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Sample records for maize streak disease

  1. Wheat streak mosaic virus lacking HC-Pro is competent to produce disease synergism in mixed infections with Maize chlorotic mottle virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single infections of maize plants with the tritimovirus Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) or the machlomovirus Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) are characterized by systemic chlorosis but not necrosis. Co-infection of maize with both viruses results in disease synergism and induction of corn leth...

  2. Wheat streak mosaic virus lacking HC-Pro is competent to produce disease synergism in double infections with maize chlorotic mottle virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single infections of maize plants with the tritimovirus Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) or the machlomovirus Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) are characterized by systemic chlorosis but not necrosis. Co-infection of maize with both viruses results in disease synergism and induction of corn leth...

  3. Efficient inoculation of rice black-streaked dwarf virus to maize using Laodelphax striatellus Fallen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) is the most important viral disease of maize in China. Although deploying disease resistant hybrids would be the most effective way to control the disease, development of resistant hybrids has been limited by virus t...

  4. Maize Chlorotic Mottle Machlomovirus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Rymovirus Concentrations Increase in the Synergistic Disease Corn Lethal Necrosis

    E-print Network

    Scheets, Kay

    in the Synergistic Disease Corn Lethal Necrosis Kay Scheets1 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics for revision October 20, 1997; accepted December 8, 1997 Corn lethal necrosis (CLN) is caused cereals. Interactions between MCMV and wheat streak mosaic rymovirus (WSMV) in N28Ht corn produced MCMV

  5. Comparative analysis of Panicum streak virus and Maize streak virus diversity, recombination patterns and phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Panicum streak virus (PanSV; Family Geminiviridae; Genus Mastrevirus) is a close relative of Maize streak virus (MSV), the most serious viral threat to maize production in Africa. PanSV and MSV have the same leafhopper vector species, largely overlapping natural host ranges and similar geographical distributions across Africa and its associated Indian Ocean Islands. Unlike MSV, however, PanSV has no known economic relevance. Results Here we report on 16 new PanSV full genome sequences sampled throughout Africa and use these together with others in public databases to reveal that PanSV and MSV populations in general share very similar patterns of genetic exchange and geographically structured diversity. A potentially important difference between the species, however, is that the movement of MSV strains throughout Africa is apparently less constrained than that of PanSV strains. Interestingly the MSV-A strain which causes maize streak disease is apparently the most mobile of all the PanSV and MSV strains investigated. Conclusion We therefore hypothesize that the generally increased mobility of MSV relative to other closely related species such as PanSV, may have been an important evolutionary step in the eventual emergence of MSV-A as a serious agricultural pathogen. The GenBank accession numbers for the sequences reported in this paper are GQ415386-GQ415401 PMID:19903330

  6. Plant host range and leafhopper transmission of Maize fine streak virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV), an emerging rhabdovirus species in the genus Nucleorhabdovirus, is persistently transmitted by the black-faced leafhopper, Graminella nigrifrons (Forbes). MFSV was transmitted to maize, wheat, oats, rye, barley, foxtail, annual ryegrass and quackgrass by G. nigrifron...

  7. The nucleotide sequence of maize streak virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Mullineaux, P M; Donson, J; Morris-Krsinich, B A; Boulton, M I; Davies, J W

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the DNA of maize streak virus (MSV) has been determined. The data were accommodated into one DNA circle of 2687 nucleotides, in contrast to previously characterised geminiviruses which have been shown to possess two circles of DNA. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the DNA of MSV with those of cassava latent virus (CLV) and tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) showed no detectable homology. Analysis of open reading frames revealed seven potential coding regions for proteins of mol. wt. greater than or equal to 10 000, three in the viral (+) sense and four in the complementary (-) sense. The position of likely transcription signals on the MSV DNA sequence would suggest a bidirectional strategy of transcription as proposed for CLV and TGMV. Nine inverted repeat sequences which have a potential of forming hairpin structures of delta G greater than or equal to -14 kcal/mol have been detected. Three of these hairpin structures are in non-coding regions and could be involved in the regulation of transcription and/or replication. PMID:6526009

  8. Nuclear import of Maize fine streak virus proteins in Drosophila S2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) is a member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae and is transmitted by the leafhopper Graminella nigrifons. The virus replicates in both its plant host and in its insect vector. Nucleorhabdoviruses replicate in the nucleus and assemble at the inner nu...

  9. Reconstructing the History of Maize Streak Virus Strain A Dispersal To Reveal Diversification Hot Spots and Its Origin in Southern Africa ? †

    PubMed Central

    Monjane, Adérito L.; Harkins, Gordon W.; Martin, Darren P.; Lemey, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Shepherd, Dionne N.; Oluwafemi, Sunday; Simuyandi, Michelo; Zinga, Innocent; Komba, Ephrem K.; Lakoutene, Didier P.; Mandakombo, Noella; Mboukoulida, Joseph; Semballa, Silla; Tagne, Appolinaire; Tiendrébéogo, Fidèle; Erdmann, Julia B.; van Antwerpen, Tania; Owor, Betty E.; Flett, Bradley; Ramusi, Moses; Windram, Oliver P.; Syed, Rizwan; Lett, Jean-Michel; Briddon, Rob W.; Markham, Peter G.; Rybicki, Edward P.; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Maize streak virus strain A (MSV-A), the causal agent of maize streak disease, is today one of the most serious biotic threats to African food security. Determining where MSV-A originated and how it spread transcontinentally could yield valuable insights into its historical emergence as a crop pathogen. Similarly, determining where the major extant MSV-A lineages arose could identify geographical hot spots of MSV evolution. Here, we use model-based phylogeographic analyses of 353 fully sequenced MSV-A isolates to reconstruct a plausible history of MSV-A movements over the past 150 years. We show that since the probable emergence of MSV-A in southern Africa around 1863, the virus spread transcontinentally at an average rate of 32.5 km/year (95% highest probability density interval, 15.6 to 51.6 km/year). Using distinctive patterns of nucleotide variation caused by 20 unique intra-MSV-A recombination events, we tentatively classified the MSV-A isolates into 24 easily discernible lineages. Despite many of these lineages displaying distinct geographical distributions, it is apparent that almost all have emerged within the past 4 decades from either southern or east-central Africa. Collectively, our results suggest that regular analysis of MSV-A genomes within these diversification hot spots could be used to monitor the emergence of future MSV-A lineages that could affect maize cultivation in Africa. PMID:21715477

  10. Genetic Insights into Graminella nigrifrons Competence for Maize fine streak virus Infection and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Andrew P.; Stewart, Lucy R.; Redinbaugh, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most plant-infecting rhabdoviruses are transmitted by one or a few closely related insect species. Additionally, intraspecific differences in transmission efficacy often exist among races/biotypes within vector species and among strains within a virus species. The black-faced leafhopper, Graminella nigrifrons, is the only known vector of the persistent propagative rhabdovirus Maize fine streak virus (MFSV). Only a small percentage of leafhoppers are capable of transmitting the virus, although the mechanisms underlying vector competence are not well understood. Methodology RNA-Seq was carried out to explore transcript expression changes and sequence variation in G. nigrifrons and MFSV that may be associated with the ability of the vector to acquire and transmit the virus. RT-qPCR assays were used to validate differential transcript accumulation. Results/Significance Feeding on MFSV-infected maize elicited a considerable transcriptional response in G. nigrifrons, with increased expression of cytoskeleton organization and immunity transcripts in infected leafhoppers. Differences between leafhoppers capable of transmitting MFSV, relative to non-transmitting but infected leafhoppers were more limited, which may reflect difficulties discerning between the two groups and/or the likelihood that the transmitter phenotype results from one or a few genetic differences. The ability of infected leafhoppers to transmit MFSV did not appear associated with virus transcript accumulation in the infected leafhoppers or sequence polymorphisms in the viral genome. However, the non-structural MFSV 3 gene was expressed at unexpectedly high levels in infected leafhoppers, suggesting it plays an active role in the infection of the insect host. The results of this study begin to define the functional roles of specific G. nigrifrons and MFSV genes in the viral transmission process. PMID:25420026

  11. Control of virus diseases in maize.

    PubMed

    Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Zambrano, José L

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by viruses are found throughout the maize-growing regions of the world and can cause significant losses for producers. In this review, virus diseases of maize and the pathogens that cause them are discussed. Factors leading to the spread of disease and measures for disease control are reviewed, as is our current knowledge of the genetics of virus resistance in this important crop. PMID:25410107

  12. Fine mapping of Msv1, a major QTL for resistance to Maize Streak Virus leads to development of production markers for breeding pipelines.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sudha K; Babu, Raman; Magorokosho, Cosmos; Mahuku, George; Semagn, Kassa; Beyene, Yoseph; Das, Biswanath; Makumbi, Dan; Lava Kumar, P; Olsen, Michael; Boddupalli, Prasanna M

    2015-09-01

    Msv1 , the major QTL for MSV resistance was delimited to an interval of 0.87 cM on chromosome 1 at 87 Mb and production markers with high prediction accuracy were developed. Maize streak virus (MSV) disease is a devastating disease in the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), which causes significant yield loss in maize. Resistance to MSV has previously been mapped to a major QTL (Msv1) on chromosome 1 that is germplasm and environment independent and to several minor loci elsewhere in the genome. In this study, Msv1 was fine-mapped through QTL isogenic recombinant strategy using a large F 2 population of CML206 × CML312 to an interval of 0.87 cM on chromosome 1. Genome-wide association study was conducted in the DTMA (Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa)-Association mapping panel with 278 tropical/sub-tropical breeding lines from CIMMYT using the high-density genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) markers. This study identified 19 SNPs in the region between 82 and 93 Mb on chromosome 1(B73 RefGen_V2) at a P < 1.00E-04, which coincided with the fine-mapped region of Msv1. Haplotype trend regression identified a haplotype block significantly associated with response to MSV. Three SNPs in this haplotype block at 87 Mb on chromosome 1 had an accuracy of 0.94 in predicting the disease reaction in a collection of breeding lines with known responses to MSV infection. In two biparental populations, selection for resistant Msv1 haplotype demonstrated a reduction of 1.03-1.39 units on a rating scale of 1-5, compared to the susceptible haplotype. High-throughput KASP assays have been developed for these three SNPs to enable routine marker screening in the breeding pipeline for MSV resistance. PMID:26081946

  13. The African Fusarium/maize disease.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Michael F

    2009-03-01

    There is a general but rather vague feeling that the use of maize (corn) as a staple foodstuff by black rural Africans is somehow a factor in, or is linked to, chronic disease found in these populations. An attempt is made in this review to consider the evidence for this connection and to identify what is actually the root of the problem. The main thrust of the argument to explain this perception is that maize is routinely contaminated with fungi and of these Fusarium verticillioides is found in maize throughout the world. Evidence is presented to this effect and, further, of the mycotoxins found in maize, the fumonisins are the most common and at the highest levels. Various animal chronic diseases arising from the consumption of contaminated maize are reviewed and possible human conditions listed, in some cases related to the known animal ones. A brief overview of the complicated cellular mechanisms of fumonisin B1 is given and it is concluded that the prime suspect in what might be called "the maize disease" can be attributed to the ingestion of this mycotoxin, sometimes in combination with other synergist mycotoxins and other disease factors, such as smoking and drinking. PMID:23604934

  14. Cassava brown streak disease: a threat to food security in Africa.

    PubMed

    Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Legg, James P; Kanju, Edward; Fauquet, Claude M

    2015-05-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has emerged as the most important viral disease of cassava (Manihot esculenta) in Africa and is a major threat to food security. CBSD is caused by two distinct species of ipomoviruses, Cassava brown streak virus and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus, belonging to the family Potyviridae. Previously, CBSD was reported only from the coastal lowlands of East Africa, but recently it has begun to spread as an epidemic throughout the Great Lakes region of East and Central Africa. This new spread represents a major threat to the cassava-growing regions of West Africa. CBSD-resistant cassava cultivars are being developed through breeding, and transgenic RNA interference-derived field resistance to CBSD has also been demonstrated. This review aims to provide a summary of the most important studies on the aetiology, epidemiology and control of CBSD and to highlight key research areas that need prioritization. PMID:26015320

  15. REMOTE SENSING OF BARLEY YELLOW DWARF AND WHEAT STREAK MOSAIC DISEASE IN WINTER WHEAT CANOPIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficiency of field monitoring for barley yellow dwarf (BYD) and wheat streak mosaic (WSM) viral diseases would be improved with knowledge of reflected solar radiation from winter wheat crop canopies. Our objective was to characterize canopy spectral reflectance as well as other canopy and yield...

  16. Plant Disease / August 2005 853 The Window of Risk for Emigration of Wheat streak mosaic virus Varies

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Karen A.

    Plant Disease / August 2005 853 The Window of Risk for Emigration of Wheat streak mosaic virus or disease vector. For wheat stem rust, the complete eradication of an alter- nate host has been attempted vectors may be most active. In winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), the "green bridge" provided by volunteer

  17. Mapping Disease Resistance QTL for Three Foliar Diseases of Maize in a RIL Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern leaf blight (SLB), gray leaf spot (GLS), and northern leaf blight (NLB) are three important foliar diseases impacting maize production. The objectives of this study were to identify quantitative trait loci for disease resistance (dQTL) for resistance to these diseases in a maize recombinan...

  18. Genome-Wide Association Implicates Candidate Genes Conferring Resistance to Maize Rough Dwarf Disease in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengshen; Wang, Xiaoming; Hao, Junjie; Yan, Jianbing; Ding, Junqiang

    2015-01-01

    Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is a destructive viral disease in China, which results in 20–30% of the maize yield losses in affected areas and even as high as 100% in severely infected fields. Understanding the genetic basis of resistance will provide important insights for maize breeding program. In this study, a diverse maize population comprising of 527 inbred lines was evaluated in four environments and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was undertaken with over 556000 SNP markers. Fifteen candidate genes associated with MRDD resistance were identified, including ten genes with annotated protein encoding functions. The homologous of nine candidate genes were predicted to relate to plant defense in different species based on published results. Significant correlation (R2 = 0.79) between the MRDD severity and the number of resistance alleles was observed. Consequently, we have broadened the resistant germplasm to MRDD and identified a number of resistance alleles by GWAS. The results in present study also imply the candidate genes in defense pathway play an important role in resistance to MRDD in maize. PMID:26529245

  19. Seed treatments enhance photosynthesis in maize seedlings by reducing infection with Fusarium spp. and consequent disease development in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a seed treatment on early season growth, seedling disease development, incidence Fusarium spp. infection, and photosynthetic performance of maize were evaluated at two locations in Iowa in 2007. Maize seed was either treated with Cruiser 2Extreme 250 ® (fludioxonil + azoxystrobin + me...

  20. Transcriptional response of virus-infected cassava and identification of putative sources of resistance for cassava brown streak disease.

    PubMed

    Maruthi, M N; Bouvaine, Sophie; Tufan, Hale A; Mohammed, Ibrahim U; Hillocks, Rory J

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is a major food staple in sub-Saharan Africa, which is severely affected by cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). The aim of this study was to identify resistance for CBSD as well as to understand the mechanism of putative resistance for providing effective control for the disease. Three cassava varieties; Kaleso, Kiroba and Albert were inoculated with cassava brown streak viruses by grafting and also using the natural insect vector the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Kaleso expressed mild or no disease symptoms and supported low concentrations of viruses, which is a characteristic of resistant plants. In comparison, Kiroba expressed severe leaf but milder root symptoms, while Albert was susceptible with severe symptoms both on leaves and roots. Real-time PCR was used to estimate virus concentrations in cassava varieties. Virus quantities were higher in Kiroba and Albert compared to Kaleso. The Illumina RNA-sequencing was used to further understand the genetic basis of resistance. More than 700 genes were uniquely overexpressed in Kaleso in response to virus infection compared to Albert. Surprisingly, none of them were similar to known resistant gene orthologs. Some of the overexpressed genes, however, belonged to the hormone signalling pathways and secondary metabolites, both of which are linked to plant resistance. These genes should be further characterised before confirming their role in resistance to CBSD. PMID:24846209

  1. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf disease in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Wang, Lijiao; Wang, Ying; Gao, Cunyi; Lan, Ying; Sun, Feng; Fan, Yongjian; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf disease, caused by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), is transmitted by small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, SBPH) and causes severe yield loss in epidemic years in China and other East Asian countries. Breeding for resistance to RBSDV is a promising strategy to control the disease. We identified Tetep that showed resistance to RBSDV using a field test and artificial inoculation test. An evaluation of the resistance mechanism revealed that Tetep was resistant to RBSDV but not to SBPH. Genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Tetep to RBSDV was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three new QTLs for RBSDV resistance were identified in this study, i.e., qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11. The LOD scores of qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11 were 4.07, 2.24 and 2.21, accounting for 17.5%, 0.3% and 12.4% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. All the resistance loci identified in this study were associated with virus resistance genes. The alleles for enhancing resistance on chromosomes 3 and 11 originated from Tetep, whereas the other allele on chromosome 10 originated from a susceptible parent. The identified new resistance QTLs in this study are useful resources for efficiently breeding resistant rice cultivars to RBSDV. PMID:26198760

  2. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf disease in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Wang, Lijiao; Wang, Ying; Gao, Cunyi; Lan, Ying; Sun, Feng; Fan, Yongjian; Wang, Guoliang; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf disease, caused by rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), is transmitted by small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, SBPH) and causes severe yield loss in epidemic years in China and other East Asian countries. Breeding for resistance to RBSDV is a promising strategy to control the disease. We identified Tetep that showed resistance to RBSDV using a field test and artificial inoculation test. An evaluation of the resistance mechanism revealed that Tetep was resistant to RBSDV but not to SBPH. Genetic analysis showed that the resistance of Tetep to RBSDV was controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Three new QTLs for RBSDV resistance were identified in this study, i.e., qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11. The LOD scores of qRBSDV-3, qRBSDV-10 and qRBSDV-11 were 4.07, 2.24 and 2.21, accounting for 17.5%, 0.3% and 12.4% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. All the resistance loci identified in this study were associated with virus resistance genes. The alleles for enhancing resistance on chromosomes 3 and 11 originated from Tetep, whereas the other allele on chromosome 10 originated from a susceptible parent. The identified new resistance QTLs in this study are useful resources for efficiently breeding resistant rice cultivars to RBSDV. PMID:26198760

  3. Maize-Pathogen Interactions: An Ongoing Combat from a Proteomics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Pechanova, Olga; Pechan, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a host to numerous pathogenic species that impose serious diseases to its ear and foliage, negatively affecting the yield and the quality of the maize crop. A considerable amount of research has been carried out to elucidate mechanisms of maize-pathogen interactions with a major goal to identify defense-associated proteins. In this review, we summarize interactions of maize with its agriculturally important pathogens that were assessed at the proteome level. Employing differential analyses, such as the comparison of pathogen-resistant and susceptible maize varieties, as well as changes in maize proteomes after pathogen challenge, numerous proteins were identified as possible candidates in maize resistance. We describe findings of various research groups that used mainly mass spectrometry-based, high through-put proteomic tools to investigate maize interactions with fungal pathogens Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium spp., and Curvularia lunata, and viral agents Rice Black-streaked Dwarf Virus and Sugarcane Mosaic Virus. PMID:26633370

  4. Maize-Pathogen Interactions: An Ongoing Combat from a Proteomics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pechanova, Olga; Pechan, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a host to numerous pathogenic species that impose serious diseases to its ear and foliage, negatively affecting the yield and the quality of the maize crop. A considerable amount of research has been carried out to elucidate mechanisms of maize-pathogen interactions with a major goal to identify defense-associated proteins. In this review, we summarize interactions of maize with its agriculturally important pathogens that were assessed at the proteome level. Employing differential analyses, such as the comparison of pathogen-resistant and susceptible maize varieties, as well as changes in maize proteomes after pathogen challenge, numerous proteins were identified as possible candidates in maize resistance. We describe findings of various research groups that used mainly mass spectrometry-based, high through-put proteomic tools to investigate maize interactions with fungal pathogens Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium spp., and Curvularia lunata, and viral agents Rice Black-streaked Dwarf Virus and Sugarcane Mosaic Virus. PMID:26633370

  5. Identification and fine-mapping of a QTL, qMrdd1, that confers recessive resistance to maize rough dwarf disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD) is a devastating viral disease that results in considerable yield losses worldwide. Three major strains of virus cause MRDD, including maize rough dwarf virus in Europe, Mal de Río Cuarto virus in South America, and rice black-streaked dwarf virus in East Asia. These viral pathogens belong to the genus fijivirus in the family Reoviridae. Resistance against MRDD is a complex trait that involves a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL). The primary approach used to minimize yield losses from these viruses is to breed and deploy resistant maize hybrids. Results Of the 50 heterogeneous inbred families (HIFs), 24 showed consistent responses to MRDD across different years and locations, in which 9 were resistant and 15 were susceptible. We performed trait-marker association analysis on the 24 HIFs and found six chromosomal regions which were putatively associated with MRDD resistance. We then conducted QTL analysis and detected a major resistance QTL, qMrdd1, on chromosome 8. By applying recombinant-derived progeny testing to self-pollinated backcrossed families, we fine-mapped the qMrdd1 locus into a 1.2-Mb region flanked by markers M103-4 and M105-3. The qMrdd1 locus acted in a recessive manner to reduce the disease-severity index (DSI) by 24.2–39.3%. The genetic effect of qMrdd1 was validated using another F6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population in which MRDD resistance was segregating and two genotypes at the qMrdd1 locus differed significantly in DSI values. Conclusions The qMrdd1 locus is a major resistance QTL, acting in a recessive manner to increase maize resistance to MRDD. We mapped qMrdd1 to a 1.2-Mb region, which will enable the introgression of qMrdd1-based resistance into elite maize hybrids and reduce MRDD-related crop losses. PMID:24079304

  6. Development of VNTR Markers to Assess Genetic Diversity of Mycosphaerella Fijiensis, the Causal Agent of Black Leaf Streak Disease in Bananas (Musa spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causal agent of black leaf streak (BLS) disease in bananas. This pathogen threatens global banana production as the main export cultivars are highly susceptible. As a consequence, commercial banana plantations must be protected chemically with fungicides; up to 40 app...

  7. Development of a genetic linkage map of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease in bananas (Musa spp.) using SSR and DArT markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causal agent of black leaf streak (BLS) disease in bananas. This pathogen threatens global banana production as the main export cultivars are highly susceptible. As a consequence, commercial banana plantations must be protected chemically with fungicides; up to 40 app...

  8. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Markers in the Genome Sequence of Mycosphaerella Fijiensis, the Causal Agent of Black Leaf Streak Disease of Banana (Musa spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of banana leaf streak disease (commonly known as black Sigatoka), is the most devastating pathogen attacking bananas (Musa spp). Recently the whole genome sequence of M. fijiensis became available. This sequence was screened for the presence of Variable Num...

  9. The c-terminus of wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize through host-specific long-distance transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multifunctional viral coat proteins (CPs) play important roles in the virus life-cycle. The CP determinants and mechanisms involved in extension of host range of monocot-infecting viruses are poorly understood. The role of the C-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) CP in virus transpo...

  10. Fumonisin biomarkers in maize eaters and implications for human disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is the predominant food source contaminated by fumonisins and this has particular health risks for communities consuming maize as a staple diet. The main biochemical effect of fumonisins is the inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis causing an increase in sphingoid bases and sphingoid base 1-pho...

  11. Indirect selection for resistance to ear rot and leaf diseases in maize lines using biplots.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G S; Camargos, R B; Balestre, M; Von Pinho, R G; C Melo, W M

    2015-01-01

    Leaf disease and ear rot have caused reductions in maize yield in Brazil and other producer countries. Therefore, the aims of this study were to analyze the association between husked ear yield and the severity of maize white spot, gray leaf spot, helminthosporium, and ear rot caused by Fusarium verticillioides and Diplodia maydis using biplots in a mixed-model approach. The responses of 238 lines introduced to Brazil and four controls were evaluated using an incomplete block design with three replicates in two locations: Lavras and Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Two experiments were conducted in each location, one with F. verticillioides and the other with D. maydis. The mixed models elucidated the relationship between yield, leaf disease, and ear disease. Significant genotype x environment and genotype x pathogen interactions were observed. In conclusion, husked ear yield is more associated with ear rot than with the leaf diseases evaluated, justifying the indirect selection for resistance to kernel rot in maize-F. verticillioides and maize-D. maydis pathosystems by yield evaluation. PMID:26400335

  12. Necrotic streak disease of tomato in Florida caused by a new ilarvirus species related to Tulare apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel ilarvirus for which the name Tomato necrotic streak virus (TomNSV) is proposed was detected in Florida tomato plants beginning in October 2013. Symptoms including necrosis of leaves, petioles and stems, and necrotic rings or spots on fruits were observed. This report provides an overview o...

  13. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  14. Plant-Plant-Microbe Mechanisms Involved in Soil-Borne Disease Suppression on a Maize and Pepper Intercropping System

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xinyue; Liao, Jingjing; Ding, Xupo; Deng, Weiping; Fan, Limin; He, Xiahong; Vivanco, Jorge M.; Li, Chengyun; Zhu, Youyong; Zhu, Shusheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Intercropping systems could increase crop diversity and avoid vulnerability to biotic stresses. Most studies have shown that intercropping can provide relief to crops against wind-dispersed pathogens. However, there was limited data on how the practice of intercropping help crops against soil-borne Phytophthora disease. Principal Findings Compared to pepper monoculture, a large scale intercropping study of maize grown between pepper rows reduced disease levels of the soil-borne pepper Phytophthora blight. These reduced disease levels of Phytophthora in the intercropping system were correlated with the ability of maize plants to form a “root wall” that restricted the movement of Phytophthora capsici across rows. Experimentally, it was found that maize roots attracted the zoospores of P. capsici and then inhibited their growth. When maize plants were grown in close proximity to each other, the roots produced and secreted larger quantities of 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA) and 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA). Furthermore, MBOA, benzothiazole (BZO), and 2-(methylthio)-benzothiazole (MBZO) were identified in root exudates of maize and showed antimicrobial activity against P. capsici. Conclusions Maize could form a “root wall” to restrict the spread of P. capsici across rows in maize and pepper intercropping systems. Antimicrobe compounds secreted by maize root were one of the factors that resulted in the inhibition of P. capsici. These results provide new insights into plant-plant-microbe mechanisms involved in intercropping systems. PMID:25551554

  15. Lycus Sulci Slope Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 March 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark slope streaks on ridges in the Lycus Sulci region, north of the Olympus Mons volcano. Slope streaks form in the dry, dust-mantled regions of Mars. The darker streaks formed more recently than lighter ones, perhaps within the past Mars year or two. These streaks are located near 24.1oN, 146.1oW. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  16. Distribution and genetic diversity of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice and maize dwarf diseases caused by the newly introduced Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) have led to severe economic losses in South China in recent years. The distribution and diversity of SRBSDV have not been investigated in the main rice and maize growing areas in China. In this study, the distribution of SRBSDV in China was determined by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Between 2009 and 2010, 2404 plant samples (2294 rice, 110 maize samples, and more than 300 cultivars) with dwarf symptoms were collected from fields in 194 counties of 17 provinces in China and SRBSDV was detected. The results indicated that 1545 (64.27%) of samples (both rice and maize) were infected with SRBSDV. SRBSDV was detected widely in Hainan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Guizhou, Chongqing, Fujian, Jiangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Anhui, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces, which suggests SRBSDV is an important pathogen causing rice dwarfing diseases in South China. Phylogenetic analysis of 15 representative virus isolates revealed that SRBSDV isolates in China had high levels of nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities (>97.8%). Conclusions SRBSDV spreads naturally in Yangtze River basin and south region, the location of the major rice production areas. In comparison, the virus rarely spreads north of Yangtze River in North China. Distribution of SRBSDV is consistent with the migrating and existing ranges of its vector WBPH, suggesting that SRBSDV might be introduced into South China along with the migration of viruliferous WBPH. PMID:24131521

  17. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  18. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  19. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  20. Distribution of disease symptoms and mycotoxins in maize ears infected by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Ellner, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Red ear rot an important disease of maize cultivated in Europe is caused by toxigenic Fusarium species like Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum. To get detailed information on the time course of the infection process leading to the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in maize ears, a field study was conducted over 2 years with two maize varieties, which were inoculated with F. culmorum or F. graminearum isolates at the stage of female flowering. Every fortnight after inoculation, infection and contamination progress in the ears was followed by visually evaluating disease signs and analysing Fusarium toxin concentrations in the infected ear tissues. In principle, infection and mycotoxin distribution were similar in respect of pathogens, varieties, and years. External infection symptoms showing some small pale or brown-marbled kernels with dark brown pedicels were mainly seen at the ear tip, whereas internal infection symptoms on the rachis were much more pronounced and spread in the upper half showing greyish brownish or pink discoloration of the pith. Well correlated with disease symptoms, a top-down gradient from high to low toxin levels within the ear with considerably higher concentrations in the rachis compared with the kernels was observed. It is suggested that both Fusarium pathogens primarily infect the rachis from the tip toward the bottom, whereas the kernels are subsequently infected via the rachillae connected to the rachis. A special focus on the pronounced disease symptoms visible in the rachis may be an approach to improve the evaluation of maize-genotype susceptibility against red ear rot pathogens. It has to be underlined that the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in the rachis greatly accelerated 6 weeks after inoculation; therefore, highest contamination risk is indicated for feedstuffs containing large amounts of rachis (e.g., corn cob mix), especially when cut late in growing season. PMID:25904523

  1. Lycus Sulci Slope Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 May 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark slope streaks coming off of rugged hills in the Lycus Sulci region, north of the Olympus Mons volcano. These slopes are mantled with fine, bright dust. From time to time, the dust will avalanche down a slope, forming a slope streak. The behavior of this dry, granular material can be somewhat fluid-like. New slope streaks can form at any time and, for an area the size of that shown here, may form at a rate of one per Mars year (687 Earth days). Naturally, some scientists have suggested that water plays a role in forming these streaks, but, in general, Mars is drier than the driest deserts on Earth and these streaks are contemporary features that occur in the dustiest regions of the planet. The image is located near 29.8oN, 133.4oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  2. Mapping QTL conferring resistance in maize to gray leaf spot disease caused by Cercospora zeina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gray leaf spot (GLS) is a globally important foliar disease of maize. Cercospora zeina, one of the two fungal species that cause the disease, is prevalent in southern Africa, China, Brazil and the eastern corn belt of the USA. Identification of QTL for GLS resistance in subtropical germplasm is important to support breeding programmes in developing countries where C.?zeina limits production of this staple food crop. Results A maize RIL population (F7:S6) from a cross between CML444 and SC Malawi was field-tested under GLS disease pressure at five field sites over three seasons in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Thirty QTL identified from eleven field trials (environments) were consolidated to seven QTL for GLS resistance based on their expression in at least two environments and location in the same core maize bins. Four GLS resistance alleles were derived from the more resistant parent CML444 (bin 1.10, 4.08, 9.04/9.05, 10.06/10.07), whereas the remainder were from SC Malawi (bin 6.06/6.07, 7.02/7.03, 9.06). QTLs in bin 4.08 and bin 6.06/6.07 were also detected as joint QTLs, each explained more than 11% of the phenotypic variation, and were identified in four and seven environments, respectively. Common markers were used to allocate GLS QTL from eleven previous studies to bins on the IBM2005 map, and GLS QTL “hotspots” were noted. Bin 4.08 and 7.02/7.03 GLS QTL from this study overlapped with hotspots, whereas the bin 6.06/6.07 and bin 9.06 QTLs appeared to be unique. QTL for flowering time (bin 1.07, 4.09) in this population did not correspond to QTL for GLS resistance. Conclusions QTL mapping of a RIL population from the subtropical maize parents CML444 and SC Malawi identified seven QTL for resistance to gray leaf spot disease caused by C.?zeina. These QTL together with QTL from eleven studies were allocated to bins on the IBM2005 map to provide a basis for comparison. Hotspots of GLS QTL were identified on chromosomes one, two, four, five and seven, with QTL in the current study overlapping with two of these. Two QTL from this study did not overlap with previously reported QTL. PMID:24885661

  3. Construction of a genetic linkage map of the fungal pathogen of banana Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black leaf streak disease.

    PubMed

    Manzo-Sánchez, Gilberto; Zapater, Marie-Françoise; Luna-Martínez, Francisco; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Carlier, Jean; James-Kay, Andrew; Simpson, June

    2008-05-01

    A genetic linkage map of the fungal plant pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black leaf streak disease of banana was developed. A cross between the isolates CIRAD86 (from Cameroon) and CIRAD139A (from Colombia) was analyzed using molecular markers and the MAT locus. The genetic linkage map consists of 298 AFLP and 16 SSR markers with 23 linkage groups, containing five or more markers, covering 1,879 cM. Markers are separated on average by around 5.9 cM. The MAT locus was shown to segregate in a 1:1 ratio but could not be successfully mapped. An estimate of the relation between physical size and genetic distance was approximately 39.0 kb/cM. The estimated total haploid genome size was calculated using the genetic mapping data at 4,298.2 cM. This is the first genetic linkage map reported for this important foliar pathogen of banana. The great utility of the map will be for anchoring contigs in the genome sequence, evolutionary studies in comparison with other fungi, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with aggressiveness or oxidative stress resistance and with the recently available genome sequence, for positional cloning. PMID:18365202

  4. Oxidative stress response of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease in banana plants, to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Manzo-Sanchez, Gilberto; Guzmán-González, Salvador; Arias-Castro, Carlos; Rodríguez-Mendiola, Martha; Avila-Miranda, Martin; Ogura, Tetsuya

    2009-07-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis causes black leaf streak disease in banana and plantain. This fungus is usually attacked by reactive oxygen species secreted by the plant or during exposure to fungicide, however, little is known about the antioxidant response of the fungus. In this study, mycelia were observed to totally decompose 30 mmol/L of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) within 120 min, liberating oxygen bubbles, and also to survive in concentrations as high as 100 mmol/L H2O2. The oxidative stress responses to H2O2, paraquat, and hydroquinone were characterized in terms of the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Two active catalase bands were seen in native PAGE induced by H2O2. Band I had monofunctional activity and band II had bifunctional catalase-peroxidase activity. Two isozymes of SOD, distinguishable by their cyanide sensitivity, were found; CuZnSOD was the main one. The combination of H2O2 and 3-aminotriazole reduced the accumulation of biomass up to 40% compared with exposure to H2O2 alone, suggesting that catalase is important for the rapid decomposition of H2O2 and has a direct bearing on cell viability. The results also suggest that the superoxide anion formed through the redox of paraquat and hydroquinone has a greater effect than H2O2 on the cellular viability of M. fijiensis. PMID:19767862

  5. Effect of Inoculation Pressure on Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus Strain-A Disease Incidence, Severity and Titer in Sorghum. 

    E-print Network

    Mahuku, George S.; Toler, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    virus strains. Phytopathology 76:769-773. 7. Mackenzie, D. R., Anderson, P. M., and Wernham, C. C. 1966. A mobile airblast inoculator for pot experiments with maize dwarf mosaic virus. Plant Disease Reporter 60:363-367. 8. Martin, T. J... :--------------,1 NO.1706 8-1706 May 1992 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Effect of Inoculation Pressure . on Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus Strain-A Disease Incidence, Severity and Titer in Sorghum The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station ? J. Charles Lee, Interim...

  6. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  7. Stolbur Phytoplasma Transmission to Maize by Reptalus panzeri and the Disease Cycle of Maize Redness in Serbia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize redness (MR), induced by stolbur phytoplasma (Candidatus Phytoplasma solani, subgroup 16SrXII-A), is characterized by midrib, leaf and stalk reddening and abnormal ear development. MR has been reported from Serbia, Romania and Bulgaria for 50 years, and recent epiphytotics reduced yields by 4...

  8. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases. PMID:23535334

  9. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  10. Bright Streak on Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    These two images of Jupiter's small, irregularly shaped moon Amalthea, obtained by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft in August 1999(left) and November 1999 (right), form a 'stereo pair' that helps scientists determine this moon's shape and the topography of its surface features. Features as small as 3.8 kilometers (2.4 miles) across can be resolved in these images, making them among the highest-resolution images ever taken of Amalthea.

    The large impact crater visible in both images, near the right-hand edge of Amalthea's disk, is about 40 kilometers (about 29 miles) across; two ridges, tall enough to cast shadows, extend from the top of the crater in a V-shape reminiscent of a 'rabbit ears' television antenna. To the left of these ridges, in the top center portion of Amalthea's disk, is a second large impact crater similar in size to the first crater. To the left of this second crater is a linear 'streak' of relatively bright material about 50 kilometers (31 miles) long. In previous spacecraft images of Amalthea taken from other viewing directions, this bright feature was thought to be a small, round, bright 'spot' and was given the name Ida. These new images reveal for the first time that Ida is actually a long, linear 'streak.' This bright streak may represent material ejected during the formation of the adjacent impact crater, or it may just mark the crest of a local ridge. Other patches of relatively bright material can be seen elsewhere on Amalthea's disk, although none of these other bright spots has Ida's linear shape.

    In both images, sunlight is coming from the left and north is approximately up. Note that the north pole of Amalthea is missing in the right-hand image (it was cut off by the edge of the camera frame). The bright streak, Ida, is on the side of the moon that faces permanently away from Jupiter, and the crater near the right-hand edge of the disk is in the center of Amalthea's leading side (the side of the moon that 'leads' as Amalthea moves in its orbit around Jupiter).

    The images are, from left to right: Amalthea taken on August 12, 1999 at a range of 446,000 kilometers (about 277,000 miles) and on November 26, 1999 at a range of 374,000 kilometers (about 232,000 miles).

  11. Streaking into Middle School Science: The Dell Streak Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Susan Eudy

    2012-01-01

    A case study is conducted implementing the Dell Streak seven-inch android device into eighth grade science classes of one teacher in a rural middle school in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The purpose of the study is to determine if the use of the Dell Streaks would increase student achievement on standardized subject testing, if the…

  12. Root Interactions in a Maize/Soybean Intercropping System Control Soybean Soil-Borne Disease, Red Crown Rot

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Man; Xu, Ruineng; Wang, Xiurong; Pan, Ruqian; Kim, Hye-Ji; Liao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Within-field multiple crop species intercropping is well documented and used for disease control, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. As roots are the primary organ for perceiving signals in the soil from neighboring plants, root behavior may play an important role in soil-borne disease control. Principal Findings In two years of field experiments, maize/soybean intercropping suppressed the occurrence of soybean red crown rot, a severe soil-borne disease caused by Cylindrocladium parasiticum (C. parasiticum). The suppressive effects decreased with increasing distance between intercropped plants under both low P and high P supply, suggesting that root interactions play a significant role independent of nutrient status. Further detailed quantitative studies revealed that the diversity and intensity of root interactions altered the expression of important soybean PR genes, as well as, the activity of corresponding enzymes in both P treatments. Furthermore, 5 phenolic acids were detected in root exudates of maize/soybean intercropped plants. Among these phenolic acids, cinnamic acid was released in significantly greater concentrations when intercropped maize with soybean compared to either crop grown in monoculture, and this spike in cinnamic acid was found dramatically constrain C. parasiticum growth in vitro. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report to demonstrate that intercropping with maize can promote resistance in soybean to red crown rot in a root-dependent manner. This supports the point that intercropping may be an efficient ecological strategy to control soil-borne plant disease and should be incorporated in sustainable agricultural management practices. PMID:24810161

  13. Molecular breeding for developing drought tolerant and disease resistant maize in sub Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), in collaboration with public and private partners, is working on developing and disseminating drought tolerant maize for sub Saharan Africa (SSA) using pedigree selection and molecular breeding. In this paper, we provide an overview of ...

  14. Priming maize resistance by its neighbors: activating 1,4-benzoxazine-3-ones synthesis and defense gene expression to alleviate leaf disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xupo; Yang, Min; Huang, Huichuan; Chuan, Youcong; He, Xiahong; Li, Chengyun; Zhu, Youyong; Zhu, Shusheng

    2015-01-01

    Plant disease can be effectively suppressed in intercropping systems. Our previous study demonstrated that neighboring maize plants can restrict the spread of soil-borne pathogens of pepper plants by secreting defense compounds into the soil. However, whether maize plant can receive benefits from its neighboring pepper plants in an intercropping system is little attention. We examined the effects of maize roots treated with elicitors from the pepper pathogen Phytophthora capsici and pepper root exudates on the synthesis of 1,4-benzoxazine-3-ones (BXs), the expression of defense-related genes in maize, and their ability to alleviate the severity of southern corn leaf blight (SCLB) caused by Bipolaris maydis. We found that SCLB was significantly reduced after the above treatments. The contents of 1,4-benzoxazine-3-ones (BXs: DIBOA, DIMBOA, and MBOA) and the expression levels of BX synthesis and defense genes in maize roots and shoots were up-regulated. DIMBOA and MBOA effectively inhibited the mycelium growth of Bipolaris maydis at physiological concentrations in maize shoots. Further studies suggested that the defense related pathways or genes in maize roots and shoots were activated by elicitors from the P. capsici or pepper root exudates. In conclusion, maize increased the levels of BXs and defense gene expression both in roots and shoots after being triggered by root exudates and pathogen from neighboring pepper plants, eventually enhancing its resistance. PMID:26528303

  15. Cerberus Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 May 2002) The Science Cerberus is a dark region on Mars that has shrunk down from a continuous length of about 1000 km to roughly three discontinuous spots a few 100 kms in length in less than 20 years. There are two competing processes at work in the Cerberus region that produce the bright and dark features seen in this THEMIS image. Bright dust settles out of the atmosphere, especially after global dust storms, depositing a layer just thick enough to brighten the dark surfaces. Deposition occurs preferentially in the low wind 'shadow zones' within craters and downwind of crater rims, producing the bright streaks. The direction of the streaks clearly indicates that the dominant winds come from the northeast. Dust deposition would completely blot out the dark areas if it were not for the action of wind-blown sand grains scouring the surface and lifting the dust back into the atmosphere. Again, the shadow zones are protected from the blowing sand, preserving the bright layer of dust. Also visible in this image are lava flow features extending from the flanks of the huge Elysium volcanoes to the northwest. Two shallow channels and a raised flow lobe are just barely discernable. The lava channel in the middle of the image crosses the boundary of the bright and dark surfaces without any obvious change in its morphology. This demonstrates that the bright dust layer is very thin in this location, perhaps as little as a few millimeters. The Story Mars is an ever-changing land of spectacular contrasts. This THEMIS image shows the Cerberus region of Mars, a dark area located near the Elysium volcanoes and fittingly named after the three-headed, dragon-tailed dog who guards the door of the underworld. Two opposing processes are at work here: a thin layer of dust falling from the atmosphere and/or dust storms creating brighter surface areas (e.g. the top left portion of this image) and dust being scoured away by the action of the Martian wind disturbing the sand grains and freeing the lighter dust to fly away once more (the darker portions of this image). There are, however, some darker areas that are somewhat shielded and protected from the wind that have yielded bright, dusty crater floors and wind streaks that trail out behind the craters. These wind streaks tell a story all their own as to the prevailing wind direction coming from the northeast. This, added to the fact that this dark region was once 1000 km in length and has dwindled to just a few isolated dark splotches of 100 kilometers in the past 20 years, help us to see that the Martian environment is still quite dynamic and capable of changing. Finally, this being a volcanic region, a lobe of a lava flow from the immense Elysium volcanoes to the northwest is visible stretching across the bottom one-quarter of the image.

  16. Unraveling Genomic Complexity at a Quantitative Disease Resistance Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Jamann, Tiffany M.; Poland, Jesse A.; Kolkman, Judith M.; Smith, Laurie G.; Nelson, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple disease resistance has important implications for plant fitness, given the selection pressure that many pathogens exert directly on natural plant populations and indirectly via crop improvement programs. Evidence of a locus conditioning resistance to multiple pathogens was found in bin 1.06 of the maize genome with the allele from inbred line “Tx303” conditioning quantitative resistance to northern leaf blight (NLB) and qualitative resistance to Stewart’s wilt. To dissect the genetic basis of resistance in this region and to refine candidate gene hypotheses, we mapped resistance to the two diseases. Both resistance phenotypes were localized to overlapping regions, with the Stewart’s wilt interval refined to a 95.9-kb segment containing three genes and the NLB interval to a 3.60-Mb segment containing 117 genes. Regions of the introgression showed little to no recombination, suggesting structural differences between the inbred lines Tx303 and “B73,” the parents of the fine-mapping population. We examined copy number variation across the region using next-generation sequencing data, and found large variation in read depth in Tx303 across the region relative to the reference genome of B73. In the fine-mapping region, association mapping for NLB implicated candidate genes, including a putative zinc finger and pan1. We tested mutant alleles and found that pan1 is a susceptibility gene for NLB and Stewart’s wilt. Our data strongly suggest that structural variation plays an important role in resistance conditioned by this region, and pan1, a gene conditioning susceptibility for NLB, may underlie the QTL. PMID:25009146

  17. Streak camera time calibration procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, J.; Jackson, I.

    1978-01-01

    Time calibration procedures for streak cameras utilizing a modulated laser beam are described. The time calibration determines a writing rate accuracy of 0.15% with a rotating mirror camera and 0.3% with an image converter camera.

  18. Molecular Genetic Analysis and Evolution of Segment 7 in Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanping; Wu, Jirong; Meng, Qingchang; Han, Xiaohua; Hao, Zhuanfang; Li, Mingshun; Yong, Hongjun; Zhang, Degui; Zhang, Shihuang; Li, Xinhai

    2015-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) causes maize rough dwarf disease or rice black-streaked dwarf disease and can lead to severe yield losses in maize and rice. To analyse RBSDV evolution, codon usage bias and genetic structure were investigated in 111 maize and rice RBSDV isolates from eight geographic locations in 2013 and 2014. The linear dsRNA S7 is A+U rich, with overall codon usage biased toward codons ending with A (A3s, S7-1: 32.64%, S7-2: 29.95%) or U (U3s, S7-1: 44.18%, S7-2: 46.06%). Effective number of codons (Nc) values of 45.63 in S7-1 (the first open reading frame of S7) and 39.96 in S7-2 (the second open reading frame of S7) indicate low degrees of RBSDV-S7 codon usage bias, likely driven by mutational bias regardless of year, host, or geographical origin. Twelve optimal codons were detected in S7. The nucleotide diversity (?) of S7 sequences in 2013 isolates (0.0307) was significantly higher than in 2014 isolates (0.0244, P = 0.0226). The nucleotide diversity (?) of S7 sequences in isolates from Jinan (0.0391) was higher than that from the other seven locations (P < 0.01). Only one S7 recombinant was detected in Baoding. RBSDV isolates could be phylogenetically classified into two groups according to S7 sequences, and further classified into two subgroups. S7-1 and S7-2 were under negative and purifying selection, with respective Ka/Ks ratios of 0.0179 and 0.0537. These RBSDV populations were expanding (P < 0.01) as indicated by negative values for Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D, and Fu and Li's F. Genetic differentiation was detected in six RBSDV subpopulations (P < 0.05). Absolute Fst (0.0790) and Nm (65.12) between 2013 and 2014, absolute Fst (0.1720) and Nm (38.49) between maize and rice, and absolute Fst values of 0.0085-0.3069 and Nm values of 0.56-29.61 among these eight geographic locations revealed frequent gene flow between subpopulations. Gene flow between 2013 and 2014 was the most frequent. PMID:26121638

  19. Streak camera dynamic range optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedwald, J.D.; Lerche, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    The LLNL optical streak camera is used by the Laser Fusion Program in a wide range of applications. Many of these applications require a large recorded dynamic range. Recent work has focused on maximizing the dynamic range of the streak camera recording system. For our streak cameras, image intensifier saturation limits the upper end of the dynamic range. We have developed procedures to set the image intensifier gain such that the system dynamic range is maximized. Specifically, the gain is set such that a single streak tube photoelectron is recorded with an exposure of about five times the recording system noise. This ensures detection of single photoelectrons, while not consuming intensifier or recording system dynamic range through excessive intensifier gain. The optimum intensifier gain has been determined for two types of film and for a lens-coupled CCD camera. We have determined that by recording the streak camera image with a CCD camera, the system is shot-noise limited up to the onset of image intensifier nonlinearity. When recording on film, the film determines the noise at high exposure levels. There is discussion of the effects of slit width and image intensifier saturation on dynamic range. 8 refs.

  20. Circular Scan Streak Tube Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1980-01-01

    A streak tube having circular scan was designed, built and tested. Continuous circular scan, easily derived from out of phase sine waves applied to the conventional deflection plates, permits the timing of pulses traveling long baselines. At the tube's output a circular array of 720 elements is scanned to provide 30 to 40 picosecond resolution. Initial difficulties with electron bombarded silicon arrays were circumvented by using microchannel plates within the streak tube to provide the needed electronic amplification and digital sensitivity and coupling the 720 element arrays to the electron beam by means of a phosphor on a fiber optics. Two ceramic body tubes with S-20 photocathodes were tested and delivered.

  1. Properties of martian slope streak populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonio, Justin R.; Rottas, Kimberly M.; Schorghofer, Norbert

    2013-07-01

    Slope streaks are down-slope mass movements on the surface of Mars that are among the few known examples of contemporary geologic activity on Mars. Here we study slope streak activity over three decades, based on overlapping images in the Lycus Sulci region taken by the Context Camera (CTX) 2007-2010 and the Viking Orbiter Camera in 1977. The number of disappeared slope streaks is nearly equal the number of newly formed slope streaks, suggesting the streak population is balanced. The turnover time of the population is estimated to be four decades. Slope streaks fade gradually over time, with islands of persistence. We also determine the number of observable slope streaks as a function of image resolution based on images by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera, and find that the number of discernible slope streaks can increase rapidly with spatial resolution.

  2. Streaking into middle school science: The Dell Streak pilot project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Susan Eudy

    A case study is conducted implementing the Dell Streak seven-inch android device into eighth grade science classes of one teacher in a rural middle school in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The purpose of the study is to determine if the use of the Dell Streaks would increase student achievement on standardized subject testing, if the Streak could be used as an effective instructional tool, and if it could be considered an effective instructional resource for reviewing and preparing for the science assessments. A mixed method research design was used for the study to analyze both quantitative and qualitative results to determine if the Dell Streaks' utilization could achieve the following: 1. instructional strategies would change, 2. it would be an effective instructional tool, and 3. a comparison of the students' test scores and benchmark assessments' scores would provide statistically significant difference. Through the use of an ANOVA it was determined a statistically significant difference had occurred. A Post Hoc analysis was conducted to identify where the difference occurred. Finally a T-test determined was there was no statistically significance difference between the mean End-of-Grade tests and four quarterly benchmark scores of the control and the experimental groups. Qualitative research methods were used to gather results to determine if the Streaks were an effective instructional tool. Classroom observations identified that the teacher's teaching styles and new instructional strategies were implemented throughout the pilot project. Students had an opportunity to complete a questionnaire three times during the pilot project. Results revealed what the students liked about using the devices and the challenges they were facing. The teacher completed a reflective questionnaire throughout the pilot project and offered valuable reflections about the use of the devices in an educational setting. The reflection data supporting the case study was drawn from the teacher's statements regarding the change in instructional delivery as a respect of using the students' device. The results section of the study will elaborate upon these findings. The study recommendations on the use of the Dell Streak device will address whether further actions as the use of the Streak technology in the classroom and summary section.

  3. Slope Streaks in Terra Sabaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Click on image for larger version

    This HiRISE image shows the rim of a crater in the region of Terra Sabaea in the northern hemisphere of Mars.

    The subimage (figure 1) is a close-up view of the crater rim revealing dark and light-toned slope streaks. Slope streak formation is among the few known processes currently active on Mars. While their mechanism of formation and triggering is debated, they are most commonly believed to form by downslope movement of extremely dry sand or very fine-grained dust in an almost fluidlike manner (analogous to a terrestrial snow avalanche) exposing darker underlying material.

    Other ideas include the triggering of slope streak formation by possible concentrations of near-surface ice or scouring of the surface by running water from aquifers intercepting slope faces, spring discharge (perhaps brines), and/or hydrothermal activity.

    Several of the slope streaks in the subimage, particularly the three longest darker streaks, show evidence that downslope movement is being diverted around obstacles such as large boulders. Several streaks also appear to originate at boulders or clumps of rocky material.

    In general, the slope streaks do not have large deposits of displaced material at their downslope ends and do not run out onto the crater floor suggesting that they have little reserve kinetic energy. The darkest slope streaks are youngest and can be seen to cross cut and superpose older and lighter-toned streaks. The lighter-toned streaks are believed to be dark streaks that have lightened with time as new dust is deposited on their surface.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_001808_1875 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Dec-2006. The complete image is centered at 7.4 degrees latitude, 47.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 272.1 km (170.1 miles). At this distance the image scale is 54.4 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 163 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 03:36 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 53 degrees, thus the sun was about 37 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 150.7 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Summer.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  4. The Streak Camera Development at LLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; Boni. R.; Butler, D.; Ghosh, S.; Donaldson, W.R.; Keck, R.L.

    2005-03-31

    The Diagnostic Development Group at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics has endeavored to build a stand-alone, remotely operated streak camera with comprehensive autofocus and self-calibration capability. Designated as the Rochester Optical Streak System (ROSS), it is a generic streak camera platform, capable of accepting a variety of streak tubes. The system performance is limited by the installed tube's electron optics, not by any camera subsystem. Moreover, the ROSS camera can be photometrically calibrated.

  5. Evidence for a diffusible factor that induces susceptibility in the Colletotrichum-maize disease interaction.

    PubMed

    Torres, Maria F; Cuadros, Diego F; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola, the causal agent of maize anthracnose, is a hemibiotrophic fungus that initially infects living host cells via primary hyphae surrounded by a membrane. A nonpathogenic mutant disrupted in a gene encoding a component of the signal peptidase complex, and believed to be deficient in protein processing and secretion, regained pathogenicity when it was inoculated onto maize leaf sheaths close to the wild-type fungus. Evidence is presented suggesting that the wild-type produces a diffusible factor(s) that induces the localized susceptibility of host cells at the borders of expanding colonies, causing them to become receptive to biotrophic invasion. The induced susceptibility effect is limited to a distance of approximately eight cells from the edge of the wild-type colony, is dosage dependent and is specific to C. graminicola. PMID:24003973

  6. Gated SIT vidicon streak tube

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, D.L.; Yates, G.J.; Black, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    A recently developed prototype streak tube designed to produce high gain and resolution by incorporating the streak and readout functions in one envelope thereby minimizing photon-to-change transformations and eliminating external coupling losses is presented. The tube is based upon a grid-gated Silicon-Intensified-Target Vidicon (SITV) with integral Focus Projection Scan (FPS) TV readout. Demagnifying electron optics (m=0.63) in the image section map the 40-mm-diameter photocathode image unto a 25-mm-diameter silicon target where gains greater than or equal to10/sup 3/ are achieved with only 10 KV accelerating voltage. This is compared with much lower gains (approx.50) at much higher voltages (approx.30 KV) reported for streak tubes using phosphor screens. Because SIT technology is well established means for electron imaging in vacuum, such fundamental problems as ''backside thinning'' required for electron imaging unto CCDs do not exist. The high spatial resolution (approx.30 lp/mm), variable scan formats, and high speed electrostatic deflection (250 mm/sup 2/ areas are routinely rastered with 256 scan lines in 1.6 ms) available from FPS readout add versatility not available in CCD devices. Theoretical gain and spatial resolution for this design (developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and General Electric Co.) are compared with similar calculations and measured data obtained for RCA 73435 streaks fiber optically coupled to (1) 25-mm-diameter SIT FPS vidicons and (2) 40-mm-diameter MCPTs (proximity-focused microchannel plate image intensifier tubes) fiber optically coupled to 18-mm-diameter Sb/sub 2/S/sub 3/ FPS vidicons. Sweep sensitivity, shutter ratio, and record lengths for nanosecond duration (20 to 200 ns) streak applications are discussed.

  7. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus: a white-backed planthopper-transmitted fijivirus threatening rice production in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guohui; Xu, Donglin; Xu, Dagao; Zhang, Maoxin

    2013-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a non-enveloped icosahedral virus with a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments, is a novel species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae) first recognized in 2008. Rice plants infected with this virus exhibit symptoms similar to those caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus. Since 2009, the virus has rapidly spread and caused serious rice losses in East and Southeast Asia. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding this disease, especially about the functions of the viral genes, rice–virus–insect interactions, and epidemiology and control measures. The virus can be efficiently transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent circulative propagative manner but cannot be transmitted by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Rice, maize, Chinese sorghum (Coix lacryma-jobi) and other grass weeds can be infected via WBPH. However, only rice plays a major role in the virus infection cycle because of the vector’s preference. In Southeast Asia, WBPH is a long-distance migratory rice pest. The disease cycle can be described as follows: SRBSDV and its WBPH vector overwinter in warm tropical or sub-tropical areas; viruliferous WBPH adults carry the virus from south to north via long-distance migration in early spring, transmit the virus to rice seedlings in the newly colonized areas, and lay eggs on the infected seedlings; the next generation of WBPHs propagate on infected seedlings, become viruliferous, disperse, and cause new disease outbreaks. Several molecular and serological methods have been developed to detect SRBSDV in plant tissues and individual insects. Control measures based on protection from WBPH, including seedbed coverage, chemical seed treatments, and chemical spraying of seedlings, have proven effective in China. PMID:24058362

  8. Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus: a white-backed planthopper-transmitted fijivirus threatening rice production in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guohui; Xu, Donglin; Xu, Dagao; Zhang, Maoxin

    2013-01-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV), a non-enveloped icosahedral virus with a genome of 10 double-stranded RNA segments, is a novel species in the genus Fijivirus (family Reoviridae) first recognized in 2008. Rice plants infected with this virus exhibit symptoms similar to those caused by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus. Since 2009, the virus has rapidly spread and caused serious rice losses in East and Southeast Asia. Significant progress has been made in recent years in understanding this disease, especially about the functions of the viral genes, rice-virus-insect interactions, and epidemiology and control measures. The virus can be efficiently transmitted by the white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) in a persistent circulative propagative manner but cannot be transmitted by the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) and small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Rice, maize, Chinese sorghum (Coix lacryma-jobi) and other grass weeds can be infected via WBPH. However, only rice plays a major role in the virus infection cycle because of the vector's preference. In Southeast Asia, WBPH is a long-distance migratory rice pest. The disease cycle can be described as follows: SRBSDV and its WBPH vector overwinter in warm tropical or sub-tropical areas; viruliferous WBPH adults carry the virus from south to north via long-distance migration in early spring, transmit the virus to rice seedlings in the newly colonized areas, and lay eggs on the infected seedlings; the next generation of WBPHs propagate on infected seedlings, become viruliferous, disperse, and cause new disease outbreaks. Several molecular and serological methods have been developed to detect SRBSDV in plant tissues and individual insects. Control measures based on protection from WBPH, including seedbed coverage, chemical seed treatments, and chemical spraying of seedlings, have proven effective in China. PMID:24058362

  9. Wind vs. Dust Devil Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    22 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presents a fine illustration of the difference between streaks made by dust devils and streaks made by wind gusts. Dust devils are usually solitary, spinning vortices. They resemble a tornado, or the swirling motion of a familiar, Tasmanian cartoon character. Wind gusts, on the other hand, can cover a larger area and affect more terrain at the same time. The dark, straight, and parallel features resembling scrape marks near the right/center of this image are thought to have been formed by a singular gust of wind, whereas the more haphazard dark streaks that crisscross the scene were formed by dozens of individual dust devils, acting at different times. This southern summer image is located in Noachis Terra near 67.0oS, 316.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left; the picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  10. Sporadic formation of slope streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorghofer, Norbert; King, Christina M.

    2011-11-01

    Slope streaks are a form of gravity-driven mass-movements that frequently occur on Mars today. The cause of slope streak formation remains unclear; both, dry and wet processes have been suggested. Here, we observationally constrain the time of the year during which slope streaks form. Imagery from four Mars-orbiting cameras is mined to identify locations that have been imaged repeatedly, and the overlapping images are surveyed for streak activity. A search algorithm automatically finds the locations on the surface that have been imaged most often based on a graph representation. Dark slope streaks are found to form sporadically throughout the Mars year. At one study site in the Olympus Mons Aureole, observations constrain slope streak formation to at least five distinct time intervals within a single Mars year. New slope streaks form spatially isolated or in small groups within a few kilometers of one another. The observations suggest that slope streak triggering is unrelated to season and not caused by any large regional events. Most slope streaks are caused by sporadic events of small spatial extent.

  11. The maize disease resistance gene Htn1 against northern corn leaf blight encodes a wall-associated receptor-like kinase.

    PubMed

    Hurni, Severine; Scheuermann, Daniela; Krattinger, Simon G; Kessel, Bettina; Wicker, Thomas; Herren, Gerhard; Fitze, Mirjam N; Breen, James; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Keller, Beat

    2015-07-14

    Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) caused by the hemibiotrophic fungus Exserohilum turcicum is an important foliar disease of maize that is mainly controlled by growing resistant maize cultivars. The Htn1 locus confers quantitative and partial NCLB resistance by delaying the onset of lesion formation. Htn1 represents an important source of genetic resistance that was originally introduced from a Mexican landrace into modern maize breeding lines in the 1970s. Using a high-resolution map-based cloning approach, we delimited Htn1 to a 131.7-kb physical interval on chromosome 8 that contained three candidate genes encoding two wall-associated receptor-like kinases (ZmWAK-RLK1 and ZmWAK-RLK2) and one wall-associated receptor-like protein (ZmWAK-RLP1). TILLING (targeting induced local lesions in genomes) mutants in ZmWAK-RLK1 were more susceptible to NCLB than wild-type plants, both in greenhouse experiments and in the field. ZmWAK-RLK1 contains a nonarginine-aspartate (non-RD) kinase domain, typically found in plant innate immune receptors. Sequence comparison showed that the extracellular domain of ZmWAK-RLK1 is highly diverse between different maize genotypes. Furthermore, an alternative splice variant resulting in a truncated protein was present at higher frequency in the susceptible parents of the mapping populations compared with in the resistant parents. Hence, the quantitative Htn1 disease resistance in maize is encoded by an unusual innate immune receptor with an extracellular wall-associated kinase domain. These results further highlight the importance of this protein family in resistance to adapted pathogens. PMID:26124097

  12. Overexpression of rice black-streaked dwarf virus p7-1 in Arabidopsis results in male sterility due to non-dehiscent anthers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Yuan, Xia; Xu, Qiufang; Zhou, Tong; Fan, Yongjian; Zhou, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a member of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae, is propagatively transmitted by the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén). RBSDV causes rice black-streaked dwarf and maize rough dwarf diseases, which lead to severe yield losses in crops in China. Although several RBSDV proteins have been studied in detail, the functions of the nonstructural protein P7-1 are still largely unknown. To investigate the role of the P7-1 protein in virus pathogenicity, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants were generated in which the P7-1 gene was expressed under the control of the 35S promoter. The RBSDV P7-1-transgenic Arabidopsis plants (named P7-1-OE) were male sterility. Flowers and pollen from P7-1-transgenic plants were of normal size and shape, and anthers developed to the normal size but failed to dehisce. The non-dehiscent anthers observed in P7-1-OE were attributed to decreased lignin content in the anthers. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species levels were quite low in the transgenic plants compared with the wild type. These results indicate that ectopic expression of the RBSDV P7-1 protein in A. thaliana causes male sterility, possibly through the disruption of the lignin biosynthesis and H2O2-dependent polymerization pathways. PMID:24260239

  13. Wind Streaks on Earth; Exploration and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Zada, Aviv Lee; Blumberg, Dan G.; Maman, Shimrit

    2015-04-01

    Wind streaks, one of the most common aeolian features on planetary surfaces, are observable on the surface of the planets Earth, Mars and Venus. Due to their reflectance properties, wind streaks are distinguishable from their surroundings, and they have thus been widely studied by remote sensing since the early 1970s, particularly on Mars. In imagery, these streaks are interpreted as the presence - or lack thereof - of small loose particles on the surface deposited or eroded by wind. The existence of wind streaks serves as evidence for past or present active aeolian processes. Therefore, wind streaks are thought to represent integrative climate processes. As opposed to the comprehensive and global studies of wind streaks on Mars and Venus, wind streaks on Earth are understudied and poorly investigated, both geomorphologically and by remote sensing. The aim of this study is, thus, to fill the knowledge gap about the wind streaks on Earth by: generating a global map of Earth wind streaks from modern high-resolution remotely sensed imagery; incorporating the streaks in a geographic information system (GIS); and overlaying the GIS layers with boundary layer wind data from general circulation models (GCMs) and data from the ECMWF Reanalysis Interim project. The study defines wind streaks (and thereby distinguishes them from other aeolian features) based not only on their appearance in imagery but more importantly on their surface appearance. This effort is complemented by a focused field investigation to study wind streaks on the ground and from a variety of remotely sensed images (both optical and radar). In this way, we provide a better definition of the physical and geomorphic characteristics of wind streaks and acquire a deeper knowledge of terrestrial wind streaks as a means to better understand global and planetary climate and climate change. In a preliminary study, we detected and mapped over 2,900 wind streaks in the desert regions of Earth distributed in approximately 500 sites. Most terrestrial wind streaks are formed on a relatively young geological surface and are concentrated along the equator (± 30°). They are categorized by the combination of their planform and reflectance; with linear-bright and dark are the most common. A site-specific examination of remote-sensing effects on wind streaks identification has been conducted. The results thus far, indicate that in images with varying spatial and spectral specifications some wind streaks are actually composed of other aeolian bedforms, especially dunes. Specific regions of the Earth were then compared qualitatively to surface wind data extracted from a general circulation model. Understanding the mechanism and spatial and temporal distribution of wind streak formation is important not only for understanding surface modifications in the geomorphological context but also for shedding light on past and present climatic processes and atmospheric circulation on Earth. This study yields an explanation for wind streaks as a geomorphological feature. Moreover, it is in this planet-wide geomorphological research ability to lay down the foundations for comparative planetary research.

  14. Banana streak virus is very diverse in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Harper, Glyn; Hart, Darren; Moult, Sarah; Hull, Roger

    2004-03-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV) is a badnavirus that causes a viral leaf streak disease of banana and plantain (Musa spp.). Identified in essentially all Musa growing areas of the world, it has a deleterious effect on the productivity of infected plants as well as being a major constraint to Musa breeding programmes and germplasm dissemination. Banana is a staple food in Uganda which is, per capita, one of the worlds largest banana producers and consumers. BSV was isolated from infected plants sampled across the Ugandan Musa growing area and the isolates were analysed using molecular and serological techniques. These analyses showed that BSV is very highly variable in Uganda. They suggest that the variability is, in part, due to a series of introductions of banana into Uganda, each with a different complement of infecting viruses. PMID:15036835

  15. Electro-optic Phase Grating Streak Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, F. J.

    2012-08-02

    The electro-optic phase grating streak spectrometer (EOPGSS) generates a time-resolved spectra equivalent to that obtained with a conventional spectrometer/streak camera combination, but without using a streak camera (by far the more expensive and problematic component of the conventional system). The EOPGSS is based on a phase, rather than an amplitude grating. Further, this grating is fabricated of electro-optic material such as, for example, KD*P, by either etching grooves into an E-O slab, or by depositing lines of the E-O material onto an optical flat. An electric field normal to the grating alters the material’s index of refraction and thus affects a shift (in angle) of the output spectrum. Ramping the voltage streaks the spectrum correspondingly. The streak and dispersion directions are the same, so a second (static, conventional) grating disperses the spectrum in the orthogonal direction to prevent different wavelengths from “overwriting” each other. Because the streaking is done by the grating, the streaked output spectrum is recorded with a time-integrating device, such as a CCD. System model, typical design, and performance expectations will be presented.

  16. Atomic and molecular phases through attosecond streaking

    SciTech Connect

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-02-15

    In attosecond streaking, an electron is released by a short xuv pulse into a strong near infrared laser field. If the laser couples two states in the target, the streaking technique, which allows for a complete determination of the driving field, also gives an accurate measurement of the relative phase of the atomic or molecular ionization matrix elements from the two states through the interference from the two channels. The interference may change the phase of the photoelectron streaking signal within the envelope of the infrared field, an effect to be accounted for when reconstructing short pulses from the photoelectron signal and in attosecond time-resolved measurements.

  17. A Picosecond Time Resolution Streak Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Hou; Ruduan, Zhang; Hanben, Niu; Jilai, Chao; Jiunren, Chen; Zhunghou, Wang

    1985-02-01

    The paper describes an image converter streak camera system developed in China. It consists of a streak tube, an intensifier, sweep and synchronizing circuits, a film recorder and a real-time readout system. The streak tube has a spherical photocathode and a spherical extraction mesh to correct the transit-time distortion. The measured highest time resolution is 2.5 ps. The real-time readout system with two windows consists of a SIT TV camera, a digitizing circuit, a CPU, a monitor and hardcopy devices.

  18. 98 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Genetic Variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus

    E-print Network

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    98 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Virology Genetic Variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States, T. D. 2013. Genetic variation of Wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States Pacific Northwest. Phytopathol- ogy 103:98-104. Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), the cause of wheat streak mosaic

  19. Maize lethal necrosis (MLN), an emerging threat to maize-based food security in sub-Saharan Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sub-Saharan Africa, maize is a staple food and key determinant of food security for smallholder farming communities. Pest and disease outbreaks are key constraints to maize productivity. In September 2011, a serious disease outbreak, later diagnosed as maize lethal necrosis (MLN), was reported on...

  20. Effect of Maize Hybrid and Foliar Fungicides on Yield Under Low Foliar Disease Severity Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mallowa, Sally O; Esker, Paul D; Paul, Pierce A; Bradley, Carl A; Chapara, Venkata R; Conley, Shawn P; Robertson, Alison E

    2015-08-01

    Foliar fungicide use in the U.S. Corn Belt increased in the last decade; however, questions persist pertaining to its value and sustainability. Multistate field trials were established from 2010 to 2012 in Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, and Wisconsin to examine how hybrid and foliar fungicide influenced disease intensity and yield. The experimental design was in a split-split plot with main plots consisting of hybrids varying in resistance to gray leaf spot (caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis) and northern corn leaf blight (caused by Setosphaera turcica), subplots corresponding to four application timings of the fungicide pyraclostrobin, and sub-subplots represented by inoculations with either C. zeae-maydis, S. turcica, or both at two vegetative growth stages. Fungicide application (VT/R1) significantly reduced total disease severity relative to the control in five of eight site-years (P<0.05). Disease was reduced by approximately 30% at Wisconsin in 2011, 20% at Illinois in 2010, 29% at Iowa in 2010, and 32 and 30% at Ohio in 2010 and 2012, respectively. These disease severities ranged from 0.2 to 0.3% in Wisconsin in 2011 to 16.7 to 22.1% in Illinois in 2010. The untreated control had significantly lower yield (P<0.05) than the fungicide-treated in three site-years. Fungicide application increased the yield by approximately 6% at Ohio in 2010, 5% at Wisconsin in 2010 and 6% in 2011. Yield differences ranged from 8,403 to 8,890 kg/ha in Wisconsin 2011 to 11,362 to 11,919 kg/ha in Wisconsin 2010. Results suggest susceptibility to disease and prevailing environment are important drivers of observed differences. Yield increases as a result of the physiological benefits of plant health benefits under low disease were not consistent. PMID:25760523

  1. Photorealistic Rendering of Rain Streaks Kshitiz Garg Shree K. Nayar

    E-print Network

    Nayar, Shree K.

    Photorealistic Rendering of Rain Streaks Kshitiz Garg Shree K. Nayar Columbia University qview 30 10 RealImages ofRainStreaks Rendered RainStreaks o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oo o o Figure 1: Appearance of actual rain streaks and rendered rain streaks. The top row shows

  2. Compact Optical Technique for Streak Camera Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Allen; Terence Davies; Frans Janson; Ronald Justin; Bruce Marshall; Oliver Sweningsen; Perry Bell; Roger Griffith; Karla Hagans; Richard Lerche

    2004-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship Program. Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation. To accurately reduce data from the streak cameras a temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for generating trains of precisely timed short-duration optical pulses that are suitable for temporal calibrations.

  3. Performance comparison of streak camera recording systems

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Barber, T.

    1995-07-01

    Streak camera based diagnostics are vital to the inertial confinement fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories. Performance characteristics of various readout systems coupled to an EGG-AVO streak camera were analyzed and compared to scaling estimates. The purpose of the work was to determine the limits of the streak camera performance and the optimal fielding conditions for the Amador Valley Operations (AVO) streak camera systems. The authors measured streak camera limitations in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Streak camera limits on spatial resolution are greater than 18 lp/mm at 4% contrast. However, it will be difficult to make use of any resolution greater than this because of high spatial frequency variation in the photocathode sensitivity. They have measured a signal to noise of 3,000 with 0.3 mW/cm{sup 2} of 830 nm light at a 10 ns/mm sweep speed. They have compared lens coupling systems with and without micro-channel plate intensifiers and systems using film or charge coupled device (CCD) readout. There were no conditions where film was found to be an improvement over the CCD readout. Systems utilizing a CCD readout without an intensifier have comparable resolution, for these source sizes and at a nominal cost in signal to noise of 3, over those with an intensifier. Estimates of the signal-to-noise for different light coupling methods show how performance can be improved.

  4. Analyses of Twelve New Whole Genome Sequences of Cassava Brown Streak Viruses and Ugandan Cassava Brown Streak Viruses from East Africa: Diversity, Supercomputing and Evidence for Further Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Ndunguru, Joseph; Sseruwagi, Peter; Tairo, Fred; Stomeo, Francesca; Maina, Solomon; Djinkeng, Appolinaire; Kehoe, Monica; Boykin, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Cassava brown streak disease is caused by two devastating viruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) which are frequently found infecting cassava, one of sub-Saharan Africa’s most important staple food crops. Each year these viruses cause losses of up to $100 million USD and can leave entire families without their primary food source, for an entire year. Twelve new whole genomes, including seven of CBSV and five of UCBSV were uncovered in this research, doubling the genomic sequences available in the public domain for these viruses. These new sequences disprove the assumption that the viruses are limited by agro-ecological zones, show that current diagnostic primers are insufficient to provide confident diagnosis of these viruses and give rise to the possibility that there may be as many as four distinct species of virus. Utilizing NGS sequencing technologies and proper phylogenetic practices will rapidly increase the solution to sustainable cassava production. PMID:26439260

  5. ZmPep1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis elicitor Peptide 1, regulates maize innate immunity and enhances disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ZmPep1 is a bioactive peptide encoded by a previously uncharacterized maize gene termed ZmPROPEP1. The gene was identified by sequence similarity as an ortholog of the Arabidopsis AtPROPEP1 gene, which encodes the precursor protein of elicitor peptide 1 (AtPep1). Together with its receptors, AtPEPR1...

  6. Southern leaf blight disease severity is correlated with decreased maize leaf epiphytic bacterial species richness and the phyllosphere bacterial diversity decline is enhanced by nitrogen fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Manching, Heather C.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Stapleton, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Plant leaves are inhabited by a diverse group of microorganisms that are important contributors to optimal growth. Biotic and abiotic effects on plant growth are usually studied in controlled settings examining response to variation in single factors and in field settings with large numbers of variables. Multi-factor experiments with combinations of stresses bridge this gap, increasing our understanding of the genotype-environment-phenotype functional map for the host plant and the affiliated epiphytic community. The maize inbred B73 was exposed to single and combination abiotic and the biotic stress treatments: low nitrogen fertilizer and high levels of infection with southern leaf blight (causal agent Cochliobolus heterostrophus). Microbial epiphyte samples were collected at the vegetative early-season phase and species composition was determined using 16S ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Plant traits and level of southern leaf blight disease were measured late-season. Bacterial diversity was different among stress treatment groups (P < 0.001). Lower species richness—alpha diversity—was correlated with increased severity of southern leaf blight disease when disease pressure was high. Nitrogen fertilization intensified the decline in bacterial alpha diversity. While no single bacterial ribotype was consistently associated with disease severity, small sets of ribotypes were good predictors of disease levels. Difference in leaf bacterial-epiphyte diversity early in the season were correlated with plant disease severity, supporting further tests of microbial epiphyte-disease correlations for use in predicting disease progression. PMID:25177328

  7. On Baseball Team Standings and Streaks

    E-print Network

    Sire, C

    2008-01-01

    Can one understand the statistics of wins and losses of baseball teams? Are their consecutive-game winning and losing streaks self-reinforcing or can they be described statistically? We apply the Bradley-Terry model, which incorporates the heterogeneity of team strengths in a simple way, to quantify the rank dependence of the average number team wins and losses in major-league baseball over the past century, and also to argue that long winning and losing streaks have a purely statistical origin. The data further show that the past half-century of baseball has been more competitive than the preceding half-century.

  8. Reinventing MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maize Database (MaizeDB) to the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MaizeGDB) turns 20 this year, and such a significant milestone must be celebrated! With the release of the B73 reference sequence and more sequenced genomes on the way, the maize community needs to address various opportunitie...

  9. Evaluation of banana hybrids for tolerance to black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) in Puerto Rico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Puerto Rico, bananas (including plantains) are important agricultural commodities; their combined production totaled 133,500 tons in 2008. Black leaf streak (BLS) and Sigatoka leaf spot diseases, caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis and M. musicola, respectively, are responsible for significant los...

  10. Adding streamwise streaks in the plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollands, Martin; Cossu, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    In recent investigations, finite amplitude streamwise streaks, generated with roughness elements, have been used to delay transition to turbulence. The maximum height of these roughness elements is limited by the appearance of instabilities in their near wake, therefore putting a limit on the maximum streak amplitude they can produce. Here we prove that large amplitude streaks can be generated by 'adding' lower amplitude streaks with multiple arrays of roughness elements. To cite this article: M. Hollands, C. Cossu, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  11. First report of bacterial streak of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) in California caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. apii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new bacterial streak disease appeared on fennel leaves, stems and bulbs grown in Salinas California production fields. Initial symptoms consisted of small black lesions on stems that spread down the stem to the bulbs and up the stem to leaves as the disease progressed. The disease rendered the pl...

  12. Dark Streaks Over-riding Inactive Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Not all sand dunes on Mars are active in the modern martian environment. This example from the Lycus Sulci (Olympus Mons'aureole') region shows a case where small windblown dunes at the base of a slope have been over-ridden by more recent dark streaks (arrows). The dark streaks are most likely caused by what geologists call mass wasting or mass movement (landslides and avalanches are mass movements). Dark slope streaks such as these are common in dustier regions of Mars, and they appear to result from movement of extremely dry dust or sand in an almost fluidlike manner down a slope. This movement disrupts the bright dust coating on the surface and thus appears darker than the surrounding terrain.

    In this case, the dark slope streaks have moved up and over the dunes at the bottom of the slope, indicating that the process that moves sediment down the slope is more active (that is, it has occurred more recently and hence is more likely to occur) in the modern environment than is the movement of dunes and ripples at this location on Mars. The dunes, in fact, are probably mantled by dust. This October 1997 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture is illuminated from the left and located near 31.6oN, 134.0oW.

  13. Streaks Of Colored Water Indicate Surface Airflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Response faster and contamination less than in oil-flow technique. Flowing colored water provides accurate and clean way to reveal flows of air on surfaces of models in wind tunnels. Colored water flows from small orifices in model, forming streak lines under influence of air streaming over surface of model.

  14. Analysis of quantitative disease resistance to southern leaf blight and of multiple disease resistance in maize, using near-isogenic lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize inbred lines NC292 and NC330 were derived by repeated backcrossing of an elite source of southern leaf blight (SLB) resistance (NC250P) to the SLB-susceptible line B73, with selection for SLB resistance among and within backcross families at each generation. Consequently, while B73 is very SLB...

  15. Wind Streaks on Venus: Clues to Atmospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Schubert, Gerald; Limonadi, Daniel; Bender, Kelly C.; Newman, William I.; Thomas, Peggy E.; Weitz, Catherine M.; Wall, Stephen D.

    1994-01-01

    Magellan images reveal surface features on Venus attributed to wind processes. Sand dunes, wind-sculpted hills, and more than 5830 wind streaks have been identified. The streaks serve as local "wind vanes," representing wind direction at the time of streak formation and allowing the first global mapping of near-surface wind patterns on Venus. Wind streaks are oriented both toward the equator and toward the west. When streaks associated with local transient events, such as impact cratering, are deleted, the westward component is mostly lost but the equatorward component remains. This pattern is consistent with a Hadley circulation of the lower atmosphere.

  16. Martian Slope Streaks and Gullies: Origins as Dry Granular Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Louge, M. Y.

    2004-01-01

    Streaks and gullies are common on Martian slopes, and are geologically young; slope streaks have formed during the last few years of Mars Global Surveyor imaging. Both slope streaks and gullies involve flow of granular material, but it is not clear whether liquid water (or another suspending agent) was involved. The possibility that liquid water was involved makes gullies and slope streaks important for understanding Mars recent climate and for the hope of extant life near its surface. Here, we show that significant features of slope streaks and gullies are consistent with dry flows of granular material. Liquid water may not be required.

  17. Structure-Based Computational Study of Two Disease Resistance Gene Homologues (Hm1 and Hm2) in Maize (Zea mays L.) with Implications in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Barooah, Madhumita

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent HC-toxin reductases (HCTR1 and 2) encoded by enzymatic class of disease resistance homologous genes (Hm1 and Hm2) protect maize by detoxifying a cyclic tetrapeptide, HC-toxin, secreted by the fungus Cochliobolus carbonum race 1(CCR1). Unlike the other classes' resistance (R) genes, HCTR-mediated disease resistance is an inimitable mechanism where the avirulence (Avr) component from CCR1 is not involved in toxin degradation. In this study, we attempted to decipher cofactor (NADPH) recognition and mode of HC-toxin binding to HCTRs through molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding free energy calculation methods. The rationality and the stability of docked complexes were validated by 30-ns MD simulation. The binding free energy decomposition of enzyme-cofactor complex was calculated to find the driving force behind cofactor recognition. The overall binding free energies of HCTR1-NADPH and HCTR2-NADPH were found to be ?616.989 and ?16.9749 kJ mol?1 respectively. The binding free energy decomposition revealed that the binding of NADPH to the HCTR1 is mainly governed by van der Waals and nonpolar interactions, whereas electrostatic terms play dominant role in stabilizing the binding mode between HCTR2 and NADPH. Further, docking analysis of HC-toxin with HCTR-NADPH complexes showed a distinct mode of binding and the complexes were stabilized by a strong network of hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. This study is the first in silico attempt to unravel the biophysical and biochemical basis of cofactor recognition in enzymatic class of R genes in cereal crop maize. PMID:24847713

  18. Clinical comparison of the Welch Allyn SureSight™ handheld autorefractor versus streak retinoscopy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Allyson D.; Hollingsworth, Steven R.; Ofri, Ron; Kass, Philip H.; Reed, Zoe; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the Welch Allyn SureSight™ wavefront autorefractor with retinoscopy in normal dogs. Animals studied 50 privately-owned dogs (100 eyes) of 20 breeds, free of ocular disease. Mean ±SD age 5.7 ± 3.25 years (range: 6 months – 13 years). Procedures The refractive error was determined in each eye by two experienced retinoscopists using streak retinoscopy as well as by an autorefractor operated by two different examiners. Measurements were performed before and approximately 30–45 minutes after cycloplegia was induced by cyclopentolate 0.5% and tropicamide 0.5% ophthalmic solutions. Results Mean ±SD non-cyclopleged retinoscopy net sphere was ?0.55 ± 1.14 (range: ?3.75 to 3.5) diopters (D). Mean cyclopleged retinoscopy net sphere was ?0.52 ±1.18 (range: ?4.25 to 2) D. Mean ± SD non-cyclopleged autorefractor spherical equivalent (SE) was ?0.42 ± 1.13D (range: ?3.36 to 2.73) D. Mean cyclopleged autorefractor spherical equivalent was 0.10 ±1.47 (range: ?5.62 to 3.19) D. Non-cyclopleged autorefraction results were not significantly different from streak retinoscopy (whether non-cyclopleged or cyclopleged, p=0.80, 0.26, respectively). Cyclopleged autorefraction results were significantly different from non-cyclopleged or cyclopleged streak retinoscopy (p<0.0001 in both states). There was no significant difference between non-cyclopleged and cyclopleged streak retinoscopy (p= 0.97). Conclusions Non-cyclopleged autorefraction shows good agreement with streak retinoscopy in dogs and may be a useful clinical technique. Cycloplegia does not significantly affect streak retinoscopy results in dogs. PMID:23173899

  19. Understanding baseball team standings and streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sire, C.; Redner, S.

    2009-02-01

    Can one understand the statistics of wins and losses of baseball teams? Are their consecutive-game winning and losing streaks self-reinforcing or can they be described statistically? We apply the Bradley-Terry model, which incorporates the heterogeneity of team strengths in a minimalist way, to answer these questions. Excellent agreement is found between the predictions of the Bradley-Terry model and the rank dependence of the average number team wins and losses in major-league baseball over the past century when the distribution of team strengths is taken to be uniformly distributed over a finite range. Using this uniform strength distribution, we also find very good agreement between model predictions and the observed distribution of consecutive-game team winning and losing streaks over the last half-century; however, the agreement is less good for the previous half-century. The behavior of the last half-century supports the hypothesis that long streaks are primarily statistical in origin with little self-reinforcing component. The data further show that the past half-century of baseball has been more competitive than the preceding half-century.

  20. Whole-genome expression analysis of Rice black-streaked dwarf virus in different plant hosts and small brown planthopper.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiufang; Ni, Haiping; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lan, Ying; Ren, Chunmei; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-11-10

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) can infect a number of gramineous plants and cause severe crop yield losses in southeast Asian countries. The virus is transmitted by small brown planthopper (SBPH) in a persistent circulative manner. The interactions between RBSDV and its different hosts remain unknown. Besides, how the virus adjusts itself to infect different hosts is unclear. In the present study, the relative RNA levels of the thirteen RBSDV genes in rice, maize, wheat, and SBPH were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. P7-1 and P10 genes were predominantly expressed whereas P8 and P7-2 genes were expressed at low levels in plant hosts. Similar to the expression in rice, P7-1 was the most abundantly expressed gene and P8 was expressed at the lowest level in SBPH, indicating that RBSDV adopts the same strategy to infect distinct hosts. The high expression levels of the P7-1 gene in both plants and insect suggest that it can be used as the target gene for disease diagnostics. However, the expression levels of some genes varied from host to host. P5-1, P6 and P9-1, the components of the RBSDV viroplasm, are differentially expressed in different hosts. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the quantity of the P9-1 protein was more abundant in SBPH than in plant hosts. These data indicate that the virus may adjust its own gene expression to replicate in different hosts. Analysis of time course of gene expression revealed that P7-1 stands out as the only gene highly expressed at the earliest time point and its expression precedes all others throughout infection from 8 to 24days post-inoculation. The high expression levels of the P7-1 gene suggest that it plays a significant role in RBSDV-host interactions. PMID:26149652

  1. HiRISE observations of slope streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Frank C.; Beyer, Ross A.; McEwen, Alfred S.; Thomson, Bradley J.

    2007-10-01

    Images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment have revealed new details on the morphologic and topographic characteristics of slope streaks on Mars. Over 1500 HiRISE images were analyzed with 78 unique image sites having slope streaks. Images with low sun illumination reveal that dark slope streaks have topographic relief where streaked surfaces are lower than their surroundings. Slope streaks often initiate below localized features such as rock outcrops, individual boulders, and impact craters. They are also abundant in great numbers within the blast zones of small young impact craters 10-50 m in diameter. These observations suggest that slope streaks can be triggered by localized disturbances such as rockfalls and impact blasts. Seismic activity from external (e.g., impacts) or internal forces could also trigger slope streaks. The topographic relief and triggering mechanisms of slope streaks seem to best fit models that involve dry dust avalanches. Martian slope streaks and meters-thick avalanche scars are part of a continuum of active mass-wasting features at meter to sub-meter scales.

  2. Fumonisin Disruption of Ceramide Biosynthesis in Maize Roots and the Effects on Plant Development and Fusarium verticillioides-Induced Seedling Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides infects maize (Zea mays) and produces fumonisins, inhibitors of acyl coenzyme A dependent ceramide synthase. To determine the role of fumonisins on maize root development, seeds were inoculated with pathogenic or non- pathogenic strains of F. verticillioides. Ro...

  3. Compressible laminar streaks with wall suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, Pierre; Shah, Daniel; Hicks, Peter D.

    2013-05-01

    The response of a compressible laminar boundary layer subject to free-stream vortical disturbances and steady mean-flow wall suction is studied. The theoretical frameworks of Leib et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 380, 169-203 (1999), 10.1017/S0022112098003504] and Ricco and Wu [J. Fluid Mech. 587, 97-138 (2007), 10.1017/S0022112007007070], based on the linearized unsteady boundary-region equations, are adopted to study the influence of suction on the kinematic and thermal streaks arising through the interaction between the free-stream vortical perturbations and the boundary layer. In the asymptotic limit of small spanwise wavelength compared with the boundary layer thickness, i.e., when the disturbance flow is conveniently described by the steady compressible boundary region equations, the effect of suction is mild on the velocity fluctuations and negligible on the temperature fluctuations. When the spanwise wavelength is comparable with the boundary layer thickness, small suction values intensify the supersonic streaks, while higher transpiration levels always stabilize the disturbances at all Mach numbers. At larger spanwise wavelengths, very small amplitudes of wall transpiration have a dramatic stabilizing effect on all boundary layer fluctuations, which can take the form of transiently growing thermal streaks, large amplitude streamwise oscillations, or oblique exponentially growing Tollmien-Schlichting waves, depending on the Mach number and the wavelengths. The range of wavenumbers for which the exponential growth occurs becomes narrower and the location of instability is significantly shifted downstream by mild suction, indicating that wall transpiration can be a suitable vehicle for delaying transition when the laminar breakdown is promoted by these unstable disturbances. The typical streamwise wavelength of these disturbances is instead not influenced by suction, and asymptotic triple deck theory predicts the strong changes in growth rate and the very mild modifications in streamwise wavenumber in the limit of larger downstream distance and small spanwise wavenumber.

  4. Virus-independent and common transcriptome responses of leafhopper vectors feeding on maize infected with semi-persistently and persistent propagatively transmitted viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insects are the most important epidemiological factors for plant virus disease spread, with >75% of viruses being dependent on insects for transmission to new hosts. The black-faced leafhopper (Graminella nigrifrons Forbes) transmits two viruses that use different strategies for transmission: Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV) which is semi-persistently transmitted and Maize fine streak virus (MFSV) which is persistently and propagatively transmitted. To date, little is known regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms in insects that regulate the process and efficiency of transmission, or how these mechanisms differ based on virus transmission strategy. Results RNA-Seq was used to examine transcript changes in leafhoppers after feeding on MCDV-infected, MFSV-infected and healthy maize for 4 h and 7 d. After sequencing cDNA libraries constructed from whole individuals using Illumina next generation sequencing, the Rnnotator pipeline in Galaxy was used to reassemble the G. nigrifrons transcriptome. Using differential expression analyses, we identified significant changes in transcript abundance in G. nigrifrons. In particular, transcripts implicated in the innate immune response and energy production were more highly expressed in insects fed on virus-infected maize. Leafhoppers fed on MFSV-infected maize also showed an induction of transcripts involved in hemocoel and cell-membrane linked immune responses within four hours of feeding. Patterns of transcript expression were validated for a subset of transcripts by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using RNA samples collected from insects fed on healthy or virus-infected maize for between a 4 h and seven week period. Conclusions We expected, and found, changes in transcript expression in G. nigrifrons feeding of maize infected with a virus (MFSV) that also infects the leafhopper, including induction of immune responses in the hemocoel and at the cell membrane. The significant induction of the innate immune system in G. nigrifrons fed on a foregut-borne virus (MCDV) that does not infect leafhoppers was less expected. The changes in transcript accumulation that occur independent of the mode of pathogen transmission could be key for identifying insect factors that disrupt vector-mediated plant virus transmission. PMID:24524215

  5. Mass movement within a slope streak on Mars Cynthia B. Phillips,1

    E-print Network

    Kah, Linda

    of a slope streak that reveal topographic mounds within the streak. These mounds do not continue outside of the total volume of mounds in this particular streak, compared with the estimated excavation volume

  6. Radar-visible wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Christensen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Isolated knobs that are erosional remnants of central volcanoes or of folded rocks occur in several areas of the Altiplano are visible on both optical and images. The optically visible streaks occur in the immediate lee of the knobs, whereas the radar visible streaks occur in the zone downwind between the knobs. Aerial reconnaissance and field studies showed that the optically visible streaks consist of a series of small ( 100 m wide) barchan and barchanoid dunes, intradune sand sheets, and sand hummocks (large shrub coppice dunes) up to 15 m across and 5 m high. On LANDSAT images these features are poorly resolved but combine to form a bright streak. On the radar image, this area also appears brighter than the zone of the radar dark streak; evidently, the dunes and hummocks serve as radar reflectors. The radar dark streak consists of a relatively flat, smooth sand sheet which lacks organized aerolian bedforms, other than occasional ripples. Wind velocity profiles show a greater U value in the optically bright streak zone than in the radar dark streak.

  7. The direct evaluation of attosecond chirp from a streaking measurement

    E-print Network

    Justin Gagnon; Vladislav S. Yakovlev

    2010-12-07

    We derive an analytical expression, from classical electron trajectories in a laser field, that relates the breadth of a streaked photoelectron spectrum to the group-delay dispersion of an isolated attosecond pulse. Based on this analytical expression, we introduce a simple, efficient and robust procedure to instantly extract the attosecond pulse's chirp from the streaking measurement.

  8. Detecting Streaks from Dermoscopic Images of Pigmented Skin Lesions

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    Detecting Streaks from Dermoscopic Images of Pigmented Skin Lesions Hengameh Mirzaalian1 , Tim K dermatologists. Recently, a few works have been proposed towards automating pigmented skin lesion (PSL, we focus on extracting features for streak detection due to the clinical importance of the absence

  9. Supplemental Material Generalized Streak Lines Advected Tangent Curves

    E-print Network

    in space-time and their collection at a certain time step denotes the generalized streak line. Many to each other in space-time via fold bifurcations. Also note that generalized streak lines may change: critical points (green, yellow) tracked in space-time using FFF. (b) Advection: Path lines in space-time

  10. A compensating wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium Robertsonian translocation conferring resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), is a potentially devastating disease of common wheat in the Great Plains of North America. So far, two genes conferring resistance to WSMV have been named and used in cultivar improvement. Here we report a new source of resistance that was derived from a wheat-Th. i...

  11. HiRISE Observations of Slope Streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Ross A.; Chuang, F. C.; McEwen, A. S.; Thomson, B. J.; HiRISE Team

    2007-10-01

    Images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) have revealed new details on the morphologic and topographic characteristics of slope streaks on Mars. Over 1500 HiRISE images were analyzed with 78 unique image sites having slope streaks. Images with low illumination angles reveal that dark slope streaks have topographic relief where the streak surfaces are lower than their surroundings, representing an excavation of material. Slope streaks often initiate below localized features such as rock outcrops, individual boulders, and impact craters. They are also abundant in great numbers within the blast zones of small young impact craters. These observations suggest that slope streaks are triggered by localized disturbances such as rockfalls, impact blasts, and seismic shaking. These new observations of topographic relief and improved correlation with triggering mechanisms seem to best fit models that involve dry dust avalanches. Additionally, Gerstell et al. [1] identified a population of meters-thick avalanche scars as being a separate class of mass-wasting features. Our analysis of dark slope streaks and meters-thick avalanche scars suggests that the two features are related and part of a continuum of active mass-wasting features formed by dust avalanches. HiRISE observations indicate that dark slope streaks without observable depth in MOC images do have topography and have less than a meter of excavation depth. While many slope streaks do not appear to have topography in HiRISE images, this does not indicate that topography is absent, but that the depth of excavated dust is not sufficiently thick to be resolved by HiRISE at the observed illumination angles. The presence and continuing formation of slope streaks on Mars further highlights the modification of the current-day surface by mass-wasting and eolian processes. [1] Gerstell, M.F., O. Aharonson, and N. Schorghofer (2004), A distinct class of avalanche scars on Mars, Icarus, 168, 122-130.

  12. Maize aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the most economically important food crops grown on acid soils, where aluminum (Al) toxicity greatly limits crop yields. Considerable variation for Al tolerance exists in maize, and this variation has been exploited for many years by plant breeders to enhance maize Al tolerance. Curr...

  13. MaizeCyc: Metabolic networks in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeCyc is a catalog of known and predicted metabolic and transport pathways that enables plant researchers to graphically represent the metabolome of maize (Zea mays), thereby supporting integrated systems-biology analysis. Supported analyses include molecular and genetic/phenotypic profiling (e.g...

  14. Genetic erosion in maize’s center of origin

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, George A.; López-Feldman, Alejandro; Yúnez-Naude, Antonio; Taylor, J. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Crop genetic diversity is an indispensable resource for farmers and professional breeders responding to changing climate, pests, and diseases. Anecdotal appraisals in centers of crop origin have suggested serious threats to this diversity for over half a century. However, a nationwide inventory recently found all maize races previously described for Mexico, including some formerly considered nearly extinct. A flurry of social studies seems to confirm that farmers maintain considerable diversity. Here, we compare estimates of maize diversity from case studies over the past 15 y with nationally and regionally representative matched longitudinal data from farmers across rural Mexico. Our findings reveal an increasing bias in inferences based on case study results and widespread loss of diversity. Cross-sectional, case study data suggest that farm-level richness has increased by 0.04 y?1 nationwide; however, direct estimates using matched longitudinal data reveal that richness dropped ?0.04 y?1 between 2002 and 2007, from 1.43 to 1.22 varieties per farm. Varietal losses occurred across regions and altitudinal zones, and regardless of farm turnover within the sector. Extinction of local maize populations may not have resulted in an immediate loss of alleles, but low varietal richness and changes in maize’s metapopulation dynamics may prevent farmers from accessing germplasm suitable to a rapidly changing climate. Declining yields could then lead farmers to leave the sector and result in a further loss of diversity. Similarities in research approaches across crops suggest that methodological biases could conceal a loss of diversity at other centers of crop origin. PMID:25197088

  15. Multivariate analysis of maize disease resistances suggests a pleiotropic genetic basis and implicates a glutathione S-transferase gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are attacked by pathogens representing diverse taxonomic groups, such that genes providing multiple disease resistance (MDR) would likely be under positive selection pressure. We examined the novel proposition that naturally occurring allelic variants may confer MDR. To do so, we applied a ...

  16. High Performance Imaging Streak Camera for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Opachich, Y. P.; Kalantar, D.; MacPhee, A.; Holder, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Hatch, B.; Brown, C.; Landen, O.; Perfect, B. H.; Guidry, B.; Mead, A.; Charest, M.; Palmer, N.; Homoelle, D.; Browning, D.; Silbernagel, C.; Brienza-Larsen, G.; Griffin, M.; Lee, J. J.; Haugh, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray streak camera platform has been characterized and implemented for use at the National Ignition Facility. The camera has been modified to meet the experiment requirements of the National Ignition Campaign and to perform reliably in conditions that produce high EMI. A train of temporal UV timing markers has been added to the diagnostic in order to calibrate the temporal axis of the instrument and the detector efficiency of the streak camera was improved by using a CsI photocathode. The performance of the streak camera has been characterized and is summarized in this paper. The detector efficiency and cathode measurements are also presented.

  17. Streak tube photocathode development program. Phase 2, Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-20

    This report details the progress made toward developing a streak tube with greater than 1% quantum efficiency at a wavelength of 1300 nm. The achieved performance is the result of approximately three years of effort. The goal of Phase 2 of this contract was to seal a working 1.3 {mu}m streak tube. This effort was focused in two areas. First there was a continuing effort to further develop and demonstrate the cathodes ability to meet the stated requirements. The second effort was aimed at solving the mechanical and process related problems related to sealing this cathode onto a EG&G streak tube.

  18. The formation of streak defects on anodized aluminum extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang; Zhang, Xinquan; Couper, Malcolm J.; Dahle, Arne K.

    2010-05-01

    Streaking is a common surface defect on anodized extrusions of 6xxx series soft alloys. Very often, the defects only become apparent after anodizing, which makes it difficult to identify their root cause. In industry practice, a trial-and-error method has been taken to reduce the intensities of the streak defects, greatly increasing the fabrication cost. This paper describes the formation mechanism of various streak defects on the basis of a literature review and experimental results. This provides a basis for developing effective measures for preventing the formation of these defects for the extrusion industry.

  19. Progress on Modeling of Ultrafast X-Ray Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, G.; Byrd, J.M.; Feng, J.; Qiang, J.; Wang, W.

    2007-06-22

    Streak cameras continue to be useful tools for studying phenomena on the picoseconds time scale. We have employed accelerator modeling tools to understand and possibly improve the time resolution of present and future streak cameras. This effort has resulted in an end-to-end model of the camera. This model has contributed to the recent measurement of 230 fsec (FWHM) resolution measured at 266 nm in the Advanced Light Source Streak Camera Laboratory. We describe results from this model that show agreement with the experiments. We also extrapolate the performance of this camera including several possible improvements.

  20. Temporal Contrast Changes in Dark Slope Streaks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, H.; Phillips, C. B.; Fenton, L. K.; Brown, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Dark slope streaks on Mars, first observed in Viking images, provide insight into one of the most active and dynamic processes observed on the planet's surface. While various formation models have been suggested [1][2][3], dust avalanches seem to best explain streak origin and characteristics[4][5]. New dark streaks are observed to have the greatest contrast to their surroundings while older streaks have lower contrast, suggesting that streaks fade over time. One theory for this is atmospheric dust fallout slowly raising the albedo of the surface exposed by the dust avalanche, resulting in increased streak albedo over time until the streak becomes indistinguishable from the surrounding surface. In this study, we attempt an initial evaluation of changes in streak brightness relative to surroundings, with a first order correction for incidence angle[6] based on MOLA data. CRISM images were first identified for spatial and temporal overlap, then further selected for those image sets with well-matched viewing geometries. Locations included Nicholson Crater (CRISM images: frt0000c287_07_de165l, hrl0000d0f1_7_de165l, frt00018c69_07_de165l) and South of Nestus Valles (CRISM images: hrl00004a5e_07_de181l, hrl0000812a_07_de182l) as well as Naktong Vallis (CRISM images: hrl0000898d_07_de182l, hrl00005337_07_de182l) and an area in Lycus Sulci (CRISM images: hrl0000a52a_07_de166l, hrl0000ce5f_07_if175l). We focused on 1 micron wavelength CRISM images in order to reduce atmosphric interference. From here, brightness (observed radiance divided by solar irradiance at Mars divided by pi) values were collected along individual streaks, with measurements at multiple locations along the streak length and alongside at points of similar elevation to streak measurements to establish an average contrast ratio. Both on-streak and off-streak values were divided by the cosine of their respective local MOLA incidence angles to correct for brightness variation due to solar flux and topographic angles. These measurements were then repeated for overlapping temporal images, establishing local and overall averages for the rate of change in this contrast ratio. While our initial hypothesis was for linear streak fading, results showed a range of trends, including streaks and imaged areas with streaks that darkened, brightened, and brightened then darkened or vice versa. We continue to explore the possibility of non-linear brightening as well as streak reactivation and localized events, surface characteristics, and topography. Further study will focus on these and other morphological changes observed from vast data sets of other instruments including the Mars Reconnaissance Orbter HiRISE and CTX, Mars Express HRSC, Mars Odyssey THEMIS (visible), and the Mars Global Surveyor MOC. [1] Morris (1982) JGR, 87, 1164-1178. [2] Ferguson and Lucchita (1984) NASA Tech. Memo., TM-86246, 188-190. [3] Miyamoto, H. et al. (2004) JGR, 109, E06008. [4] Sullivan, R. et al. (2001) JGR, 106, 23607-23633. [5] Baratoux, N. M. et al. (2006) Icarus, 183, 30-45. [6] Brown, A. et al. (2010) JGR, 115, E00D13.

  1. MARTIAN SLOPE STREAKS FORM SPORADICALLY THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. Christina M. , Norbert Schorghofer2

    E-print Network

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    , 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109. Introduction: Slope streaks are dark mass move- ments streak formation on Mars [2, 5-8]. One model sug- gests that like in Antarctica, slope streak formation, quakes, or dust devils play a role in slope streak for- mation on Mars. Previous work has had only very

  2. Attosecond streaking of photoelectron emission from disordered solids

    E-print Network

    Okell, W A; Fabris, D; Arrell, C A; Hengster, J; Ibrahimkutty, S; Seiler, A; Barthelmess, M; Stankov, S; Lei, D Y; Sonnefraud, Y; Rahmani, M; Uphues, Th; Maier, S A; Marangos, J P; Tisch, J W G

    2014-01-01

    Attosecond streaking of photoelectrons emitted by extreme ultraviolet light has begun to reveal how electrons behave during their transport within simple crystalline solids. Many sample types within nanoplasmonics, thin-film physics, and semiconductor physics, however, do not have a simple single crystal structure. The electron dynamics which underpin the optical response of plasmonic nanostructures and wide-bandgap semiconductors happen on an attosecond timescale. Measuring these dynamics using attosecond streaking will enable such systems to be specially tailored for applications in areas such as ultrafast opto-electronics. We show that streaking can be extended to this very general type of sample by presenting streaking measurements on an amorphous film of the wide-bandgap semiconductor tungsten trioxide, and on polycrystalline gold, a material that forms the basis of many nanoplasmonic devices. Our measurements reveal the near-field temporal structure at the sample surface, and photoelectron wavepacket te...

  3. Note: X-ray streak camera sweep speed calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Tuo; Yang Jiamin; Deng Bo; Wang Zhebin; Yang Dong; He Xiaoan

    2010-05-15

    X-ray streak cameras are extensively used to study transient x-ray processes in experiments carried out on various laser facilities at the Research Center of Laser Fusion. Precise calibration and clear description of the sweep speed of the x-ray streak camera are vital for obtaining precise temporal information to understand the fast physics phenomena. An x-ray streak camera named wide-slit x-ray streak camera has been calibrated using a small-scale laser facility with pulse duration of 8 ps. Sweep speeds on most part of the output screen (charge coupled device) are obtained. These calibration results can be used to correct the nonlinearity of sweep speed in measurement of temporal processes.

  4. RNAi-mediated resistance to Cassava brown streak Uganda virus in transgenic cassava.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jitender S; Ogwok, Emmanuel; Wagaba, Henry; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Alicai, Titus; Gaitan-Solis, Eliana; Taylor, Nigel J; Fauquet, Claude M

    2011-09-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), is of new epidemic importance to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production in East Africa, and an emerging threat to the crop in Central and West Africa. This study demonstrates that at least one of these two ipomoviruses, CBSUV, can be efficiently controlled using RNA interference (RNAi) technology in cassava. An RNAi construct targeting the near full-length coat protein (FL-CP) of CBSUV was expressed constitutively as a hairpin construct in cassava. Transgenic cassava lines expressing small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against this sequence showed 100% resistance to CBSUV across replicated graft inoculation experiments. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed the presence of CBSUV in leaves and some tuberous roots from challenged controls, but not in the same tissues from transgenic plants. This is the first demonstration of RNAi-mediated resistance to the ipomovirus CBSUV in cassava. PMID:21726367

  5. Tests for Wet Mechanism of Slope Streaks Formation on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M.; Head, J.

    2007-12-01

    Slope streaks are forming in some equatorial regions on Mars. They have been mostly interpreted as a result of dry mass wasting of dust. Recently a striking morphological similarity with wet slope streaks in the Antarctic Dry Valleys has been demonstrated. Physical conditions on Mars do not allow the same mechanism. We propose a "wet" mechanism on Mars, which inherits the main feature of the Antarctic slope streaks responsible for their distinctive planforms, namely, shallow subsurface percolation of liquid above the ice table. This mechanism assumes some ice in the shallow subsurface, which had been emplaced under previous wetter climate conditions and currently is undergoing slow desiccation. This icy soil is overlaid by a layer highly enriched in chlorides. On top of this layer, there is a thin layer of dry fine dust. During the warm season, droplets of highly concentrated brines are formed in the salty layer. Sometimes at some places, the droplets coalesce; the liquid percolates downhill, wicks up through the dust layer and dries up. This alters the uppermost dust layer structure, which affects the surface albedo and observable as a dark streak. Further gradual changes of this new surface structure lead to slow brightening of the streak and final fading away. Such a mechanism is at the margin of physical possibility and consistency with observational constraints. Prospective observational tests for "wet" mechanism: (1) Spectral signature of hydrated chlorides in fresh streaks, would make "wet" hypothesis much more probable. (2) Gentle slope of slope streaks, especially of their uppermost parts would strongly favor "wet" mechanism. (3) Observation of slope streak formation during cold seasons, when the day-average surface temperature is below 190 K would reject "wet" mechanism. (4) Observation of a slope streak in the process of formation (a streak that lengthens from earlier to later image) would almost prove "wet" mechanism, at least, almost reject dry avalanche scenario. (5) Absence of a shallow high-thermal-inertia layer would be inconsistent with a "wet" scenario. (6) Geomorphologic observations supporting subsurface ice in the slope streak regions would favor the "wet" mechanism.

  6. Attosecond streaking of photoelectrons emitted from metal surfaces

    E-print Network

    Boyan Obreshkov

    2014-11-17

    We numerically investigate attosecond streaking time delays in the photoemission of valence and 2p core electrons of aluminum surface. We find that electron emission from the core level band is delayed by $\\Delta \\tau =100$ attoseconds relative to the release of electrons from the valence band. We show that this relative time offset in electron emission is caused by the screening of the streaking laser field by conduction electrons.

  7. Attosecond streaking of photoelectrons emitted from metal surfaces

    E-print Network

    Obreshkov, Boyan

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate attosecond streaking time delays in the photoemission of valence and 2p core electrons of aluminum surface. We find that electron emission from the core level band is delayed by $\\Delta \\tau =100$ attoseconds relative to the release of electrons from the valence band. We show that this relative time offset in electron emission is caused by the screening of the streaking laser field by conduction electrons.

  8. Vascular Streak Dieback of cacao in Southeast Asia detection and Melanesia: in planta detection of the pathogen and a new taxonomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular Streak Dieback (VSD) disease of cacao (Theobroma cacao) in Southeast Asia and Melanesia is caused by a basidiomycete (Ceratobasidiales) fungus described in a monotypic genus as Oncobasidium theobromae (syn. =Thanatephorus theobromae). The symptoms of the disease include green-spotted chloro...

  9. The effect of the attochirp on attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Cory; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Becker, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Measurements invoking the use of attosecond pulses can be incorrectly interpreted if the chirp of such pulses is not taken into account. In this study, we use a physically intuitive analytical model to understand the effect a chirp in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse will have upon the delay observed in streaking experiments. It is known that both the photoionization cross-section of the system and the spectral and temporal characteristics of the attosecond pulse used will determine the relative time-dependent probability of absorbing a particular photon energy. We additionally use an analytical method to calculate the streaking delay as a function of the absorbed photon energy and the time delay between the XUV and streaking pulses. Equipped with this information, we determine the expected value of the streaking delay observed when a chirped attosecond XUV pulse is used to initiate streaking experiments. We then demonstrate that depending on the chirp, the streaking delay can be changed by several attoseconds, which is on the order of the delays usually observed in such experiments. We acknowledge the following support: C.G. and A.B: U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program (Award No. DE-FG02-09ER16103), A.J.-B.: U.S. NSF (Grants No. PHY-1125844 and No. PHY-1068706).

  10. Tobacco streak virus isolated from lettuce.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, F S; Khodai Motlagh, M

    2009-05-01

    Tobacco streak virus (TSV) is an ilarvirus with a worldwide distribution. This virus infects many plants and causes significant yield losses. In this study, 300 samples of lettuce were collected from lettuce fields in Tehran Province. Infected plants show symptoms such as: mosaic, vein clearing, vein necrosis, yellowing and leaf distortion. DAS-ELISA (Double Antibody Sandwich-ELISA) was used with a polyclonal antiserum against TSV. Five isolates (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5), which are collected, respectively from Mohammad Abad (Karaj), Malek Abad (Karaj), Hashtgerd (Karaj), Tarand Balla (Varamin) and Deh mah sin (Pishva) were inoculated on 29 species of Cucurbitaceae, Amaranthaceae, Solanacea, Compositae, Leguminosae and Chenopodiacea. Chenopodium quinoa 6 days after inoculation showed necrotic local lesions. Gomphrena globosa 10 days after inoculation developed chlorotic local lesions. Systemic symptoms were produced in Datura stramonium. Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Kidney 5 days after inoculation developed necrotic local lesions. Nicotiana tabacum 7 days after inoculation showed necrotic and chlorotic local lesions. Nicotiana clevelandii 15 days after inoculation developed leaf distortion and vein necrosis. Lactuca sativa 10-15 days after inoculation developed leaf istortion and mosaic. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) was performed using one primer pairs designed by DSMZ. An approximately 710 bp fragment was amplified with a specific primer. PMID:19634475

  11. The Domestication of Maize The Maize Genome

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    transformed into larger ears with edible kernels that remained on the cob for easy harvest. How these dramatic, such as the time to flowering. As human populations migrated throughout the Americas, new varieties of maize were

  12. Study of Geometric Parameters of Slope Streaks on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusnikin, Eugene; Kreslavsky, Mikhail; Karachevtseva, Irina; Zubarev, Anatoliy; Patratiy, Vyacheslav

    2015-04-01

    Slope streaks are a unique active phenomenon observed in low-latitude dusty regions on Mars. They are dark markings formed by an unknown type of run-away downslope propagation of surface disturbance. There are two kinds of hypotheses of their formation mechanism: "dry", involving granular follow, in particular, dust avalanche, and "wet", involving liquid flow, in particular, percolation of concentrated brines in shallow subsurface (1). Study of geometric characteristics of the slope streaks, especially their slopes, is a way to decipher their origin. We are carrying out an extensive set of measurements of geometric parameters of the slope streaks. We use stereo pairs of images obtained by High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard MRO orbital mission to Mars. These stereo pairs potentially allow geometric measurements (both horizontal and vertical) with accuracy on an order of a meter. Unfortunately, the digital terrain model is currently released for only one stereo pair in the regions of slope streak occurrence, and we have to work with raw, unprocessed stereo pairs. We perform direct photogrammetric measurements using PHOTOMOD software complex (http://www.racurs.ru/). We use our custom software to import "raw" HiRISE imgas (EDRs) and supplementary geometric information from SPICE into PHOTOMOD (2). We select tens to a hundred meters long segments in the beginning and the end of selected streaks and register length, azimuth, and slope of each segment. We also search for anomalously gentle parts of streaks. We analyze the obtained results by means of ESRI ArcGIS software. Our survey is in progress. So far we registered over a hundred of streaks. We found that the extent of the streaks varies from several meters to hundreds of meters. The streaks are formed in locales with a slope from 17 to 37 degrees. The lower boundary indicates that the streaks can propagate on slopes that are significantly gentler than the static angle of repose. Distal (downslope) termini of the streaks often are in rather flat sites. So far we have not found any convincing example of a streak propagating uphill. This is consistent with earlier conclusions that the streaks do not have appreciable inertia. We will continue our survey. With more data we will correlate streak formation and their slopes with slope orientation, latitude, etc. This work was carried out in MIIGAiK and supported by Russian Science Foundation, project 14-22-00197. References: 1. Kreslavsky A.M. and J. W. Head, Slope streaks on Mars: A new "wet" mechanism, Icarus 201, 517-527 (2009). 2. Zubarev A., Nadezhdina I. Alignment-Calibration and Processing of HIRISE CCD Data // ISPRS Meeting of the Working Group IV/8 "Advances in Planetary Mapping and Spatial Databases", Moscow, Russia, October 09-12, 2013

  13. MaizeGDB, the maize model organism database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the maize research community's database for maize genetic and genomic information. In this seminar I will outline our current endeavors including a full website redesign, the status of maize genome assembly and annotation projects, and work toward genome functional annotation. Mechanis...

  14. EXOTIC GERMPLASM CONTRIBUTION TO GEM MAIZE LINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project is a cooperative effort between the USDA-ARS and public and industry researchers. The goal is to introgress exotic germplasm into elite U.S. Cornbelt inbred backgrounds to enhance genetic gain for yield, disease and pest resistance, and value-added t...

  15. MAIZE ALLELIC DIVERSITY PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the estimated 250-300 races of maize, only 24 races are represented in materials utilized by the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project, a collaborative effort between USDA-ARS and public and private sector research scientists. This is largely a result of poor performance of many races in ...

  16. Maize Genetic Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter describes the resources held at the Maize Genetics Cooperation • Stock Center in detail and also provides some information about the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) in Ames, IA, Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo (CIMMYT) in Mexico, and the N...

  17. Viruses in maize and johnsongrass in southern ohio.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L R; Teplier, R; Todd, J C; Jones, M W; Cassone, B J; Wijeratne, S; Wijeratne, A; Redinbaugh, M G

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT The two major U.S. maize viruses, Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV), emerged in southern Ohio and surrounding regions in the 1960s and caused significant losses. Planting resistant varieties and changing cultural practices has dramatically reduced virus impact in subsequent decades. Current information on the distribution, diversity, and impact of known and potential U.S. maize disease-causing viruses is lacking. To assess the current reservoir of viruses present at the sites of past disease emergence, we used a combination of serological testing and next-generation RNA sequencing approaches. Here, we report enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RNA-Seq data from samples collected over 2 years to assess the presence of viruses in cultivated maize and an important weedy reservoir, Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). Results revealed a persistent reservoir of MDMV and two strains of MCDV in Ohio Johnsongrass. We identified sequences of several other grass-infecting viruses and confirmed the presence of Wheat mosaic virus in Ohio maize. Together, these results provide important data for managing virus disease in field corn and sweet corn maize crops, and identifying potential future virus threats. PMID:24918609

  18. Design and Field Test of a Galvanometer Deflected Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C C; Goosman, D R; Wade, J T; Avara, R

    2002-11-08

    We have developed a compact fieldable optically-deflected streak camera first reported in the 20th HSPP Congress. Using a triggerable galvanometer that scans the optical signal, the imaging and streaking function is an all-optical process without incurring any photon-electron-photon conversion or photoelectronic deflection. As such, the achievable imaging quality is limited mainly only by optical design, rather than by multiple conversions of signal carrier and high voltage electron-optics effect. All core elements of the camera are packaged into a 12 inch x 24 inch footprint box, a size similar to that of a conventional electronic streak camera. At LLNL's Site-300 Test Site, we have conducted a Fabry-Perot interferometer measurement of fast object velocity using this all-optical camera side-by-side with an intensified electronic streak camera. These two cameras are configured as two independent instruments for recording synchronously each branch of the 50/50 splits from one incoming signal. Given the same signal characteristics, the test result has undisputedly demonstrated superior imaging performance for the all-optical streak camera. It produces higher signal sensitivity, wider linear dynamic range, better spatial contrast, finer temporal resolution, and larger data capacity as compared with that of the electronic counterpart. The camera had also demonstrated its structural robustness and functional consistence to be well compatible with field environment. This paper presents the camera design and the test results in both pictorial records and post-process graphic summaries.

  19. Hitting Is Contagious in Baseball: Evidence from Long Hitting Streaks

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Joel R.; Maewal, Akhilesh; Gough, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis is used to test the hypothesis that “hitting is contagious”. A statistical model is described to study the effect of a hot hitter upon his teammates’ batting during a consecutive game hitting streak. Box score data for entire seasons comprising streaks of length games, including a total observations were compiled. Treatment and control sample groups () were constructed from core lineups of players on the streaking batter’s team. The percentile method bootstrap was used to calculate confidence intervals for statistics representing differences in the mean distributions of two batting statistics between groups. Batters in the treatment group (hot streak active) showed statistically significant improvements in hitting performance, as compared against the control. Mean for the treatment group was found to be to percentage points higher during hot streaks (mean difference increased points), while the batting heat index introduced here was observed to increase by points. For each performance statistic, the null hypothesis was rejected at the significance level. We conclude that the evidence suggests the potential existence of a “statistical contagion effect”. Psychological mechanisms essential to the empirical results are suggested, as several studies from the scientific literature lend credence to contagious phenomena in sports. Causal inference from these results is difficult, but we suggest and discuss several latent variables that may contribute to the observed results, and offer possible directions for future research. PMID:23251507

  20. Slope streaks in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: Characteristics, candidate formation mechanisms, and implications for slope streak formation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    Slope streaks on Mars are typically dark, extend downslope for up to ~2 km, are <200 m in width, show no detectable relief, and have been observed to form and change over less than decadal time periods. Mars slope streaks occur exclusively in regions of low thermal inertia, steep slopes, and only where peak temperatures exceed 275 K; changes are observed only if the interval includes the warm season. Mechanisms proposed for Mars slope streaks include dry dust avalanches, dust avalanches controlled by wind, wet debris flows, both wet and dry debris flows, and erosive fluvial processes from spring discharge, where melting is aided by hydrothermal activity or hypersaline aquifers. Although the ADV represent one of the most Mars-like terrestrial environments, there are also substantial differences (e.g., atmospheric pressure and composition; abundance of water, etc.) and thus analogs must be assessed cautiously. We investigated very similar slope streaks in upper Wright Valley of the Antarctic Dry Valleys and interpret their formation to be due to snowpack and near-surface melting-derived saline water traveling downslope along the top of the ice table, wicking upward, and dampening the surface to cause the streak. Among the observations of Mars streaks that suggest that this mechanism should be seriously considered are: 1) similarities in characteristics, brightness, scales, slopes, aspect ratio, temporal behavior, and modes of occurrence; 2) distribution and geometry of occurrence suggesting a relation to solar insolation (low latitudes and northernmost streaks occur preferentially on warmer south-facing slopes); 3) the observation that they occur only where peak temperatures exceed 275 K, and that changes occur only where there has been an intervening warm season, suggesting a potential role for the melting of surface snow and ice. We thus conclude that the saline-assisted surface-near surface melting and water migration origin of slope streaks interpreted from the ADV should be further assessed as a candidate mechanism for the origin of slope streaks on Mars. If this origin proves to be applicable to Mars, then the high frequency, continuity, and renewal of occurrence of these features in specific areas of Mars suggests an important role for liquid water and brines under current seasonal conditions.

  1. Bacterial endophytes from wild maize suppress Fusarium graminearum in modern maize and inhibit mycotoxin accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Walaa K.; Shearer, Charles R.; Limay-Rios, Victor; Zhou, Ting; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Wild maize (teosinte) has been reported to be less susceptible to pests than their modern maize (corn) relatives. Endophytes, defined as microbes that inhabit plants without causing disease, are known for their ability to antagonize plant pests and pathogens. We hypothesized that the wild relatives of modern maize may host endophytes that combat pathogens. Fusarium graminearum is the fungus that causes Gibberella Ear Rot (GER) in modern maize and produces the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON). In this study, 215 bacterial endophytes, previously isolated from diverse maize genotypes including wild teosintes, traditional landraces and modern varieties, were tested for their ability to antagonize F. graminearum in vitro. Candidate endophytes were then tested for their ability to suppress GER in modern maize in independent greenhouse trials. The results revealed that three candidate endophytes derived from wild teosintes were most potent in suppressing F. graminearum in vitro and GER in a modern maize hybrid. These wild teosinte endophytes could suppress a broad spectrum of fungal pathogens of modern crops in vitro. The teosinte endophytes also suppressed DON mycotoxin during storage to below acceptable safety threshold levels. A fourth, less robust anti-fungal strain was isolated from a modern maize hybrid. Three of the anti-fungal endophytes were predicted to be Paenibacillus polymyxa, along with one strain of Citrobacter. Microscopy studies suggested a fungicidal mode of action by all four strains. Molecular and biochemical studies showed that the P. polymyxa strains produced the previously characterized anti-Fusarium compound, fusaricidin. Our results suggest that the wild relatives of modern crops may serve as a valuable reservoir for endophytes in the ongoing fight against serious threats to modern agriculture. We discuss the possible impact of crop evolution and domestication on endophytes in the context of plant defense. PMID:26500660

  2. Bacterial endophytes from wild maize suppress Fusarium graminearum in modern maize and inhibit mycotoxin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Walaa K; Shearer, Charles R; Limay-Rios, Victor; Zhou, Ting; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Wild maize (teosinte) has been reported to be less susceptible to pests than their modern maize (corn) relatives. Endophytes, defined as microbes that inhabit plants without causing disease, are known for their ability to antagonize plant pests and pathogens. We hypothesized that the wild relatives of modern maize may host endophytes that combat pathogens. Fusarium graminearum is the fungus that causes Gibberella Ear Rot (GER) in modern maize and produces the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON). In this study, 215 bacterial endophytes, previously isolated from diverse maize genotypes including wild teosintes, traditional landraces and modern varieties, were tested for their ability to antagonize F. graminearum in vitro. Candidate endophytes were then tested for their ability to suppress GER in modern maize in independent greenhouse trials. The results revealed that three candidate endophytes derived from wild teosintes were most potent in suppressing F. graminearum in vitro and GER in a modern maize hybrid. These wild teosinte endophytes could suppress a broad spectrum of fungal pathogens of modern crops in vitro. The teosinte endophytes also suppressed DON mycotoxin during storage to below acceptable safety threshold levels. A fourth, less robust anti-fungal strain was isolated from a modern maize hybrid. Three of the anti-fungal endophytes were predicted to be Paenibacillus polymyxa, along with one strain of Citrobacter. Microscopy studies suggested a fungicidal mode of action by all four strains. Molecular and biochemical studies showed that the P. polymyxa strains produced the previously characterized anti-Fusarium compound, fusaricidin. Our results suggest that the wild relatives of modern crops may serve as a valuable reservoir for endophytes in the ongoing fight against serious threats to modern agriculture. We discuss the possible impact of crop evolution and domestication on endophytes in the context of plant defense. PMID:26500660

  3. DISSECTION OF QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI (QTL) ASSOCIATED WITH GRAY LEAF SPOT RESISTANCE AND MATURITY IN MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract Gray Leaf Spot (GLS) is recognized as one of the most significant yield-limiting diseases of maize worldwide and has the potential to threaten maize production. Breeding for resistance provides the best preventive measure against the disease. However, associations between GLS and maturity c...

  4. Effects of the Fusarium verticillioides mycotoxin, fumonisin B1, on maize stomatal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides is a non-obligate plant pathogen causing a number of maize diseases and is responsible for the production of fumonisin B1 (FB1), a potential human carcinogen and agent of fatal farm animal diseases. The effect of FB1 on the health and development of maize seedlings was recen...

  5. Attosecond Streaking Enables the Measurement of Quantum Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V. S.; Gagnon, J.; Krausz, F.; Karpowicz, N.

    2010-08-13

    Attosecond streaking, as a measurement technique, was originally conceived as a means to characterize attosecond light pulses, which is a good approximation if the relevant transition matrix elements are approximately constant within the bandwidth of the light pulse. Our analysis of attosecond streaking measurements on systems with a complex response to the photoionizing pulse reveals the relation between the momentum-space wave function of the outgoing electron and the result of conventional retrieval algorithms. This finding enables the measurement of the quantum phase associated with bound-continuum transitions.

  6. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren; Kendall, Amy; Berger, P.H.; Shiel, P.J.; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  7. A fiber sensor neutron streak camera for ICF diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kislev, H.; Miley, G.H.

    1986-11-01

    The authors propose an optical sensing based neutron streak camera for ICF burn studies. The conversion of the neutron flux to optical signal is gained through measuring the time dependent optical attenuation (darkening) of a fissile material doped fiber optics. The miniature sensor enables a sensing distance of > 2 cm from the target, such that the neutron doppler broadening can be neglected. An additional major advantage over the current designs is that the streak camera is removed from the intense radiation field. Estimates of minimum yield requirements, darkening time response, and overall temporal resolution are presented.

  8. MaizeGDB.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Carolyn J

    2007-01-01

    MaizeGDB is the community database for biological information about the crop plant Zea mays. Genetic, genomic, sequence, gene product, functional characterization, literature reference, and person/organization contact information are among the data types stored at MaizeGDB. At the project's website (http://www.maizegdb.org) are standardized custom interfaces enabling researchers to browse data and to seek out specific information matching explicit search criteria. In addition, pre-compiled reports are made available for particular types of data, and bulletin boards are provided to facilitate communication and coordination among members of the community of maize geneticists. PMID:18287701

  9. Global maize trade and food security: implications from a social network model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a social network model of the global trade of maize: one of the most important food, feed, and industrial crops worldwide, and critical to food security. We used this model to analyze patterns of maize trade among nations, and to determine where vulnerabilities in food security might arise if maize availability was decreased due to factors such as diversion to nonfood uses, climatic factors, or plant diseases. Using data on imports and exports from the U.N. Commodity Trade Statistics Database for each year from 2000 to 2009 inclusive, we summarized statistics on volumes of maize trade between pairs of nations for 217 nations. There is evidence of market segregation among clusters of nations; with three prominent clusters representing Europe, Brazil and Argentina, and the United States. The United States is by far the largest exporter of maize worldwide, whereas Japan and the Republic of Korea are the largest maize importers. In particular, the star-shaped cluster of the network that represents U.S. maize trade to other nations indicates the potential for food security risks because of the lack of trade these other nations conduct with other maize exporters. If a scenario arose in which U.S. maize could not be exported in as large quantities, maize supplies in many nations could be jeopardized. We discuss this in the context of recent maize ethanol production and its attendant impacts on food prices elsewhere worldwide. PMID:23656551

  10. Global Maize Trade and Food Security: Implications from a Social Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a social network model of the global trade of maize: one of the most important food, feed, and industrial crops worldwide, and critical to food security. We used this model to analyze patterns of maize trade among nations, and to determine where vulnerabilities in food security might arise if maize availability were decreased due to factors such as diversion to non-food uses, climatic factors, or plant diseases. Using data on imports and exports from the United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database for each year from 2000 to 2009 inclusive, we summarized statistics on volumes of maize trade between pairs of nations for 217 nations. There is evidence of market segregation among clusters of nations; with three prominent clusters representing Europe, Brazil and Argentina, and the United States. The United States is by far the largest exporter of maize worldwide, while Japan and the Republic of Korea are the largest maize importers. In particular, the star-shaped cluster of the network that represents US maize trade to other nations indicates the potential for food security risks because of the lack of trade these other nations conduct with other maize exporters. If a scenario arose in which US maize could not be exported in as large quantities, maize supplies in many nations could be jeopardized. We discuss this in the context of recent maize ethanol production and its attendant impacts on food prices elsewhere worldwide. PMID:23656551

  11. Streaked Visible Spectroscopy Data Reduction Manual Ross E. Falcon1

    E-print Network

    Jefferys, William

    Streaked Visible Spectroscopy Data Reduction Manual Ross E. Falcon1 Department of Astronomy and Mc forms of this diagnostic (e.g., Bailey et al. 2000; Dunham et al. 2004; Bailey et al. 2008; Falcon et al Physical Science Consortium Graduate Fellow #12;R. E. Falcon SVS Data Manual 2 The pulsed power accelerator

  12. Soft x-ray streak camera for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    This thesis reviews the development and significance of the soft x-ray streak camera (SXRSC) in the context of inertial confinement fusion energy development. A brief introduction of laser fusion and laser fusion diagnostics is presented. The need for a soft x-ray streak camera as a laser fusion diagnostic is shown. Basic x-ray streak camera characteristics, design, and operation are reviewed. The SXRSC design criteria, the requirement for a subkilovolt x-ray transmitting window, and the resulting camera design are explained. Theory and design of reflector-filter pair combinations for three subkilovolt channels centered at 220 eV, 460 eV, and 620 eV are also presented. Calibration experiments are explained and data showing a dynamic range of 1000 and a sweep speed of 134 psec/mm are presented. Sensitivity modifications to the soft x-ray streak camera for a high-power target shot are described. A preliminary investigation, using a stepped cathode, of the thickness dependence of the gold photocathode response is discussed. Data from a typical Argus laser gold-disk target experiment are shown.

  13. Reliable and Repeatable Characterication of Optical Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D; Charest, M; Torres III, P; Charest, M

    2008-05-06

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  14. Processing Particle-Streak Imagery On A Personal Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes simple flow experiment in which streak images of particles suspended in fluid and illuminated for short times processed into maps of velocity vectors. In experiment, semiautomatic data-reduction scheme used which recovers significant image data more efficiently than currently available automatic scheme.

  15. Attosecond time-resolved streaked photoemission from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qing; Thumm, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    We established a quantum-mechanical model for infrared (IR) laser streaked photoelectron (PE) emission from metal solids by an ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse. Special emphasis was laid on the influence of the energy dispersion of PEs inside the solids on the photoemission time delay. We first applied this model to Mg(0001) surfaces, assuming free-electron dispersion and found good agreement with measured streaked PE spectra and streaking time delays. Next, we investigate W(110) surfaces for which non-free PE dispersion must be included in order to reproduce the measured photoemission delays at different XUV central photon energies. Our model reproduces a series of measured streaked spectrograms and photoemission delays for different metal solids, including clean Mg(0001) and W(110) surfaces and Mg-covered W(110) surfaces. It incorporates modeling of the target band structure, electron mean free paths, energy dispersion, and screening of the IR laser field on the surface. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13491 and NSF Grant PHY-1068752.

  16. Reliable and Repeatable Characterization of Optical Streak Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Charest Jr., Peter Torres III, Christopher Silbernagel, and Daniel Kalantar

    2008-10-31

    Optical streak cameras are used as primary diagnostics for a wide range of physics and laser experiments at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To meet the strict accuracy requirements needed for these experiments, the systematic nonlinearities of the streak cameras (attributed to nonlinearities in the optical and electrical components that make up the streak camera system) must be characterized. In some cases the characterization information is used as a guide to help determine how experiment data should be taken. In other cases, the characterization data are applied to the raw data images to correct for the nonlinearities. In order to characterize an optical streak camera, a specific set of data is collected, where the response to defined inputs are recorded. A set of analysis software routines has been developed to extract information such as spatial resolution, dynamic range, and temporal resolution from this data set. The routines are highly automated, requiring very little user input and thus provide very reliable and repeatable results that are not subject to interpretation. An emphasis on quality control has been placed on these routines due to the high importance of the camera characterization information.

  17. Ipomoviruses: Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus, Cassava brown streak virus, and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ipomoviruses including Squash vein yellowing virus, Cucumber vein yellowing virus and Cassava brown streak virus are currently causing significant economic impact on crop production in several regions of the world. Only recently have results of detailed characterization of their whitefly transmissi...

  18. MAIZE GDB: THE MAIZE GENETICS AND GENOMICS DATABASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three exercises are presented to familiarize workshop participants with how to use the MaizeGDB website. The first exercise guides the student through the online MaizeGDB Tutorial and asks questions that can only be answered by having completed the exercise. The second exercise uses the MaizeGDB w...

  19. Periumbilical pseudoxanthoma elasticum associated with chronic renal failure and angioid streaks--apparent regression with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sapadin, A N; Lebwohl, M G; Teich, S A; Phelps, R G; DiCostanzo, D; Cohen, S R

    1998-08-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable connective tissue disease involving progressive fragmentation and dystrophic calcification of elastic fibers. Periumbilical disease as the exclusive site of cutaneous involvement is most commonly seen in the rare entity termed periumbilical perforating pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PPPXE). Patients with this disorder are generally obese, middle aged, multiparous black women with hypertension. The cutaneous lesions are well-demarcated, hyperpigmented, periumbilical plaques with keratotic papules on the periphery. Extracutaneous manifestations have rarely been described. We describe a patient with periumbilical PXE associated with chronic renal failure and bilateral angioid streaks. Histopathologic examination demonstrated typical calcification of elastic fibers with additional amorphous calcium deposits in the superficial dermis. Transepidermal elimination was not present. Normalization of the serum calcium-phosphate product resulted in regression of the lesions--both clinically and histopathologically. The relation between PPPXE and hereditary PXE is discussed. The role of chronic renal failure in precipitating PPPXE is considered. PMID:9703148

  20. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  1. Absolute Calibration of the OMEGA Streaked Optical Pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, M.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; McCoy, C.; Henchen, R. J.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.

    2013-10-01

    High-energy-density-physics (HEDP) experiments often rely on temperature measurements using optical pyrometry. Laser-driven experiments have time scales of picoseconds, requiring the use of a streak camera as a detector. This complicates the already formidable task of absolute calibration. We report on multiple calibration runs that used a NIST-traceable tungsten-filament lamp to calibrate the optical response of the streaked optical pyrometer on OMEGA. This entailed constructing a spectral-response function from measurements and estimates of the transmissions and responses of all components in the system as well as measurements using narrowband (30-nm) optical filters. The latter is used to normalize the estimated response. The resulting response function predicts the wideband (~300-nm) response of the system to high precision. The performance of a spectral calibration device is also presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Timing between streak cameras with a precision of 10 ps

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.

    1990-12-07

    The laser beams irradiating a target at the Nova laser facility comprise a set of ten simultaneous events. Two streak cameras, whose resolutions are 40 ps, record the power history for each beam, five beams to a camera; their time bases are cross-timed with a fiducial pulse. Analysis of data recorded for target experiments conducted over a six month period show the precision for cross-timing signals between two streak cameras to be {plus minus}9 ps and for characterizing a single temporal feature of a pulse to be {plus minus}5 ps. Beam synchronization at the end of six months was within 20 ps of the synchronization at the beginning of the experiments. A beam timing shift greater than 25 ps can be detected on a single laser shot; shifts of 10 to 20 ps require several shots to detect. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Observation of molecular dipole excitations by attosecond self-streaking

    E-print Network

    Wachter, Georg; Sato, Shunsuke A; Pazourek, Renate; Wais, Michael; Lemell, Christoph; Tong, Xiao-Min; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We propose a protocol to probe the ultrafast evolution and dephasing of coherent electronic excitation in molecules in the time domain by the intrinsic streaking field generated by the molecule itself. Coherent electronic motion in the endohedral fullerene \\Necsixty~is initiated by a moderately intense femtosecond UV-VIS pulse leading to coherent oscillations of the molecular dipole moment that persist after the end of the laser pulse. The resulting time-dependent molecular near-field is probed through the momentum modulation of photoemission from the central neon atom by a time-delayed attosecond XUV pulse. Our ab-initio time-dependent density functional theory and classical trajectory simulations predict that this self-streaking signal accurately traces the molecular dipole oscillations in real time. We discuss the underlying processes and give an analytical model that captures the essence of our ab-initio simulations.

  4. Identification of multiple ear-colonizing insect and disease resistance in CIMMYT maize inbred lines with varying levels of silk maysin.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xinzhi; Krakowsky, Matthew D; Buntin, G David; Rector, Brian G; Guo, Baozhu; Snook, Maurice E

    2008-08-01

    Ninety four corn inbred lines selected from International Center for the Improvement of Maize and Wheat (CIMMYT) in Mexico were evaluated for levels of silk maysin in 2001 and 2002. Damage by major ear-feeding insects [i.e., corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae); maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamais (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say); southern green stink bugs, Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae)], and common smut [Ustilago maydis DC (Corda)] infection on these inbred lines were evaluated in 2005 and 2006 under subtropical conditions at Tifton, GA. Ten inbred lines possessing good agronomic traits were also resistant to the corn earworm. The correlation between ear-feeding insect damage or smut infection and three phenotypic traits (silk maysin level, husk extension, and husk tightness of corn ears) was also examined. Corn earworm and stink bug damage was negatively correlated to husk extension, but not to either silk maysin levels or husk tightness. In combination with the best agronomic trait ratings that show the least corn earworm and stink bug damage, lowest smut infection rate, and good insect-resistant phenotypic traits (i.e., high maysin and good husk coverage and husk tightness), 10 best inbred lines (CML90, CML92, CML94, CML99, CML104, CML108, CML114, CML128, CML137, and CML373) were identified from the 94 lines examined. These selected inbred lines will be used for further examination of their resistance mechanisms and development of new corn germplasm that confers multiple ear-colonizing pest resistance. PMID:18767760

  5. 9. VIEW OF 'BLUE STREAK' HAMMER MILL (Prater Pulverizer Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF 'BLUE STREAK' HAMMER MILL (Prater Pulverizer Co., Chicago, Illinois), LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE BASEMENT, WAS ADDED IN THE EARLY 1930s. THIS WAS THE MILL'S FIRST ELECTRIC-POWERED MACHINERY. THE HAMMER MILL WAS USED TO PULVERIZE OATS, ALFALFA MEAL, AND CORN. Photographer: Louise Taft Cawood, July 1986 - Alexander's Grist Mill, Lock 37 on Ohio & Erie Canal, South of Cleveland, Valley View, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. Nitric oxide detoxification by Fusarium verticillioides flavohemoglobin and role in pathogenicity of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides is a non-obligate plant pathogen of maize causing a number of specific diseases, including root rot, kernel rot, seed rot, stalk rot, and seedling blight. The saprophytic nature of this fungus, its production of the mycotoxin fumonisin, and complex relationship maize puts t...

  7. Fusarium graminearum: an pathogen of maize in Nepal, pathogenic variability and mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium graminearum is an important pathogen of maize in hills of Nepal. It predominantly occurs on maize grown in cool and humid environment of high hills. The pathogen is also known to infect other cereal crops including wheat and rice causing important diseases. The incidence of ear rot is hi...

  8. Slope Streaks in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: Characteristics, Candidate Formation Mechanisms, and Implications for Slope Streak Formation in the Martian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Dickson, J. L.; Levy, J. S.; Morgan, G. A.

    2007-03-01

    Mars slope streaks are thought to have formed by dry dust avalanches; slope streaks in the Mars-like ADV form by melting of surface/shallow subsurface snow/ice, meltwater migration along the top of the ice table, and wicking to form surface wetting.

  9. A new design of filter system in streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengyu; Bai, Yonglin

    2015-10-01

    In order to reduce the frequency of researchers routing in and out of the testing site and ensure the fluency of the testing we design a new filter system applied to the streak cameras. This system promotes streak cameras' abilities on spatial discrimination and time resolution. This paper focuses on the instruction of the piezoelectric motor's principle based on field-effect tubes. Filter wheel is driven by piezoelectric motor. It can effectively avoid the influences of high field produced by streak tube. Finally we achieve auto regulation at different gears and promote the efficiency of operations and guarantee the safety of researchers. CD4046 introduces the driven clock of this system and we use an inverter to get two synchronous inverted signals. These signals are amplified by field-effect tubes to more than 300V. The amplified ones are integrated at the output terminals to generate sinusoidal signal. The test shows that in this filter system piezoelectric motor operates at its resonance frequency under a control signal of 62.5 KHz. Its working current is 1.9A and driving power is almost 10W. By adjusting the gears, the filter wheel costs less than 2 seconds to calibrate. We accomplish the test in respected results.

  10. Streaking at high energies with electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ipp, Andreas; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H.; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.

    2012-07-09

    State-of-the-art attosecond metrology deals with the detection and characterization of photon pulses with typical energies up to the hundreds of eV and time resolution of several tens of attoseconds. Such short pulses are used for example to control the motion of electrons on the atomic scale or to measure inner-shell atomic dynamics. The next challenge of time-resolving the inner-nuclear dynamics, transient meson states and resonances requires photon pulses below attosecond duration and with energies exceeding the MeV scale. Here we discuss a detection scheme for time-resolving high-energy gamma ray pulses down to the zeptosecond timescale. The scheme is based on the concept of attosecond streak imaging, but instead of conversion of photons into electrons in a nonlinear medium, the high-energy process of electron-positron pair creation is utilized. These pairs are produced in vacuum through the collision of a test pulse to be characterized with an intense laser pulse, and they acquire additional energy and momentum depending on their phase in the streaking pulse at the moment of production. A coincidence measurement of the electron and positron momenta after the interaction provides information on the pair production phase within the streaking pulse. We examine the limitations imposed by quantum radiation reaction in multiphoton Compton scattering on this detection scheme, and discuss other necessary conditions to render the scheme feasible in the upcoming Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) laser facility.

  11. Design of microcontroller based system for automation of streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, M. J.; Upadhyay, J.; Deshpande, P. P.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P.

    2010-08-15

    A microcontroller based system has been developed for automation of the S-20 optical streak camera, which is used as a diagnostic tool to measure ultrafast light phenomenon. An 8 bit MCS family microcontroller is employed to generate all control signals for the streak camera. All biasing voltages required for various electrodes of the tubes are generated using dc-to-dc converters. A high voltage ramp signal is generated through a step generator unit followed by an integrator circuit and is applied to the camera's deflecting plates. The slope of the ramp can be changed by varying values of the capacitor and inductor. A programmable digital delay generator has been developed for synchronization of ramp signal with the optical signal. An independent hardwired interlock circuit has been developed for machine safety. A LABVIEW based graphical user interface has been developed which enables the user to program the settings of the camera and capture the image. The image is displayed with intensity profiles along horizontal and vertical axes. The streak camera was calibrated using nanosecond and femtosecond lasers.

  12. MaizeGDB Community Curation Tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB (http://www.maizegdb.org) is the community database for maize genetics and genomics. The success of the MaizeGDB project largely can be attributed to the involvement of the community of maize geneticists. Members of the community have (1) made their data available by contributing to MaizeGD...

  13. A genome-wide association study reveals genes associated with fusarium ear rot resistance in a maize core diversity panel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium ear rot is a common disease of maize that affects food and feed quality globally. Resistance to the disease is highly quantitative, and maize breeders have difficulty incorporating polygenic resistance alleles from unadapted donor sources into elite breeding populations without having a ne...

  14. Streak camera based SLR receiver for two color atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Clarke, Christopher; Oldham, Thomas; Selden, Michael

    1993-01-01

    To realize accurate two-color differential measurements, an image digitizing system with variable spatial resolution was designed, built, and integrated to a photon-counting picosecond streak camera, yielding a temporal scan resolution better than 300 femtosecond/pixel. The streak camera is configured to operate with 3 spatial channels; two of these support green (532 nm) and uv (355 nm) while the third accommodates reference pulses (764 nm) for real-time calibration. Critical parameters affecting differential timing accuracy such as pulse width and shape, number of received photons, streak camera/imaging system nonlinearities, dynamic range, and noise characteristics were investigated to optimize the system for accurate differential delay measurements. The streak camera output image consists of three image fields, each field is 1024 pixels along the time axis and 16 pixels across the spatial axis. Each of the image fields may be independently positioned across the spatial axis. Two of the image fields are used for the two wavelengths used in the experiment; the third window measures the temporal separation of a pair of diode laser pulses which verify the streak camera sweep speed for each data frame. The sum of the 16 pixel intensities across each of the 1024 temporal positions for the three data windows is used to extract the three waveforms. The waveform data is processed using an iterative three-point running average filter (10 to 30 iterations are used) to remove high-frequency structure. The pulse pair separations are determined using the half-max and centroid type analysis. Rigorous experimental verification has demonstrated that this simplified process provides the best measurement accuracy. To calibrate the receiver system sweep, two laser pulses with precisely known temporal separation are scanned along the full length of the sweep axis. The experimental measurements are then modeled using polynomial regression to obtain a best fit to the data. Data aggregation using normal point approach has provided accurate data fitting techniques and is found to be much more convenient than using the full rate single shot data. The systematic errors from this model have been found to be less than 3 ps for normal points.

  15. Use of an advanced intercross line population for mapping of quantitative trait loci for northern leaf blight resistance in maize and for the investigation of multiple disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we identify regions of the genome conferring resistance to the corn disease, northern corn leaf blight. We also report evidence for the existence of genes conferring resistance to multiple diseases....

  16. On the nature and visibility of crater-associated streaks on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Sagan, C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper considers Mariner 9 and Viking data that contradict Kuzmin's (1975) hypothesis that all crater-associated wind streaks on Mars are depositional and consist of unresolved barchan-like dunes. According to Kuzmin's hypothesis, any streak can appear either bright or dark relative to its surroundings depending on the sun's position. The spacecraft images, however, show examples of dark and light streaks visible at the same azimuth angle of the sun. Evidence that bright and dark streaks differ both in morphology and in character is considered. It is suggested that the common ragged dark streaks are probably erosion scars while most bright streaks probably represent accumulations of bright dust-storm fallout.

  17. Characteristics of a streak disturbance induced by an isolated roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bade, Kyle; Naguib, Ahmed

    2012-11-01

    A detailed description of a streak disturbance introduced in a Blasius boundary layer by an isolated roughness element will be presented. This work is motivated by the desire to understand the dependence of the evolution/instability of streamwise-oriented streaks (which play a key role in bypass transition) on the method by which they are generated. The proper scaling of the streamwise evolution of the streak disturbance energy is examined. This expands upon established Rek2scaling (White et al., Physics of Fluids, 2005) of streak disturbances induced by spanwise-periodic roughness element arrays. Examining different roughness heights, k, and employing a method that accounts for the streamwise growth of the streak's wall-normal and spanwise scales, it is found that the streak energy density scales with Rek7/ 3 , in the case of an isolated roughness element. The data used in the analysis are acquired using hotwire anemometry throughout a three-dimensional domain located downstream of a single cylindrical roughness element. These measurements are complemented by smokewire visualizations, which capture clearly three distinct disturbance states, dependent upon roughness element height; namely, stable streaks, streaks with intermittent turbulent bursts, and turbulent disturbances. Correspondence is established between these states and the streamwise evolution of the streak energy and the cross-stream disturbance profiles. NSF Grant: CMMI 0932546.

  18. Defrosting Polar Dunes--Dark Spots and Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The first time that the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC)team saw dark spots on defrosting dune surfaces was in August and September of 1998. At that time, it was the north polar seasonal frost cap that was subliming away (more recent images from 1999 have shown the south polar frosts). This picture (above) shows a small portion of the giant dune field that surrounds the north polar region, as it appeared on August 23, 1998. At the time, it was early northern spring and the dunes were still covered with winter frost.

    Dark spots had appeared on the north polar dunes, and many of them exhibited a radial or semi-radial pattern of dark streaks and streamers. At first, there was speculation that the streaks indicated that the defrosting process might somehow involve explosions! The dark spots seemed to resemble small craters with dark, radial ejecta. It seemed possible that frozen carbon dioxide trapped beneath water ice might somehow heat up, turn to gas, expand, and then 'explode' in either a small blast or at least a 'puff' of air similar to that which comes from the blowhole of a surfacing whale or seal.

    The image shown here changed the earlier impression. The dark spots and streaks do not result from explosions. The spots--though not well understood--represent the earliest stages of defrosting on the sand dunes. The streaks, instead of being caused by small explosions, are instead the result of wind. In this picture, the fine, dark streaks show essentially identical orientations from spot to spot (e.g., compare the spots seen in boxes (a) and (b)). Each ray of dark material must result from wind blowing from a particular direction--for example, all of the spots in this picture exhibit a ray that points toward the upper left corner of the image, and each of these rays indicates the same wind regime. Each spot also has a ray pointing toward the lower right and top/upper-right. These, too, must indicate periods when the wind was strong enough to move materials, consistently, in only one direction.

    The sand that makes up the north polar dunes is dark. Each spot and streak is composed of the dune sand. The bright surfaces are all covered with frost. This picture is located near 76.9oN, 271.2oW, in the north polar sand sea. Illumination is from the lower left. The 200 meter scale also indicates a distance of 656 feet.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  19. A Rapid and Efficient Method for Assessing Pathogenicity of Ustilago maydis on Maize and Teosinte Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Suchitra; Smith, Shavannor M.

    2014-01-01

    Maize is a major cereal crop worldwide. However, susceptibility to biotrophic pathogens is the primary constraint to increasing productivity. U. maydis is a biotrophic fungal pathogen and the causal agent of corn smut on maize. This disease is responsible for significant yield losses of approximately $1.0 billion annually in the U.S.1 Several methods including crop rotation, fungicide application and seed treatments are currently used to control corn smut2. However, host resistance is the only practical method for managing corn smut. Identification of crop plants including maize, wheat, and rice that are resistant to various biotrophic pathogens has significantly decreased yield losses annually3-5. Therefore, the use of a pathogen inoculation method that efficiently and reproducibly delivers the pathogen in between the plant leaves, would facilitate the rapid identification of maize lines that are resistant to U. maydis. As, a first step toward indentifying maize lines that are resistant to U. maydis, a needle injection inoculation method and a resistance reaction screening method was utilized to inoculate maize, teosinte, and maize x teosinte introgression lines with a U. maydis strain and to select resistant plants. Maize, teosinte and maize x teosinte introgression lines, consisting of about 700 plants, were planted, inoculated with a strain of U. maydis, and screened for resistance. The inoculation and screening methods successfully identified three teosinte lines resistant to U. maydis. Here a detailed needle injection inoculation and resistance reaction screening protocol for maize, teosinte, and maize x teosinte introgression lines is presented. This study demonstrates that needle injection inoculation is an invaluable tool in agriculture that can efficiently deliver U. maydis in between the plant leaves and has provided plant lines that are resistant to U. maydis that can now be combined and tested in breeding programs for improved disease resistance. PMID:24430201

  20. Attosecond streaking of core lines of copper dihalides

    E-print Network

    J. D. Lee

    2011-09-26

    In the attosecond (as) streaking of Cu 3s core-level photoemission of copper dihalides, we predict theoretically that the satellite ($3d^9$) is emitted later than the main line ($3d^{10}L^{-1}$; $L$: ligand). The emission time delay is originated from the electron correlation between the core level and 3d shell, which leads to the difference in core-hole screening between satellite and main lines. Further, we find that the time delay corresponds to a quantification of the extrinsic loss of photoemission.

  1. Streaks of Aftershocks Following the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.; Engdahl, E. R.; Diehl, T.

    2009-12-01

    Five years after the devastating 26 December, 2004 M 9.3 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, regional and global seismic networks have recorded tens of thousands of aftershocks. We use bulletin data from the International Seismological Centre (ISC) and the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC), and waveforms from IRIS, to relocate more than 20,000 hypocenters between 1964 and 2008 using teleseimic cross-correlation and double-difference methods. Relative location uncertainties of a few km or less allow for detailed analysis of the seismogenic faults activated as a result of the massive stress changes associated with the mega-thrust event. We focus our interest on an area of intense aftershock activity off-shore Banda Aceh in northern Sumatra, where the relocated epicenters reveal a pattern of northeast oriented streaks. The two most prominent streaks are ~70 km long with widths of only a few km. Some sections of the streaks are formed by what appear to be small, NNE striking sub-streaks. Hypocenter depths indicate that the events locate both on the plate interface and in the overriding Sunda plate, within a ~20 km wide band overlying the plate interface. Events on the plate interface indicate that the slab dip changes from ~20° to ~30° at around 50 km depth. Locations of the larger events in the overriding plate indicate an extension of the steeper dipping mega thrust fault to the surface, imaging what appears to be a major splay fault that reaches the surface somewhere near the western edge of the Aceh basin. Additional secondary splay faults, which branch off the plate interface at shallower depths, may explain the diffuse distribution of smaller events in the overriding plate, although their relative locations are less well constrained. Focal mechanisms support the relocation results. They show a narrowing range of fault dips with increasing distance from the trench. Specifically, they show reverse faulting on ~30° dipping faults above the shallow (20°) dipping plate interface. The observation of active splay faults associated with the mega thrust event is consistent with co- and post-seismic motion data, and may have significant implications on the generation and size of the tsunami that caused 300,000 deaths.

  2. Evaluation of Argentine maize hybrids and exotic x temperate testcrosses across environments 

    E-print Network

    Ochs, Brett Allen

    2005-11-01

    diversity among U.S. maize hybrids has narrowed. Problems, such as insect pressure, diseases, and mycotoxins, present obstacles for breeders. One approach is to use exotic germplasm in breeding programs to provide useful, novel alleles for productivity...

  3. Slope Streaks in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: Characteristics, Candidate Formation Mechanisms, and Implications for Slope Streak Formation in the Martian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.; Dickson, J. L.; Levy, J. S.; Morgan, G. A.

    2007-07-01

    Enigmatic slope streaks on Mars are apparently active today. Remarkably similar analogs in the Antarctic Dry Valleys hyperarid polar desert involve near-surface flow of saline meltwater and wicking to the surface; we examine implications for Mars.

  4. Parametric frequency upconversion, optical fiber transmission, and streak camera recording

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.E.; Rotter, M.D.

    1987-01-30

    The use of optical fiber for the transmission of information over relatively long distances is being recognized as the only viable solution to many data transmission problems, particularly those requiring high information density and faithful temporal content. This necessary reliance upon the optical carrier has meant that the image-tube based optical streak camera is often the instrument of choice for recording single-shot multi-parameter events with high temporal resolution. However, current photocathode technology is incompatible with the trend of the optical fiber industry toward the use of the 1300 to 1600 nm wavelength regime. To retain the advantages of optical streak-camera recording and optical fiber transmission, a way must be found to ''upconvert'' the optical carrier to higher energy. This report describes the use of an intense lazer pump beam coincident with the IR signal into a non-linear crystal (LiIO/sub 3/) to increase the signal's frequency. A beam splitter is used to separate the signal from the pump beam at the detector. The physical theory underlying this process is described. (JDH)

  5. Microprocessor-controlled, wide-range streak camera

    SciTech Connect

    Amy E. Lewis, Craig Hollabaugh

    2006-09-01

    Bechtel Nevada/NSTec recently announced deployment of their fifth generation streak camera. This camera incorporates many advanced features beyond those currently available for streak cameras. The arc-resistant driver includes a trigger lockout mechanism, actively monitors input trigger levels, and incorporates a high-voltage fault interrupter for user safety and tube protection. The camera is completely modular and may deflect over a variable full-sweep time of 15 nanoseconds to 500 microseconds. The camera design is compatible with both large- and small-format commercial tubes from several vendors. The embedded microprocessor offers Ethernet connectivity, and XML [extensible markup language]-based configuration management with non-volatile parameter storage using flash-based storage media. The camera’s user interface is platform-independent (Microsoft Windows, Unix, Linux, Macintosh OSX) and is accessible using an AJAX [asynchronous Javascript and XML]-equipped modem browser, such as Internet Explorer 6, Firefox, or Safari. User interface operation requires no installation of client software or browser plug-in technology. Automation software can also access the camera configuration and control using HTTP [hypertext transfer protocol]. The software architecture supports multiple-simultaneous clients, multiple cameras, and multiple module access with a standard browser. The entire user interface can be customized.

  6. MaizeGDB: The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the community database for biological information about the crop plant Zea mays. Genetic, genomic, sequence, gene product, functional characterization, literature reference, and person/organization contact information are among the datatypes stored at MaizeGDB. At the project's website...

  7. Molecular population genetics of maize regulatory genes during maize evolution

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    for the adaptive evolution of organisms. Domestication is a selection process for the adaptation of animal or plant species to the cultivated environment under human influence. During domestication, artificial selection in a dramatic and rapid morphological divergence between maize and teosinte. Identification of maize genes under

  8. The role of the wind-transported dust in slope streaks activity: Evidence from the HRSC

    E-print Network

    Cord, Aurélien

    the Olympus Mons Aureole. The statistics of slope streaks shapes measured from orthorectified images confirm. Slope streaks occur preferentially on west facing slopes at lat- itudes lower than 30o N for Olympus the dusty season correlate with these orientations. Furthermore, west facing slopes at Olympus have

  9. A Generalized Low-Rank Appearance Model for Spatio-Temporally Correlated Rain Streaks

    E-print Network

    Hsu, Chiou-Ting Candy

    A Generalized Low-Rank Appearance Model for Spatio-Temporally Correlated Rain Streaks Yi-Lei Chen rain streaks, just exploit the repeatability/similarity of rain steaks taken in the same scene! Our advantages:(1) no pre-processing (e.g., rain detection); (2) training-free (e.g., dictionary learning

  10. Streak-Detection in Dermoscopic Color Images using Localized Radial Flux of

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    Chapter 1 Streak-Detection in Dermoscopic Color Images using Localized Radial Flux of Principal. In this chapter, we will present a fully automated method for streak detection based on a machine learning approach, which is useful for a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for pigmented skin lesions

  11. Wigner-Smith time delay and its application to attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Cory; Su, Jing; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka

    2015-05-01

    Attosecond streaking experiments have been suggested as a means for observing temporal delays in photoemission, but the interpretation of the time delays observed in such experiments is still debated. Using a calculation of the streaking delays as a field-weighted sum over finite-range delays accumulated over the duration of the streaking pulse length, we provide further analysis into the role the Coulomb potential plays in the observed, so-called ``streaking delay.'' To this end, we make use of cut-off Coulomb and single active electron (SAE) potentials to calculate field-free Wigner-Smith-like time delays accumulated over small intervals of time to formulate an analytical model for the calculation of the streaking delays for hydrogenic atoms, as well as for SAE model potentials for noble gases. Our results indicate that in most cases, the influence of the streaking field on the short-range parts of the potential is a small effect. This allows for the representation of the streaking delay as the sum of the Wigner-Smith (WS) delay from scattering theory and the coupling between the streaking and Coulomb fields. We acknowledge the following support: C.G., J.S., and A.B: U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences Program (Award No. DE-FG02-09ER16103), A.J.-B.: U.S. NSF (Grants No. PHY-1125844 and No. PHY-1068706).

  12. Understanding Baseball Team Standings and Streaks C. Sire 1 and S. Redner 1, 2

    E-print Network

    Redner, Sidney

    Understanding Baseball Team Standings and Streaks C. Sire 1 and S. Redner 1, 2 1 Laboratoire de the statistics of wins and losses of baseball teams? Are their consecutive­ game winning and losing streaks self and losses in major­league baseball over the past century when the distribution of team strengths is taken

  13. Avoiding acidic region streaking in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: Case study with two bacterial

    E-print Network

    Pal, Debnath

    Avoiding acidic region streaking in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: Case study with two, dpal@serc.iisc.in) Acidic region streaking (ARS) is one of the lacunae in two-dimensional gel across publications, including the recent ones. In this work, we demonstrate how ultrasound wave can

  14. STREAKS ON N A T U R A L W A T E R SURFACES By H. STOMMEL

    E-print Network

    Young, William R.

    the readers of Weather; one, showing ` venous streaks ' on the surface of the Great Salt Lake of Utah or with a vein-like pattern. I find it convenient to call them 'parallel ' and ' venous ' streaks respectively

  15. Learning Features for Streak Detection in Dermoscopic Color Images using Localized Radial Flux of Principal Intensity Curvature

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    features to differentiate melanoma from melanocytic nevi, or detect the pigment network, homogeneousLearning Features for Streak Detection in Dermoscopic Color Images using Localized Radial Flux (pigment network, dots, streaks, blue-whitish veil, regression structures, hypopigmentation, blotches

  16. Aflatoxin resistance in maize: what have we learned lately?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin contamination of maize grain is a huge economic and health problem, causing death and increased disease burden in much of the developing world and income loss in the developed world. Despite the gravity of the problem, deployable solutions are still being sought. In the past 15 years, much...

  17. Genetic erosion in maize's center of origin.

    PubMed

    Dyer, George A; López-Feldman, Alejandro; Yúnez-Naude, Antonio; Taylor, J Edward

    2014-09-30

    Crop genetic diversity is an indispensable resource for farmers and professional breeders responding to changing climate, pests, and diseases. Anecdotal appraisals in centers of crop origin have suggested serious threats to this diversity for over half a century. However, a nationwide inventory recently found all maize races previously described for Mexico, including some formerly considered nearly extinct. A flurry of social studies seems to confirm that farmers maintain considerable diversity. Here, we compare estimates of maize diversity from case studies over the past 15 y with nationally and regionally representative matched longitudinal data from farmers across rural Mexico. Our findings reveal an increasing bias in inferences based on case study results and widespread loss of diversity. Cross-sectional, case study data suggest that farm-level richness has increased by 0.04 y(-1) nationwide; however, direct estimates using matched longitudinal data reveal that richness dropped -0.04 y(-1) between 2002 and 2007, from 1.43 to 1.22 varieties per farm. Varietal losses occurred across regions and altitudinal zones, and regardless of farm turnover within the sector. Extinction of local maize populations may not have resulted in an immediate loss of alleles, but low varietal richness and changes in maize's metapopulation dynamics may prevent farmers from accessing germplasm suitable to a rapidly changing climate. Declining yields could then lead farmers to leave the sector and result in a further loss of diversity. Similarities in research approaches across crops suggest that methodological biases could conceal a loss of diversity at other centers of crop origin. PMID:25197088

  18. Satellite Observations of Plume-like Streaks in a Cloud Field in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Lewis; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Seaman, Curtis J.; Stocks, Brian; Rabin, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    On the afternoon of 28 October 2013, plume-like streaks were detected by geostationary and polar orbiting satellites over eastern Ontario, Canada. These streaks were characterized by enhanced reflectivity in the visible bands and warmer brightness temperatures at 3.9 µm. These streaks were part of a low-level liquid water cloud layer. Due to the similarity of the streaks to plume-like features in marine stratocumulus caused by smoke from the stacks of ships, so-called ship tracks, a local source of emitted aerosols was suspected and subsequently identified as the burning of logging residue. This event provides further support for the ability of locally enhanced aerosol loading to alter microphysical characteristics of clouds. Ship tracks, pollution plumes from industrial burning, and pyro-cumulus are known examples of this type of interaction. In addition, the plume-like streaks could be used indirectly to identify the location of the source of the emitted particles.

  19. Characterization of X-ray streak cameras for use on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; Bell, P.M.; Costa, R.L.; Hammel, B.A.; Landen, O.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Hares, J.D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A.K.L.

    1996-10-01

    There are many different types of measurements that require a continuous time history of x-ray emission that can be provided with an x-ray streak camera. In order to properly analyze the images that are recorded with the x-ray streak cameras operated on Nova, it is important to account for the streak characterization of each camera. We have performed a number of calibrations of the streak cameras both on the bench as well as with Nova disk target shots where we use a time modulated laser intensity profile (self-beating of the laser) an the target to generate an x-ray comb. We have measured the streak camera sweep direction and spatial offset, curvature of the electron optics, sweep rate, and magnification and resolution of the electron optics.

  20. Characterization of X-ray streak cameras for use on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; Bell, P.M.; Costa, R.L.; Hammel, B.A.; Landen, O.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Hares, J.D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A.K.L.

    1996-09-01

    There are many different types of measurements that require a continuous time history of x-ray emission that can be provided with an x-ray streak camera. In order to properly analyze the images that are recorded with the x-ray streak cameras operated on Nova, it is important to account for the streak characterization of each camera. We have performed a number of calibrations of the streak cameras both on the bench as well as with Nova disk target shots where we use a time modulated laser intensity profile (self-beating of the laser) on the target to generate an x-ray comb. We have measured the streak camera sweep direction and spatial offset, curvature of the electron optics, sweep rate, and magnification and resolution of the electron optics.

  1. Efficient and stable expression of GFP through Wheat streak mosaic virus-based vectors in cereal hosts using a range of cleavage sites: Formation of dense fluorescent aggregates for sensitive virus tracking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-based expression vectors were developed by engineering cycle 3 GFP (GFP) cistron between P1 and HC-Pro cistrons with several catalytic/cleavage peptides at the C-terminus of GFP. WSMV-GFP vectors with the Foot-and-mouth disease virus 1D/2A or 2A catalytic...

  2. Maize variety and method of production

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, Markus; Hake, Sarah; Kraemer, Florian J

    2014-05-27

    The disclosure relates to a maize plant, seed, variety, and hybrid. More specifically, the disclosure relates to a maize plant containing a Cal-1 allele, whose expression results in increased cell wall-derived glucan content in the maize plant. The disclosure also relates to crossing inbreds, varieties, and hybrids containing the Cal-1 allele to produce novel types and varieties of maize plants.

  3. The MaizeGDB Genome Browser

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB (http://www.maizegdb.org) is the community database for maize genetics and genomics. As part of an effort to develop MaizeGDB as a more sequence-centric resource, we implemented a genome browser based on information we gathered by surveying the community of maize geneticists. Based on commu...

  4. Metabolic pathway resources at MaizeGDB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two maize metabolic networks are available at MaizeGDB: MaizeCyc (http://maizecyc.maizegdb.org, also at Gramene) and CornCyc (http://corncyc.maizegdb.org, also at the Plant Metabolic Network). MaizeCyc was developed by Gramene, and CornCyc by the Plant Metabolic Network, both in collaboration with M...

  5. AN INTEGRATED MAP FOR MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Maize Mapping Project (MMP) is focused on developing genetic, physical, and database resources for the maize genome. A key resource being developed by the MMP is a well-integrated genetic and physical map that will expedite the identification of DNA sequences underlying key traits that have been...

  6. Proteomic analysis of the maize rachis: Potential roles of constitutive and induced proteins in resistance to Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of the maize (Zea mays L.) with aflatoxigenic fungus Aspergillus flavus and consequent contamination with carcinogenic aflatoxin is a persistent and serious agricultural problem causing disease and significant crop losses worldwide. The rachis (cob) is an important structure of maize ear ...

  7. Roles of Stolbur phytoplasma and Reptalus panzeri (Cixiinae, Auchenorrhyncha) in the epidemiology of Maize redness in Serbia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize redness (MR), a disease causing midrib, leaf and stalk reddening and abnormal ear development in maize, has been reported from Serbia, Romania and Bulgaria for 50 years. Recent epiphytotics reduced yields by 40-90% in southern Banat, Serbia. MR was recently associated with the presence of th...

  8. Roles of Stolbur Phytoplasma and Reptalus Panzeri (Cixiinae, Auchenorrhyncha) in the Epidemiology of Maize Redness in Serbia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize redness (MR), a disease causing midrib, leaf and stalk reddening and abnormal ear development in maize, has been reported from Serbia, Romania and Bulgaria for 50 years. Recent epiphytotics reduced yields by 40-90% in southern Banat, Serbia. MR was recently associated with the presence of th...

  9. Effects of elevated [CO2 ] on maize defence against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn; Sims, James; Martins, Vitor F; Swerbilow, Jay; Romero, Maritza; Alborn, Hans T; Allen, Leon Hartwell; Teal, Peter E A

    2014-12-01

    Maize is by quantity the most important C4 cereal crop; however, future climate changes are expected to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce productivity. While rising atmospheric [CO2 ] is a driving force behind the warmer temperatures and drought, which aggravate fungal disease and mycotoxin accumulation, our understanding of how elevated [CO2 ] will effect maize defences against such pathogens is limited. Here we report that elevated [CO2 ] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation, while mycotoxin levels are unaltered. Fumonisin production is not proportional to the increase in F.?verticillioides biomass, and the amount of fumonisin produced per unit pathogen is reduced at elevated [CO2 ]. Following F.?verticillioides stalk inoculation, the accumulation of sugars, free fatty acids, lipoxygenase (LOX) transcripts, phytohormones and downstream phytoalexins is dampened in maize grown at elevated [CO2 ]. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and jasmonic acid production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2 ]. Our findings suggest that elevated [CO2 ] will compromise maize LOX-dependent signalling, which will influence the interactions between maize and mycotoxigenic fungi. PMID:24689748

  10. Transmission studies with Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (Potyviridae: Ipomovirus) and its interaction with abiotic and biotic factors in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Alicai, Titus; Fauquet, Claude M

    2010-11-01

    Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by two distinct species, Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), is a major constraint to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production in Africa. Absence of infectious clones of CBSUV or CBSV and the lack of efficient means of mechanical transmission of CBSD has hampered laboratory studies of this disease. Mechanical transmission, achieved mainly by plant sap inoculation, is a widely used technique for characterizing plant viruses. Efficient sap transmission of CBSUV/CBSV to the common laboratory host Nicotiana benthamiana is essential for both basic and applied studies of the virus. We report here the development of an efficient protocol for sap transmission of CBSUV to N. benthamiana and N. debneyi. Several factors affecting transmission efficiency were identified such as the effects of buffer composition, antioxidants, inoculum concentration, plant age and temperature. Higher temperatures (30 °C) favored rapid symptom initiation compared to lower temperatures (21 °C) when sap prepared in phosphate buffer of pH 7.0 was applied on the leaves of N. benthamiana dusted with the abrasive (carborundum). We demonstrated the usefulness of the transmission method in transient evaluation of CBSUV[UG:Nam:04]-derived RNA interference constructs for CBSD resistance and also in studying the interaction of CBSUV[UG:Nam:04] with cassava mosaic geminiviruses, another important group of viruses infecting cassava. PMID:20691215

  11. X-ray Streak Diagnostics on Nike Laser Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Sethian, J. D.; Mostovych, A. N.; Dahlburg, J. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Gardner, J. H.; Lehecka, T.

    1998-11-01

    We use an x-ray streak camera looking side-on at planar targets in several Nike laser experiments. The measurements include self emission from target blow off and x-ray sidelighting. The laser illuminated sidelighter target material is chosen to match the needs of a given experiment. The silicon line at 1.86 keV and chlorine line at 2.7 keV are used most often. X-ray sidelighting is used to investigate the acceleration of both solid plastic and foam targets filled with liquid deuterium. We are also using it to measure shock propagation in empty and deuterium filled foam targets. We employ the camera to study the evolution of radiative plasma structures (RPS) via x-ray emission from the target blow off plasma. Results and plans for future work will be presented.

  12. DESCRIPTION OF A COMPLEX DISEASE: CORN STUNT COMPLEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The corn stunt disease complex is considered to be caused by two or more of a complex of maize rayado fino virus, corn stunt spiroplasma, and maize bushy stunt phytoplasma, and is also known by the names achaparramiento, maize stunt, and red stunt, among others. This complex appears to be restricte...

  13. MaizeGDB: The Maize Genetics and Genomics Database.

    PubMed

    Harper, Lisa; Gardiner, Jack; Andorf, Carson; Lawrence, Carolyn J

    2016-01-01

    MaizeGDB is the community database for biological information about the crop plant Zea mays. Genomic, genetic, sequence, gene product, functional characterization, literature reference, and person/organization contact information are among the datatypes stored at MaizeGDB. At the project's website ( http://www.maizegdb.org ) are custom interfaces enabling researchers to browse data and to seek out specific information matching explicit search criteria. In addition, pre-compiled reports are made available for particular types of data and bulletin boards are provided to facilitate communication and coordination among members of the community of maize geneticists. PMID:26519406

  14. Emissivity spectrum of a large "dark streak" from themis infrared imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Brumby, Steven P.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    'Dark streaks', also known as 'slope streaks', are unusual surface features found on Mars that are known to appear and fade away on timescales of years. Various explanations have been proposed for their origin and composition, including dry avalanches and wet debris or precipitates from brines. Previous investigations have been based on analysis of panchromatic imagery and altimetry from Viking and Mars Global Surveyor missions. We have obtained an infrared emissivity spectrum of a large dark streak on the north western edge of Olympus Mons, using imagery from the THEMIS instrument on the Mars Odyssey 2001 spacecraft.

  15. Ultra fast x-ray streak camera for ten inch manipulator based platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, E. V.; Shepherd, R.; Fulkerson, S.; James, L.; Emig, J.; Norman, D.

    2012-10-15

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  16. Ultra Fast X-ray Streak Camera for TIM Based Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, E; Shepherd, R; Fulkerson, E S; James, L; Emig, J; Norman, D

    2012-05-02

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The LLNL ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  17. Effects of elevated [CO2] on maize defence against mycotoxigenic Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Martha M; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Dafoe, Nicole J; Christensen, Shawn; Sims, James; Martins, Vitor F; Swerbilow, Jay; Romero, Maritza; Alborn, Hans T; Allen, Leon HARTWELL; Teal, Peter EA

    2014-01-01

    Maize is by quantity the most important C4 cereal crop; however, future climate changes are expected to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce productivity. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force behind the warmer temperatures and drought, which aggravate fungal disease and mycotoxin accumulation, our understanding of how elevated [CO2] will effect maize defences against such pathogens is limited. Here we report that elevated [CO2] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation, while mycotoxin levels are unaltered. Fumonisin production is not proportional to the increase in F.?verticillioides biomass, and the amount of fumonisin produced per unit pathogen is reduced at elevated [CO2]. Following F.?verticillioides stalk inoculation, the accumulation of sugars, free fatty acids, lipoxygenase (LOX) transcripts, phytohormones and downstream phytoalexins is dampened in maize grown at elevated [CO2]. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and jasmonic acid production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2]. Our findings suggest that elevated [CO2] will compromise maize LOX-dependent signalling, which will influence the interactions between maize and mycotoxigenic fungi. Elevated [CO2] increases maize susceptibility to Fusarium verticillioides proliferation but mycotoxin levels are unaltered. The attenuation of maize 13-LOXs and JA production correlates with reduced terpenoid phytoalexins and increased susceptibility. Furthermore, the attenuated induction of 9-LOXs, which have been suggested to stimulate mycotoxin biosynthesis, is consistent with reduced fumonisin per unit fungal biomass at elevated [CO2]. PMID:24689748

  18. Effect of Process Variables on the Formation of Streak Defects on Anodized Aluminum Extrusions: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang; Couper, Malcolm J.; Dahle, Arne K.

    2012-04-01

    Streak defects are often present on anodized extrusions of 6xxx series aluminum alloys, increasing the fabrication cost of these products. Moreover, streaking often only becomes visible after etching and anodizing treatments, rather than in the as-extruded condition, making it difficult to identify the original causes and influencing factors of these defects. In this paper, various process variables that influence the formation of streak defects on anodized aluminium extrusions are reviewed on the basis of a literature review, industrial practice and experimental results. The influencing factors involved in various processing steps such as billet quality, extrusion process, die design and etching process are considered. Effective measures for preventing the formation of streak defects in industrial extrusion products are discussed.

  19. Standard design for National Ignition Facility x-ray streak and framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrough, J. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Holder, J. P.; Kalantar, D. K.; MacPhee, A. G.; Telford, S.

    2010-10-15

    The x-ray streak camera and x-ray framing camera for the National Ignition Facility were redesigned to improve electromagnetic pulse hardening, protect high voltage circuits from pressure transients, and maximize the use of common parts and operational software. Both instruments use the same PC104 based controller, interface, power supply, charge coupled device camera, protective hermetically sealed housing, and mechanical interfaces. Communication is over fiber optics with identical facility hardware for both instruments. Each has three triggers that can be either fiber optic or coax. High voltage protection consists of a vacuum sensor to enable the high voltage and pulsed microchannel plate phosphor voltage. In the streak camera, the high voltage is removed after the sweep. Both rely on the hardened aluminum box and a custom power supply to reduce electromagnetic pulse/electromagnetic interference (EMP/EMI) getting into the electronics. In addition, the streak camera has an EMP/EMI shield enclosing the front of the streak tube.

  20. Split ring resonator based THz-driven electron streak camera featuring femtosecond resolution

    PubMed Central

    Fabia?ska, Justyna; Kassier, Günther; Feurer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Through combined three-dimensional electromagnetic and particle tracking simulations we demonstrate a THz driven electron streak camera featuring a temporal resolution on the order of a femtosecond. The ultrafast streaking field is generated in a resonant THz sub-wavelength antenna which is illuminated by an intense single-cycle THz pulse. Since electron bunches and THz pulses are generated with parts of the same laser system, synchronization between the two is inherently guaranteed. PMID:25010060

  1. Intravitreal bevacizumab for choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks: A report of two patients

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya, Abdullah; Alkin, Zeynep; Faiz, Miray; Yazici, Ahmet Taylan; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to report clinical course of choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks (AS) in two patients who underwent intravitreal bevacizumab therapy. Fundus examination, fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed the diagnosis of subfoveal classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in the right eye in patient 1 and in the left eye in patient 2. After three consecutive bevacizumab injections, visual acuity improved from 20/40 to 20/25 in patient 1 and from 20/80 to 20/50 in patient 2. After 3 months of therapy, additional bevacizumab injection was administered when the lesion showed recurrence. After a follow-up time of 24-months, patient 1 received 14 intravitreal bevacizumab injections; patient 2 received only 4 injections. Visual acuities remained stable at 20/32 and 20/50 in patient 1 and patient 2, respectively. Though, the patients of CNV secondary to AS showed similar clinical appearance at the beginning, this report provides the data for different responses to intravitreal bevacizumab therapy. While fewer injections were required to control the disease in one patient, the other patient needed much more injections for stabilization of the CNV. Further studies are required to understand the cause of varied treatment responses in those patients. PMID:25473350

  2. New observations of Bolivian wind streaks by JPL Airborne SAR: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Dan G.; Greeley, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    In 1993 NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar system (AIRSAR) was deployed to South America to collect multi-parameter radar data over pre-selected targets. Among the sites targeted was a series of wind streaks located in the Altiplano of Bolivia. The objective of this investigation is to study the effect of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle on the visibility of wind streaks in radar data. Because this is a preliminary evaluation of the recently acquired data we will focus on one scene and, thus, only on the effects of wavelength and polarization. Wind streaks provide information on the near-surface prevailing winds and on the abundance of winderodible material, such as sand. The potential for a free-flyer radar system that could provide global radar images in multiple wavelengths, polarizations, and incidence angles requires definition of system parameters for mission planning. Furthermore, thousands of wind streaks were mapped from Magellan radar images of Venus; their interpretation requires an understanding of the interaction of radar with wind streaks and the surrounding terrain. Our experiment was conducted on wind streaks in the Altiplano of Bolivia to address these issues.

  3. Applications of the streak seeding technique in protein crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    1991-03-01

    The seeding of protein solutions is a powerful method for growing crystals. Microseeding and macroseeding both require conditions under which spontaneous nucleation is totally absent or extremely rare. A technique where seeds from a crystal are streaked into a protein-precipitant drop along a straight line using a rabbit whisker has been developed to determine suitable conditions for either micro- or macro-seeding. This seeding technique has also been successful in obtaining crystals using crystalline precipitate as the source of seeds, in cross-seeding from Fab—peptide complex crystals to obtain complexes with peptides of longer length, and similarly in cross-seeding from crystals of one monoclonal Fab—peptide complex to obtain crystals of a different monoclonal Fab complexed to the same peptide. This relatively simple technique should be of general applicability in macromolecular crystallizations and offers the potential to test whether new complex crystals mey be obtained by seeding with the native or other complexes, to determine whether cross-seeding may be used with seeds from a related protein or to analyze the crystallization potential of different protein preparations.

  4. A simplified method for simultaneous detection of Rice stripe virus and Rice black-streaked dwarf virus in insect vector.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Wang, Xi; Xu, Jianxiang; Ji, Yinghua; Zhou, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) are transmitted by their common vector small brown planthopper (SBPH) that cause serious crop losses in China. A simple reverse transcription-PCR method was developed for the simultaneous detection of RSV and RBSDV in single SBPH. Three primers targeted to RSV-RNA4 and RBSDV-S2 segments were designed to amplify respectively 1114-bp and 414-bp fragments in a reaction. The method is reliable, rapid and inexpensive for detecting the two viruses in vector, which could facilitate better forecasting and control of the virus diseases. Using this method, it was found that SBPH could carry RSV and RBSDV simultaneously. PMID:25455902

  5. MaizeGDB's New Genome Browser Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB (http://www.maizegdb.org) is the community database for maize genetics and genomics. Based upon the 2006 MaizeGDB Working Group Report (available at http://www.maizegdb.org/working_group.php) and the Allerton Report (http://www.maizegdb.org/AllertonReport.doc), it has become evident that th...

  6. MaizeGDB Becomes Sequence-centric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the maize research community’s central repository for genetic and genomic information about the crop plant and research model Zea mays ssp. mays. The MaizeGDB team endeavors to meet research needs as they evolve based on researcher feedback and guidance. Recent work has focused on bett...

  7. CHROMOSOMAL DISTRIBUTION OF MAIZE REPETITIVE SEQUENCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology used in conjunction with labeled DNA from oat-maize addition (OMA) lines enable chromosomal analysis of the organization and distribution of maize repetitive elements. Each OMA line contains an individual maize chromosome allowing for an analysis of its composition. The probes ...

  8. MAIZEGDB, THE MAIZE GENETICS AND GENOMICS DATABASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB (http://www.maizegdb.org) is the database that houses data and analysis tools crafted to suit the needs of the community of maize geneticists. Among the data sets included in MaizeGDB are sequences; detailed genetic, physical, recombination nodule, and cytological maps; molecular markers; a...

  9. The Genetic Architecture of Maize Flowering Time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flowering time is the key trait controlling adaptation of plants to their local environment, and, in an outcrossing species like maize, it is a complex trait. Variation for this complex trait was dissected in maize using a novel set of 5000 recombinant inbred lines (maize Nested Association Mapping...

  10. Maize, tropical (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Assem, Shireen K

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the third most important food crop globally after wheat and rice. In sub-Saharan Africa, tropical maize has traditionally been the main staple of the diet; 95 % of the maize grown is consumed directly as human food and as an important source of income for the resource-poor rural population. The biotechnological approach to engineer biotic and abiotic traits implies the availability of an efficient plant transformation method. The production of genetically transformed plants depends both on the ability to integrate foreign genes into target cells and the efficiency with which plants are regenerated. Maize transformation and regeneration through immature embryo culture is the most efficient system to regenerate normal transgenic plants. However, this system is highly genotype dependent. Genotypes adapted to tropic areas are difficult to regenerate. Therefore, transformation methods used with model genotypes adapted to temperate areas are not necessarily efficient with tropical lines. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the method of choice since it has been first achieved in 1996. In this report, we describe a transformation method used successfully with several tropical maize lines. All the steps of transformation and regeneration are described in details. This protocol can be used with a wide variety of tropical lines. However, some modifications may be needed with recalcitrant lines. PMID:25300835

  11. The sedimentology and dynamics of crater-affiliated wind streaks in western Arabia Terra, Mars and Patagonia, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Tanaka, K.L.; Yamamoto, A.; Berman, D.C.; Zimbelman, J.R.; Kargel, J.S.; Sasaki, S.; Jinguo, Y.; Miyamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    Wind streaks comprise recent aeolian deposits that have been extensively documented on Venus, Earth and Mars. Martian wind streaks are among the most abundant surface features on the planet and commonly extend from the downwind margins of impact craters. Previous studies of wind streaks emerging from crater interior deposits suggested that the mode of emplacement was primarily related to the deposition of silt-sized particles as these settled from plumes. We have performed geologic investigations of two wind streaks clusters; one situated in western Arabia Terra, a region in the northern hemisphere of Mars, and another in an analogous terrestrial site located in southern Patagonia, Argentina, where occurrences of wind streaks emanate from playas within maar craters. In both these regions we have identified bedforms in sedimentary deposits on crater floors, along wind-facing interior crater margins, and along wind streaks. These observations indicate that these deposits contain sand-sized particles and that sediment migration has occurred via saltation from crater interior deposits to wind streaks. In Arabia Terra and in Patagonia wind streaks initiate from crater floors that contain lithic and evaporitic sedimentary deposits, suggesting that the composition of wind streak source materials has played an important role in development. Spatial and topographic analyses suggest that regional clustering of wind streaks in the studied regions directly correlates to the areal density of craters with interior deposits, the degree of proximity of these deposits, and the craters' rim-to-floor depths. In addition, some (but not all) wind streaks within the studied clusters have propagated at comparable yearly (Earth years) rates. Extensive saltation is inferred to have been involved in its propagation based on the studied terrestrial wind streak that shows ripples and dunes on its surface and the Martian counterpart changes orientation toward the downslope direction where it extends into an impact crater. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Mars Eolian Geology at Airphoto Scales: The Large Wind Streaks of Western Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    More than 27,000 pictures at aerial photograph scales (1.5-12 m/pixel) have been acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) since September 1997. The pictures are valuable for testing hypotheses about geologic history and processes of Mars. Of particular interest are eolian features connected to surface albedo patterns. This work is focused on low-albedo wind streaks, some over 100 km long, in western Arabia Terra. Each streak is widest where it originates at an impact crater (typically 25-150 km diameter). The streaks taper downwind. Within the associated craters there is a lower-albedo surface that, in nearly all observed cases, includes barchan dunes indicative of transport in the same direction as the wind streaks. Upwind of the dunes there is usually an outcrop of layered material that might have served as a source for dune sand. MOC images show that the west Arabia streaks consist of a smooth-surfaced, multiple-meters-thick, mantle (smooth at 1.5 m/pixel) that appears to be superposed on local surfaces. No dunes are present, indicating that down-streak transport of sediment via saltation and traction have not occurred. Two models might explain the observed properties: (1) the streaks consist of dark silt- and clay-sized grains deflated from the adjacent crater interiors and deposited from suspension or (2) they are remnants (protected in the lee of impact crater rims) of a formerly much larger, regional covering of low albedo, smooth-surfaced mantle. The latter hypothesis is based on observation of low albedo mantled surfaces occurring south of west Arabia in Terra Meridiani. For reasons yet unknown, a large fraction of the martian equatorial regions are covered by low albedo, mesa-forming material that lies unconformably atop eroded layered and cratered terrain. Both hypotheses are being explored via continued selective targeting of new MOC images as well as analyses of the new data.

  13. Use of Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC) to identify novel genetic loci that modify the maize hypersensitive response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The partially-dominant, autoactive maize disease resistance gene Rp1-D21 causes hypersensitive response (HR) lesions to form spontaneously on the leaves and stem in the absence of pathogen recognition. The maize nested association mapping (NAM) population consists of 25 200-line subpopulations each...

  14. A single extraction method for the analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of fumonisins and biomarkers of disrupted sphingolipid metabolism in tissues of maize seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of many plants and produces fumonisins. In addition to their well-studied animal toxicoses these toxins contribute to the development of maize seedling disease in susceptible maize varieties. Fumonisin disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis occurs ...

  15. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  16. MaizeGDB update: new tools, data and interface for the maize model organism database.

    PubMed

    Andorf, Carson M; Cannon, Ethalinda K; Portwood, John L; Gardiner, Jack M; Harper, Lisa C; Schaeffer, Mary L; Braun, Bremen L; Campbell, Darwin A; Vinnakota, Abhinav G; Sribalusu, Venktanaga V; Huerta, Miranda; Cho, Kyoung Tak; Wimalanathan, Kokulapalan; Richter, Jacqueline D; Mauch, Emily D; Rao, Bhavani S; Birkett, Scott M; Sen, Taner Z; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J

    2016-01-01

    MaizeGDB is a highly curated, community-oriented database and informatics service to researchers focused on the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. Although some form of the maize community database has existed over the last 25 years, there have only been two major releases. In 1991, the original maize genetics database MaizeDB was created. In 2003, the combined contents of MaizeDB and the sequence data from ZmDB were made accessible as a single resource named MaizeGDB. Over the next decade, MaizeGDB became more sequence driven while still maintaining traditional maize genetics datasets. This enabled the project to meet the continued growing and evolving needs of the maize research community, yet the interface and underlying infrastructure remained unchanged. In 2015, the MaizeGDB team completed a multi-year effort to update the MaizeGDB resource by reorganizing existing data, upgrading hardware and infrastructure, creating new tools, incorporating new data types (including diversity data, expression data, gene models, and metabolic pathways), and developing and deploying a modern interface. In addition to coordinating a data resource, the MaizeGDB team coordinates activities and provides technical support to the maize research community. MaizeGDB is accessible online at http://www.maizegdb.org. PMID:26432828

  17. MaizeGDB update: new tools, data and interface for the maize model organism database

    PubMed Central

    Andorf, Carson M.; Cannon, Ethalinda K.; Portwood, John L.; Gardiner, Jack M.; Harper, Lisa C.; Schaeffer, Mary L.; Braun, Bremen L.; Campbell, Darwin A.; Vinnakota, Abhinav G.; Sribalusu, Venktanaga V.; Huerta, Miranda; Cho, Kyoung Tak; Wimalanathan, Kokulapalan; Richter, Jacqueline D.; Mauch, Emily D.; Rao, Bhavani S.; Birkett, Scott M.; Sen, Taner Z.; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J.

    2016-01-01

    MaizeGDB is a highly curated, community-oriented database and informatics service to researchers focused on the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. Although some form of the maize community database has existed over the last 25 years, there have only been two major releases. In 1991, the original maize genetics database MaizeDB was created. In 2003, the combined contents of MaizeDB and the sequence data from ZmDB were made accessible as a single resource named MaizeGDB. Over the next decade, MaizeGDB became more sequence driven while still maintaining traditional maize genetics datasets. This enabled the project to meet the continued growing and evolving needs of the maize research community, yet the interface and underlying infrastructure remained unchanged. In 2015, the MaizeGDB team completed a multi-year effort to update the MaizeGDB resource by reorganizing existing data, upgrading hardware and infrastructure, creating new tools, incorporating new data types (including diversity data, expression data, gene models, and metabolic pathways), and developing and deploying a modern interface. In addition to coordinating a data resource, the MaizeGDB team coordinates activities and provides technical support to the maize research community. MaizeGDB is accessible online at http://www.maizegdb.org. PMID:26432828

  18. Global maize production, utilization, and consumption.

    PubMed

    Ranum, Peter; Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; Garcia-Casal, Maria Nieves

    2014-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays), also called corn, is believed to have originated in central Mexico 7000 years ago from a wild grass, and Native Americans transformed maize into a better source of food. Maize contains approximately 72% starch, 10% protein, and 4% fat, supplying an energy density of 365 Kcal/100 g and is grown throughout the world, with the United States, China, and Brazil being the top three maize-producing countries in the world, producing approximately 563 of the 717 million metric tons/year. Maize can be processed into a variety of food and industrial products, including starch, sweeteners, oil, beverages, glue, industrial alcohol, and fuel ethanol. In the last 10 years, the use of maize for fuel production significantly increased, accounting for approximately 40% of the maize production in the United States. As the ethanol industry absorbs a larger share of the maize crop, higher prices for maize will intensify demand competition and could affect maize prices for animal and human consumption. Low production costs, along with the high consumption of maize flour and cornmeal, especially where micronutrient deficiencies are common public health problems, make this food staple an ideal food vehicle for fortification. PMID:24650320

  19. Impact of laser phase and amplitude noises on streak camera temporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Wlotzko, V; Uhring, W; Summ, P

    2015-09-01

    Streak cameras are now reaching sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In cumulative acquisition mode, this resolution does not entirely rely on the electronic or the vacuum tube performances but also on the light source characteristics. The light source, usually an actively mode-locked laser, is affected by phase and amplitude noises. In this paper, the theoretical effects of such noises on the synchronization of the streak system are studied in synchroscan and triggered modes. More precisely, the contribution of band-pass filters, delays, and time walk is ascertained. Methods to compute the resulting synchronization jitter are depicted. The results are verified by measurement with a streak camera combined with a Ti:Al2O3 solid state laser oscillator and also a fiber oscillator. PMID:26429463

  20. Performances of a solid streak camera based on conventional CCD with nanosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Bai, Yonglin; Zhu, Bingli; Gou, Yongsheng; Xu, Peng; Bai, XiaoHong; Liu, Baiyu; Qin, Junjun

    2015-02-01

    Imaging systems with high temporal resolution are needed to study rapid physical phenomena ranging from shock waves, including extracorporeal shock waves used for surgery, to diagnostics of laser fusion and fuel injection in internal combustion engines. However, conventional streak cameras use a vacuum tube making thus fragile, cumbersome and expensive. Here we report an CMOS streak camera project consists in reproducing completely this streak camera functionality with a single CMOS chip. By changing the mode of charge transfer of CMOS image sensor, fast photoelectric diagnostics of single point with linear CMOS and high-speed line scanning with array CMOS sensor can be achieved respectively. A fast photoelectric diagnostics system has been designed and fabricated to investigate the feasibility of this method. Finally, the dynamic operation of the sensors is exposed. Measurements show a sample time of 500 ps and a time resolution better than 2 ns.

  1. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  2. Impact of laser phase and amplitude noises on streak camera temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlotzko, V.; Uhring, W.; Summ, P.

    2015-09-01

    Streak cameras are now reaching sub-picosecond temporal resolution. In cumulative acquisition mode, this resolution does not entirely rely on the electronic or the vacuum tube performances but also on the light source characteristics. The light source, usually an actively mode-locked laser, is affected by phase and amplitude noises. In this paper, the theoretical effects of such noises on the synchronization of the streak system are studied in synchroscan and triggered modes. More precisely, the contribution of band-pass filters, delays, and time walk is ascertained. Methods to compute the resulting synchronization jitter are depicted. The results are verified by measurement with a streak camera combined with a Ti:Al2O3 solid state laser oscillator and also a fiber oscillator.

  3. Hugoniot-measurement experiments on hard ceramics using a high-speed streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu; Uchino, Mazakazu; Nakamura, Akira

    1995-05-01

    It is important to use high time-resolved photonics system and to use good quality specimens for the shock-wave measurements of ceramics, because the sound velocities are very fast, and their shock compression behaviors are complicated compared with those of metals. We produced the rotating-mirror type streak camera with the maximum streak rate to film of faster than 10 mm/microsecond(s) and the intense Xenon-flash lamp, and have been measuring the Hugoniot data of various kinds of ceramics by the inclined-mirror method. In this report, the high-velocity streak photonics system combined with a powder gun is described, and the measurement experiments on some hard ceramics (Si3N4, AlN and B4C ceramics) are reviewed.

  4. Fast phosphor picosecond streak tube for ultrafast laser diagnostics in repetitive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageeva, N. V.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Ivanova, S. R.; Kulechenkova, T. P.; Levina, G. P.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Makushina, V. A.; Schelev, M. Ya; Shashkov, E. V.; Scaballanovich, T. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Vereschagin, A. K.; Vereschagin, K. A.; Vorobiev, N. S.

    2015-08-01

    The well-established PIF-01/S1/P43 picosecond streak tube, designed 30?years ago and still manufactured at the A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, was modified by replacing its traditional P43 phosphor screen with a P47 one having approximately three orders of magnitude shorter decay time. The experimental measurements of this decay time were provided by PIF-01/S1/P47 image tube photocathode irradiation either with a single or a train of 8?ps laser pulses separated by 8?ns from each other at a 1.08??m wavelength. The results of our preliminary measurements of P47-BH phosphor (manufactured by Phosphor Technology Ltd) indicate the possibility of employing the PIF-01/S1/P47 streak tube for synchrotron diagnostics at a units megahertz repetition rate without the negative influence of ‘ghost images’ from the previous streak records.

  5. Development of a multiplexed PCR detection method for Barley and Cereal Yellow Dwarf Viruses, Wheat Spindle Streak Virus, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Soil-Borne Wheat Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley and Cereal Yellow Dwarf Viruses (B/CYDVs), Wheat Spindle Streak Mosaic (WSSMV), Soil-Borne Wheat Mosaic (SBWMV) Mosaic Virus and Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) constitute the most economically important group of wheat viruses. In this paper, a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chai...

  6. What do Seismicity Streaks and Holes Reveal About the Distribution of Seismic and Aseismic Slip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Beroza, G. C.

    2004-12-01

    Many studies have shown that faults have "holes," i.e., regions of an otherwise active fault that are devoid of microseismicity, both in the aftershock sequences of large earthquakes (e.g., Mendoza and Hartzell, 1988) and during the interseismic interval (e.g., Oppenheimer et al., 1990). Seismicity holes also appear between more recently discovered "streaks" of seismicity on the Calaveras, Hayward, and San Andreas faults in California. Ellsworth et al. (2000) have made a convincing case that two streaks on the San Andreas fault near Parkfield delimit a stuck patch that has been partially ruptured by several magnitude 4+ events in the early 1990's. We examine these same features using precise earthquake relocations for the Calaveras fault. The Calaveras fault has a number of streaks and holes in its seismicity distribution and with the geometry of locked vs. slipping regions more difficult to discern than it is on the San Andreas fault at Parkfield. Our working hypothesis is that the streaks illuminate the transition from creeping to locked portions of the fault. We can test this by examining medium magnitude (M ¡Y 3.5) earthquakes, which we expect to rupture inward from the streaks into areas devoid of microearthquakes, i.e. areas that were previously locked. Double difference relocations show medium sized earthquakes within these streaks, but clipping makes it difficult to determine earthquake locations as accurately for these events. To overcome this problem, we use a first-break master-event cross correlation method to improve hypocentral locations of these larger earthquakes that represent where these moderate magnitude events initiate. Analysis of accelerometer and short-period seismometer records provides finite faulting information, which will allow us to constrain the propagation direction relative to these hypocenters.

  7. System for photometric calibration of optoelectronic imaging devices especially streak cameras

    DOEpatents

    Boni, Robert; Jaanimagi, Paul

    2003-11-04

    A system for the photometric calibration of streak cameras and similar imaging devices provides a precise knowledge of the camera's flat-field response as well as a mapping of the geometric distortions. The system provides the flat-field response, representing the spatial variations in the sensitivity of the recorded output, with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) greater than can be achieved in a single submicrosecond streak record. The measurement of the flat-field response is carried out by illuminating the input slit of the streak camera with a signal that is uniform in space and constant in time. This signal is generated by passing a continuous wave source through an optical homogenizer made up of a light pipe or pipes in which the illumination typically makes several bounces before exiting as a spatially uniform source field. The rectangular cross-section of the homogenizer is matched to the usable photocathode area of the streak tube. The flat-field data set is obtained by using a slow streak ramp that may have a period from one millisecond (ms) to ten seconds (s), but may be nominally one second in duration. The system also provides a mapping of the geometric distortions, by spatially and temporarily modulating the output of the homogenizer and obtaining a data set using the slow streak ramps. All data sets are acquired using a CCD camera and stored on a computer, which is used to calculate all relevant corrections to the signal data sets. The signal and flat-field data sets are both corrected for geometric distortions prior to applying the flat-field correction. Absolute photometric calibration is obtained by measuring the output fluence of the homogenizer with a "standard-traceable" meter and relating that to the CCD pixel values for a self-corrected flat-field data set.

  8. Flowering and Determinacy in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All plant organs are produced by meristems, groups of stem cells located in the tips of roots and shoots. Indeterminate meristems make an indefinite number of organs, whereas determinate meristems are consumed after making a specific number of organs. Maize is an ideal system to study the genetic co...

  9. A maize wall-associated kinase confers quantitative resistance to head smut.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Weiliang; Chao, Qing; Zhang, Nan; Ye, Jianrong; Tan, Guoqing; Li, Bailin; Xing, Yuexian; Zhang, Boqi; Liu, Haijun; Fengler, Kevin A; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xianrong; Chen, Yongsheng; Lai, Jinsheng; Yan, Jianbing; Xu, Mingliang

    2015-02-01

    Head smut is a systemic disease in maize caused by the soil-borne fungus Sporisorium reilianum that poses a grave threat to maize production worldwide. A major head smut quantitative resistance locus, qHSR1, has been detected on maize chromosome bin2.09. Here we report the map-based cloning of qHSR1 and the molecular mechanism of qHSR1-mediated resistance. Sequential fine mapping and transgenic complementation demonstrated that ZmWAK is the gene within qHSR1 conferring quantitative resistance to maize head smut. ZmWAK spans the plasma membrane, potentially serving as a receptor-like kinase to perceive and transduce extracellular signals. ZmWAK was highly expressed in the mesocotyl of seedlings where it arrested biotrophic growth of the endophytic S. reilianum. Impaired expression in the mesocotyl compromised ZmWAK-mediated resistance. Deletion of the ZmWAK locus appears to have occurred after domestication and spread among maize germplasm, and the ZmWAK kinase domain underwent functional constraints during maize evolution. PMID:25531751

  10. Maize ZmRACK1 Is Involved in the Plant Response to Fungal Phytopathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baosheng; Yu, Jingjuan; Zhu, Dengyun; Chang, Yujie; Zhao, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) belongs to a protein subfamily containing a tryptophan-aspartic acid-domain (WD) repeat structure. Compelling evidence indicates that RACK1 can interact with many signal molecules and affect different signal transduction pathways. In this study, we cloned a maize RACK1 gene (ZmRACK1) by RT-PCR. The amino acid sequence of ZmRACK1 had seven WD repeats in which there were typical GH (glycine-histidine) and WD dipeptides. Comparison with OsRACK1 from rice revealed 89% identity at the amino acid level. Expression pattern analysis by RT-PCR showed that ZmRACK1 was expressed in all analyzed tissues of maize and that its transcription in leaves was induced by abscisic acid and jasmonate at a high concentration. Overexpression of ZmRACK1 in maize led to a reduction in symptoms caused by Exserohilum turcicum (Pass.) on maize leaves. The expression levels of the pathogenesis-related protein genes, PR-1 and PR-5, increased 2.5–3 times in transgenic maize, and reactive oxygen species production was more active than in the wild-type. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed that ZmRACK1 could interact with RAC1, RAR1 and SGT1. This study and previous work leads us to believe that ZmRACK1 may form a complex with regulators of plant disease resistance to coordinate maize reactions to pathogens. PMID:24865494

  11. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Engelhorn, K.; Cho, B.I.; Lee, H.J.; Greaves, M.; Weber, C.P.; Falcone, R.W.; Padmore, H. A.; Heimann, P.A.

    2010-02-18

    An ultrafast x-ray streak camera has been realized using a grazing incidence reflection photocathode. X-rays are incident on a gold photocathode at a grazing angle of 20 degree and photoemitted electrons are focused by a large aperture magnetic solenoid lens. The streak camera has high quantum efficiency, 600fs temporal resolution, and 6mm imaging length in the spectral direction. Its single shot capability eliminates temporal smearing due to sweep jitter, and allows recording of the ultrafast dynamics of samples that undergo non-reversible changes.

  12. Probing dielectric-response effects with attosecond time-resolved streaked photoelectron spectroscopy of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.-H.; Thumm, U.

    2011-12-15

    The release of conduction-band electrons from a metal surface by a subfemtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse and their propagation through the solid provoke a dielectric response in the solid that acts back on the photoelectron wave packet. We calculated the (wake) potential associated with this photoelectron self-interaction in terms of bulk and surface plasmon excitations and show that it induces a considerable, XUV-frequency-dependent temporal shift in laser-streaked XUV photoemission spectra, suggesting the observation of the ultrafast solid-state dielectric response in contemporary streaked photoemission experiments.

  13. Linear stability of optimal streaks in the log-layer of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizard, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The importance of secondary instability of streaks for the generation of vortical structures attached to the wall in the logarithmic region of turbulent channels is studied. The streaks and their linear instability are computed by solving equations associated with the organized motion that include an eddy-viscosity modeling the effect of incoherent fluctuations. Three friction Reynolds numbers, Re? = 2000, 3000, and 5000, are investigated. For all flow cases, optimal streamwise vortices (i.e., having the highest potential for linear transient energy amplification) are used as initial conditions. Due to the lift-up mechanism, these optimal perturbations lead to the nonlinear growth of streaks. Based on a Floquet theory along the spanwise direction, we observe the onset of streak secondary instability for a wide range of spanwise wavelengths when the streak amplitude exceeds a critical value. Under neutral conditions, it is shown that streak instability modes have their energy mainly concentrated in the overlap layer and propagate with a phase velocity equal to the mean streamwise velocity of the log-layer. These neutral log-layer modes exhibit a sinuous pattern and have characteristic sizes that are proportional to the wall distance in both streamwise and spanwise directions, in agreement with the Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis (A. Townsend, the structure of turbulent shear flow, Cambridge university press, 1976 2nd edition). In particular, for a distance from the wall varying from y+ ? 100 (in wall units) to y ? 0.3h, where h is half the height of the channel, the neutral log-layer modes are self-similar with a spanwise width of ?z ? y/0.3 and a streamwise length of ?x ? 3?z, independently of the Reynolds number. Based on this observation, it is suggested that compact vortical structures attached to the wall can be ascribed to streak secondary instabilities. In addition, spatial distributions of fluctuating vorticity components show that the onset of secondary instability is associated with the roll-up of the shear layer at the edge of the low-speed streak, similarly to a three-dimensional mixing layer.

  14. A Monte Carlo Approach to Joe DiMaggio and Streaks in Baseball

    E-print Network

    Arbesman, S

    2008-01-01

    We examine Joe DiMaggio's 56-game hitting streak and look at its likelihood, using a number of simple models. And it turns out that, contrary to many people's expectations, an extreme streak, while unlikely in any given year, is not unlikely to have occurred about once within the history of baseball. Surprisingly, however, such a record should have occurred far earlier in baseball history: back in the late 1800's or early 1900's. But not in 1941, when it actually happened.

  15. NORTHERN LEAF BLIGHT HELMINTHOSPORIUM TURCICUM ON MAIZE IN LATVIA.

    PubMed

    Treikale, O; Javoisha, B; Pugacheva, E; Vigule, Z; Feodorova-Fedotova, L

    2014-01-01

    In Latvia, climatic factors are influential in spreading of the Northern leaf blight of maize caused by Setosphaeria turcica (SETOTU, anamorph Exserohilum turcicum, Helminthosporium turcicum). The field experiments with the aim to investigate the effect of strobilurines to control of SETOTU in maize and the possibility to have a greening effect on yield and the silage quality parameters there were conducted in Latvian Plant Protection Research Centre in 2010. The effect of fungicides under natural and artificial infection with SETOTU on yield of maize was evaluated in 2012 and 2013. Trials designed with four replicates using randomized blocks, a plot size of 30 m2. Plots were inoculated at beginning of anthesis stage of maize by conidium of local population of H. turcicum propagated on PDA. Application of fungicides has been done in two times. Weather conditions were favourable for infestation of Northern leaf blight in maize. Disease severity was recorded according to the EPPO Guideline PP 1/272(1) on 10 plants from two central rows by 5 layers of leaves. Yield was recorded from two central separately harvested rows of each plot. The silage quality parameters in 2010 were analysed by Blgg BV Company, Netherlands. After the artificial inoculation an increase of the disease pressure in maize was observed. A good effect of the fungicides to control SETOTU was observed in all trials. No significant differences in efficacy were found between the treatments of Propulse (fluopyram 125 g L(-1), prothioconazole 125 g L(-1)), Opera (epoxiconazole 75, pyraclostrobin 199, 5 g L(-1) and Opera N (epoxiconazole 75, pyraclostrobin 102 g L(-1)). The effect of application time at the BBCH 55-59 was higher compared with application time at the BBCH 30-37. Two applications of Propulse compared with the single showed higher effect on SETOTU. The prolonged effect of Propulse on SETOTU was similar to Opera and Opera N. Greening effect was significant for all treatments compared with the untreated. In all treatments the increase of yield of fresh and dry mass was significant to the untreated. The positive influence of Opera N on the feed milk unit (VEM), protein (DVE, VOS, RP), digest OM (VCOS), starch, FAT content, NEL, energy metabolite (ME), nXP, UDP was recorded. The treatment of Opera N showed a tendency to decrease the silage quality parameters such as fatty acid vola (FOS), crude fiber (RF), crude ASH (RA), sugar content, acid det. fiber (ADF), acid det. lignin (ADL). PMID:26080484

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 88, 023413 (2013) Finite-range time delays in numerical attosecond-streaking experiments

    E-print Network

    Becker, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 88, 023413 (2013) Finite-range time delays in numerical attosecond the variation of the incident light field. Among them, some measurements used the attosecond streaking technique. Originally, in the attosecond streaking technique the elec- tron dynamics in the continuum was approximated

  17. CHINESE JOURNAL OF PHYSICS VOL. 52, NO. 1-II February 2014 Numerical Simulations of Attosecond Streaking Time Delays in

    E-print Network

    Becker, Andreas

    of Attosecond Streaking Time Delays in Photoionization Jing Su, Hongcheng Ni, Andreas Becker, and Agnieszka Jaro. INTRODUCTION Recently, applications of attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) pulse technology led to the analysis dynamics of the photoelectron is the so-called attosecond streak camera technique [4]. In this approach due

  18. 78 FR 24199 - Streak Products, Inc. v. UTi, United States, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Complaint and Assignment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Streak Products, Inc. v. UTi, United States, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Complaint and Assignment Notice is... Products, Inc. (``Streak''), hereinafter ``Complainant,'' against UTi, United States, Inc. (``UTi...). Complainant also alleges that ``UTi engaged in an unfair or unjustly discriminatory practice in violation...

  19. Foliar diseases of corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf blights and spots caused by fungi are some of the most destructive diseases of corn in the US and around the world. Correct identification of the disease is very important in determining the best means of control. For example, gray leaf spot of maize can be caused by one of at least two species...

  20. MaizeGDB: Global support for maize research through open access information [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the open-access global repository for maize genetic and genomic information – from single genes that determine nutritional quality to whole genome-scale data for complex traits including yield and drought tolerance. The data and tools at MaizeGDB enable researchers from Ethiopia to Ghan...

  1. Kernel Composition, Starch Structure, and Enzyme Digestibility of Opaque-2 Maize and Quality Protein Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were to understand how opaque-2 (o2) mutation and quality protein maize (QPM) affect maize kernel composition and starch structure, property, and enzyme digestibility. Kernels of o2 maize contained less protein (9.6−12.5%) than those of the wild-type (WT) counterparts (12...

  2. Slope streaks on Mars: Correlations with surface properties and the potential role of water

    E-print Network

    Khatiwala, Samar

    Slope streaks on Mars: Correlations with surface properties and the potential role of water Norbert; accepted 6 September 2002; published 12 December 2002. [1] The Mars Orbiter Camera on board the Mars Global are transiently present in low-latitude near-surface regions of Mars and undergo phase transitions at times

  3. Streaking artifact reduction for quantitative susceptibility mapping of sources with large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongjiang; Dibb, Russell; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Yawen; Xu, Jianrong; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI technique for the measurement of tissue magnetic susceptibility in three dimensions. Although numerous algorithms have been developed to solve this ill-posed inverse problem, the estimation of susceptibility maps with a wide range of values is still problematic. In cases such as large veins, contrast agent uptake and intracranial hemorrhages, extreme susceptibility values in focal areas cause severe streaking artifacts. To enable the reduction of these artifacts, whilst preserving subtle susceptibility contrast, a two-level QSM reconstruction algorithm (streaking artifact reduction for QSM, STAR-QSM) was developed in this study by tuning a regularization parameter to automatically reconstruct both large and small susceptibility values. Compared with current state-of-the-art QSM methods, such as the improved sparse linear equation and least-squares (iLSQR) algorithm, STAR-QSM significantly reduced the streaking artifacts, whilst preserving the sharp boundaries for blood vessels of mouse brains in vivo and fine anatomical details of high-resolution mouse brains ex vivo. Brain image data from patients with cerebral hematoma and multiple sclerosis further illustrated the superiority of this method in reducing streaking artifacts caused by large susceptibility sources, whilst maintaining sharp anatomical details. STAR-QSM is implemented in STI Suite, a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26313885

  4. Simultaneous velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography of laser-launched plates

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.; Garcia, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laser-launched, miniature, pseudo-one-dimensional flyer plates are evaluated by three distinct optical techniques that may be incorporated into an optical diagnostic system to give a complete understanding of the plate performance. These techniques are: velocity interferometry, streak photography, and pulsed laser stereo photography. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

    2008-09-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called “comb” pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

  6. Holographic particle-streak velocimetry Lisa Dixon, Fook Chiong Cheong and David G. Grier

    E-print Network

    Grier, David

    . Willert, S. T. Wereley, and J. Kompenhans, Particle Image Velocimetry: A Practical Guide (Springer, Berlin and motions," Appl. Opt. 45(16), 3893­3901 (2006). 1. Introduction Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is widelyHolographic particle-streak velocimetry Lisa Dixon, Fook Chiong Cheong and David G. Grier

  7. A method for estimating and removing streaking artifacts in quantitative susceptibility mapping

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wang, Nian; Yu, Fang; Han, Hui; Cao, Wei; Romero, Rebecca; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit; Duong, Timothy Q.; Liu, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI method for quantifying tissue magnetic property. In the brain, it reflects the molecular composition and microstructure of the local tissue. However, susceptibility maps reconstructed from single-orientation data still suffer from streaking artifacts which obscure structural details and small lesions. We propose and have developed a general method for estimating streaking artifacts and subtracting them from susceptibility maps. Specifically, this method uses a sparse linear equation and least-squares (LSQR)-algorithm-based method to derive an initial estimation of magnetic susceptibility, a fast quantitative susceptibility mapping method to estimate the susceptibility boundaries, and an iterative approach to estimate the susceptibility artifact from ill-conditioned k-space regions only. With a fixed set of parameters for the initial susceptibility estimation and subsequent streaking artifact estimation and removal, the method provides an unbiased estimate of tissue susceptibility with negligible streaking artifacts, as compared to multi-orientation QSM reconstruction. This method allows for improved delineation of white matter lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis and small structures of the human brain with excellent anatomical details. The proposed methodology can be extended to other existing QSM algorithms. PMID:25536496

  8. Deblurring Low-light Images with Light Streaks Sunghyun Cho2

    E-print Network

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    Deblurring Low-light Images with Light Streaks Zhe Hu1 Sunghyun Cho2 Jue Wang2 Ming-Hsuan Yang1 1 University of California, Merced 2 Adobe Research Abstract Images taken in low-light conditions with handheld been made recently on image deblurring, state-of-the-art approaches often fail on low-light images

  9. The new ultra high-speed all-optical coherent streak-camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Egorov, V. S.; Chekhonin, I. A.; Chekhonin, M. A.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    In the present paper a new type of ultra high-speed all-optical coherent streak-camera was developed. It was shown that a thin resonant film (quantum dots or molecules) could radiate the angular sequence of delayed ultra-short pulses if a transverse spatial periodic distribution of the laser pump field amplitude has a triangle shape.

  10. Turbulence Anisotropy Carried by Streaks in the Neutral Atmospheric Surface Layer THOMAS DUBOS

    E-print Network

    Dubos, Thomas

    Turbulence Anisotropy Carried by Streaks in the Neutral Atmospheric Surface Layer THOMAS DUBOS and Brown 1993; Drobinski et al. 1998; Young et al. 2002). Because of their long dura- tion, rolls-eddy simulations (LES) of the NPBL Corresponding author address: Dr. Thomas Dubos, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace

  11. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), through deep sequencing of sRNAs and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 only shares less than 90% sequence identity in three genomic ribonucleic...

  12. WHEAT STREAK MOSAIC VIRUS (DESCRIPTIONS OF PLANT VIRUSES NO. 48, REVISED)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological and physical properties of Wheat streak mosaic virus (genus Tritimovirus) are presented in brief monograph form. The publication represents an updated revision of The Description of Plant Viruses No. 48, originally published in 1971 by the Association of Applied Biologists. Topics cover...

  13. Streak camera measurements of laser pulse temporal dispersion in short graded-index optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Phillips, G.E.

    1981-08-28

    Streak camera measurements were used to determine temporal dispersion in short (5 to 30 meter) graded-index optical fibers. Results show that 50-ps, 1.06-..mu..m and 0.53-..mu..m laser pulses can be propagated without significant dispersion when care is taken to prevent propagation of energy in fiber cladding modes.

  14. Influence of rice black streaked dwarf virus on the ecological fitness of non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Xing; He, Xiao-Chan; Zheng, Xu-Song; Yang, Ya-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Xian

    2014-08-01

    Rice black streak dwarf virus (RBSDV) is transmitted by the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen). Non-vector rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), shares the same host rice plants with SBPH in paddy fields. The changes in nutritional composition of rice plants infected by RBSDV and the ecological fitness of BPH feeding on the infected plants were studied under both artificial climate chamber and field conditions. Contents of 16 detected amino acids and soluble sugar in RBSDV infected rice plants were higher than those in the healthy ones. On the diseased plants BPH had significantly higher nymphal survival rates, nymphal duration of the males, weight of the female adults, as well as egg hatchability compared to BPH being fed on healthy plants. However, there was no obvious difference in female nymph duration, longevity and fecundity. Defense enzymes (superoxidase dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT) and detoxifying enzymes (carboxylesterase, CAE and glutathione S-transferase, GST) in BPH adults fed on diseased plants had markedly higher activities. The results indicate rice plants infected by RBSDV improved the ecological fitness of the brown planthopper, a serious pest but not a transmitter of the RBSDV virus. PMID:23956237

  15. Resistance of maize landraces to the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Mikami, A Y; Carpentieri-Pípolo, V; Ventura, Maurício Ursi

    2012-10-01

    The maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. is an important pest of maize that attacks the grain both in the field and during storage. The damage caused by the maize weevil S. zeamais on maize landraces, Amarelo Antigo, Asteca, Caiano, Carioca, and Ferrinho, was evaluated by no-choice tests under laboratory conditions. The commercial varieties Sol da Manhã, BR 106, BR 451, and the synthetics PC 0203 and PC 9903 were evaluated for comparisons with the maize landraces. The parameters evaluated were susceptibility index, number of weevil progeny, development time, weevil progeny dry weight, and grain dry weight loss. The landraces were more susceptible to the maize weevil as compared to the commercial varieties. Based on the cluster analysis, two groups of susceptibility to the maize weevil were observed: one of more susceptible populations formed by local landraces and BR 451, and another less susceptible, with commercial varieties, synthetics, and the landrace Amarelo. PMID:23950091

  16. The iojap gene in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Martienssen, Robert

    2001-12-01

    The classical maize mutant iojap (Iodent japonica) has variegated green and white leaves. Green sectors have cells with normal chloroplasts whereas white sectors have cells where plastids fail to differentiate. These mutant plastids, when transmitted through the female gametophyte, do not recover in the presence of wild type Iojap. We cloned the Ij locus, and we have investigated the mechanism of epigenetic inheritance and phenotypic expression. More recently, a modifier of this type of variegation, ''Inhibitor of striate'', has also been cloned. Both the iojap and inhibitor of striate proteins have homologs in bacteria and are members of ancient conserved families found in multiple species. These tools can be used to address fundamental questions of inheritance and variegation associated with this classical conundrum of maize genetics. Since the work of Rhoades there has been considerable speculation concerning the nature of the Iojap gene product, the origin of leaf variegation and the mechanism behind the material inheritance of defective plastids. This has made Iojap a textbook paradigm for cytoplasmic inheritance and nuclear-organellar interaction for almost 50 years. Cloning of the Iojap gene in maize, and homologs in other plants and bacteria, provides a new means to address the origin of heteroplastidity, variegation and cytoplasmic inheritance in higher plants.

  17. Deciphering maize genetics and ecology to reduce insect damage and aflatoxin accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ear-colonizing insects and diseases, which reduce yield and impose health threats via mycotoxin contaminations, are critical impediments for maize production in the southern US states. To address this problem a combination of basic and applied research approaches are being conducted by the interdis...

  18. Using Maize chlorotic dwarf virus to explore future frontiers in plant virology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV) causes a chlorosis and stunting disease of corn throughout the Midwest United States. It is a waikavirus transmitted by the leafhopper Graminella nigrifrons. Although waikaviruses are economically important viruses in corn and rice, little is known about the viru...

  19. MaizeGDB's new data types, resources, and activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database. Available at MaizeGDB are diverse data that support maize research including maps, gene product information, loci and their various alleles, phenotypes (both naturally occurring and as a result of directed mutagenesis), stocks, sequences, molecul...

  20. Biolistic Protocol Organism: Tobacco, Mustard, wheat, maize

    E-print Network

    Raizada, Manish N.

    Biolistic Protocol Organism: Tobacco, Mustard, wheat, maize In vivo/in vitro/in situ: in vitro Target tissue: mustard and tobacco ­ leaf; wheat and maize ­ immature embryo Instrument: PDS-1000/He: Relevant publication reference(s): Contact Information: Dr. K. C. Bansal Biotechnology Centre IARI, New

  1. A meteorologically driven maize stress indicator model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. W.; Ravet, F. W. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    A maize soil moisture and temperature stress model is described which was developed to serve as a meteorological data filter to alert commodity analysts to potential stress conditions in the major maize-producing areas of the world. The model also identifies optimum climatic conditions and planting/harvest problems associated with poor tractability.

  2. Use of tropical maize for bioethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical maize is an alternative energy crop being considered as a feedstock for bioethanol production in the North Central and Midwest United States. Tropical maize is advantageous because it produces large amounts of soluble sugars in its stalks, creates a large amount of biomass, and requires lo...

  3. Maize metabolic network construction and transcriptome analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A framework for understanding the synthesis and catalysis of metabolites and other biochemicals by proteins is crucial for unraveling the physiology of cells. To create such a framework for Zea mays ssp. mays (maize), we developed MaizeCyc a metabolic network of enzyme catalysts, proteins, carbohydr...

  4. The genetic architecture of maize height

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Height is one of the most heritable and easily measured traits in maize (Zea mays L.). Given a pedigree or estimates of the genomic identity-by-state (IBS) among related plants, height is also accurately predictable. But, mapping alleles explaining natural variation in maize height remains a formida...

  5. Characterization and Comparison of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis Strains Recovered from Epiphytic and Symptomatic Infections of Maize in Iowa

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis (Cmn), the causal organism of Goss’s wilt and leaf blight of maize, can be detected in the phyllosphere of its host prior to disease development. We compared the morphology and pathogenicity of 37 putative isolates of Cmn recovered from asymptomatic and symptomatic maize leaves. Thirty-three of the isolates produced mucoid orange colonies, irrespective of the source of isolation and all but four of these isolates were pathogenic on maize. The remaining 4 isolates recovered from asymptomatic leaves had large fluidal yellow colonies, and were non-pathogenic on maize. Isolates varied in their aggressiveness on a susceptible hybrid of maize but no significant differences in aggressiveness were detected between epiphytic isolates and those recovered from diseased maize tissues. The genomics of Cmn is poorly understood; therefore as a first step to determining what genes may play a role in virulence, we compared 33 putative virulence gene sequences from 6 pathogenic and a non-pathogenic isolate recovered from the phyllosphere. Sequence polymorphisms were detected in 5 genes, cellulase A, two endoglucanases, xylanase B and a pectate lyase but there was no relationship with pathogenicity. Further research is needed to determine what genes play a role in virulence of Cmn. Our data show however, that the virulence factors in Cmn likely differ from those reported for the closely related subspecies michiganensis and sepedonicus. PMID:26599211

  6. Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification of RNA for sensitive and rapid detection of southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Du, Linlin; Fan, Yongjian; Zhou, Yijun

    2012-03-01

    Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) causes one of the most serious viral diseases of rice in Southeast Asia. A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for detection of SRBSDV using total RNA extracted from rice tissues and the insect pest, white-backed planthopper. The assay was based on a set of four primers matching a total of six sequences in the S9 region of SRBSDV genome. Presence of the virus could be detected in RT-LAMP reactions containing 1.2×10(-6)?g of a total RNA extract, which was ten times more sensitive than a classical RT-PCR assay. The SRBSDV could be distinguished from the closely related rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) by this method, indicating a high degree of specificity. This simple and sensitive RT-LAMP assay shows potential for detection of SRBSDV in field samples of hosts or vectors at a relatively low cost. PMID:22227615

  7. Single-shot visualization of evolving laser wakefields using an all-optical streak camera.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyan; Tsai, Hai-En; Zhang, Xi; Pai, Chih-Hao; Chang, Yen-Yu; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-08-22

    We visualize ps-time-scale evolution of an electron density bubble--a wake structure created in atmospheric density plasma by an intense ultrashort laser pulse--from the phase "streak" that the bubble imprints onto a probe pulse that crosses its path obliquely. Phase streaks, recovered in one shot using frequency-domain interferometric techniques, reveal the formation, propagation, and coalescence of the bubble within a 3 mm long ionized helium gas target. 3D particle-in-cell simulations validate the observed density-dependent bubble evolution, and correlate it with the generation of a quasimonoenergetic ? 100 MeV electron beam. The results provide a basis for understanding optimized electron acceleration at a plasma density n(e) ? 2 × 10(19) cm(-3), inefficient acceleration at lower density, and dephasing limits at higher density. PMID:25192102

  8. Mach-zehnder based optical marker/comb generator for streak camera calibration

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Edward Kirk

    2015-03-03

    This disclosure is directed to a method and apparatus for generating marker and comb indicia in an optical environment using a Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) modulator. High speed recording devices are configured to record image or other data defining a high speed event. To calibrate and establish time reference, the markers or combs are indicia which serve as timing pulses (markers) or a constant-frequency train of optical pulses (comb) to be imaged on a streak camera for accurate time based calibration and time reference. The system includes a camera, an optic signal generator which provides an optic signal to an M-Z modulator and biasing and modulation signal generators configured to provide input to the M-Z modulator. An optical reference signal is provided to the M-Z modulator. The M-Z modulator modulates the reference signal to a higher frequency optical signal which is output through a fiber coupled link to the streak camera.

  9. X-ray streak camera temporal resolution improvement using a longitudinal time-dependent field

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Qiang, J.; Byrd, J.M.; Feng, J.; Huang, G.

    2008-05-09

    X-ray streak cameras (XSC) have been known to be one of the fastest detectors forultrafast X-ray science. A number of applications in material science, biochemistry, accelerator physics, require sub-picosecond resolution to study new phenomena. Inthis paper, we report on a new method which can potentially improve the temporal resolution of a streak camera down to 100 femtoseconds. This method uses a time-dependent acceleration field to lengthen the photoelectron bunch, significantlyimproving the time resolution as well as reducing the time dispersion caused byinitial energy spread and the effects fromthe space charge forces. A computer simulation of an XSC using this method shows significant improvement in the resolution.

  10. Effects of diabatic heating on the ageostrophic circulation of an upper tropospheric jet streak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, D. A.; Johnson, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Interaction between the mass circulation within a mesoscale convective complex (MCC) and a direct mass circulation in the entrance region of an upper tropospheric polar jet streak was examined within the isentropic structure to investigate mechanisms responsible for linking these two scales of motion. The results establish that latent heating in the MCC modifies the direct mass circulation in the jet streak entrance region through the diabatically induced components of ageostrophic motion analyzed within isentropic coordinates. Within the strong mesoscale mass circulation of each MCC, strong horizontal mass flux convergence into the MCC at low levels is balanced by strong horizontal mass flux divergence away from the convergence at upper levels. Locations of large diabatic heating rates correspond well to the MCC position for each case; diabatic heating forces the upward vertical branch for the mesoscale mass circulation.

  11. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-01

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  12. A novel compact high speed x-ray streak camera (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2008-10-15

    Conventional in-line high speed streak cameras have fundamental issues when their performance is extended below a picosecond. The transit time spread caused by both the spread in the photoelectron (PE) ''birth'' energy and space charge effects causes significant electron pulse broadening along the axis of the streak camera and limits the time resolution. Also it is difficult to generate a sufficiently large sweep speed. This paper describes a new instrument in which the extraction electrostatic field at the photocathode increases with time, converting time to PE energy. A uniform magnetic field is used to measure the PE energy, and thus time, and also focuses in one dimension. Design calculations are presented for the factors limiting the time resolution. With our design, subpicosecond resolution with high dynamic range is expected.

  13. Changes Over a Martian Year -- New Dark Slope Streaks in Lycus Sucli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Now in its Extended Mission, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) is into its second Mars year of systematic observations of the red planet. With the Extended Mission slated to run through April 2002, the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) is being used, among other things, to look for changes that have occurred in the past martian year. Because Mars is farther from the Sun than Earth, its year is longer--about 687 Earth days.

    The two pictures shown here cover the same portion of Lycus Sulci, a rugged, ridged terrain north of the giant Olympus Mons volcano. The interval between the pictures span 92% of a martian year (August 2, 1999 to April 27, 2001). Dark streaks considered to result from the avalanching of dry, fine, bright dust are seen in both images. The disruption of the surface by the avalanching materials is thought to cause them to appear darker than their surroundings, just as the 1997 bouncing of Mars Pathfinder's airbags and the tire tracks made by the Sojourner rover left darkened markings indicating where the martian soil had been disrupted and disturbed. The arrows in the April 2001 picture indicate eight new streaks that formed on these slopes in Lycus Sulci since August 1999. These observations suggest that a new streak forms approximately once per martian year per kilometer (about 0.62 miles) along a slope.

    In both images, north is toward the top/upper right and sunlight illuminates each from the left. Dark (as well bright) slope streaks are most common in the dust-covered martian regions of Tharsis, Arabia, and Elysium.

  14. High-Speed Observer: Automated Streak Detection for the Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M. A.; OFarrell, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate digital video camera, installed on test stands at Stennis Space Center (SSC), has been used to capture images of the aerospike engine plume during test. These plume images are processed in real time to detect and differentiate anomalous plume events. Results indicate that the High-Speed Observer (HSO) system can detect anomalous plume streaking events that are indicative of aerospike engine malfunction.

  15. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Gao, Shan; Li, Rugang; Zhang, Shouan; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), obtained using deep sequencing of short RNAs (sRNAs) and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 shares only <90% sequence identity in all three genomic RNAs to several known U.S. isolates. PMID:25377714

  16. Optical laser-based THz streaking for full FEL pulse characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    Full temporal characterization of ultrashort, high brilliance x-ray pulses at Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities, while elusive, will underpin their future use in experiments ranging from single-molecule imaging to extreme timescale x-ray science. This issue is especially acute when confronted with the characteristics of current generation FELs operating on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission, as most parameters fluctuate from pulse to pulse. We have achieved this crucial characterization by extending the techniques of photoelectron streaking originally developed for attosecond spectroscopy. In our experiments, high-intensity, optical laser generated single-cycle THz pulses were used to broaden and shift -- or streak -- the photoelectron spectrum of a noble gas target ionized by the incident FEL pulse. Due to the relatively long rise time of the THz streaking field (˜600 fs), these measurements allow for the arrival-time and temporal profile of femtosecond to hundred-femtosecond FEL pulses to be determined simultaneously and on a single-shot basis. Optical laser-based THz streaking is suited for use over the full range of photon energies and pulse durations produced at FELs, from XUV to the hard x-ray regime. Experiments have now been performed at the hard x-ray Linac-Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory as well as at the XUV Free Electron Laser in Hamburg. Distinct temporal features as short as 50 fs FWHM have been observed in the raw pulse profile prior to any correction for instrument resolution. While these first measurements have been resolution-limited, the potential for improvement to access the sub 10-fs range has also been demonstrated, which would allow for characterization and effective application of the shortest predicted, few-femtosecond x-ray pulses in the near future.

  17. Low Albedo Surfaces and Eolian Sediment: Mars Orbiter Camera Views of Western Arabia Terra Craters and Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.

    2001-01-01

    High spatial resolution (1.5 to 12 m/pixel) Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images obtained September 1997 through June 2001 indicate that the large, dark wind streaks of western Arabia Terra each originate at a barchan dune field on a crater floor. The streaks consist of a relatively thin coating of sediment deflated from the dune fields and their vicinity. This sediment drapes a previous mantle that more thickly covers nearly all of western Arabia Terra. No dunes or eolian bedforms are found within the dark wind streaks, nor do any of the intracrater dunes climb up crater walls to provide sand to the wind streaks. The relations between dunes, wind streak, and subjacent terrain imply that dark-toned grains finer than those which comprise the dunes are lifted into suspension and carried out of the craters to be deposited on the adjacent terrain. Such grains are most likely in the silt size range (3.9-62.5 micrometers). The streaks change in terms of extent, relative albedo, and surface pattern over periods measured in years, but very little evidence for recent eolian activity (dust plumes, storms, dune movement) has been observed.

  18. Laser Activated Streak Camera for Measurement of Electron Pulses with Femtosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Desimone, Alice; Wilkin, Kyle; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The duration of femtosecond electron pulses used in time-resolved diffraction and microscopy experiments is challenging to measure in-situ. To overcome this problem, we have fabricated a streak camera that uses the time-varying electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor is discharged using a laser-activated GaAs photoswitch, resulting in a damped oscillation of the electric field. The delay time between the laser pulse and electron pulse is set so that the front and back halves of the bunch encounter opposite electric fields of the capacitor and are deflected in opposite directions. Thus, the electron bunch appears streaked on the detector with a length proportional to its duration. The temporal resolution of the streak camera is proportional to the maximum value of the electric field and the frequency of the discharge oscillation. The capacitor is charged by high voltage short pulses to achieve a high electric field and prevent breakdown. We have achieved an oscillation frequency in the GHz range by reducing the circuit size and hence its inductance. The camera was used to measure 100 keV electron pulses with up to a million electrons that are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by an RF cavity. This work was supported mainly by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ultrashort Pulse Laser Matter Interaction program, under grant # FA9550-12-1-0149.

  19. Designing and application of solid state lasers for streak cameras calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babushkin, A. V.; Vorobiev, Nikolai S.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.; Schelev, Mikhail Y.

    1991-01-01

    A family of specially developed solid-state lasers intended for dynamic calibration of various type streak cameras is presented. The developed lasers are able to generate either ultrasho,rt single pulses or harmonically modulated signals of nanosecond duration. 5+/-lps light pulses of 0.5% output energy instability were emitted by YAlO :Nd crystal laser with hybrid mode-locking and passive intracavity negative feedback produced by the action of a GaAs plate. After compression of single pulse inside the fiber optics compressor, the minimum available pulse duration approaches 300fs. 100 percent sinousoidally modulated nanosecond optical radiat ion with modulation period adjustable in the 0 .3ps - 6. 6ns range was generated by electro-optical positive feedback Nd:glass laser. Both ultrashort pulses and harmonically modulated radiation were utilized for streak cameras dynamic parameters evaluation. It is shown that for our streak camera equiped with PVOO1 tube its minimum temporal response function approaches to O.7ps, while its intrinsic triggering jitter does not exceed

  20. Direct evidence for encoding of motion streaks in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Apthorp, Deborah; Schwarzkopf, D. Samuel; Kaul, Christian; Bahrami, Bahador; Alais, David; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Temporal integration in the visual system causes fast-moving objects to generate static, oriented traces (‘motion streaks’), which could be used to help judge direction of motion. While human psychophysics and single-unit studies in non-human primates are consistent with this hypothesis, direct neural evidence from the human cortex is still lacking. First, we provide psychophysical evidence that faster and slower motions are processed by distinct neural mechanisms: faster motion raised human perceptual thresholds for static orientations parallel to the direction of motion, whereas slower motion raised thresholds for orthogonal orientations. We then used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure brain activity while human observers viewed either fast (‘streaky’) or slow random dot stimuli moving in different directions, or corresponding static-oriented stimuli. We found that local spatial patterns of brain activity in early retinotopic visual cortex reliably distinguished between static orientations. Critically, a multivariate pattern classifier trained on brain activity evoked by these static stimuli could then successfully distinguish the direction of fast (‘streaky’) but not slow motion. Thus, signals encoding static-oriented streak information are present in human early visual cortex when viewing fast motion. These experiments show that motion streaks are present in the human visual system for faster motion. PMID:23222445

  1. Development of intelligent control system for X-ray streak camera in diagnostic instrument manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chengquan; Wu, Shengli; Tian, Jinshou; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Yuman; Gao, Guilong; Liang, Lingliang; Wen, Wenlong

    2015-11-01

    An intelligent control system for an X ray streak camera in a diagnostic instrument manipulator (DIM) is proposed and implemented, which can control time delay, electric focusing, image gain adjustment, switch of sweep voltage, acquiring environment parameters etc. The system consists of 16 A/D converters and 16 D/A converters, a 32-channel general purpose input/output (GPIO) and two sensors. An isolated DC/DC converter with multi-outputs and a single mode fiber were adopted to reduce the interference generated by the common ground among the A/D, D/A and I/O. The software was designed using graphical programming language and can remotely access the corresponding instrument from a website. The entire intelligent control system can acquire the desirable data at a speed of 30 Mb/s and store it for later analysis. The intelligent system was implemented on a streak camera in a DIM and it shows a temporal resolution of 11.25 ps, spatial distortion of less than 10% and dynamic range of 279:1. The intelligent control system has been successfully used in a streak camera to verify the synchronization of multi-channel laser on the Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility.

  2. Attosecond streaking of molecules in the low-energy region studied by a wavefunction splitting scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xue-Feng; Peng, Liang-You; Ning, Qi-Cheng; Gong, Qihuang

    2012-04-01

    We present a theoretical study of the low-energy photoelectron spectra of hydrogen molecular ion generated by a single attosecond pulse in the presence of an infrared (IR) laser field. In order to investigate this type of attosecond streaking of molecules, we developed a very efficient grid-based numerical method to solve the two-centre time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) in the prolate spheroidal coordinates. Specifically, the radial coordinate is discretized with the finite-element discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) for easy parallel computation and the angular coordinate with the usual DVR. A wavefunction splitting scheme is utilized to reduce the demanding requirement of the computational resource to solve the corresponding TDSE when an IR field is present. After verification of the accuracy and efficiency of our method, we then apply it to investigate the attosecond streaking spectra of H+2 in the low-energy region. In contrast to the usual attosecond streaking in the high-energy region, part of the low-energy electrons may be driven back to rescatter with the residual two-centre core. Very interesting interference structures are present in the low-energy region. When the internuclear distance is small, they are very similar to what we have recently observed in the atomic case.

  3. Optical fiducial timing system for X-ray streak cameras with aluminum coated optical fiber ends

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, David G. (Oakland, CA); Campbell, E. Michael (Pleasanton, CA); MacGowan, Brian J. (Livermore, CA); Medecki, Hector (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    An optical fiducial timing system is provided for use with interdependent groups of X-ray streak cameras (18). The aluminum coated (80) ends of optical fibers (78) are positioned with the photocathodes (20, 60, 70) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). The other ends of the optical fibers (78) are placed together in a bundled array (90). A fiducial optical signal (96), that is comprised of 2.omega. or 1.omega. laser light, after introduction to the bundled array (90), travels to the aluminum coated (82) optical fiber ends and ejects quantities of electrons (84) that are recorded on the data recording media (52) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). Since both 2.omega. and 1.omega. laser light can travel long distances in optical fiber with only a slight attenuation, the initial arial power density of the fiducial optical signal (96) is well below the damage threshold of the fused silica or other material that comprises the optical fibers (78, 90). Thus the fiducial timing system can be repeatably used over long durations of time.

  4. Rhizobium etli maize populations and their competitiveness for root colonization.

    PubMed

    Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2004-05-01

    Rhizobium etli, which normally forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), is a natural maize endophyte. The genetic diversity of R. etli strains from bulk soil, bean nodules, the maize rhizosphere, the maize root, and inside stem tissue in traditional fields where maize is intercropped with P. vulgaris-beans was analyzed. Based on plasmid profiles and alloenzymes, it was determined that several R. etli types were preferentially encountered as putative maize endophytes. Some of these strains from maize were more competitive maize-root colonizers than other R. etli strains from the rhizosphere or from bean nodules. The dominant and highly competitive strain Ch24-10 was the most tolerant to 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA), a maize antimicrobial compound that is inhibitory to some bacteria and fungi. The R. tropici strain CIAT899, successfully used as inoculant of P. vulgaris, was also found to be a competitive maize endophyte in inoculation experiments. PMID:15024554

  5. Application of the continuous wavelet transform for analysis of formation and streaks in fibrous web structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Asif

    The purpose of this research was to develop a method to characterize the distribution of material in paper and other fibrous webs using a method based on the continuous wavelet transform. While investigating this subject, two major advantages of the method were discovered. The first is the ability of the method to accommodate stochastic, non-stationary data sets by spatial localization of the spectral analysis. The second is its ability to distinguish flocs and lightweight region in the spectral analysis. The impetus for using continuous wavelet transform to analyze the structure of webs, and especially machine made papers, was the need to relate the final structure of the product to the forming processes. Given that objective, an existing method that separates the static and the stochastic components of the wavelet based energy spectrum of the cross machine profile was enhanced to account for additional characteristics of machine direction streaks. These included streak intermittency, off axis orientation and oscillation of the streak position in the cross machine direction. The method was validated using simulated and measured images of the paper formation (distribution of mass). This permitted the existing problem of separating different types of streaks from the wavelet energy spectra. The potential for application of the wavelet algorithm for online processing of webs was also examined. The zone-variance effect on the quality of separation of various streaks was studied. Descriptive parameters that can simplify and effectively represent the energy spectra were described and demonstrated. Machine direction variability that was not identified in the simultaneous space-scale analysis can now be incorporated in the analysis by using the spottiness parameter. The continuous wavelet transform was also used to delineate between heavy weight (floc) and lightweight zones to provide separate spectra for each. The manner in which these spectra change with floc geometry and density was tested by using simulated and actual formation images. Significant difference in the spectra reflected the manner in which the flocs were formed. This will find significant use for characterizing differences in processes that influence the uniformity of the structure and will allow the identification of process improvements.

  6. Choosing a Genome Browser for a Model Organism Database (MOD): Surveying the Maize Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the maize genome sequencing is nearing its completion, the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (MaizeGDB), the Model Organism Database for maize, integrated a genome browser to its already existing Web interface and database. The addition of the MaizeGDB Genome Browser to MaizeGDB will allow it ...

  7. No Adjuvant Effect of Bacillus thuringiensis-Maize on Allergic Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekan, Gerhard; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are evaluated carefully for their ability to induce allergic disease. However, few studies have tested the capacity of a GM food to act as an adjuvant, i.e. influencing allergic responses to other unrelated allergens at acute onset and in individuals with pre-existing allergy. We sought to evaluate the effect of short-term feeding of GM Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-maize (MON810) on the initiation and relapse of allergic asthma in mice. BALB/c mice were provided a diet containing 33% GM or non-GM maize for up to 34 days either before ovalbumin (OVA)-induced experimental allergic asthma or disease relapse in mice with pre-existing allergy. We observed that GM-maize feeding did not affect OVA-induced eosinophilic airway and lung inflammation, mucus hypersecretion or OVA-specific antibody production at initiation or relapse of allergic asthma. There was no adjuvant effect upon GM-maize consumption on the onset or severity of allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic asthma. PMID:25084284

  8. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Maize.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial genome encodes proteins essential for mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis. Nuclear gene products, however, are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and the elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. We are exploiting a unique collection of maiz...

  9. [Effects of nitrogen management on maize nitrogen utilization and residual nitrate nitrogen in soil under maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Wen-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Qun; Yong, Tai-Wen; Liu, Wei-Guo; Yang, Feng; Mao, Shu-Ming

    2014-10-01

    A large amount of nitrogen (N) fertilizers poured into the fields severely pollute the environment. Reasonable application of N fertilizer has always been the research hotpot. The effects of N management on maize N utilization and residual nitrate N in soil under maize/soybean and maize/ sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems were reported in a field experiment in southwest China. It was found that maize N accumulation, N harvest index, N absorption efficiency, N contribution proportion after the anthesis stage in maize/soybean relay strip intercropping were increased by 6.1%, 5.4%, 4.3%, and 15.1% than under maize/sweet potato with an increase of 22.6% for maize yield after sustainable growing of maize/soybean intercropping system. Nitrate N accumulation in the 0-60 cm soil layer was 12.9% higher under maize/soybean intercropping than under maize/sweet potato intercropping. However, nitrate N concentration in the 60-120 cm soil layer when intercropped with soybean decreased by 10.3% than when intercropped with sweet potato, indicating a decrease of N leaching loss. Increasing of N application rate enhanced N accumulation of maize and decreased N use efficiency and significantly increased nitrate concentration in the soil profile except in the 60-100 cm soil layer, where no significant difference was observed with nitrogen application rate at 0 to 270 kg · hm(-2). Further application of N fertilizer significantly enhanced nitrate leaching loss. Postponing N application increased nitrate accumulation in the 60-100 cm soil layer. The results suggested that N application rates and ratio of base to top dressing had different influences on maize N concentration and nitrate N between maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato intercropping. Maize N concentration in the late growing stage, N harvest index and N use efficiency under maize/soybean intercropping increased (with N application rate at 180-270 kg · hm(-2) and ratio of base to top dressing = 3:2:5) and decreased nitrate leaching loss with yield reaching 7757 kg · hm(-2) on average. However, for maize/sweet potato, N concentration and use efficiency and maize yield increased significantly with N application rate at 180 kg · hm(-2) and ratio of base to top dressing = 5:5 than that under other treatments with yield reaching 6572 kg · hm(-2). Under these circumstances, it would be possible to realize maize high yield, high efficiency and safety of N man- agement under maize/soybean and maize/sweet potato relay strip intercropping systems. PMID:25796894

  10. Synchronous time-resolved optical and x-ray emission from simultaneous optical and x-ray streak cameras driven by a master ramp generator

    SciTech Connect

    Balmer, J.E.; Lampert, W.; Roschger, E.; Hares, J.D.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    An optical and an x-ray streak camera have been synchronized by driving the deflection plates of both cameras from the same ramp generator. The relative timing of the two cameras was calibrated by running UV light onto the x-ray streak camera. The x-ray streak camera was then used to measure the time of the x-ray emission from a laser plasma with respect to the laser pulse.

  11. Measuring 8–250 ps short pulses using a high-speed streak camera on kilojoule, petawatt-class laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, J.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Boni, R.; Bromage, J.; Hill, E.

    2013-07-15

    Short-pulse measurements using a streak camera are sensitive to space-charge broadening, which depends on the pulse duration and shape, and on the uniformity of photocathode illumination. An anamorphic-diffuser-based beam-homogenizing system and a space-charge-broadening calibration method were developed to accurately measure short pulses using an optical streak camera. This approach provides a more-uniform streak image and enables one to characterize space-charge-induced pulse-broadening effects.

  12. Quantification of southern rice black streaked dwarf virus and rice black streaked dwarf virus in the organs of their vector and nonvector insect over time.

    PubMed

    Hajano, Jamal-U-Ddin; Wang, Biao; Ren, Yingdang; Lu, Chuantao; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-10-01

    Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) and rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) are serious rice-infecting reoviruses, which are transmitted by different planthoppers in a persistent propagative manner. In this study, we quantitatively compared the spatial distribution of SRBSDV and RBSDV contents over time in their vector and nonvector insects using real time-PCR. Genome equivalent copies (GEC) were assessed every 2 days from 0 to 14 days after a 3-days acquisition access period (AAP) on infected plants. Results revealed 293.2±21.6 to 404.1±46.4 SRBSDV GEC/ng total RNA in whole body of white-backed planthopper (WBPH, Sogatella furcifera) at day 0 and 12 and 513.5±88.4 to 816.8±110.7 RBSDV GEC/ng total RNA in the whole body of small brown planthopper (SBPH, Laodelphax striatellus) at day 0 and 14, respectively, after 3-days AAP. Highest GEC of both viruses were found in the gut of their respective vectors. Although SRBSDV was detected in the gut of SBPH, it did not spread into the hemolymph or other organs. After an 8-day latent period, the transmission efficiency of SRBSDV and RBSDV by their respective vectors was significantly positively correlated with GEC in the salivary gland (r(2)=0.7808, P=0.0036 and r(2)=0.9351, P<0.0001, respectively, at ?=0.05). Together, these results confirm that accumulation of >200 SRBSDV or RBSDV GEC/ng total RNA in the gut of vector, indicated threshold for further spread and the virus content in the salivary gland was significantly correlated with transmission efficiency by their respective vectors. PMID:26116274

  13. Photomorphogenic responses in maize seedling development.

    PubMed

    Markelz, Nicole H; Costich, Denise E; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2003-12-01

    As an emerging maize (Zea mays) seedling senses light, there is a decrease in the rate of mesocotyl elongation, an induction of root growth, and an expansion of leaves. In leaf tissues, mesophyll and bundle sheath cell fate is determined, and the proplastids of each differentiate into the dimorphic chloroplasts typical of each cell type. Although it has been inferred from recent studies in several model plant species that multiple photoreceptor systems mediate this process, surprisingly little is known of light signal transduction in maize. Here, we examine two photomorphogenic responses in maize: inhibition of mesocotyl elongation and C4 photosynthetic differentiation. Through an extensive survey of white, red, far-red, and blue light responses among a diverse collection of germplasm, including a phytochrome-deficient mutant elm1, we show that light response is a highly variable trait in maize. Although all inbreds examined appear to have a functional phytochrome signal transduction pathway, several lines showed reduced sensitivity to blue light. A significant correlation was observed between light response and subpopulation, suggesting that light responsiveness may be a target of artificial selection. An examination of C4 gene expression patterns under various light regimes in the standard W22 inbred and elm1 indicate that cell-specific patterns of C4 gene expression are maintained in fully differentiated tissues independent of light quality. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first comprehensive survey of light response in maize and are discussed in relation to maize breeding strategies. PMID:14645729

  14. Comparison of Gene Expressions of Maize Kernel Pathogenesis-Related Proteins in Different Maize Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus during infection of various grain crops including maize (Zea mays). Contamination of maize with aflatoxins has been shown to be exasperated by late season drought stress. Previous studies have identified numerous resist...

  15. MaizeGDB update: New tools, data, and interface for the maize model organism database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is a highly curated, community-oriented database and informatics service to researchers focused on the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. Although some form of the maize community database has existed over the last 25 years, there have only been two major releases. In 1991, ...

  16. Expression of an anthranilate synthase from maize mutant bf-1 in maize line HiII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mutant bf-1 was one of a series of maize mutants generated by radiation from the Bikini Atoll atomic bomb test in 1946. It is characterized by blue fluorescence in seedlings and anthers under ultraviolet illumination and by mutant plants giving off a characteristic grape-like odor due to the ...

  17. Perturbation of Maize Phenylpropanoid Metabolism by an AvrE Family Type III Effector from Pantoea stewartii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Asselin, Jo Ann E.; Lin, Jinshan; Perez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Gentzel, Irene; Majerczak, Doris; Opiyo, Stephen O.; Zhao, Wanying; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Coplin, David L.; Blakeslee, Joshua J.; Mackey, David

    2015-01-01

    AvrE family type III effector proteins share the ability to suppress host defenses, induce disease-associated cell death, and promote bacterial growth. However, despite widespread contributions to numerous bacterial diseases in agriculturally important plants, the mode of action of these effectors remains largely unknown. WtsE is an AvrE family member required for the ability of Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii (Pnss) to proliferate efficiently and cause wilt and leaf blight symptoms in maize (Zea mays) plants. Notably, when WtsE is delivered by a heterologous system into the leaf cells of susceptible maize seedlings, it alone produces water-soaked disease symptoms reminiscent of those produced by Pnss. Thus, WtsE is a pathogenicity and virulence factor in maize, and an Escherichia coli heterologous delivery system can be used to study the activity of WtsE in isolation from other factors produced by Pnss. Transcriptional profiling of maize revealed the effects of WtsE, including induction of genes involved in secondary metabolism and suppression of genes involved in photosynthesis. Targeted metabolite quantification revealed that WtsE perturbs maize metabolism, including the induction of coumaroyl tyramine. The ability of mutant WtsE derivatives to elicit transcriptional and metabolic changes in susceptible maize seedlings correlated with their ability to promote disease. Furthermore, chemical inhibitors that block metabolic flux into the phenylpropanoid pathways targeted by WtsE also disrupted the pathogenicity and virulence activity of WtsE. While numerous metabolites produced downstream of the shikimate pathway are known to promote plant defense, our results indicate that misregulated induction of phenylpropanoid metabolism also can be used to promote pathogen virulence. PMID:25635112

  18. Significant seismic streaks corresponding to lithological contrasts in Mesozoic and Paleozoic accretion units, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, S.; Toda, S.; Katao, H.

    2014-12-01

    While high-density seismic streaks are commonly seen in aftershocks of a strike-slip earthquake, significant linear clusters in background seismicity are rare. A typical example of such sustained streaks is observed along the creeping section of the San Andreas fault, in which strain localization associated with frictional heterogeneity takes a responsibility. Here we show other examples from Tamba and Wakayama regions, around Osaka-Kyoto district, where a number of several-to-20-km-long seismic streaks are observed. We explore the role of geologic heterogeneity into the seismicity comparing spatial distribution of earthquakes with geologic structure in both regions, where a significant high background rate of seismicity has been continuously recorded since the mid-1900. Epicenters of numerous small earthquakes are located mainly on the Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic-Paleozoic accretion units, whereas low seismicity is characterized in granite and ultra-mafic rocks. Within the Wakayama seismic zone, in particular, we observe many E-W and ENE-WSW trending dense seismic clusters in hypocenters of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) data relocated with the hypo DD algorithm of Waldhauser and Ellsworth (2000). Most of the E-W trending seismic clusters possibly correspond to the E-W trending local scale geologic faults, folds, bedding planes, and schistosity. However, well-determined fault plane solutions by JMA and the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) show NS-trending reverse faults corresponding to EW compression. We further sought the focal mechanisms for smaller earthquakes using waveform data recorded in the SATARN seismic network system of DPRI, Kyoto University. As a result, among the many reverse fault mechanisms, we found some amounts of strike-slip ones, which may associate with the visible EW-trending seismic clusters.

  19. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-15

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 {mu}m) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ('hotspot') was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm{sup 2}/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  20. Leaf transpiration efficiency of some drought-resistant maize lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field measurements of leaf gas exchange in maize often indicate stomatal conductances higher than required to provide substomatal carbon dioxide concentrations saturating to photosynthesis. Thus maize leaves often operate at lower transpiration efficiency (TE) than potentially achievable for specie...

  1. FLORETS AND ROSETTES: MERISTEM GENES IN MAIZE AND ARABIDOPSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize and Arabidopsis genes that regulate inflorescence development are contrasted. Genes that regulate meristem size are often conserved, whereas genes that regulate meristem identity in maize do not have readily identifiable orthologs in Arabidopsis....

  2. Streaked optical pyrometer system for laser-driven shock-wave experiments on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Boehly, T R; Melchior, A; Meyerhofer, D D; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Sorce, C M; Oertel, J A; Emmel, P M

    2007-03-01

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of approximately megabar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented. PMID:17411209

  3. Study of the Performance of a Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Temperature Measurement of Shocked Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huige; Liu, Yonggang; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Dong; Ding, Yongkun; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian

    2014-06-01

    A streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) is developed and calibrated for the measurement of the temperature of shocked materials. In order to achieve a higher relative sensitivity, a one-channel scheme is adopted for the system. The system is calibrated with a shocked step-shaped aluminum sample in the SG-III prototype laser facility. The relation between the count number in the detection system and the sample temperature is thus obtained, which can be adopted to infer the temperature of any shocked materials in future experiments.

  4. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siwon; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2015-01-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections. PMID:26674930

  5. Calculation of surface distortions of rotating mirrors and their effect on streak camera resolution.

    PubMed

    Erez, A; Partom, Y

    1966-05-01

    The time resolution of streak cameras is limited by aberrations introduced by the rotating mirror. The effect of geometrical distortions of the mirror, rotating at maximum speed, may be minimized by appropriate choice of mirror material and cross section. The stresses in the rotating mirror and the distortions of its reflecting surface were calculated for various geometries of the mirror. By using a semianalytical point-match method, the same numerical scheme and the same formulas were applicable to all geometries. Sufficient data on the behavior of symmetric and partly symmetric cross sections have been obtained to permit optimization of the mirror design. PMID:20048936

  6. Temporal Characterization of individual Harmonics of an attosecond pulse train by THz Streaking

    E-print Network

    Ardana-Lamas, F; Stepanov, A; Gorgisyan, I; Juranic, P; Abela, R; Hauri, C P

    2015-01-01

    We report on the global temporal pulse characteristics of individual harmonics in an attosecond pulse train by means of photo-electron streaking in a strong low-frequency transient. The scheme allows direct retrieval of pulse durations and first order chirp of individual harmonics without the need of temporal scanning. The measurements were performed using an intense THz field generated by tilted phase front technique in LiNbO_3 . Pulse properties for harmonics of order 23, 25 and 27 show that the individual pulse durations and linear chirp are decreasing by the harmonic order.

  7. Design of a streaked radiography instrument for ICF ablator tuning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Geissel, M.; Kellogg, J. W.; Bennett, G. R.; Edens, A. D.; Atherton, B. W.; Leeper, R. J.; Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Holder, J. P.; Landen, O. L.

    2008-10-15

    A streaked radiography diagnostic has been proposed as a technique to determine the ablator mass remaining in an inertial confinement fusion ignition capsule at peak velocity. This instrument, the 'HXRI-5', has been designed to fit within a National Ignition Facility Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator. The HXRI-5 will be built at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and initial testing will be done at the SNL Z-Beamlet Facility. In this paper, we will describe the National Ignition Campaign requirements for this diagnostic, the instrument design, and the planned test experiments.

  8. Temporal Characterization of Electron Beam Bunches with a Fast Streak Camera at the JLab FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S.V. Benson; D. Douglas; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    The design and construction of an optical transport that brings synchrotron radiation from electron bunches to a fast streak camera in a remote area has become a useful tool for online observation of bunch length and stability. This paper will report on the temporal measurements we have done, comparison with simulations, and the on-going work for another imaging optical transport system that will make possible the direct measurement of the longitudinal phase space by measuring the bunch length as a function of energy

  9. First Report of Tobacco streak virus Infecting Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) in India.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara Reddy, B V; Sivaprasad, Y; Naresh Kumar, C V M; Sujitha, A; Raja Reddy, K; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2012-06-01

    The natural occurrence of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) in Hibiscus cannabinus was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using an antiserum raised against TSV and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the coat protein gene of the virus. Sequence analysis of the PCR products showed 99.6 and 99.5% of maximum identity at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively with TSV onion isolate from Kurnool (HM131490).This is the first report of the natural occurrence of TSV on kenaf in India. PMID:23730009

  10. Transient electric fields in laser plasmas observed by proton streak deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, T.; Schnuerer, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Risse, E.; Kalashnikov, M.; Sandner, W.; Priebe, G.; Amin, M.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Andreev, A. A.

    2008-03-03

    A novel proton imaging technique was applied which allows a continuous temporal record of electric fields within a time window of several nanoseconds. This 'proton streak deflectometry' was used to investigate transient electric fields of intense ({approx}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) laser irradiated foils. We found out that these fields with an absolute peak of up to 10{sup 8} V/m extend over millimeter lateral extension and decay at nanosecond duration. Hence, they last much longer than the (approximately picosecond) laser excitation and extend much beyond the laser irradiation focus.

  11. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siwon; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2015-12-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections. PMID:26674930

  12. Study Progress on Tissue Culture of Maize Mature Embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhen; Cheng, Jun; Cheng, Yanping; Zhou, Xioafu

    It has been paid more and more attention on maize tissue culture as it is a basic work in maize genetic transformation, especially huge breakthrough has been made in maize tissue culture utilizing mature embryos as explants in the recent years. This paper reviewed the study progress on maize tissue culture and plant regeneration utilizing mature embryos as explants from callus induction, subculture, plant regeneration and browning reduction and so on.

  13. Flavone-rich maize: an opportunity to improve the nutritional value of an important commodity crop

    PubMed Central

    Casas, María I.; Duarte, Silvia; Doseff, Andrea I.; Grotewold, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural outputs have resulted in food production continuously expanding. To satisfy the needs of a fast growing human population, higher yields, more efficient food processing, and food esthetic value, new crop varieties with higher caloric intake have and continue to be developed, but which lack many phytochemicals important for plant protection and adequate human nutrition. The increasing incidence of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, combined with social disparity worldwide prompted the interest in developing enhanced crops that can simultaneously address the two sides of the current malnutrition sword, increasing yield while providing added nutritional value. Flavones, phytochemicals associated with the beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet, have potent anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic activities. However, many Mediterranean diet-associated vegetables are inaccessible, or lowly consumed, in many parts of the world. Maize is the most widely grown cereal crop, yet most lines used for hybrid maize production lack flavones. As a first step toward a sustainable strategy to increasing the nutritional value of maize-based diets, we investigated the accumulation and chemical properties of flavones in maize seeds of defined genotypes. We show that the pericarps of the P1-rr genotype accumulate flavones at levels comparable to those present in some flavone-rich vegetables, and are mostly present in their C- and O-glycosylated forms. Some of these glycosides can be readily converted into the corresponding more active health beneficial aglycones during food processing. Our results provide evidence that nutritionally beneficial flavones could be re-introduced into elite lines to increase the dietary benefits of maize. PMID:25250036

  14. Biochar mitigation of allelopathy induced yield loss in continuous maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous maize yields are limited by the release of phytotoxic compounds as the previous year’s maize residue decomposes. We tested the hypothesis that soil biochar applications could help mitigate maize autotoxicity and the associated yield depression. Eighteen small field plots (23.7 m2) were es...

  15. Comprehensive genotyping of the USA national maize inbred seed bank

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germplasm bank at the USDA-ARS North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) in Ames, Iowa, preserves maize inbred lines from breeding programs from all over the world, including some of the key lines from the breeding history of maize. We genotyped 2,815 maize inbred accessions, mo...

  16. MaizeGDB: everything old is new again! [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of genetic, genomic, and breeding research evolves over time, making it necessary to continually redefine the paradigm for data access and data analysis tools. Here we report the reinvention of MaizeGDB, the maize genetics and genomics database, to meet maize researchers’ ever changing nee...

  17. Research Paper High-throughput phenotyping technology for maize roots

    E-print Network

    number of plants needs to be evaluated. In addition, to evaluate how root complexity influencesResearch Paper High-throughput phenotyping technology for maize roots T.E. Grift a, *, J. Novais b-throughput measurement techniques allowing acquisition of phenotypical data describing maize roots. One of a maize root

  18. BREEDING MAIZE FOR RESISTANCE TO MYCOTOXINS AT IITA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ear rot causing fungi including Aspergillus and Fusarium are common in maize in West and Central Africa. These fungi contaminate maize with mycotoxins that pose serious potential health hazards to humans in the sub-region. In an effort to develop maize germplasm with resistance to aflatoxin contam...

  19. Regulation of pathogenesis by light in Cercospora zeae-maydis: Identification of a photoreceptor required for infection of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cercospora zeae-maydis causes gray leaf spot, one of the most prevalent and damaging foliar diseases of maize throughout the world. Light plays a key role in the virulence of C. zeae-maydis by inducing the biosynthesis of cercosporin, a photosensitizing, non-host-specific phytotoxin. We determined t...

  20. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR or NLR) proteins, which trigger a hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid, localized cell death upon recognition of specific pathogens. The maize NLR-encoding Rp1-D21 gene is the result of an intergenic recomb...

  1. Application of an antibiotic resets the maize leaf phyllosphere community and increases resistance to southern leaf blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern leaf blight (SLB) caused by the foliar fungus Chochliobous heterostrophus is one of the most important pathogens affecting maize (Zea mays L) in warm humid regions. Direct genetic resistance has been studied extensively; more recently attempts have been made to control disease by changin...

  2. A connected set of genes associated with programmed cell death implicated in controlling the hypersensitive response in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rp1-D21 is a maize auto-active resistance gene that confers a spontaneous hypersensitive response (HR). Depending on the genetic background in which it operates; variable levels of HR are observed. This offers a convenient system to identify alleles that modulate HR and genes involved in disease res...

  3. Tent-pole spatial defect pooling for prediction of subjective quality assessment of streaks and bands in color printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, D. René

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm is described for measuring the subjective, visual impact of 1-D defects (streaks and bands) in prints. A general approach to measurements of spatially localized image defects is described, attempting to directly match three stages of processing by the human observer: formation of the perceived image, identification of individual defects, and pooling of the visual defect magnitudes into an overall assessment. The emphasis of the discussion is on the method of pooling of multiple streaks and band defects. It is demonstrated that the commonly used Minkowski pooling method does not satisfy the basic criteria necessary for this application, and a tent-pole pooling method is defined and analyzed. A complete algorithm for measuring streaks and bands, which uses tent-pole pooling, is described. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by comparison to results from new and independently collected subjective ratings.

  4. Frequency-Domain Streak Camera and Tomography for Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving and Channeled Plasma Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Reed, Stephen; Dong, Peng; Downer, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a prototype Frequency Domain Streak Camera (FDSC) that can capture the picosecond time evolution of the plasma accelerator structure in a single shot. In our prototype Frequency-Domain Streak Camera, a probe pulse propagates obliquely to a sub-picosecond pump pulse that creates an evolving nonlinear index "bubble" in fused silica glass, supplementing a conventional Frequency Domain Holographic (FDH) probe-reference pair that co-propagates with the "bubble". Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT) generalizes Frequency-Domain Streak Camera by probing the "bubble" from multiple angles and reconstructing its morphology and evolution using algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans. Multiplexing methods (Temporal Multiplexing and Angular Multiplexing) improve data storage and processing capability, demonstrating a compact Frequency Domain Tomography system with a single spectrometer.

  5. Two genes conferring resistance to Pythium stalk rot in maize inbred line Qi319.

    PubMed

    Song, Feng-Jing; Xiao, Ming-Gang; Duan, Can-Xing; Li, Hong-Jie; Zhu, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Bao-Tao; Sun, Su-Li; Wu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Stalk rots are destructive diseases in maize around the world, and are most often caused by the pathogen Pythium, Fusarium and other fungi. The most efficient management for controlling stalk rots is to breed resistant cultivars. Pythium stalk rot can cause serious yield loss on maize, and to find the resistance genes from the existing germplasm is the basis to develop Pythium-resistance hybrid lines. In this study, we investigated the genetic resistance to Pythium stalk rot in inbred line Qi319 using F2 and F2:3 population, and found that the resistance to Pythium inflatum in Qi319 was conferred by two independently inherited dominant genes, RpiQI319-1 and RpiQI319-2. Linkage analysis uncovered that the RpiQI319-1 co-segregated with markers bnlg1203, and bnlg2057 on chromosome 1, and that the RpiQI319-2 locus co-segregated with markers umc2069 and bnlg1716 on chromosome 10. The RpiQI319-1 locus was further mapped into a ~500-kb interval flanked by markers SSRZ33 and SSRZ47. These results will facilitate marker-assisted selection of Pythium stalk rot-resistant cultivars in maize breeding. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the resistance to P. inflatum in the inbred line Qi319, and is also the first description of two independently inherited dominant genes conferring the resistance of Pythium stalk rot in maize. PMID:25724693

  6. Bioguided isolation, characterization, and biotransformation by Fusarium verticillioides of maize kernel compounds that inhibit fumonisin production.

    PubMed

    Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Bernillon, Stéphane; Marchegay, Gisèle; Lornac, Aurélia; Pinson-Gadais, Laetitia; Ponts, Nadia; Zehraoui, Enric; Barreau, Christian; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2014-10-01

    Fusarium verticillioides infects maize ears, causing ear rot disease and contamination of grain with fumonisin mycotoxins. This contamination can be reduced by the presence of bioactive compounds in kernels that are able to inhibit fumonisin biosynthesis. To identify such compounds, we used kernels from a maize genotype with moderate susceptibility to F. verticillioides, harvested at the milk-dough stage (i.e., when fumonisin production initiates in planta), and applied a bioguided fractionation approach. Chlorogenic acid was the most abundant compound in the purified active fraction and its contribution to fumonisin inhibitory activity was up to 70%. Moreover, using a set of maize genotypes with different levels of susceptibility, chlorogenic acid was shown to be significantly higher in immature kernels of the moderately susceptible group. Altogether, our data indicate that chlorogenic acid may considerably contribute to either maize resistance to Fusarium ear rot, fumonisin accumulation, or both. We further investigated the mechanisms involved in the inhibition of fumonisin production by chlorogenic acid and one of its hydrolyzed products, caffeic acid, by following their metabolic fate in supplemented F. verticillioides broths. Our data indicate that F. verticillioides was able to biotransform these phenolic compounds and that the resulting products can contribute to their inhibitory activity. PMID:25014591

  7. Wind Streaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Identification and expression profiling analysis of calmodulin-binding transcription activator genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic and biotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Runqing; Lu, Caixia; Sun, Tao; Peng, Tingting; Han, Xiaohua; Qi, Jianshuang; Yan, Shufeng; Tie, Shuanggui

    2015-01-01

    The calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTA) play critical roles in plant growth and responses to environmental stimuli. However, how CAMTAs function in responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in maize (Zea mays L.) is largely unknown. In this study, we first identified all the CAMTA homologous genes in the whole genome of maize. The results showed that nine ZmCAMTA genes showed highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns. Many ZmCAMTA genes displayed high expression levels in the roots. We then surveyed the distribution of stress-related cis-regulatory elements in the ?1.5 kb promoter regions of ZmCAMTA genes. Notably, a large number of stress-related elements present in the promoter regions of some ZmCAMTA genes, indicating a genetic basis of stress expression regulation of these genes. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to test the expression of ZmCAMTA genes under several abiotic stresses (drought, salt, and cold), various stress-related hormones [abscisic acid, auxin, salicylic acid (SA), and jasmonic acid] and biotic stress [rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) infection]. Furthermore, the expression pattern of ZmCAMTA genes under RBSDV infection was analyzed to investigate their potential roles in responses of different maize cultivated varieties to RBSDV. The expression of most ZmCAMTA genes responded to both abiotic and biotic stresses. The data will help us to understand the roles of CAMTA-mediated Ca2+ signaling in maize tolerance to environmental stresses. PMID:26284092

  9. ‘Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is!’: Effects of Streaks on Confidence and Betting in a Binary Choice Task

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Bettina; Limbrick-Oldfield, Eve H; Clark, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Human choice under uncertainty is influenced by erroneous beliefs about randomness. In simple binary choice tasks, such as red/black predictions in roulette, long outcome runs (e.g. red, red, red) typically increase the tendency to predict the other outcome (i.e. black), an effect labeled the “gambler's fallacy.” In these settings, participants may also attend to streaks in their predictive performance. Winning and losing streaks are thought to affect decision confidence, although prior work indicates conflicting directions. Over three laboratory experiments involving red/black predictions in a sequential roulette task, we sought to identify the effects of outcome runs and winning/losing streaks upon color predictions, decision confidence and betting behavior. Experiments 1 (n?=?40) and 3 (n?=?40) obtained trial-by-trial confidence ratings, with a win/no win payoff and a no loss/loss payoff, respectively. Experiment 2 (n?=?39) obtained a trial-by-trial bet amount on an equivalent scale. In each experiment, the gambler's fallacy was observed on choice behavior after color runs and, in experiment 2, on betting behavior after color runs. Feedback streaks exerted no reliable influence on confidence ratings, in either payoff condition. Betting behavior, on the other hand, increased as a function of losing streaks. The increase in betting on losing streaks is interpreted as a manifestation of loss chasing; these data help clarify the psychological mechanisms underlying loss chasing and caution against the use of betting measures (“post-decision wagering”) as a straightforward index of decision confidence. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26236092

  10. PS-1/S1 picosecond streak camera application for multichannel laser system diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, S. G.; Bel'kov, S. A.; Rogozhnikov, G. S.; Rukavishnikov, N. N.; Romanov, V. V.; Voronich, I. N.; Vorob'ev, N. S.; Gornostaev, P. B.; Lozovoi, V. I.; Shchelev, M. Ya

    2014-08-01

    A PS-1/S1 picosecond image-tube streak camera (ITSC) with slit scan (streak camera), developed and manufactured at the General Physics Institute RAS, has been used to measure the spatiotemporal characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses generated by a petawatt-power laser installation 'FEMTO' at the Institute of Laser Physics Research in Sarov. It is found that such a camera is suitable for measuring the spatial and temporal parameters of single laser pulses with an accuracy of about one picosecond. It is shown that the intensity time profile of a train of picosecond pulses may be precisely defined for the pulses separated in time by a few picoseconds. The camera allows the contrast of radiation to be determined with a high (no less than 103) accuracy; spatial distribution of the laser pulses can be measured with an accuracy of tens of microns, and the temporal separation of single laser pulses can be identified with an accuracy of 1 - 1.5 ps.

  11. PS-1/S1 picosecond streak camera application for multichannel laser system diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Garanin, S G; Bel'kov, S A; Rogozhnikov, G S; Rukavishnikov, N N; Romanov, V V; Voronich, I N; Vorob'ev, N S; Gornostaev, P B; Lozovoi, V I; Shchelev, M Ya

    2014-08-31

    A PS-1/S1 picosecond image-tube streak camera (ITSC) with slit scan (streak camera), developed and manufactured at the General Physics Institute RAS, has been used to measure the spatiotemporal characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses generated by a petawatt-power laser installation 'FEMTO' at the Institute of Laser Physics Research in Sarov. It is found that such a camera is suitable for measuring the spatial and temporal parameters of single laser pulses with an accuracy of about one picosecond. It is shown that the intensity time profile of a train of picosecond pulses may be precisely defined for the pulses separated in time by a few picoseconds. The camera allows the contrast of radiation to be determined with a high (no less than 10{sup 3}) accuracy; spatial distribution of the laser pulses can be measured with an accuracy of tens of microns, and the temporal separation of single laser pulses can be identified with an accuracy of 1 – 1.5 ps. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Adaptive streak artifact reduction in computed tomography resulting from excessive x-ray photon noise.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J

    1998-11-01

    The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image is often degraded by streaking artifacts resulting from excessive x-ray quantum noise. Often, a patient has to be rescanned at a higher technique or at a larger slice thickness in order to obtain an acceptable image for diagnosis. This results in a higher dose to the patient, a degraded cross plane resolution, or a reduced patient throughput. In this paper, we propose an adaptive filtering approach in Radon space based on the local statistical properties of the CT projections. We first model the noise characteristics of a projection sample undergoing important preprocessing steps. A filter is then designed such that its parameters are dynamically adjusted to adapt to the local noise characteristics. Because of the adaptive nature of the filter, a proper balance between streak artifact suppression and spatial resolution preservation is achieved. Phantom and clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the robustness of our approach. Results demonstrate that the adaptive filtering approach is effective in reducing or eliminating quantum noise induced artifacts in CT. At the same time, the impact on the spatial resolution is kept at a low level. PMID:9829238

  13. Attosecond time-resolved streaked photoemission from Mg-covered W(110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Qing; Thumm, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    We formulate a quantum-mechanical model for infrared-streaked photoelectron (PE) emission by ultrashort extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses from an adsorbate-covered metal surface, exposing the influence of microscopic PE dispersion in substrate and adsorbate on the interpretation of streaked photoemission spectra and photoemission time delays. We validate this numerical model first by reproducing measured relative photoemission delays (a) between valence-band and 2 p -core-level (CL) PEs emitted from clean Mg(0001) surfaces and (b) between conduction-band (CB) and 4 f -CL PEs from clean W(110) surfaces at two XUV-pulse central photon energies. Next, applying this model to ultrathin Mg adsorbate layers on W(110) substrates, we reproduce (i) the measured nonmonotonic dependence of relative photoemission delays between CB and Mg (2 p ) PEs and (ii) the monotonic dependence of relative delays between W (4 f ) and Mg (2 p ) PEs in a recent experiment [S. Neppl et al., Nature (London) 517, 342 (2015), 10.1038/nature14094].

  14. An Optical Streak Diagnostic for Observing Anode-Cathode Plasmas for Radiographic Source Development

    SciTech Connect

    Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.; Lare, Gregory A.; Bennett, Nichelle L.; Johnston, Mark D.

    2013-06-13

    National Security Technologies, LLC, and Sandia National Laboratories are collaborating in the development of pulsed power–driven flash x-ray radiographic sources that utilize high-intensity electron beam diodes. The RITS 6 (Radiographic Integrated Test Stand) accelerator at Sandia is used to drive a self magnetic pinch diode to produce a Bremsstrahlung x-ray source. The high electric fields and current densities associated with these short A-K gap pinch beam diodes present many challenges in diode development. Plasmas generated at both the anode and cathode affect the diode performance, which is manifested in varying spot (source) sizes, total dose output, and impedance profiles. Understanding the nature of these plasmas including closure rates and densities is important in modeling their behavior and providing insight into their mitigation. In this paper we describe a streak camera–based optical diagnostic that is capable of observing and measuring plasma evolution within the A-K gap. By imaging a region of interest onto the input slit of a streak camera, we are able to produce a time-resolved one-dimensional image of the evolving plasma. Typical data are presented.

  15. The dynamic nature and spectral characteristics of low-albedo slope streaks on Mars and their possible hydrologic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushkin, A.; Stillman, D. E.; Gillespie, A. R.; Montgomery, D. R.; Schreiber, B. C.; Hibbitts, C.

    2014-12-01

    Low-albedo down-slope streaks that form repeatedly within weekly time-scales and subsequently fade over seasonal to decadal periods are commonly observed in the tropical and mid-latitudes of Mars. 'Dry' mass-wasting processes vs. 'wet' modification of the surface by aqueous phases are the mechanisms typically considered to explain their formation. Recently, high frequency HiRISE image time-series of seasonal recurrence, incremental growth and fading of small (meter-decameter scale) slope streaks, also termed 'recurring slope lineae' (RSL), have been presented in support of a 'wet' origin likely associated with brine seepage. Here, we present new results that demonstrate comparable recurrence, incremental growth and fading characteristics over yearly time-scales for decameter-kilometer scale low-albedo slope-streaks in Lycus Sulci, Amazonis Planitia and Arabia Terra. These dynamic characteristics support the previous association of low-albedo slope streaks with brine seepage based on their geomorphic and spectral relations with surrounding unaffected slopes. Low-albedo slope streaks are typically not associated with detectable erosion or terminal, down-slope depositional activity at the resolution of 25 cm/pixel HiRISE images. CRISM observations consistently indicate that darkened slope-streak surfaces are spectrally enriched in FeOx and are void of detectable water/ice spectral absorption bands. Thus, the liquid seeps considered for the formation of meter to kilometer scale slope streaks are likely low-volume transient events that evaporate and/or freeze and sublime leaving behind a meta-stable dry precipitate that 'stains' the surface dark and may provide insights into the possible composition of such brines. Slope streak formation through a 'wet' brine seepage mechanism supports the possible presence of pressurized sub-surface aquifers that may be released via faults or cracks able to produce recurring transient discharge events during favorably warm daily/seasonal surface conditions. First-order calculations for the liquid volumes that would be associated with such transient brine extrusions suggest the presence of regional-scale extensive aquifers and/or effective recharge mechanism for local-scale aquifers perhaps during high obliquity periods.

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Maize Leaf Systemic Symptom Infected by Bipolaris zeicola

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Guoshu; Qin, Cheng; Ye, Kunhao; Zhang, Min; Sun, Xiaofang; Zhou, You; Zhang, Youju

    2015-01-01

    Bipolaris zeicola is a fungal pathogen that causes Northern corn leaf spot (NCLS), which is a serious foliar disease in maize and one of the most significant pathogens affecting global food security. Here, we report a genome-wide transcriptional profile analysis using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of maize leaf development after inoculation with B. zeicola. We performed High-Throughput Digital Gene Expression analysis to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in resistant inbred Mo17 lines after infection with B. zeicola at four successive disease development stages—CP (contact period), PP (penetration period), IP (incubation period), and DP (disease period); the expression of the genes was compared with those in a CK (mock-treatment) control. In addition, a sensitive maize line (Zheng58) was used for the comparisons with the Mo17. Among all tested genes, 466 differentially expressed genes were identified in all libraries, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis of these genes suggested that they are involved in many biological processes related to systemic symptom development, such as plant hormone signal transduction, starch and sucrose metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in fungal-infected plants. This information will help in furthering our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to fungal infection. PMID:25781606

  17. Transcriptome analysis of maize leaf systemic symptom infected by Bipolaris zeicola.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Gao, Jian; Yin, Fuqiang; Gong, Guoshu; Qin, Cheng; Ye, Kunhao; Zhang, Min; Sun, Xiaofang; Zhou, You; Zhang, Youju

    2015-01-01

    Bipolaris zeicola is a fungal pathogen that causes Northern corn leaf spot (NCLS), which is a serious foliar disease in maize and one of the most significant pathogens affecting global food security. Here, we report a genome-wide transcriptional profile analysis using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of maize leaf development after inoculation with B. zeicola. We performed High-Throughput Digital Gene Expression analysis to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in resistant inbred Mo17 lines after infection with B. zeicola at four successive disease development stages--CP (contact period), PP (penetration period), IP (incubation period), and DP (disease period); the expression of the genes was compared with those in a CK (mock-treatment) control. In addition, a sensitive maize line (Zheng58) was used for the comparisons with the Mo17. Among all tested genes, 466 differentially expressed genes were identified in all libraries, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis of these genes suggested that they are involved in many biological processes related to systemic symptom development, such as plant hormone signal transduction, starch and sucrose metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in fungal-infected plants. This information will help in furthering our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to fungal infection. PMID:25781606

  18. Systemic Infection of Maize, Sorghum, Rice, and Beet Seedlings with Fumonisin-Producing and Nonproducing Fusarium verticillioides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Raana; Karlovsky, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Two fumonisin-nonproducing strains of Fusarium verticillioides and their fumonisin producing progenitors were tested for aggressiveness toward maize, sorghum, rice, and beetroot seedlings grown under greenhouse conditions. None of the plants showed obvious disease symptoms after root dip inoculation. Fungal biomass was determined by species-specific real-time PCR. No significant (P = 0.05) differences in systemic colonization were detected between the wild type strains and mutants not producing fumonisins. F. verticillioides was not detected in any of the non-inoculated control plants. The fungus grew from roots to the first two internodes/leaves of maize, rice and beet regardless of fumonisin production. The systemic growth of F. verticillioides in sorghum was limited. The results showed that fumonisin production was not required for the infection of roots of maize, rice and beet by F. verticillioides. PMID:26672472

  19. Systemic Infection of Maize, Sorghum, Rice, and Beet Seedlings with Fumonisin-Producing and Nonproducing Fusarium verticillioides Strains.

    PubMed

    Dastjerdi, Raana; Karlovsky, Petr

    2015-12-01

    Two fumonisin-nonproducing strains of Fusarium verticillioides and their fumonisin producing progenitors were tested for aggressiveness toward maize, sorghum, rice, and beetroot seedlings grown under greenhouse conditions. None of the plants showed obvious disease symptoms after root dip inoculation. Fungal biomass was determined by species-specific real-time PCR. No significant (P = 0.05) differences in systemic colonization were detected between the wild type strains and mutants not producing fumonisins. F. verticillioides was not detected in any of the non-inoculated control plants. The fungus grew from roots to the first two internodes/leaves of maize, rice and beet regardless of fumonisin production. The systemic growth of F. verticillioides in sorghum was limited. The results showed that fumonisin production was not required for the infection of roots of maize, rice and beet by F. verticillioides. PMID:26672472

  20. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of maize-derived HBsAg for the development of an oral vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shweta; Hayden, Celine A; Fischer, Maria E; Rao, A Gururaj; Howard, John A

    2015-12-15

    Although a vaccine against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been available since 1982, it is estimated that 600,000 people die every year due to HBV. An affordable oral vaccine could help alleviate the disease burden and to this end the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was expressed in maize. Orally delivered maize material induced the strongest immune response in mice when lipid was extracted by CO2 supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), compared to full fat and hexane-extracted material. The present study provides a biochemical and biophysical basis for these immunological differences by comparing the active ingredient in the differently treated maize material. Purified maize-derived HBsAg underwent biophysical characterization by gel filtration, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-CD, and fluorescence. Gel filtration showed that HBsAg forms higher-order oligomers and TEM demonstrated virus-like particle (VLP) formation. The VLPs obtained from SFE were more regular in shape and size compared to hexane or full fat material. In addition, SFE-derived HBsAg showed the greatest extent of ?-helical structure by far UV-CD spectrum. Fluorescence experiments also revealed differences in protein conformation. This work establishes SFE-treated maize material as a viable oral vaccine candidate and advances the development of the first oral subunit vaccine. PMID:26519888

  1. Foliar Diseases of Apiaceae Crops in Coastal California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number of outbreaks of leaf spot, blight and streak diseases on celery, cilantro, fennel and parsley has been increasing throughout central coastal California and particularly in Monterey County since 2002. Two different bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas syringae pv. apii, and P. syringae pv. cor...

  2. Fertility Relationships in Maize-Teosinte Hybrids. 

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John S. (John Sinclair)

    1950-01-01

    teosinte the pollen sterility averaged as high as 66.8 percent, and examinations at meiosis I showed more irregular behavior than was found in the Florida teosinte-maize hybrid. Mangelsdorf and Reeves (9) studied the fertility in hybrids of Florida..., when crossed with maize, produce F1 hybrids with a high degree of fertility. This indicates that the chromosomes of these teosintes and m3ize are quite similar, and that normal pairing ordinarily occurs at meiosis. This latter fact has been...

  3. GPU-accelerated Faint Streak Detection for Uncued Surveillance of LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    By astronomical standards, small objects (<10cm) in LEO illuminated by the Sun under terminator conditions are quite bright, depositing 100's to 1000's of photons per second into small telescope apertures (< 1m diameter). The challenge in discovering these objects with no a priori knowledge of their orbit (i.e. uncued surveillance) is that their relative motion with respect to a ground-based telescope makes them appear to have large angular rates of motion, up to and exceeding 1 degree per second. Thus in even a short exposure, the signal from the object is smeared out in a streak with low signal-to-noise per pixel. Go Green Termite (GGT), Inc. of Gilroy, CA, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), is building two proof-of-concept wide-field imaging systems to test, develop and prove a novel streak detection technique. The imaging systems are built from off-the-shelf optics and detectors resulting in a 350mm aperture and a 6 square degree field of view. For streak detection, field of view is of critical importance because the maximum exposure time on the object is limited by its crossing time. In this way, wider fields of view impact surveys for LEO objects both by increasing the survey volume and increasing sensitivity. Using our newly GPU-accelerated detection scheme, the proof-of-concept systems are expected to be able to detect objects fainter than 12th magnitude moving at 1 degree per second and possibly as faint as 13th magnitude for slower moving objects. Meter-class optical systems using these techniques should be able to detect objects fainter than 14th magnitude, which is roughly equivalent to a golf ball at 1000km altitude. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a scalable system for near real time detection of fast moving objects that can be then handed off to other instruments capable of tracking and characterizing them. The two proof-of-concept systems, separated by ~30km, work together by taking simultaneous images of the same volume to constrain the orbits of detected objects using parallax measurements. These detections will then be followed-up by photometric observations taken at UNM to independently assess the objects and the quality of the derived orbits. We believe this will demonstrate the potential of small telescope arrays for detecting and cataloguing heretofore unknown LEO objects.

  4. Modified ecometric technique (four-quadrant sequential streak) to evaluate Campylobacter enrichment broth proficiency in suppressing background microflora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecometric technique is a semi-quantitative scoring method used for quality control of culture media in microbiological laboratories. The technique involves inoculation with defined populations of specific culture onto solid media via a standardized chronological streaking technique, leading to ever-...

  5. Compositions of Low Albedo Intracrater Materials and Wind Streaks on Mars: Examination of MGS TES Data in Western Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Wyatt, M. B.; Christensen, P.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Basalt and andesite surface compositions are identified within individual low albedo intracrater features and adjacent dark wind streaks. High resolution mapping of compositional heterogeneities may help constrain origin hypotheses for these features. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Environmental factors influencing the development of black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) on bananas in Puerto Rico.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of environmental factors on the development of black leaf streak (BLS) were studied in Puerto Rico under field conditions. Environmental factors evaluated included temperature, relative humidity, rainfall and solar radiation. Their effect on BLS was determined by recording the youngest...

  7. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  8. An ultra-fast x-ray streak camera for the study of magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Wan, W.; Qiang, J.; Bartelt, A.; Comin, A.; Scholl, A.; Byrd, J.; Falcone, R.; Huang, G.; MacPhee, A.; Nasiatka, J.; Opachich, K.; Weinstein, D.; Young, T.; Padmore, H. A.

    2005-08-01

    An ultrafast x-ray streak camera is under development at LBNL for application primarily to studies of ultrafast magnetization dynamics. In initial work, a temporal resolution of 900fs in accumulative mode at 5 KHz has been achieved. These results and methods currently being developed to improve the resolution and repetition rate are resented. One of the primary limits to temporal resolution is caused by the finite energy width of the electron distribution from the photocathode. The positive time of flight dispersion with energy in the accelerating region of the camera can be countered by introduction of downstream optics that give negative time of flight dispersion with energy, leading to an approximate overall cancellation of this temporal aberration. Initial results of an end-to-end simulation model using the full photoelectron distribution are presented.

  9. ?-Catenin Regulates Primitive Streak Induction through Collaborative Interactions with SMAD2/SMAD3 and OCT4.

    PubMed

    Funa, Nina S; Schachter, Karen A; Lerdrup, Mads; Ekberg, Jenny; Hess, Katja; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Honoré, Christian; Hansen, Klaus; Semb, Henrik

    2015-06-01

    Canonical Wnt and Nodal signaling are both required for induction of the primitive streak (PS), which guides organization of the early embryo. The Wnt effector ?-catenin is thought to function in these early lineage specification decisions via transcriptional activation of Nodal signaling. Here, we demonstrate a broader role for ?-catenin in PS formation by analyzing its genome-wide binding in a human embryonic stem cell model of PS induction. ?-catenin occupies regulatory regions in numerous PS and neural crest genes, and direct interactions between ?-catenin and the Nodal effectors SMAD2/SMAD3 are required at these regions for PS gene activation. Furthermore, OCT4 binding in proximity to these sites is likewise required for PS induction, suggesting a collaborative interaction between ?-catenin and OCT4. Induction of neural crest genes by ?-catenin is repressed by SMAD2/SMAD3, ensuring proper lineage specification. This study provides mechanistic insight into how Wnt signaling controls early cell lineage decisions. PMID:25921273

  10. Time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence in sulfuric acid with a streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weizhong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Yue; Gao, Xianxian; Cui, Weicheng

    2008-09-01

    The time-resolved spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) in sulfuric acid have been observed with a streak camera after a spectrograph. The spectral center evolves from infrared to ultraviolet gradually within a SBSL duration, which corresponds to an increase of temperature. The peak temperature within one sonoluminescence (SL) duration is 5 9 times higher than the average temperature based on the average spectrum in our experiment. Furthermore, the ratio of the peak temperature to average temperature increases with the increase of driving pressure. The SBSL flash dies out after a dramatic heating-up, and there is no cooling procedure observed at the time resolution of 1/10 SL duration, which is incompatible with the radius-related adiabatic heating model as the mechanism of SBSL.

  11. Antimicrobial Screening of Actinobacteria using a Modified Cross-Streak Method.

    PubMed

    Velho-Pereira, Sonashia; Kamat, N M

    2011-03-01

    Out of the 30 actinobacterial cultures screened for antimicrobial activity, 28 cultures were found to produce active products against various pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast, using a modified cross streak method. The modified method helped in easy quantification of results and also in ruling out probable mutual antibiosis. The actinobacterial strains that showed the ability to produce antimicrobial compounds belonged to Streptomyces (53%), Micromonospora (13%) and Actinomadura (10%) genera. Streptomyces sp. strain MMA-5 showed the highest multispecific antibiosis efficiency score value. Broad antibiotic spectrum activity was exhibited by Streptomyces sp. strain MMA-2 and Micromonospora sp. strain MMA-8. The multidrug resistant human pathogenic yeast strain Candida albicans was inhibited by 18 actinobacterial strains. PMID:22303068

  12. Optical gating and streaking of free-electrons with attosecond precision

    E-print Network

    Kozak, Martin; Leedle, Kenneth J; Schoenenberger, Norbert; Ruehl, Alex; Hartl, Ingmar; Harris, James S; Byer, Robert L; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present proof of principle experiments of an optical gating concept for free electrons. We demonstrate a temporal resolution of 1.2+-0.3 fs via energy and transverse momentum modulation as a function of time. The scheme is based on the synchronous interaction between electrons and the near-field mode of a dielectric nano-grating excited by a femtosecond laser pulse with an optical period duration of 6.5 fs. The sub-optical cycle resolution demonstrated here is promising for use in laser-driven streak cameras for attosecond temporal characterization of bunched particle beams as well as time-resolved experiments with free-electron beams. We expect that 10 as temporal resolution will be achieved in the near future using such a scheme.

  13. Streaking temporal double-slit interference by an orthogonal two-color laser field.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martin; Kunitski, Maksim; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt, Lothar P H; Li, Min; Liu, Yunquan; Dörner, Reinhard

    2015-04-10

    We investigate electron momentum distributions from single ionization of Ar by two orthogonally polarized laser pulses of different color. The two-color scheme is used to experimentally control the interference between electron wave packets released at different times within one laser cycle. This intracycle interference pattern is typically hard to resolve in an experiment. With the two-color control scheme, these features become the dominant contribution to the electron momentum distribution. Furthermore, the second color can be used for streaking of the otherwise interfering wave packets establishing a which-way marker. Our investigation shows that the visibility of the interference fringes depends on the degree of the which-way information determined by the controllable phase between the two pulses. PMID:25910115

  14. Intravitreal aflibercept for management of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization secondary to angioid streaks

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Ebru; Sizmaz, Selçuk; Demircan, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported the clinical results of switching from ranibizumab to aflibercept for the treatment of an insufficient responder with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to angioid streaks (AS). A 39-year-old female patient with CNV secondary to AS had bilateral persistent intraretinal and subretinal fluid on the optical coherence tomography despite prior intravitreal 0.5 mg ranibizumab injections. The therapy was switched to intravitreal injection of aflibercept. The patient received a loading dose of three intravitreal 2 mg aflibercept injections at 4-week intervals for both eyes. Morphological and functional effects were observed as early as 1-week after the first injection. After the third aflibercept injection, her visual acuity improved, intraretinal and subretinal fluid resolved, and central macular thickness reduced in both eyes. This is an early, but encouraging and promising result indicating that aflibercept might be a good alternative management for CNV secondary to AS that is insufficiently responding to prior ranibizumab injections. PMID:26458482

  15. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein. PMID:26092422

  16. Absolutely calibrated soft-x-ray streak camera for laser-fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Medecki, H.; Stradling, G.

    1982-01-01

    The intensity output of a soft-x-ray streak camera was calibrated (SXRSC) in order to make absolute flux measurements of x rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas. The SXRSC developed at LLNL is used to time-resolve x-ray pulses to better than 20 ps. The SXRSC uses a Au photocathode on a thin carbon substrate which is sensitive to x rays from 100 eV to greater than 10 keV. Calibrations are done in the dynamic mode using a small laser-produced x-ray source. The SXRSC is calibrated by comparing its integrated signal to the output of calibrated x-ray diodes monitoring the source strength. The measured SXRSC response is linear over greater than two orders of magnitude. Using these calibrations, absolute intensities can be measured to an accuracy of +-30%.

  17. P552 X-Ray Streak Tube With Removable Photocathode, Improved Spatial Resolution And Temporal Fiducial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mascureau, J.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Mens, A.; Sauneif, R.; Rebuffie, J.-C.; Roux, J.-P.

    1989-02-01

    We present here the P552 soft X-ray streak tube which is derived from the P500-P550 X-ray tube from RTC 1. To meet the requirements of X-ray diagnostics in high power laser interaction experiments performed at Centre d' Etudes de Limeil-Valenton some modifications were carried out to allow an easier control of the photocathode and the insertion of an optical fiducial of the laser pulse. We describe the main features of the whole device. This tube associated with a Thomson 2 TSN 505 camera has been used in laser plasma experiments and we present here some results obtained on the PHFBUS laser facility at CEL-V.

  18. Characterization Of A Large-Format, High-Fidelity, Picosecond, Optical Streak Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Mark; Lancaster, Greg; Jander, Don; Grasz, Erna; Simpson, Bob; Lerche, Richard; Rickard, Bryan; Imhoff, C.

    1988-02-01

    We have completed preliminary characterizations of a new 3-grid, large-format, ITT1 streak camera tube operating with about a 2.3-kV extraction voltage. We have found that the best attainable impulse response is 10 ps at low input intensity. However, the impulse response increases to only 30 ps with an increase of nearly three orders of magnitude in input intensity. Further, the spatial resolution remains greater than 5 line pairs/mm at 50% contrast over these three orders of magnitude of input intensity. We have also done preliminary computational modeling of the tube's temporal response as a function of focus voltage, illumina-tion spot size, and wavelength.

  19. Microstructure investigations of streak formation in 6063 aluminum extrusions by optical metallographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Vander Voort, George; Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Asensio-Lozano, Juan

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the solidification strategy for AA 6063 alloy on the surface appearance of anodized extrusions. The microstructure of the samples was analyzed using both light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that if heavy segregation occurs from rapid solidification, coarse Mg2Si particles form, thus reducing the potential for precipitation strengthening by the finer ?-Mg2Si developed in the solid state. Differentially-strained regions formed during hot extrusion induce differences in particle size for magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) precipitates. Anodizing generates surface roughness due to Mg2Si particle dissolution and AlFeSi decohesion, which is related to both particle size and deformation. During anodizing, an oxide layer forms on the surface of the extruded products, which can lead to streak formation, usually a subject of rejection due to unacceptable heterogeneous reflectivity. PMID:23481588

  20. A quill vibrating mechanism for a sounding apparatus in the streaked tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus).

    PubMed

    Endo, Hideki; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kimura, Junpei; Rakotondraparany, Felix; Matsui, Atsushi; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Shinohara, Akio; Hasegawa, Masami

    2010-05-01

    The streaked tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus) is equipped with a quill vibrating mechanism on the dorsal side of the caudal trunk that has evolved as an extraordinary sounding apparatus for communication. An arrangement of 15 or 16 light-brown quills was observed. Thickened cutaneous muscles were confirmed beneath quills. We named this structure the "quill vibrator disc" (QVD). The QVD was 16.8 mm long and 8.55 mm wide in a typical adult. Longitudinal musculature symmetrical about the sagittal plane was developed in the QVD. Myocytes were found immunohistochemically to contain mainly fast myosin but not slow myosin. These findings indicate that the QVD is a specialized apparatus in the cutaneous muscle that contributes to the vibration of quills and to the production of sound for communication. PMID:20443690

  1. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C.

    2012-10-15

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  2. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omegaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C.

    2012-10-01

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  3. MAIZE MUTANT MAPPING WITH SSR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zea mays provides an ideal system for characterizing genes to determine genetic structure and expression in a higher crop plant. Thousands of independently isolated mutants in maize are available for research. We are facilitating this resource by establishing linkage information between these genes ...

  4. Genetic adjustment to changing climates: MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prospects for more widespread and frequent drought in the near future are placing considerable pressure on maize breeding programs to develop more drought tolerant germplasm. Despite the complexity of the plant’s responses to water limited conditions, rational application of molecular/genomic ap...

  5. Diallel analysis of aflatoxin accumulation in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin, a toxin produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus Link: Fries, occurs naturally in maize, Zea mays L. It is a potent carcinogen, and its presence markedly reduces the value of grain. Host plant resistance to A. flavus infection and subsequent aflatoxin accumulation is generally conside...

  6. Gene expression in physically impeded maize roots 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Ying-Fei

    1996-01-01

    showed that the expression was strongly induced by the 10 min physical impedance treatment and genomic Southern analysis showed that a relatively conserved gene family exists in maize. The CDNA pIIG2 has a nucleotide sequence of 830 bp with an open...

  7. Registration of maize inbred line GT603

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GT603 (Reg. No. xxxx, PI xxxxxx) is a yellow dent maize (Zea mays L.) inbred line developed and released by the USDA-ARS Crop Protection and Management Research Unit in cooperation with the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station in 2010. GT603 was developed through seven generations ...

  8. Use of tropical maize for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hsu; Kaur, Prabhjot; Dien, Bruce; Below, Frederick; Vincent, Michael L; Singh, Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Tropical maize is an alternative energy crop being considered as a feedstock for bioethanol production in the North Central and Midwest United States. Tropical maize is advantageous because it produces large amounts of soluble sugars in its stalks, creates a large amount of biomass, and requires lower inputs (e.g. nitrogen) than grain corn. Soluble sugars, including sucrose, glucose and fructose were extracted by pressing the stalks at dough stage (R4). The initial extracted syrup fermented faster than the control culture grown on a yeast extract/phosphate/sucrose medium. The syrup was subsequently concentrated 1.25-2.25 times, supplemented with urea, and fermented using Saccharomyces cerevisiae for up to 96 h. The final ethanol concentrations obtained were 8.1 % (v/v) to 15.6 % (v/v), equivalent to 90.3-92.2 % of the theoretical yields. However, fermentation productivity decreased with sugar concentration, suggesting that the yeast might be osmotically stressed at the increased sugar concentrations. These results provide in-depth information for utilizing tropical maize syrup for bioethanol production that will help in tropical maize breeding and development for use as another feedstock for the biofuel industry. PMID:23508398

  9. Maize Genetics Outreach to American Indians

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is an excellent vehicle for plant genomics outreach to those American Indian tribes who use and appreciate it nutritionally, culturally, and spiritually. During the summer 2006 season we mentored six Native American Indian students for eight weeks. All six worked at the USDA-ARS North Centra...

  10. Maize and tripsacum: experiments in intergeneric hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research in maize-Tripsacum hybridization is extensive and encompasses a period of more than 60 years of collective research. The publication “The origin of Indian corn and its relatives” describes some of the initial research in this area (Mangelsdorf and Reeves, 1939) and is recommended reading f...

  11. Use and impact of Bt maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an invited article for a free science library and personal training tool sponsored by Nature Publishing Group, which will be included under the topics Agriculture and Biotechnology (http://www.nature.com/scitable). The focus of this article is on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize. Growers of...

  12. GENETIC VARIABILITY IN MAIZE CHLOROTIC DWARF VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV) (genus Waikavirus; family Sequiviridae) is a picorna-like virus transmitted by the black-faced leafhopper, Graminella nigrifrons, in a semi-persistent manner using a virus-encoded helper protein. The MCDV genome contains one large open reading frame encoding a poly...

  13. A first generation haplotype map of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is the top production crop in the world and possesses more genetic diversity than any other major crop species. By using low-copy-enrichment and rapid sequencing-by-synthesis (SBS) approaches, we simultaneously discovered and genotyped several million sequence polymorphisms among...

  14. Practical considerations for maintaining germplasm in maize.

    PubMed

    Crossa, J; Taba, S; Eberhart, S A; Bretting, P; Vencovsky, R

    1994-09-01

    The main goals of genetic resource management are to acquire, maintain, distribute, characterize, regenerate, preserve, evaluate, and utilize the genetic diversity of crops and their wild relatives. The objectives of this study for ex-situ conservation of maize (Zea mays L.) are to review and describe: (1) practical regeneration methods that are based on population genetic theory; (2) practical problems encountered in choosing core subsets of a maize collection. Whenever possible, regeneration procedures should control the number of pollen parents (male gametes; through controlled hand pollination) and the number of female parent gametes (by harvesting equal numbers of kernels from each seed plant). When the number of pollen and seed parents are controlled during regeneration, the effective population size (Ne) is twice the size of the original population (N). Examples of practical methods for controlling the number of male and female parents are presented. The procedure involves random-paired plant crosses and taking equal numbers of seeds from each maize ear. To form a core subset, accessions of a maize race are subdivided through a stratified sampling procedure. Delineation of a core subset from a Tuxpeño racial collection is described as an example. PMID:24177775

  15. Regulatory modules controlling maize inflorescence architecture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic control of branching is a primary determinant of yield, regulating seed number and harvesting ability, yet little is known about the molecular networks that shape grain-bearing inflorescences of cereal crops. Here, we used the maize (Zea mays) inflorescence to investigate gene networks that...

  16. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patt...

  17. The transcriptome landscape of early maize meiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiosis, particularly meiotic recombination, is a major factor affecting yield and breeding of plants. To gain insight into the transcriptome landscape during early initiation steps of meiotic recombination, we profiled early prophase I meiocytes from maize using RNA-seq. Our analyses of genes prefe...

  18. Diallel Analysis of Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of maize (Zea mays L.) grain with aflatoxin, produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus Link:Fries, or fumonisin, produced by the fungus Fusarium verticillioides (Saccardo) Nirenberg (Syn=F. moniliforme Sheldon), greatly reduces its value and marketability. Host resistance to fungal inf...

  19. Maize Profilin Isoforms Are Functionally Distinct

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, David R.; Drøbak, Bjørn K.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    Profilin is an actin monomer binding protein that, depending on the conditions, causes either polymerization or depolymerization of actin filaments. In plants, profilins are encoded by multigene families. In this study, an analysis of native and recombinant proteins from maize demonstrates the existence of two classes of functionally distinct profilin isoforms. Class II profilins, including native endosperm profilin and a new recombinant protein, ZmPRO5, have biochemical properties that differ from those of class I profilins. Class II profilins had higher affinity for poly-l-proline and sequestered more monomeric actin than did class I profilins. Conversely, a class I profilin inhibited hydrolysis of membrane phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate by phospholipase C more strongly than did a class II profilin. These biochemical properties correlated with the ability of class II profilins to disrupt actin cytoplasmic architecture in live cells more rapidly than did class I profilins. The actin-sequestering activity of both maize profilin classes was found to be dependent on the concentration of free calcium. We propose a model in which profilin alters cellular concentrations of actin polymers in response to fluctuations in cytosolic calcium concentration. These results provide strong evidence that the maize profilin gene family consists of at least two classes, with distinct biochemical and live-cell properties, implying that the maize profilin isoforms perform distinct functions in the plant. PMID:10760246

  20. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. 10.57 Section 10.57...ETC. General Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification...

  1. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. 10.57 Section 10.57...ETC. General Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification...

  2. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. 10.57 Section 10.57...ETC. General Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification...

  3. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. 10.57 Section 10.57...ETC. General Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification...

  4. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. 10.57 Section 10.57...ETC. General Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification...

  5. Genetic Combining Analysis of Food-Grade Maize: Colored and Quality Protein 

    E-print Network

    Mahan, Adam Lyle

    2012-10-19

    Maize genetic diversity includes an array of kernel colors (red, blue, purple) with blue concentrated in the aleurone and red primarily in the pericarp. Quality protein maize (QPM) is improved over normal maize in regards to grain concentration...

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Performance of Aspergillus flavus on Resistant and Susceptible Maize Genotypes during Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus, a mycotoxicogenic fungal genus, produces carcinogenic aflatoxins in crops like peanuts and maize. Development of fungal resistant maize cultivars is one strategy used to decrease contamination. Successful development and identification of resistant maize genotypes requires evaluation o...

  7. The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, Karen

    2014-03-26

    The 50th Annual Maize Genetics Conference was held February 27 - March 2, 2008 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. As the golden anniversary of the Conference and coinciding with the release of a draft of the maize genome sequence, this was a special meeting. To publicize this unique occasion, meeting organizers hosted a press conference, which was attended by members of the press representing science and non-science publications, and an evening reception at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where the draft sequence was announced and awards were presented to Dr. Mary Clutter and Senator Kit Bond to thank them for their outstanding contributions to maize genetics and genomics research. As usual, the Conference provided an invigorating forum for exchange of recent research results in many areas of maize genetics, e.g., cytogenetics, development, molecular genetics, transposable element biology, biochemical genetics, and genomics. Results were shared via both oral and poster presentations. Invited talks were given by four distinguished geneticists: Vicki Chandler, University of Arizona; John Doebley, University of Wisconsin; Susan Wessler, University of Georgia; and Richard Wilson, Washington University. There were 46 short talks and 241 poster presentations. The Conference was attended by over 500 participants. This included a large number of first-time participants in the meeting and an increasingly visible presence by individuals from underrepresented groups. Although we do not have concrete counts, there seem to be more African American, African and Hispanic/Latino attendees coming to the meeting than in years past. In addition, this meeting attracted many participants from outside the U.S. Student participation continues to be hallmark of the spirit of free exchange and cooperation characteristic of the maize genetics community. With the generous support provided by DOE, USDA NSF, and corporate/private donors, organizers were able to defray lodging and meal costs for 133 graduate and undergraduate students and 66 postdocs

  8. Genetic Characterization of a Core Set of a Tropical Maize Race Tuxpeño for Further Use in Maize Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Tovar, Victor H.; Yan, Jianbing; Taba, Suketoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tropical maize race Tuxpeño is a well-known race of Mexican dent germplasm which has greatly contributed to the development of tropical and subtropical maize gene pools. In order to investigate how it could be exploited in future maize improvement, a panel of maize germplasm accessions was assembled and characterized using genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. This panel included 321 core accessions of Tuxpeño race from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) germplasm bank collection, 94 CIMMYT maize lines (CMLs) and 54 U.S. Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) lines. The panel also included other diverse sources of reference germplasm: 14 U.S. maize landrace accessions, 4 temperate inbred lines from the U.S. and China, and 11 CIMMYT populations (a total of 498 entries with 795 plants). Clustering analyses (CA) based on Modified Rogers Distance (MRD) clearly partitioned all 498 entries into their corresponding groups. No sub clusters were observed within the Tuxpeño core set. Various breeding strategies for using the Tuxpeño core set, based on grouping of the studied germplasm and genetic distance among them, were discussed. In order to facilitate sampling diversity within the Tuxpeño core, a minicore subset of 64 Tuxpeño accessions (20% of its usual size) representing the diversity of the core set was developed, using an approach combining phenotypic and molecular data. Untapped diversity represents further use of the Tuxpeño landrace for maize improvement through the core and/or minicore subset available to the maize community. PMID:22412898

  9. Processing maize flour and corn meal food products

    PubMed Central

    Gwirtz, Jeffrey A; Garcia-Casal, Maria Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Corn is the cereal with the highest production worldwide and is used for human consumption, livestock feed, and fuel. Various food technologies are currently used for processing industrially produced maize flours and corn meals in different parts of the world to obtain precooked refined maize flour, dehydrated nixtamalized flour, fermented maize flours, and other maize products. These products have different intrinsic vitamin and mineral contents, and their processing follows different pathways from raw grain to the consumer final product, which entail changes in nutrient composition. Dry maize mechanical processing creates whole or fractionated products, separated by anatomical features such as bran, germ, and endosperm. Wet maize processing separates by chemical compound classification such as starch and protein. Various industrial processes, including whole grain, dry milling fractionation, and nixtamalization, are described. Vitamin and mineral losses during processing are identified and the nutritional impacts outlined. Also discussed are the vitamin and mineral contents of corn. PMID:24329576

  10. Comparative diversity of arthropods on Bt maize and non-Bt maize in two different cropping systems in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Truter, J; Van Hamburg, H; Van Den Berg, J

    2014-02-01

    The biodiversity of an agroecosystem is not only important for its intrinsic value but also because it influences ecological functions that are vital for crop production in sustainable agricultural systems and the surrounding environment. A concern about genetically modified (GM) crops is the potential negative impact that such crops could have on diversity and abundance of nontarget organisms, and subsequently on ecosystem functions. Therefore, it is essential to assess the potential environmental risk of the release of a GM crop and to study its effect on species assemblages within that ecosystem. Assessment of the impact of Bt maize on the environment is hampered by the lack of basic checklists of species present in maize agroecosystems. The aims of the study were to compile a checklist of arthropods that occur on maize in South Africa and to compare the diversity and abundance of arthropods and functional groups on Bt maize and non-Bt maize. Collections of arthropods were carried out during two growing seasons on Bt maize and non-Bt maize plants at two localities. Three maize fields were sampled per locality during each season. Twenty plants, each of Bt maize and non-Bt maize, were randomly selected from the fields at each site. The arthropods collected during this study were classified to morphospecies level and grouped into the following functional groups: detritivores, herbivores, predators, and parasitoids. Based on feeding strategy, herbivores and predators were further divided into sucking herbivores or predators (piercing-sucking mouthparts) and chewing herbivores or predators (chewing mouthparts). A total of 8,771 arthropod individuals, comprising 288 morphospecies and presenting 20 orders, were collected. Results from this short-term study indicated that abundance and diversity of arthropods in maize and the different functional guilds were not significantly affected by Bt maize, either in terms of diversity or abundance. PMID:24472209

  11. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin in a Caco-2 cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Anastasia L; Proulx, Amy K; Scott, M Paul; Beavers, Alyssa; Reddy, Manju B

    2013-07-31

    Maize ( Zea mays ) is an important staple crop in many parts of the world but has low iron bioavailability, in part due to its high phytate content. Hemoglobin is a form of iron that is highly bioavailable, and its bioavailability is not inhibited by phytate. It was hypothesized that maize hemoglobin is a highly bioavailable iron source and that biofortification of maize with iron can be accomplished by overexpression of maize globin in the endosperm. Maize was transformed with a gene construct encoding a translational fusion of maize globin and green fluorescent protein under transcriptional control of the maize 27 kDa ?-zein promoter. Iron bioavailability of maize hemoglobin produced in Escherichia coli and of stably transformed seeds expressing the maize globin-GFP fusion was determined using an in vitro Caco-2 cell culture model. Maize flour fortified with maize hemoglobin was found to have iron bioavailability that is not significantly different from that of flour fortified with ferrous sulfate or bovine hemoglobin but is significantly higher than unfortified flour. Transformed maize grain expressing maize globin was found to have iron bioavailability similar to that of untransformed seeds. These results suggest that maize globin produced in E. coli may be an effective iron fortificant, but overexpressing maize globin in maize endosperm may require a different strategy to increase bioavailable iron content in maize. PMID:23834908

  12. Dust Devils Seen Streaking Across Mars: PART II--They're the Work of the Devil!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In December 1999, the MOC team finally had an answer! A dust devil, shown in the above left figure, was caught in the act of creating a swirly, dark streak! An eerie sensation washed over the first team members who saw this picture--here was an event on Mars 'caught in the act' just hours before the picture was played back to Earth. A 'smoking gun.'

    The first dust devil seen making a streak--located in Promethei Terra (above, left)--was traveling from right (east) to left (west). A columnar shadow was cast by sunlight coming from the upper left. This shadow indicates the true shape of the dust devil. The bright dust devil itself does not look like a column because the picture was taken from a camera looking straight down on it. The dust devil is less than 100 meters (less than 100 yards) wide and the picture covers an area approximately 1.5 by 1.7 kilometers (about 1 by 1 mile).

    Dust devils are spinning, columnar vortices of wind that move across the landscape, pick up dust, and look somewhat like miniature tornadoes. Dust devils are a common occurrence in dry and desert landscapes on Earth as well as Mars. They form when the ground heats up during the day, warming the air immediately above the surface. As the warmed air nearest the surface begins to rise, it spins. The spinning column begins to move across the surface and picks up loose dust (if any is present). The dust makes the vortex visible and gives it the 'dust devil' or tornado-like appearance. On Earth, dust devils typically last for only a few minutes.

    The fourth picture (above, right) shows a surface in southwestern Terra Sirenum near 63oS, 168oW, that has seen the activity of so many dust devils that it looks like a plate of dark gray spaghetti. This image, taken in early summer during February 2000, covers an area 3 km wide and 30 km long (1.9 by 19 miles). In fact, a dust devil can be seen in the upper right of this image. Like the other pictures shown here, the Terra Sirenum image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  13. FGF signalling through RAS/MAPK and PI3K pathways regulates cell movement and gene expression in the chicken primitive streak without affecting E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background FGF signalling regulates numerous aspects of early embryo development. During gastrulation in amniotes, epiblast cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the primitive streak to form the mesoderm and endoderm. In mice lacking FGFR1, epiblast cells in the primitive streak fail to downregulate E-cadherin and undergo EMT, and cell migration is inhibited. This study investigated how FGF signalling regulates cell movement and gene expression in the primitive streak of chicken embryos. Results We find that pharmacological inhibition of FGFR activity blocks migration of cells through the primitive streak of chicken embryos without apparent alterations in the level or intracellular localization of E-cadherin. E-cadherin protein is localized to the periphery of epiblast, primitive streak and some mesodermal cells. FGFR inhibition leads to downregulation of a large number of regulatory genes in the preingression epiblast adjacent to the primitive streak, the primitive streak and the newly formed mesoderm. This includes members of the FGF, NOTCH, EPH, PDGF, and canonical and non-canonical WNT pathways, negative modulators of these pathways, and a large number of transcriptional regulatory genes. SNAI2 expression in the primitive streak and mesoderm is not altered by FGFR inhibition, but is downregulated only in the preingression epiblast region with no significant effect on E-cadherin. Furthermore, over expression of SNAIL has no discernable effect on E-cadherin protein levels or localization in epiblast, primitive streak or mesodermal cells. FGFR activity modulates distinct downstream pathways including RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK or AKT indicate that these downstream effectors control discrete and overlapping groups of genes during gastrulation. FGFR activity regulates components of several pathways known to be required for cell migration through the streak or in the mesoderm, including RHOA, the non-canonical WNT pathway, PDGF signalling and the cell adhesion protein N-cadherin. Conclusions In chicken embryos, FGF signalling regulates cell movement through the primitive streak by mechanisms that appear to be independent of changes in E-cadherin expression or protein localization. The positive and negative effects on large groups of genes by pharmacological inhibition of FGF signalling, including major signalling pathways and transcription factor families, indicates that the FGF pathway is a focal point of regulation during gastrulation in chicken. PMID:21418646

  14. The President's Day cyclone 17-19 February 1979: An analysis of jet streak interactions prior to cyclogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uccellini, L. W.; Kocin, P. J.; Walsh, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The President's Day cyclone, produced record breaking snowfall along the East Coast of the United States in February 1979. Conventional radiosonde data, SMS GOES infrared imagery and LFM 2 model diagnostics were used to analyze the interaction of upper and lower tropospheric jet streaks prior to cyclogenesis. The analysis reveals that a series of complex scale interactive processes is responsible for the development of the intense cyclone. The evolution of the subsynoptic scale mass and momentum fields prior to and during the period of rapid development of the President's Day cyclone utilizing conventional data and SMS GOES imagery is documented. The interaction between upper and lower tropospheric jet streaks which occurred prior to the onset of cyclogenesis is discussed as well as the possible effects of terrain modified airflow within the precyclogenesis environment. Possible deficiencies in the LFM-2 initial wind fields that could have been responsible, in part, for the poor numerical forecast are examined.

  15. Peptide regulation of Maize defense reponses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ZmPEP1 is a peptide signal encoded by a previously uncharacterized maize gene that we have named ZmPROPEP1. The ZmPROPEP1 gene was identified by homology to the Arabidopsis AtPROPEP1 gene that encodes the precursor protein to the peptide signal AtPEP1. Together with its receptors, AtPEPR1 and AtPEP...

  16. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, M.C.A.; Poff, K.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26{degree}C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  17. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26 degrees C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  18. Distributed Blowing and Suction for the Purpose of Streak Control in a Boundary Layer Subjected to a Favorable Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the optimal control by blowing and suction in order to generate stream- wise velocity streaks is presented. The problem is examined using an iterative process that employs the Parabolized Stability Equations for an incompressible uid along with its adjoint equations. In particular, distributions of blowing and suction are computed for both the normal and tangential velocity perturbations for various choices of parameters.

  19. A One-Step Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for the Detection and Quantitation of Sugarcane Streak Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Sheng-Ren; Fu, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ru-Kai; Su, Jin-Wei; Gao, San-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane mosaic disease is caused by the Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV; genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) which is common in some Asian countries. Here, we established a protocol of a one-step real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) using the TaqMan probe for the detection of SCSMV in sugarcane. Primers and probes were designed within the conserved region of the SCSMV coat protein (CP) gene sequences. Standard single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) generated by PCR-based gene transcripts of recombinant pGEM-CP plasmid in vitro and total RNA extracted from SCSMV-infected sugarcane were used as templates of qRT-PCR. We further performed a sensitivity assay to show that the detection limit of the assay was 100 copies of ssRNA and 2?pg of total RNA with good reproducibility. The values obtained were approximately 100-fold more sensitive than those of the conventional RT-PCR. A higher incidence (68.6%) of SCSMV infection was detected by qRT-PCR than that (48.6%) with conventional RT-PCR in samples showing mosaic symptoms. SCSMV-free samples were verified by infection with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) or a combination of both. The developed qRT-PCR assay may become an alternative molecular tool for an economical, rapid, and efficient detection and quantification of SCSMV. PMID:26185758

  20. 4D display of the outflow track of embryonic-chick hearts (HH 14-19) using a high speed streak mode OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Siyu; Wang, Rui; Goodwin, Richard L.; Markwald, Roger R.; Borg, Thomas K.; Runyan, Raymond B.; Gao, Zhi

    2013-02-01

    Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common congenital malformation in newborns in the US. Although knowledge of CHD is limited, altered hemodynamic conditions are suspected as the factor that stimulates cardiovascular cell response, resulting in the heart morphology remodeling that ultimately causes CHDs. Therefore, one of recent efforts in CHD study is to develop high-speed imaging tools to correlate the rapidly changing hemodynamic condition and the morphological adaptations of an embryonic heart in vivo. We have developed a high-speed streak mode OCT that works at the center wavelength of 830 nm and is capable of providing images (292x220 ?m2) of the outflow tract of an embryonic chick heart at the rate of 1000 Hz. The modality can provide a voxel resolution in the range of 10 ?m3, and the spectral resolution allows a depth range of 1.63 mm. In the study reported here, each of the 4D images of an outflow tract was recorded for 2 seconds. The recording was conducted every 2 hours (HH17 to HH18), 3 hours (HH14 to HH17), and 4 hours (HH18 to HH19). Because of the fast scan speed, there is no need for postacquisition processing such as use of gating techniques to provide a fine 3D structure. In addition, more details of the outflow tract are preserved in the recorded images. The 4D images can be used in the future to determine the role of blood flow in CHD development.

  1. Distribution of expansins in graviresponding maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, N.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    To test if expansins, wall loosening proteins that disrupt binding between microfibrils and cell wall matrix, participate in the differential elongation of graviresponding roots, Zea mays L. cv. Merit roots were gravistimulated and used for immunolocalization with anti-expansin. Western blots showed cross-reaction with two proteins of maize, one of the same mass as cucumber expansin (29 kDa), the second slightly larger (32 kDa). Maize roots contained mainly the larger protein, but both were found in coleoptiles. The expansin distribution in cucumber roots and hypocotyls was similar to the distribution in maize. Roots showed stronger expansin signals on the expanding convex side than the concave flank as early as 30 min after gravistimulation. Treatment with brefeldin A, a vesicle transport inhibitor, or the auxin transport inhibitor, naphthylphthalamic acid, showed delayed graviresponse and the appearance of differential staining. Our results indicate that expansins may be transported and secreted to cell walls via vesicles and function in wall expansion.

  2. Brassinosteroid control of sex determination in maize

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Thomas; Chuck, George S.; Fujioka, Shozo; Klempien, Antje; Weizbauer, Renate; Potluri, Devi Prasad V.; Choe, Sunghwa; Johal, Gurmukh S.; Schulz, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are plant hormones that regulate growth and development. They share structural similarities with animal steroids, which are decisive factors of sex determination. BRs are known to regulate morphogenesis and environmental stress responses, but their involvement in sex determination in plants has been only speculative. We show that BRs control sex determination in maize revealed through characterization of the classical dwarf mutant nana plant1 (na1), which also feminizes male flowers. na1 plants carry a loss-of-function mutation in a DET2 homolog—a gene in the BR biosynthetic pathway. The mutant accumulates the DET2-specific substrate (24R)-24-methylcholest-4-en-3-one with a concomitant decrease of downstream BR metabolites. Treatment of wild-type maize plants with BR biosynthesis inhibitors completely mimicked both dwarf and tasselseed phenotypes of na1 mutants. Tissue-specific na1 expression in anthers throughout their development supports the hypothesis that BRs promote masculinity of the male inflorescence. These findings suggest that, in the monoecious plant maize, BRs have been coopted to perform a sex determination function not found in plants with bisexual flowers. PMID:22106275

  3. Aflatoxin control in maize by Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Scarpari, Marzia; Bello, Cristiano; Pietricola, Chiara; Zaccaria, Marco; Bertocchi, Luigi; Angelucci, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Scala, Valeria; Parroni, Alessia; Fabbri, Anna A; Reverberi, Massimo; Zjalic, Slaven; Fanelli, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known ubiquitous fungus able to contaminate both in pre- and postharvest period different feed and food commodities. During their growth, these fungi can synthesise aflatoxins, secondary metabolites highly hazardous for animal and human health. The requirement of products with low impact on the environment and on human health, able to control aflatoxin production, has increased. In this work the effect of the basidiomycete Trametes versicolor on the aflatoxin production by A. flavus both in vitro and in maize, was investigated. The goal was to propose an environmental loyal tool for a significant control of aflatoxin production, in order to obtain feedstuffs and feed with a high standard of quality and safety to enhance the wellbeing of dairy cows. The presence of T. versicolor, grown on sugar beet pulp, inhibited the production of aflatoxin B1 in maize by A. flavus. Furthermore, treatment of contaminated maize with culture filtrates of T. versicolor containing ligninolytic enzymes, showed a significant reduction of the content of aflatoxin B1. PMID:25525683

  4. Aflatoxin Control in Maize by Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Scarpari, Marzia; Bello, Cristiano; Pietricola, Chiara; Zaccaria, Marco; Bertocchi, Luigi; Angelucci, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Scala, Valeria; Parroni, Alessia; Fabbri, Anna A.; Reverberi, Massimo; Zjalic, Slaven; Fanelli, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a well-known ubiquitous fungus able to contaminate both in pre- and postharvest period different feed and food commodities. During their growth, these fungi can synthesise aflatoxins, secondary metabolites highly hazardous for animal and human health. The requirement of products with low impact on the environment and on human health, able to control aflatoxin production, has increased. In this work the effect of the basidiomycete Trametes versicolor on the aflatoxin production by A. flavus both in vitro and in maize, was investigated. The goal was to propose an environmental loyal tool for a significant control of aflatoxin production, in order to obtain feedstuffs and feed with a high standard of quality and safety to enhance the wellbeing of dairy cows. The presence of T. versicolor, grown on sugar beet pulp, inhibited the production of aflatoxin B1 in maize by A. flavus. Furthermore, treatment of contaminated maize with culture filtrates of T. versicolor containing ligninolytic enzymes, showed a significant reduction of the content of aflatoxin B1. PMID:25525683

  5. Aflatoxin regulations in a network of global maize trade.

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, food supplies often contain unavoidable contaminants, many of which adversely affect health and hence are subject to regulations of maximum tolerable levels in food. These regulations differ from nation to nation, and may affect patterns of food trade. We soughtto determine whether there is an association between nations' food safety regulations and global food trade patterns, with implications for public health and policymaking. We developed a network model of maize trade around the world. From maize import/export data for 217 nations from 2000-2009, we calculated basic statistics on volumes of trade; then examined how regulations of aflatoxin, a common contaminant of maize, are similar or different between pairs of nations engaging in significant amounts of maize trade. Globally, market segregation appears to occur among clusters of nations. The United States is at the center of one cluster; European countries make up another cluster with hardly any maize trade with the US; and Argentina, Brazil, and China export maize all over the world. Pairs of nations trading large amounts of maize have very similar aflatoxin regulations: nations with strict standards tend to trade maize with each other, while nations with more relaxed standards tend to trade maize with each other. Rarely among the top pairs of maize-trading nations do total aflatoxin standards (standards based on the sum of the levels of aflatoxins B(1), B(2), G(1), and G(2)) differ by more than 5 µg/kg. These results suggest that, globally, separate maize trading communities emerge; and nations tend to trade with other nations that have very similar food safety standards. PMID:23049773

  6. Aflatoxin Regulations in a Network of Global Maize Trade

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Guclu, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, food supplies often contain unavoidable contaminants, many of which adversely affect health and hence are subject to regulations of maximum tolerable levels in food. These regulations differ from nation to nation, and may affect patterns of food trade. We soughtto determine whether there is an association between nations' food safety regulations and global food trade patterns, with implications for public health and policymaking. We developed a network model of maize trade around the world. From maize import/export data for 217 nations from 2000–2009, we calculated basic statistics on volumes of trade; then examined how regulations of aflatoxin, a common contaminant of maize, are similar or different between pairs of nations engaging in significant amounts of maize trade. Globally, market segregation appears to occur among clusters of nations. The United States is at the center of one cluster; European countries make up another cluster with hardly any maize trade with the US; and Argentina, Brazil, and China export maize all over the world. Pairs of nations trading large amounts of maize have very similar aflatoxin regulations: nations with strict standards tend to trade maize with each other, while nations with more relaxed standards tend to trade maize with each other. Rarely among the top pairs of maize-trading nations do total aflatoxin standards (standards based on the sum of the levels of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2) differ by more than 5 µg/kg. These results suggest that, globally, separate maize trading communities emerge; and nations tend to trade with other nations that have very similar food safety standards. PMID:23049773

  7. Detoxification of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Maize by Neutral Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water.

    PubMed

    Jardon-Xicotencatl, Samantha; Díaz-Torres, Roberto; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2015-10-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of extremely toxic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius, can occur as natural contaminants of certain agricultural commodities, particularly maize. These toxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and cause severe human and animal diseases. The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW) on aflatoxin detoxification was investigated in HepG2 cells using several validation methodologies such as the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the induction of lipid peroxidation, the oxidative damage by means of glutathione modulation, the Ames test and the alkaline Comet assay. Our results showed that, after the aflatoxin-contaminated maize containing 360 ng/g was soaked in NEW (60 mg/L available chlorine, pH 7.01) during 15 min at room temperature, the aflatoxin content did not decrease as confirmed by the immunoaffinity column and ultra performance liquid chromatography methods. Aflatoxin fluorescence strength of detoxified samples was similar to untreated samples. However, aflatoxin-associated cytotoxicity and OPEN ACCESS Toxins 2015, 7 4295 genotoxicity effects were markedly reduced upon treatment. According to these results, NEW can be effectively used to detoxify aflatoxin-contaminated maize. PMID:26512692

  8. Detoxification of Aflatoxin-Contaminated Maize by Neutral Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water

    PubMed Central

    Jardon-Xicotencatl, Samantha; Díaz-Torres, Roberto; Marroquín-Cardona, Alicia; Villarreal-Barajas, Tania; Méndez-Albores, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins, a group of extremely toxic mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius, can occur as natural contaminants of certain agricultural commodities, particularly maize. These toxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic and cause severe human and animal diseases. The effectiveness of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW) on aflatoxin detoxification was investigated in HepG2 cells using several validation methodologies such as the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the induction of lipid peroxidation, the oxidative damage by means of glutathione modulation, the Ames test and the alkaline Comet assay. Our results showed that, after the aflatoxin-contaminated maize containing 360 ng/g was soaked in NEW (60 mg/L available chlorine, pH 7.01) during 15 min at room temperature, the aflatoxin content did not decrease as confirmed by the immunoaffinity column and ultra performance liquid chromatography methods. Aflatoxin fluorescence strength of detoxified samples was similar to untreated samples. However, aflatoxin-associated cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects were markedly reduced upon treatment. According to these results, NEW can be effectively used to detoxify aflatoxin-contaminated maize. PMID:26512692

  9. Impact of enhanced ultraviolet-B irradiance on maize yield formation and structure: a field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Zheng, Youfei; Slusser, James R.; He, Yuhong; Zhang, Ronggang

    2003-11-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion and enhanced solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiance may have adverse impacts on the productivity of agricultural crops. Though only a small portion of the total solar electromagnetic spectrum, UV-B irradiance has a disproportionately large photobiological effect, largely because it is readily absorbed by important macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that the effect of UV-B enhancements on plants includes a reduction in grain yield, alteration in species competition, susceptibility to disease, and changes in plant structure and pigmentation. Many experiments examining UV-B radiation effects on plants were conducted in growth chambers or greenhouses. It has been questioned if the effect of UV-B radiation on plants can be extrapolated to field responses from indoor studies because of the unnaturally high ratios of UV-B/UV-A and UV-B/PAR in many indoor studies. Field studies on UV-B radiation effect on plants have been recommended in order to use the UV and PAR irradiance provided by natural light. This study found the maize yield formation and yield structural elements responded to enhanced UV-B radiation under field conditions. Enhanced UV-B radiation caused a significant reduction of the dry matter accumulation and the maize grain yield in turn was affected. Analysis of yield structure indicates that the maize yield decreased with increased UV-B radiation and was evidently related to the decreased kernel weight and kernel number per ear.

  10. Comparative analysis of phylogenetic relationships, morphologies, and pathogenicities among Curvularia lunata isolates from maize in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Zhao, F Z; Wang, Y Y; Hou, J M; Liu, L Z; Shen, Y Q; Liu, Z; Zhang, H T; Zuo, Y H

    2015-01-01

    To understand the effects of disease-resistant maize varieties and new cropping systems on the population of Curvularia lunata, 52 isolates of C. lunata were collected in China from 2011 to 2013. The isolates were analyzed in terms of phylogenetic relationships, morphology, and pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 52 isolates clustered into 2 distinct clusters with further subdivisions, suggesting the emergence of new genetic divergence within C. lunata. Results of morphology and pathogenicity analyses demonstrated that there were significant differences among these isolates: 27 isolates were classified as fast growing, 5 as slow growing, and 20 as moderate growing. Three isolates had white-colored colonies, 13 had yellowish green-colored colonies, and the remaining isolates had dark green-colored colonies. Furthermore, conidiation rates were assessed: 30 isolates were characterized as having low conidiation rates, 15 as having medium conidiation rates, and the remaining 7 isolates as having high conidiation rates. Eleven of the isolates appeared to be strongly pathogenic against maize, 15 isolates proved to be weakly pathogenic against maize, and the remaining isolates were regarded to be moderately pathogenic. Interestingly, correlation analysis demonstrated a negative correlation between the growth rate and the pathogenicity of the isolates, while a positive correlation was observed between the conidiation rate and the pathogenicity. No correlation was observed between the colony color and the pathogenicity of the isolates. PMID:26505404

  11. Development of wide-field, multi-imaging x-ray streak camera technique with increased image-sampling arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, M.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.; Miyanaga, N.; Yamanaka, T.

    2001-01-01

    In order to enlarge the field of view of a multi-imaging x-ray streak (MIXS) camera technique [H. Shiraga et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 722 (1995)], which provides two-dimensionally space-resolved x-ray imaging with a high temporal resolution of ˜10 ps, we have proposed and designed a wide-field MIXS (W-MIXS) by increasing the number of image-sampling arrays. In this method, multiple cathode slits were used on the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera. The field of view of the W-MIXS can be enlarged up to 150-200 ?m instead of ˜70 ?m for a typical MIXS with a spatial resolution of ˜15 ?m. A proof-of-principle experiment with the W-MIXS was carried out at the Gekko-XII laser system. A cross-wire target was irradiated by four beams of the Gekko-XII laser. The data streaked with the W-MIXS system were reconstructed as a series of time-resolved, two-dimensional x-ray images. The W-MIXS system has been established as an improved two-dimensionally space-resolved and sequentially time-resolved technique.

  12. A Robust In-Situ Warp-Correction Algorithm For VISAR Streak Camera Data at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Labaria, G; Warrick, A L; Celliers, P M; Kalantar, D H

    2015-01-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam pulsed laser system for high-energy-density physics experiments. Sophisticated diagnostics have been designed around key performance metrics to achieve ignition. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is the primary diagnostic for measuring the timing of shocks induced into an ignition capsule. The VISAR system utilizes three streak cameras; these streak cameras are inherently nonlinear and require warp corrections to remove these nonlinear eff ects. A detailed calibration procedure has been developed with National Security Technologies (NSTec) and applied to the camera correction analysis in production. However, the camera nonlinearities drift over time, aff ecting the performance of this method. An in-situ fi ber array is used to inject a comb of pulses to generate a calibration correction in order to meet the timing accuracy requirements of VISAR. We develop a robust algorithm for the analysis of the comb calibration images to generate the warp correction that is then applied to the data images. Our algorithm utilizes the method of thin-plate splines (TPS) to model the complex nonlinear distortions in the streak camera data. In this paper, we focus on the theory and implementation of the TPS warp-correction algorithm for the use in a production environment.

  13. Inferring the time resolved core electron temperature from x-ray emission measured by a streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shahab; Izumi, Niko; Patel, Pravesh; Macphee, Andrew; Ma, Tammy; Cerjan, Charlie; Town, Richard; Bradley, David

    2014-10-01

    The electron temperature (Te) of the hot spot within the core of imploded inertial confinement fusion capsules is an effective indicator of implosion performance. A temporally resolved measurement of Te helps elucidate the mechanisms for hot spot heating and cooling such as alpha-heating and mix. Additionally, comparison with simulations will aid in tuning models to effectively predict implosion performance. The Streaked Polar Instrumentation for Diagnosing Energetic Radiation (SPIDER) is an x-ray streak camera designed to record the x-ray burn history during the stagnation phase. SPIDER accurately reports bang time and burn duration of implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The addition of several filters of specific materials and thicknesses spread across the spatial axis of the streak camera imager allows for a least square fit of the signal through these filters to a bremsstrahlung hot spot model. The fitted parameters of the model are the Te, opacity, and X-ray yield which is valuable for ablator mix estimates. The details of this calculation and results from several shots on NIF are presented.

  14. Genetic structure of populations of sugarcane streak mosaic virus in China: Comparison with the populations in India.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Yasaka, Ryosuke; Li, Wenfeng; Li, Shifang; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV) causes mosaic and streak symptoms on sugarcane and sorghum crops, and has a broad host range. SCSMV is a member of the genus Poacevirus in the family Potyviridae.Ten SCSMV isolates were collected from sugarcane plants showing mosaic and streaking in Southern China from 2009-2011. Sequence-based phylogenetic and population genetic analyses were conducted using four partial genomic sequences covering the full genomes. These analyses were used to estimate the subpopulation differentiation and divergence within the Chinese virus population, and were compared with isolates from India. SCSMV-infected sugarcane plants in the field commonly harbor virus quasispecies (mutant cloud), and often have mixed infections with the same virus isolates. Inter- and intra-lineage recombination sites were identified in the protein 1, helper-component proteinase, coat protein and 3' non-coding regions of the Chinese isolates. All the Chinese non-recombinant isolates fell into at least nine lineages, and many clustered with Indian isolates. However, estimates of genetic differentiation and gene flow indicated that the SCSMV populations in China and India are genetically independent. Our genetic study of a poacevirus population in South Asia regions indicates the importance of the evolutionary-based design to control viruses. PMID:26432446

  15. New Experimental Hosts of Tobacco streak virus and Absence of True Seed Transmission in Leguminous Hosts.

    PubMed

    Vemana, K; Jain, R K

    2010-10-01

    Of 70 plant species tested, 50 species were susceptible to Tobacco streak virus (TSV) on sap inoculation. Both localized (necrotic and chlorotic spots) and systemic (necrotic spots, axillary shoot proliferation, stunting, total necrosis and wilt) symptoms are observed by majority of plant species. Eleven new experimental hosts were identified viz., Amaranthus blitum var. oleracea (Chaulai sag), Celosia cristata (Cocks comb), Beta vulgaris var. bengalensis (Palak/Indian spinach), Calendula officinalis (Pot marigold), Chrysanthemum indicum, Cosmos sulphurens (Yellow cosmos), Citrullus lunatus (Watermelon), Lagenaria siceraria (Bottle gourd), Coriandrum sativum (Coriander), Hibiscus subderiffa var. subderiffa (Roselle) and Portulaca oleraceae (Little hogweed). Detected groundnut seed infection with TSV for the first time by Direct antigen coated immunosorbent assay (DAC-ELISA) using whole seed. The seed infection ranged from 18.9 to 28.9% among the seeds collected from naturally infected and sap inoculated groundnut varieties (JL 24, TMV 2, Prasuna, Kadiri 6, Kadiri 9, Anantha and Kadiri 7 Bold) belonging to spanish and virginia types. Further, TSV was detected both in pod shell and seed testa and none of the samples showed the presence of TSV either in cotyledon or embryo. Grow-out and bio-assay tests proved the absence of seed transmission in groundnut and other legume crops. Hence, TSV isolate was not a true seed transmission case under Indian conditions in legumes. PMID:23637490

  16. Studying the Equation of State of Isochorically Heated Al Using Streaked Optical Pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Nilson, P. M.; Gregor, M. C.; Boehly, T. R.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    The thermal equilibration rates of warm (few eV) dense (~1023 g/cm3) matter is important in high-energy-density physics. The OMEGA EP laser was used to isochorically heat a 20- ?m-thick Al target using a short-pulse beam with 250 J in a 10-ps pulse. Twenty OMEGA beams were used to drive a Ti backlighter to radiograph the expansion of the foil using an x-ray framing camera (XRFC). The short duration of the heating laser pulse and the subsequent hot-electron energy deposition inside the target ensure minimal hydrodynamic expansion during the target heating phase. Streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) was used to measure the surface temperature of the foil. Together, these two measurements can be used to determine the equation of state along the release isentrope of the isochorically heated Al foil. Initial analysis of the SOP and XRFC data indicate the Al foil was heated to temperatures of tens of eV. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Note: A technique to capture and compose streak images of explosive events with unpredictable timing.

    PubMed

    Parker, Gary R; Asay, Blaine W; Dickson, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a method to capture optical data and construct digitized streak images for analysis of high-speed phenomena with unpredictable timing by using a high-speed video camera and software routines. Advances in high-speed video camera technology have led to development of cameras with frame rates (1 x 10(6) frames per second) and spatial resolution (1280 x 800 pixels) suitable to capture fast phenomena, such as detonation in high explosives (< or = 10 km s(-1)), on small enough scales to be convenient for laboratory experiments. Further, relatively long-duration recordings (> or = 1 s) are maintained in a rolling buffer in volatile memory allowing the entire frame sequence to be recorded pretrigger, thus obviating the need for precisely located diagnostic triggers. The method described was used to capture the progression of luminous reaction during the deflagration-to-detonation transition of the HMX-based (octahydro-1, 3, 5, 7-tetranitro-1, 3, 5, 7-tetrazocine) plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulation during cookoff. PMID:20113140

  18. August Rauber (1841-1917): from the primitive streak to Cellularmechanik.

    PubMed

    Brauckmann, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    In the early 19th century Karl Ernst von Baer initiated a new research program searching for the mechanisms by which an egg transforms itself into an embryo. August Rauber (1841-1917) took up this challenge. He considered the phylogenetic principle as the right tool to explain the similitude of embryogenetic processes. In extending Baer's approach, he combined comparative embryology and histology in his studies of avian and mammalian embryos. His earlier work demonstrated that the two-layered chick embryo is a modified gastrula and not a "disc" as Wilhelm His had claimed. From the 1880s onwards, he concentrated on the issue of how the development of germ layers is related to tissue differentiation. To address this, he studied the blastopore, epiblast, primitive streak, teratology and the relative importance of nucleus and cytoplasm in heredity. This paper reconstructs some of Rauber's work and concludes that his observations and reflections constituted a new approach combining embryology and histology with "phylogenetic" reasoning. PMID:16586344

  19. Visualization of wave propagation within a supersonic two-dimensional cavity by digital streak schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, Vikram; Kleine, Harald; Gai, Sudhir L.

    2015-07-01

    Optical measurements were carried out in planar two-dimensional open shallow cavities in order to determine how the flow field inside the cavity changes if the length-to-depth ratio of the cavity and the conditions of the boundary layer at the cavity leading edge are varied. The main challenge in this configuration, namely the fact that there are often no clearly identifiable wave fronts in the flow within the cavity, was overcome by applying a digital streak schlieren technique in combination with time-resolved high-speed flow visualizations. Using this approach, one can identify the propagation of waves within the cavity which allows one to determine the frequencies of flow oscillations inside the cavity entirely by optical means. The results from these measurements showed excellent agreement with independently conducted pressure measurements, simulations and analytical predictions. The applied technique also provides a measurement for the convective flow velocity within the cavity, for which different values can be found in the literature. The paper presents the results obtained for a Mach 2 supersonic flow over shallow rectangular open cavities with length-to-depth ratios of 3, 5, 6 and 8.

  20. Improving the diffraction of full-length human selenomethionyl metavinculin crystals by streak-seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Izard, Tina

    2012-06-28

    Metavinculin is an alternatively spliced isoform of vinculin that has a 68-residue insert in its tail domain (1134 total residues) and is exclusively expressed in cardiac and smooth muscle tissue, where it plays important roles in myocyte adhesion complexes. Mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in man. Crystals of a DCM-associated mutant of full-length selenomethionine-labeled metavinculin grown by hanging-drop vapor diffusion diffracted poorly and were highly sensitive to radiation, preventing the collection of a complete X-ray diffraction data set at the highest possible resolution. Streak-seeding markedly improved the stability, crystal-growth rate and diffraction quality of DCM-associated mutant metavinculin crystals, allowing complete data collection to 3.9 {angstrom} resolution. These crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 170, c = 211 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}.

  1. Improved detection of episomal Banana streak viruses by multiplex immunocapture PCR.

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Grégoire; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Acina, Isabelle; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Banana streak viruses (BSV) are currently the main viral constraint to Musa germplasm movement, genetic improvement and mass propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and implement BSV detection strategies that are both reliable and sensitive, such as PCR-based techniques. Unfortunately, BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs) are present in the genome of Musa balbisiana. They interfere with PCR-based detection of episomal BSV in infected banana and plantain, such as immunocapture PCR. Therefore, a multiplex, immunocapture PCR (M-IC-PCR) was developed for the detection of BSV. Musa sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) primers were selected and used in combination with BSV species-specific primers in order to monitor possible contamination by Musa genomic DNA, using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, immunocapture conditions were optimized in order to prevent Musa DNA from interfering with episomal BSV DNA during the PCR step. This improved detection method successfully allowed the accurate, specific and sensitive detection of episomal DNA only from distinct BSV species. Its implementation should benefit PCR-based detection of viruses for which homologous sequences are present in the genome of their hosts, including transgenic plants expressing viral sequences. PMID:16857272

  2. A single extraction method for the analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of fumonisins and biomarkers of disrupted sphingolipid metabolism in tissues of maize seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of many plants and is known to produce fumonisins. These toxins have been shown to contribute to the development of maize seedling disease. Fumonisin disruption of sphingolipid biosynthesis has been demonstrated to occur during such pathogenesis. A l...

  3. Precise mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Southern Leaf Blight, caused by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race O, using an Advanced Intercross Maize Population.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The IBM population, an advanced intercross recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between the maize lines Mo17 (resistant) and B73 (susceptible), was evaluated in four environments for resistance to southern leaf blight (SLB) disease caused by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race O. ...

  4. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci for Resistance to Southern Leaf Blight and Days to Anthesis in Two Maize Recombinant Inbred Line Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses between maize lines H99 and B73 (HB population) and between B73 and B52 (BB population) were evaluated for resistance to southern leaf blight (SLB) disease caused by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race O and for days to anthesis (DTA) in tw...

  5. Use of backcross recurrent selection and QTL mapping to identify loci contributing to southern leaf blight resistance in a highly resistant maize line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B73 is a commonly used maize line with excellent yield potential but high susceptibility to the foliar disease southern leaf blight (SLB). NC292 and NC330 are B73 near-isogenic lines (NILs) that are highly resistant to SLB. They were derived by repeated backcrossing an elite source of SLB resistanc...

  6. Identification of alleles conferring resistance to gray leaf spot in maize derived from its wild progenitor species teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray Leaf Spot [(GLS), causal agent Cercospora zeae-maydis and Cercospora zeina] is an important maize disease in the United States. Current control methods for GLS include using resistant cultivars, crop rotation, chemical applications, and conventional tillage to reduce inoculum levels. Teosinte ...

  7. Secretome of Trichoderma interacting with maize roots: role in induced systemic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lamdan, Netta-Li; Shalaby, Samer; Ziv, Tamar; Kenerley, Charles M; Horwitz, Benjamin A

    2015-04-01

    Trichoderma virens is a biocontrol agent used in agriculture to antagonize pathogens of crop plants. In addition to direct mycoparasitism of soil-borne fungal pathogens, T. virens interacts with roots. This interaction induces systemic resistance (ISR), which reduces disease in above-ground parts of the plant. In the molecular dialog between fungus and plant leading to ISR, proteins secreted by T. virens provide signals. Only a few such proteins have been characterized previously. To study the secretome, proteins were characterized from hydroponic culture systems with T. virens alone or with maize seedlings, and combined with a bioassay for ISR in maize leaves infected by the pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The secreted protein fraction from coculture of maize roots and T. virens (Tv+M) was found to have a higher ISR activity than from T. virens grown alone (Tv). A total of 280 fungal proteins were identified, 66 showing significant differences in abundance between the two conditions: 32 were higher in Tv+M and 34 were higher in Tv. Among the 34 found in higher abundance in Tv and negatively regulated by roots were 13 SSCPs (small, secreted, cysteine rich proteins), known to be important in the molecular dialog between plants and fungi. The role of four SSCPs in ISR was studied by gene knockout. All four knockout lines showed better ISR activity than WT without affecting colonization of maize roots. Furthermore, the secreted protein fraction from each of the mutant lines showed improved ISR activity compared with WT. These SSCPs, apparently, act as negative effectors reducing the defense levels in the plant and may be important for the fine tuning of ISR by Trichoderma. The down-regulation of SSCPs in interaction with plant roots implies a revision of the current model for the Trichoderma-plant symbiosis and its induction of resistance to pathogens. PMID:25681119

  8. Comparative efficiencies of isopropyl and tert-butyl alcohols for extracting zeins from maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Landry, Jacques; Delhaye, Sonia; Damerval, Catherine

    2002-07-01

    Protein of endosperm of maize grains originating from three wild-type inbreds and their opaque-2 versions were solubilized in diverse extracts (E) by the sequential use of 0.5 M NaCl, water (E(1,2)), alcohol plus a reducing agent (E(3)), and salt plus a reducing agent (E(4)). Zeins were isolated in extracts E(3) and E(4) obtained by using 55% (w/w) isopropyl alcohol (i-PrOH) + 0.2% dithiothreitol (DTT) followed by 0.5 M NaCl + 0.2% DTT buffered at pH 10 or 60% tert-butyl alcohol (t-BuOH) + 0.2% DTT followed by 0.5% sodium acetate + 0.2% DTT in 30% t-BuOH. For a given genotype the percentage of extracted zeins was independent of the nature of the alcohol. The latter had a slight effect on the respective magnitude of E(3) and E(4): E(3) increased at the expense of E(4) when t-BuOH was substituted to i-PrOH for their isolation. The percentage of the total endosperm nitrogen present in E(3) + E(4) was identical to that of fractions F(II) + F(III) + F(IV) isolated according to the classical Landry-Moureaux extraction procedure. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the presence of all types of zeins (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) in E(3) and F(III), residual zeins in E(4) isolated with t-BuOH, and streaking only in E(4) and F(IV) isolated with NaCl at pH 10. The data together with those of the literature were discussed with regard to the influence of procedure on the yield of zeins using alcoholic extraction. PMID:12083896

  9. Lipid-lowering effect of maize-based traditional Mexican food on a metabolic syndrome model in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maize-based food is typical in Mexico and other Mesoamerican countries. Used for millennia, they have recently been replaced by modern food that is associated with an increase in the prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the effects of traditional food on lipid profiles. Methods Metabolic syndrome was induced in animals given a 30% sucrose solution. The animals were given maize tortillas (n=5) and maize pozol (n=5), traditional Mexican food items. A control group was given a 30% sucrose solution in the laboratory diet (n=5) and a witness group was given plain water and pellets. Triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose in tail blood were recorded each month between weeks 12 to 24. Blood was obtained from the cardiac cavity on week 28 and triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, C-reactive protein, alanine amino transferase, glucose and glycated hemoglobin were recorded. Results The animals provided with supplementary traditional food presented a lower increase in triglycerides up to week 24 (p<0.001). Data recorded on week 28 showed lower values of LDL (p<0.05), a lower percentage of glycated hemoglobin when maize tortillas were provided (p<0.01) and lower values of alanine amino transferase when both food items were provided (p<0.01). Conclusions Providing traditional Mexican food generated a protective effect against the intake of a 30% sucrose solution over a long period. PMID:23497051

  10. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  11. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  12. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  13. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  14. 19 CFR 10.57 - Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize... Provisions Potatoes, Corn, Or Maize § 10.57 Certified seed potatoes, and seed corn or maize. Claim for classification as seed potatoes under subheading 0701.10.00, as seed corn (maize) under subheading...

  15. Sequence Resources at MaizeGDB with Emphasis on POPcorn: A Project Portal for Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the maize research community’s centralized, long-term repository for genetic and genomic information about the crop plant and model organism Zea mays ssp. mays. The MaizeGDB team endeavors to meet the needs of the maize research community based on feedback and guidance. Recent work has f...

  16. MaizeGDB: enabling access to basic, translational, and applied research information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MaizeGDB is the Maize Genetics and Genomics Database (available online at http://www.maizegdb.org). The MaizeGDB project is not simply an online database and website but rather an information service to maize researchers that supports customized data access and analysis needs to individual research...

  17. Mining natural variation for maize improvement: Selection on phenotypes and genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is highly genetically and phenotypically diverse. Tropical maize and teosinte are important genetic resources that harbor unique alleles not found in temperate maize hybrids. To access these resources, breeders must be able to extract favorable unique alleles from tropical maize and teosinte f...

  18. IN THIS ISSUE Naughty Behavior of Maize Minichromosomes in Meiosis

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    IN THIS ISSUE Naughty Behavior of Maize Minichromosomes in Meiosis Imagine a plant genetics lab, in particular, its behavior during meiosis. Un- fortunately, this is an area that we do not know much about- lection of 22 maize minichromosomes and observed them during meiosis. They report that many

  19. Transgenic maize plants expressing a fungal phytase gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rumei; Xue, Guangxing; Chen, Ping; Yao, Bin; Yang, Wenzhu; Ma, Qianli; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Zuoyu; Tarczynski, Mitchell C; Shi, Jinrui

    2008-08-01

    Maize seeds are the major ingredient of commercial pig and poultry feed. Phosphorus in maize seeds exists predominantly in the form of phytate. Phytate phosphorus is not available to monogastric animals and phosphate supplementation is required for optimal animal growth. Undigested phytate in animal manure is considered a major source of phosphorus pollution to the environment from agricultural production. Microbial phytase produced by fermentation as a feed additive is widely used to manage the nutritional and environmental problems caused by phytate, but the approach is associated with production costs for the enzyme and requirement of special cares in feed processing and diet formulation. An alternative approach would be to produce plant seeds that contain high phytase activities. We have over-expressed Aspergillus niger phyA2 gene in maize seeds using a construct driven by the maize embryo-specific globulin-1 promoter. Low-copy-number transgenic lines with simple integration patterns were identified. Western-blot analysis showed that the maize-expressed phytase protein was smaller than that expressed in yeast, apparently due to different glycosylation. Phytase activity in transgenic maize seeds reached approximately 2,200 units per kg seed, about a 50-fold increase compared to non-transgenic maize seeds. The phytase expression was stable across four generations. The transgenic seeds germinated normally. Our results show that the phytase expression lines can be used for development of new maize hybrids to improve phosphorus availability and reduce the impact of animal production on the environment. PMID:17932782

  20. The Role of cis Regulatory Evolution in Maize Domestication

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    The Role of cis Regulatory Evolution in Maize Domestication Zachary H. Lemmon1 , Robert Bukowski2, Wisconsin, United States of America, 2 Bioinformatics Facility, Institute of Biotechnology, Cornell assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte

  1. Scientific Correspondence Cleavage of Bipartite Substrates by Rice and Maize

    E-print Network

    Gopalan, Venkat

    Scientific Correspondence Cleavage of Bipartite Substrates by Rice and Maize Ribonuclease P.G.) and Plant Biology (V.G.), The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210; and Center for Biotechnology with rice (Oryza sativa) and maize (Zea mays) nuclear RNase P. By successively employing ion

  2. Evidence of programmed cell death in maize suspension cultures 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yu-Shan

    2001-01-01

    to severe trauma, and is not genetically based. The goal of this research is to determine if there is evidence of apoptosis in maize (Zea mays L., cv. Black Mexican Sweet) suspension cultures. Maize suspension cultures were chosen for this research because...

  3. Constructing a Cytogenetic Map of the Maize Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are developing a pachytene cytogenetic FISH (Fluorescence in situ Hybridization) map of the maize (Zea mays L.) genome using maize marker-selected sorghum BACs (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) as described by Koumbaris and Bass (2003, Plant J. 35:647). The two main projects are the production of...

  4. Can Maize Anthocyanins Function as Resistance Molecules to Corn Earworm?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect herbivory of valuable crops increases the probability of fungal infection in damaged tissues. Mycotoxins produced by some fungi are harmful to livestock and humans. Anthocyanin biosynthesis in maize protects tissues from biotic and abiotic stresses. Constitutive expression of the maize B1 ...

  5. Genetic, evoluntionary and plant breedinginsights from the domestication of maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural history of maize began nine thousand years ago when Mexican farmers started to collect the seeds of the wild grass, teosinte. Invaluable as a food source, maize permeated Mexican culture and religion. Its domestication eventually led to its adoption as a model organism, aided in large pa...

  6. A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    their wild relative (teosinte). We present phylogenetic analyses based on 264 individual plants, each flow from teosinte into maize. Most domesticated plant and animal species originated during a brief on the diversity of ear shapes in maize, Galinat (7) concluded that distinct ancestral types of annual teosinte

  7. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E. (Cross Plains, WI); Pan, David (Madison, WI)

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  8. IS CATALASE ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH MAIZE RESISTANCE TO ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalase activity was measured in various cob tissues during maize ear development because of its role in maintaining reactive oxygen homeostasis during biotic and abiotic stress. Catalase activity was determined in immature and mature embryos, pericarp, and rachis tissues of maize lines that are re...

  9. Genetic Properties of the Maize Nested Association Mapping Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is one of the world’s most diverse species, and this variation can be used to understand the molecular basis of phenotypic variation and to improve agricultural efficiency and sustainability. To access this genetic variation, 25 diverse inbred maize lines were crossed to the B73 reference lin...

  10. MAIZE STEM TISSUES: FERULATE DEPOSITION IN DEVELOPING INTERNODE CELL WALLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized that ferulates are only deposited in the primary cell wall of grasses. To test this hypothesis, the fourth elongating, above-ground internode of maize (Zea mays L.) was sampled from three maize hybrids throughout development. Cell wall composition was determined by the Uppsa...

  11. Molecular and Ultrastructural Properties of Maize White Line Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of Maize white line mosaic virus (MWLMV) and describes the ultrastructural features of infected maize cells. The viral genome is an RNA molecule 4293 nt in size with the same structural organization of members of the Aureusvirus and ...

  12. AN INTEGRATED COMPREHENSIVE MAP OF THE MAIZE GENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the completion of the rice genome sequencing project in December 2004, the next cereal genome to be sequenced will be maize. The maize genome (~2000 Mb) is nearly five times bigger than that of rice (~400 Mb) and is rich in nested retrotransposons, which comprise approximately 80 percent of th...

  13. MAIZE RACES AND TRAITS IDENTIFIED FROM THE GEM PROJECT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize Project (GEM) is a cooperative effort of the USDA-ARS, land grant universities, private industry, international, and non-governmental organizations (NGO) organizations to broaden the germplasm base of maize. The project is administered through the USDA-ARS Plant I...

  14. Identifying Aphid Resistance Genes in a Maize NAM Population

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Identifying Aphid Resistance Genes in a Maize NAM Population Georg Jander Boyce Thompson Institute of Nymphs Experiment 1 CML322 B73 R2 = 0.7 Aphid reproduction varies 100-fold on maize inbred lines Lisa Meihls and Harleen Kaur Rhopalosiphum maidis #12;Aphid resistance is recessive in B73 x CML322 0 10 20 30

  15. Entering the second century of maize quantitative genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is the most widely grown cereal in the world. In addition to its role in global agriculture, it has also long served as a model organism for genetic research. Maize stands at a genetic crossroads, as it has access to all the tools available for plant genetics but exhibits a genetic architectur...

  16. QTL MAPPING WITH NEAR-ISOGENIC LINES IN MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A set of 89 near-isogenic lines (NILs) of maize was created using marker-assisted selection. Nineteen genomic regions, identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism loci and chosen to represent portions of all 10 maize chromosomes, were introgressed by backcrossing three generations from d...

  17. Maize diversity and ethnolinguistic diversity in Chiapas, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Perales, Hugo R.; Benz, Bruce F.; Brush, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether ethnolinguistic diversity influences crop diversity. Factors suggest a correlation between biological diversity of crops and cultural diversity. Although this correlation has been noted, little systematic research has focused on the role of culture in shaping crop diversity. This paper reports on research in the Maya highlands (altitude > 1,800 m) of central Chiapas in southern Mexico that examined the distribution of maize (Zea mays) types among communities of two groups, the Tzeltal and Tzotzil. The findings suggest that maize populations are distinct according to ethnolinguistic group. However, a study of isozymes indicates no clear separation of the region's maize into two distinct populations based on ethnolin-guistic origin. A reciprocal garden experiment shows that there is adaptation of maize to its environment but that Tzeltal maize sometimes out-yields Tzotzil maize in Tzotzil environments. Because of the proximity of the two groups and selection for yield, we would expect that the superior maize would dominate both groups' maize populations, but we find that such domination is not the case. The role of ethnolinguistic identity in shaping social networks and information exchange is discussed in relation to landrace differentiation. PMID:15640353

  18. Comparative population genomics of maize domestication and improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Domestication and modern breeding represent exemplary case studies of evolution in action. Maize is an outcrossing species with a complex genome, and an understanding of maize evolution is thus relevant for both plant and animal systems. This study is the largest plant resequencing effort to date, ...

  19. The art and design of genetic screens: maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays) is an excellent model for basic research. Genetic screens have informed our understanding of developmental processes, meiosis, epigenetics and biochemical pathways--not only in maize but also in other cereal crops. We discuss the forward and reverse genetic screens that are possible...

  20. Mining Natural Variation for Maize Improvement: Selection on Phenotypes

    E-print Network

    Flint-Garcia, Sherry

    Chapter 25 Mining Natural Variation for Maize Improvement: Selection on Phenotypes and Genes Shilpa Sood, Sherry Flint-Garcia, Martha C. Willcox and James B. Holland Contents 25.1 Maize History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 623 25.5 Linkage and Association Analysis in Nested Association Mapping Populations . . . . . 625 25

  1. RESPONSE OF MAIZE AND WHEAT TO SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four hybrids of maize and seven cultivars of wheat were exposed to relatively low concentrations of sulfur dioxide (0.1 to 0.6 ppm) for up to 100 hours. Maize was found to be tolerant to sulfur dioxide and only minor differences were observed in dry mass, foliar injury, and total...

  2. SELECTION FOR METHIONINE AND TRYPTOPHAN CONTENT IN MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some essential amino acids in maize are nutritionally limiting for animal diets. In plant breeding, selection to improve a population while conserving genetic variation within the population is referred to as recurrent selection. The potential of this method to improve maize populations for their ...

  3. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  4. Maize centromere mapping: A comparison of physical and genetic strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The location of chromosome centromeres in various maize genetic maps relative to physical maps has not been consistently and clearly identified due to the paucity of markers and low recombination in the highly heterochromatic centromeric and flanking regions. Centromere positions on seven maize chro...

  5. Influence of chronic treatment with a nitric oxide donor on fatty streak development and reactivity of the rabbit aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Bult, H; De Meyer, G R; Herman, A G

    1995-01-01

    1. The influence of chronic treatment with molsidomine, pro-drug of the nitric oxide (NO) donor, 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1), on fatty streak development and release of NO and prostacyclin (PGI2) was studied in the aorta of normal and cholesterol-fed rabbits. 2. Groups of 10 rabbits received standard diet (150 g day-1), or diets with 0.3% cholesterol, with 0.02% molsidomine or with the combination of cholesterol and molsidomine for 16 weeks. Lesion area and thickness, maximum change in isometric force (Emax) and sensitivity (-log EC50 or pD2) to constricting and relaxing agonists were assessed in segments of arch, thoracic and abdominal aorta. Bioassay was used to assess NO release. 3. Cholesterol-induced fatty streaks tapered off towards the abdominal aorta. Area, thickness, weight and cholesterylester content of the lesions were augmented by the NO donor, whereas the hypercholesterolaemia remained unchanged. The exacerbation was attributed to co-release of superoxide anion from the sydnonimine. 4. As fatty streaks progressed, amplitude and pD2 of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxations decreased, whereas cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP second messenger systems were not influenced, since Emax and sensitivity to SIN-1 and forskolin remained unchanged. However, extensive lesions apparently trapped some NO, as the pD2 of authentic NO decreased. 5. The fatty streaks curtailed the biosynthesis of PGI2 and the overflow of NO from the perfused thoracic aorta. The latter defect was not restored by L-arginine and appears to be consistent with a functional change of the endothelial muscarinic receptors. 6. The NO donor desensitized the aorta to cyclic GMP-mediated relaxations (ACh, SIN-1 and NO), without affecting cyclic AMP-mediated relaxation to forskolin or constrictor responses to phenylephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine. 7. The drug also suppressed the ACh-induced overflow of NO, without changing PGI2 release. This selective reduction of endothelial NO release and the desensitization of cyclic GMP-mediated relaxations occurred independently of fatty streak formation. 8. The results indicate that chronic exposure to exogenous NO downregulates endothelial NO release and cyclic GMP-mediated relaxations, and provide evidence for the existence of negative feed-back regulations of the L-arginine NO pathway under in vivo conditions. PMID:7606341

  6. Meso-beta scale numerical simulation studies of terrain-induced jet streak mass/momentum perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Mesoscale model simulations provide insight into the complex jet streak adjustments on 11-12 July 1981 that preceded the first of two significant gravity wave events to have been generated over the Rocky Mountains in Montana. Simulations employing a variety of terrain treatments indicate that prior to wave formation, geostrophic adjustment processes modified the structure of the mid-upper tropospheric jet streak by creating secondary jetlets to the southeast of the polar jet streak in proximity to the gravity wave generation region. This simulated restructuring of the mid-upper tropospheric jet streak is the result of a four stage process. During stage 1, the wind adjusts to the mass field as the jet streak exit region propagates into the inflection point between the upstream trough and downstream ridge in the height field. Stage 2 is initiated as the mass field is forced to adjust to the new ageostrophic wind field created during stage 1. Stage 3 is defined by a second geostrophic adjustment process occurring in a similar manner but to the south and east of the adjustment which occurs during stage 1. A low-level mesoscale jetlet is formed during stage 4 in response to the low-level pressure falls that are established during stage 3. The perturbation of this jetlet, caused by orographically-induced adiabatic and diabatic physical processes, is the likely mechanism responsible for the generation of the first and second episode of observed gravity waves. The dynamics responsible for this wave episode are discussed as differential surface sensible heating inducing an orographically-forced mountain-plains solenoid, resulting in the formation of additional mesoscale jetlets and internal gravity waves. Also discussed is how convective latent heating modifies the numerically simulated terrain-induced internal gravity waves, especially their amplitude and phase velocities, which provide better agreement with those wave characteristics observed in nature. Finally, the three-dimensional linear response of a zonally uniform barotropic flow in a vertically unbounded, continuously stratified, Boussinesq atmosphere which is perturbed from geostrophic equilibrium is investigated.

  7. Ancient maize from Chacoan great houses: Where was it grown?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Cordell, L.; Vincent, K.; Taylor, H.; Stein, J.; Farmer, G.L.; Futa, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we compare chemical (87Sr/86Sr and elemental) analyses of archaeological maize from dated contexts within Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, to potential agricultural sites on the periphery of the San Juan Basin. The oldest maize analyzed from Pueblo Bonito probably was grown in an area located 80 km to the west at the base of the Chuska Mountains. The youngest maize came from the San Juan or Animas river flood-plains 90 km to the north. This article demonstrates that maize, a dietary staple of southwestern Native Americans, was transported over considerable distances in pre-Columbian times, a finding fundamental to understanding the organization of pre-Columbian southwestern societies. In addition, this article provides support for the hypothesis that major construction events in Chaco Canyon were made possible because maize was brought in to support extra-local labor forces.

  8. Inferences on the genome structure of progenitor maize through comparative analysis of rice, maize and the domesticated panicoids.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W A; Harrington, S E; Woodman, W L; Lee, M; Sorrells, M E; McCouch, S R

    1999-01-01

    Corn and rice genetic linkage map alignments were extended and refined by the addition of 262 new, reciprocally mapped maize cDNA loci. Twenty chromosomal rearrangements were identified in maize relative to rice and these included telomeric fusions between rice linkage groups, nested insertion of rice linkage groups, intrachromosomal inversions, and a nonreciprocal translocation. Maize genome evolution was inferred relative to other species within the Panicoideae and a progenitor maize genome with eight linkage groups was proposed. Conservation of composite linkage groups indicates that the tetrasomic state arose during maize evolution either from duplication of one progenitor corn genome (autoploidy) or from a cross between species that shared the composite linkages observed in modern maize (alloploidy). New evidence of a quadruplicated homeologous segment on maize chromosomes 2 and 10, and 3 and 4, corresponded to the internally duplicated region on rice chromosomes 11 and 12 and suggested that this duplication in the rice genome predated the divergence of the Panicoideae and Oryzoideae subfamilies. Charting of the macroevolutionary steps leading to the modern maize genome clarifies the interpretation of intercladal comparative maps and facilitates alignments and genomic cross-referencing of genes and phenotypes among grass family members. PMID:10471726

  9. Areawide suppression of European corn borer with Bt maize reaps savings to non-Bt maize growers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic maize, engineered to express insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has become one of the most widely adopted pest management technologies in U.S. agriculture. In 2009, Bt maize was planted on more than 22.2 million ha, comprising 63% of the U.S. crop. The te...

  10. THE MAIZE MAPPING PROJECT: COMPREHENSIVE GENETIC, PHYSICAL AND DATABASE RESOURCES FOR MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Progress in preparing an integrated genetic and physical map of maize is described. The strategy is to fingerprint bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) fragments and assemble the fragments in a deep-coverage resource, accompanied by pegging with markers to confirm and to intercalate the assembled c...

  11. High Throughput Sequence Analysis for Disease Resistance in Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results of a computational analysis of high throughput sequencing data from Zea mays and the fungus Aspergillus are reported. The Illumina Genome Analyzer was used to sequence RNA samples from two strains of Z. mays (Va35 and Mp313) collected over a time course as well as several specie...

  12. Plant Disease / September 2002 10431043 Perennial Wheat Germ Plasm Lines Resistant to Eyespot, Cephalosporium Stripe,

    E-print Network

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Plant Disease / September 2002 10431043 Perennial Wheat Germ Plasm Lines Resistant to Eyespot, Cephalosporium Stripe, and Wheat Streak Mosaic C. M. Cox, Former Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Plant are needed that are ecologically and economically sustainable. Perennial wheat has the potential to con- vert

  13. Tritimovirus P1 functions as a suppressor of RNA silencing and an enhancer of disease symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an eriophyid mite-transmitted virus of the genus Tritimovirus, family Potyviridae. Complete deletion of HC-Pro has no effect on WSMV virulence or disease synergism, suggesting that a different viral protein suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). PT...

  14. First report of zebra chip disease and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum on potatoes in Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September of 2011, potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers in a packing facility in (Idaho Falls???) were observed with internal discolorations suggestive of the zebra chip disease (ZC). Symptoms were observed in 1-2% of tubers of Russet Burbank and Russet Norkotah and included brown spots and streak...

  15. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  16. Genetic Factors Involved in Fumonisin Accumulation in Maize Kernels and Their Implications in Maize Agronomic Management and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Cao, Ana; Butrón, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of maize with fumonisins depends on the environmental conditions; the maize resistance to contamination and the interaction between both factors. Although the effect of environmental factors is a determinant for establishing the risk of kernel contamination in a region, there is sufficient genetic variability among maize to develop resistance to fumonisin contamination and to breed varieties with contamination at safe levels. In addition, ascertaining which environmental factors are the most important in a region will allow the implementation of risk monitoring programs and suitable cultural practices to reduce the impact of such environmental variables. The current paper reviews all works done to address the influence of environmental variables on fumonisin accumulation, the genetics of maize resistance to fumonisin accumulation, and the search for the biochemical and/or structural mechanisms of the maize plant that could be involved in resistance to fumonisin contamination. We also explore the outcomes of breeding programs and risk monitoring of undertaken projects. PMID:26308050

  17. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose a novel approach to measure short electron bunch profiles at micrometer level. Low energy electrons generated during beam-gas ionization are simultaneously modulated by the transverse electric field of a circularly-polarized laser, and then they are collected at a downstream screen where the angular modulation is converted to a circular shape. The longitudinal bunch profile is simply represented by the angular distribution of the electrons on the screen. We only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration and there is no phase synchronization problem. Meanwhile the required laser power is also relatively low in this setup. Some simulations examples and experimental consideration of this method are discussed. At Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), an S-band RF transverse deflector (TCAV) is used to measure the bunch length with a resolution 10 femtosecond (fs) rms. An X-band deflector (wavelength 2.6cm) is proposed recently to improve the resolution. However, at the low charge operation mode (20pC), the pulse length can be as short as fs. It is very challenging to measure femtosecond and sub-femtosecond level bunch length. One of the methods is switching from RF to {mu}m level wavelength laser to deflect the bunch. A powerful laser ({approx}10s GW) is required to deflect such a high energy beam (GeV) in a wiggler. Synchronization is another difficulty: the jitter between the bunch and the laser can be larger than the laser wavelength, which makes single-shot measurement impossible. To reduce the laser power, we propose to use ionized electrons from high energy electron beam and gas interaction for high energy electron bunch diagnostics. Similarly, the femtosecond X-ray streak camera uses X-ray ionization electrons to measure the X-ray pulse. The electrons generated by beam-gas ionization have low energy (eVs). Therefore, a lower laser power is possible to deflect such low energy electrons. Note that there is no field ionization in our case. To avoid field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  18. Neutron Radiation Shielding For The NIF Streaked X-Ray Detector (SXD) Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Holder, J; Young, B; Kalantar, D; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2006-11-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) scheduled in 2010. The NIC is comprised of several ''tuning'' physics subcampaigns leading up to a demonstration of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. In some of these experiments, time-resolved x-ray imaging of the imploding capsule may be required to measure capsule trajectory (shock timing) or x-ray ''bang-time''. A capsule fueled with pure tritium (T) instead of a deutriun-tritium (DT) mixture is thought to offer useful physics surrogacy, with reduced yields of up to 5e14 neutrons. These measurements will require the use of the NIF streak x-ray detector (SXD). The resulting prompt neutron fluence at the planned SXD location ({approx}1.7 m from the target) would be {approx}1.4e9/cm{sup 2}. Previous measurements suggest the onset of significant background at a neutron fluence of {approx} 1e8/cm{sup 2}. The radiation damage and operational upsets which starts at {approx}1e8 rad-Si/sec must be factored into an integrated experimental campaign plan. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to predict the neutron and gamma/x-ray fluences and radiation doses for the proposed diagnostic configuration. A possible shielding configuration is proposed to mitigate radiation effects. The primary component of this shielding is an 80 cm thickness of Polyethylene (PE) between target chamber center (TCC) and the SXD diagnostic. Additionally, 6-8 cm of PE around the detector provide from the large number of neutrons that scatter off the inside of the target chamber. This proposed shielding configuration reduces the high-energy neutron fluence at the SXD by approximately a factor {approx}50.

  19. Streaked Imaging of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2003-10-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the seeds for subsequent growth of perturbations due to the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically,(V.N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82), 2091 (1999). observed in 2-D ORCHID hydrodynamic simulations, and measured experimentally.(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly, through face-on x-ray radiography. Experiments with a high-resolution, Ir-coated Kirkpatrick--Baez microscope, coupled to a high-current streak tube, provided a continuous record of the target areal density during shock transit, while it was dominated by the evolution of the RM instability. Planar plastic targets with variable thicknesses (30 to 60 ?m) and single-mode (? = 10 to 30 ?m) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses with intensities---ranging from 5 × 10^13 W/cm^2 to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. The predicted dependence of the oscillation period on laser intensity and modulation wavelength was quantified. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  20. Sweet Corn Hybrid Disease Nursery - 2009

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report summarizes the reactions of 387 sweet corn hybrids to Stewart’s wilt, common rust, maize dwarf mosaic virus, Southern leaf blight, and Northern leaf blight based on their performance in the University of Illinois sweet corn disease nursery in 2009. The reactions of these hybrids to three...