMID:26927199

  1. Malaria parasites utilize both homologous recombination and alternative end joining pathways to maintain genome integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Laura A.; Lawrence, Elizabeth A.; Deitsch, Kirk W.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites replicate asexually within their mammalian hosts as haploid cells and are subject to DNA damage from the immune response and chemotherapeutic agents that can significantly disrupt genomic integrity. Examination of the annotated genome of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum identified genes encoding core proteins required for the homologous recombination (HR) pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but surprisingly none of the components of the canonical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) pathway were identified. To better understand how malaria parasites repair DSBs and maintain genome integrity, we modified the yeast I-SceI endonuclease system to generate inducible, site-specific DSBs within the parasite’s genome. Analysis of repaired genomic DNA showed that parasites possess both a typical HR pathway resulting in gene conversion events as well as an end joining (EJ) pathway for repair of DSBs when no homologous sequence is available. The products of EJ were limited in number and identical products were observed in multiple independent experiments. The repair junctions frequently contained short insertions also found in the surrounding sequences, suggesting the possibility of a templated repair process. We propose that an alternative end-joining pathway rather than C-NHEJ, serves as a primary method for repairing DSBs in malaria parasites. PMID:24089143

  2. Genomic stability during cellular reprogramming: Mission impossible?

    PubMed

    von Joest, Mathieu; Búa Aguín, Sabela; Li, Han

    2016-06-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult somatic cells is one of the most exciting discoveries in recent biomedical research. It holds tremendous potential in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, a series of reports highlighting genomic instability in iPSCs raises concerns about their clinical application. Although the mechanisms cause genomic instability during cellular reprogramming are largely unknown, several potential sources have been suggested. This review summarizes current knowledge on this active research field and discusses the latest efforts to alleviate the genomic insults during cellular reprogramming to generate iPSCs with enhanced quality and safety. PMID:26851988

  3. Ancient hybridization and genomic stabilization in a swordtail fish.

    PubMed

    Schumer, Molly; Cui, Rongfeng; Powell, Daniel L; Rosenthal, Gil G; Andolfatto, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A rapidly increasing body of work is revealing that the genomes of distinct species often exhibit hybrid ancestry, presumably due to postspeciation hybridization between closely related species. Despite the growing number of documented cases, we still know relatively little about how genomes evolve and stabilize following hybridization, and to what extent hybridization is functionally relevant. Here, we examine the case of Xiphophorus nezahualcoyotl, a teleost fish whose genome exhibits significant hybrid ancestry. We show that hybridization was relatively ancient and is unlikely to be ongoing. Strikingly, the genome of X. nezahualcoyotl has largely stabilized following hybridization, distinguishing it from examples such as human-Neanderthal hybridization. Hybridization-derived regions are remarkably distinct from other regions of the genome, tending to be enriched in genomic regions with reduced constraint. These results suggest that selection has played a role in removing hybrid ancestry from certain functionally important regions. Combined with findings in other systems, our results raise many questions about the process of genomic stabilization and the role of selection in shaping patterns of hybrid ancestry in the genome. PMID:26937625

  4. Histone H3.3 maintains genome integrity during mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Chuan-Wei; Shibata, Yoichiro; Starmer, Joshua; Yee, Della; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Histone H3.3 is a highly conserved histone H3 replacement variant in metazoans and has been implicated in many important biological processes, including cell differentiation and reprogramming. Germline and somatic mutations in H3.3 genomic incorporation pathway components or in H3.3 encoding genes have been associated with human congenital diseases and cancers, respectively. However, the role of H3.3 in mammalian development remains unclear. To address this question, we generated H3.3-null mouse models through classical genetic approaches. We found that H3.3 plays an essential role in mouse development. Complete depletion of H3.3 leads to developmental retardation and early embryonic lethality. At the cellular level, H3.3 loss triggers cell cycle suppression and cell death. Surprisingly, H3.3 depletion does not dramatically disrupt gene regulation in the developing embryo. Instead, H3.3 depletion causes dysfunction of heterochromatin structures at telomeres, centromeres, and pericentromeric regions of chromosomes, leading to mitotic defects. The resulting karyotypical abnormalities and DNA damage lead to p53 pathway activation. In summary, our results reveal that an important function of H3.3 is to support chromosomal heterochromatic structures, thus maintaining genome integrity during mammalian development. PMID:26159997

  5. Neogenin recruitment of the WAVE regulatory complex maintains adherens junction stability and tension

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Natalie K.; Fok, Ka Wai; White, Amanda; Wilson, Nicole H.; O'Leary, Conor J.; Cox, Hayley L.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Cooper, Helen M.

    2016-01-01

    To maintain tissue integrity during epithelial morphogenesis, adherens junctions (AJs) must resist the mechanical stresses exerted by dynamic tissue movements. Junctional stability is dependent on actomyosin contractility within the actin ring. Here we describe a novel function for the axon guidance receptor, Neogenin, as a key component of the actin nucleation machinery governing junctional stability. Loss of Neogenin perturbs AJs and attenuates junctional tension. Neogenin promotes actin nucleation at AJs by recruiting the Wave regulatory complex (WRC) and Arp2/3. A direct interaction between the Neogenin WIRS domain and the WRC is crucial for the spatially restricted recruitment of the WRC to the junction. Thus, we provide the first example of a functional WIRS–WRC interaction in epithelia. We further show that Neogenin regulates cadherin recycling at the AJ. In summary, we identify Neogenin as a pivotal component of the AJ, where it influences both cadherin dynamics and junctional tension. PMID:27029596

  6. LRF maintains genome integrity by regulating the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue-Song; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Rass, Emilie; Guan, Yinghua; Wang, Guocan; Hobbs, Robin M.; Rajendran, Anbazhagan; Xie, Anyong; Shah, Jagesh V.; Davis, Anthony J.; Scully, Ralph; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) is a POZ/BTB and Krüppel (POK) transcriptional repressor characterized by context-dependent key roles in cell fate decision and tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate an unexpected transcription-independent function for LRF in the classical non-homologous end joining (cNHEJ) pathway of double-strand break (DSB) repair. We find that LRF loss in cell lines and mouse tissues results in defective cNHEJ, genomic instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we show that LRF binds and stabilizes DNA-PKcs on DSBs, in turn favouring DNA-PK activity. Importantly, LRF loss restores ionizing radiation sensitivity to p53 null cells, making LRF an attractive biomarker to direct p53-null LRF-deficient tumours towards therapeutic treatments based on genotoxic agents or PARP inhibitors following a synthetic lethal strategy. PMID:26446488

  7. LRF maintains genome integrity by regulating the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue-Song; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Rass, Emilie; Guan, Yinghua; Wang, Guocan; Hobbs, Robin M; Rajendran, Anbazhagan; Xie, Anyong; Shah, Jagesh V; Davis, Anthony J; Scully, Ralph; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) is a POZ/BTB and Krüppel (POK) transcriptional repressor characterized by context-dependent key roles in cell fate decision and tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate an unexpected transcription-independent function for LRF in the classical non-homologous end joining (cNHEJ) pathway of double-strand break (DSB) repair. We find that LRF loss in cell lines and mouse tissues results in defective cNHEJ, genomic instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we show that LRF binds and stabilizes DNA-PKcs on DSBs, in turn favouring DNA-PK activity. Importantly, LRF loss restores ionizing radiation sensitivity to p53 null cells, making LRF an attractive biomarker to direct p53-null LRF-deficient tumours towards therapeutic treatments based on genotoxic agents or PARP inhibitors following a synthetic lethal strategy. PMID:26446488

  8. Genome Stability Pathways in Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, Kenneth J.; Panizza, Benedict; Richard, Derek J.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability underlies the transformation of host cells toward malignancy, promotes development of invasion and metastasis and shapes the response of established cancer to treatment. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of genomic stability in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), with an emphasis on DNA repair pathways. HNSCC is characterized by distinct profiles in genome stability between similarly staged cancers that are reflected in risk, treatment response and outcomes. Defective DNA repair generates chromosomal derangement that can cause subsequent alterations in gene expression, and is a hallmark of progression toward carcinoma. Variable functionality of an increasing spectrum of repair gene polymorphisms is associated with increased cancer risk, while aetiological factors such as human papillomavirus, tobacco and alcohol induce significantly different behaviour in induced malignancy, underpinned by differences in genomic stability. Targeted inhibition of signalling receptors has proven to be a clinically-validated therapy, and protein expression of other DNA repair and signalling molecules associated with cancer behaviour could potentially provide a more refined clinical model for prognosis and treatment prediction. Development and expansion of current genomic stability models is furthering our understanding of HNSCC pathophysiology and uncovering new, promising treatment strategies. PMID:24364026

  9. Two adjacent inversions maintain genomic differentiation between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Tina Graceline; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Sandve, Simen R; Baranski, Matthew; Nome, Torfinn; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Righino, Benedetta; Johansen, Torild; Otterå, Håkon; Sonesson, Anna; Lien, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Øivind

    2016-05-01

    Atlantic cod is composed of multiple migratory and stationary populations widely distributed in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Arctic cod (NEAC) population in the Barents Sea undertakes annual spawning migrations to the northern Norwegian coast. Although spawning occurs sympatrically with the stationary Norwegian coastal cod (NCC), phenotypic and genetic differences between NEAC and NCC are maintained. In this study, we resolve the enigma by revealing the mechanisms underlying these differences. Extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population divergence were demonstrated in a 17.4-Mb region on linkage group 1 (LG1) based on genotypes of 494 SNPs from 192 parents of farmed families of NEAC, NCC or NEACxNCC crosses. Linkage analyses revealed two adjacent inversions within this region that repress meiotic recombination in NEACxNCC crosses. We identified a NEAC-specific haplotype consisting of 186 SNPs that was fixed in NEAC sampled from the Barents Sea, but segregating under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in eight NCC stocks. Comparative genomic analyses determine the NEAC configuration of the inversions to be the derived state and date it to ~1.6-2.0 Mya. The haplotype block harbours 763 genes, including candidates regulating swim bladder pressure, haem synthesis and skeletal muscle organization conferring adaptation to long-distance migrations and vertical movements down to large depths. Our results suggest that the migratory ecotype experiences strong directional selection for the two adjacent inversions on LG1. Despite interbreeding between NEAC and NCC, the inversions are maintaining genetic differentiation, and we hypothesize the co-occurrence of multiple adaptive alleles forming a 'supergene' in the NEAC population. PMID:26923504

  10. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixiang; Xie, Shaojun; Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  11. Grazing maintains native plant diversity and promotes community stability in an annual grassland.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jared J; Hernández, Daniel L; Pasari, Jae R; Zavaleta, Erika S

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining native biodiversity in grasslands requires management and mitigation of anthropogenic changes that have altered resource availability, grazing regimes, and community composition. In California (USA), high levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition have facilitated the invasion of exotic grasses, posing a threat to the diverse plant and insect communities endemic to serpentine grasslands. Cattle grazing has been employed to mitigate the consequences of exotic grass invasion, but the ecological effects of grazing in this system are not fully understood. To characterize the effects of realistic N deposition on serpentine plant communities and to evaluate the efficacy of grazing as a management tool, we performed a factorial experiment adding N and excluding large herbivores in California's largest serpentine grassland. Although we observed significant interannual variation in community composition related to climate in our six-year study, exotic cover was consistently and negatively correlated with native plant richness. Sustained low-level N addition did not influence plant community composition, but grazing reduced grass abundance while maintaining greater native forb cover, native plant diversity, and species richness in comparison to plots excluding large herbivores. Furthermore, grazing increased the temporal stability of plant communities by decreasing year-to-year variation in native forb cover, native plant diversity, and native species richness. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that moderate-intensity cattle grazing can be used to restrict the invasive potential of exotic grasses and maintain native plant communities in serpentine grasslands. We hypothesize that the reduced temporal variability in serpentine plant communities managed by grazing may directly benefit populations of the threatened Edith's Bay checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha bayensis). PMID:26485954

  12. DNA damage checkpoint, damage repair, and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Yu, Shan-Shan; Chen, Guan-Jun; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2006-05-01

    Genomic DNA is under constant attack from both endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damaging agents. Without proper care, the ensuing DNA damages would lead to alteration of genomic structure thus affecting the faithful transmission of genetic information. During the process of evolution, organisms have acquired a series of mechanisms responding to and repairing DNA damage, thus assuring the maintenance of genome stability and faithful transmission of genetic information. DNA damage checkpoint is one such important mechanism by which, in the face of DNA damage, a cell can respond to amplified damage signals, either by actively halting the cell cycle until it ensures that critical processes such as DNA replication or mitosis are complete or by initiating apoptosis as a last resort. Over the last decade, complex hierarchical interactions between the key components like ATM/ATR in the checkpoint pathway and various other mediators, effectors including DNA damage repair proteins have begun to emerge. In the meantime, an intimate relationship between mechanisms of damage checkpoint pathway, DNA damage repair, and genome stability was also uncovered. Reviewed herein are the recent findings on both the mechanisms of activation of checkpoint pathways and their coordination with DNA damage repair machinery as well as their effect on genomic integrity. PMID:16722332

  13. Nutrients drive transcriptional changes that maintain metabolic homeostasis but alter genome architecture in Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Morgan M; Dearth, Stephen P; Dill, Brian D; Li, Zhou; Larsen, Kristen M; Campagna, Shawn R; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a globally distributed bloom-forming organism that degrades freshwater systems around the world. Factors that drive its dispersion, diversification and success remain, however, poorly understood. To develop insight into cellular-level responses to nutrient drivers of eutrophication, RNA sequencing was coupled to a comprehensive metabolomics survey of M. aeruginosa sp. NIES 843 grown in various nutrient-reduced conditions. Transcriptomes were generated for cultures grown in nutrient-replete (with nitrate as the nitrogen (N) source), nitrogen-reduced (with nitrate, urea or ammonium acting as the N sources) and phosphate-reduced conditions. Extensive expression differences (up to 696 genes for urea-grown cells) relative to the control treatment were observed, demonstrating that the chemical variant of nitrogen available to cells affected transcriptional activity. Of particular note, a high number of transposase genes (up to 81) were significantly and reproducibly up-regulated relative to the control when grown on urea. Conversely, phosphorus (P) reduction resulted in a significant cessation in transcription of transposase genes, indicating that variation in nutrient chemistry may influence transcription of transposases and may impact the highly mosaic genomic architecture of M. aeruginosa. Corresponding metabolomes showed comparably few differences between treatments, suggesting broad changes to gene transcription are required to maintain metabolic homeostasis under nutrient reduction. The combined observations provide novel and extensive insight into the complex cellular interactions that take place in this important bloom-forming organism during variable nutrient conditions and highlight a potential unknown molecular mechanism that may drive Microcystis blooms and evolution. PMID:24858783

  14. The Deubiquitinase USP9X Maintains DNA Replication Fork Stability and DNA Damage Checkpoint Responses by Regulating CLASPIN during S-Phase.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Edel; Gaboriau, David; Rainey, Michael D; Restuccia, Umberto; Bachi, Angela; Santocanale, Corrado

    2016-04-15

    Coordination of the multiple processes underlying DNA replication is key for maintaining genome stability and preventing tumorigenesis. CLASPIN, a critical player in replication fork stabilization and checkpoint responses, must be tightly regulated during the cell cycle to prevent the accumulation of DNA damage. In this study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach and identified USP9X as a novel CLASPIN-interacting protein. USP9X is a deubiquitinase involved in multiple signaling and survival pathways whose tumor suppressor or oncogenic activity is highly context dependent. We found that USP9X regulated the expression and stability of CLASPIN in an S-phase-specific manner. USP9X depletion profoundly impairs the progression of DNA replication forks, causing unscheduled termination events with a frequency similar to CLASPIN depletion, resulting in excessive endogenous DNA damage. Importantly, restoration of CLASPIN expression in USP9X-depleted cells partially suppressed the accumulation of DNA damage. Furthermore, USP9X depletion compromised CHK1 activation in response to hydroxyurea and UV, thus promoting hypersensitivity to drug-induced replication stress. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for USP9X in the maintenance of genomic stability during DNA replication and provide potential mechanistic insights into its tumor suppressor role in certain malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2384-93. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921344

  15. Odontoid process fractures: the role of the ligaments in maintaining stability. A biomechanical, cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Boughton, Oliver Richard; Bernard, Jason; Szarko, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We wished to investigate the role of the cervical ligaments in maintaining atlantoaxial stability after fracture of the odontoid process. Methods: We dissected eight fresh-frozen cadaveric cervical spines to prepare the C1 and C2 vertebrae for biomechanical analysis. The C1 and C2 blocks were mounted and biomechanical analysis was performed to test the stability of the C1-C2 complex after cutting the odontoid process to create an Anderson and D’Alonzo type II fracture then successive division of the atlantoaxial ligaments. Biomechanical analysis of stiffness, expressed as Young’s modulus, was performed under right rotation, left rotation and anterior displacement. Results: The mean Young’s modulus in anterior displacement decreased by 37% when the odontoid process was fractured (p = 0.038, 95% confidence interval 0.04–1.07). The mean Young’s modulus in anterior displacement decreased proportionally (compared to the previous dissection) by the following percentages when the structures were divided: facet joint capsules (bilateral) 16%, ligamentum flavum 27%, anterior longitudinal ligament 10%. These differences did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Discussion: We have found that the odontoid process itself may account for up to 37% of the stiffness of the C1-C2 complex and that soft tissue structures account for further resistance to movement. We suggest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the soft tissues in the acute setting of a minimally displaced odontoid process fracture to plan management of the injury. If the MRI determines that there is associated ligament injury it is likely that the fracture is unstable and we would suggest operative management. PMID:27163067

  16. Usp7 protects genomic stability by regulating Bub3

    PubMed Central

    Giovinazzi, Serena; Sirleto, Pietro; Aksenova, Vasilisa; Morozov, Viacheslav M.; Zori, Roberto; Reinhold, William C.; Ishov, Alexander M.

    2014-01-01

    USP7 (Ubiquitin Specific processing Protease-7) is a deubiquitinase which, over the past decade emerged as a critical regulator of cellular processes. Deregulation of USP7 activity has been linked to cancer, making USP7 inhibition an appealing anti-cancer strategy. The identification of novel USP7 substrates and additional USP7-dependent cellular activities will broaden our knowledge towards potential clinical application of USP7 inhibitors. Results presented in this study uncover a novel and pivotal function of USP7 in the maintenance of genomic stability. Upon USP7 depletion we observed prolonged mitosis and mitotic abnormalities including micronuclei accumulation, lagging chromosomes and karyotype instability. Inhibition of USP7 with small molecule inhibitors stabilizes cyclin B and causes mitotic abnormalities. Our results suggest that these USP7-dependent effects are mediated by decreased levels of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) component Bub3, which we characterized as an interacting partner and substrate of USP7. In silico analysis across the NCI-60 panels of cell lines supports our results where lower levels of USP7 strongly correlate with genomic instability. In conclusion, we identified a novel role of USP7 as regulator of the SAC component Bub3 and genomic stability. PMID:25003721

  17. Using genome-wide measures of coancestry to maintain diversity and fitness in endangered and domestic pig populations

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Mirte; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Madsen, Ole; Crooijmans, Richard P.M.A.; Ryder, Oliver A.; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Groenen, Martien A.M.; de Cara, M. Angeles R.

    2015-01-01

    Conservation and breeding programs aim at maintaining the most diversity, thereby avoiding deleterious effects of inbreeding while maintaining enough variation from which traits of interest can be selected. Theoretically, the most diversity is maintained using optimal contributions based on many markers to calculate coancestries, but this can decrease fitness by maintaining linked deleterious variants. The heterogeneous patterns of coancestry displayed in pigs make them an excellent model to test these predictions. We propose methods to measure coancestry and fitness from resequencing data and use them in population management. We analyzed the resequencing data of Sus cebifrons, a highly endangered porcine species from the Philippines, and genotype data from the Pietrain domestic breed. By analyzing the demographic history of Sus cebifrons, we inferred two past bottlenecks that resulted in some inbreeding load. In Pietrain, we analyzed signatures of selection possibly associated with commercial traits. We also simulated the management of each population to assess the performance of different optimal contribution methods to maintain diversity, fitness, and selection signatures. Maximum genetic diversity was maintained using marker-by-marker coancestry, and least using genealogical coancestry. Using a measure of coancestry based on shared segments of the genome achieved the best results in terms of diversity and fitness. However, this segment-based management eliminated signatures of selection. We demonstrate that maintaining both diversity and fitness depends on the genomic distribution of deleterious variants, which is shaped by demographic and selection histories. Our findings show the importance of genomic and next-generation sequencing information in the optimal design of breeding or conservation programs. PMID:26063737

  18. Mitotic Accumulation of Dimethylated Lysine 79 of Histone H3 Is Important for Maintaining Genome Integrity During Mitosis in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guppy, Brent J.; McManus, Kirk J.

    2015-01-01

    The loss of genome stability is an early event that drives the development and progression of virtually all tumor types. Recent studies have revealed that certain histone post-translational modifications exhibit dynamic and global increases in abundance that coincide with mitosis and exhibit essential roles in maintaining genomic stability. Histone H2B ubiquitination at lysine 120 (H2Bub1) is regulated by RNF20, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is altered in many tumor types. Through an evolutionarily conserved trans-histone pathway, H2Bub1 is an essential prerequisite for subsequent downstream dimethylation events at lysines 4 (H3K4me2) and 79 (H3K79me2) of histone H3. Although the role that RNF20 plays in tumorigenesis has garnered much attention, the downstream components of the trans-histone pathway, H3K4me2 and H3K79me2, and their potential contributions to genome stability remain largely overlooked. In this study, we employ single-cell imaging and biochemical approaches to investigate the spatial and temporal patterning of RNF20, H2Bub1, H3K4me2, and H3K79me2 throughout the cell cycle, with a particular focus on mitosis. We show that H2Bub1, H3K4me2, and H3K79me2 exhibit distinct temporal progression patterns throughout the cell cycle. Most notably, we demonstrate that H3K79me2 is a highly dynamic histone post-translational modification that reaches maximal abundance during mitosis in an H2Bub1-independent manner. Using RNAi and chemical genetic approaches, we identify DOT1L as a histone methyltransferase required for the mitotic-associated increases in H3K79me2. We also demonstrate that the loss of mitotic H3K79me2 levels correlates with increases in chromosome numbers and increases in mitotic defects. Collectively, these data suggest that H3K79me2 dynamics during mitosis are normally required to maintain genome stability and further implicate the loss of H3K79me2 during mitosis as a pathogenic event that contributes to the development and progression of tumors

  19. Selection Maintains Low Genomic GC Content in Marine SAR11 Lineages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei; Thompson, Luke R; Stingl, Ulrich; Hughes, Austin L

    2015-10-01

    The genomic G+C content of ocean bacteria varies from below 30% to over 60%. This broad range of base composition is likely shaped by distinct mutational processes, recombination, effective population size, and selection driven by environmental factors. A number of studies have hypothesized that depletion of G/C in genomes of marine bacterioplankton cells is an adaptation to the nitrogen-poor pelagic oceans, but they failed to disentangle environmental factors from mutational biases and population history. Here, we reconstructed the evolutionary changes of bases at synonymous sites in genomes of two marine SAR11 populations and a freshwater counterpart with its evolutionary origin rooted in the marine lineage. Although they all have similar genome sizes, DNA repair gene repertoire, and base compositions, there is a stronger bias toward A/T changes, a reduced frequency of nitrogenous amino acids, and an exclusive occurrence of polyamine, opine, and taurine transport systems in the ocean populations, consistent with a greater nitrogen stress in surface oceans compared with freshwater lakes. Furthermore, the ratio of nonsynoymous to synonymous nucleotide diversity is not statistically distinguishable among these populations, suggesting that population history has a limited effect. Taken together, the ecological transition of SAR11 from ocean to freshwater habitats makes nitrogen more available to these organisms, and thus relaxation of purifying selection drove a genome-wide reduction in the frequency of G/C to A/T changes in the freshwater population. PMID:26116859

  20. Sde2: A novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Sde2 is essential for telomere silencing. {yields} Sde2 is involved in the maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} Sde2 promotes the recruitment of SHREC, a histone deacetylase complex, to telomeres. -- Abstract: Telomeres, specialized domains assembled at the ends of linear chromosomes, are essential for genomic stability in eukaryotes. The formation and maintenance of telomeres are governed by numerous factors such as telomeric repeats, telomere-binding proteins, heterochromatin proteins, and telomerase. Here, we report Sde2, a novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A deficiency in sde2 results in the derepression of the ura4{sup +} gene inserted near telomeric repeats, and the noncoding transcripts from telomeric regions accumulate in sde2{Delta} cells. The loss of Sde2 function compromises transcriptional silencing at telomeres, and this silencing defect is accompanied by increased levels of acetylated histone H3K14 and RNA polymerase II occupancy at telomeres as well as reduced recruitment of the SNF2 ATPase/histone deacetylase-containing complex SHREC to telomeres. Deletion of sde2 also leads to a higher frequency of mitotic minichromosome loss, and sde2{Delta} cells often form asci that contain spores in abnormal numbers, shapes, or both. In addition, sde2{Delta} cells are highly sensitive to several stresses, including high/low temperatures, bleomycin, which induces DNA damage, and thiabendazole, a microtubule-destabilizing agent. Furthermore, Sde2 genetically interacts with the telomere regulators Taz1, Pof3, and Ccq1. These findings demonstrate that Sde2 cooperates with other telomere regulators to maintain functional telomeres, thereby preventing genomic instability.

  1. Stability domains of actin genes and genomic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlon, E.; Dkhissi, A.; Malki, M. Lejard; Blossey, R.

    2007-11-01

    In eukaryotic genes, the protein coding sequence is split into several fragments, the exons, separated by noncoding DNA stretches, the introns. Prokaryotes do not have introns in their genomes. We report calculations of the stability domains of actin genes for various organisms in the animal, plant, and fungi kingdoms. Actin genes have been chosen because they have been highly conserved during evolution. In these genes, all introns were removed so as to mimic ancient genes at the time of the early eukaryotic development, i.e., before intron insertion. Common stability boundaries are found in evolutionarily distant organisms, which implies that these boundaries date from the early origin of eukaryotes. In general, the boundaries correspond with intron positions in the actins of vertebrates and other animals, but not much for plants and fungi. The sharpest boundary is found in a locus where fungi, algae, and animals have introns in positions separated by one nucleotide only, which identifies a hot spot for insertion. These results suggest that some introns may have been incorporated into the genomes through a thermodynamically driven mechanism, in agreement with previous observations on human genes. They also suggest a different mechanism for intron insertion in plants and animals.

  2. The annealing helicase SMARCAL1 maintains genome integrity at stalled replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Bansbach, Carol E.; Bétous, Rémy; Lovejoy, Courtney A.; Glick, Gloria G.; Cortez, David

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in SMARCAL1 (HARP) cause Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD). The mechanistic basis for this disease is unknown. Using functional genomic screens, we identified SMARCAL1 as a genome maintenance protein. Silencing and overexpression of SMARCAL1 leads to activation of the DNA damage response during S phase in the absence of any genotoxic agent. SMARCAL1 contains a Replication protein A (RPA)-binding motif similar to that found in the replication stress response protein TIPIN (Timeless-Interacting Protein), which is both necessary and sufficient to target SMARCAL1 to stalled replication forks. RPA binding is critical for the cellular function of SMARCAL1; however, it is not necessary for the annealing helicase activity of SMARCAL1 in vitro. An SIOD-associated SMARCAL1 mutant fails to prevent replication-associated DNA damage from accumulating in cells in which endogenous SMARCAL1 is silenced. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) phosphorylate SMARCAL1 in response to replication stress. Loss of SMARCAL1 activity causes increased RPA loading onto chromatin and persistent RPA phosphorylation after a transient exposure to replication stress. Furthermore, SMARCAL1-deficient cells are hypersensitive to replication stress agents. Thus, SMARCAL1 is a replication stress response protein, and the pleiotropic phenotypes of SIOD are at least partly due to defects in genome maintenance during DNA replication. PMID:19793861

  3. FANCJ is essential to maintain microsatellite structure genome-wide during replication stress.

    PubMed

    Barthelemy, Joanna; Hanenberg, Helmut; Leffak, Michael

    2016-08-19

    Microsatellite DNAs that form non-B structures are implicated in replication fork stalling, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and human disease. Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disorder in which mutations in at least nineteen genes are responsible for the phenotypes of genome instability and cancer predisposition. FA pathway proteins are active in the resolution of non-B DNA structures including interstrand crosslinks, G quadruplexes and DNA triplexes. In FANCJ helicase depleted cells, we show that hydroxyurea or aphidicolin treatment leads to loss of microsatellite polymerase chain reaction signals and to chromosome recombination at an ectopic hairpin forming CTG/CAG repeat in the HeLa genome. Moreover, diverse endogenous microsatellite signals were also lost upon replication stress after FANCJ depletion, and in FANCJ null patient cells. The phenotype of microsatellite signal instability is specific for FANCJ apart from the intact FA pathway, and is consistent with DSBs at microsatellites genome-wide in FANCJ depleted cells following replication stress. PMID:27179029

  4. Trichodesmium genome maintains abundant, widespread noncoding DNA in situ, despite oligotrophic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Nathan G.; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Nelson, William C.; Mincer, Tracy; Heidelberg, John F.; Fu, Feixue; Waterbury, John B.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Land, Miriam L.; Woyke, Tanja; Hutchins, David A.; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Webb, Eric A.

    2015-04-07

    Understanding the evolution of the free-living, cyanobacterial, diazotroph Trichodesmium is of great importance due to its critical role in oceanic biogeochemistry and primary production. Unlike the other >150 available genomes of free-living cyanobacteria, only 63.8% of the Trichodesmium erythraeum (strain IMS101) genome is predicted to encode protein, which is 20-25% less than the average for other cyanobacteria and non-pathogenic, free-living bacteria. We use distinctive isolates and metagenomic data to show that low coding density observed in IMS101 is a common feature of the Trichodesmium genus both in culture and in situ. Transcriptome analysis indicates that 86% of the non-coding space is expressed, although the function of these transcripts is unclear. The density of noncoding, possible regulatory elements predicted in Trichodesmium, when normalized per intergenic kilobase, was comparable and two fold higher than that found in the gene dense genomes of the sympatric cyanobacterial genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, respectively. Conserved Trichodesmium ncRNA secondary structures were predicted between most culture and metagenomic sequences lending support to the structural conservation. Conservation of these intergenic regions in spatiotemporally separated Trichodesmium populations suggests possible genus-wide selection for their maintenance. These large intergenic spacers may have developed during intervals of strong genetic drift caused by periodic blooms of a subset of genotypes, which may have reduced effective population size. Our data suggest that transposition of selfish DNA, low effective population size, and high fidelity replication allowed the unusual ‘inflation’ of noncoding sequence observed in Trichodesmium despite its oligotrophic lifestyle.

  5. Trichodesmium genome maintains abundant, widespread noncoding DNA in situ, despite oligotrophic lifestyle

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Nathan; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Nelson, William C.; Mincer, Tracy; Heidelberg, John F.; Fu, Feixue; Waterbury, John B.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Land, Miriam L.; Woyke, Tanja; Hutchins, David A.; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Webb, Eric A.

    2015-03-23

    Understanding the evolution of the free-living, cyanobacterial, diazotroph Trichodesmium is of great importance because of its critical role in oceanic biogeochemistry and primary production. Unlike the other >150 available genomes of free-living cyanobacteria, only 63.8% of the Trichodesmium erythraeum (strain IMS101) genome is predicted to encode protein, which is 20–25% less than the average for other cyanobacteria and nonpathogenic, free-living bacteria. In this paper, we use distinctive isolates and metagenomic data to show that low coding density observed in IMS101 is a common feature of the Trichodesmium genus, both in culture and in situ. Transcriptome analysis indicates that 86% of the noncoding space is expressed, although the function of these transcripts is unclear. The density of noncoding, possible regulatory elements predicted in Trichodesmium, when normalized per intergenic kilobase, was comparable and twofold higher than that found in the gene-dense genomes of the sympatric cyanobacterial genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, respectively. Conserved Trichodesmium noncoding RNA secondary structures were predicted between most culture and metagenomic sequences, lending support to the structural conservation. Conservation of these intergenic regions in spatiotemporally separated Trichodesmium populations suggests possible genus-wide selection for their maintenance. These large intergenic spacers may have developed during intervals of strong genetic drift caused by periodic blooms of a subset of genotypes, which may have reduced effective population size. Finally, our data suggest that transposition of selfish DNA, low effective population size, and high-fidelity replication allowed the unusual “inflation” of noncoding sequence observed in Trichodesmium despite its oligotrophic lifestyle.

  6. Trichodesmium genome maintains abundant, widespread noncoding DNA in situ, despite oligotrophic lifestyle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walworth, Nathan; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Nelson, William C.; Mincer, Tracy; Heidelberg, John F.; Fu, Feixue; Waterbury, John B.; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Understanding the evolution of the free-living, cyanobacterial, diazotroph Trichodesmium is of great importance because of its critical role in oceanic biogeochemistry and primary production. Unlike the other >150 available genomes of free-living cyanobacteria, only 63.8% of the Trichodesmium erythraeum (strain IMS101) genome is predicted to encode protein, which is 20–25% less than the average for other cyanobacteria and nonpathogenic, free-living bacteria. In this paper, we use distinctive isolates and metagenomic data to show that low coding density observed in IMS101 is a common feature of the Trichodesmium genus, both in culture and in situ. Transcriptome analysis indicates that 86% ofmore » the noncoding space is expressed, although the function of these transcripts is unclear. The density of noncoding, possible regulatory elements predicted in Trichodesmium, when normalized per intergenic kilobase, was comparable and twofold higher than that found in the gene-dense genomes of the sympatric cyanobacterial genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, respectively. Conserved Trichodesmium noncoding RNA secondary structures were predicted between most culture and metagenomic sequences, lending support to the structural conservation. Conservation of these intergenic regions in spatiotemporally separated Trichodesmium populations suggests possible genus-wide selection for their maintenance. These large intergenic spacers may have developed during intervals of strong genetic drift caused by periodic blooms of a subset of genotypes, which may have reduced effective population size. Finally, our data suggest that transposition of selfish DNA, low effective population size, and high-fidelity replication allowed the unusual “inflation” of noncoding sequence observed in Trichodesmium despite its oligotrophic lifestyle.« less

  7. Age-related changes in genomic stability of horses.

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Maciej; Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Lewinska, Anna; Oklejewicz, Bernadetta; Zabek, Tomasz; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Słota, Ewa

    2011-05-01

    Recently, the old horse has been proposed as a model to study telomere-dependent senescence, immunosenescence and inflamm-aging. In the present paper, we used 80 Hucul and Anglo-Arabian horses divided into 3 age groups (juvenile, adult, old) to evaluate age-dependent changes at the genomic and DNA level and in cell proliferative potential. The level of positive TUNEL cells (both apoptotic and with DNA fragmentation), oxidative DNA damage (8-oxoG immunostaining), sister chromatid exchange and bleomycin-induced chromatid breaks were significantly increased in the combined old group compared to the combined adult group. We observed a negative correlation between micronuclei formation and age, which may be associated with damaged cells undergoing apoptosis, rather than expressing micronuclei. We were unable to show any significant changes in the nuclear division index value, which reflects the proliferative status of the viable cell fraction during aging. Here, we show that breed-independent and age-associated changes in genomic stability may contribute, at least in part, to the aging process in the horse. PMID:21557962

  8. Genome-wide analysis of longevity in nutrient-deprived Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals importance of recycling in maintaining cell viability.

    PubMed

    Davey, Hazel M; Cross, Emma J M; Davey, Christopher L; Gkargkas, Konstantinos; Delneri, Daniela; Hoyle, David C; Oliver, Stephen G; Kell, Douglas B; Griffith, Gareth W

    2012-05-01

    Although typically cosseted in the laboratory with constant temperatures and plentiful nutrients, microbes are frequently exposed to much more stressful conditions in their natural environments where survival and competitive fitness depend upon both growth rate when conditions are favourable and on persistence in a viable and recoverable state when they are not. In order to determine the role of genetic heterogeneity in environmental fitness we present a novel approach that combines the power of fluorescence-activated cell sorting with barcode microarray analysis and apply this to determining the importance of every gene in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome in a high-throughput, genome-wide fitness screen. We have grown > 6000 heterozygous mutants together and exposed them to a starvation stress before using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to identify and isolate those individual cells that have not survived the stress applied. Barcode array analysis of the sorted and total populations reveals the importance of cellular recycling mechanisms (autophagy, pexophagy and ribosome breakdown) in maintaining cell viability during starvation and provides compelling evidence for an important role for fatty acid degradation in maintaining viability. In addition, we have developed a semi-batch fermentor system that is a more realistic model of environmental fitness than either batch or chemostat culture. Barcode array analysis revealed that arginine biosynthesis was important for fitness in semi-batch culture and modelling of this regime showed that rapid emergence from lag phase led to greatly increased fitness. One hundred and twenty-five strains with deletions in unclassified proteins were identified as being over-represented in the sorted fraction, while 27 unclassified proteins caused a haploinsufficient phenotype in semi-batch culture. These methods thus provide a screen to identifying other genes and pathways that have a role in maintaining cell viability. PMID

  9. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  10. The homologous recombination component EEPD1 is required for genome stability in response to developmental stress of vertebrate embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Changzoon; Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR), initiated by nuclease cleavage of branched structures at stalled forks. We previously reported that the 5′ nuclease EEPD1 is recruited to stressed replication forks, where it plays critical early roles in HR initiation by promoting fork cleavage and end resection. HR repair of stressed replication forks prevents their repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which would cause genome instability. Rapid cell division during vertebrate embryonic development generates enormous pressure to maintain replication speed and accuracy. To determine the role of EEPD1 in maintaining replication fork integrity and genome stability during rapid cell division in embryonic development, we assessed the role of EEPD1 during zebrafish embryogenesis. We show here that when EEPD1 is depleted, zebrafish embryos fail to develop normally and have a marked increase in death rate. Zebrafish embryos depleted of EEPD1 are far more sensitive to replication stress caused by nucleotide depletion. We hypothesized that the HR defect with EEPD1 depletion would shift repair of stressed replication forks to unopposed NHEJ, causing chromosome abnormalities. Consistent with this, EEPD1 depletion results in nuclear defects including anaphase bridges and micronuclei in stressed zebrafish embryos, similar to BRCA1 deficiency. These results demonstrate that the newly characterized HR protein EEPD1 maintains genome stability during embryonic replication stress. These data also imply that the rapid cell cycle transit seen during embryonic development produces replication stress that requires HR to resolve. PMID:26900729

  11. The Transcription Factor TFII-I Promotes DNA Translesion Synthesis and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Fattah, Farjana J.; Hara, Kodai; Fattah, Kazi R.; Yang, Chenyi; Wu, Nan; Warrington, Ross; Chen, David J.; Zhou, Pengbo; Boothman, David A.; Yu, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) enables DNA replication through damaged bases, increases cellular DNA damage tolerance, and maintains genomic stability. The sliding clamp PCNA and the adaptor polymerase Rev1 coordinate polymerase switching during TLS. The polymerases Pol η, ι, and κ insert nucleotides opposite damaged bases. Pol ζ, consisting of the catalytic subunit Rev3 and the regulatory subunit Rev7, then extends DNA synthesis past the lesion. Here, we show that Rev7 binds to the transcription factor TFII-I in human cells. TFII-I is required for TLS and DNA damage tolerance. The TLS function of TFII-I appears to be independent of its role in transcription, but requires homodimerization and binding to PCNA. We propose that TFII-I bridges PCNA and Pol ζ to promote TLS. Our findings extend the general principle of component sharing among divergent nuclear processes and implicate TLS deficiency as a possible contributing factor in Williams-Beuren syndrome. PMID:24922507

  12. The BRCA1-interacting protein, Abraxas, is required for genomic stability and tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Andy; Paul, Atanu; Sun, Baohua; Huang, Ting Hsiang; Wang, Yucai; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Tyler, Jessica; Li, Lei; You, M James; Zou, Lee; Yao, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Germline mutations of BRCA1 confer hereditary susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, somatic mutation of BRCA1 is infrequent in sporadic breast cancers. The BRCA1 protein C-terminus BRCT domains interact with multiple proteins and are required for BRCA1's tumor suppressor function. In this study, we demonstrated that Abraxas, a BRCA1 BRCT domain-interacting protein, plays a role in tumor suppression. Abraxas exerts its function through binding to BRCA1 to regulate DNA repair and maintain genome stability. Both homozygous and heterozygous Abraxas knockout mice exhibited decreased survival and increased tumor incidence. The gene encoding Abraxas suffers from gene copy loss and somatic mutations in multiple human cancers including breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers, suggesting that mutation and loss of function of Abraxas may contribute to tumor development in human patients. PMID:25066119

  13. Hdac3 is essential for the maintenance of chromatin structure and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskara, Srividya; Knutson, Sarah K.; Jiang, Guochun; Chandrasekharan, Mahesh B.; Wilson, Andrew J.; Zheng, Siyuan; Yenamandra, Ashwini; Locke, Kimberly; Yuan, Jia-ling; Bonine-Summers, Alyssa R.; Wells, Christina E.; Kaiser, Jonathan F.; Washington, M. Kay; Zhao, Zhongming; Wagner, Florence F.; Sun, Zu-Wen; Xia, Fen; Holson, Edward B.; Khabele, Dineo; Hiebert, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Hdac3 is essential for efficient DNA replication and DNA damage control. Deletion of Hdac3 impaired DNA repair and greatly reduced chromatin compaction and heterochromatin content. These defects corresponded to increases in histone H3K9,K14ac, and H4K5ac and H4K12ac in late S phase of the cell cycle, and histone deposition marks were retained in quiescent Hdac3-null cells. Liver-specific deletion of Hdac3 culminated in hepatocellular carcinoma. While HDAC3 expression was down regulated in only a small number of human liver cancers, the mRNA levels of the HDAC3 cofactor NCOR1 were reduced in 1/3 of these cases. siRNA targeting of NCOR1 and SMRT (NCOR2) increased H4K5ac and caused DNA damage, indicating that the HDAC3/NCOR/SMRT axis is critical for maintaining chromatin structure and genomic stability. PMID:21075309

  14. Proteoglycans maintain lung stability in an elastase-treated mouse model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2014-07-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema. PMID:24450478

  15. Proteoglycans Maintain Lung Stability in an Elastase-Treated Mouse Model of Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ayuko; Majumdar, Arnab; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling and tissue rupture contribute to the progression of emphysema. Lung tissue elasticity is governed by the tensile stiffness of fibers and the compressive stiffness of proteoglycans. It is not known how proteoglycan remodeling affects tissue stability and destruction in emphysema. The objective of this study was to characterize the role of remodeled proteoglycans in alveolar stability and tissue destruction in emphysema. At 30 days after treatment with porcine pancreatic elastase, mouse lung tissue stiffness and alveolar deformation were evaluated under varying tonicity conditions that affect the stiffness of proteoglycans. Proteoglycans were stained and measured in the alveolar walls. Computational models of alveolar stability and rupture incorporating the mechanical properties of fibers and proteoglycans were developed. Although absolute tissue stiffness was only 24% of normal, changes in relative stiffness and alveolar shape distortion due to changes in tonicity were increased in emphysema (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). Glycosaminoglycan amount per unit alveolar wall length, which is responsible for proteoglycan stiffness, was higher in emphysema (P < 0.001). Versican expression increased in the tissue, but decorin decreased. Our network model predicted that the rate of tissue deterioration locally governed by mechanical forces was reduced when proteoglycan stiffness was increased. Consequently, this general network model explains why increasing proteoglycan deposition protects the alveolar walls from rupture in emphysema. Our results suggest that the loss of proteoglycans observed in human emphysema contributes to disease progression, whereas treatments that promote proteoglycan deposition in the extracellular matrix should slow the progression of emphysema. PMID:24450478

  16. The Second Subunit of DNA Polymerase Delta Is Required for Genomic Stability and Epigenetic Regulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jinkui; Lai, Jinsheng; Gong, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase δ plays crucial roles in DNA repair and replication as well as maintaining genomic stability. However, the function of POLD2, the second small subunit of DNA polymerase δ, has not been characterized yet in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). During a genetic screen for release of transcriptional gene silencing, we identified a mutation in POLD2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing indicated that POLD2 is not involved in the regulation of DNA methylation. POLD2 genetically interacts with Ataxia Telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related and DNA polymerase α. The pold2-1 mutant exhibits genomic instability with a high frequency of homologous recombination. It also exhibits hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and short telomere length. Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing analyses suggest that pold2-1 changes H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications, and these changes are correlated with the gene expression levels. Our study suggests that POLD2 is required for maintaining genome integrity and properly establishing the epigenetic markers during DNA replication to modulate gene expression. PMID:27208288

  17. Morphogenetic and chemical stability of long-term maintained Agrobacterium-mediated transgenic Catharanthus roseus plants.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Abhishek; Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Mathur, Ajay Kumar; Shanker, Karuna

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic Catharanthus roseus plants (transgenic Dhawal [DT] and transgenic Nirmal [NT]) obtained from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizognenes-mediated transformations, respectively, have been maintained in vitro for 5 years. Plants were studied at regular intervals for various parameters such as plant height, leaf size, multiplication rate, alkaloid profile and presence of marker genes. DT plant gradually lost the GUS gene expression and it was not detected in the fifth year while NT plant demonstrated the presence of genes rolA, rolB and rolC even in the fifth year, indicating the more stable nature of Ri transgene. Vindoline content in the DT was two times more than in non-transformed control plants. Alkaloid and tryptophan profiles were almost constant during the 5 years. The cluster analysis revealed that the DT plant is more close to the control Nirmal plant followed by NT plant. PMID:25102992

  18. Genomic stability of murine leukemia viruses containing insertions at the Env-3' untranslated region boundary.

    PubMed

    Logg, C R; Logg, A; Tai, C K; Cannon, P M; Kasahara, N

    2001-08-01

    Retroviruses containing inserts of exogenous sequences frequently eliminate the inserted sequences upon spread in susceptible cells. We have constructed replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV) vectors containing internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-transgene cassettes at the env-3' untranslated region boundary in order to examine the effects of insert sequence and size on the loss of inserts during viral replication. A virus containing an insertion of 1.6 kb replicated with greatly attenuated kinetics relative to wild-type virus and lost the inserted sequences in a single infection cycle. In contrast, MLVs containing inserts of 1.15 to 1.30 kb replicated with kinetics only slightly attenuated compared to wild-type MLV and exhibited much greater stability, maintaining their genomic integrity over multiple serial infection cycles. Eventually, multiple species of deletion mutants were detected simultaneously in later infection cycles; once detected, these variants rapidly dominated the population and thereafter appeared to be maintained at a relative equilibrium. Sequence analysis of these variants identified preferred sites of recombination in the parental viruses, including both short direct repeats and inverted repeats. One instance of insert deletion through recombination with an endogenous retrovirus was also observed. When specific sequences involved in these recombination events were eliminated, deletion variants still arose with the same kinetics upon virus passage and by apparently similar mechanisms, although at different locations in the vectors. Our results suggest that while lengthened, insert-containing genomes can be maintained over multiple replication cycles, preferential deletions resulting in loss of the inserted sequences confer a strong selective advantage. PMID:11435579

  19. CUL9 mediates the functions of the 3M complex and ubiquitylates survivin to maintain genome integrity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhijun; Pei, Xin-Hai; Yan, Jun; Yan, Feng; Cappell, Kathryn M.; Whitehurst, Angelique W.; Xiong, Yue

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The Cullin 9 (CUL9) gene encodes a putative E3 ligase that localizes in the cytoplasm. Cul9 null mice develop spontaneous tumors in multiple organs, however either the cellular or molecular mechanisms of CUL9 in tumor suppression are currently not known. We show here that deletion of Cul9 leads to abnormal nuclear morphology, increased DNA damage and aneuploidy. CUL9 knockdown rescues the microtubule and mitosis defects in cells depleted for CUL7 or OBSL1, two genes that are mutated in a mutually exclusive manner in 3M growth retardation syndrome and function in microtubule dynamics. CUL9 promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of survivin and is inhibited by CUL7. Depletion of CUL7 decreases survivin level and overexpression of survivin rescues the defects caused by CUL7 depletion. We propose a 3M–CUL9-survivin pathway in maintaining microtubule and genome integrity, normal development and tumor suppression. PMID:24793696

  20. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway Maintains Genome Stability by Coordinating Replication and Transcription.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Rebekka A; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shah, Fenil; Langton, Jamie; Lopez Martinez, David; Liang, Chih-Chao; Cohn, Martin A; Gibbons, Richard J; Deans, Andrew J; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2015-11-01

    DNA replication stress can cause chromosomal instability and tumor progression. One key pathway that counteracts replication stress and promotes faithful DNA replication consists of the Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. However, how these proteins limit replication stress remains largely elusive. Here we show that conflicts between replication and transcription activate the FA pathway. Inhibition of transcription or enzymatic degradation of transcription-associated R-loops (DNA:RNA hybrids) suppresses replication fork arrest and DNA damage occurring in the absence of a functional FA pathway. Furthermore, we show that simple aldehydes, known to cause leukemia in FA-deficient mice, induce DNA:RNA hybrids in FA-depleted cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the molecular mechanism by which the FA pathway limits R-loop accumulation requires FANCM translocase activity. Failure to activate a response to physiologically occurring DNA:RNA hybrids may critically contribute to the heightened cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure of individuals with mutated FA proteins. PMID:26593718

  1. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway Maintains Genome Stability by Coordinating Replication and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Rebekka A.; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shah, Fenil; Langton, Jamie; Lopez Martinez, David; Liang, Chih-Chao; Cohn, Martin A.; Gibbons, Richard J.; Deans, Andrew J.; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA replication stress can cause chromosomal instability and tumor progression. One key pathway that counteracts replication stress and promotes faithful DNA replication consists of the Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. However, how these proteins limit replication stress remains largely elusive. Here we show that conflicts between replication and transcription activate the FA pathway. Inhibition of transcription or enzymatic degradation of transcription-associated R-loops (DNA:RNA hybrids) suppresses replication fork arrest and DNA damage occurring in the absence of a functional FA pathway. Furthermore, we show that simple aldehydes, known to cause leukemia in FA-deficient mice, induce DNA:RNA hybrids in FA-depleted cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the molecular mechanism by which the FA pathway limits R-loop accumulation requires FANCM translocase activity. Failure to activate a response to physiologically occurring DNA:RNA hybrids may critically contribute to the heightened cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure of individuals with mutated FA proteins. PMID:26593718

  2. Catalase addition to vitrification solutions maintains goat ovarian preantral follicles stability.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A A; Faustino, L R; Silva, C M G; Castro, S V; Lobo, C H; Santos, F W; Santos, R R; Campello, C C; Bordignon, V; Figueiredo, J R; Rodrigues, A P R

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether the addition of catalase (20 IU/mL) at different steps of goat ovarian tissue vitrification affects ROS levels, follicular morphology and viability, stromal cell density, apoptosis and the expression of proteins related to DNA-damage signaling (γH2AX) and repair (53BP1). Goat ovarian tissues were analyzed fresh (control) or after vitrification: without catalase (VS-/WS-), with catalase in vitrification solutions (VS+/WS-), with catalase in washing solutions (VS-/WS+) or with catalase in both solutions (VS+/WS+). The vitrification without catalase had higher ROS levels than the control. The catalase, regardless the step of addition, maintained ROS levels similar to the control. There were no difference between treatments regarding follicular viability, stromal cell density and detection of γH2AX and 53BP1. There was no difference in follicular morphology and DNA fragmentation between groups vitrified. In conclusion, catalase addition to vitrification solutions prevents ROS formation in cryopreserved goat ovarian tissues. PMID:24972862

  3. Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) Proteins Link Microtubule Stability to Genome Integrity*

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, Guillaume; Tremblay-Boudreault, Thierry; Roy, Marc-André; Andersen, Parker; Bonneil, Éric; Atchia, Kaleem; Thibault, Pierre; D'Amours, Damien; Kwok, Benjamin H.

    2014-01-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) proteins are key organizers of chromosome architecture and are essential for genome integrity. They act by binding to chromatin and connecting distinct parts of chromosomes together. Interestingly, their potential role in providing connections between chromatin and the mitotic spindle has not been explored. Here, we show that yeast SMC proteins bind directly to microtubules and can provide a functional link between microtubules and DNA. We mapped the microtubule-binding region of Smc5 and generated a mutant with impaired microtubule binding activity. This mutant is viable in yeast but exhibited a cold-specific conditional lethality associated with mitotic arrest, aberrant spindle structures, and chromosome segregation defects. In an in vitro reconstitution assay, this Smc5 mutant also showed a compromised ability to protect microtubules from cold-induced depolymerization. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that SMC proteins can bind to and stabilize microtubules and that SMC-microtubule interactions are essential to establish a robust system to maintain genome integrity. PMID:25135640

  4. Cdk12 is essential for embryonic development and the maintenance of genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Juan, H-C; Lin, Y; Chen, H-R; Fann, M-J

    2016-06-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity during early embryonic development is important in order to ensure the proper development of the embryo. Studies from cultured cells have demonstrated that cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (Cdk12) is a multifunctional protein that maintains genomic stability and the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. Perturbation of its functions is also known to be associated with pathogenesis and drug resistance in human cancers. However, the biological significance of Cdk12 in vivo is unclear. Here we bred mice that are deficient in Cdk12 and demonstrated that Cdk12 depletion leads to embryonic lethality shortly after implantation. We also used an in vitro culture system of blastocysts to examine the molecular mechanisms associated with the embryonic lethality of Cdk12-deficient embryos. Cdk12(-/-) blastocysts fail to undergo outgrowth of the inner cell mass because of an increase in the apoptosis of these cells. Spontaneous DNA damage was revealed by an increase in 53BP1 foci among cells cultured from Cdk12(-/-) embryos. Furthermore, the expression levels of various DNA damage response genes, namely Atr, Brca1, Fanci and Fancd2, are reduced in Cdk12(-/-) embryos. These findings indicate that Cdk12 is important for the correct expression of some DNA damage response genes and indirectly has an influence on the efficiency of DNA repair. Our report also highlights that DNA breaks occurring during DNA replication are frequent in mouse embryonic cells and repair of such damage is critical to the successful development of mouse embryos. PMID:26658019

  5. NDRG1 links p53 with proliferation-mediated centrosome homeostasis and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Croessmann, Sarah; Wong, Hong Yuen; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Chu, David; Mendonca, Janet; Sharma, Anup; Mohseni, Morassa; Rosen, D. Marc; Scharpf, Robert B.; Cidado, Justin; Cochran, Rory L.; Parsons, Heather A.; Dalton, W. Brian; Erlanger, Bracha; Button, Berry; Cravero, Karen; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Beaver, Julia A.; Kachhap, Sushant; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    The tumor protein 53 (TP53) tumor suppressor gene is the most frequently somatically altered gene in human cancers. Here we show expression of N-Myc down-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is induced by p53 during physiologic low proliferative states, and mediates centrosome homeostasis, thus maintaining genome stability. When placed in physiologic low-proliferating conditions, human TP53 null cells fail to increase expression of NDRG1 compared with isogenic wild-type controls and TP53 R248W knockin cells. Overexpression and RNA interference studies demonstrate that NDRG1 regulates centrosome number and amplification. Mechanistically, NDRG1 physically associates with γ-tubulin, a key component of the centrosome, with reduced association in p53 null cells. Strikingly, TP53 homozygous loss was mutually exclusive of NDRG1 overexpression in over 96% of human cancers, supporting the broad applicability of these results. Our study elucidates a mechanism of how TP53 loss leads to abnormal centrosome numbers and genomic instability mediated by NDRG1. PMID:26324937

  6. Tobacco exposure results in increased E6 and E7 oncogene expression, DNA damage and mutation rates in cells maintaining episomal human papillomavirus 16 genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lanlan; Griego, Anastacia M.; Chu, Ming; Ozbun, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections are necessary but insufficient agents of cervical and other epithelial cancers. Epidemiological studies support a causal, but ill-defined, relationship between tobacco smoking and cervical malignancies. In this study, we used mainstream tobacco smoke condensate (MSTS-C) treatments of cervical cell lines that maintain either episomal or integrated HPV16 or HPV31 genomes to model tobacco smoke exposure to the cervical epithelium of the smoker. MSTS-C exposure caused a dose-dependent increase in viral genome replication and correspondingly higher early gene transcription in cells with episomal HPV genomes. However, MSTS-C exposure in cells with integrated HR-HPV genomes had no effect on genome copy number or early gene transcription. In cells with episomal HPV genomes, the MSTS-C-induced increases in E6 oncogene transcription led to decreased p53 protein levels and activity. As expected from loss of p53 activity in tobacco-exposed cells, DNA strand breaks were significantly higher but apoptosis was minimal compared with cells containing integrated viral genomes. Furthermore, DNA mutation frequencies were higher in surviving cells with HPV episomes. These findings provide increased understanding of tobacco smoke exposure risk in HPV infection and indicate tobacco smoking acts more directly to alter HR-HPV oncogene expression in cells that maintain episomal viral genomes. This suggests a more prominent role for tobacco smoke in earlier stages of HPV-related cancer progression. PMID:25064354

  7. Highly Dynamic Interactions Maintain Kinetic Stability of the ClpXP Protease During the ATP-Fueled Mechanical Cycle.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Schmitz, Karl R; Sello, Jason K; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2016-06-17

    The ClpXP protease assembles in a reaction in which an ATP-bound ring hexamer of ClpX binds to one or both heptameric rings of the ClpP peptidase. Contacts between ClpX IGF-loops and clefts on a ClpP ring stabilize the complex. How ClpXP stability is maintained during the ATP-hydrolysis cycle that powers mechanical unfolding and translocation of protein substrates is poorly understood. Here, we use a real-time kinetic assay to monitor the effects of nucleotides on the assembly and disassembly of ClpXP. When ATP is present, complexes containing single-chain ClpX assemble via an intermediate and remain intact until transferred into buffers containing ADP or no nucleotides. ATP binding to high-affinity subunits of the ClpX hexamer prevents rapid dissociation, but additional subunits must be occupied to promote assembly. Small-molecule acyldepsipeptides, which compete with the IGF loops of ClpX for ClpP-cleft binding, cause exceptionally rapid dissociation of otherwise stable ClpXP complexes, suggesting that the IGF-loop interactions with ClpP must be highly dynamic. Our results indicate that the ClpX hexamer spends almost no time in an ATP-free state during the ATPase cycle, allowing highly processive degradation of protein substrates. PMID:27003103

  8. Mre11 Nuclease Activity has Essential Roles in DNA Repair and Genomic Stability Distinct from ATM Activation

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Jeffrey; Wu, Yipin; Deng, Yibin; Leddon, Jennifer; Westfield, Gerwin; Eckersdorff, Mark; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Chang, Sandy; Ferguson, David O.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Mre11/Rad50/NBS1 complex (MRN) maintains genomic stability by bridging DNA ends and initiating DNA damage signaling through activation of the ATM kinase. Mre11 possesses DNA nuclease activities that are highly conserved in evolution, but play unknown roles in mammals. To define functions of Mre11 we engineered targeted mouse alleles which either abrogate nuclease activities or inactivate the entire MRN complex. Mre11 nuclease deficiency causes a striking array of phenotypes indistinguishable from absence of MRN, including early embryonic lethality and dramatic genomic instability. We identify a crucial role for the nuclease activities in homology directed double strand break repair, and a contributing role in activating the ATR kinase. However, nuclease activities are not required to activate ATM after DNA damage or telomere deprotection. Therefore, nucleolytic processing by Mre11 is an essential function of fundamental importance in DNA repair distinct from MRN control of ATM signaling. PMID:18854157

  9. Drosophila muller f elements maintain a distinct set of genomic properties over 40 million years of evolution.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D; Reed, Laura K; Smith, Sheryl T; Barshop, William; Dirkes, William; Dothager, Matthew; Lee, Paul; Wong, Jeannette; Xiong, David; Yuan, Han; Bedard, James E J; Machone, Joshua F; Patterson, Seantay D; Price, Amber L; Turner, Bryce A; Robic, Srebrenka; Luippold, Erin K; McCartha, Shannon R; Walji, Tezin A; Walker, Chelsea A; Saville, Kenneth; Abrams, Marita K; Armstrong, Andrew R; Armstrong, William; Bailey, Robert J; Barberi, Chelsea R; Beck, Lauren R; Blaker, Amanda L; Blunden, Christopher E; Brand, Jordan P; Brock, Ethan J; Brooks, Dana W; Brown, Marie; Butzler, Sarah C; Clark, Eric M; Clark, Nicole B; Collins, Ashley A; Cotteleer, Rebecca J; Cullimore, Peterson R; Dawson, Seth G; Docking, Carter T; Dorsett, Sasha L; Dougherty, Grace A; Downey, Kaitlyn A; Drake, Andrew P; Earl, Erica K; Floyd, Trevor G; Forsyth, Joshua D; Foust, Jonathan D; Franchi, Spencer L; Geary, James F; Hanson, Cynthia K; Harding, Taylor S; Harris, Cameron B; Heckman, Jonathan M; Holderness, Heather L; Howey, Nicole A; Jacobs, Dontae A; Jewell, Elizabeth S; Kaisler, Maria; Karaska, Elizabeth A; Kehoe, James L; Koaches, Hannah C; Koehler, Jessica; Koenig, Dana; Kujawski, Alexander J; Kus, Jordan E; Lammers, Jennifer A; Leads, Rachel R; Leatherman, Emily C; Lippert, Rachel N; Messenger, Gregory S; Morrow, Adam T; Newcomb, Victoria; Plasman, Haley J; Potocny, Stephanie J; Powers, Michelle K; Reem, Rachel M; Rennhack, Jonathan P; Reynolds, Katherine R; Reynolds, Lyndsey A; Rhee, Dong K; Rivard, Allyson B; Ronk, Adam J; Rooney, Meghan B; Rubin, Lainey S; Salbert, Luke R; Saluja, Rasleen K; Schauder, Taylor; Schneiter, Allison R; Schulz, Robert W; Smith, Karl E; Spencer, Sarah; Swanson, Bryant R; Tache, Melissa A; Tewilliager, Ashley A; Tilot, Amanda K; VanEck, Eve; Villerot, Matthew M; Vylonis, Megan B; Watson, David T; Wurzler, Juliana A; Wysocki, Lauren M; Yalamanchili, Monica; Zaborowicz, Matthew A; Emerson, Julia A; Ortiz, Carlos; Deuschle, Frederic J; DiLorenzo, Lauren A; Goeller, Katie L; Macchi, Christopher R; Muller, Sarah E; Pasierb, Brittany D; Sable, Joseph E; Tucci, Jessica M; Tynon, Marykathryn; Dunbar, David A; Beken, Levent H; Conturso, Alaina C; Danner, Benjamin L; DeMichele, Gabriella A; Gonzales, Justin A; Hammond, Maureen S; Kelley, Colleen V; Kelly, Elisabeth A; Kulich, Danielle; Mageeney, Catherine M; McCabe, Nikie L; Newman, Alyssa M; Spaeder, Lindsay A; Tumminello, Richard A; Revie, Dennis; Benson, Jonathon M; Cristostomo, Michael C; DaSilva, Paolo A; Harker, Katherine S; Jarrell, Jenifer N; Jimenez, Luis A; Katz, Brandon M; Kennedy, William R; Kolibas, Kimberly S; LeBlanc, Mark T; Nguyen, Trung T; Nicolas, Daniel S; Patao, Melissa D; Patao, Shane M; Rupley, Bryan J; Sessions, Bridget J; Weaver, Jennifer A; Goodman, Anya L; Alvendia, Erica L; Baldassari, Shana M; Brown, Ashley S; Chase, Ian O; Chen, Maida; Chiang, Scott; Cromwell, Avery B; Custer, Ashley F; DiTommaso, Tia M; El-Adaimi, Jad; Goscinski, Nora C; Grove, Ryan A; Gutierrez, Nestor; Harnoto, Raechel S; Hedeen, Heather; Hong, Emily L; Hopkins, Barbara L; Huerta, Vilma F; Khoshabian, Colin; LaForge, Kristin M; Lee, Cassidy T; Lewis, Benjamin M; Lydon, Anniken M; Maniaci, Brian J; Mitchell, Ryan D; Morlock, Elaine V; Morris, William M; Naik, Priyanka; Olson, Nicole C; Osterloh, Jeannette M; Perez, Marcos A; Presley, Jonathan D; Randazzo, Matt J; Regan, Melanie K; Rossi, Franca G; Smith, Melanie A; Soliterman, Eugenia A; Sparks, Ciani J; Tran, Danny L; Wan, Tiffany; Welker, Anne A; Wong, Jeremy N; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Youngblom, Jim; Adams, Andrew; Alldredge, Justin; Bryant, Ashley; Carranza, David; Cifelli, Alyssa; Coulson, Kevin; Debow, Calise; Delacruz, Noelle; Emerson, Charlene; Farrar, Cassandra; Foret, Don; Garibay, Edgar; Gooch, John; Heslop, Michelle; Kaur, Sukhjit; Khan, Ambreen; Kim, Van; Lamb, Travis; Lindbeck, Peter; Lucas, Gabi; Macias, Elizabeth; Martiniuc, Daniela; Mayorga, Lissett; Medina, Joseph; Membreno, Nelson; Messiah, Shady; Neufeld, Lacey; Nguyen, San Francisco; Nichols, Zachary; Odisho, George; Peterson, Daymon; Rodela, Laura; Rodriguez, Priscilla; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Ruiz, Jorge; Sherrill, Will; Silva, Valeria; Sparks, Jeri; Statton, Geeta; Townsend, Ashley; Valdez, Isabel; Waters, Mary; Westphal, Kyle; Winkler, Stacey; Zumkehr, Joannee; DeJong, Randall J; Hoogewerf, Arlene J; Ackerman, Cheri M; Armistead, Isaac O; Baatenburg, Lara; Borr, Matthew J; Brouwer, Lindsay K; Burkhart, Brandon J; Bushhouse, Kelsey T; Cesko, Lejla; Choi, Tiffany Y Y; Cohen, Heather; Damsteegt, Amanda M; Darusz, Jess M; Dauphin, Cory M

    2015-05-01

    The Muller F element (4.2 Mb, ~80 protein-coding genes) is an unusual autosome of Drosophila melanogaster; it is mostly heterochromatic with a low recombination rate. To investigate how these properties impact the evolution of repeats and genes, we manually improved the sequence and annotated the genes on the D. erecta, D. mojavensis, and D. grimshawi F elements and euchromatic domains from the Muller D element. We find that F elements have greater transposon density (25-50%) than euchromatic reference regions (3-11%). Among the F elements, D. grimshawi has the lowest transposon density (particularly DINE-1: 2% vs. 11-27%). F element genes have larger coding spans, more coding exons, larger introns, and lower codon bias. Comparison of the Effective Number of Codons with the Codon Adaptation Index shows that, in contrast to the other species, codon bias in D. grimshawi F element genes can be attributed primarily to selection instead of mutational biases, suggesting that density and types of transposons affect the degree of local heterochromatin formation. F element genes have lower estimated DNA melting temperatures than D element genes, potentially facilitating transcription through heterochromatin. Most F element genes (~90%) have remained on that element, but the F element has smaller syntenic blocks than genome averages (3.4-3.6 vs. 8.4-8.8 genes per block), indicating greater rates of inversion despite lower rates of recombination. Overall, the F element has maintained characteristics that are distinct from other autosomes in the Drosophila lineage, illuminating the constraints imposed by a heterochromatic milieu. PMID:25740935

  10. Drosophila Muller F Elements Maintain a Distinct Set of Genomic Properties Over 40 Million Years of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wilson; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Reed, Laura K.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Barshop, William; Dirkes, William; Dothager, Matthew; Lee, Paul; Wong, Jeannette; Xiong, David; Yuan, Han; Bedard, James E. J.; Machone, Joshua F.; Patterson, Seantay D.; Price, Amber L.; Turner, Bryce A.; Robic, Srebrenka; Luippold, Erin K.; McCartha, Shannon R.; Walji, Tezin A.; Walker, Chelsea A.; Saville, Kenneth; Abrams, Marita K.; Armstrong, Andrew R.; Armstrong, William; Bailey, Robert J.; Barberi, Chelsea R.; Beck, Lauren R.; Blaker, Amanda L.; Blunden, Christopher E.; Brand, Jordan P.; Brock, Ethan J.; Brooks, Dana W.; Brown, Marie; Butzler, Sarah C.; Clark, Eric M.; Clark, Nicole B.; Collins, Ashley A.; Cotteleer, Rebecca J.; Cullimore, Peterson R.; Dawson, Seth G.; Docking, Carter T.; Dorsett, Sasha L.; Dougherty, Grace A.; Downey, Kaitlyn A.; Drake, Andrew P.; Earl, Erica K.; Floyd, Trevor G.; Forsyth, Joshua D.; Foust, Jonathan D.; Franchi, Spencer L.; Geary, James F.; Hanson, Cynthia K.; Harding, Taylor S.; Harris, Cameron B.; Heckman, Jonathan M.; Holderness, Heather L.; Howey, Nicole A.; Jacobs, Dontae A.; Jewell, Elizabeth S.; Kaisler, Maria; Karaska, Elizabeth A.; Kehoe, James L.; Koaches, Hannah C.; Koehler, Jessica; Koenig, Dana; Kujawski, Alexander J.; Kus, Jordan E.; Lammers, Jennifer A.; Leads, Rachel R.; Leatherman, Emily C.; Lippert, Rachel N.; Messenger, Gregory S.; Morrow, Adam T.; Newcomb, Victoria; Plasman, Haley J.; Potocny, Stephanie J.; Powers, Michelle K.; Reem, Rachel M.; Rennhack, Jonathan P.; Reynolds, Katherine R.; Reynolds, Lyndsey A.; Rhee, Dong K.; Rivard, Allyson B.; Ronk, Adam J.; Rooney, Meghan B.; Rubin, Lainey S.; Salbert, Luke R.; Saluja, Rasleen K.; Schauder, Taylor; Schneiter, Allison R.; Schulz, Robert W.; Smith, Karl E.; Spencer, Sarah; Swanson, Bryant R.; Tache, Melissa A.; Tewilliager, Ashley A.; Tilot, Amanda K.; VanEck, Eve; Villerot, Matthew M.; Vylonis, Megan B.; Watson, David T.; Wurzler, Juliana A.; Wysocki, Lauren M.; Yalamanchili, Monica; Zaborowicz, Matthew A.; Emerson, Julia A.; Ortiz, Carlos; Deuschle, Frederic J.; DiLorenzo, Lauren A.; Goeller, Katie L.; Macchi, Christopher R.; Muller, Sarah E.; Pasierb, Brittany D.; Sable, Joseph E.; Tucci, Jessica M.; Tynon, Marykathryn; Dunbar, David A.; Beken, Levent H.; Conturso, Alaina C.; Danner, Benjamin L.; DeMichele, Gabriella A.; Gonzales, Justin A.; Hammond, Maureen S.; Kelley, Colleen V.; Kelly, Elisabeth A.; Kulich, Danielle; Mageeney, Catherine M.; McCabe, Nikie L.; Newman, Alyssa M.; Spaeder, Lindsay A.; Tumminello, Richard A.; Revie, Dennis; Benson, Jonathon M.; Cristostomo, Michael C.; DaSilva, Paolo A.; Harker, Katherine S.; Jarrell, Jenifer N.; Jimenez, Luis A.; Katz, Brandon M.; Kennedy, William R.; Kolibas, Kimberly S.; LeBlanc, Mark T.; Nguyen, Trung T.; Nicolas, Daniel S.; Patao, Melissa D.; Patao, Shane M.; Rupley, Bryan J.; Sessions, Bridget J.; Weaver, Jennifer A.; Goodman, Anya L.; Alvendia, Erica L.; Baldassari, Shana M.; Brown, Ashley S.; Chase, Ian O.; Chen, Maida; Chiang, Scott; Cromwell, Avery B.; Custer, Ashley F.; DiTommaso, Tia M.; El-Adaimi, Jad; Goscinski, Nora C.; Grove, Ryan A.; Gutierrez, Nestor; Harnoto, Raechel S.; Hedeen, Heather; Hong, Emily L.; Hopkins, Barbara L.; Huerta, Vilma F.; Khoshabian, Colin; LaForge, Kristin M.; Lee, Cassidy T.; Lewis, Benjamin M.; Lydon, Anniken M.; Maniaci, Brian J.; Mitchell, Ryan D.; Morlock, Elaine V.; Morris, William M.; Naik, Priyanka; Olson, Nicole C.; Osterloh, Jeannette M.; Perez, Marcos A.; Presley, Jonathan D.; Randazzo, Matt J.; Regan, Melanie K.; Rossi, Franca G.; Smith, Melanie A.; Soliterman, Eugenia A.; Sparks, Ciani J.; Tran, Danny L.; Wan, Tiffany; Welker, Anne A.; Wong, Jeremy N.; Sreenivasan, Aparna; Youngblom, Jim; Adams, Andrew; Alldredge, Justin; Bryant, Ashley; Carranza, David; Cifelli, Alyssa; Coulson, Kevin; Debow, Calise; Delacruz, Noelle; Emerson, Charlene; Farrar, Cassandra; Foret, Don; Garibay, Edgar; Gooch, John; Heslop, Michelle; Kaur, Sukhjit; Khan, Ambreen; Kim, Van; Lamb, Travis; Lindbeck, Peter; Lucas, Gabi; Macias, Elizabeth; Martiniuc, Daniela; Mayorga, Lissett; Medina, Joseph; Membreno, Nelson; Messiah, Shady; Neufeld, Lacey; Nguyen, San Francisco; Nichols, Zachary; Odisho, George; Peterson, Daymon; Rodela, Laura; Rodriguez, Priscilla; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Ruiz, Jorge; Sherrill, Will; Silva, Valeria; Sparks, Jeri; Statton, Geeta; Townsend, Ashley; Valdez, Isabel; Waters, Mary; Westphal, Kyle; Winkler, Stacey; Zumkehr, Joannee; DeJong, Randall J.; Hoogewerf, Arlene J.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Armistead, Isaac O.

    2015-01-01

    The Muller F element (4.2 Mb, ~80 protein-coding genes) is an unusual autosome of Drosophila melanogaster; it is mostly heterochromatic with a low recombination rate. To investigate how these properties impact the evolution of repeats and genes, we manually improved the sequence and annotated the genes on the D. erecta, D. mojavensis, and D. grimshawi F elements and euchromatic domains from the Muller D element. We find that F elements have greater transposon density (25–50%) than euchromatic reference regions (3–11%). Among the F elements, D. grimshawi has the lowest transposon density (particularly DINE-1: 2% vs. 11–27%). F element genes have larger coding spans, more coding exons, larger introns, and lower codon bias. Comparison of the Effective Number of Codons with the Codon Adaptation Index shows that, in contrast to the other species, codon bias in D. grimshawi F element genes can be attributed primarily to selection instead of mutational biases, suggesting that density and types of transposons affect the degree of local heterochromatin formation. F element genes have lower estimated DNA melting temperatures than D element genes, potentially facilitating transcription through heterochromatin. Most F element genes (~90%) have remained on that element, but the F element has smaller syntenic blocks than genome averages (3.4–3.6 vs. 8.4–8.8 genes per block), indicating greater rates of inversion despite lower rates of recombination. Overall, the F element has maintained characteristics that are distinct from other autosomes in the Drosophila lineage, illuminating the constraints imposed by a heterochromatic milieu. PMID:25740935

  11. Inter- and intra-specific pan-genomes of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato: genome stability and adaptive radiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria from the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi s.l.) species complex. To reconstruct the evolution of B. burgdorferi s.l. and identify the genomic basis of its human virulence, we compared the genomes of 23 B. burgdorferi s.l. isolates from Europe and the United States, including B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (B. burgdorferi s.s., 14 isolates), B. afzelii (2), B. garinii (2), B. “bavariensis” (1), B. spielmanii (1), B. valaisiana (1), B. bissettii (1), and B. “finlandensis” (1). Results Robust B. burgdorferi s.s. and B. burgdorferi s.l. phylogenies were obtained using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms, despite recombination. Phylogeny-based pan-genome analysis showed that the rate of gene acquisition was higher between species than within species, suggesting adaptive speciation. Strong positive natural selection drives the sequence evolution of lipoproteins, including chromosomally-encoded genes 0102 and 0404, cp26-encoded ospC and b08, and lp54-encoded dbpA, a07, a22, a33, a53, a65. Computer simulations predicted rapid adaptive radiation of genomic groups as population size increases. Conclusions Intra- and inter-specific pan-genome sizes of B. burgdorferi s.l. expand linearly with phylogenetic diversity. Yet gene-acquisition rates in B. burgdorferi s.l. are among the lowest in bacterial pathogens, resulting in high genome stability and few lineage-specific genes. Genome adaptation of B. burgdorferi s.l. is driven predominantly by copy-number and sequence variations of lipoprotein genes. New genomic groups are likely to emerge if the current trend of B. burgdorferi s.l. population expansion continues. PMID:24112474

  12. Cdk12 is essential for embryonic development and the maintenance of genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Juan, H-C; Lin, Y; Chen, H-R; Fann, M-J

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity during early embryonic development is important in order to ensure the proper development of the embryo. Studies from cultured cells have demonstrated that cyclin-dependent kinase 12 (Cdk12) is a multifunctional protein that maintains genomic stability and the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. Perturbation of its functions is also known to be associated with pathogenesis and drug resistance in human cancers. However, the biological significance of Cdk12 in vivo is unclear. Here we bred mice that are deficient in Cdk12 and demonstrated that Cdk12 depletion leads to embryonic lethality shortly after implantation. We also used an in vitro culture system of blastocysts to examine the molecular mechanisms associated with the embryonic lethality of Cdk12-deficient embryos. Cdk12−/− blastocysts fail to undergo outgrowth of the inner cell mass because of an increase in the apoptosis of these cells. Spontaneous DNA damage was revealed by an increase in 53BP1 foci among cells cultured from Cdk12−/− embryos. Furthermore, the expression levels of various DNA damage response genes, namely Atr, Brca1, Fanci and Fancd2, are reduced in Cdk12−/− embryos. These findings indicate that Cdk12 is important for the correct expression of some DNA damage response genes and indirectly has an influence on the efficiency of DNA repair. Our report also highlights that DNA breaks occurring during DNA replication are frequent in mouse embryonic cells and repair of such damage is critical to the successful development of mouse embryos. PMID:26658019

  13. MEK1 signaling promotes self-renewal and tumorigenicity of liver cancer stem cells via maintaining SIRT1 protein stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiamin; Liu, Chungang; Liu, Limei; Chen, Xuejiao; Shan, Juanjuan; Shen, Junjie; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death. This high mortality has been commonly attributed to the presence of residual cancer stem cells (CSCs). Meanwhile, MEK1 signaling is regarded as a key molecular in HCC maintenance and development. However, nobody has figured out the particular mechanisms that how MEK1 signaling regulates liver CSCs self-renewal. In this study, we show that inhibition or depletion of MEK1 can significantly decrease liver CSCs self-renewal and tumor growth both in vitro and vivo conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MEK1 signaling promotes liver CSCs self-renewal and tumorigenicity by maintaining SIRT1 level. Mechanistically, MEK1 signaling keeps SIRT1 protein stabilization through activating SIRT1 ubiquitination, which inhibits proteasomal degradation. Clinical analysis shows that patients co-expression of MEK1 and SIRT1 are associated with poor survival. Our finding indicates that MEK1-SIRT1 can act as a novel diagnostic biomarker and inhibition of MEK1 may be a viable therapeutic option for targeting liver CSCs treatment. PMID:26967560

  14. SUMOylated ORC2 Recruits a Histone Demethylase to Regulate Centromeric Histone Modification and Genomic Stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Cheng, Jinke; Bawa-Khalfe, Tasneem; Yao, Xuebiao; Chin, Y Eugene; Yeh, Edward T H

    2016-04-01

    Origin recognition complex 2 (ORC2), a subunit of the ORC, is essential for DNA replication initiation in eukaryotic cells. In addition to a role in DNA replication initiation at the G1/S phase, ORC2 has been shown to localize to the centromere during the G2/M phase. Here, we show that ORC2 is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier 2 (SUMO2), but not SUMO1, at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. SUMO2-modification of ORC2 is important for the recruitment of KDM5A in order to convert H3K4me3 to H3K4me2, a "permissive" histone marker for α-satellite transcription at the centromere. Persistent expression of SUMO-less ORC2 led to reduced α-satellite transcription and impaired pericentric heterochromatin silencing, which resulted in re-replication of heterochromatin DNA. DNA re-replication eventually activated the DNA damage response, causing the bypass of mitosis and the formation of polyploid cells. Thus, ORC2 sustains genomic stability by recruiting KDM5A to maintain centromere histone methylation in order to prevent DNA re-replication. PMID:27052177

  15. Stability analysis of chickpea large genomic DNA inserts in Agrobacterium.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of large DNA inserts directly into plants facilitates the transfer of gene clusters and flanking regulatory elements. It is recommended that the integrity of large genomic fragments in Agrobacterium be verified prior to plant transformation. In this ...

  16. Filia is an ESC-specific regulator of DNA damage response and safeguards genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Wei-dao; Duan, Ying-liang; Lu, Yong-qing; Cun, Yi-xian; Li, Chao-hui; Guo, Kun; Nie, Wen-hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Rugang; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in cell-based therapy, but the genomic instability seen in culture hampers full application. Greater understanding of the factors that regulate genomic stability in PSCs could help address this issue. Here we describe the identification of Filia as a specific regulator of genomic stability in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Filia expression is induced by genotoxic stress. Filia promotes centrosome integrity and regulates DNA damage response (DDR) through multiple pathways, including DDR signaling, cell cycle checkpoints and damage repair, ESC differentiation and apoptosis. Filia depletion causes ESC genomic instability, induces resistance to apoptosis and promotes malignant transformation. As part of its role in the DDR, Filia interacts with PARP1 and stimulates its enzymatic activity. Filia also constitutively resides on centrosomes and translocates to DNA damage sites and mitochondria, consistent with its multifaceted roles in regulating centrosome integrity, damage repair and apoptosis. PMID:25936915

  17. Genome stability: What we have learned from cohesinopathies.

    PubMed

    Cucco, Francesco; Musio, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein complex involved in many DNA-related processes such as proper chromosome segregation, replication, transcription, and repair. Mutations in cohesin gene pathways are responsible for human diseases, collectively referred to as cohesinopathies. In addition, both cohesin gene expression dysregulation and mutations have been identified in cancer. Cohesinopathy cells are characterized by genome instability (GIN) visualized by a constellation of markers such as chromosome aneuploidies, chromosome aberrations, precocious sister chromatid separation, premature centromere separation, micronuclei formation, and sensitivity to genotoxic drugs. The emerging picture suggests that GIN observed in cohesinopathies may result from the synergistic effects of the multiple cohesin dysfunctions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27091086

  18. Genomic stability in the archaeae Haloferax volcanii and Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed Central

    López-García, P; St Jean, A; Amils, R; Charlebois, R L

    1995-01-01

    Through hybridization of available probes, we have added nine genes to the macrorestriction map of the Haloferax mediterranei chromosome and five genes to the contig map of Haloferax volcanii. Additionally, we hybridized 17 of the mapped cosmid clones from H. volcanii to the H. mediterranei genome. The resulting 35-point chromosomal comparison revealed only two inversions and a few translocations. Forces known to promote rearrangement, common in the haloarchaea, have been ineffective in changing global gene order throughout the nearly 10(7) years of these species' divergent evolution. PMID:7868620

  19. Small cell ovarian carcinoma: genomic stability and responsiveness to therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The biology of small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT), which is a rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer, is poorly understood. Tumourigenicity, in vitro growth characteristics, genetic and genomic anomalies, and sensitivity to standard and novel chemotherapeutic treatments were investigated in the unique SCCOHT cell line, BIN-67, to provide further insight in the biology of this rare type of ovarian cancer. Method The tumourigenic potential of BIN-67 cells was determined and the tumours formed in a xenograft model was compared to human SCCOHT. DNA sequencing, spectral karyotyping and high density SNP array analysis was performed. The sensitivity of the BIN-67 cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents and to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the JX-594 vaccinia virus was tested. Results BIN-67 cells were capable of forming spheroids in hanging drop cultures. When xenografted into immunodeficient mice, BIN-67 cells developed into tumours that reflected the hypercalcemia and histology of human SCCOHT, notably intense expression of WT-1 and vimentin, and lack of expression of inhibin. Somatic mutations in TP53 and the most common activating mutations in KRAS and BRAF were not found in BIN-67 cells by DNA sequencing. Spectral karyotyping revealed a largely normal diploid karyotype (in greater than 95% of cells) with a visibly shorter chromosome 20 contig. High density SNP array analysis also revealed few genomic anomalies in BIN-67 cells, which included loss of heterozygosity of an estimated 16.7 Mb interval on chromosome 20. SNP array analyses of four SCCOHT samples also indicated a low frequency of genomic anomalies in the majority of cases. Although resistant to platinum chemotherapeutic drugs, BIN-67 cell viability in vitro was reduced by >75% after infection with oncolytic viruses. Conclusions These results show that SCCOHT differs from high-grade serous carcinomas by exhibiting few chromosomal anomalies and lacking TP53

  20. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability.

    PubMed

    Trego, Kelly S; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R; Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Nelson, Michael R; Hlaing, Ayesu; Shih, Brian; Rydberg, Björn; Pluth, Janice M; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K

    2016-02-18

    XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair, and incision-defective XPG mutations cause the skin cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. Truncating mutations instead cause the neurodevelopmental progeroid disorder Cockayne syndrome, but little is known about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. We identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability to overcome replication fork stalling, and replication stress. XPG directly interacts with BRCA2, RAD51, and PALB2, and XPG depletion reduces their chromatin binding and subsequent RAD51 foci formation. Upstream in HRR, XPG interacts directly with BRCA1. Its depletion causes BRCA1 hyper-phosphorylation and persistent chromatin binding. These unexpected findings establish XPG as an HRR protein with important roles in genome stability and suggest how XPG defects produce severe clinical consequences including cancer and accelerated aging. PMID:26833090

  1. Microsatellite Interruptions Stabilize Primate Genomes and Exist as Population-Specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within Individual Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E.; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000–40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  2. Different genome-specific chromosome stabilities in synthetic Brassica allohexaploids revealed by wide crosses with Orychophragmus

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xian-Hong; Wang, Jing; Li, Zai-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims In sexual hybrids between cultivated Brassica species and another crucifer, Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24), parental genome separation during mitosis and meiosis is under genetic control but this phenomenon varies depending upon the Brassica species. To further investigate the mechanisms involved in parental genome separation, complex hybrids between synthetic Brassica allohexaploids (2n = 54, AABBCC) from three sources and O. violaceus were obtained and characterized. Methods Genomic in situ hybridization, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) were used to explore chromosomal/genomic components and rRNA gene expression of the complex hybrids and their progenies. Key Results Complex hybrids with variable fertility exhibited phenotypes that were different from the female allohexaploids and expressed some traits from O. violaceus. These hybrids were mixoploids (2n = 34–46) and retained partial complements of allohexaploids, including whole chromosomes of the A and B genomes and some of the C genome but no intact O. violaceus chromosomes; AFLP bands specific for O. violaceus, novel for two parents and absent in hexaploids were detected. The complex hybrids produced progenies with chromosomes/genomic complements biased to B. juncea (2n = 36, AABB) and novel B. juncea lines with two genomes of different origins. The expression of rRNA genes from B. nigra was revealed in all allohexaploids and complex hybrids, showing that the hierarchy of nucleolar dominance (B. nigra, BB > B. rapa, AA > B. oleracea, CC) in Brassica allotetraploids was still valid in these plants. Conclusions The chromosomes of three genomes in these synthetic Brassica allohexaploids showed different genome-specific stabilities (B > A > C) under induction of alien chromosome elimination in crosses with O. violaceus, which was possibly affected by nucleolar dominance. PMID:19403626

  3. Mechanisms of RecQ helicases in pathways of DNA metabolism and maintenance of genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudha; Doherty, Kevin M.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motor proteins that couple the hydrolysis of NTP to nucleic acid unwinding. The growing number of DNA helicases implicated in human disease suggests that their vital specialized roles in cellular pathways are important for the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in genes of the RecQ family of DNA helicases result in chromosomal instability diseases of premature aging and/or cancer predisposition. We will discuss the mechanisms of RecQ helicases in pathways of DNA metabolism. A review of RecQ helicases from bacteria to human reveals their importance in genomic stability by their participation with other proteins to resolve DNA replication and recombination intermediates. In the light of their known catalytic activities and protein interactions, proposed models for RecQ function will be summarized with an emphasis on how this distinct class of enzymes functions in chromosomal stability maintenance and prevention of human disease and cancer. PMID:16925525

  4. Protein Degradation Pathways Regulate the Functions of Helicases in the DNA Damage Response and Maintenance of Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Joshua A.; Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of helicases or helicase-like proteins, often mediated by ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways, plays important regulatory roles in cellular mechanisms that respond to DNA damage or replication stress. The Bloom’s syndrome helicase (BLM) provides an example of how helicase degradation pathways, regulated by post-translational modifications and protein interactions with components of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair pathway, influence cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, and replication restart. The FANCM DNA translocase can be targeted by checkpoint kinases that exert dramatic effects on FANCM stability and chromosomal integrity. Other work provides evidence that degradation of the F-box DNA helicase (FBH1) helps to balance translesion synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) repair at blocked replication forks. Degradation of the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), a DNA translocase and ubiquitylating enzyme, influences the choice of post replication repair (PRR) pathway. Stability of the Werner syndrome helicase-nuclease (WRN) involved in the replication stress response is regulated by its acetylation. Turning to transcription, stability of the Cockayne Syndrome Group B DNA translocase (CSB) implicated in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is regulated by a CSA ubiquitin ligase complex enabling recovery of RNA synthesis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that helicases can be targeted for degradation to maintain genome homeostasis. PMID:25906194

  5. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Luft, Benjamin J.; Schutzer, Steven E.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Huang, Wai Mun; Vujadinovic, Marija; Aron, John K.; Vargas, Levy C.; Freeman, Sam; Radune, Diana; Weidman, Janice F.; Dimitrov, George I.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Sosa, Julia E.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Dunn, John J.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33–40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi ∼900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short ≤20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant. PMID:22432010

  6. Genome Stability of Lyme Disease Spirochetes: Comparative Genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi Plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens S. R.; Dunn J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Schutzer, S. E.; Gilcrease, E. B.; Huang, W. M.; Vujadinovic, M.; Aron, J. K.; Vargas, L. C.; Freeman, S.; Radune, D.; Weidman, J. F.; Dimitrov, G. I.; Khouri, H. M.; Sosa, J. E.; Halpin, R. A.; Fraser, C. M.

    2012-03-14

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne human illness in North America. In order to understand the molecular pathogenesis, natural diversity, population structure and epizootic spread of the North American Lyme agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, a much better understanding of the natural diversity of its genome will be required. Towards this end we present a comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the numerous plasmids of B. burgdorferi isolates B31, N40, JD1 and 297. These strains were chosen because they include the three most commonly studied laboratory strains, and because they represent different major genetic lineages and so are informative regarding the genetic diversity and evolution of this organism. A unique feature of Borrelia genomes is that they carry a large number of linear and circular plasmids, and this work shows that strains N40, JD1, 297 and B31 carry related but non-identical sets of 16, 20, 19 and 21 plasmids, respectively, that comprise 33-40% of their genomes. We deduce that there are at least 28 plasmid compatibility types among the four strains. The B. burgdorferi {approx}900 Kbp linear chromosomes are evolutionarily exceptionally stable, except for a short {le}20 Kbp plasmid-like section at the right end. A few of the plasmids, including the linear lp54 and circular cp26, are also very stable. We show here that the other plasmids, especially the linear ones, are considerably more variable. Nearly all of the linear plasmids have undergone one or more substantial inter-plasmid rearrangements since their last common ancestor. In spite of these rearrangements and differences in plasmid contents, the overall gene complement of the different isolates has remained relatively constant.

  7. Role of DNA polymerase κ in the maintenance of genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Pillaire, Marie-Jeanne; Bétous, Rémy; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    To ensure high cell viability and genomic stability, cells have evolved two major mechanisms to deal with the constant challenge of DNA replication fork arrest during S phase of the cell cycle: (1) induction of the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) replication checkpoint mechanism, and (2) activation of a pathway that bypasses DNA damage and DNA with abnormal structure and is mediated by translesion synthesis (TLS) Y-family DNA polymerases. This review focuses on how DNA polymerase kappa (Pol κ), one of the most highly conserved TLS DNA polymerases, is involved in each of these pathways and thereby coordinates them to choreograph the response to a stalled replication fork. We also describe how loss of Pol κ regulation, which occurs frequently in human cancers, affects genomic stability and contributes to cancer development. PMID:27308312

  8. Development of Sequential Calculating Type Autonomous Stabilizing Controller for Maintaining Transient Stability in case of Backup Relay Operation in Load System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Maekawa, Kazuo; Shimomura, Kimihiko; Sasaki, Takashi; Kowada, Yasuyuki; Maeda, Toru

    A new Autonomous Stabilizing Controller (ASC) has been developed, which is based on the concept of using only locall information measured at the substation where ASC is installed. ASC prevents the power system from wide-area blackout by shedding generators optimally when a serious fault occurs in 154kV-or-below-voltage power system and is cleared by backup relay. ASC consists of three functions, a function of detecting faults and judging of starting stability calculations (The first function), a function of calculating power system stability (The second function), and a function of selecting optimal generators to be shed (The third function). The first function composes a signal for starting stability calculations when a fault cleared by backup relay is detected. According to the starting signal composed by the first function, the second function executes stability calculations based on equal area criterion. If the result of stability calculations is instable, the third function selects a generator to be shed by considering not only the stabilizing effect but also the quickly restoration after shedding. This paper presents total algorithms applied in ASC.

  9. Mining 3D genome structure populations identifies major factors governing the stability of regulatory communities

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Li, Wenyuan; Tjong, Harianto; Hao, Shengli; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Qingjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Bing; Alber, Frank; Jasmine Zhou, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) genome structures vary from cell to cell even in an isogenic sample. Unlike protein structures, genome structures are highly plastic, posing a significant challenge for structure-function mapping. Here we report an approach to comprehensively identify 3D chromatin clusters that each occurs frequently across a population of genome structures, either deconvoluted from ensemble-averaged Hi-C data or from a collection of single-cell Hi-C data. Applying our method to a population of genome structures (at the macrodomain resolution) of lymphoblastoid cells, we identify an atlas of stable inter-chromosomal chromatin clusters. A large number of these clusters are enriched in binding of specific regulatory factors and are therefore defined as ‘Regulatory Communities.' We reveal two major factors, centromere clustering and transcription factor binding, which significantly stabilize such communities. Finally, we show that the regulatory communities differ substantially from cell to cell, indicating that expression variability could be impacted by genome structures. PMID:27240697

  10. Comparison between the effectiveness of expiration and abdominal bracing maneuvers in maintaining spinal stability following sudden trunk loading.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Watanabe, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effectiveness of expiration and abdominal bracing maneuvers in response to sudden trunk loading in healthy subjects. Fifteen healthy male subjects were anteriorly loaded under different experimental conditions. Tests were conducted at rest and while performing each of the stabilization maneuvers (expiration and abdominal bracing) at 15% of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the internal oblique muscle. Subjects had no knowledge of the perturbation timing. An electromyographic biofeedback system was used to control the intensity of internal oblique muscle activation. Muscular pre-activation of three trunk muscles (internal oblique, external oblique, and L3 erector spinae muscles) and lumbar acceleration in response to loading were measured. The expiration and abdominal bracing maneuvers promoted torso co-contraction, reduced the magnitude of lumbar acceleration, and increased spinal stability compared to the resting condition. There were no differences between the expiration and abdominal bracing maneuvers in the pre-activation of the three trunk muscles or in lumbar acceleration in response to loading. It appears that both expiration and abdominal bracing maneuvers are effective in increasing spinal stability in response to sudden anterior loading. PMID:26711271

  11. ERK2 phosphorylates Krüppel-like factor 8 protein at serine 48 to maintain its stability.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Satadru K; Lu, Heng; Mukherjee, Debarati; Yu, Lin; Zhao, Jihe

    2016-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) plays important roles in cancer and is strictly regulated by various post-translational modifications such as sumoylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and PARylation. Here we report a novel phosphorylation of KLF8 by ERK2 responsible and critical for the stability of KLF8 protein. The full-length KLF8 protein displays a doublet in SDS-PAGE gel. The upper band of the doublet, however, disappeared when the N-terminal 50 amino acids were deleted. In its full-length the upper band disappeared upon phosphatase treatment or mutation of the serine 48 (S48) to alanine whereas the lower band was lost when the S48 was mutated to aspartic acid that mimics phosphorylated S48. These results suggest that S48 phosphorylation is responsible for the motility up-shift of KLF8 protein. Pharmacological and genetic manipulations of various potential kinases identified ERK2 as the likely one that phosphorylates KLF8 at S48. Functional studies indicated that this phosphorylation is crucial for protecting KLF8 protein from degradation in the nucleus and promoting cell migration. Taken together, this study identifies a novel mechanism of phosphorylation critical for KLF8 protein stabilization and function. PMID:27293988

  12. ERK2 phosphorylates Krüppel-like factor 8 protein at serine 48 to maintain its stability

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Satadru K; Lu, Heng; Mukherjee, Debarati; Yu, Lin; Zhao, Jihe

    2016-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) plays important roles in cancer and is strictly regulated by various post-translational modifications such as sumoylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and PARylation. Here we report a novel phosphorylation of KLF8 by ERK2 responsible and critical for the stability of KLF8 protein. The full-length KLF8 protein displays a doublet in SDS-PAGE gel. The upper band of the doublet, however, disappeared when the N-terminal 50 amino acids were deleted. In its full-length the upper band disappeared upon phosphatase treatment or mutation of the serine 48 (S48) to alanine whereas the lower band was lost when the S48 was mutated to aspartic acid that mimics phosphorylated S48. These results suggest that S48 phosphorylation is responsible for the motility up-shift of KLF8 protein. Pharmacological and genetic manipulations of various potential kinases identified ERK2 as the likely one that phosphorylates KLF8 at S48. Functional studies indicated that this phosphorylation is crucial for protecting KLF8 protein from degradation in the nucleus and promoting cell migration. Taken together, this study identifies a novel mechanism of phosphorylation critical for KLF8 protein stabilization and function. PMID:27293988

  13. Histone demethylase KDM5B is a key regulator of genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liu, Ling; Yang, Shangda; Song, Nan; Zhou, Xing; Gao, Jie; Yu, Na; Shan, Lin; Wang, Qian; Liang, Jing; Xuan, Chenghao; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability is essential for normal organismal development and is vital to prevent diseases such as cancer. As genetic information is packaged into chromatin, it has become increasingly clear that the chromatin environment plays an important role in DNA damage response. However, how DNA repair is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms is not fully understood. Here we report the identification and characterization of lysine-specific histone demethylase 5B (KDM5B), a member of the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases, as an important player in multiple aspects of DNA double-strand break (DSB) response in human cells. We found that KDM5B becomes enriched in DNA-damage sites after ironizing radiation and endonuclease treatment in a poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1- and histone variant macroH2A1.1-dependent manner. We showed that KDM5B is required for efficient DSB repair and for the recruitment of Ku70 and BRCA1, the essential component of nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination, respectively. Significantly, KDM5B deficiency disengages the DNA repair process, promotes spontaneous DNA damage, activates p53 signaling, and sensitizes cells to genotoxic insults. Our results suggest that KDM5B is a bona fide DNA damage response protein and indicate that KDM5B is an important genome caretaker and a critical regulator of genome stability, adding to the understanding of the roles of epigenetics in the maintenance of genetic fidelity. PMID:24778210

  14. The influence of micronutrients in cell culture: a reflection on viability and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Machado, Miriana; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Bergter, Lothar; Prá, Daniel; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5-10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed. PMID:23781504

  15. Plants from Chernobyl zone could shed light on genome stability in radioactive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Galina; Talalaiev, Oleksandr; Doonan, John

    2016-07-01

    For nearly 30 years, despite of chronic radiation, flora in Chernobyl zone continue to flourish, evidencing the adaptation of plants to such an environment. Keeping in mind interplanetary missions, this phenomenon is a challenge for plant space research since it highlights the possible mechanisms of genome protection and stabilization in harmful environment. Plants are sessile organisms and, contrary to animals, could not escape the external impact. Therefore, plants should evolve the robust system allowing DNA-protection against damage, which is of special interest. Our investigations show that Arabidopsis thaliana from Chernobyl zone tolerate radiomimetics and heavy metals better than control plants from non-polluted areas. Besides, its genome is less affected by such mutagens. qPCR investigations have revealed up-regulation of some genes involved in DNA damage response. In particular, expression of ATR is increased slightly and downstream expression of CycB1:1 gene is increased significantly after bleomycin treatment suggesting role of ATR-dependent pathway in genome stabilization. Several DNA repair pathways are known to exist in plants. We continue investigations on gene expression from different DNA repair pathways as well as cell cycle regulation and investigation of PCD hallmarks in order to reveal the mechanism of plant tolerance to radiation environment. Our investigations provide unique information for space researchers working on biotechnology of radiation tolerant plants.

  16. The Influence of Micronutrients in Cell Culture: A Reflection on Viability and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Prá, Daniel; Pêgas Henriques, João Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5–10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed. PMID:23781504

  17. Paraffin Phase Change Material for Maintaining Temperature Stability of IceCube Type of CubeSats in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The MLA and IFA of the instrument on the IceCube require a 20 C temperature and a thermal stability of +/-1 C. The thermal environment of the ISS orbit for the IceCube is very unstable due to solar beta angles in the -75deg to +75deg range. Additionally the instrument is powered off in every eclipse to conserve electrical power. These two factors cause thermal instability to the MLA and IFA. This paper presents a thermal design of using mini paraffin PCM packs to meet the thermal requirements of these instrument components. With a 31 g mass plus a 30% margin of n-hexadecane, the MLA and IFA are powered on for 32.3 minutes in sunlight at a 0deg beta angle to melt the paraffin. The powered-on time increases to 38 minutes at a 75deg (+/-) beta angle. When the MLA and IFA are powered off, the paraffin freezes.

  18. System and method for tuning adjusting the central frequency of a laser while maintaining frequency stabilization to an external reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey (Inventor); Thorpe, James I. (Inventor); Numata, Kenji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for stabilizing a laser to a frequency reference with an adjustable offset. The method locks a sideband signal generated by passing an incoming laser beam through the phase modulator to a frequency reference, and adjusts a carrier frequency relative to the locked sideband signal by changing a phase modulation frequency input to the phase modulator. The sideband signal can be a single sideband (SSB), dual sideband (DSB), or an electronic sideband (ESB) signal. Two separate electro-optic modulators can produce the DSB signal. The two electro-optic modulators can be a broadband modulator and a resonant modulator. With a DSB signal, the method can introduce two sinusoidal phase modulations at the phase modulator. With ESB signals, the method can further drive the optical phase modulator with an electrical signal with nominal frequency OMEGA(sub 1) that is phase modulated at a frequency OMEGA(sub 2)

  19. Identification of Multiple Proteins Coupling Transcriptional Gene Silencing to Genome Stability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hale, Christopher J; Potok, Magdalena E; Lopez, Jennifer; Do, Truman; Liu, Ao; Gallego-Bartolome, Javier; Michaels, Scott D; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by epigenetic marks that act to modulate transcriptional control as well as to regulate DNA replication and repair. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutation of the ATXR5 and ATXR6 histone methyltransferases causes reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 monomethylation, transcriptional upregulation of transposons, and a genome instability defect in which there is an accumulation of excess DNA corresponding to pericentromeric heterochromatin. We designed a forward genetic screen to identify suppressors of the atxr5/6 phenotype that uncovered loss-of-function mutations in two components of the TREX-2 complex (AtTHP1, AtSAC3B), a SUMO-interacting E3 ubiquitin ligase (AtSTUbL2) and a methyl-binding domain protein (AtMBD9). Additionally, using a reverse genetic approach, we show that a mutation in a plant homolog of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 enhances the atxr5/6 phenotype. Through characterization of these mutations, our results suggest models for the production atxr5 atxr6-induced extra DNA involving conflicts between the replicative and transcriptional processes in the cell, and suggest that the atxr5 atxr6 transcriptional defects may be the cause of the genome instability defects in the mutants. These findings highlight the critical intersection of transcriptional silencing and DNA replication in the maintenance of genome stability of heterochromatin. PMID:27253878

  20. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  1. Identification of Multiple Proteins Coupling Transcriptional Gene Silencing to Genome Stability in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Christopher J.; Potok, Magdalena E.; Lopez, Jennifer; Do, Truman; Liu, Ao; Michaels, Scott D.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by epigenetic marks that act to modulate transcriptional control as well as to regulate DNA replication and repair. In Arabidopsis thaliana, mutation of the ATXR5 and ATXR6 histone methyltransferases causes reduction in histone H3 lysine 27 monomethylation, transcriptional upregulation of transposons, and a genome instability defect in which there is an accumulation of excess DNA corresponding to pericentromeric heterochromatin. We designed a forward genetic screen to identify suppressors of the atxr5/6 phenotype that uncovered loss-of-function mutations in two components of the TREX-2 complex (AtTHP1, AtSAC3B), a SUMO-interacting E3 ubiquitin ligase (AtSTUbL2) and a methyl-binding domain protein (AtMBD9). Additionally, using a reverse genetic approach, we show that a mutation in a plant homolog of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 enhances the atxr5/6 phenotype. Through characterization of these mutations, our results suggest models for the production atxr5 atxr6-induced extra DNA involving conflicts between the replicative and transcriptional processes in the cell, and suggest that the atxr5 atxr6 transcriptional defects may be the cause of the genome instability defects in the mutants. These findings highlight the critical intersection of transcriptional silencing and DNA replication in the maintenance of genome stability of heterochromatin. PMID:27253878

  2. Non-epigenetic function of HDAC8 in regulating breast cancer stem cells by maintaining Notch1 protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Min-Wu; Chu, Po-Chen; Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Shen, Fang-Hsiu; Chou, Chih-Chien; Hsu, En-Chi; Himmel, Lauren E.; Huang, Han-Li; Tu, Huang-Ju; Kulp, Samuel K.; Teng, Che-Ming; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a novel non-epigenetic function of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 8 in activating cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties in breast cancer cells by enhancing the stability of Notch1 protein. The pan-HDAC inhibitors AR-42 and SAHA, and the class I HDAC inhibitor depsipeptide, suppressed mammosphere formation and other CSC markers by reducing Notch1 expression in MDA-MB-231 and SUM-159 cells. Interrogation of individual class I isoforms (HDAC1–3 and 8) using si/shRNA-mediated knockdown, ectopic expression and/or pharmacological inhibition revealed HDAC8 to be the primary mediator of this drug effect. This suppression of Notch1 in response to HDAC8 inhibition was abrogated by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and siRNA-induced silencing of Fbwx7, indicating Notch1 suppression occurred through proteasomal degradation. However, co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that HDAC8 did not form complexes with Notch1 and HDAC inhibition had no effect on Notch1 acetylation. In a xenograft tumor model, the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells was decreased by HDAC8 knockdown. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of HDAC8 inhibition to suppress Notch1 signaling in breast cancer. PMID:26625202

  3. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    PubMed Central

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues. PMID:27150430

  4. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues. PMID:27150430

  5. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues.

  6. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeatedDNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jamy C.

    2007-05-05

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  7. The role of extrinsic ligaments in maintaining carpal stability - A prospective statistical analysis of 85 arthroscopic cases.

    PubMed

    Van Overstraeten, Luc; Camus, Emmanuel J

    2016-02-01

    Several biomechanical studies have shown that the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments are not the only stabilizers of the proximal carpal row. However, no study has yet analyzed the range of ligament lesions leading to instability in vivo. Arthroscopy has been used to assess the condition of the wrist's extrinsic ligaments by palpating and tensioning the various ligament and capsule structures. In this prospective study, this arthroscopic method was used in 85 cases of wrist sprain without static instability to evaluate the correlation between lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments and carpal instability. In SL instability, a scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) lesion was statistically correlated with lesions of the long radiolunate ligament (P<0.05). There also was a statistically significant correlation between lesions of the SLIL and the radioscaphocapitate, scaphotrapezial and dorsal intercarpal ligaments. There was a correlation between the stage of SL instability and the number of lax extrinsic ligaments (P<0.05) but not with the severity of the extrinsic ligament lesions. In LT instability, a LT interosseous ligament lesion was statistically correlated with lesions of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (P<0.05). There also was a correlation between the stage of LT instability and the number (P<0.005) and severity (P<0.001) of the extrinsic ligament lesions. Arthroscopy can reveal hidden radiographic instability and can also be used to define the number and severity of injured ligaments. In carpal instability, a lesion of one intrinsic carpal ligament was associated with a lesion of one or more extrinsic ligaments. PMID:27117018

  8. Death of PRDM9 coincides with stabilization of the recombination landscape in the dog genome

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Erik; Webster, Matthew T.; Ratnakumar, Abhirami; Ponting, Chris P.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of diverse eukaryotes has revealed that recombination events cluster in discrete genomic locations known as hotspots. In humans, a zinc-finger protein, PRDM9, is believed to initiate recombination in >40% of hotspots by binding to a specific DNA sequence motif. However, the PRDM9 coding sequence is disrupted in the dog genome assembly, raising questions regarding the nature and control of recombination in dogs. By analyzing the sequences of PRDM9 orthologs in a number of dog breeds and several carnivores, we show here that this gene was inactivated early in canid evolution. We next use patterns of linkage disequilibrium using more than 170,000 SNP markers typed in almost 500 dogs to estimate the recombination rates in the dog genome using a coalescent-based approach. Broad-scale recombination rates show good correspondence with an existing linkage-based map. Significant variation in recombination rate is observed on the fine scale, and we are able to detect over 4000 recombination hotspots with high confidence. In contrast to human hotspots, 40% of canine hotspots are characterized by a distinct peak in GC content. A comparative genomic analysis indicates that these peaks are present also as weaker peaks in the panda, suggesting that the hotspots have been continually reinforced by accelerated and strongly GC biased nucleotide substitutions, consistent with the long-term action of biased gene conversion on the dog lineage. These results are consistent with the loss of PRDM9 in canids, resulting in a greater evolutionary stability of recombination hotspots. The genetic determinants of recombination hotspots in the dog genome may thus reflect a fundamental process of relevance to diverse animal species. PMID:22006216

  9. BRCA2 Coordinates the Activities of Cell-Cycle Kinases to Promote Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Yata, Keiko; Bleuyard, Jean-Yves; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Ralf, Christine; Katou, Yuki; Schwab, Rebekka A.; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Esashi, Fumiko

    2014-01-01

    Summary Numerous human genome instability syndromes, including cancer, are closely associated with events arising from malfunction of the essential recombinase Rad51. However, little is known about how Rad51 is dynamically regulated in human cells. Here, we show that the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2, a key Rad51 binding partner, coordinates the activity of the central cell-cycle drivers CDKs and Plk1 to promote Rad51-mediated genome stability control. The soluble nuclear fraction of BRCA2 binds Plk1 directly in a cell-cycle- and CDK-dependent manner and acts as a molecular platform to facilitate Plk1-mediated Rad51 phosphorylation. This phosphorylation is important for enhancing the association of Rad51 with stressed replication forks, which in turn protects the genomic integrity of proliferating human cells. This study reveals an elaborate but highly organized molecular interplay between Rad51 regulators and has significant implications for understanding tumorigenesis and therapeutic resistance in patients with BRCA2 deficiency. PMID:24835992

  10. Role of the double-strand break repair pathway in the maintenance of genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Le Guen, Tangui; Ragu, Sandrine; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lopez, Bernard S

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly lethal lesions that jeopardize genome integrity. However, DSBs are also used to generate diversity during the physiological processes of meiosis or establishment of the immune repertoire. Therefore, DSB repair must be tightly controlled. Two main strategies are used to repair DSBs: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HR is generally considered to be error-free, whereas NHEJ is considered to be error-prone. However, recent data challenge these assertions. Here, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in HR and NHEJ and the recently described alternative end-joining mechanism, which is exclusively mutagenic. Whereas NHEJ is not intrinsically error-prone but adaptable, HR has the intrinsic ability to modify the DNA sequence. Importantly, in both cases the initial structure of the DNA impacts the outcome. Finally, the consequences and applications of these repair mechanisms are discussed. Both HR and NHEJ are double-edged swords, essential for maintenance of genome stability and diversity but also able to generate genome instability. PMID:27308383

  11. A FACS-Optimized Screen Identifies Regulators of Genome Stability in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Feri, Adeline; Nguyen, Marie; Maufrais, Corinne; Yansouni, Jennifer; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) plays important roles in genome dynamics, notably, during tumorigenesis. In the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, LOH contributes to the acquisition of antifungal resistance. In order to investigate the mechanisms that regulate LOH in C. albicans, we have established a novel method combining an artificial heterozygous locus harboring the blue fluorescent protein and green fluorescent protein markers and flow cytometry to detect LOH events at the single-cell level. Using this fluorescence-based method, we have confirmed that elevated temperature, treatment with methyl methanesulfonate, and inactivation of the Mec1 DNA damage checkpoint kinase triggered an increase in the frequency of LOH. Taking advantage of this system, we have searched for C. albicans genes whose overexpression triggered an increase in LOH and identified four candidates, some of which are known regulators of genome dynamics with human homologues contributing to cancer progression. Hence, the approach presented here will allow the implementation of new screens to identify genes that are important for genome stability in C. albicans and more generally in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25595446

  12. Constitutive stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha selectively promotes the self-renewal of mesenchymal progenitors and maintains mesenchymal stromal cells in an undifferentiated state.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Hyun-Kyung; Shim, Jae-Seung; Whang, Soo-Young; Hahn, Sang June; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing use of culture-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cell therapies, factors that regulate the cellular characteristics of MSCs have been of major interest. Oxygen concentration has been shown to influence the functions of MSCs, as well as other normal and malignant stem cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of hypoxic responses and the precise role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (Hif-1α), the master regulatory protein of hypoxia, in MSCs remain unclear, due to the limited span of Hif-1α stabilization and the complex network of hypoxic responses. In this study, to further define the significance of Hif-1α in MSC function during their self-renewal and terminal differentiation, we established adult bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs that are able to sustain high level expression of ubiquitin-resistant Hif-1α during such long-term biological processes. Using this model, we show that the stabilization of Hif-1α proteins exerts a selective influence on colony-forming mesenchymal progenitors promoting their self-renewal and proliferation, without affecting the proliferation of the MSC mass population. Moreover, Hif-1α stabilization in MSCs led to the induction of pluripotent genes (oct-4 and klf-4) and the inhibition of their terminal differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. These results provide insights into the previously unrecognized roles of Hif-1α proteins in maintaining the primitive state of primary MSCs and on the cellular heterogeneities in hypoxic responses among MSC populations. PMID:24071737

  13. Conserved interaction of Ctf18-RFC with DNA polymerase ε is critical for maintenance of genome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Hiroko; Tanaka, Seiji; Araki, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2016-05-01

    Human Ctf18-RFC, a PCNA loader complex, interacts with DNA polymerase ε (Polε) through a structure formed by the Ctf18, Dcc1 and Ctf8 subunits. The C-terminal stretch of Ctf18, which is highly conserved from yeast to human, is necessary to form the Polε-capturing structure. We found that in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ctf18, Dcc1 and Ctf8 formed the same structure through the conserved C-terminus and interacted specifically with Polε. Thus, the specific interaction of Ctf18-RFC with Polε is a conserved feature between these proteins. A C-terminal deletion mutant of Ctf18 (ctf18(ΔC) ) exhibited the same high sensitivity to hydroxyurea as the complete deletion strain (ctf18Δ) or ATPase-deficient mutant (ctf18(K189A) ), but was somewhat less sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate than either of them. These phenotypes were also observed in dcc1Δ and ctf8Δ, predicted to be deficient in the interaction with Polε. Furthermore, both plasmid loss and gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR) rates were increased in ctf18(ΔC) cells to the same extent as in ctf18Δ cells. These results indicate that the Ctf18-RFC/Polε interaction plays a crucial role in maintaining genome stability in budding yeast, probably through recruitment of this PCNA loader to the replication fork. PMID:26987677

  14. Phosphorylation of Measles Virus Nucleoprotein Affects Viral Growth by Changing Gene Expression and Genomic RNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroki; Yoneda, Misako

    2013-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) nucleoprotein associates with the viral RNA genome to form the N-RNA complex, providing a template for viral RNA synthesis. In our previous study, major phosphorylation sites of the nucleoprotein were identified as S479 and S510. However, the functions of these phosphorylation sites have not been clarified. In this study, we rescued recombinant MVs (rMVs) whose phosphorylation sites in the nucleoprotein were substituted (rMV-S479A, rMV-S510A, and rMV-S479A/S510A) by reverse genetics and used them in subsequent analyses. In a one-step growth experiment, rMVs showed rapid growth kinetics compared with wild-type MV, although the peak titer of the wild-type MV was the same as or slightly higher than those of the rMVs. Time course analysis of nucleoprotein accumulation also revealed that viral gene expression of rMV was enhanced during the early phase of infection. These findings suggest that nucleoprotein phosphorylation has an important role in controlling viral growth rate through the regulation of viral gene expression. Conversely, multistep growth curves revealed that nucleoprotein-phosphorylation intensity inversely correlated with viral titer at the plateau phase. Additionally, the phosphorylation intensity of the wild-type nucleoprotein in infected cells was significantly reduced through nucleoprotein-phosphoprotein binding. Excessive nucleoprotein-phosphorylation resulted in lower stability against RNase and faster turnover of viral genomic RNA. These results suggest that nucleoprotein-phosphorylation is also involved in viral genomic RNA stability. PMID:23966404

  15. Uncoupling the Roles of the SUV3 Helicase in Maintenance of Mitochondrial Genome Stability and RNA Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuning Emily; Chen, Chi-Fen; Wang, Dennis Ding-Hwa; Modrek, Aram Sandaldjian; Phan, Vy Hoai; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Chen, Phang-Lang

    2011-01-01

    Yeast SUV3 is a nuclear encoded mitochondrial RNA helicase that complexes with an exoribonuclease, DSS1, to function as an RNA degradosome. Inactivation of SUV3 leads to mitochondrial dysfunctions, such as respiratory deficiency; accumulation of aberrant RNA species, including excised group I introns; and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Although intron toxicity has long been speculated to be the major reason for the observed phenotypes, direct evidence to support or refute this theory is lacking. Moreover, it remains unknown whether SUV3 plays a direct role in mtDNA maintenance independently of its degradosome activity. In this paper, we address these questions by employing an inducible knockdown system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with either normal or intronless mtDNA background. Expressing mutants defective in ATPase (K245A) or RNA binding activities (V272L or ΔCC, which carries an 8-amino acid deletion at the C-terminal conserved region) resulted in not only respiratory deficiencies but also loss of mtDNA under normal mtDNA background. Surprisingly, V272L, but not other mutants, can rescue the said deficiencies under intronless background. These results provide genetic evidence supporting the notion that the functional requirements of SUV3 for degradosome activity and maintenance of mtDNA stability are separable. Furthermore, V272L mutants and wild-type SUV3 associated with an active mtDNA replication origin and facilitated mtDNA replication, whereas K245A and ΔCC failed to support mtDNA replication. These results indicate a direct role of SUV3 in maintaining mitochondrial genome stability that is independent of intron turnover but requires the intact ATPase activity and the CC conserved region. PMID:21911497

  16. Nuclear alpha spectrin: Critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link repair and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-09-01

    Non-erythroid alpha spectrin (αIISp) is a structural protein which we have shown is present in the nucleus of human cells. It interacts with a number of nuclear proteins such as actin, lamin, emerin, chromatin remodeling factors, and DNA repair proteins. αIISp's interaction with DNA repair proteins has been extensively studied. We have demonstrated that nuclear αIISp is critical in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair in S phase, in both genomic (non-telomeric) and telomeric DNA, and in maintenance of genomic stability following ICL damage to DNA. We have proposed that αIISp acts as a scaffold aiding to recruit repair proteins to sites of damage. This involvement of αIISp in ICL repair and telomere maintenance after ICL damage represents new and critical functions for αIISp. These studies have led to development of a model for the role of αIISp in DNA ICL repair. They have been aided by examination of cells from patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), a repair-deficient genetic disorder in which a deficiency in αIISp leads to defective ICL repair in genomic and telomeric DNA, telomere dysfunction, and chromosome instability following DNA ICL damage. We have shown that loss of αIISp in FA cells is due to increased breakdown by the protease, µ-calpain. Importantly, we have demonstrated that this deficiency can be corrected by knockdown of µ-calpain and restoring αIISp levels to normal. This corrects a number of the phenotypic deficiencies in FA after ICL damage. These studies suggest a new and unexplored direction for therapeutically restoring genomic stability in FA cells and for correcting numerous phenotypic deficiencies occurring after ICL damage. Developing a more in-depth understanding of the importance of the interaction of αIISp with other nuclear proteins could significantly enhance our knowledge of the consequences of loss of αIISp on critical nuclear processes. PMID:27480253

  17. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1DCAF8 was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27462461

  18. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1(DCAF8) was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27462461

  19. Phosphorylation of EB2 by Aurora B and CDK1 ensures mitotic progression and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Iimori, Makoto; Watanabe, Sugiko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Sakasai, Ryo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Temporal regulation of microtubule dynamics is essential for proper progression of mitosis and control of microtubule plus-end tracking proteins by phosphorylation is an essential component of this regulation. Here we show that Aurora B and CDK1 phosphorylate microtubule end-binding protein 2 (EB2) at multiple sites within the amino terminus and a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the calponin homology and end-binding homology domains. EB2 phosphorylation, which is strictly associated with mitotic entry and progression, reduces the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules. Expression of non-phosphorylatable EB2 induces stable kinetochore microtubule dynamics and delays formation of bipolar metaphase plates in a microtubule binding-dependent manner, and leads to aneuploidy even in unperturbed mitosis. We propose that Aurora B and CDK1 temporally regulate the binding affinity of EB2 for microtubules, thereby ensuring kinetochore microtubule dynamics, proper mitotic progression and genome stability. PMID:27030108

  20. ATMIN is required for maintenance of genomic stability and suppression of B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Loizou, Joanna I; Sancho, Rocio; Kanu, Nnennaya; Bolland, Daniel J; Yang, Fengtang; Rada, Cristina; Corcoran, Anne E; Behrens, Axel

    2011-05-17

    Defective V(D)J rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy or light chain (IgH or IgL) or class switch recombination (CSR) can initiate chromosomal translocations. The DNA-damage kinase ATM is required for the suppression of chromosomal translocations but ATM regulation is incompletely understood. Here, we show that mice lacking the ATM cofactor ATMIN in B cells (ATMIN(ΔB/ΔB)) have impaired ATM signaling and develop B cell lymphomas. Notably, ATMIN(ΔB/ΔB) cells exhibited defective peripheral V(D)J rearrangement and CSR, resulting in translocations involving the Igh and Igl loci, indicating that ATMIN is required for efficient repair of DNA breaks generated during somatic recombination. Thus, our results identify a role for ATMIN in regulating the maintenance of genomic stability and tumor suppression in B cells. PMID:21575860

  1. YAP controls retinal stem cell DNA replication timing and genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Cabochette, Pauline; Vega-Lopez, Guillermo; Bitard, Juliette; Parain, Karine; Chemouny, Romain; Masson, Christel; Borday, Caroline; Hedderich, Marie; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Locker, Morgane; Bronchain, Odile; Perron, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    The adult frog retina retains a reservoir of active neural stem cells that contribute to continuous eye growth throughout life. We found that Yap, a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, is specifically expressed in these stem cells. Yap knock-down leads to an accelerated S-phase and an abnormal progression of DNA replication, a phenotype likely mediated by upregulation of c-Myc. This is associated with an increased occurrence of DNA damage and eventually p53-p21 pathway-mediated cell death. Finally, we identified PKNOX1, a transcription factor involved in the maintenance of genomic stability, as a functional and physical interactant of YAP. Altogether, we propose that YAP is required in adult retinal stem cells to regulate the temporal firing of replication origins and quality control of replicated DNA. Our data reinforce the view that specific mechanisms dedicated to S-phase control are at work in stem cells to protect them from genomic instability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08488.001 PMID:26393999

  2. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Teresa L.F.; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Blow, J. Julian; Sale, Julian E.; Watson, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability. PMID:27149840

  3. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains. PMID:26691589

  4. Word Reading Fluency: Role of Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Developmental Stability and Correlations with Print Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlaar, Nicole; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The genetic effects on individual differences in reading development were examined using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) in a twin sample. In unrelated individuals (one twin per pair, n = 2,942), the GCTA-based heritability of reading fluency was ~20%-29% at ages 7 and 12. GCTA bivariate results showed that the phenotypic stability of…

  5. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains. PMID:26691589

  6. Global insights into acetic acid resistance mechanisms and genetic stability of Acetobacter pasteurianus strains by comparative genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Tao; Chen, Wanping; Chen, Fusheng

    2015-12-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus (Ap) CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 are two acetic acid bacteria strains that, because of their strong abilities to produce and tolerate high concentrations of acetic acid, have been widely used to brew vinegar in China. To globally understand the fermentation characteristics, acid-tolerant mechanisms and genetic stabilities, their genomes were sequenced. Genomic comparisons with 9 other sequenced Ap strains revealed that their chromosomes were evolutionarily conserved, whereas the plasmids were unique compared with other Ap strains. Analysis of the acid-tolerant metabolic pathway at the genomic level indicated that the metabolism of some amino acids and the known mechanisms of acetic acid tolerance, might collaboratively contribute to acetic acid resistance in Ap strains. The balance of instability factors and stability factors in the genomes of Ap CICC 20001 and CGMCC 1.41 strains might be the basis for their genetic stability, consistent with their stable industrial performances. These observations provide important insights into the acid resistance mechanism and the genetic stability of Ap strains and lay a foundation for future genetic manipulation and engineering of these two strains.

  7. Super DNAging-New insights into DNA integrity, genome stability and telomeres in the oldest old.

    PubMed

    Franzke, Bernhard; Neubauer, Oliver; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in DNA integrity, genome stability, and telomere length are strongly associated with the aging process, age-related diseases as well as the age-related loss of muscle mass. However, in people reaching an age far beyond their statistical life expectancy the prevalence of diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes or dementia, is much lower compared to "averagely" aged humans. These inverse observations in nonagenarians (90-99 years), centenarians (100-109 years) and super-centenarians (110 years and older) require a closer look into dynamics underlying DNA damage within the oldest old of our society. Available data indicate improved DNA repair and antioxidant defense mechanisms in "super old" humans, which are comparable with much younger cohorts. Partly as a result of these enhanced endogenous repair and protective mechanisms, the oldest old humans appear to cope better with risk factors for DNA damage over their lifetime compared to subjects whose lifespan coincides with the statistical life expectancy. This model is supported by study results demonstrating superior chromosomal stability, telomere dynamics and DNA integrity in "successful agers". There is also compelling evidence suggesting that life-style related factors including regular physical activity, a well-balanced diet and minimized psycho-social stress can reduce DNA damage and improve chromosomal stability. The most conclusive picture that emerges from reviewing the literature is that reaching "super old" age appears to be primarily determined by hereditary/genetic factors, while a healthy lifestyle additionally contributes to achieving the individual maximum lifespan in humans. More research is required in this rapidly growing population of super old people. In particular, there is need for more comprehensive investigations including short- and long-term lifestyle interventions as well as investigations focusing on the mechanisms causing DNA damage, mutations, and telomere

  8. Maintaining Breast Cancer Specimen Integrity and Individual or Simultaneous Extraction of Quality DNA, RNA, and Proteins from Allprotect-Stabilized and Nonstabilized Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Paul; Donatello, Simona; Connolly, Elizabeth; Griffin, Mairead; Dunne, Barbara; Burke, Louise; Flavin, Richard; Rizkalla, Hala; Ryan, Ciara; Hayes, Brian; D'Adhemar, Charles; Banville, Niamh; Faheem, Nazia; Muldoon, Cian; Gaffney, Eoin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Saint James's Hospital Biobank was established in 2008, to develop a high-quality breast tissue BioResource, as a part of the breast cancer clinical care pathway. The aims of this work were: (1) to ascertain the quality of RNA, DNA, and protein in biobanked carcinomas and normal breast tissues, (2) to assess the efficacy of AllPrep® (Qiagen) in isolating RNA, DNA, and protein simultaneously, (3) to compare AllPrep with RNEasy® and QIAamp® (both Qiagen), and (4) to examine the effectiveness of Allprotect® (Qiagen), a new tissue stabilization medium in preserving DNA, RNA, and proteins. One hundred eleven frozen samples of carcinoma and normal breast tissue were analyzed. Tumor and normal tissue morphology were confirmed by frozen sections. Tissue type, tissue treatment (Allprotect vs. no Allprotect), extraction kit, and nucleic acid quantification were analyzed by utilizing a 4 factorial design (SPSS PASW 18 Statistics Software®). QIAamp (DNA isolation), AllPrep (DNA, RNA, and Protein isolation), and RNeasy (RNA isolation) kits were assessed and compared. Mean DNA yield and A260/280 values using QIAamp were 33.2 ng/μL and 1.86, respectively, and using AllPrep were 23.2 ng/μL and 1.94. Mean RNA yield and RNA Integrity Number (RIN) values with RNeasy were 73.4 ng/μL and 8.16, respectively, and with AllPrep were 74.8 ng/μL and 7.92. Allprotect-treated tissues produced higher RIN values of borderline significance (P=0.055). No discernible loss of RNA stability was detected after 6 h incubation of stabilized or nonstabilized tissues at room temperature or 4°C or in 9 freeze-thaw cycles. Allprotect requires further detailed evaluation, but we consider AllPrep to be an excellent option for the simultaneous extraction of RNA, DNA, and protein from tumor and normal breast tissues. The essential presampling procedures that maintain the diagnostic integrity of pathology specimens do not appear to compromise the quality of molecular isolates. PMID

  9. FLJ25439, a novel cytokinesis-associated protein, induces tetraploidization and maintains chromosomal stability via enhancing expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress chaperones.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tai-Long; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wang, Pei-Wen; Cheng, Ya-Ting; Chang, Yu-Chen; Saha, Sudipta; Hu, Jiwei; Ouyang, Pin

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms leading to aneuploidy and polyploidy is critical to cancer research. Previous studies have provided strong evidence of the importance of tetraploidization as an early step in tumorigenesis. In cancer cells, tetraploid cells may contribute to abnormal mitotic progression, which may be associated with cytokinesis failure. Tetraploidy leads to genomic instability due to centrosome and chromosome over-replication. Until now, the mechanism by which cells maintain tetraploid status has been unknown. Here, we identified a novel D box-containing protein, FLJ25439, which displays a dynamic expression profile during mitosis/cytokinesis with the midbody as the most prominent associated structure. To understand the function of FLJ25439, we established stable cell lines overexpressing FLJ25439. FLJ25439-overexpression cells grew slower and displayed a tetraploid DNA content in comparison with diploid parental cells. They also showed aberrant mitosis and dysregulated expression of p53, pRb and p21, suggesting a defect in cell cycle progression. To explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for FLJ25439-induced tetraploidization, we conducted a comparative analysis of the global protein expression patterns of wild type and overexpressors using proteomics and bioinformatics approaches. Protein category profiling indicated that FLJ25439 is involved in pathways related to anti-apoptosis, protein folding, the cell cycle, and cytoskeleton regulation. Specifically, genotoxic-stress- and ER stress-related chaperone proteins greatly contributed to the FLJ25439 overexpression phenotypes. The results of this study pave the way to our further understanding of the role of this novel cytokinesis-related protein in protecting cells from environmental stress and tetraploid formation. PMID:25751302

  10. Polyphosphate is involved in cell cycle progression and genomic stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bru, Samuel; Martínez-Laínez, Joan Marc; Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Quandt, Eva; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Canadell, David; Ariño, Joaquin; Sharma, Sushma; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear chain of up to hundreds of inorganic phosphate residues that is necessary for many physiological functions in all living organisms. In some bacteria, polyP supplies material to molecules such as DNA, thus playing an important role in biosynthetic processes in prokaryotes. In the present study, we set out to gain further insight into the role of polyP in eukaryotic cells. We observed that polyP amounts are cyclically regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and those mutants that cannot synthesise (vtc4Δ) or hydrolyse polyP (ppn1Δ, ppx1Δ) present impaired cell cycle progression. Further analysis revealed that polyP mutants show delayed nucleotide production and increased genomic instability. Based on these findings, we concluded that polyP not only maintains intracellular phosphate concentrations in response to fluctuations in extracellular phosphate levels, but also muffles internal cyclic phosphate fluctuations, such as those produced by the sudden demand of phosphate to synthetize deoxynucleotides just before and during DNA duplication. We propose that the presence of polyP in eukaryotic cells is required for the timely and accurate duplication of DNA. PMID:27072996

  11. Recent Insights into the Control of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genome Stability, Loss, and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Most human papillomavirus (HPV) antiviral strategies have focused upon inhibiting viral DNA replication, but it is increasingly apparent that viral DNA levels can be chemically controlled by approaches that promote its instability. HPVs and other DNA viruses have a tenuous relationship with their hosts. They must replicate and hide from the DNA damage response (DDR) and innate immune systems, which serve to protect cells from foreign or “non-self” DNA, and yet they draft these same systems to support their life cycles. DNA binding antiviral agents promoting massive viral DNA instability and elimination are reviewed. Mechanistic studies of these agents have identified genetic antiviral enhancers and repressors, antiviral sensitizers, and host cell elements that protect and stabilize HPV genomes. Viral DNA degradation appears to be an important means of controlling HPV DNA levels in some cases, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. These findings may prove useful not only for understanding viral DNA persistence but only in devising future antiviral strategies. PMID:25798290

  12. Interplay between arginine methylation and ubiquitylation regulates KLF4-mediated genome stability and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dong; Gur, Mert; Zhou, Zhuan; Gamper, Armin; Hung, Mien-Chie; Fujita, Naoya; Lan, Li; Bahar, Ivet; Wan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    KLF4 is an important regulator of cell-fate decision, including DNA damage response and apoptosis. We identify a novel interplay between protein modifications in regulating KLF4 function. Here we show that arginine methylation of KLF4 by PRMT5 inhibits KLF4 ubiquitylation by VHL and thereby reduces KLF4 turnover, resulting in the elevation of KLF4 protein levels concomitant with increased transcription of KLF4-dependent p21 and reduced expression of KLF4-repressed Bax. Structure-based modelling and simulations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of KLF4 recognition and catalysis by PRMT5. Following genotoxic stress, disruption of PRMT5-mediated KLF4 methylation leads to abrogation of KLF4 accumulation, which, in turn, attenuates cell cycle arrest. Mutating KLF4 methylation sites suppresses breast tumour initiation and progression, and immunohistochemical stain shows increased levels of both KLF4 and PRMT5 in breast cancer tissues. Taken together, our results point to a critical role for aberrant KLF4 regulation by PRMT5 in genome stability and breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26420673

  13. Interplay between arginine methylation and ubiquitylation regulates KLF4-mediated genome stability and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong; Gur, Mert; Zhou, Zhuan; Gamper, Armin; Hung, Mien-Chie; Fujita, Naoya; Lan, Li; Bahar, Ivet; Wan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    KLF4 is an important regulator of cell-fate decision, including DNA damage response and apoptosis. We identify a novel interplay between protein modifications in regulating KLF4 function. Here we show that arginine methylation of KLF4 by PRMT5 inhibits KLF4 ubiquitylation by VHL and thereby reduces KLF4 turnover, resulting in the elevation of KLF4 protein levels concomitant with increased transcription of KLF4-dependent p21 and reduced expression of KLF4-repressed Bax. Structure-based modelling and simulations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of KLF4 recognition and catalysis by PRMT5. Following genotoxic stress, disruption of PRMT5-mediated KLF4 methylation leads to abrogation of KLF4 accumulation, which, in turn, attenuates cell cycle arrest. Mutating KLF4 methylation sites suppresses breast tumour initiation and progression, and immunohistochemical stain shows increased levels of both KLF4 and PRMT5 in breast cancer tissues. Taken together, our results point to a critical role for aberrant KLF4 regulation by PRMT5 in genome stability and breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26420673

  14. Survey of Wastewater Indicators and Human Pathogen Genomes in Biosolids Produced by Class A and Class B Stabilization Treatments ▿

    PubMed Central

    Viau, Emily; Peccia, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the infectious aerosol risk associated with the land application of biosolids requires an in-depth knowledge of the magnitudes and changes in pathogen concentrations for a variety of class A and class B stabilization methods. The following survey used quantitative PCR (qPCR) and culture assays to detect environmentally resistant bacterial and viral pathogens and biosolid indicator organisms for 36 biosolid grab samples. Biosolids were collected from 14 U.S. states and included 16 class B mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD) samples and 20 class A biosolid samples from temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD), MAD plus composting (COM), and MAD plus heat pelletization processes. The indicator concentrations of fecal coliforms and male-specific coliphages as well as pathogen genome concentrations for human adenovirus species, Legionella pneumophila, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile were significantly lower in the class A samples, and a multivariate analysis of variance ranked the stabilization processes from the lowest pathogen/indicator load to the highest as (i) class A COM, (ii) class A TPAD, and (iii) class B MAD. Human adenovirus genomes were found in 88% of the class B samples and 70 to 100% of the class A samples. L. pneumophila, S. aureus, and C. difficile genomes were detected at the qPCR assay detection limits in 19 to 50% of the class B and class A anaerobic digestion samples, while L. pneumophila was detected in 50% of the class A compost samples. When considering all the stabilization methods, both the fecal coliform and the male-specific coliphage concentrations show a significant linear correlation with the pathogen genome concentrations. This survey provides the necessary pathogen concentrations to add to biosolid aerosol risk and pathogen exposure analyses and clarifies the effectiveness of class A stabilization methods with the pathogen and indicator loads in biosolids. PMID:18997022

  15. Short-range inversions: rethinking organelle genome stability: template switching events during DNA replication destabilize organelle genomes.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Belzile, Samuel; Lepage, Étienne; Zampini, Éric; Brisson, Normand

    2015-10-01

    In the organelles of plants and mammals, recent evidence suggests that genomic instability stems in large part from template switching events taking place during DNA replication. Although more than one mechanism may be responsible for this, some similarities exist between the different proposed models. These can be separated into two main categories, depending on whether they involve a single-strand-switching or a reciprocal-strand-switching event. Single-strand-switching events lead to intermediates containing Y junctions, whereas reciprocal-strand-switching creates Holliday junctions. Common features in all the described models include replication stress, fork stalling and the presence of inverted repeats, but no single element appears to be required in all cases. We review the field, and examine the ideas that several mechanisms may take place in any given genome, and that the presence of palindromes or inverted repeats in certain regions may favor specific rearrangements. PMID:26222836

  16. Effect of storage and processing on plasmid, yeast and plant genomic DNA stability in juice from genetically modified oranges.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Julia; Ros-Chumillas, Maria; Peña, Leandro; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2007-01-30

    Recombinant DNA technology is an important tool in the development of plant varieties with new favourable features. There is strong opposition towards this technology due to the potential risk of horizontal gene transfer between genetically modified plant material and food-associated bacteria, especially if genes for antibiotic resistance are involved. Since horizontal transfer efficiency depends on size and length of homologous sequences, we investigated the effect of conditions required for orange juice processing on the stability of DNA from three different origins: plasmid DNA, yeast genomic DNA and endogenous genomic DNA from transgenic sweet orange (C. sinensis L. Osb.). Acidic orange juice matrix had a strong degrading effect on plasmid DNA which becomes apparent in a conformation change from supercoiled structure to nicked, linear structure within 5h of storage at 4 degrees C. Genomic yeast DNA was degraded during exposure to acidic orange juice matrix within 4 days, and also the genomic DNA of C. sinensis suffered degradation within 2 days of storage as indicated by amplification results from transgene markers. Standard pasteurization procedures affected DNA integrity depending on the method and time used. Our data show that the current standard industrial procedures to pasteurize orange juice as well as its acidic nature causes a strong degradation of both yeast and endogenous genomic DNA below sizes reported to be suitable for horizontal gene transfer. PMID:17064805

  17. Genome-health nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics: nutritional requirements or 'nutriomes' for chromosomal stability and telomere maintenance at the individual level.

    PubMed

    Bull, Caroline; Fenech, Michael

    2008-05-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that (a) risk for developmental and degenerative disease increases with more DNA damage, which in turn is dependent on nutritional status, and (b) the optimal concentration of micronutrients for prevention of genome damage is also dependent on genetic polymorphisms that alter the function of genes involved directly or indirectly in the uptake and metabolism of micronutrients required for DNA repair and DNA replication. The development of dietary patterns, functional foods and supplements that are designed to improve genome-health maintenance in individuals with specific genetic backgrounds may provide an important contribution to an optimum health strategy based on the diagnosis and individualised nutritional prevention of genome damage, i.e. genome health clinics. The present review summarises some of the recent knowledge relating to micronutrients that are associated with chromosomal stability and provides some initial insights into the likely nutritional factors that may be expected to have an impact on the maintenance of telomeres. It is evident that developing effective strategies for defining nutrient doses and combinations or 'nutriomes' for genome-health maintenance at the individual level is essential for further progress in this research field. PMID:18412988

  18. Towards a typing strategy for Arcobacter species isolated from humans and animals and assessment of the in vitro genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Baré, Julie; Houf, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    Arcobacter species have a widespread distribution with a broad range of animal hosts and environmental reservoirs, and are increasingly associated with human illness. To elucidate the routes of infection, several characterization methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), amplified fragment-length polymorphism, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR have already been applied, but without proper validation or comparison. At present, no criterion standard typing method or strategy has been proposed. Therefore, after the validation of PFGE, those commonly applied typing methods were compared for the characterization of six human- and animal-associated Arcobacter species. With a limited number of isolates to be characterized, PFGE with restriction by KpnI is proposed as the first method of choice. However, ERIC-PCR represents a more convenient genomic fingerprinting technique when a large number of isolates is involved. Therefore, a first clustering of similar patterns obtained after ERIC-PCR, with a subsequent typing of some representatives per ERIC cluster by PFGE, is recommended. As multiple genotypes are commonly isolated from the same host and food, genomic plasticity has been suggested. The in vitro genomic stability of Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus was assessed under two temperatures and two oxygen concentrations. Variability in the genomic profile of A. cryaerophilus was observed after different passages for different strains at 37°C under microaerobic conditions. The bias due to these genomic changes must be taken into account in the evaluation of the relationship of strains. PMID:24400986

  19. The effect of zinc sulphate and zinc carnosine on genome stability and cytotoxicity in the WIL2-NS human lymphoblastoid cell line.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Razinah; Thomas, Philip; Zalewski, Peter; Graham, Robin D; Fenech, Michael

    2011-02-28

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential cofactor required by numerous enzymes that are essential for cell metabolism and the maintenance of DNA integrity. We investigated the effect of Zn deficiency or excess on genomic instability events and determined the optimal concentration of two Zn compounds that minimize DNA-damage events. The effects of Zn sulphate (ZnSO(4)) and Zn carnosine (ZnC) on cell proliferation were investigated in the WIL2-NS human lymphoblastoid cell line. DNA damage was determined by the use of both the comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-Cyt) assay. Zn-deficient medium (0μM) was produced using Chelex treatment, and the two Zn compounds (i.e. ZnSO(4) and ZnC) were tested at concentrations of 0.0, 0.4, 4.0, 16.0, 32.0 and 100.0μM. Results from an MTT assay showed that cell growth and viability were decreased in Zn-depleted cells (0μM) as well as at 32μM and 100μM for both Zn compounds (P<0.0001). DNA strand-breaks, as measured by the comet assay, were found to be increased in Zn-depleted cells compared with the other treatment groups (P<0.05). The CBMN-Cyt assay showed a significant increase in the frequency of both apoptotic and necrotic cells under Zn-deficient conditions (P<0.0001). Elevated frequencies of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBuds) were induced in Zn-depleted cells (P<0.0001), whereas genome damage was reduced in supplemented cultures for both Zn compounds at 4μM and 16μM, possibly suggesting that these concentrations may be optimal for genome stability. The potential protective effect of ZnSO(4) and ZnC was also investigated following exposure to 1.0Gy γ-radiation. Culture in medium containing these compounds at 4-32μM prior to irradiation displayed significantly reduced frequencies of MNi, NPBs and NBuds compared with cells maintained in 0μM medium (P<0.0001). Expression of γ-H2AX and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase measured by western blotting was increased in Zn

  20. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  1. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  2. Simulated movement termination for balance recovery: can movement strategies be sought to maintain stability in the presence of slipping or forced sliding?

    PubMed

    Pai, Y C; Iqbal, K

    1999-08-01

    Slipping during various kinds of movement often leads to potentially dangerous incidents of falling. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was evidence to support the theory that movement strategies could be used by individuals to regain stability during an episode of slipping and whether forced sliding from a moving platform accurately simulated the effect of slipping on stability and balance. A single-link-plus-foot biomechanical model was used to mathematically simulate base of support (BOS) translation and body segment rotation during movement termination in sagittal plane. An optimization routine was used to determine region of stability [defined at given COM locations as the feasible range of horizontal velocities of the center of mass (COM) of human subject that can be reduced to zero with respect to the BOS while still allowing the COM to traverse within the BOS limits]. We found some 30% overlap in the region of stability for slipping and non-slipping conditions. This finding supports the theory that movement strategies can be sought for restoring stability and balance even if slipping unexpectedly occurs. We also found that forced sliding produces effects on stability that are similar to those of slipping, indicated by over 50% overlap in the regions of stability for the two conditions. In addition, forced sliding has distinctive effects on stability, including a "shift" of the region of stability extended beyond the BOS in the direction of sliding. These findings may provide quantifiable guidance for balance training aimed at reducing fall incidents under uncertain floor surface conditions. PMID:10433419

  3. Short loop length and high thermal stability determine genomic instability induced by G-quadruplex-forming minisatellites

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Aurèle; Adrian, Michael; Samazan, Frédéric; Heddi, Brahim; Hamon, Florian; Serero, Alexandre; Lopes, Judith; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Phan, Anh Tuân; Nicolas, Alain

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are polymorphic four-stranded structures formed by certain G-rich nucleic acids, with various biological roles. However, structural features dictating their formation and/or functionin vivo are unknown. InS. cerevisiae, the pathological persistency of G4 within the CEB1 minisatellite induces its rearrangement during leading-strand replication. We now show that several other G4-forming sequences remain stable. Extensive mutagenesis of the CEB25 minisatellite motif reveals that only variants with very short (≤ 4 nt) G4 loops preferentially containing pyrimidine bases trigger genomic instability. Parallel biophysical analyses demonstrate that shortening loop length does not change the monomorphic G4 structure of CEB25 variants but drastically increases its thermal stability, in correlation with thein vivo instability. Finally, bioinformatics analyses reveal that the threat for genomic stability posed by G4 bearing short pyrimidine loops is conserved inC. elegans and humans. This work provides a framework explanation for the heterogeneous instability behavior of G4-forming sequencesin vivo, highlights the importance of structure thermal stability, and questions the prevailing assumption that G4 structures with short or longer loops are as likely to formin vivo. PMID:25956747

  4. RINT1 functions as a multitasking protein at the crossroads between genomic stability, ER homeostasis, and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Grigaravicius, Paulius; von Deimling, Andreas; Frappart, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-08-01

    RINT1 was first identified as an RAD50-interacting protein and its function was therefore linked to the maintenance of genomic stability. It was also shown that RINT1 was a key player in ER-Golgi trafficking as a member of an ER tethering complex interacting with STX18. However, due to early embryonic lethality of rint1-null mice, the in vivo functions of RINT1 remained for the most part elusive. We recently described the consequences of Rint1 inactivation in various neuronal cells of the central nervous system. We observed that lack of RINT1 in vivo triggers genomic instability and ER stress leading to depletion of the neural progenitor pool and neurodegeneration. Surprisingly, we also observed inhibition of autophagy in RINT1-deficient neurons, indicating an involvement of RINT1 in the regulation of neuronal autophagy. Here, we summarize our main RINT1 findings and discuss its putative roles in autophagy. PMID:27367497

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SYSTEMS WHICH ALTER GENOME STABILITY IN PSEUDOMONAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used a model organism to study mechanisms that lead to genome alteration in freshwater microbial populations. ur studies demonstrated horizontal transmission by both transduction and conjugation in freshwater ecosystems and provided data that suggest th...

  6. Genome-wide profiles of CtBP link metabolism with genome stability and epithelial reprogramming in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di, Li-Jun; Byun, Jung S.; Wong, Madeline M.; Wakano, Clay; Taylor, Tara; Bilke, Sven; Baek, Songjoon; Hunter, Kent; Yang, Howard; Lee, Maxwell; Zvosec, Celia; Khramtsova, Galina; Cheng, Fan; Perou, Charles M.; Miller, C. Ryan; Raab, Rachel; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Gardner, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a NADH-dependent transcriptional repressor that links carbohydrate metabolism to epigenetic regulation by recruiting diverse histone modifying complexes to chromatin. Here, global profiling of CtBP in breast cancer cells reveals that it drives epithelial to mesenchymal transition, stem cell pathways, and genome instability. CtBP expression induces mesenchymal and stem cell-like features while CtBP depletion or caloric restriction reverses gene repression and increases DNA repair. Multiple members of the CtBP-targeted gene network are selectively down-regulated in aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Differential expression of CtBP-targeted genes predicts poor clinical outcome in breast cancer patients, and elevated levels of CtBP in patient tumors predict shorter median survival. Finally, both CtBP promoter targeting and gene repression can be reversed by small molecule inhibition. These findings define broad roles for CtBP in breast cancer biology and suggest novel chromatin-based strategies for pharmacologic and metabolic intervention in cancer. PMID:23385593

  7. DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation of EZH2 regulates the DNA damage-induced apoptosis to maintain T-cell genomic integrity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Sun, H; Wang, J; Wang, H; Meng, L; Xu, C; Jin, M; Wang, B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhu, T

    2016-01-01

    EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase whose functions in stem cells and tumor cells are well established. Accumulating evidence shows that EZH2 has critical roles in T cells and could be a promising therapeutic target for several immune diseases. To further reveal the novel functions of EZH2 in human T cells, protein co-immunoprecipitation combined mass spectrometry was conducted and several previous unknown EZH2-interacting proteins were identified. Of them, we focused on a DNA damage responsive protein, Ku80, because of the limited knowledge regarding EZH2 in the DNA damage response. Then, we demonstrated that instead of being methylated by EZH2, Ku80 bridges the interaction between the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex and EZH2, thus facilitating EZH2 phosphorylation. Moreover, EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity was enhanced when Ku80 was knocked down or DNA-PK activity was inhibited, suggesting DNA-PK-mediated EZH2 phosphorylation impairs EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. On the other hand, EZH2 inhibition increased the DNA damage level at the late phase of T-cell activation, suggesting EZH2 involved in genomic integrity maintenance. In conclusion, our study is the first to demonstrate that EZH2 is phosphorylated by the DNA damage responsive complex DNA-PK and regulates DNA damage-mediated T-cell apoptosis, which reveals a novel functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulation and genomic integrity. PMID:27468692

  8. DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation of EZH2 regulates the DNA damage-induced apoptosis to maintain T-cell genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Sun, H; Wang, J; Wang, H; Meng, L; Xu, C; Jin, M; Wang, B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhu, T

    2016-01-01

    EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase whose functions in stem cells and tumor cells are well established. Accumulating evidence shows that EZH2 has critical roles in T cells and could be a promising therapeutic target for several immune diseases. To further reveal the novel functions of EZH2 in human T cells, protein co-immunoprecipitation combined mass spectrometry was conducted and several previous unknown EZH2-interacting proteins were identified. Of them, we focused on a DNA damage responsive protein, Ku80, because of the limited knowledge regarding EZH2 in the DNA damage response. Then, we demonstrated that instead of being methylated by EZH2, Ku80 bridges the interaction between the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex and EZH2, thus facilitating EZH2 phosphorylation. Moreover, EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity was enhanced when Ku80 was knocked down or DNA-PK activity was inhibited, suggesting DNA-PK-mediated EZH2 phosphorylation impairs EZH2 histone methyltransferase activity. On the other hand, EZH2 inhibition increased the DNA damage level at the late phase of T-cell activation, suggesting EZH2 involved in genomic integrity maintenance. In conclusion, our study is the first to demonstrate that EZH2 is phosphorylated by the DNA damage responsive complex DNA-PK and regulates DNA damage-mediated T-cell apoptosis, which reveals a novel functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulation and genomic integrity. PMID:27468692

  9. Word reading fluency: role of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms in developmental stability and correlations with print exposure.

    PubMed

    Harlaar, Nicole; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The genetic effects on individual differences in reading development were examined using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) in a twin sample. In unrelated individuals (one twin per pair, n = 2,942), the GCTA-based heritability of reading fluency was ~20%-29% at ages 7 and 12. GCTA bivariate results showed that the phenotypic stability of reading fluency from 7 to 12 years (r = 0.69) is largely driven by genetic stability (genetic r = 0.69). Genetic effects on print exposure at age 12 were moderate (~26%) and correlated with those influencing reading fluency at 12 (genetic r = 0.89), indicative of a gene-environment correlation. These findings were largely consistent with quantitative genetic twin analyses that used both twins in each pair (n = 1,066-1,409). PMID:24392801

  10. A cellular genome-wide association study reveals human variation in microtubule stability and a role in inflammatory cell death

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Raul E.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Thomas, Monica I.; Shukla, Kajal P.; Miller, Samuel I.; Ko, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Pyroptosis is proinflammatory cell death that occurs in response to certain microbes. Activation of the protease caspase-1 by molecular platforms called inflammasomes is required for pyroptosis. We performed a cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Salmonella typhimurium infection of human lymphoblastoid cell lines as a means of dissecting the genetic architecture of susceptibility to pyroptosis and identifying unknown regulatory mechanisms. Cellular GWAS revealed that a common human genetic difference that regulates pyroptosis also alters microtubule stability. An intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphism on chromosome 18 is associated with decreased pyroptosis and increased expression of TUBB6 (tubulin, β 6 class V). TUBB6 is unique among tubulin isoforms in that its overexpression can completely disrupt the microtubule network. Cells from individuals with higher levels of TUBB6 expression have lower microtubule stability and less pyroptosis. Reducing TUBB6 expression or stabilizing microtubules pharmacologically with paclitaxel (Taxol) increases pyroptosis without affecting the other major readout of caspase-1 activation, interleukin-1β secretion. The results reveal a new role for microtubules and possibly specific tubulin isoforms in the execution of pyroptosis. Furthermore, the finding that there is common diversity in TUBB6 expression and microtubule stability could have broad consequences for other microtubule-dependent phenotypes, diseases, and pharmacological responses. PMID:24173717

  11. A Genome-wide Functional Screen Shows MAGI-1 Is an L1CAM-Dependent Stabilizer of Apical Junctions in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Allison M.; Grana, Theresa; Cox, Elizabeth; Couthier, Annabelle; Cameron, Michel; Chin-Sang, Ian; Pettitt, Jonathan; Hardin, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In multicellular organisms, cell-cell junctions are involved in many aspects of tissue morphogenesis. α-catenin links the cadherin-catenin complex (CCC) to the actin cytoskeleton, stabilizing cadherin-dependent adhesions. Results To identify modulators of cadherin-based cell adhesion, we conducted a genome-wide RNAi screen in C. elegans and uncovered MAGI-1, a highly conserved protein scaffold. Loss of magi-1 function in wild-type embryos results in disorganized epithelial migration and occasional morphogenetic failure. MAGI-1 physically interacts with the putative actin regulator AFD-1/afadin; knocking down magi-1 or afd-1 function in a hypomorphic α-catenin background leads to complete morphogenetic failure and actin disorganization in the embryonic epidermis. MAGI-1 and AFD-1 localize to a unique domain in the apical junction and normal accumulation of MAGI-1 at junctions requires SAX-7/L1CAM, which can bind MAGI-1 via its C-terminus. Depletion of MAGI-1 leads to loss of spatial segregation and expansion of apical junctional domains and greater mobility of junctional proteins. Conclusions Our screen is the first genome-wide approach to identify proteins that function synergistically with the CCC during epidermal morphogenesis in a living embryo. We demonstrate novel physical interactions between MAGI-1, AFD-1/afadin and SAX-7/L1CAM, which are part of a functional interactome that includes components of the core CCC. Our results further suggest MAGI-1 helps to partition and maintain a stable, spatially ordered apical junction during morphogenesis. PMID:22981773

  12. Toscana Virus Genome Stability: Data from a Meningoencephalitis Case in Mantua, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Baggieri, Melissa; Gattuso, Gianni; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Vaccari, Gabriele; Zaccaria, Guendalina; Marchi, Antonella; Bucci, Paola; Benedetti, Eleonora; Fiorentini, Cristiano; Nicoletti, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In July of 2013, samples from a patient with a neurological syndrome were collected from Mantua hospital and sent to the National Reference Laboratory for Arboviruses (National Institute of Health, Rome). On the basis of the symptoms, serological and molecular assays were performed to diagnose either West Nile virus (WNV) or Toscana virus (TOSV) infection. Molecular and serological tests confirmed TOSV infection. Virus isolation was obtained from cerebrospinal fluid. A full genome sequence was determined from this TOSV strain with next-generation sequencing using Ion Torrent technology. Nucleotide and amino acidic sequences grouped phylogenetically with lineage TOSV A and showed a low genome variability. PMID:25514123

  13. Genome sequencing of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells reveals retroelement stability and infrequent DNA rearrangement during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Aaron R.; Boland, Michael J.; Leibowitz, Mitchell L.; Shumilina, Svetlana; Pehrson, Sidney M.; Baldwin, Kristin K.; Hall, Ira M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The biomedical utility of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) will be diminished if most iPSC lines harbor deleterious genetic mutations. Recent microarray studies have shown that human iPSCs carry elevated levels of DNA copy number variation compared to embryonic stem cells, suggesting that these and other classes of genomic structural variation (SV) including inversions, smaller duplications and deletions, complex rearrangements and retroelement transpositions may frequently arise as a consequence of reprogramming. Here we employ whole genome paired-end DNA sequencing and sensitive mapping algorithms to identify all classes of SV in several fully pluripotent mouse iPSC lines. Despite the improved scope and resolution of this study, we find few spontaneous mutations per line (1–2) and no evidence for endogenous retroelement transposition. These results show that genome stability can persist throughout reprogramming, and argue that it is possible to generate iPSCs lacking gene disrupting mutations using current reprogramming methods. PMID:21982236

  14. More than 10% of yeast genes are related to genome stability and influence cellular senescence via rDNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Saka, Kimiko; Takahashi, Akihiro; Sasaki, Mariko; Kobayashi, Takehiko

    2016-05-19

    Genome instability triggers cellular senescence and is a common cause of cancer. The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA), due to their repetitive structure, form a fragile site with frequent rearrangements. To identify eukaryotic factors that connect reduced genome stability to senescence we screened 4,876 strains of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for aberrant rDNA and found 708 genes that contribute to its upkeep. 28 mutants caused abnormalities in non-rDNA chromosomes and among them 12 mutants have abnormalities both in rDNA and in non-rDNA chromosomes. Many mutated genes have not previously been implicated with genome maintenance nor their homologues with tumorigenesis in mammals. The link between rDNA state and senescence was broken after deletion of factors related with DNA polymerase ϵ. These mutations also suppressed the short lifespan phenotype of a sir2 mutant, suggesting a model in which molecular events at the heart of the replication fork induce abnormal rDNA recombination and are responsible for the emergence of an aging signal. PMID:26912831

  15. Caloric restriction promotes genomic stability by induction of base excision repair and reversal of its age-related decline.

    PubMed

    Cabelof, Diane C; Yanamadala, Sunitha; Raffoul, Julian J; Guo, ZhongMao; Soofi, Abdulsalam; Heydari, Ahmad R

    2003-03-01

    Caloric restriction is a potent experimental manipulation that extends mean and maximum life span and delays the onset and progression of tumors in laboratory rodents. While caloric restriction (CR) clearly protects the genome from deleterious damage, the mechanism by which genomic stability is achieved remains unclear. We provide evidence that CR promotes genomic stability by increasing DNA repair capacity, specifically base excision repair (BER). CR completely reverses the age-related decline in BER capacity (P<0.01) in all tissues tested (brain, liver, spleen and testes) providing aged, CR animals with the BER phenotype of young, ad libitum-fed animals. This CR-induced reversal of the aged BER phenotype is accompanied by a reversal in the age-related decline in DNA polymerase beta (beta-pol), a rate-limiting enzyme in the BER pathway. CR significantly reversed the age-related loss of beta-pol protein levels (P<0.01), mRNA levels (P<0.01) and enzyme activity (P<0.01) in all tissues tested. Additionally, in young (4-6-month-old) CR animals a significant up-regulation in BER capacity, beta-pol protein and beta-pol mRNA is observed (P<0.01), demonstrating an early effect of CR that may provide insight in distinguishing the anti-tumor from the anti-aging effects of CR. This up-regulation in BER by caloric restriction in young animals corresponds to increased protection from carcinogen exposure, as mutation frequency is significantly reduced in CR animals exposed to either DMS or 2-nitropropane (2-NP) (P<0.01). Overall the data suggest an important biological consequence of moderate BER up-regulation and provides support for the hormesis theory of caloric restriction. PMID:12547392

  16. The role of DNA helicases and their interaction partners in genome stability and meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2011-03-01

    DNA helicases are enzymes that are able to unwind DNA by the use of the energy-equivalent ATP. They play essential roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination in all organisms. As homologous recombination occurs in somatic and meiotic cells, the same proteins may participate in both processes, albeit not necessarily with identical functions. DNA helicases involved in genome stability and meiotic recombination are the focus of this review. The role of these enzymes and their characterized interaction partners in plants will be summarized. Although most factors are conserved in eukaryotes, plant-specific features are becoming apparent. In the RecQ helicase family, Arabidopsis thaliana RECQ4A has been shown before to be the functional homologue of the well-researched baker's yeast Sgs1 and human BLM proteins. It was surprising to find that its interaction partners AtRMI1 and AtTOP3α are absolutely essential for meiotic recombination in plants, where they are central factors of a formerly underappreciated dissolution step of recombination intermediates. In the expanding group of anti-recombinases, future analysis of plant helicases is especially promising. While no FBH1 homologue is present, the Arabidopsis genome contains homologues of both SRS2 and RTEL1. Yeast and mammals, on the other hand. only possess homologues of either one or the other of these helicases. Plants also contain several other classes of helicases that are known from other organisms to be involved in the preservation of genome stability: FANCM is conserved with parts of the human Fanconi anaemia proteins, as are homologues of the Swi2/Snf2 family and of PIF1. PMID:21081662

  17. Genome stability of Propionibacterium acnes: a comprehensive study of indels and homopolymeric tracts.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Christian F P; Brüggemann, Holger; Lomholt, Hans B; Tettelin, Hervé; Kilian, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    We present a species-wide comparative analysis of 90 genomes of Propionibacterium acnes that represent the known diversity of the species. Our results are augmented by six high-quality genomes and a manual investigation of all gene-sized indels found in the strains. Overall, the order of genes is conserved throughout the species. A public sybil database for easy comparative analysis of the 90 genomes was established. The analysis of indels revealed a total of 66 loci of non-core genes that correlate with phylogenetic clades. No gene was strain-specific in agreement with our conclusion that the P. acnes pan-genome is closed. An exhaustive search for homopolymeric tracts (HPTs) identified a total of 54 variable-length HPTs almost exclusively of guanine/cytosines located between genes or affecting the reading frame of genes. The repeat variation was consistent with phylogenetic clades suggesting slow accumulation over time rather than active modification. By transcriptome analysis we demonstrate how an HPT variation can affect the gene expression levels. Selected cases of both indels and HPTs are described. The catalogued data and the public P. acnes Sybil database provide a solid foundation for generating hypotheses and facilitate comparative genetic analyses in future P. acnes research. PMID:26857276

  18. Genome stability of Propionibacterium acnes: a comprehensive study of indels and homopolymeric tracts

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Christian F. P.; Brüggemann, Holger; Lomholt, Hans B.; Tettelin, Hervé; Kilian, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    We present a species-wide comparative analysis of 90 genomes of Propionibacterium acnes that represent the known diversity of the species. Our results are augmented by six high-quality genomes and a manual investigation of all gene-sized indels found in the strains. Overall, the order of genes is conserved throughout the species. A public sybil database for easy comparative analysis of the 90 genomes was established. The analysis of indels revealed a total of 66 loci of non-core genes that correlate with phylogenetic clades. No gene was strain-specific in agreement with our conclusion that the P. acnes pan-genome is closed. An exhaustive search for homopolymeric tracts (HPTs) identified a total of 54 variable-length HPTs almost exclusively of guanine/cytosines located between genes or affecting the reading frame of genes. The repeat variation was consistent with phylogenetic clades suggesting slow accumulation over time rather than active modification. By transcriptome analysis we demonstrate how an HPT variation can affect the gene expression levels. Selected cases of both indels and HPTs are described. The catalogued data and the public P. acnes Sybil database provide a solid foundation for generating hypotheses and facilitate comparative genetic analyses in future P. acnes research. PMID:26857276

  19. A role for the CaM Kinase II related anchoring protein (αkap) in maintaining the stability of nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mouslim, Chakib; Aittaleb, Mohamed; Hume, Richard I.; Akaaboune, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    αkap, a muscle specific anchoring protein encoded within the Camk2a gene is thought to play a role in targeting multiple calcium/calmodulin kinase II isoforms to specific subcellular locations. Here we demonstrate a novel function of αkap in stabilizing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Knockdown of αkap expression with shRNA significantly enhanced the degradation of AChR α-subunits (AChRα), leading to fewer and smaller AChR clusters on the surface of differentiated C2C12 myotubes. Mutagenesis and biochemical studies in HEK293T cells revealed that αkap promoted AChRα stability by a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism. In the absence of αkap, AChRα was heavily ubiquitinated and the number of AChRα was increased by proteasome inhibitors. However, in the presence of αkap, AChRα was less ubiquitinated and proteasome inhibitors had almost no effect on AChRα accumulation. The major sites of AChRα ubiquitination reside within the large intracellular loop and mutations of critical lysine residues in this loop to arginine increased AChRα stability in the absence of αkap. These results provide an unexpected mechanism by which αkap controls receptor trafficking onto the surface of muscle cells, and thus the maintenance of postsynaptic receptor density and synaptic function. PMID:22496563

  20. Construction of a promoter probe vector autonomously maintained in Aspergillus and characterization of promoter regions derived from A. niger and A. oryzae genomes.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, K; Kanda, A; Hamachi, M; Nunokawa, Y

    1996-03-01

    We used a plasmid carrying a sequence for autonomous maintenance in Aspergillus (AMA1) and the E. coli uidA gene as a reporter gene to search the A. oryzae and A. niger genomes for DNA fragments having strong promoter activity. Beta-glucuronidase (GUS)-producing A. oryzae transformants containing the No. 8AN derived from A. niger, or the No. 9AO derived from A. oryzae, were constitutive for the expression of the uidA gene when cultivated in the presence of a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources. When the GUS-producing transformants were grown in liquid culture, the No. 8AN showed an increase of approximately 3-fold in GUS activity compared to the amyB (alpha-amylase encoding gene) promoter. There was also a corresponding increase in the amount of GUS gene-specific mRNA. When these transformants were grown as rice-koji, the No. 8AN showed an increase of approximately 6-fold compared to the amyB promoter, and the amount of GUS protein produced also increased. These strong promoter regions might be applicable to the production of other heterologous proteins in Aspergillus species. PMID:8901095

  1. Sirtuins in Cancer: a Balancing Act between Genome Stability and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability and altered metabolism are key features of most cancers. Recent studies suggest that metabolic reprogramming is part of a systematic response to cellular DNA damage. Thus, defining the molecules that fine-tune metabolism in response to DNA damage will enhance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis and have profound implications for the development of strategies for cancer therapy. Sirtuins have been established as critical regulators in cellular homeostasis and physiology. Here, we review the emerging data revealing a pivotal function of sirtuins in genome maintenance and cell metabolism, and highlight current advances about the phenotypic consequences of defects in these critical regulators in tumorigenesis. While many questions should be addressed about the regulation and context-dependent functions of sirtuins, it appears clear that sirtuins may provide a promising, exciting new avenue for cancer therapy. PMID:26420294

  2. Genomic Stability over 9 Years of an Isoniazid Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Outbreak Strain in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Sandegren, Linus; Groenheit, Ramona; Koivula, Tuija; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Advani, Abdolreza; Castro, Elsie; Pennhag, Alexandra; Hoffner, Sven; Mazurek, Jolanta; Pawlowski, Andrzej; Kan, Boris; Bruchfeld, Judith; Melefors, Öjar; Källenius, Gunilla

    2011-01-01

    In molecular epidemiological studies of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) in Sweden a large outbreak of an isoniazid resistant strain was identified, involving 115 patients, mainly from the Horn of Africa. During the outbreak period, the genomic pattern of the outbreak strain has stayed virtually unchanged with regard to drug resistance, IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism and spoligotyping patterns. Here we present the complete genome sequence analyses of the index isolate and two isolates sampled nine years after the index case as well as experimental data on the virulence of this outbreak strain. Even though the strain has been present in the community for nine years and passaged between patients at least five times in-between the isolates, we only found four single nucleotide polymorphisms in one of the later isolates and a small (4 amino acids) deletion in the other compared to the index isolate. In contrast to many other evolutionarily successful outbreak lineages (e.g. the Beijing lineage) this outbreak strain appears to be genetically very stable yet evolutionarily successful in a low endemic country such as Sweden. These findings further illustrate that the rate of genomic variation in TB can be highly strain dependent, something that can have important implications for epidemiological studies as well as development of resistance. PMID:21304944

  3. [Analysis of meiotic genome stabilization in the rye-wheat amphidiploid secalotriticum (×Secalotriticum, s/RRAABB, 2n = 42)].

    PubMed

    Lyusikov, O M; Gordei, I A

    2014-07-01

    The results of cytogenetic studies of genome stabilization in secalotriticum are presented. Comparative analysis of microsporogenesis in hexaploid secalotriticum, triticale, and reciprocal hybrids of them (S/RRAABB, T/AABBRR, 2n = 6x = 42) was carried out. The cytogenetic properties and genotypic factors of genome stabilization in heteroplasmic triticale were found. The inheritance by the secalotriticum of the genotypically caused first meiotic division, the so-called reduction division, ofunivalents from original combinations of rye-triticale hybrids was demonstrated for the first time. PMID:25720137

  4. The characterization of an intestine-like genomic signature maintained during Barrett's-associated adenocarcinogenesis reveals an NR5A2-mediated promotion of cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Shane P; Behan, Fiona M; Kirca, Murat; Zaheer, Abdul; McGarrigle, Sarah A; Reynolds, John V; Vaz, Gisela M F; Senge, Mathias O; Kelleher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus (BO), an intestinal-type metaplasia (IM), typically arising in conjunction with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, is a prominent risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The molecular similarities between IM and normal intestinal tissues are ill-defined. Consequently, the contribution of intestine-enriched factors expressed within BO to oncogenesis is unclear. Herein, using transcriptomics we define the intestine-enriched genes expressed in meta-profiles of BO and OAC. Interestingly, 77% of the genes differentially expressed in a meta-profile of BO were similarly expressed in intestinal tissues. Furthermore, 85% of this intestine-like signature was maintained upon transition to OAC. Gene networking analysis of transcription factors within this signature revealed a network centred upon NR5A2, GATA6 and FOXA2, whose over-expression was determined in a cohort of BO and OAC patients. Simulated acid reflux was observed to induce the expression of both NR5A2 and GATA6. Using siRNA-mediated silencing and an NR5A2 antagonist we demonstrate that NR5A2-mediated cancer cell survival is facilitated through augmentation of GATA6 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL-XL levels. Abrogation of NR5A2-GATA6 expression in conjunction with BCL-XL co-silencing resulted in synergistically increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and photo-dynamic therapeutics. These findings characterize the intestine-like signature associated with IM which may have important consequences to adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:27586588

  5. The characterization of an intestine-like genomic signature maintained during Barrett’s-associated adenocarcinogenesis reveals an NR5A2-mediated promotion of cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Shane P.; Behan, Fiona M.; Kirca, Murat; Zaheer, Abdul; McGarrigle, Sarah A.; Reynolds, John V.; Vaz, Gisela M. F.; Senge, Mathias O.; Kelleher, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Barrett’s oesophagus (BO), an intestinal-type metaplasia (IM), typically arising in conjunction with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, is a prominent risk factor for the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The molecular similarities between IM and normal intestinal tissues are ill-defined. Consequently, the contribution of intestine-enriched factors expressed within BO to oncogenesis is unclear. Herein, using transcriptomics we define the intestine-enriched genes expressed in meta-profiles of BO and OAC. Interestingly, 77% of the genes differentially expressed in a meta-profile of BO were similarly expressed in intestinal tissues. Furthermore, 85% of this intestine-like signature was maintained upon transition to OAC. Gene networking analysis of transcription factors within this signature revealed a network centred upon NR5A2, GATA6 and FOXA2, whose over-expression was determined in a cohort of BO and OAC patients. Simulated acid reflux was observed to induce the expression of both NR5A2 and GATA6. Using siRNA-mediated silencing and an NR5A2 antagonist we demonstrate that NR5A2-mediated cancer cell survival is facilitated through augmentation of GATA6 and anti-apoptotic factor BCL-XL levels. Abrogation of NR5A2-GATA6 expression in conjunction with BCL-XL co-silencing resulted in synergistically increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and photo-dynamic therapeutics. These findings characterize the intestine-like signature associated with IM which may have important consequences to adenocarcinogenesis. PMID:27586588

  6. Genomic stability of Palmer amaranth plants derived by macro-vegetative propagation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Q-PCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) were utilized to investigate genetic stability of Palmer amaranth cloned plants over 10 generations. Q-PCR analysis of DNA from parent Palmer amaranth plants was repeated and confidence levels for determining ...

  7. Modifiers and Readers of DNA Modifications and Their Impact on Genome Structure, Expression, and Stability in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Anne K.; Zhang, Peng; Cardoso, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine base modifications in mammals underwent a recent expansion with the addition of several naturally occurring further modifications of methylcytosine in the last years. This expansion was accompanied by the identification of the respective enzymes and proteins reading and translating the different modifications into chromatin higher order organization as well as genome activity and stability, leading to the hypothesis of a cytosine code. Here, we summarize the current state-of-the-art on DNA modifications, the enzyme families setting the cytosine modifications and the protein families reading and translating the different modifications with emphasis on the mouse protein homologs. Throughout this review, we focus on functional and mechanistic studies performed on mammalian cells, corresponding mouse models and associated human diseases. PMID:27446199

  8. Importance of the operating pH in maintaining the stability of anoxic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Jaroszynski, L W; Cicek, N; Sparling, R; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2011-07-01

    Two bench-scale parallel moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) were operated to assess pH-associated anammox activity changes during long term treatment of anaerobically digested sludge centrate pre-treated in a suspended growth partial nitrification reactor. The pH was maintained at 6.5 in reactor R1, while it was allowed to vary naturally between 7.5 and 8.1 in reactor R2. At high nitrogen loads reactor R2 had a 61% lower volumetric specific nitrogen removal rate than reactor R1. The low pH and the associated low free ammonia (FA) concentrations were found to be critical to stable anammox activity in the MBBR. Nitrite enhanced the nitrogen removal rate in the conditions of low pH, all the way up to the investigated level of 50mg NO(2)-N/L. At low FA levels nitrite concentrations up to 250 mg NO(2)-N/L did not cause inactivation of anammox consortia over a 2-days exposure time. PMID:21565492

  9. Roles of POLD4, smallest subunit of DNA polymerase {delta}, in nuclear structures and genomic stability of human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qin Miao; Akashi, Tomohiro; Masuda, Yuji; Kamiya, Kenji; Takahashi, Takashi; Suzuki, Motoshi

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian DNA polymerase {delta} (pol {delta}) is essential for DNA replication, though the functions of this smallest subunit of POLD4 have been elusive. We investigated pol {delta} activities in vitro and found that it was less active in the absence of POLD4, irrespective of the presence of the accessory protein PCNA. shRNA-mediated reduction of POLD4 resulted in a marked decrease in colony formation activity by Calu6, ACC-LC-319, and PC-10 cells. We also found that POLD4 reduction was associated with an increased population of karyomere-like cells, which may be an indication of DNA replication stress and/or DNA damage. The karyomere-like cells retained an ability to progress through the cell cycle, suggesting that POLD4 reduction induces modest genomic instability, while allowing cells to grow until DNA damage reaches an intolerant level. Our results indicate that POLD4 is required for the in vitro pol {delta} activity, and that it functions in cell proliferation and maintenance of genomic stability of human cells.

  10. Stability of a Pseudomonas putida KT2440 bacteriophage-carried genomic island and its impact on rhizosphere fitness.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Jose M; Soriano, María Isabel; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2012-10-01

    The stability of seven genomic islands of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with predicted potential for mobilization was studied in bacterial populations associated with the rhizosphere of corn plants by multiplex PCR. DNA rearrangements were detected for only one of them (GI28), which was lost at high frequency. This genomic island of 39.4 kb, with 53 open reading frames, shows the characteristic organization of genes belonging to tailed phages. We present evidence indicating that it corresponds to the lysogenic state of a functional bacteriophage that we have designated Pspu28. Integrated and rarely excised forms of Pspu28 coexist in KT2440 populations. Pspu28 is self-transmissible, and an excisionase is essential for its removal from the bacterial chromosome. The excised Pspu28 forms a circular element that can integrate into the chromosome at a specific location, att sites containing a 17-bp direct repeat sequence. Excision/insertion of Pspu28 alters the promoter sequence and changes the expression level of PP_1531, which encodes a predicted arsenate reductase. Finally, we show that the presence of Pspu28 in the lysogenic state has a negative effect on bacterial fitness in the rhizosphere under conditions of intraspecific competition, thus explaining why clones having lost this mobile element are recovered from that environment. PMID:22843519

  11. Safeguarding genome stability: RASSF1A tumor suppressor regulates BRCA2 at stalled forks

    PubMed Central

    Pefani, Dafni Eleftheria; O'Neill, Eric

    2015-01-01

    While it has been widely established that defective fork restart after exposure to stress results in increased genomic instability, the importance of fork protection during stalling for safeguarding genomic integrity has recently been fully appreciated. BRCA2, Breast tumor suppressor, has dual functionality promoting not only DNA repair but also preventing DNA lesions at stalled forks. In response to replication stress, BRCA2 recruits RAD51 onto nascent DNA at stalled forks, protecting nascent DNA from nucleolitic cleavage. Phosphorylation of the BRCA2 C-terminal RAD51 binding site by CDK2 promotes RAD51 filament disassembly, leading to nucleolitic cleavage of newly synthesized DNA and compromised fork integrity. Recently we uncovered how the core Hippo pathway components RASSF1A, MST2 and LATS1 regulate CDK2 activity towards BRCA2, in response to fork stalling. In complex with LATS1, CDK2 exhibits reduced kinase activity which results in low levels of pBRCA2-S3291 and stable RAD51 filaments protecting nascent DNA from MRE11 cleavage. In the absence of the RASSF1A/MST2/LATS1/CDK2 pathway increased resection of newly synthesized DNA leads to chromosomal instability and malignant transformation. This function of RASSF1A in stalled replication fork protection adds to the role of RASSF1A as a tumor suppressor and builds up evidence for RASSF1A status and its prognostic and predictive value in cancer. PMID:25927241

  12. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection. PMID:23591108

  13. Ionic interactions near the loop L4 are important for maintaining the active-site environment and the dimer stability of (pro)caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the role of a salt bridge between Lys242 and Glu246 in loop L4 of procaspase 3 and of mature caspase 3, and we show that the interactions are required for stabilizing the active site. Replacing either of the residues with an alanine residue results in a complete loss of procaspase 3 activity. Although both mutants are active in the context of the mature caspase 3, the mutations result in an increase in Km and a decrease in kcat when compared with the wild-type caspase 3. In addition, the mutations result in an increase in the pKa value associated with a change in kcat with pH, but does not affect the transition observed for Km versus pH. The mutations also affect the accessibility of the active-site solvent as measured by tryptophan fluorescence emission in the presence of quenching agents and as a function of pH. We show that, as the pH is lowered, the (pro)caspase dissociates, and the mutations increase the pH-dependent instability of the dimer. Overall, the results suggest that the contacts lost in the procaspase as a result of replacing Lys242 and Glu246 are compensated partially in the mature caspase as a result of new contacts that are known to form on zymogen processing. PMID:15312047

  14. HDAC1/2-Dependent P0 Expression Maintains Paranodal and Nodal Integrity Independently of Myelin Stability through Interactions with Neurofascins

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Valérie; Engler, Stefanie; Pereira, Jorge A.; Ruff, Sophie; Horn, Michael; Welzl, Hans; Münger, Emmanuelle; Vaquié, Adrien; Sidiropoulos, Páris N. M.; Egger, Boris; Yotovski, Peter; Filgueira, Luis; Somandin, Christian; Lühmann, Tessa C.; D’Antonio, Maurizio; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Matthias, Patrick; Suter, Ueli; Jacob, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies in adults is linked to maintenance mechanisms that are not well understood. Here, we elucidate a novel critical maintenance mechanism for Schwann cell (SC)–axon interaction. Using mouse genetics, ablation of the transcriptional regulators histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/2) in adult SCs severely affected paranodal and nodal integrity and led to demyelination/remyelination. Expression levels of the HDAC1/2 target gene myelin protein zero (P0) were reduced by half, accompanied by altered localization and stability of neurofascin (NFasc)155, NFasc186, and loss of Caspr and septate-like junctions. We identify P0 as a novel binding partner of NFasc155 and NFasc186, both in vivo and by in vitro adhesion assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HDAC1/2-dependent P0 expression is crucial for the maintenance of paranodal/nodal integrity and axonal function through interaction of P0 with neurofascins. In addition, we show that the latter mechanism is impaired by some P0 mutations that lead to late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:26406915

  15. HDAC1/2-Dependent P0 Expression Maintains Paranodal and Nodal Integrity Independently of Myelin Stability through Interactions with Neurofascins.

    PubMed

    Brügger, Valérie; Engler, Stefanie; Pereira, Jorge A; Ruff, Sophie; Horn, Michael; Welzl, Hans; Münger, Emmanuelle; Vaquié, Adrien; Sidiropoulos, Páris N M; Egger, Boris; Yotovski, Peter; Filgueira, Luis; Somandin, Christian; Lühmann, Tessa C; D'Antonio, Maurizio; Yamaguchi, Teppei; Matthias, Patrick; Suter, Ueli; Jacob, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies in adults is linked to maintenance mechanisms that are not well understood. Here, we elucidate a novel critical maintenance mechanism for Schwann cell (SC)-axon interaction. Using mouse genetics, ablation of the transcriptional regulators histone deacetylases 1 and 2 (HDAC1/2) in adult SCs severely affected paranodal and nodal integrity and led to demyelination/remyelination. Expression levels of the HDAC1/2 target gene myelin protein zero (P0) were reduced by half, accompanied by altered localization and stability of neurofascin (NFasc)155, NFasc186, and loss of Caspr and septate-like junctions. We identify P0 as a novel binding partner of NFasc155 and NFasc186, both in vivo and by in vitro adhesion assay. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HDAC1/2-dependent P0 expression is crucial for the maintenance of paranodal/nodal integrity and axonal function through interaction of P0 with neurofascins. In addition, we show that the latter mechanism is impaired by some P0 mutations that lead to late onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:26406915

  16. Dietary Vitamin D and Its Metabolites Non-Genomically Stabilize the Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Christopher C; Davis, Chadwick T; Zhu, Weiquan; Bowman-Kirigin, Jay A; Walker, Ashley E; Tai, Zhengfu; Thomas, Kirk R; Donato, Anthony J; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Li, Dean Y

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is a known modulator of inflammation. Native dietary vitamin D3 is thought to be bio-inactive, and beneficial vitamin D3 effects are thought to be largely mediated by the metabolite 1,25(OH)2D3. Reduced serum levels of the most commonly measured precursor metabolite, 25(OH)D3, is linked to an increased risk of multiple inflammatory diseases, including: cardiovascular disease, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and sepsis. Common to all of these diseases is the disruption of endothelial stability and an enhancement of vascular leak. We previously performed an unbiased chemical suppressor screen on a genetic model of vascular instability, and identified cholecalciferol (D3, dietary Vitamin D3) as a factor that had profound and immediate stabilizing and therapeutic effects in that model. In this manuscript we show that the presumed inactive sterol, D3, is actually a potent and general mediator of endothelial stability at physiologically relevant concentrations. We further demonstrate that this phenomenon is apparent in vitamin D3 metabolites 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3, and that the effects are independent of the canonical transcription-mediated vitamin D pathway. Our data suggests the presence of an alternative signaling modality by which D3 acts directly on endothelial cells to prevent vascular leak. The finding that D3 and its metabolites modulate endothelial stability may help explain the clinical correlations between low serum vitamin D levels and the many human diseases with well-described vascular dysfunction phenotypes. PMID:26469335

  17. Scaffold expulsion and genome packaging trigger stabilization of herpes simplex virus capsids

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Wouter H.; Radtke, Kerstin; Kniesmeijer, Edward; Geertsema, Hylkje; Sodeik, Beate; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) capsids undergo extensive structural changes during maturation and DNA packaging. As a result, they become more stable and competent for nuclear egress. To further elucidate this stabilization process, we used biochemical and nanoindentation approaches to analyze the structural and mechanical properties of scaffold-containing (B), empty (A), and DNA-containing (C) nuclear capsids. Atomic force microscopy experiments revealed that A and C capsids were mechanically indistinguishable, indicating that the presence of DNA does not account for changes in mechanical properties during capsid maturation. Despite having the same rigidity, the scaffold-containing B capsids broke at significantly lower forces than A and C capsids. An extraction of pentons with guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) increased the flexibility of all capsids. Surprisingly, the breaking forces of the modified A and C capsids dropped to similar values as those of the GuHCl-treated B capsids, indicating that mechanical reinforcement occurs at the vertices. Nonetheless, it also showed that HSV1 capsids possess a remarkable structural integrity that was preserved after removal of pentons. We suggest that HSV1 capsids are stabilized after removal of the scaffold proteins, and that this stabilization is triggered by the packaging of DNA, but independent of the actual presence of DNA. PMID:19487681

  18. Scaffold expulsion and genome packaging trigger stabilization of herpes simplex virus capsids.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wouter H; Radtke, Kerstin; Kniesmeijer, Edward; Geertsema, Hylkje; Sodeik, Beate; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2009-06-16

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) capsids undergo extensive structural changes during maturation and DNA packaging. As a result, they become more stable and competent for nuclear egress. To further elucidate this stabilization process, we used biochemical and nanoindentation approaches to analyze the structural and mechanical properties of scaffold-containing (B), empty (A), and DNA-containing (C) nuclear capsids. Atomic force microscopy experiments revealed that A and C capsids were mechanically indistinguishable, indicating that the presence of DNA does not account for changes in mechanical properties during capsid maturation. Despite having the same rigidity, the scaffold-containing B capsids broke at significantly lower forces than A and C capsids. An extraction of pentons with guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) increased the flexibility of all capsids. Surprisingly, the breaking forces of the modified A and C capsids dropped to similar values as those of the GuHCl-treated B capsids, indicating that mechanical reinforcement occurs at the vertices. Nonetheless, it also showed that HSV1 capsids possess a remarkable structural integrity that was preserved after removal of pentons. We suggest that HSV1 capsids are stabilized after removal of the scaffold proteins, and that this stabilization is triggered by the packaging of DNA, but independent of the actual presence of DNA. PMID:19487681

  19. Deregulation of DNA double-strand break repair in multiple myeloma: implications for genome stability.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Ana B; San Miguel, Jesús; Gutierrez, Norma C

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by frequent chromosome abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for this genome instability remains unknown. Since both impaired and hyperactive double strand break (DSB) repair pathways can result in DNA rearrangements, we investigated the functionality of DSB repair in MM cells. Repair kinetics of ionizing-radiation (IR)-induced DSBs was similar in MM and normal control lymphoblastoid cell lines, as revealed by the comet assay. However, four out of seven MM cell lines analyzed exhibited a subset of persistent DSBs, marked by γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci that elicited a prolonged G2/M DNA damage checkpoint activation and hypersensitivity to IR, especially in the presence of checkpoint inhibitors. An analysis of the proteins involved in DSB repair in MM cells revealed upregulation of DNA-PKcs, Artemis and XRCC4, that participate in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), and Rad51, involved in homologous recombination (HR). Accordingly, activity of both NHEJ and HR were elevated in MM cells compared to controls, as determined by in vivo functional assays. Interestingly, levels of proteins involved in a highly mutagenic, translocation-promoting, alternative NHEJ subpathway (Alt-NHEJ) were also increased in all MM cell lines, with the Alt-NHEJ protein DNA ligase IIIα, also overexpressed in several plasma cell samples isolated from MM patients. Overactivation of the Alt-NHEJ pathway was revealed in MM cells by larger deletions and higher sequence microhomology at repair junctions, which were reduced by chemical inhibition of the pathway. Taken together, our results uncover a deregulated DSB repair in MM that might underlie the characteristic genome instability of the disease, and could be therapeutically exploited. PMID:25790254

  20. Low-level laser irradiation alters mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajano, L. A. S. N.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Silva, C. L.; Carvalho, L.; Mencalha, A. L.; Stumbo, A. C.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    Low-level lasers are used for the treatment of diseases in soft and bone tissues, but few data are available regarding their effects on genomic stability. In this study, we investigated mRNA expression from genes involved in DNA repair and genomic stabilization in myoblasts exposed to low-level infrared laser. C2C12 myoblast cultures in different fetal bovine serum concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (10, 35 and 70 J cm‑2), and collected for the evaluation of DNA repair gene expression. Laser exposure increased gene expression related to base excision repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1), nucleotide excision repair (excision repair cross-complementation group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum C protein) and genomic stabilization (ATM serine/threonine kinase and tumor protein p53) in normal and low fetal bovine serum concentrations. Results suggest that genomic stability could be part of a biostimulation effect of low-level laser therapy in injured muscles.

  1. Role of the Exocyst Complex Component Sec6/8 in Genomic Stability.

    PubMed

    Torres, Michael J; Pandita, Raj K; Kulak, Ozlem; Kumar, Rakesh; Formstecher, Etienne; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mujoo, Kalpana; Hunt, Clayton R; Zhao, Yingming; Lum, Lawrence; Zaman, Aubhishek; Yeaman, Charles; White, Michael A; Pandita, Tej K

    2015-11-01

    The exocyst is a heterooctomeric complex well appreciated for its role in the dynamic assembly of specialized membrane domains. Accumulating evidence indicates that this macromolecular machine also serves as a physical platform that coordinates regulatory cascades supporting biological systems such as host defense signaling, cell fate, and energy homeostasis. The isolation of multiple components of the DNA damage response (DDR) as exocyst-interacting proteins, together with the identification of Sec8 as a suppressor of the p53 response, suggested functional interactions between the exocyst and the DDR. We found that exocyst perturbation resulted in resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and accelerated resolution of DNA damage. This occurred at the expense of genomic integrity, as enhanced recombination frequencies correlated with the accumulation of aberrant chromatid exchanges. Sec8 perturbation resulted in the accumulation of ATF2 and RNF20 and the promiscuous accumulation of DDR-associated chromatin marks and Rad51 repairosomes. Thus, the exocyst supports DNA repair fidelity by limiting the formation of repair chromatin in the absence of DNA damage. PMID:26283729

  2. Rif1 Is Required for Resolution of Ultrafine DNA Bridges in Anaphase to Ensure Genomic Stability.

    PubMed

    Hengeveld, Rutger C C; de Boer, H Rudolf; Schoonen, Pepijn M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Lens, Susanne M A; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2015-08-24

    Sister-chromatid disjunction in anaphase requires the resolution of DNA catenanes by topoisomerase II together with Plk1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) and Bloom's helicase (BLM). We here identify Rif1 as a factor involved in the resolution of DNA catenanes that are visible as ultrafine DNA bridges (UFBs) in anaphase to which PICH and BLM localize. Rif1, which during interphase functions downstream of 53BP1 in DNA repair, is recruited to UFBs in a PICH-dependent fashion, but independently of 53BP1 or BLM. Similar to PICH and BLM, Rif1 promotes the resolution of UFBs: its depletion increases the frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges and RPA70-positive UFBs in late anaphase. Moreover, in the absence of Rif1, PICH, or BLM, more nuclear bodies with damaged DNA arise in ensuing G1 cells, when chromosome decatenation is impaired. Our data reveal a thus far unrecognized function for Rif1 in the resolution of UFBs during anaphase to protect genomic integrity. PMID:26256213

  3. Role of the Exocyst Complex Component Sec6/8 in Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Michael J.; Pandita, Raj K.; Kulak, Ozlem; Kumar, Rakesh; Formstecher, Etienne; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mujoo, Kalpana; Hunt, Clayton R.; Zhao, Yingming; Lum, Lawrence; Zaman, Aubhishek; Yeaman, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The exocyst is a heterooctomeric complex well appreciated for its role in the dynamic assembly of specialized membrane domains. Accumulating evidence indicates that this macromolecular machine also serves as a physical platform that coordinates regulatory cascades supporting biological systems such as host defense signaling, cell fate, and energy homeostasis. The isolation of multiple components of the DNA damage response (DDR) as exocyst-interacting proteins, together with the identification of Sec8 as a suppressor of the p53 response, suggested functional interactions between the exocyst and the DDR. We found that exocyst perturbation resulted in resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and accelerated resolution of DNA damage. This occurred at the expense of genomic integrity, as enhanced recombination frequencies correlated with the accumulation of aberrant chromatid exchanges. Sec8 perturbation resulted in the accumulation of ATF2 and RNF20 and the promiscuous accumulation of DDR-associated chromatin marks and Rad51 repairosomes. Thus, the exocyst supports DNA repair fidelity by limiting the formation of repair chromatin in the absence of DNA damage. PMID:26283729

  4. Sequential replication-coupled destruction at G1/S ensures genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kate E.; Grant, Gavin D.; Haggerty, Rachel A.; Brantley, Kristen; Shibata, Etsuko; Workman, Benjamin D.; Dutta, Anindya; Varma, Dileep; Purvis, Jeremy E.; Cook, Jeanette Gowen

    2015-01-01

    Timely ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is fundamental to cell cycle control, but the precise degradation order at each cell cycle phase transition is still unclear. We investigated the degradation order among substrates of a single human E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL4Cdt2, which mediates the S-phase degradation of key cell cycle proteins, including Cdt1, PR-Set7, and p21. Our analysis of synchronized cells and asynchronously proliferating live single cells revealed a consistent order of replication-coupled destruction during both S-phase entry and DNA repair; Cdt1 is destroyed first, whereas p21 destruction is always substantially later than that of Cdt1. These differences are attributable to the CRL4Cdt2 targeting motif known as the PIP degron, which binds DNA-loaded proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNADNA) and recruits CRL4Cdt2. Fusing Cdt1's PIP degron to p21 causes p21 to be destroyed nearly concurrently with Cdt1 rather than consecutively. This accelerated degradation conferred by the Cdt1 PIP degron is accompanied by more effective Cdt2 recruitment by Cdt1 even though p21 has higher affinity for PCNADNA. Importantly, cells with artificially accelerated p21 degradation display evidence of stalled replication in mid-S phase and sensitivity to replication arrest. We therefore propose that sequential degradation ensures orderly S-phase progression to avoid replication stress and genome instability. PMID:26272819

  5. MTHFD1 regulates nuclear de novo thymidylate biosynthesis and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Field, Martha S; Kamynina, Elena; Stover, Patrick J

    2016-07-01

    Disruptions in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) are associated with risk for several pathologies including developmental anomalies such as neural tube defects and congenital heart defects, diseases of aging including cognitive decline, neurodegeneration and epithelial cancers, and hematopoietic disorders including megaloblastic anemia. However, the causal pathways and mechanisms that underlie these pathologies remain unresolved. Because folate-dependent anabolic pathways are tightly interconnected and best described as a metabolic network, the identification of causal pathways and associated mechanisms of pathophysiology remains a major challenge in identifying the contribution of individual pathways to disease phenotypes. Investigations of genetic mouse models and human inborn errors of metabolism enable a more precise dissection of the pathways that constitute the FOCM network and enable elucidation of causal pathways associated with NTDs. In this overview, we summarize recent evidence that the enzyme MTHFD1 plays an essential role in FOCM in humans and in mice, and that it determines the partitioning of folate-activated one carbon units between the folate-dependent de novo thymidylate and homocysteine remethylation pathways through its regulated nuclear localization. We demonstrate that impairments in MTHFD1 activity compromise both homocysteine remethylation and de novo thymidylate biosynthesis, and provide evidence that MTHFD1-associated disruptions in de novo thymidylate biosynthesis lead to genome instability that may underlie folate-associated immunodeficiency and birth defects. PMID:26853819

  6. A Novel Histone Deacetylase Complex in the Control of Transcription and Genome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zilio, Nicola; Codlin, Sandra; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Bitton, Danny A.; Head, Steven R.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Bähler, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    The acetylation state of histones, controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs), profoundly affects DNA transcription and repair by modulating chromatin accessibility to the cellular machinery. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe HDAC Clr6 (human HDAC1) binds to different sets of proteins that define functionally distinct complexes: I, I′, and II. Here, we determine the composition, architecture, and functions of a new Clr6 HDAC complex, I′′, delineated by the novel proteins Nts1, Mug165, and Png3. Deletion of nts1 causes increased sensitivity to genotoxins and deregulated expression of Tf2 elements, long noncoding RNA, and subtelomeric and stress-related genes. Similar, but more pervasive, phenotypes are observed upon Clr6 inactivation, supporting the designation of complex I′′ as a mediator of a key subset of Clr6 functions. We also reveal that with the exception of Tf2 elements, the genome-wide loading sites and loci regulated by Clr6 I″ do not correlate. Instead, Nts1 loads at genes that are expressed in midmeiosis, following oxidative stress, or are periodically expressed. Collective data suggest that Clr6 I′′ has (i) indirect effects on gene expression, conceivably by mediating higher-order chromatin organization of subtelomeres and Tf2 elements, and (ii) direct effects on the transcription of specific genes in response to certain cellular or environmental stimuli. PMID:25002536

  7. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  8. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  9. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability by RAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloïse; Groesser, Torsten; Filippo, Joseph San; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams, Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress, and RAD51AP1 is epistatic to the HR protein XRCC3. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds both dsDNA and a D-loop structure, and, only when able to interact with RAD51, greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement. PMID:17996711

  10. Patterns of cyto-nuclear linkage disequilibrium in Silene latifolia: genomic heterogeneity and temporal stability

    PubMed Central

    Fields, P D; McCauley, D E; McAssey, E V; Taylor, D R

    2014-01-01

    Non-random association of alleles in the nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, or cyto-nuclear linkage disequilibrium (LD), is both an important component of a number of evolutionary processes and a statistical indicator of others. The evolutionary significance of cyto-nuclear LD will depend on both its magnitude and how stable those associations are through time. Here, we use a longitudinal population genetic data set to explore the magnitude and temporal dynamics of cyto-nuclear disequilibria through time. We genotyped 135 and 170 individuals from 16 and 17 patches of the plant species Silene latifolia in Southwestern VA, sampled in 1993 and 2008, respectively. Individuals were genotyped at 14 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the mitochondrial gene, atp1. Normalized LD (D′) between nuclear and cytoplasmic loci varied considerably depending on which nuclear locus was considered (ranging from 0.005–0.632). Four of the 14 cyto-nuclear associations showed a statistically significant shift over approximately seven generations. However, the overall magnitude of this disequilibrium was largely stable over time. The observed origin and stability of cyto-nuclear LD is most likely caused by the slow admixture between anciently diverged lineages within the species' newly invaded range, and the local spatial structure and metapopulation dynamics that are known to structure genetic variation in this system. PMID:24002238

  11. Redox regulation of genome stability by effects on gene expression, epigenetic pathways and DNA damage/repair

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Görlach, Agnes; Knaus, Ulla G.; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (e.g. H2O2, nitric oxide) confer redox regulation of essential cellular signaling pathways such as cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis. In addition, classical regulation of gene expression or activity, including gene transcription to RNA followed by translation to the protein level, by transcription factors (e.g. NF-κB, HIF-1α) and mRNA binding proteins (e.g. GAPDH, HuR) is subject to redox regulation. This review will give an update of recent discoveries in this field, and specifically highlight the impact of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species on DNA repair systems that contribute to genomic stability. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging role of redox mechanisms regulating epigenetic pathways (e.g. miRNA, DNA methylation and histone modifications). By providing clinical correlations we discuss how oxidative stress can impact on gene regulation/activity and vise versa, how epigenetic processes, other gene regulatory mechanisms and DNA repair can influence the cellular redox state and contribute or prevent development or progression of disease. PMID:26079210

  12. Evidence of two mechanisms involved in Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis decreased toxicity against mosquito larvae: Genome dynamic and toxins stability.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Jihen; Zribi Zghal, Raida; Lacoix, Marie Noël; Chandre, Fabrice; Tounsi, Slim; Jaoua, Samir

    2015-07-01

    Biopesticides based on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis are the most used and most successful around the world. This bacterium is characterized by a dynamic genome able to win or lose genetic materials which leads to a decrease in its effectiveness. The detection of such phenomena is of great importance to monitor the stability of B. thuringiensis strains in industrial production processes of biopesticides. New local B. thuringiensis israelensis isolates were investigated. They present variable levels of delta-endotoxins production and insecticidal activities against Aedes aegypti larvae. Searching on the origin of this variability, molecular and biochemical analyses were performed. The obtained results describe two main reasons of the decrease of B. thuringiensis israelensis insecticidal activity. The first reason was the deletion of cry4Aa and cry10Aa genes from the 128-kb pBtoxis plasmid as evidenced in three strains (BLB124, BLB199 and BLB506) among five. The second was the early degradation of Cry toxins by proteases in larvae midgut mainly due to some amino acids substitutions evidenced in Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa δ-endotoxins detected in BLB356. Before biological treatment based on B. thuringiensis israelensis, the studies of microflore in each ecosystem have a great importance to succeed pest management programs. PMID:26070692

  13. Different genome stability proteins underpin primed and naïve adaptation in E. coli CRISPR-Cas immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Cass, Simon D; Wearne, Stephen J; Bolt, Edward L

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a prokaryotic immune system built from capture and integration of invader DNA into CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) loci, termed ‘Adaptation’, which is dependent on Cas1 and Cas2 proteins. In Escherichia coli, Cascade-Cas3 degrades invader DNA to effect immunity, termed ‘Interference’. Adaptation can interact with interference (‘primed’), or is independent of it (‘naïve’). We demonstrate that primed adaptation requires the RecG helicase and PriA protein to be present. Genetic analysis of mutant phenotypes suggests that RecG is needed to dissipate R-loops at blocked replication forks. Additionally, we identify that DNA polymerase I is important for both primed and naive adaptation, and that RecB is needed for naïve adaptation. Purified Cas1-Cas2 protein shows specificity for binding to and nicking forked DNA within single strand gaps, and collapsing forks into DNA duplexes. The data suggest that different genome stability systems interact with primed or naïve adaptation when responding to blocked or collapsed invader DNA replication. In this model, RecG and Cas3 proteins respond to invader DNA replication forks that are blocked by Cascade interference, enabling DNA capture. RecBCD targets DNA ends at collapsed forks, enabling DNA capture without interference. DNA polymerase I is proposed to fill DNA gaps during spacer integration. PMID:26578567

  14. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 depositi...

  15. Mechanisms of genome instability induced by RNA processing defects

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yujia A.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The role of normal transcription and RNA processing in maintaining genome integrity is becoming increasingly appreciated in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Several mutations in RNA biogenesis factors have been implicated in human cancers, but the mechanisms and potential connections to tumor genome instability are not clear. Here we discuss how RNA processing defects could destabilize genomes through mutagenic R-loop structures and by altering expression of genes required for genome stability. A compelling body of evidence now suggests that researchers should be directly testing these mechanisms in models of human cancer. PMID:24794811

  16. Mechanisms of genome instability induced by RNA-processing defects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2014-06-01

    The role of normal transcription and RNA processing in maintaining genome integrity is becoming increasingly appreciated in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Several mutations in RNA biogenesis factors have been implicated in human cancers, but the mechanisms and potential connections to tumor genome instability are not clear. Here, we discuss how RNA-processing defects could destabilize genomes through mutagenic R-loop structures and by altering expression of genes required for genome stability. A compelling body of evidence now suggests that researchers should be directly testing these mechanisms in models of human cancer. PMID:24794811

  17. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  18. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  19. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  20. Transfection of BmCPV genomic dsRNA in silkmoth-derived Bm5 cells: stability and interactions with the core RNAi machinery.

    PubMed

    Swevers, Luc; Kolliopoulou, Anna; Li, Zheng; Daskalaki, Maria; Verret, Frederic; Kalantidis, Kriton; Smagghe, Guy; Sun, Jingchen

    2014-05-01

    While several studies have been conducted to investigate the stability of dsRNA in the extracellular medium (hemolymph, gut content, saliva), little is known regarding the persistence of dsRNA once it has been introduced into the cell. Here, we investigate the stability of Bombyx mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV) genomic dsRNA fragments after transfection into Bombyx-derived Bm5 cells. Using RT-PCR as a detection method, we found that dsRNA could persist for long periods (up to 8 days) in the intracellular environment. While the BmCPV genomic dsRNA was processed by the RNAi machinery, its presence had no effects on other RNAi processes, such as the silencing of a luciferase reporter by dsLuc. We also found that transfection of BmCPV genomic dsRNA could not establish a viral infection in the Bm5 cells, even when co-transfections were carried out with dsRNAs targeting Dicer and Argonaute genes, suggesting that the neutralization by RNAi does not play a role in the establishment of an in vitro culture system. The mechanism of the dsRNA stability in Bm5 cells is discussed, as well as the implications for the establishment for an in vitro culture system for BmCPV. PMID:24636911

  1. Involvement of Iron-Containing Proteins in Genome Integrity in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome encodes numerous iron-containing proteins such as iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster proteins and hemoproteins. These proteins generally utilize iron as a cofactor, and they perform critical roles in photosynthesis, genome stability, electron transfer, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to maintain iron homeostasis for the assembly of functional iron-containing proteins, thereby ensuring genome stability, cell development, and plant growth. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron-containing proteins and their functions involved in genome stability has expanded enormously. In this review, I provide the current perspectives on iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis, followed by a summary of iron-containing protein functions involved in genome stability maintenance and a discussion of their possible molecular mechanisms. PMID:27330736

  2. Maintaining the unmethylated state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A remarkable correspondence exists between the cytogenetic locations of the known fragile sites and frequently reported sites of hypermethylation. The best-known features of fragile sites are sequence motifs that are prone to the spontaneous formation of a non-B DNA structure. These facts, coupled with the known enzymological specificities of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), the ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases, and the ten-eleven translocation (TET) dioxygenases, suggest that these enzymes are involved in an epigenetic cycle that maintains the unmethylated state at these sites by resolving non-B structure, preventing both the sequestration of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and hypermethylation in normal cells. Presentation of the hypothesis The innate tendency of DNA sequences present at fragile sites to form non-B DNA structures results in de novo methylation of DNA at these sites that is held in check in normal cells by the action of ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases coupled with the action of TET dioxygenases. This constitutes a previously unrecognized epigenetic repair cycle in which spontaneously forming non-B DNA structures formed at fragile sites are methylated by DNMTs as they are removed by the action of ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases, with the resulting nascent methylation rendered non-transmissible by TET dioxygenases. Testing the hypothesis A strong prediction of the hypothesis is that knockdown of ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases will result in enhanced bisulfite sensitivity and hypermethylation at non-B structures in multiple fragile sites coupled with global hypomethylation. Implications of the hypothesis A key implication of the hypothesis is that helicases, like the lymphoid-specific helicase and alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked helicase, passively promote accurate maintenance of DNA methylation by preventing the sequestration of DNMTs at sites of unrepaired non-B DNA

  3. Ex situ conservation of Ruscus aculeatus L. – ruscogenin biosynthesis, genome-size stability and propagation traits of tissue-cultured clones

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Teodora; Dimitrova, Dessislava; Gussev, Chavdar; Bosseva, Yulia; Stoeva, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Ruscus aculeatus L. is a perennial semi-shrub with distinctive leaf-like branches (cladodes). Rhizomes and roots contain steroidal saponins (ruscogenins) that are used in medicine and cosmetics for their anti-inflammatory, venotonic and antihaemorroidal activity. Problematic cultivation of the species causes in many countries unsustainable over-collection from the wild. Tissue culture propagation of R. aculeatus was carried out for conservation and propagation purposes. The impact of the clonal origin (genotype) on the ruscogenin biosynthesis, genome-size stability and propagation traits and morpho-physiological response to long-term cultivation in vitro was studied. Production of ruscogenins in fully developed regenerants was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Genome-size stability of the clones was assessed by flow cytometry. Slow growth and prolonged lag-phase were characteristic for the whole propagation cycle. Produced plantlets with well-defined organs were suitable for direct ex vitro planting. Genome DNA content of all clones was stable and comparable to native plants. Ruscogenin biosynthesis was clone-specific, presenting distinctive profiles of the cultures. Our results imply that clone origin and culture type might influence saponin biosynthesis in Ruscus. These traits should be considered in the ex situ conservation of the genetic diversity of this species and by production of planting material as well. PMID:26019616

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Deletion in Protein Phosphatase 2A That Affects Its Stability and Localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L.; Granas, David M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating. PMID:24086163

  5. The tumor suppressor SirT2 regulates cell cycle progression and genome stability by modulating the mitotic deposition of H4K20 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lourdes; Martínez-Redondo, Paloma; Marazuela-Duque, Anna; Vazquez, Berta N.; Dooley, Scott J.; Voigt, Philipp; Beck, David B.; Kane-Goldsmith, Noriko; Tong, Qiang; Rabanal, Rosa M.; Fondevila, Dolors; Muñoz, Purificación; Krüger, Marcus; Tischfield, Jay A.; Vaquero, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of the epigenetic mark H4K20me1 (monomethylation of H4K20) by PR-Set7 during G2/M directly impacts S-phase progression and genome stability. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of this event are not well understood. Here we show that SirT2 regulates H4K20me1 deposition through the deacetylation of H4K16Ac (acetylation of H4K16) and determines the levels of H4K20me2/3 throughout the cell cycle. SirT2 binds and deacetylates PR-Set7 at K90, modulating its chromatin localization. Consistently, SirT2 depletion significantly reduces PR-Set7 chromatin levels, alters the size and number of PR-Set7 foci, and decreases the overall mitotic deposition of H4K20me1. Upon stress, the interaction between SirT2 and PR-Set7 increases along with the H4K20me1 levels, suggesting a novel mitotic checkpoint mechanism. SirT2 loss in mice induces significant defects associated with defective H4K20me1–3 levels. Accordingly, SirT2-deficient animals exhibit genomic instability and chromosomal aberrations and are prone to tumorigenesis. Our studies suggest that the dynamic cross-talk between the environment and the genome during mitosis determines the fate of the subsequent cell cycle. PMID:23468428

  6. In Vivo Reinsertion of Excised Episomes by the V(D)J Recombinase: A Potential Threat to Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trang; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Cabaud, Olivier; Roulland, Sandrine; Vachez, Elodie; Prinz, Immo; Ferrier, Pierre; Marculescu, Rodrig; Jäger, Ulrich; Nadel, Bertrand

    2007-01-01

    It has long been thought that signal joints, the byproducts of V(D)J recombination, are not involved in the dynamics of the rearrangement process. Evidence has now started to accumulate that this is not the case, and that signal joints play unsuspected roles in events that might compromise genomic integrity. Here we show both ex vivo and in vivo that the episomal circles excised during the normal process of receptor gene rearrangement may be reintegrated into the genome through trans-V(D)J recombination occurring between the episomal signal joint and an immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor target. We further demonstrate that cryptic recombination sites involved in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia–associated chromosomal translocations constitute hotspots of insertion. Eventually, the identification of two in vivo cases associating episomal reintegration and chromosomal translocation suggests that reintegration events are linked to genomic instability. Altogether, our data suggest that V(D)J-mediated reintegration of episomal circles, an event likely eluding classical cytogenetic screenings, might represent an additional potent source of genomic instability and lymphoid cancer. PMID:17298184

  7. Subcellular integrities in Chroococcidiopsis sp. CCMEE 029 survivors after prolonged desiccation revealed by molecular probes and genome stability assays.

    PubMed

    Billi, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Desiccation-tolerant cells must either protect their cellular components from desiccation-induced damage and/or repair it upon rewetting. Subcellular damage to the anhydrobiotic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp. CCMEE 029 stored in the desiccated state for 4 years was evaluated at the single-cell level using fluorescent DNA strand breakage labelling, membrane integrity and potential related molecular probes, oxidant-sensing fluorochrome and redox dye. Covalent modifications of dried genomes were assessed by testing their suitability as PCR template. Results suggest that desiccation survivors avoid/and or limit genome fragmentation and genome covalent modifications, preserve intact plasma membranes and phycobiliprotein autofluorescence, exhibit spatially-reduced ROS accumulation and dehydrogenase activity upon rewetting. Damaged cells undergo genome fragmentation, loss of plasma membrane potential and integrity, phycobiliprotein bleaching, whole-cell ROS accumulation and lack respiratory activity upon rewetting. The co-occurrence of live and dead cells within dried aggregates of Chroococcidiopsis confirms that desiccation resistance is not a simple process and that subtle modifications to the cellular milieu are required to dry without dying. It rises also intriguing questions about the triggers of dead cells in response to drying. The capability of desiccation survivors to avoid and/or reduce subcellular damage, shows that protection mechanisms are relevant in the desiccation tolerance of this cyanobacterium. PMID:18931823

  8. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts.

    PubMed

    Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-10-13

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains. PMID:26384347

  9. Genome-wide array-CGH analysis reveals YRF1 gene copy number variation that modulates genetic stability in distillery yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Skoneczna, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial yeasts, economically important microorganisms, are widely used in diverse biotechnological processes including brewing, winemaking and distilling. In contrast to a well-established genome of brewer's and wine yeast strains, the comprehensive evaluation of genomic features of distillery strains is lacking. In the present study, twenty two distillery yeast strains were subjected to electrophoretic karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). The strains analyzed were assigned to the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex and grouped into four species categories: S. bayanus, S. paradoxus, S. cerevisiae and S. kudriavzevii. The genomic diversity was mainly revealed within subtelomeric regions and the losses and/or gains of fragments of chromosomes I, III, VI and IX were the most frequently observed. Statistically significant differences in the gene copy number were documented in six functional gene categories: 1) telomere maintenance via recombination, DNA helicase activity or DNA binding, 2) maltose metabolism process, glucose transmembrane transporter activity; 3) asparagine catabolism, cellular response to nitrogen starvation, localized in cell wall-bounded periplasmic space, 4) siderophore transport, 5) response to copper ion, cadmium ion binding and 6) L-iditol 2- dehydrogenase activity. The losses of YRF1 genes (Y' element ATP-dependent helicase) were accompanied by decreased level of Y' sequences and an increase in DNA double and single strand breaks, and oxidative DNA damage in the S. paradoxus group compared to the S. bayanus group. We postulate that naturally occurring diversity in the YRF1 gene copy number may promote genetic stability in the S. bayanus group of distillery yeast strains. PMID:26384347

  10. Roles of DNA helicases in the maintenance of genome integrity

    PubMed Central

    Bochman, Matthew L

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is achieved and maintained by the sum of all of the processes in the cell that ensure the faithful duplication and repair of DNA, as well as its genetic transmission from one cell division to the next. As central players in virtually all of the DNA transactions that occur in vivo, DNA helicases (molecular motors that unwind double-stranded DNA to produce single-stranded substrates) represent a crucial enzyme family that is necessary for genomic stability. Indeed, mutations in many human helicase genes are linked to a variety of diseases with symptoms that can be generally described as genomic instability, such as predispositions to cancers. This review focuses on the roles of both DNA replication helicases and recombination/repair helicases in maintaining genome integrity and provides a brief overview of the diseases related to defects in these enzymes. PMID:27308340

  11. Maintaining Medicinal Plant Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For all plant genetic resources collections, including medicinal plant germplasm, maintaining the genetic integrity of material held ex situ is of major importance. This holds true for all intended end uses of the material whether it is as a source for crop improvement, medical research, as voucher...

  12. Maintaining Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... center but can also be done in nursing facilities, hospitals, or at home. Book a PFF Ambassador for your event. Call 844.TalkPFF > Life with PF About PF Treatment Options Clinical Trials Maintaining Your Health Find Medical Care Support Groups PFF ...

  13. Nuclear power plant maintainability.

    PubMed

    Seminara, J L; Parsons, S O

    1982-09-01

    In the mid-1970s a general awareness of human factors engineering deficiencies associated with power plant control rooms took shape and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) awarded the Lockheed Corporation a contract to review the human factors aspects of five representative operational control rooms and their associated simulators. This investigation revealed a host of major and minor deficiencies that assumed unforeseen dimensions in the post- Three Mile Island accident period. In the course of examining operational problems (Seminara et al, 1976) and subsequently the methods for overcoming such problems (Seminara et al, 1979, 1980) indications surfaced that power plants were far from ideal in meeting the needs of maintenance personnel. Accordingly, EPRI sponsored an investigation of the human factors aspects of power plant maintainability (Seminara, 1981). This paper provides an overview of the maintainability problems and issues encountered in the course of reviewing five nuclear power plants. PMID:15676441

  14. Obtaining and maintaining funding

    SciTech Connect

    Beverly Hartline

    1996-04-01

    Obtaining and maintaining funding is important for individuals, groups, institutions, and fields. This challenge is easier during times of abundant and growing resources than it is now, when funding is tight and shrinking. Thus, to obtain and maintain funding will require: maintaining healthy funding levels for all of science; maintaining healthy funding levels for the field(s) you work in; and competing successfully for the available funds. Everyone should pay attention to the overall prospects for science funding and dedicate some effort to working with others to grow the constituency for science. Public support is likely an important prerequisite for keeping future science budgets high. In this context, researchers should share with society at large the benefits of their research, so that taxpayers can see and appreciate some return from the federal investment in science. Assuming this effort is successful, and there continue to be government and private organizations with substantial resources to invest in research, what can the individual investigator do to improve her chances? She can be clear about her goal(s) and carefully plan her effort to make maximum progress for minimum resources, especially early in her career while she is establishing a solid professional reputation. Specific useful strategies include: brainstorm funding options and select the most promising one(s); be persistent but flexible, responsive to new information and changing circumstances; provide value and assistance to prospective funding sources both before and after receiving funding; know the funding agents and what their goals are, they are the customers; promise a lot and always deliver more; build partnerships and collaboration to leverage interest and resources; and develop capabilities and ideas with a promising, irresistible future. There is no guarantee of success. For the best chances, consistently contribute positively and productively in all your efforts, and continue to

  15. Maintaining radiation protection records

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-30

    This Report is part of a series prepared under the auspices of Scientific Committee 46 on Operational Radiation Safety. It provides guidance on maintaining radiation protection records. Record keeping is an essential element of every radiation protection program. This Report describes the elements that should enter into the design of a program for the maintenance of operational radiation safety records. The problems of the length of time for retention of records for operational, regulatory, epidemiologic and legal uses are discussed in detail.

  16. Genome Structure of the Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens and Its Stability on Metalliferous and Nonmetalliferous Soils.

    PubMed

    Mandáková, Terezie; Singh, Vasantika; Krämer, Ute; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-09-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens), an extremophile heavy metal hyperaccumulator model plant in the Brassicaceae family, is a morphologically and phenotypically diverse species exhibiting metal tolerance and leaf accumulation of zinc, cadmium, and nickel. Here, we provide a detailed genome structure of the approximately 267-Mb N. caerulescens genome, which has descended from seven chromosomes of the ancestral proto-Calepineae Karyotype (n = 7) through an unusually high number of pericentric inversions. Genome analysis in two other related species, Noccaea jankae and Raparia bulbosa, showed that all three species, and thus probably the entire Coluteocarpeae tribe, have descended from the proto-Calepineae Karyotype. All three analyzed species share the chromosome structure of six out of seven chromosomes and an unusually high metal accumulation in leaves, which remains moderate in N. jankae and R. bulbosa and is extreme in N. caerulescens. Among these species, N. caerulescens has the most derived karyotype, with species-specific inversions on chromosome NC6, which grouped onto its bottom arm functionally related genes of zinc and iron metal homeostasis comprising the major candidate genes NICOTIANAMINE SYNTHASE2 and ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE1. Concurrently, copper and organellar metal homeostasis genes, which are functionally unrelated to the extreme traits characteristic of N. caerulescens, were grouped onto the top arm of NC6. Compared with Arabidopsis thaliana, more distal chromosomal positions in N. caerulescens were enriched among more highly expressed metal homeostasis genes but not among other groups of genes. Thus, chromosome rearrangements could have facilitated the evolution of enhanced metal homeostasis gene expression, a known hallmark of metal hyperaccumulation. PMID:26195571

  17. Genome Structure of the Heavy Metal Hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens and Its Stability on Metalliferous and Nonmetalliferous Soils1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mandáková, Terezie; Singh, Vasantika; Krämer, Ute; Lysak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Noccaea caerulescens (formerly known as Thlaspi caerulescens), an extremophile heavy metal hyperaccumulator model plant in the Brassicaceae family, is a morphologically and phenotypically diverse species exhibiting metal tolerance and leaf accumulation of zinc, cadmium, and nickel. Here, we provide a detailed genome structure of the approximately 267-Mb N. caerulescens genome, which has descended from seven chromosomes of the ancestral proto-Calepineae Karyotype (n = 7) through an unusually high number of pericentric inversions. Genome analysis in two other related species, Noccaea jankae and Raparia bulbosa, showed that all three species, and thus probably the entire Coluteocarpeae tribe, have descended from the proto-Calepineae Karyotype. All three analyzed species share the chromosome structure of six out of seven chromosomes and an unusually high metal accumulation in leaves, which remains moderate in N. jankae and R. bulbosa and is extreme in N. caerulescens. Among these species, N. caerulescens has the most derived karyotype, with species-specific inversions on chromosome NC6, which grouped onto its bottom arm functionally related genes of zinc and iron metal homeostasis comprising the major candidate genes NICOTIANAMINE SYNTHASE2 and ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE1. Concurrently, copper and organellar metal homeostasis genes, which are functionally unrelated to the extreme traits characteristic of N. caerulescens, were grouped onto the top arm of NC6. Compared with Arabidopsis thaliana, more distal chromosomal positions in N. caerulescens were enriched among more highly expressed metal homeostasis genes but not among other groups of genes. Thus, chromosome rearrangements could have facilitated the evolution of enhanced metal homeostasis gene expression, a known hallmark of metal hyperaccumulation. PMID:26195571

  18. Qualitative assessment of genotoxicity using random amplified polymorphic DNA: Comparison of genomic template stability with key fitness parameters in Daphnia magna exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, F.A.; Conradi, M.; Evenden, A.J.; Jha, A.N.; Depledge, M.H.

    1999-10-01

    A method of DNA profiling using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to assess toxicant-induced DNA effects in laboratory populations of Daphnia magna exposed to varying concentrations of the genotoxic hydrocarbon benzo[a]pyrene. These effects, represented by changes in the RAPD profiles, were compared with a number of key ecological fitness parameters (age-specific survival, age-specific fecundity, net reproductive rate, and intrinsic rate of population increase). Not only was the RAPD profiling method shown to be a rapid and reproducible assay of toxicant-induced DNA effects, but the qualitative measure of genomic template stability compared favorably with the traditional indices of fitness. The RAPD profiles, however, exhibited higher sensitivity in detecting toxic effects. The significance of these findings for future ecotoxicological studies is discussed.

  19. Ligninolytic peroxidase genes in the oyster mushroom genome: heterologous expression, molecular structure, catalytic and stability properties, and lignin-degrading ability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome of Pleurotus ostreatus, an important edible mushroom and a model ligninolytic organism of interest in lignocellulose biorefineries due to its ability to delignify agricultural wastes, was sequenced with the purpose of identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for lignin degradation. Results Heterologous expression of the class II peroxidase genes, followed by kinetic studies, enabled their functional classification. The resulting inventory revealed the absence of lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and the presence of three versatile peroxidases (VPs) and six manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the crystal structures of two of them (VP1 and MnP4) were solved at 1.0 to 1.1 Å showing significant structural differences. Gene expansion supports the importance of both peroxidase types in the white-rot lifestyle of this fungus. Using a lignin model dimer and synthetic lignin, we showed that VP is able to degrade lignin. Moreover, the dual Mn-mediated and Mn-independent activity of P. ostreatus MnPs justifies their inclusion in a new peroxidase subfamily. The availability of the whole POD repertoire enabled investigation, at a biochemical level, of the existence of duplicated genes. Differences between isoenzymes are not limited to their kinetic constants. Surprising differences in their activity T50 and residual activity at both acidic and alkaline pH were observed. Directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic/structural information were combined to explain the catalytic and stability properties of the most interesting isoenzymes, and their evolutionary history was analyzed in the context of over 200 basidiomycete peroxidase sequences. Conclusions The analysis of the P. ostreatus genome shows a lignin-degrading system where the role generally played by LiP has been assumed by VP. Moreover, it enabled the first characterization of the complete set of peroxidase isoenzymes in a basidiomycete, revealing strong differences in stability properties and providing

  20. Local Neutral Networks Help Maintain Inaccurately Replicating Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-01-01

    The error threshold of replication limits the selectively maintainable genome size against recurrent deleterious mutations for most fitness landscapes. In the context of RNA replication a distinction between the genotypic and the phenotypic error threshold has been made; where the latter concerns the maintenance of secondary structure rather than sequence. RNA secondary structure is treated as a proxy for function. The phenotypic error threshold allows higher per digit mutation rates than its genotypic counterpart, and is known to increase with the frequency of neutral mutations in sequence space. Here we show that the degree of neutrality, i.e. the frequency of nearest-neighbour (one-step) neutral mutants is a remarkably accurate proxy for the overall frequency of such mutants in an experimentally verifiable formula for the phenotypic error threshold; this we achieve by the full numerical solution for the concentration of all sequences in mutation-selection balance up to length 16. We reinforce our previous result that currently known ribozymes could be selectively maintained by the accuracy known from the best available polymerase ribozymes. Furthermore, we show that in silico stabilizing selection can increase the mutational robustness of ribozymes due to the fact that they were produced by artificial directional selection in the first place. Our finding offers a better understanding of the error threshold and provides further insight into the plausibility of an ancient RNA world. PMID:25299454

  1. Genome-Wide Characterization of Maize Small RNA Loci and Their Regulation in the required to maintain repression6-1 (rmr6-1) Mutant and Long-Term Abiotic Stresses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lunardon, Alice; Forestan, Cristian; Farinati, Silvia; Axtell, Michael J.; Varotto, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) contribute to gene regulation and genome homeostasis, but their activities and functions are incompletely known. The maize genome has a high number of transposable elements (TEs; almost 85%), some of which spawn abundant sRNAs. We performed sRNA and total RNA sequencing from control and abiotically stressed B73 wild-type plants and rmr6-1 mutants. RMR6 encodes the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase IV complex and is responsible for accumulation of most 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). We identified novel MIRNA loci and verified miR399 target conservation in maize. RMR6-dependent 23-24 nt siRNA loci were specifically enriched in the upstream region of the most highly expressed genes. Most genes misregulated in rmr6-1 did not show a significant correlation with loss of flanking siRNAs, but we identified one gene supporting existing models of direct gene regulation by TE-derived siRNAs. Long-term drought correlated with changes of miRNA and sRNA accumulation, in particular inducing down-regulation of a set of sRNA loci in the wild-typeleaf. PMID:26747286

  2. Maintaining gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, J.D.

    1997-05-01

    An often overlooked key to satisfactory operation and longevity of any mechanical device is proper operation and maintenance in accordance with the manufacturer`s written instructions. Absorption chillers, although they use a different technology than the more familiar vapor compression cycle to produce chilled water, operate successfully in a variety of applications if operated and maintained properly. Maintenance procedures may be more frequent than those required for vapor compression chillers, but they are also typically less complex. The goal of this article is to describe the basic operation of an absorption chiller to provide an understanding of the relatively simple tasks required to keep the machine operating at maximum efficiency for its design life and beyond. A good starting point is definitions. Gas cooling equipment is generally defined as alternative energy, non-electric cooling products. This includes absorption chillers, engine-drive chillers and packaged desiccant units, among others. Natural gas combustion drives the equipment.

  3. Reagan: Maintain Antarctic program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan has decided that the United States should maintain an ‘active and influential presence’ in Antarctica to support the nation's interests. Following a review of a study by the Antarctica Policy Group, Reagan issued a memorandum, dated February 5, to the heads of 14 government agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Office of Management and Budget.The U.S. presence in Antarctica ‘shall include the conduct of scientific activities in major disciplines; year-round occupation of the South Pole and two coastal stations; and availability of related necessary logistics support,’ wrote the President. In addition, NSF should continue to budget for the entire U.S. program in Antarctica. Short-term programs by other agencies require the recommendation of the Antarctica Policy Group and should be coordinated within the framework of NSF logistics support.

  4. Persistence drives gene clustering in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Gang; Rocha, Eduardo PC; Danchin, Antoine

    2008-01-01

    Background Gene clustering plays an important role in the organization of the bacterial chromosome and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain its extent. However, the controversies raised about the validity of each of these mechanisms remind us that the cause of this gene organization remains an open question. Models proposed to explain clustering did not take into account the function of the gene products nor the likely presence or absence of a given gene in a genome. However, genomes harbor two very different categories of genes: those genes present in a majority of organisms – persistent genes – and those present in very few organisms – rare genes. Results We show that two classes of genes are significantly clustered in bacterial genomes: the highly persistent and the rare genes. The clustering of rare genes is readily explained by the selfish operon theory. Yet, genes persistently present in bacterial genomes are also clustered and we try to understand why. We propose a model accounting specifically for such clustering, and show that indispensability in a genome with frequent gene deletion and insertion leads to the transient clustering of these genes. The model describes how clusters are created via the gene flux that continuously introduces new genes while deleting others. We then test if known selective processes, such as co-transcription, physical interaction or functional neighborhood, account for the stabilization of these clusters. Conclusion We show that the strong selective pressure acting on the function of persistent genes, in a permanent state of flux of genes in bacterial genomes, maintaining their size fairly constant, that drives persistent genes clustering. A further selective stabilization process might contribute to maintaining the clustering. PMID:18179692

  5. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  6. Histone Acetyl Transferase 1 Is Essential for Mammalian Development, Genome Stability, and the Processing of Newly Synthesized Histones H3 and H4

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Prabakaran; Ge, Zhongqi; Sirbu, Bianca; Doughty, Cheryl; Agudelo Garcia, Paula A.; Schlederer, Michaela; Annunziato, Anthony T.; Cortez, David; Kenner, Lukas; Parthun, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferase 1 is an evolutionarily conserved type B histone acetyltransferase that is thought to be responsible for the diacetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines 5 and 12 during chromatin assembly. To understand the function of this enzyme in a complex organism, we have constructed a conditional mouse knockout model of Hat1. Murine Hat1 is essential for viability, as homozygous deletion of Hat1 results in neonatal lethality. The lungs of embryos and pups genetically deficient in Hat1 were much less mature upon histological evaluation. The neonatal lethality is due to severe defects in lung development that result in less aeration and respiratory distress. Many of the Hat1−/− neonates also display significant craniofacial defects with abnormalities in the bones of the skull and jaw. Hat1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are defective in cell proliferation and are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. In addition, the Hat1−/− MEFs display a marked increase in genome instability. Analysis of histone dynamics at sites of replication-coupled chromatin assembly demonstrates that Hat1 is not only responsible for the acetylation of newly synthesized histone H4 but is also required to maintain the acetylation of histone H3 on lysines 9, 18, and 27 during replication-coupled chromatin assembly. PMID:23754951

  7. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  8. Stability and Fitness Impact of the Visually Discernible Rosea1 Marker in the Tobacco etch virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Majer, Eszter; Daròs, José-Antonio; Zwart, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Antirrhinum majus Rosea1 (Ros1) is an MYB-related transcription factor that induces anthocyanin biosynthesis in plant tissues, and has been shown to be suitable for visual tracking of virus infection in plants. However, activation of anthocyanin biosynthesis has far reaching effects on plant physiology and could consequently have negative effects on viral replication. Therefore, viruses carrying the Ros1 marker might have a low fitness and consequently rapidly lose the marker. To compare the stability of the Ros1 marker, we generated Tobacco etch virus (TEV) based constructs containing either Ros1 or the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) between the NIb and CP cistrons (TEV-Ros1 and TEV-eGFP, respectively). We measured the within-host competitive fitness of both viruses by direct competitions with a common competitor during infection of Nicotiana tabacum. The fitness of TEV-Ros1 was significantly lower than that of TEV-eGFP, and both recombinant viruses had a significantly lower fitness than the wild-type virus. Nevertheless, after seven weeks of infection in N. tabacum, similar levels of marker gene instability where found for both viruses. Despite lower fitness of the marked virus, Ros1 is therefore a viable alternative marker for tracking viral infection in plants. PMID:24022073

  9. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; et al

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  10. The 3D folding of metazoan genomes correlates with the association of similar repetitive elements

    PubMed Central

    Cournac, Axel; Koszul, Romain; Mozziconacci, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The potential roles of the numerous repetitive elements found in the genomes of multi-cellular organisms remain speculative. Several studies have suggested a role in stabilizing specific 3D genomic contacts. To test this hypothesis, we exploited inter-chromosomal contacts frequencies obtained from Hi-C experiments and show that the folding of the human, mouse and Drosophila genomes is associated with a significant co-localization of several specific repetitive elements, notably many elements of the SINE family. These repeats tend to be the oldest ones and are enriched in transcription factor binding sites. We propose that the co-localization of these repetitive elements may explain the global conservation of genome folding observed between homologous regions of the human and mouse genome. Taken together, these results support a contribution of specific repetitive elements in maintaining and/or reshaping genome architecture over evolutionary times. PMID:26609133