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Sample records for major flares coronal

  1. Coronal mass ejections and major solar flares: The great active center of March 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan; Hundhausen, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    The solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) events associated with the large and complex March 1989 active region are discussed. This active region gave us a chance to study the relation of CME with truly major solar flares. The work concentrates on questions of the relation of CMEs and flares to one another and to other types of activity on the Sun. As expected, some major (X-3B class) flares had associated CMEs. However, an unexpected finding is that others did not. In fact, there is strong evidence that the X4-4B flare of March 9th had no CME. This lack of a CME for such an outstanding flare event has important implications to theories of CME causation.Apparently, not all major flares cause CMEs or are caused by CMEs. The relations between CMEs and other types of solar activity are also discussed. No filament disappearances are reported for major CMEs studied here. Comparing these results with other studies, CMEs occur in association with flares and with erupting prominences, but neither are required for a CME. The relation between solar structures showing flaring without filament eruptions and structures showing filament eruptions without flares becomes important. The evolutionary relation between an active flaring sunspot region and extensive filaments without sunspots is reviewed, and the concept of an 'evolving magnetic structure' (EMS) is introduced. It is suggested that all CMEs arise in EMSs and that CMEs provide a major path through which azimuthal magnetic fields escape form the Sun during the solar cycle.

  2. Using coronal loops to reconstruct the magnetic field of an active region before and after a major flare

    SciTech Connect

    Malanushenko, A.; Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2014-03-10

    The shapes of solar coronal loops are sensitive to the presence of electrical currents that are the carriers of the non-potential energy available for impulsive activity. We use this information in a new method for modeling the coronal magnetic field of active region (AR) 11158 as a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF). The observations used are coronal images around the time of major flare activity on 2011 February 15, together with the surface line-of-sight magnetic field measurements. The data are from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The model fields are constrained to approximate the coronal loop configurations as closely as possible, while also being subject to the force-free constraints. The method does not use transverse photospheric magnetic field components as input and is thereby distinct from methods for modeling NLFFFs based on photospheric vector magnetograms. We validate the method using observations of AR 11158 at a time well before major flaring and subsequently review the field evolution just prior to and following an X2.2 flare and associated eruption. The models indicate that the energy released during the instability is about 1 × 10{sup 32} erg, consistent with what is needed to power such a large eruptive flare. Immediately prior to the eruption, the model field contains a compact sigmoid bundle of twisted flux that is not present in the post-eruption models, which is consistent with the observations. The core of that model structure is twisted by ≈0.9 full turns about its axis.

  3. Coronal behavior before the large flare onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Shinsuke; Bamba, Yumi; Kusano, Kanya

    2014-12-01

    Flares are a major explosive event in our solar system. They are often followed by a coronal mass ejection that has the potential to trigger geomagnetic storms. There are various studies aiming to predict when and where the flares are likely to occur. Most of these studies mainly discuss the photospheric and chromospheric activity before the flare onset. In this paper we study the coronal features before the famous large flare occurrence on 2006 December 13. Using the data from Hinode/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), we discuss the coronal features in the large scale (a few 100″) before the flare onset. Our findings are as follows. (1) The upflows in and around the active region start growing from ˜ 10 to 30 km s-1 a day before the flare. (2) The expanding coronal loops are clearly observed a few hours before the flare. (3) Soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet intensity are gradually reduced. (4) The upflows are further enhanced after the flare. From these observed signatures, we conclude that the outer part of active region loops with low density was expanding a day before the flare onset, and the inner part with high density was expanding a few hours before the onset.

  4. Formation of Magnetic Flux Ropes during a Confined Flaring Well before the Onset of a Pair of Major Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Patsourakos, Spiros; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-08-01

    NOAA active region (AR) 11429 was the source of twin super-fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The CMEs took place within an hour from each other, with the onset of the first taking place in the beginning of 2012 March 7. This AR fulfills all the requirements for a “super active region” namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a δ-spot magnetic configuration. One of the biggest storms of Solar Cycle 24 to date ({D}{st}=-143 nT) was associated with one of these events. Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in ∼10 MK hot plasma emission and are often considered the core of erupting structures. However, their “dormant” existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e., prior to eruptions), is an open question. Aided by multi-wavelength observations by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and a nonlinear force-free model for the coronal magnetic field, our work uncovers two separate, weakly twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of pre-eruption MFRs that eventually became the seeds of the two CMEs. The MFRs could have been formed during confined (i.e., not leading to major CMEs) flaring and sub-flaring events which took place the day before the two CMEs in the host AR 11429.

  5. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  6. The cooling and condensation of flare coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A model is investigated for the decay of flare heated coronal loops in which rapid radiative cooling at the loop base creates strong pressure gradients which, in turn, generate large (supersonic) downward flows. The coronal material cools and 'condenses' onto the flare chromosphere. The features which distinguish this model from previous models of flare cooling are: (1) most of the thermal energy of the coronal plasma may be lost by mass motion rather than by conduction or coronal radiation; (2) flare loops are not isobaric during their decay phase, and large downward velocities are present near the footpoints; (3) the differential emission measure q has a strong temperature dependence.

  7. A Tool for Empirical Forecasting of Major Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Solar Particle Events from a Proxy of Active-Region Free Magnetic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes a new forecasting tool developed for and is currently being tested by NASA s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at JSC, which is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of radiation exposure levels of astronauts. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, as well as solar energetic particle events. Its algorithm is based on an empirical relationship between the various types of events rates and a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy, determined from a data set of approx.40,000 active-region magnetograms from approx.1,300 active regions observed by SOHO/MDI that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production. The new tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic areas from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as an NOAA active region, and measures a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free magnetic energy proxy into an expected event rate. The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. Descriptions of the datasets, algorithm, and software in addition to sample applications and a validation test are presented. Further development and transition of the new tool in anticipation of SDO/HMI is briefly discussed.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-11-20

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  9. Coronal propagation of flare associated electrons and protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schellert, G.; Wibberenz, G.; Kunow, H.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical study of characteristic times and intensities of 36 solar particle events observed between 1977 and 1979 by the Kiel Cosmic Ray Experiment on board HELIOS-1 and -2 has been carried out. For approx. 0.5 MeV electrons we order the times of maximum and the absolute intensities with respect to angular distance from the parent flare. Discussion of coronal parameters in terms of Reid's model leads to typical time constants for coronal diffusion and escape.

  10. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-05-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at {approx}100 km s{sup -1} at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at {approx}6 km s{sup -1} for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  11. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  12. FLARE-GENERATED TYPE II BURST WITHOUT ASSOCIATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenic, J.; Marque, C.; Zhukov, A. N.; Vrsnak, B.; Veronig, A.

    2012-02-20

    We present a study of the solar coronal shock wave on 2005 November 14 associated with the GOES M3.9 flare that occurred close to the east limb (S06 Degree-Sign E60 Degree-Sign ). The shock signature, a type II radio burst, had an unusually high starting frequency of about 800 MHz, indicating that the shock was formed at a rather low height. The position of the radio source, the direction of the shock wave propagation, and the coronal electron density were estimated using Nancay Radioheliograph observations and the dynamic spectrum of the Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer. The soft X-ray, H{alpha}, and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations show that the flare was compact, very impulsive, and of a rather high density and temperature, indicating a strong and impulsive increase of pressure in a small flare loop. The close association of the shock wave initiation with the impulsive energy release suggests that the impulsive increase of the pressure in the flare was the source of the shock wave. This is supported by the fact that, contrary to the majority of events studied previously, no coronal mass ejection was detected in association with the shock wave, although the corresponding flare occurred close to the limb.

  13. The structure, stability and flaring of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of recent progress in the theory of the magnetohydrodynamic behavior of coronal loops, beginning with a brief characterization of thy observations. The equilibrium magnetic field is described, along with the consequences of the empirical requirement for short-term, or infinite-conductivity, stability which is shown to be dominated by the end-effect influence of thy quasi-rigid photosphere. A new loop-flare model is then developed, which takes account of the finite loop length. The primary resistive-sausage-mode instability exhibits the necessary threshold behavior, and produces a number of spatially and energetically distinct flare-release manifestations.

  14. Time Evolution of Coronal Magnetic Helicity in the Flaring Active Region NOAA 10930

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Tan, Changyi; Wang, Haimin

    2010-09-01

    To study the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field topology and its long-term evolution associated with the X3.4 flare of 2006 December 13, we investigate the coronal relative magnetic helicity in the flaring active region (AR) NOAA 10930 during the time period of December 8-14. The coronal helicity is calculated based on the 3D nonlinear force-free magnetic fields reconstructed by the weighted optimization method of Wiegelmann, and is compared with the amount of helicity injected through the photospheric surface of the AR. The helicity injection is determined from the magnetic helicity flux density proposed by Pariat et al. using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. The major findings of this study are the following. (1) The time profile of the coronal helicity shows a good correlation with that of the helicity accumulation by injection through the surface. (2) The coronal helicity of the AR is estimated to be -4.3 × 1043 Mx2 just before the X3.4 flare. (3) This flare is preceded not only by a large increase of negative helicity, -3.2 × 1043 Mx2, in the corona over ~1.5 days but also by noticeable injections of positive helicity through the photospheric surface around the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line during the time period of the channel structure development. We conjecture that the occurrence of the X3.4 flare is involved with the positive helicity injection into an existing system of negative helicity.

  15. TIME EVOLUTION OF CORONAL MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE FLARING ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Hong; Jing, Ju; Wang Haimin; Chae, Jongchul; Tan, Changyi

    2010-09-10

    To study the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field topology and its long-term evolution associated with the X3.4 flare of 2006 December 13, we investigate the coronal relative magnetic helicity in the flaring active region (AR) NOAA 10930 during the time period of December 8-14. The coronal helicity is calculated based on the 3D nonlinear force-free magnetic fields reconstructed by the weighted optimization method of Wiegelmann, and is compared with the amount of helicity injected through the photospheric surface of the AR. The helicity injection is determined from the magnetic helicity flux density proposed by Pariat et al. using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. The major findings of this study are the following. (1) The time profile of the coronal helicity shows a good correlation with that of the helicity accumulation by injection through the surface. (2) The coronal helicity of the AR is estimated to be -4.3 x 10{sup 43} Mx{sup 2} just before the X3.4 flare. (3) This flare is preceded not only by a large increase of negative helicity, -3.2 x 10{sup 43} Mx{sup 2}, in the corona over {approx}1.5 days but also by noticeable injections of positive helicity through the photospheric surface around the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line during the time period of the channel structure development. We conjecture that the occurrence of the X3.4 flare is involved with the positive helicity injection into an existing system of negative helicity.

  16. Photospheric and Coronal Observations of Abrupt Magnetic Restructuring in Two Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2016-03-01

    For two major X-class flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft when they were close to quadrature, we compare major, abrupt changes in the photospheric magnetic vector field to changes in the observed coronal magnetic structure during the two flares. The Lorentz force changes in strong photospheric fields within active regions are estimated from time series of SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms. These show that the major changes occurred in each case near the main neutral line of the region and in two neighboring twisted opposite-polarity sunspots. In each case the horizontal parallel field strengthened significantly near the neutral line while the azimuthal field in the sunspots decreased, suggesting that a flux rope joining the two sunspots collapsed across the neutral line with reduced magnetic pressure because of a reduced field twist component. At the same time, the coronal extreme ultraviolet (EUV) loop structure was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on STEREO-A to decrease significantly in height during each eruption, discontinuous changes signifying ejection of magnetized plasma, and outward-propagating continuous but abrupt changes consistent with loop contraction. An asymmetry in the observed EUV loop changes during one of the flares matches an asymmetry in the photospheric magnetic changes associated with that flare. The observations are discussed in terms of the well-known tether-cutting and breakout flare initiation models.

  17. Photospheric and Coronal Observations of Abrupt Magnetic Restructuring in Two Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    For two major X-class flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A) spacecraft when they were close to quadrature, we compare major, abrupt changes in the photospheric magnetic vector field to changes in the observed coronal magnetic structure during the two flares. The Lorentz force changes in strong photospheric fields within active regions are estimated from time series of SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms. These show that the major changes occurred in each case near the main neutral line of the region and in two neighboring twisted opposite-polarity sunspots. In each case the horizontal parallel field strengthened significantly near the neutral line while the azimuthal field in the sunspots decreased, suggesting that a flux rope joining the two sunspots collapsed across the neutral line with reduced magnetic pressure because of a reduced field twist component. At the same time, the coronal extreme ultraviolet (EUV) loop structure was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on STEREO-A to decrease significantly in height during each eruption, discontinuous changes signifying ejection of magnetized plasma, and outward-propagating continuous but abrupt changes consistent with loop contraction. An asymmetry in the observed EUV loop changes during one of the flares matches an asymmetry in the photospheric magnetic changes associated with that flare. The observations are discussed in terms of the well-known tether-cutting and breakout flare initiation models.

  18. Solar wind heavy ions from flare-heated coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gosling, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    Information concerning the coronal expansion is carried by solar-wind heavy ions. Distinctly different energy-per-charge ion spectra are found in two classes of solar wind having the low kinetic temperatures necessary for E/q resolution of the ion species. Heavy-ion spectra which can be resolved are most frequently observed in the low-speed interstream (IS) plasma found between high speed streams; the streams are thought to originate from coronal holes. Although the sources of the IS plasma are uncertain, the heavy-ion spectra found there contain identifiable peaks of O, Si, and Fe ions. Such spectra indicate that the IS ionization state of O is established in coronal gas at a temperature of approximately 1.6 million K, while that of Fe is frozen in farther out at about 1.5 million K. On occasion anomalous spectra are found outside IS flows in solar wind with abnormally depressed local kinetic temperatures. The anomalous spectra contain Fe(16+) ions, not usually found in IS flows, and the derived coronal freezing-in temperatures are significantly higher. The coronal sources of some of these ionizationally hot flows are identified as solar flares.

  19. Energetic Correlation Between Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Medlin, Drew A.; Haga, Leah; Schwartz, Richard a.; Tolbert, A. Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    We find a strong correlation between the kinetic energies (KEs) of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the radiated energies of the associated solar flares for the events that occurred during the period of intense solar activity between 18 October and 08 November 2003. CME start times, speeds, mass and KEs were taken from Gopalswamy et al. (2005), who used SOHO/LASCO observations. The GOES observations of the associated flares were analyzed to find the peak soft X-ray (SXR) flux, the radiated energy in SXRs (L(sub sxR)), and the radiated energy from the emitting plasma across all wavelengths (L(sub hot)). RHESSI observations were also used to find the energy in non-thermal electrons, ions, and the plasma thermal energy for some events. For two events, SORCE/TIM observations of the total solar irradiance during a flare were also available to give the total radiated flare energy (L(sub total)).W e find that the total flare energies of the larger events are of the same order of magnitude as the CME KE with a stronger correlation than has been found in the past for other time intervals.

  20. Time Evolution of Coronal Magnetic Helicity in the Flaring Active Region NOAA 10930

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Hong; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2010-05-01

    To study the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field topology and its long-term (a few days) evolution associated with the X3.4 flare of 2006 December 13, we investigate the temporal evolution of the relative coronal magnetic helicity in NOAA active region (AR) 10930 during the time period of December 8, 21:20 UT through December 14, 5:00 UT. The coronal helicity is calculated based on the 3D nonlinear force-free (NLFF) magnetic fields reconstructed by the optimization method (Wheatland et al. 2000) as implemented by Wiegelmann (2004). As the boundary conditions for the force-free reconstruction, we use the preprocessed Hinode Spectropolarimeter (SP) vector magnetograms in which the net Lorentz force and the torque in the photosphere are minimized (see Wiegelmann et al. 2006 for the details). The major findings of this study are: (1) a negative (left-handed) helicity of -5×1043 Mx2 in the AR corona is estimated right before the X3.4 flare; (2) the major flare is preceded by a significantly and consistently large amount of negative helicity injection (-2×1043 Mx2) into the corona over 2 days; (3) the temporal variation of helicity is comparable to that of the rotational speed in the southern sunspot with positive polarity; (4) in general, the time profile of the coronal helicity is well-matched with that of the helicity accumulation by the time integration of the simplified helicity injection rate (Chae 2001) determined by using SOHO MDI magnetograms; (5) at the time period of the channel structure development (December 11, 4:00-8:00 UT) with newly emerging flux and just right before the C5.7 class flare, the time variation of the coronal helicity shows a rapid and huge increase of negative helicity, but that of the helicity accumulation by MDI magnetograms indicates a monotonous increase of negative helicity.

  1. Magnetic flux emergence, flares, and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Schmieder, Brigitte; Cristiani, Germán; Demoulin, Pascal; Guo, Yang

    We study the violent events occurring in the cluster of two active regions (ARs), NOAA numbers 11121 and 11123, observed in November 2010 with instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and from Earth. Within one day the total magnetic flux increased by 70 per cent with the emergence of new groups of bipoles in AR 11123. These emergences led to a very complex magnetic configuration in which around ten solar flares, some of them accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), occurred. A magnetic-field topology somputation indicates the presence of null points, associated separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) where magnetic reconnection is prone to occur. Based on this analysis, we propose a scenario to explain the origin of a low-energy event preceding a filament eruption, which is accompanied by a two-ribbon flare and CME, and a consecutive confined flare in AR 11123. The results of our topology computation can also explain the locations of flare ribbons in two other events, one preceding and one following the ones just mentioned.

  2. Coronal seismology of flare-excited longitudinal slow magnetoacoustic waves in hot coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Sun, X.; Provornikova, E. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 bandpasses. These oscillations show similar physical properties (such as period, decay time, and trigger) as those slow-mode standing waves previously detected by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer in Doppler shift of flare lines formed above 6 MK. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage enable us to measure both thermal and wave properties of the oscillating hot plasma with unprecedented accuracy. These new measurements can be used to diagnose the complicated energy transport processes in flare plasma by a technique called coronal seismology based on the combination of observations and MHD wave theory. From a detailed case study we have found evidence for thermal conduction suppression in hot loops by measuring the polytropic index and analyzing the phase relationship between the temperature and density wave signals. This result is not only crucial for better understanding the wave dissipation mechanism but also provides an alternative mechanism to explain the puzzles of long-duration events and X-ray loop-top sources which show much slower cooling than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. This finding may also shed a light on the coronal heating problem because weak thermal conductivity implies slower cooling of hot plasma in nanoflares, so increasing the average coronal temperature for the same heating rate. We will discuss the effects of thermal conduction suppression on the wave damping and loop cooling based on MHD simulations.

  3. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CORONAL ACCELERATION REGION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Saem; Hudson, H. S.; Glesener, L.; Lin, R. P.; White, S. M.; Masuda, S.; Wuelser, J.-P.

    2010-05-10

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) are used to investigate coronal hard X-ray and microwave emissions in the partially disk-occulted solar flare of 2007 December 31. The STEREO mission provides EUV images of the flare site at different viewing angles, establishing a two-ribbon flare geometry and occultation heights of the RHESSI and NoRH observations of {approx}16 Mm and {approx}25 Mm, respectively. Despite the occultation, intense hard X-ray emission up to {approx}80 keV occurs during the impulsive phase from a coronal source that is also seen in microwaves. The hard X-ray and microwave source during the impulsive phase is located {approx}6 Mm above thermal flare loops seen later at the soft X-ray peak time, similar in location to the above-the-loop-top source in the Masuda flare. A single non-thermal electron population with a power-law distribution (with spectral index of {approx}3.7 from {approx}16 keV up to the MeV range) radiating in both bremsstrahlung and gyrosynchrotron emission can explain the observed hard X-ray and microwave spectrum, respectively. This clearly establishes the non-thermal nature of the above-the-loop-top source. The large hard X-ray intensity requires a very large number (>5 x 10{sup 35} above 16 keV for the derived upper limit of the ambient density of {approx}8 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) of suprathermal electrons to be present in this above-the-loop-top source. This is of the same order of magnitude as the number of ambient thermal electrons. We show that collisional losses of these accelerated electrons would heat all ambient electrons to superhot temperatures (tens of keV) within seconds. Hence, the standard scenario, with hard X-rays produced by a beam comprising the tail of a dominant thermal core plasma, does not work. Instead, all electrons in the above-the-loop-top source seem to be accelerated, suggesting that the above-the-loop-top source is itself the

  4. CORONAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SOLAR FLARES: DRIFT-KINETIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2011-05-10

    Using a model of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares, we investigate the height distribution of coronal electrons by focusing on the energy-dependent pitch-angle scattering. When pitch-angle scattering is not included, the peak heights of loop-top electrons are constant, regardless of their energy, owing to the continuous acceleration and compression of the electrons via shrinkage of magnetic loops. On the other hand, under pitch-angle scattering, the electron heights are energy-dependent: intermediate-energy electrons are at a higher altitude, whereas lower and higher energy electrons are at lower altitudes. This implies that the intermediate-energy electrons are inhibited from following the shrinking field lines to lower altitudes because pitch-angle scattering causes efficient precipitation of these electrons into the footpoint and their subsequent loss from the loop. This result is qualitatively consistent with the position of the above-the-loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) source that is located above coronal HXR loops emitted by lower energy electrons and microwaves emitted by higher energy electrons. Quantitative agreement with observations might be achieved by considering primary acceleration before the onset of loop shrinkage and additional pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions.

  5. Radio-frequency heating of the coronal plasma during flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed for the radio-frequency (RF) heating of soft X-ray emitting plasma in solar flares due to absorption of amplified cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying approximately 10 to the 27th to approximately 10 to the 30th erg/s, is generated through maser emission following partial precipitation of electrons in one or more flaring loops. The maser operates in a large number of small regions, each producing an 'elementary burst' (EB) of short duration. This radiation propagates either directly or after reflection to the second-harmonic absorption layer, where it is absorbed by thermal electrons. The properties of EBs and the heating of the electrons in the absorption layer are discussed in detail. RF heating and evaporation models for the production of soft X-ray emitting plasma are compared. Properties of the RF heating model that explain observed features are energy transport across field lines, rapid heating (in approximately 1 s) of coronal plasma to approximately 3 x 10 to the 7th K, and instigation of turbulent velocities up to the ion sound speed.

  6. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  7. Coronal explosions as a signature of current loop coalescence in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi; de Jager, Cornelis

    1989-09-01

    The coronal explosions interpreted by De Jaeger and Boelee (1984) as masnifestations of plasma streaming out of flare kernels are presently reinterpreted as signatures of current loop coalescence in the flaring region. This interpretation can quantitatively explain the various characteristics of the observed coronal explosions. The present model is expected to be very directly addressed by the soft X-ray imaging instrument that will be carried by the Solar-A mission spacecraft due for launch during the next solar maximum.

  8. A unified view of coronal loop contraction and oscillation in flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Transverse loop oscillations and loop contractions are commonly associated with solar flares, but the two types of motion have traditionally been regarded as separate phenomena. Aims: We present an observation of coronal loops that contract and oscillate following the onset of a flare. We aim to explain why both behaviours are seen together and why only some of the loops oscillate. Methods: A time sequence of SDO/AIA 171 Å images is analysed to identify the positions of coronal loops following the onset of the M6.4 flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53. We focus on five loops in particular, all of which contract during the flare, with three of them oscillating as well. A simple model is then developed for the contraction and oscillation of a coronal loop. Results: We propose that coronal loop contractions and oscillations can occur in a single response to removal of magnetic energy from the corona. Our model reproduces the various types of loop motion observed and explains why the highest loops oscillate during their contraction, while no oscillation is detected for the shortest contracting loops. The proposed framework suggests that loop motions can be used as a diagnostic for the removal of coronal magnetic energy by flares, while rapid decrease in coronal magnetic energy is a newly identified excitation mechanism for transverse loop oscillations. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Warning, no authors found for 2015A&A...581A..14.

  9. How Did a Major Confined Flare Occur in Super Solar Active Region 12192?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Wang, Haiming; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution, which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully “reproduced” the macroscopic magnetic process of the flare. In particular, with simulation, we explained why this event is a confined eruption—the consequence of the reconnection is a shared arcade instead of a newly formed flux rope. We also found a much weaker magnetic implosion effect compared to many other X-class flares.

  10. High-temperature differential emission measure and altitude variations in the temperature and density of solar flare coronal X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2015-12-01

    The detailed knowledge of plasma heating and acceleration region properties presents a major observational challenge in solar flare physics. Using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the high temperature differential emission measure, DEM(T), and the energy-dependent spatial structure of solar flare coronal sources were studied quantitatively. The altitude of the coronal X-ray source was observed to increase with energy by ~+0.2 arcsec/keV between 10 and 25 keV. Although an isothermal model can fit the thermal X-ray spectrum observed by RHESSI, such a model cannot account for the changes in altitude, and multi-thermal coronal sources are required where the temperature increases with altitude. For the first time, we show how RHESSI imaging information can be used to constrain the DEM(T) of a flaring plasma. We developed a thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission model with inhomogeneous temperature and density distributions to simultaneously reproduce i) DEM(T); ii) altitude as a function of energy; and iii) vertical extent of the flaring coronal source versus energy. We find that the temperature-altitude gradient in the region is ~+0.08 keV/arcsec (~1.3 MK/Mm). Similar altitude-energy trends in other flares suggest that the majority of coronal X-ray sources are multi-thermal and have strong vertical temperature and density gradients with a broad DEM(T).

  11. When and where to look to observe major solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.

    1989-01-01

    When and where to look is an important issue to observers planning to observe major solar flares. Prediction of major flares is also important because they influence the Earth's environment. Techniques for utilizing recently discovered solar hot spots and a solar activity periodicity of about 154 days in determining when and where to look to catch major flares are discussed.

  12. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  13. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24 h interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare list, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one-day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterized by the normalized frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalized by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6 h time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 h prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6 h subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  14. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24-hour interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare List, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterised by the normalised frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalised by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6-hour time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 hours prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6-hour subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  15. Core and Large-Scale Structure of the 2000 November 24 X-Class Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin; Gallagher, Peter; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Yang, Guo; Godde, Philip R.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present three important aspects of the XI .8 flare and the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2000 November 24: (1) The source of the flare is clearly associated with a magnetic channel structure, as was noted in a study by Zirin & Wang , which is due to a combination of flux emergence inside the leading edge of the penumbra of the major leading sunspot and proper motion of the sunspot group. The channel structure provides evidence for twisted flux ropes that can erupt, forming the core of a CME, and may be a common property of several superactive regions that have produced multiple X-class flares in the past. (2) There are actually three flare ribbons visible. The first can be seen moving away from the flare site, while the second and third make up a stationary ribbon near the leader spot. The moving ribbons could be due to a shock associated with the erupting flux rope or due to the interaction of erupting rope and the surrounding magnetic fields. In either case, the ribbon motion does not fit the classical Kopp-Pneuman model, in which the separation of ribbons is due to magnetic reconnection at successively higher and higher coronal altitudes. (3) From the coronal dimming observed with the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT), the CME involved a much larger region than the initial X-class flare. By comparing high-resolution full-disk Ha and EIT observations, we found that a remote dimming area is cospatial with the enhanced Ha emission. This result is consistent with the recent model of Yokoyama & Shibata that some dimming areas near footpoints may be due to chromospheric evaporation.

  16. Does Flare Reconnection Occur Before or After Explosive Coronal Mass Ejection Acceleration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. R.; Qiu, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    The mechanism for producing fast coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares (CME/EFs) is hotly debated. Most models rely on ideal instability/loss of equilibrium or magnetic reconnection; these two categories of models predict different causal relationships between CMEs and flares. In both cases, flare reconnection disconnects the bulk of the CME from the Sun, but in the former models, flare reconnection onset is a consequence of the fast outward motion of the CME while in the later models reconnection is what causes the CME acceleration. Discriminating between these models requires continuous, high-cadence observations and state-of-the-art numerical simulations that enable the relative timing of key stages in the events to be determined. With the advent of SDO, STEREO, and massively parallel supercomputers, we are well poised to tackle this major challenge to our understanding of solar activity. In recent work (Karpen et al. 2012), we determined the timing and location of triggering mechanisms for the breakout initiation model (Antiochos et al. 1999), using ultra-high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations with adaptive mesh refinement and high-cadence analysis. This approach enabled us to resolve as finely as possible the small scales of magnetic reconnection and island formation in the current sheets, within the global context of a large-scale solar eruption. We found that the explosive acceleration of the fast CME occurs only after the onset of rapid reconnection at the flare current sheet formed in the wake of the rising CME flux rope. In the present work, we compare flare reconnection rates, measured from flare ribbon UV brightenings observed by SDO/AIA and magnetograms from SDO/HMI, with the height evolution of CME fronts and cores, measured from STEREO/SECCHI EUV and coronagraph images. We also calculate these quantities from numerical simulations and compare them to observations, as a new test of the breakout initiation model. This work was supported by

  17. Solar gamma-ray-line flares, type II radio bursts, and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; Forrest, D. J.; Koomen, M. J.; Howard, R. A.; Wright, C. S.

    1991-10-01

    A Big Flare Syndrome (BFS) test is used to substantiate earlier reports of a statistically significant association between nuclear gamma-ray-line (GRL) flares and metric type II bursts from coronal shocks. The type II onset characteristically follows the onset of gamma-ray emission with a median delay of two minutes. It is found that 70-90 percent of GRL flares for which coronagraph data were available were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Gradual and impulsive GRL flares were equally well associated with CMEs. The CMEs were typically fast, with a median speed greater than 800 km/s. possible `non-BFS' explanations for the GRL-type II association are discussed.

  18. Solar gamma-ray-line flares, type II radio bursts, and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; Forrest, D. J.; Koomen, M. J.; Howard, R. A.; Wright, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    A Big Flare Syndrome (BFS) test is used to substantiate earlier reports of a statistically significant association between nuclear gamma-ray-line (GRL) flares and metric type II bursts from coronal shocks. The type II onset characteristically follows the onset of gamma-ray emission with a median delay of two minutes. It is found that 70-90 percent of GRL flares for which coronagraph data were available were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Gradual and impulsive GRL flares were equally well associated with CMEs. The CMEs were typically fast, with a median speed greater than 800 km/s. possible `non-BFS' explanations for the GRL-type II association are discussed.

  19. X-ray observations of a major eruptive flare behind the limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kermit L.; Svestka, Zdenek; Strong, Keith T.; Mccabe, Marie K.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze X-ray images and spectra of a coronal structure which extended to altitudes over 130000 km above an eruptive flare located 20 deg behind the western solar limb. The images were obtained by the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) and the spectra were obtained by the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) aboard the SMM spacecraft. Images in O VIII and Mg XI lines cover the period from before the flare onset (which occurred at 22:31 UT on 16 February, 1986) through 17 UT on 17 February and were used for determination of temperature and emission measure within the structure. BCS obtained Ca XIX spectra of the coronal event, benefiting from the occultation of the active region behind the solar limb. The BCS data show, and FCS data confirm, that the temperature, after an initial rise and decline, stayed almost constant for many hours after 04:30 UT on 17 February. This may indicate that initially we observed the rise and decay of post-flare loops, but later the X-ray emission came predominantly from a post-flare giant arch that formed above them. This has been observed in many previous cases. However, a comparison with other events characterized by very high post-flare loops suggests that we may be observing the same system of slowly growing groups all the time. Therefore, we suggest a third possibility, i.e., that such anomalously high loop systems first behave like post-flare loops but gradually take over some characteristics of a post-flare giant arch. The Soft X-ray Telescope aboard Yohkoh, with spatial resolution improved by nearly an order of magnitude, might be able to check up on the development of such large-scale coronal structures if proper observational modes are applied after the occurrence of major eruptive flares.

  20. Well-observed Dynamics of Flaring and Peripheral Coronal Magnetic Loops during an M-class Limb Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Li

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  1. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  2. The Structure and Dynamics of the Coronal Part of the 06.11.1979 Flare by Ground Spectral Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ograpishvili, N. B.; Maghradze, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of observational data obtained in the Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory in the form of spectrograms and filter images of formations, related to the limb flare of November, 6th, 1979, is presented. The flare loops system, a late stage development of bright flare loops and post-flare coronal loops received in Hα and coronal lines, were studied. Physical parameters of observable structures, as well as their sizes and interposition were defined. Doppler speeds at different heights are measured. The primary direction of movement of a matter in flare loops upwards from below is revealed.

  3. A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF THE FUNDAMENTAL ASSUMPTIONS OF SOLAR FLARE AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, D. S.; Bingham, R.; Harrison, R.

    2013-05-01

    The fundamental assumptions of conventional solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) theory are re-examined. In particular, the common theoretical assumption that magnetic energy that drives flares and CMEs can be stored in situ in the corona with sufficient energy density is found wanting. In addition, the observational constraint that flares and CMEs produce non-thermal electrons with fluxes of order 10{sup 34}-10{sup 36} electrons s{sup -1}, with energies of order 10-20 keV, must also be explained. This constraint when imposed on the ''standard model'' for flares and CMEs is found to miss the mark by many orders of magnitude. We suggest, in conclusion, there are really only two possible ways to explain the requirements of observations and theory: flares and CMEs are caused by mass-loaded prominences or driven directly by emerging magnetized flux.

  4. Photospheric and Coronal Observations of Abrupt Magnetic Restructuring in Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Lorentz force changes associated with strong photospheric fields in large structures within active regions can be estimated from time series of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) vector magnetograms. The major, most organized changes tend to occur close to the centers of flaring regions, near the main neutral line and/or in twisted sunspots. Fields close to the neutral line tend to collapse downward and inward, consistent with compression rather than rotation of the vector field. In sunspots the twist (or azimuthal component around the sunspot axis) tends to decrease. In a limited number of cases particularly well-observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), the evolution of the photospheric magnetic vector field can be related to changes in coronal magnetic structure to provide a coherent description of the magnetic changes during the different phases of a flare. This work was supported by NASA grant NNX14AE05G.

  5. Coronal propagation of solar flare particles observed by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohno, T.; Nitta, N.; Wada, M.; Suda, T.

    1985-01-01

    Propagation of solar flare particles in corona was studied using the satellite data at the geostationary orbit. by selecting very fast rise time events only, the interplanetary propagation were assumed to be scatter free arrival. The results show that the propagation in corona does not depend on particle energy in 4 to 500 MeV protons, and the time delays from optical flare do not depend on the distance between the flare site and the base of the interplanetary magnetic field which connects to the Earth.

  6. Spectral Evolution of Coronal Hard X-ray Sources during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Sam; Lin, R. P.

    2006-06-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) emissions during solar flares are most prominent at chromospheric footpoints of flare loops which reveal where flare-accelerated electrons lose their energy by collision. The lower density in the corona makes it much more difficult to detect coronal HXR emissions, but coronal HXR sources directly reveal insights into the acceleration region (e.g. Masuda et al. 1994). Observations with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) give for the first time detailed spatial and spectral observations in the HXR range. Initial results of a few events reveal at least two different spectral behavior, possibly indicating two different acceleration mechanisms: (1) Coronal HXR sources with a 'soft-hard-soft' behavior (Battaglia & Benz 2006), and (2) sources that show spectral hardening in time, i.e. a 'soft-hard-harder' behavior (Krucker et al. 2005). After a short review of recent RHESSI observations, we will present statistical results on the spectral evolution of coronal HXR sources of 50 partly occulted limb flares seen by RHESSI.

  7. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Hudson, H. S.; Russell, A. J. B. E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-11-10

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ≈60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium.

  8. Closed coronal structures. V - Gasdynamic models of flaring loops and comparison with SMM observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G.; Acton, L.; Leibacher, J.; Rosner, R.; Pallavicini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional code incorporating energy, momentum and mass conservation equations, and taking the entire solar atmospheric structure into account, is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response of confined magnetic structures to strong heating perturbations. Model calculation results are compared with flare observations which include the light curves of spectral lines formed over a wide range of coronal flare temperatures, as well as determinations of Doppler shifts for the high temperature plasma. It is shown that the numerical simulation predictions are in good overall agreement with the observed flare coronal plasma evolution, correctly reproducing the temporal profile of X-ray spectral lines and their relative intensities. The predicted upflow velocities support the interpretation of the blueshifts as due to evaporation of chromospheric material.

  9. Temporal and Spatial Relationship of Flare Signatures and the Force-free Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Veronig, A.; Su, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the plasma and magnetic environment of active region NOAA 11261 on 2011 August 2 around a GOES M1.4 flare/CME (SOL2011-08-02T06:19). We compare coronal emission at the (extreme) ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths, using SDO AIA and RHESSI images, in order to identify the relative timing and locations of reconnection-related sources. We trace flare ribbon signatures at ultraviolet wavelengths in order to pin down the intersection of previously reconnected flaring loops in the lower solar atmosphere. These locations are used to calculate field lines from three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear force-free magnetic field models, established on the basis of SDO HMI photospheric vector magnetic field maps. Using this procedure, we analyze the quasi-static time evolution of the coronal model magnetic field previously involved in magnetic reconnection. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the elevation speed of the current sheet’s lower tip during an on-disk observed flare as a few kilometers per second. A comparison to post-flare loops observed later above the limb in STEREO EUVI images supports this velocity estimate. Furthermore, we provide evidence for an implosion of parts of the flaring coronal model magnetic field, and identify the corresponding coronal sub-volumes associated with the loss of magnetic energy. Finally, we spatially relate the build up of magnetic energy in the 3D models to highly sheared fields, established due to the dynamic relative motions of polarity patches within the active region.

  10. Impulsively Fast Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections and in Laboratory Plasma Merging Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chio Z.; Ono, Yasushi; Yang, Ya-Hui; Choe, Gwangson

    2012-10-01

    Impulsively fast magnetic reconnection has been shown to be the major mechanism responsible for explosive flare non-thermal energy release and acceleration of coronal mass ejection (CME) motion. It has been observed that for most large solar flares non-thermal emissions in hard X-rays (HXR) and millimeter/submillimeter waves impulsively rise and decade during the soft X-ray (SXR) emission rise phase. Moreover, the filament/CME upward motion is accelerated temporally in correlation with the impulsive enhancement of flare non-thermal emission and reconnection electric field in the current sheet in both simulations and observations. The peak reconnection electric field during flare impulsive phase is on the order of a few kV/m for X-class flares. Here, we demonstrated for the first time in laboratory plasma merging experiments the correlation of the magnetic reconnection rate with the acceleration of plasmoid ejected from the current sheet using the TS-4 device of the Tokyo University. Moreover, we have also found that the electron heating occurs in the current sheet and the ion heating occurs in the down-stream outflow region. Thus, we conclude that the plasmoid/CME acceleration is a key mechanism for the impulsive enhancement of magnetic reconnection rate (electric field).

  11. Decaying long-period oscillations in flaring coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakariakov, Valery

    Quasi-periodic rapidly-decaying variations of the Doppler shift of the emission lines associated with the hot plasma were detected in solar flares about ten years ago with the SUMER spectrograph operating in EUV. Later, similar field-aligned flows of the hot plasma in flaring loops were found in the data of Yohkoh/BCS. The oscillations characterised by relatively long periods, in the range 10-20 min, and very short decay times, 15-30 min, are known as “SUMER” oscillations. We present observations of SUMER oscillations in the microwave band with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and SDO/AIA. Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel during an M1.6 flare revealed the presence of 12.6-min oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations were seen to decay with the characteristic time of about 15 min. Simultaneously, these oscillations were detected in the variation of the EUV emission intensity measured in the 335A channel of SDO/AIA. Our observational findings support the interpretation of SUMER oscillations in terms of impulsively excited standing acoustic oscillations in flaring loops or arcades, based upon numerical radiative MHD simulations. Moreover, very recently a similar dynamical pattern was detected in the light-curve of a megaflare on the dM4.5e star YZ CMi in the white light band. This result indicates striking similarities between dynamical processes in moderate solar flares and stellar megaflares.

  12. Emission Measure and Temperature Analysis of the Upper Coronal Source of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Z.; Li, D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-08-01

    An X-ray coronal source is usually seen above the reconnection site located above flare loops, while a second source appears in between this site and the loops. The first source is called the upper coronal source, the second the loop-top source. Both sources are thought to be related to the outflows from the magnetic reconnection site above the flare loops. Previous observations have shown that the upper coronal source has both a thermal and nonthermal component. In this article, we explore the spatial appearance of the upper coronal source in a solar flare observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA) on 8 March 2011. This event occurred at the limb with completely occulted loop footpoints. Both the loop-top and the upper coronal sources are well observed by RHESSI in X-rays. The loop-top source emission covers a wide energy range up to 50 keV, while the upper coronal source emits below 25 keV. The upper coronal source appears later (about two minutes) than the loop-top source, and the RHESSI X-ray spectral analysis shows that both sources have a temperature of 30 MK. This temperature is confirmed by the differential emission measure (DEM) analysis from SDO/AIA data. AIA observations show the counterparts in the ultraviolet (UV), and bidirectional outflows appear between AIA brightenings. The loop-top source seems to be located at the top of a hot and dense loop system, which expands with a speed of 10 km s^{-1}, while the upper coronal source moves faster upward with a speed of about 32 km s^{-1} in the same time interval. The analysis of the spatial distribution of the emission measure and temperature indicates that the hot plasma itself or the heating region are possibly moving upward from the lower coronal region where the loop-top source appears. This is the reason that the upper coronal source appears later than the loop-top source.

  13. Emission Measure and Temperature Analysis of the Upper Coronal Source of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Z.; Li, D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2016-06-01

    An X-ray coronal source is usually seen above the reconnection site located above flare loops, while a second source appears in between this site and the loops. The first source is called the upper coronal source, the second the loop-top source. Both sources are thought to be related to the outflows from the magnetic reconnection site above the flare loops. Previous observations have shown that the upper coronal source has both a thermal and nonthermal component. In this article, we explore the spatial appearance of the upper coronal source in a solar flare observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA) on 8 March 2011. This event occurred at the limb with completely occulted loop footpoints. Both the loop-top and the upper coronal sources are well observed by RHESSI in X-rays. The loop-top source emission covers a wide energy range up to 50 keV, while the upper coronal source emits below 25 keV. The upper coronal source appears later (about two minutes) than the loop-top source, and the RHESSI X-ray spectral analysis shows that both sources have a temperature of 30 MK. This temperature is confirmed by the differential emission measure (DEM) analysis from SDO/AIA data. AIA observations show the counterparts in the ultraviolet (UV), and bidirectional outflows appear between AIA brightenings. The loop-top source seems to be located at the top of a hot and dense loop system, which expands with a speed of 10 km s^{-1}, while the upper coronal source moves faster upward with a speed of about 32 km s^{-1} in the same time interval. The analysis of the spatial distribution of the emission measure and temperature indicates that the hot plasma itself or the heating region are possibly moving upward from the lower coronal region where the loop-top source appears. This is the reason that the upper coronal source appears later than the loop-top source.

  14. Statistical properties of solar flares and coronal mass ejections through the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telloni, Daniele; Carbone, Vincenzo; Lepreti, Fabio; Antonucci, Ester

    2016-03-01

    Waiting Time Distributions (WTDs) of solar flares are investigated all through the solar cycle. The same approach applied to Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in a previous work is considered here for flare occurrence. Our analysis reveals that flares and CMEs share some common statistical properties, which result dependent on the level of solar activity. Both flares and CMEs seem to independently occur during minimum solar activity phases, whilst their WTDs significantly deviate from a Poisson function at solar maximum, thus suggesting that these events are correlated. The characteristics of WTDs are constrained by the physical processes generating those eruptions associated with flares and CMEs. A scenario may be drawn in which different mechanisms are actively at work during different phases of the solar cycle. Stochastic processes, most likely related to random magnetic reconnections of the field lines, seem to play a key role during solar minimum periods. On the other hand, persistent processes, like sympathetic eruptions associated to the variability of the photospheric magnetism, are suggested to dominate during periods of high solar activity. Moreover, despite the similar statistical properties shown by flares and CMEs, as it was mentioned above, their WTDs appear different in some aspects. During solar minimum periods, the flare occurrence randomness seems to be more evident than for CMEs. Those persistent mechanisms generating interdependent events during maximum periods of solar activity can be suggested to play a more important role for CMEs than for flares, thus mitigating the competitive action of the random processes, which seem instead strong enough to weaken the correlations among flare event occurrence during solar minimum periods. However, it cannot be excluded that the physical processes at the basis of the origin of the temporal correlation between solar events are different for flares and CMEs, or that, more likely, more sophisticated effects are

  15. SDO/AIA Observation and Modeling of Flare-excited Slow Waves in Hot Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Provornikova, E.; Sun, X.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The flare-excited standing slow waves were first detected by SOHO/SUMER as Doppler shift oscillations in hot (>6 MK) coronal loops. It has been suggested that they are excited by small or micro- flares at one loop's footpoint. However, the detailed excitation mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we report an oscillation event observed by SDO/AIA in the 131 channel. The intensity disturbances excited by a C-class flare propagated back and forth along a hot loop for about two period with a strong damping. From the measured oscillation period and loop length, we estimate the wave phase speed to be about 410 km/s. Using a regularized DEM analysis we determine the loop temperature and electron density evolution and find that the loop plasma is heated to a temperature of 8-12 MK with a mean about 9 MK. These measurements support the interpretation as slow magnetoacousic waves. Magnetic field extrapolation suggests that the flare is triggered by slipping and null-point-type reconnections in a fan-spine magnetic topology, and the injected (or impulsively evaporated) hot plasmas flowing along the large spine field lines form the oscillating hot loops. To understand why the propagating waves but not the standing waves as observed previously are excited in this event, we preform simulations using a 3D MHD model based on the observed magnetic configuration including full energy equation. Our simulations indicate that the nature of loop temperature structure is critical for the excitation of whether propagating or standing waves in a hot loop. Our result demonstrates that the slow waves may be used for heating diagnostics of coronal loops with coronal seismology. We also discuss the application of coronal seismology for estimating the average magnetic field strength in the hot loop based on the observed slow waves.

  16. Three-dimensional MHD modeling of flare-induced waves in coronal loops: thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, Elena; Ofman, Leon; Wang, Tongjiang

    EUV imaging and spectroscopic observations from several space missions (SOHO, TRACE, Hinode/EIS, SDO/AIA) have revealed the presence of MHD waves in solar coronal loops. Past analysis of SOHO/SUMER data suggested that slow magnetosonic waves in hot coronal loops are excited by flares at the loop`s footpoint. Recent Hinode/EIS observed propagating disturbances in active region loops were interpreted as flows as well as waves most likely generated by plasma outflows or jets. In order to understand dynamics of plasma in coronal loops due to flares or jets at the lower corona boundary, we perform full 3D MHD modeling of an active region and consider different mechanisms of wave excitation. We assume an initial equilibrium of the model active region with dipole magnetic field structure, gravitationally stratified density and temperature obtained from polytropic equation of state of the background coronal plasma. We extend previous isothermal studies by including full energy equation with empirical heating and radiative losses terms in the model. We study waves in both, short and long loops, and consider two excitation mechanisms in the model: impulsive plasma injection into the steady plasma upflow along the magnetic field lines, and impulsive heating at the footpoint of the loop. We show initiation and evolution of flows, excitation and damping of waves and flow-wave interaction in the loops. We compare our new results with previous models and observations.

  17. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel; Lindsey, Charles; Bogart, Rick; Couvidat, Sebastien; Scherrer, Phil; Schou, Jesper

    2014-01-10

    We report observations of white-light ejecta in the low corona, for two X-class flares on 2013 May 13, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. At least two distinct kinds of sources appeared (chromospheric and coronal), in the early and later phases of flare development, in addition to the white-light footpoint sources commonly observed in the lower atmosphere. The gradual emissions have a clear identification with the classical loop-prominence system, but are brighter than expected and possibly seen here in the continuum rather than line emission. We find the HMI flux exceeds the radio/X-ray interpolation of the bremsstrahlung produced in the flare soft X-ray sources by at least one order of magnitude. This implies the participation of cooler sources that can produce free-bound continua and possibly line emission detectable by HMI. One of the early sources dynamically resembles {sup c}oronal rain{sup ,} appearing at a maximum apparent height and moving toward the photosphere at an apparent constant projected speed of 134 ± 8 km s{sup –1}. Not much literature exists on the detection of optical continuum sources above the limb of the Sun by non-coronagraphic instruments and these observations have potential implications for our basic understanding of flare development, since visible observations can in principle provide high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. Relationship of Ground Level Enhancement with Solar Flare, Coronal Mass Ejection and Solar Energetic Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoz, K. M.; Cho, K.; Lee, J.; Kumar, P.; Hwang, J.; Oh, S. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Ground level enhancement (GLE) is the sudden increase in the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) which is thought to be caused by solar eruption. In this study we have analyzed the CRI data from 1968 through 2008 registered by several Neutron Monitors and deduced increase rate (%) of GLE events using the 5-minute data mainly from Oulu Neutron Monitor (ONM) and Calgary Neutron Monitor (CNM). To investigate the relations of GLEs with solar X-ray flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), we have inspected the peak time and peak intensity differences of GLE events. As results, we have found that the peak time (UT) differences vary mostly within ±20 minutes when the peak intensities vary mostly within ±50% at CNM and ONM. It has been observed that GLE events are associated with strong flares as well as fast /halo CMEs. Almost 62% of the flares associated with strong GLE were originated from south-west active region while 38% of the flares were originated from north-west active region. On an exception, an apparently weaker flare associated with GLE is not actually a weaker flare, rather a large flare existing behind the limb. The average of GLE associated CMEs is (1916.60 km/s) much faster than the average (458.53 km/s) of all CMEs. The fluences of the high energy proton flux (PF > 100MeV) associated with the GLE are stronger than those associated with non-GLE events. We will introduce our results briefly and discuss on the relationship of GLE with flare, CME and SEP.

  19. Coronal extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code: From quiet sun to flare simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code, which includes a treatment of the solar corona in terms of MHD, optically thin radiative loss and field-aligned heat conduction. In order to relax the severe time-step constraints imposed by large Alfven velocities and heat conduction we use a combination of semi-relativistic MHD with reduced speed of light ("Boris correction") and a hyperbolic formulation of heat conduction. We apply the numerical setup to 4 different setups including a mixed polarity quiet sun, an open flux region, an arcade solution and an active region setup and find all cases an amount of coronal heating sufficient to maintain a corona with temperatures from 1 MK (quiet sun) to 2 MK (active region, arcade). In all our setups the Poynting flux is self-consistently created by photospheric and sub-photospheric magneto-convection in the lower part of our simulation domain. Varying the maximum allowed Alfven velocity ("reduced speed of light") leads to only minor changes in the coronal structure as long as the limited Alfven velocity remains larger than the speed of sound and about 1.5-3 times larger than the peak advection velocity. We also found that varying details of the numerical diffusivities that govern the resistive and viscous energy dissipation do not strongly affect the overall coronal heating, but the ratio of resistive and viscous energy dependence is strongly dependent on the effective numerical magnetic Prandtl number. We use our active region setup in order to simulate a flare triggered by the emergence of a twisted flux rope into a pre-existing bipolar active region. Our simulation yields a series of flares, with the strongest one reaching GOES M1 class. The simulation reproduces many observed properties of eruptions such as flare ribbons, post flare loops and a sunquake.

  20. The propagation of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A time-dependent diffusion equation with velocity-dependent diffusion and energy-loss coefficients was solved for the case where energetic solar particles are injected into a coronal loop and then diffuse out the ends of the loop into the lower corona/chromosphere. The solution yields for the case of relativistic electrons, precipitation rates and populations which are necessary for calculating thick and thin target X-ray emission. It follows that the thick target emission is necessarily delayed with respect to the particle acceleration on injection by more than the mere travel time of the particle over the loop length. In addition the time-dependent electron population at the top of the loop is calculated. This is useful in estimating the resulting micron-wave emission. The results show relative timing differences in the different emission processes which are functions of particle species, energy and the point of injection of the particles into the loop. Equivalent quantities are calculated for non-relativistic protons.

  1. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  2. Exceptions to the rule: the X-flares of AR 2192 Lacking Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    NOAA Active region (AR) 2192, that was present on the Sun in October 2014, was the largest region which occurred since November 1990 (see Figure 1). The huge size accompanied by a very high activity level, was quite unexpected as it appeared during the unusually weak solar cycle 24. Nevertheless, the AR turned out to be one of the most prolific flaring ARs of cycle 24. It produced in total 6 X, 29 M, 79 C flares during its disk passage from October 18-29, 2014 (see Figure 2). Surprisingly, all flares greater than GOES class M5 and X were confined, i.e. had no coronal mass ejections (CME) associated. All the flare events had some obvious similarity in morphology, as they were located in the core of the AR and revealed only minor separation motion away from the neutral line but a large initial separation of the conjugate flare ribbons. In the paper by Thalmann et al. (2015) we describe the series of flares and give details about the confined X1.6 flare event from October 22, 2014 as well as the single eruptive M4.0 flare event from October 24, 2014. The study of the X1.6 flare revealed a large initial separation of flare ribbons together with recurrent flare brightenings, which were related to two episodes of enhanced hard X-ray emission as derived from RHESSI observations. This suggests that magnetic field structures connected to specific regions were repeatedly involved in the process of reconnection and energy release. Opposite to the central location of the sequence of confined events within the AR, a single eruptive (M4.0) event occurred on the outskirt of the AR in the vicinity of open magnetic fields. Our investigations revealed a predominantly north-south oriented magnetic system of arcade fields overlying the AR that could have preserved the magnetic arcade to erupt, and consequently kept the energy release trapped in a localized volume of magnetic field high up in the corona (as supported by the absence of a lateral motion of the flare ribbons and the

  3. From Coronal Observations to MHD Simulations, the Building Blocks for 3D Models of Solar Flares (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares are energetic events taking place in the Sun's atmosphere, and their effects can greatly impact the environment of the surrounding planets. In particular, eruptive flares, as opposed to confined flares, launch coronal mass ejections into the interplanetary medium, and as such, are one of the main drivers of space weather. After briefly reviewing the main characteristics of solar flares, we summarise the processes that can account for the build-up and release of energy during their evolution. In particular, we focus on the development of recent 3D numerical simulations that explain many of the observed flare features. These simulations can also provide predictions of the dynamical evolution of coronal and photospheric magnetic field. Here we present a few observational examples that, together with numerical modelling, point to the underlying physical mechanisms of the eruptions.

  4. Coronal and Chromospheric Signatures of Large-scale Disturbances Associated with a Major Solar Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Weiguo; Dai, Yu

    2015-08-01

    We present both coronal and chromospheric observations of large-scale disturbances associated with a major solar eruption on 2005 September 7. In the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites/Solar X-ray Imager (SXI), arclike coronal brightenings are recorded propagating in the southern hemisphere. The SXI front shows an initially constant speed of 730 km s-1 and decelerates later on, and its center is near the central position angle of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) but away from the flare site. Chromospheric signatures of the disturbances are observed in both Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO)/Polarimeter for Inner Coronal Studies Hα and MLSO/Chromospheric Helium I Imaging Photometer He i λ10830 and can be divided into two parts. The southern signatures occur in regions where the SXI front sweeps over, with the Hα bright front coincident with the SXI front, while the He i dark front lags the SXI front but shows a similar kinematics. Ahead of the path of the southern signatures, oscillations of a filament are observed. The northern signatures occur near the equator, with the Hα and He i fronts coincident with each other. They first propagate westward and then deflect to the north at the boundary of an equatorial coronal hole. Based on these observational facts, we suggest that the global disturbances are associated with the CME lift-off and show a hybrid nature: a mainly non-wave CME flank nature for the SXI signatures and the corresponding southern chromospheric signatures, and a shocked fast-mode coronal MHD wave nature for the northern chromospheric signatures.

  5. Faint Coronal Hard X-rays From Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay Erin

    Solar flares are huge explosions on the Sun that release a tremendous amount of energy from the coronal magnetic field, up to 1033 ergs, in a short time (100--1000 seconds), with much of the energy going into accelerated electrons and ions. An efficient acceleration mechanism is needed, but the details of this mechanism remain relatively unknown. A fraction of this explosive energy reaches the Earth in the form of energetic particles, producing geomagnetic storms and posing dangers to spaceborne instruments, astronauts, and Earthbound power grids. There are thus practical reasons, as well as intellectual ones, for wishing to understand this extraordinary form of energy release. Through imaging spectroscopy of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares, the behavior of flare-accelerated electrons can be studied. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) spacecraft launched in 2002 with the goal of better understanding flare particle acceleration. Using rotation modulation collimators, RHESSI is able to cover a wide energy range (3 keV--17 MeV) with fine angular and energy resolutions. RHESSI's success in the last 10 years in investigating the relationship between energetic electrons and ions, the nature of faint sources in the corona, the energy distribution of flares, and several other topics have significantly advanced the understanding of flares. But along with the wealth of information revealed by RHESSI come some clear observational challenges. Very few, if any, RHESSI observations have come close to imaging the electron acceleration region itself. This is undoubtedly due to a lack of both sensitivity (HXRs from electron beams in the tenuous corona are faint) and dynamic range (HXR sources at chromospheric flare footpoints are much brighter and tend to obscure faint coronal sources). Greater sensitivity is also required to investigate the role that small flares in the quiet Sun could play in heating the corona. The Focusing Optics

  6. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity During Eruptive Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, E. R.; Longcope, D. W.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    During eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections, a non-potential magnetic arcade with much excess magnetic energy goes unstable and reconnects. It produces a twisted erupting flux rope and leaves behind a sheared arcade of hot coronal loops. We suggest that the twist of the erupting flux rope can be determined from conservation of magnetic flux and magnetic helicity and equipartition of magnetic helicity. It depends on the geometry of the initial pre-eruptive structure. Two cases are considered, in the first of which a flux rope is not present initially but is created during the eruption by the reconnection. In the second case, a flux rope is present under the arcade in the pre-eruptive state, and the effect of the eruption and reconnection is to add an amount of magnetic helicity that depends on the fluxes of the rope and arcade and the geometry.

  7. COMBINED STEREO/RHESSI STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Krucker, S.; Vrsnak, B. E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.a E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed

    2010-04-01

    Using the potential of two unprecedented missions, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we study three well-observed fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred close to the limb together with their associated high-energy flare emissions in terms of RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) spectra and flux evolution. From STEREO/EUVI and STEREO/COR1 data, the full CME kinematics of the impulsive acceleration phase up to {approx}4 R{sub sun} is measured with a high time cadence of <=2.5 minutes. For deriving CME velocity and acceleration, we apply and test a new algorithm based on regularization methods. The CME maximum acceleration is achieved at heights h <= 0.4 R{sub sun}, and the peak velocity at h <= 2.1 R{sub sun} (in one case, as small as 0.5 R{sub sun}). We find that the CME acceleration profile and the flare energy release as evidenced in the RHESSI HXR flux evolve in a synchronized manner. These results support the 'standard' flare/CME model which is characterized by a feedback relationship between the large-scale CME acceleration process and the energy release in the associated flare.

  8. Quasi-periodic fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains within coronal waveguides associated with flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Broder, Brittany; Karlický, Marian; Downs, Cooper

    2016-03-01

    Quasi-periodic, fast-mode, propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon recently discovered in the solar corona by the Solar Dynamics Observatory with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging observations. They originate from flares and propagate at speeds up to ˜2000 km s-1 within funnel-shaped waveguides in the wakes of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). QFPs can carry suffcient energy fluxes required for coronal heating during their occurr ences. They can provide new diagnostics for the solar corona and their associated flares. We present recent observations of QFPs focusing on their spatio-temporal properties, temperature dependence, and statistical correlation with flares and CMEs. Of particular interest is the 2010-Aug-01 C3.2 flare with correlated QFPs and drifting zebra and fiber radio bursts, which might be different manifestations of the same fast-mode wave trains. We also discuss the potential roles of QFPs in accelerating and/or modulating the solar wind.

  9. Slow-Mode Oscillations of Hot Coronal Loops Excited at Flaring Footpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    A large number of strongly damped oscillations in hot coronal loops have been observed by SOHO/SUMER in the past decade in Doppler shifts of flaring (>6 MK) lines (Fe XIX and Fe XXI). These oscillations with periods on the order of 10-30 min were interpreted as fundamental standing slow modes. They often manifest features such as recurrence and association with a flow (100-300 km/s) pulse preceding to the oscillation, which suggests that they are likely driven by microflares at the footpoints. With coordinated RHESSI observations, we have found a dozen such events supporting this conjecture. A typical event is presetned here. By analyzing RHESSI hard X-ray and GOES/SXI soft X-ray emissions as well as SUMER Doppler shifts, we identify the flare that triggers the loop oscillations. From RHESSI spectra, we measure physical parameters such as temperature, emission measure, and thermal/non-thermal energy contents as functions of time. We discuss the wave excitation mechanism based on these observations. Our results provide important observational constraints that can be used for improving theoretical models of magnetosonic wave excitation, and for coronal seismology.

  10. THE MECHANISMS FOR THE ONSET AND EXPLOSIVE ERUPTION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND ERUPTIVE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-11-20

    We have investigated the onset and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. To isolate the eruption physics, our study uses the breakout model, which is insensitive to the energy buildup process leading to the eruption. We performed 2.5D simulations with adaptive mesh refinement that achieved the highest overall spatial resolution to date in a CME/eruptive flare simulation. The ultra-high resolution allows us to separate clearly the timing of the various phases of the eruption. Using new computational tools, we have determined the number and evolution of all X- and O-type nulls in the system, thereby tracking both the progress and the products of reconnection throughout the computational domain. Our results show definitively that CME onset is due to the start of fast reconnection at the breakout current sheet. Once this reconnection begins, eruption is inevitable; if this is the only reconnection in the system, however, the eruption will be slow. The explosive CME acceleration is triggered by fast reconnection at the flare current sheet. Our results indicate that the explosive eruption is caused by a resistive instability, not an ideal process. Moreover, both breakout and flare reconnections begin first as a form of weak tearing characterized by slowly evolving plasmoids, but eventually transition to a fast form with well-defined Alfvenic reconnection jets and rapid flux transfer. This transition to fast reconnection is required for both CME onset and explosive acceleration. We discuss the key implications of our results for CME/flare observations and for theories of magnetic reconnection.

  11. The Mechanisms for the Onset and Explosive Eruption of Coronal Mass Ejections and Eruptive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, Carl Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the onset and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. To isolate the eruption physics, our study uses the breakout model, which is insensitive to the energy buildup process leading to the eruption. We performed 2.5D simulations with adaptive mesh refinement that achieved the highest overall spatial resolution to date in a CME/eruptive flare simulation. The ultra-high resolution allows us to separate clearly the timing of the various phases of the eruption. Using new computational tools, we have determined the number and evolution of all X- and O-type nulls in the system, thereby tracking both the progress and the products of reconnection throughout the computational domain. Our results show definitively that CME onset is due to the start of fast reconnection at the breakout current sheet. Once this reconnection begins, eruption is inevitable; if this is the only reconnection in the system, however, the eruption will be slow. The explosive CME acceleration is triggered by fast reconnection at the flare current sheet. Our results indicate that the explosive eruption is caused by a resistive instability, not an ideal process. Moreover, both breakout and flare reconnections begin first as a form of weak tearing characterized by a slowly evolving plasmoids, but eventually transition to a fast form with well-defined Alfvenic reconnection jets and rapid flux transfer. This transition to fast reconnection is required for both CME onset and explosive acceleration. We discuss the key implications of our results for CME/flare observations and for theories of magnetic reconnection.

  12. Comparing the Coronal Flaring Efficacy of Five Different Instruments Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Homayoon, Amin; Hamidi, Mahmood Reza; Haddadi, Azam; Madani, Zahra Sadat; Moudi, Ehsan; Bijani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fearless removal of tooth structure during canal preparation and shaping has negative effects on the prognosis of treatment. On the other hand, sufficient pre-enlargement facilitates exact measurement of the apical size. The present in vitro study aimed to compare the efficacy of Gates-Glidden drills, K3, ProTaper, FlexMaster and RaCe instruments in dentin removal during coronal flaring using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: A total of 40 mandibular molars were selected and the coronal areas of their mesiobuccal and mesiolingual root canals were randomly prepared with either mentioned instruments. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were taken and the thickness of canal walls was measured in 1.5- and 3-mm distances from the furcation area. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA. Tukey’s post hoc tests were used for two-by-two comparisons. Results: At 1.5-mm distance, there was no significant difference between different instruments. However, at 3-mm distances, Gates-Glidden drills removed significantly more dentin compared to FlexMaster files (mean=0.18 mm) (P<0.02); however, two-by-two comparisons did not reveal any significant differences between the other groups. Conclusion: All tested instruments can be effectively used in clinical settings for coronal pre-enlargement. PMID:26525955

  13. Over-and-Out Coronal Mass Ejections: Blowouts of Magnetic Arches by Ejective Flares in One Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Streamer puffs from compact ejective flares in the foot of an outer loop of the magnetic arcade under a streamer were recently identified as a new variety of coronal mass ejection (CME) (Bemporad, Sterling, Moore, & Poletto 2006, ApJ Letters, in press). In the reported examples, the compact flares produced only weak to moderate soft X-ray bursts having peak intensities no stronger than GOES class C3. Here, we present two examples of this type of CME in which the compact flare in the flank of the steamer base is much stronger (one M-class, the other X-class in GOES X-rays) and the resulting streamer puff is wider and brighter than in the discovery examples. Coronal dimming observed in SOHOBIT Fe XII images in the launching of each of these two CMEs M e r supports the view that these CMEs are produced by a high loop of the steamer arcade being blown out by magnetoplasma ejecta exploding up the leg of the loop from the flare. In addition, we present evidence that this same type of CME occurs on larger scales than in the above examples. We examine a sequence of flare eruptions seated on the north side of AR 8210 as it rotated across the southern hemisphere in late April and early May 1998. Each flare occurs in synchrony with the launching of a large CME centered on the equator. Coronal dimming in EIT Fe XII images shows the trans-equatorial footprints of these CMEs extending north from the flare site. The set of flare-with-CME events includes the trans-equatorial loop eruptions reported by Khan & Hudson (1998, GRL, 27, 1083). Our observations indicate that these CMEs were not driven by the self-eruption of the transequatorial loops, but that these loops were part of a trans-equatorial magnetic arch that was blown open by ejecta from the flares on the north side of AR 8210. Thus, a relatively compact ejective flare can be the driver of a CME that is much larger in lateral extent than the flare and is laterally far offset from the flare. It has previously been thought

  14. Study of multi-periodic coronal pulsations during an X-class solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Partha; Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Sych, Robert; Moon, Y.-J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate quasi-periodic coronal pulsations during the decay phase of an X 3.2 class flare on 14 May 2013, using soft X-ray data from the RHESSI satellite. Periodogram analyses of soft X-ray light curves show that ∼ 53 s and ∼ 72 s periods co-exist in the 3-6 keV, 6-12 keV and 12-25 keV energy bands. Considering the typical length of the flaring loop system and observed periodicities, we find that they are associated with multiple (first two harmonics) of fast magnetoacoustic sausage waves. The phase relationship of soft X-ray emissions in different energy bands using cross-correlation technique show that these modes are standing in nature as we do not find the phase lag. Considering the period ratio, we diagnose the local plasma conditions of the flaring region by invoking MHD seismology. The period ratio P1/2P2 is found to be ∼ 0.65, which indicates that such oscillations are most likely excited in longitudinal density stratified loops.

  15. Coronal Seismology of Flare-Excited Standing Slow-Mode Waves Observed by SDO/AIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 Å bandpasses. Based on the interpretation in terms of a slow-mode wave, quantitative evidence of thermal conduction suppression in hot (>9 MK) loops has been obtained for the first time from measurements of the polytropic index and phase shift between the temperature and density perturbations (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). This result has significant implications in two aspects. One is that the thermal conduction suppression suggests the need of greatly enhanced compressive viscosity to interpret the observed strong wave damping. The other is that the conduction suppression provides a reasonable mechanism for explaining the long-duration events where the thermal plasma is sustained well beyond the duration of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in many flares, for a time much longer than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. In this study, we model the observed standing slow-mode wave in Wang et al. (2015) using a 1D nonlinear MHD code. With the seismology-derived transport coefficients for thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, we successfully simulate the oscillation period and damping time of the observed waves. Based on the parametric study of the effect of thermal conduction suppression and viscosity enhancement on the observables, we discuss the inversion scheme for determining the energy transport coefficients by coronal seismology.

  16. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating

  17. Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observation of Direct Coronal Heating During a C-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    With the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (9.8 s) stare mode during a C6.6 flare on the solar disk, we observed a sudden brightening of Fe xix line emission (formed at temperature T ˜ 8 MK) above the pre-flare noise without a corresponding brightening of emission from ions formed at lower temperatures, including He i (0.01 MK), Ov (0.25 MK), and Si xii (2 MK). The sudden brightening persisted as a plateau of Fe xix intensity that endured more than 11 minutes. The Fe xix emission at the rise and during the life of the plateau showed no evidence of significant bulk velocity flows, and hence cannot be attributed to chromospheric evaporation. However, the line width showed a significant broadening at the rise of the plateau, corresponding to nonthermal velocities of at least 89 km s-1 due to reconnection outflows or turbulence. During the plateau He i, Ov, and Si xii brightened at successively later times starting about 3.5 minutes after Fe xix, which suggests that these brightenings were produced by thermal conduction from the plasma that produced the Fe xix line emission; however, we cannot rule out the possibility that they were produced by a weak beam of nonthermal particles. We interpret an observed shortening of the Ov wavelength for about 1.5 minutes toward the middle of the plateau to indicate new upward motions driven by the flare, as occurs during gentle chromospheric evaporation; relative to a quiescent interval shortly before the flare, the Ov upward velocity was around -10 km s-1.

  18. The solar flare iron line to continuum ratio and the coronal abundances of iron and helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Narrow band Ross filter measurements of the Fe 25 line flux around 0.185 nm and simultaneous broadband measurements during a solar flare were used to determine the relationship between the solar coronal abundances of iron and helium. The Fe 25 ion population was also determined as a function of time. The proportional counter and the Ross filter on OSO-7 were utilized. The data were analyzed under the separate assumptions that (1) the electron density was high enough that a single temperature could characterize the continuum spectrum and the ionization equilibrium, and that (2) the electron density was low so that the ion populations trailed the electron temperature in time. It was found that the density was at least 5x10 to the 9th power, and that the high density assumption was valid. It was also found that the iron abundance is 0.000011 for a helium abundance of 0.2, relative to hydrogen.

  19. Topological model of the solar event including a flare and coronal mass ejection on October 19, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. I.; Yazev, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Based on the analysis of a strong solar flare X1.6/2B on October 19, 2001 in the active region 9661, accompanied by a coronal mass ejection (CME) of the halo type, a topological model of development of this solar event is suggested. The model considers a unified process of development of CME and a chromosphere flare. According to the model, this process has a common source of energy supply: the turbulent current layer lying between the arcade of flare loops and the surface of CME going away. The structures on the ends of flare bands (SEFB) represent in this model chromosphere feet of the system of large-scale coronal magnetic arches at the initial stage of the dynamic processes whose evolution results in CME. Peripheral structures (PS) of the flare (elongated double bright emission strips beyond the limits of the active region) are interpreted as chromosphere bases of magnetic field lines that form an external shell (braid) of the CME at the late stage of the flare.

  20. Investigation of X-class Flare-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections with and without DH Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrance, M. Bendict; Shanmugaraju, A.; Vršnak, Bojan

    2015-11-01

    A statistical analysis of 135 out of 141 X-class flares observed during 1997 - 2012 with and without deca-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts has been performed. It was found that 79 events (X-class flares and coronal mass ejections - Group I) were associated with DH type II radio bursts and 62 X-class flare events were not. Out of these 62 events without DH type IIs, 56 events (Group II) have location information, and they were selected for this study. Of these 56 events, only 32 were associated with CMEs. Most of the DH-associated X-class events ({˜} 79 %) were halo CMEs, in contrast to 14 % in Group II. The average CME speed of the X-class flares associated with DH type IIs is 1555 km s-1, which is nearly twice that of the X-class flare-associated CMEs without DH event (744 km s-1). The X-class flares associated with DH radio bursts have a mean flare intensity (3.63 × 10^{-4} W m^{-2}) that is 38 % greater than that of X-class flares without DH radio bursts (2.23 × 10^{-4} W m^{-2}). In addition to the greater intensity, it is also found that the the duration and rise time of flares associated with DH radio emission (DH flares) is more than twice than that of the flares without DH radio emission. When the events were further divided into two categories with respect to their source locations in eastern and western regions, 65 % of the events in the radio-loud category (with DH radio bursts) are from the western hemisphere and the remaining 35 % are from the eastern hemisphere. On the other hand, in the radio-quiet category (without DH radio bursts), nearly 60 % of the events are from the eastern hemisphere in contrast to those of the radio-loud category. It is found that 81 % of the events from eastern regions have flare durations > 30 min in the DH-flare category, in contrast to a nearly equal number from the western side for flare durations longer/shorter than 30 min. Similarly, the eastern events in the DH-flare category have a longer average rise-time of

  1. KAPPA DISTRIBUTION MODEL FOR HARD X-RAY CORONAL SOURCES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2013-02-10

    Solar flares produce hard X-ray emission, the photon spectrum of which is often represented by a combination of thermal and power-law distributions. However, the estimates of the number and total energy of non-thermal electrons are sensitive to the determination of the power-law cutoff energy. Here, we revisit an 'above-the-loop' coronal source observed by RHESSI on 2007 December 31 and show that a kappa distribution model can also be used to fit its spectrum. Because the kappa distribution has a Maxwellian-like core in addition to a high-energy power-law tail, the emission measure and temperature of the instantaneous electrons can be derived without assuming the cutoff energy. Moreover, the non-thermal fractions of electron number/energy densities can be uniquely estimated because they are functions of only the power-law index. With the kappa distribution model, we estimated that the total electron density of the coronal source region was {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. We also estimated without assuming the source volume that a moderate fraction ({approx}20%) of electrons in the source region was non-thermal and carried {approx}52% of the total electron energy. The temperature was 28 MK, and the power-law index {delta} of the electron density distribution was -4.3. These results are compared to the conventional power-law models with and without a thermal core component.

  2. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, Hilary V.; Erickson, W. C.; Prestage, N. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this correlative study between greater than 20 MeV solar proton events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and radio bursts it is found that essentially all of the proton events are preceded by groups of type III bursts and all are preceded by CMEs. These type III bursts (that are a flare phenomenon) usually are long-lasting, intense bursts seen in the low-frequency observations made from space. They are caused by streams of electrons traveling from close to the solar surface out to 1 AU. In most events the type III emissions extend into, or originate at, the time when type II and type IV bursts are reported (some 5 to 10 minutes after the start of the associated soft X-ray flare) and have starting frequencies in the 500 to approximately 100 MHz range that often get lower as a function of time. These later type III emissions are often not reported by ground-based observers, probably because of undue attention to type II bursts. It is suggested to call them type III-1. Type III-1 bursts have previously been called shock accelerated (SA) events, but an examination of radio dynamic spectra over an extended frequency range shows that the type III-1 bursts usually start at frequencies above any type II burst that may be present. The bursts sometimes continue beyond the time when type II emission is seen and, furthermore, sometimes occur in the absence of any type II emission. Thus the causative electrons are unlikely to be shock accelerated and probably originate in the reconnection regions below fast CMEs. A search did not find any type III-1 bursts that were not associated with CMEs. The existence of low-frequency type III bursts proves that open field lines extend from within 0.5 radius of the Sun into the interplanetary medium (the bursts start above 100 MHz, and such emission originates within 0.5 solar radius of the solar surface). Thus it is not valid to assume that only closed field lines exist in the flaring regions associated with CMEs and some

  3. On the transport and acceleration of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.; Lee, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    The turbulent environment of a flaring solar coronal loop directly affects the population of particles to be accelerated or already accelerated. Under the assumption of a uniform turbulent MHD wave field within the loop, the behavior of a particle distribution as it interacts with the turbulence is discussed, including particle precipitation to the footpoints of the loop and the evolution of the energy distribution as the particles undergo second-order stochastic acceleration. Two cases are discussed in detail: (1) particles spatially diffusing within the loop and precipitating with minimal acceleration in the short time scale of an impulsive event and (2) particles diffusing in both real and momentum space in a long duration event. Collisional losses due to ambient electrons are included. The gamma-ray flare of June 3, 1982 is modeled, and good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed time profiles if the loop length is 100,000 km with an intrinsic spatial diffusion time of 100-450 s. It follows that the production of high-energy neutrons and pi mesons extends over a time scale of 1000 s as observed.

  4. Ion acceleration and abundance enhancements in coronal heating and during impulsive flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. M.; Liu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations and modeling results are presented of ion heating during guide-field reconnection of large-scale current layers with multiple species. We focus on the reconnection exhaust where most of the magnetic energy is released. We show that the classical MHD description of the exhaust in which rotational discontinuities (RDs) switch off the reconnecting field and slow shocks then heat the plasma fails because of strong ion heating at the RD. We have shown that the heating at the RD depends critically on the mass-to-charge of the particles. Ions with mi/Z_im_p>√ {β pr}, where β pr=8π pp/B_r2 is based on the proton pressure and reconnecting magnetic field Br just upstream of the exhaust, behave like "pickup" particles and are strongly heated. As reconnection in wide current layers begins, Br is initially very small and there is essentially no heating of any ion species. As reconnection proceeds, ions with progressively higher values of mi/Z_im_p are heated with most of the energy going to the perpendicular component with T⊥ ˜ micAr2. Thus, high-mass-to-charge ions are heated first and gain the most energy, producing a simple, direct mechanism for producing the abundance enhancements seen in impulsive flares. For typical coronal parameters ions reach temperatures of several keV/nucleon. During flares further energy gain can take place as ions interact with multiple magnetic islands.

  5. Ensemble forecasting of major solar flares: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, J. A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results from the first ensemble prediction model for major solar flares (M and X classes). The primary aim of this investigation is to explore the construction of an ensemble for an initial prototyping of this new concept. Using the probabilistic forecasts from three models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (NASA-GSFC) and the NOAA forecasts, we developed an ensemble forecast by linearly combining the flaring probabilities from all four methods. Performance-based combination weights were calculated using a Monte Carlo-type algorithm that applies a decision threshold Pth to the combined probabilities and maximizing the Heidke Skill Score (HSS). Using the data for 13 recent solar active regions between years 2012 and 2014, we found that linear combination methods can improve the overall probabilistic prediction and improve the categorical prediction for certain values of decision thresholds. Combination weights vary with the applied threshold and none of the tested individual forecasting models seem to provide more accurate predictions than the others for all values of Pth. According to the maximum values of HSS, a performance-based weights calculated by averaging over the sample, performed similarly to a equally weighted model. The values Pth for which the ensemble forecast performs the best are 25% for M-class flares and 15% for X-class flares. When the human-adjusted probabilities from NOAA are excluded from the ensemble, the ensemble performance in terms of the Heidke score is reduced.

  6. ASYMMETRIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN SOLAR FLARE AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION CURRENT SHEETS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, N. A.; Miralles, M. P.; Pope, C. L.; Raymond, J. C.; Winter, H. D.; Reeves, K. K.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Lin, J.; Seaton, D. B.

    2012-05-20

    We present two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of line-tied asymmetric magnetic reconnection in the context of solar flare and coronal mass ejection current sheets. The reconnection process is made asymmetric along the inflow direction by allowing the initial upstream magnetic field strengths and densities to differ, and along the outflow direction by placing the initial perturbation near a conducting wall boundary that represents the photosphere. When the upstream magnetic fields are asymmetric, the post-flare loop structure is distorted into a characteristic skewed candle flame shape. The simulations can thus be used to provide constraints on the reconnection asymmetry in post-flare loops. More hard X-ray emission is expected to occur at the footpoint on the weak magnetic field side because energetic particles are more likely to escape the magnetic mirror there than at the strong magnetic field footpoint. The footpoint on the weak magnetic field side is predicted to move more quickly because of the requirement in two dimensions that equal amounts of flux must be reconnected from each upstream region. The X-line drifts away from the conducting wall in all simulations with asymmetric outflow and into the strong magnetic field region during most of the simulations with asymmetric inflow. There is net plasma flow across the X-line for both the inflow and outflow directions. The reconnection exhaust directed away from the obstructing wall is significantly faster than the exhaust directed toward it. The asymmetric inflow condition allows net vorticity in the rising outflow plasmoid which would appear as rolling motions about the flux rope axis.

  7. Pre-Impulsive Hard X-Ray Emission from Coronal Sources in X-Class Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed significant non- thermal emission up to ~70~keV from coronal sources prior to the impulsive phase in some flares, which has interesting implications for particle trapping and flare energy release. Images and spectra during the pre- impulsive phase of the GOES-class X4.8 event on 23~July~2002 suggests that the coronal hard X-ray (HXR) emission is non-thermal, as analysis of the Fe (~6.7~keV) and Fe/Ni (~8~keV) line complexes constrains the thermal component to have little or no thermal continuum emission above ~15~keV. The over-the-limb X3.1 event on 24~Aug~2002 displays similar spectral characteristics, and occultation of the footpoints places the non-thermal HXR emission unambiguously in the corona. RHESSI images of this event show an extended source below ~35~keV and a compact looptop source above ~35~keV, possibly indicating trapping of energetic electrons. Spatially-integrated spectra are well-fit by a broken power-law and the spectral indices above and below the break differ by ~2, suggesting an observation of the transition between thin- and thick-target bremsstrahlung. The collisional lifetime of non-thermal electrons is <10~sec at the inferred densities of ~1011~cm-3 and the rising HXR flux thus suggests continuous particle injection. We apply the technique of Johns &Lin (1992) to invert the pre-impulsive phase photon spectra and recover the original electron energy spectra as a function of time, both for spatially-integrated spectra and source-isolated spectra using imaging spectroscopy. We then compare the inverted spectra with a forward-modeling analysis of the photon spectra using the iron line analysis technique of Caspi &Lin (2006) to constrain the thermal model. We compare the results for both 24~Aug~2002 and 23~Jul~2002, and discuss the implications for electron acceleration and flare plasma heating in the corona during this period.

  8. Flare-associated Fast-mode Coronal Wave Trains Discovered by SDO/AIA: Physical Properties and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.; Cheung, C. M. M.; Broder, B.; De Pontieu, B.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic Fast Propagating wave trains (QFPs) are a new observational phenomenon discovered in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). They are fast-mode magnetosonic waves, closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flare emission ranging from radio to X-ray wavelengths. The significance of QFPs lies in their diagnostic potential, because they can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. In this presentation, we report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs. For example, using differential emission measure (DEM) inversion, we found clear evidence of heating and cooling cycles that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic wave pulses. Moreover, recent IRIS observations of QFP source regions revealed sawtooth-like flare ribbon motions, indicative of pulsed magnetic reconnection, that are correlated with QFP excitation. More interestingly, from a survey of over 100 QFP events, we found a preferential association with eruptive flares rather than confined flares. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating, energy transport, and solar eruptions.

  9. BBSO/NST Observations of the Sudden Differential Rotation of a Sunspot Caused by a Major Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Deng, Na; Cao, Wenda; Lee, Jeongwoo; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Jiasheng; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field visible on the solar surface (photosphere), from which the field extends high into the corona. Complex plasma motions that drag field in the photosphere can build up free energy in the corona that powers solar eruptions. It is known that solar flares and the often associated coronal ejections (CMEs) can produce various radiations in the low atmosphere. However, it was considered implausible that disturbances created in the tenuous corona would cause a direct perturbation of the dense photosphere involving bulk motion. Here we report the sudden rotational motion of a sunspot clearly induced by a major solar flare (SOL2015-06-22T18:23 M6.6), using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). It is particularly striking that the rotation is not uniform over the sunspot: as the flare ribbon sweeps across, its different portions accelerate (up to ~50 degree per hour) at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. The intensity and magnetic field of the sunspot also change significantly associated with the flare. Our results reveal an intrinsic relationship between the photospheric plasma bulk motions and coronal energy release, with direct consequences for our understanding of energy and momentum balance in the flare/CME phenomenon. This work is mainly supported by NASA grants NNX13AF76G and NNX13AG13G (LWS), and NNX16AF72G, and NSF grants AGS 1250818 and 1408703.

  10. Simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer and Optical Observations of Ad Leonis: Evidence for Large Coronal Loops and the Neupert Effect in Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.; Simon, Theodore; Cully, Scott L.; Deustua, Susana E.; Jablonski, Marek; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Pettersen, Bjorn R.; Smith, Verne; Spiesman, William J.; Valenti, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    We report on the first simultaneous Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and optical observations of flares on the dMe flare star AD Leonis. The data show the following features: (1) Two flares (one large and one of moderate size) of several hours duration were observed in the EUV wavelength range; (2) Flare emission observed in the optical precedes the emission seen with EUVE; and (3) Several diminutions (DIMs) in the optical continuum were observed during the period of optical flare activity. To interpret these data, we develop a technique for deriving the coronal loop length from the observed rise and decay behavior of the EUV flare. The technique is generally applicable to existing and future coronal observations of stellar flares. We also determine the pressure, column depth, emission measure, loop cross-sectional area, and peak thermal energy during the two EUV flares, and the temperature, area coverage, and energy of the optical continuum emission. When the optical and coronal data are combined, we find convincing evidence of a stellar 'Neupert effect' which is a strong signature of chromospheric evaporation models. We then argue that the known spatial correlation of white-light emission with hard X-ray emission in solar flares, and the identification of the hard X-ray emission with nonthermal bremsstrahlung produced by accelerated electrons, provides evidence that flare heating on dMe stars is produced by the same electron precipitation mechanism that is inferred to occur on the Sun. We provide a thorough picture of the physical processes that are operative during the largest EUV flare, compare and contrast this picture with the canonical solar flare model, and conclude that the coronal loop length may be the most important factor in determining the flare rise time and energetics.

  11. Flare-generated Shock Wave Propagation through Solar Coronal Arcade Loops and an Associated Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ∼800 km s‑1 and it accelerated to ∼1490 km s‑1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan–spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (∼340 km s‑1) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan–spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  12. Flare-generated Shock Wave Propagation through Solar Coronal Arcade Loops and an Associated Type II Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ˜800 km s‑1 and it accelerated to ˜1490 km s‑1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan–spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (˜340 km s‑1) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan–spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  13. Numerical experiments on magnetic reconnection in solar flare and coronal mass ejection current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Z.; Shen, C.; Wu, N.; Lin, J.; Murphy, N. A.; Roussev, I. I.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays a critical role in energy conversion during solar eruptions. This paper presents a set of magnetohydrodynamic experiments for the magnetic reconnection process in a current sheet (CS) formed in the wake of the rising flux rope. The eruption results from the loss of equilibrium in a magnetic configuration that includes a current-carrying flux rope, representing a pre-existing filament. In order to study the fine structure and micro processes inside the CS, mesh refinement is used to reduce the numerical diffusion. We start with a uniform, explicitly defined resistivity which results in a Lundquist number S = 104 in the vicinity of CS. The use of mesh refinement allows the simulation to capture high-resolution features such as plasmoids from the tearing mode and plasmoid instability regions of turbulence and slow-mode shocks. Inside the CS, magnetic reconnection goes through the Sweet-Parker and the fractal stages, and eventually displays a time-dependent Petschek pattern. Our results support the concept of fractal reconnection suggested by Shibata et al. and Shibata & Tanuma, and also suggest that the CS evolves through Sweet-Parker reconnection prior to the fast reconnection stage. For the first time, the detailed features and/or fine structures inside the coronal mass ejection/flare CS in the eruption were investigated in this work.

  14. On the variation of solar flare coronal X-ray source sizes with energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2014-05-20

    Observations with RHESSI have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold target model and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here, we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, which leads to the observationally inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch angle and scattering within the target, cause the projected propagation distance parallel to the guiding magnetic field to be reduced, so that a one-dimensional interpretation can overestimate the actual density by a factor of up to ∼6. The implications of these results for the determination of acceleration region properties (specific acceleration rate, filling factor, etc.) are discussed.

  15. RHESSI AND SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS OF THE CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, M.; Kontar, E. P.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations are an important diagnostic of various plasma parameters of the solar atmosphere during solar flares. Soft X-ray and EUV observations often show coronal sources near the top of flaring loops, while hard X-ray emission is mostly observed from chromospheric footpoints. Combining RHESSI with simultaneous Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations, it is possible for the first time to determine the density, temperature, and emission profile of the solar atmosphere over a wide range of heights during a flare, using two independent methods. Here we analyze a near limb event during the first of three hard X-ray peaks. The emission measure, temperature, and density of the coronal source is found using soft X-ray RHESSI images while the chromospheric density is determined using RHESSI visibility analysis of the hard X-ray footpoints. A regularized inversion technique is applied to AIA images of the flare to find the differential emission measure (DEM). Using DEM maps, we determine the emission and temperature structure of the loop, as well as the density, and compare it with RHESSI results. The soft X-ray and hard X-ray sources are spatially coincident with the top and bottom of the EUV loop, but the bulk of the EUV emission originates from a region without cospatial RHESSI emission. The temperature analysis along the loop indicates that the hottest plasma is found near the coronal loop-top source. The EUV observations suggest that the density in the loop legs increases with increasing height while the temperature remains constant within uncertainties.

  16. A coronal mass ejection model for the 1992 July 15 flare on AU Microscopii observed by the extreme ultraviolet explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cully, Scott L.; Fisher, George H.; Abbott, Mark J.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.

    1994-01-01

    The dM1e flare star AU Microscopii (AU Mic) was observed by the EUVE Deep Survey Instrument on 1992 July 14-18. A large flare was detected in the Deep Survey Lexan/Boron (DS Lex/B)(65-190 A) band and the SW (70-190 A) and MW (140-380 A) spectrometers. The flare consisted of a sharp impulsive peak lasting approximately 2 hours followed by a decaying tail lasting about a day. We present a simple, single temperature, dynamic model for the flare decay which is consistent with the DS Lex/B light curve and reproduces the strongest, high-temperature spectral lines in the released EUVE spectra. In this model, we assume the long decay time is due to an ejected, magnetically confined, low beta plasmoid expanding self similarly in the ambient medium in a manner reminiscent of solar coronal mass ejections. We demonstrate that the long tail of the DS Lex/B light curve can be explained by rapid expansion, causing the plasma to become tenuous sufficiently quickly that it avoids catastrophic radiative cooling. From this model, we estimate the mass of the plasmoid to be approximately = 10(exp 20) g and the total energy of the event to be approximately = 10(exp 36) ergs. These values are approximately 10(exp 4) times as large as those seen during the largest solar coronal mass ejection (CME) events. We argue that the results of our model are consistent with other measurements of stellar flare parameters. We also estimate a mass-loss rate of a few times 10(exp -13) Solar mass/yr and discuss the role of mass loss from dMe stars in the mass balance of the interstellar medium. We estimate the rotational braking timescale from these events to be less than 500 million years and suggest that CME's may be an important source of angular momentum loss from late-type stars.

  17. SDO/AIA observations and model of standing waves in hot coronal loops excited by a flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-06-01

    The strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations in hot coronal loops were first observed by SOHO/SUMER in flare lines formed at plasma temperature more than 6 MK. They were mainly interpreted as the standing slow magnetosonic waves excited by impulsive energy release at the loop’s footpoint based on the measured properties and on MHD modeling results. Longitudinal waves with similar properties have been recently observed by SDO/AIA in active region loops. In this study, we report a new event that exhibited the flare-excited intensity disturbances propagating back and forth in a hot coronal loop imaged by AIA in 131 bandpass. We measure the physical parameters of the wave and loop plasma, determine the loop geometry, and explore the triggering mechanism. We identify the wave modes (propagating or standing waves) based on these measurements and on 3D MHD modeling. A loop model is constructed with enhanced density in a hydrostatic equilibrium following potential or force-free magnetic field lines extrapolated from the photospheric magnetic field data observed by SDO/HMI. We also discuss the applications of coronal seismology to this event.

  18. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Non-potentiality of the solar coronal magnetic field accounts for the solar explosion like flares and CMEs. We apply a data-driven CESE-MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The CESE-MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most time. The magnetic configuration changes very limited during the studied time interval of two hours. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photoshpere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the magnetic free energy drops during the flare with an amount of 1.7 × 1030 erg, which can be interpreted as the energy budget released by the minor C-class flare.

  19. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  20. The magnetic field of active region 11158 during the 2011 February 12-17 flares: Differences between photospheric extrapolation and coronal forward-fitting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang E-mail: xudongs@stanford.edu

    2014-04-10

    We developed a coronal nonlinear force-free field (COR-NLFFF) forward-fitting code that fits an approximate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) solution to the observed geometry of automatically traced coronal loops. In contrast to photospheric NLFFF codes, which calculate a magnetic field solution from the constraints of the transverse photospheric field, this new code uses coronal constraints instead, and this way provides important information on systematic errors of each magnetic field calculation method, as well as on the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. In this study we applied the COR-NLFFF code to NOAA Active Region 11158, during the time interval of 2011 February 12-17, which includes an X2.2 GOES-class flare plus 35 M- and C-class flares. We calculated the free magnetic energy with a 6 minute cadence over 5 days. We find good agreement between the two types of codes for the total nonpotential E{sub N} and potential energy E{sub P} but find up to a factor of 4 discrepancy in the free energy E {sub free} = E{sub N} – E{sub P} and up to a factor of 10 discrepancy in the decrease of the free energy ΔE {sub free} during flares. The coronal NLFFF code exhibits a larger time variability and yields a decrease of free energy during the flare that is sufficient to satisfy the flare energy budget, while the photospheric NLFFF code shows much less time variability and an order of magnitude less free-energy decrease during flares. The discrepancy may partly be due to the preprocessing of photospheric vector data but more likely is due to the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. We conclude that the coronal field cannot be correctly calculated on the basis of photospheric data alone and requires additional information on coronal loop geometries.

  1. Longitudinal distribution of major solar flares during 1975 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Y.; Cui, Y. M.; He, Y. L.; He, H.; Du, Z. L.; Li, R.; Wang, H. N.

    We have analyzed the coordinates of optical flares associated with the X-ray flares of class X observed by GOES satellite during the period from January 1975 through September 2005. The results can be summarized as follows. The latitude distribution of X-ray flares of class X displays the Maunder butterfly diagram pattern. The longitude distribution suggests that the place where X-ray flares of class X preferentially occur migrates in Carrington longitude. In the new dynamic reference frame inferred from the differential rotation law on the Sun, the longitude distribution diagram shows that there are two persistent preferred longitudes of strong X-ray flare occurrence separated by about 180°. This suggests that strong X-ray flare active longitudes exist indeed for tens of years. The strength of the two active longitudes alternates similarly to the "flip-flop" phenomenon. The non-axisymmetry of the X-ray flare distribution is found to be highly significant 42.5% (43.0%) for Northern (Southern) hemisphere for the peak intensity and 55% (49%) for Northern (Southern) hemisphere for the flare number.

  2. Above-the-loop-top Oscillation and Quasi-periodic Coronal Wave Generation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Observations revealed that various kinds of oscillations are excited in solar flare regions. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in flare emissions are commonly observed in a wide range of wavelengths. Recent observations have found that fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are quasi-periodically emitted from some flaring sites (quasi-periodic propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic waves; QPFs). Both QPPs and QPFs imply a cyclic disturbance originating from the flaring sites. However, the physical mechanisms remain puzzling. By performing a set of two-dimensional MHD simulations of a solar flare, we discovered the local oscillation above the loops filled with evaporated plasma (above-the-loop-top region) and the generation of QPFs from such oscillating regions. Unlike all previous models for QPFs, our model includes essential physics for solar flares such as magnetic reconnection, heat conduction, and chromospheric evaporation. We revealed that QPFs can be spontaneously excited by the above-the-loop-top oscillation. We found that this oscillation is controlled by the backflow of the reconnection outflow. The new model revealed that flare loops and the above-the-loop-top region are full of shocks and waves, which is different from the previous expectations based on a standard flare model and previous simulations. In this paper, we show the QPF generation process based on our new picture of flare loops and will briefly discuss a possible relationship between QPFs and QPPs. Our findings will change the current view of solar flares to a new view in which they are a very dynamic phenomenon full of shocks and waves.

  3. Coronal vs chromospheric heating through co-spatial return currents during the 19 and 20 Jan 2005 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-05-01

    The high electron flux required to explain the bremsstrahlung X-ray emission observed from solar flares is expected to be accompanied by a neutralizing co-spatial return current. In addition to resupplying the acceleration region with electrons, this return current will both heat the coronal plasma and flatten the electron distribution at lower energies. This flattening in the electron distribution in turn flattens the X-ray spectrum. We have found that return-current collisional thick-target model (RCCTTM) of Holman (2012) provides an acceptable fit to X-ray spectra with strong breaks for 18 flares observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This is a 1D model similar to the collisional thick-target model (CTTM) with two additional assumptions: (1) electrons lose some of their energy through return current losses along their path to the thick target, where they lose all their remaining energy through Coulomb collisions; (2) the non-thermal beam is streaming in a warm target, which means that electrons will be thermalized at a non-zero energy. We assume this energy to be equal to the analytical value derived by Kontar et al. 2015. We show that return-current heating in the corona is about an order of magnitude higher than the heating at the footpoints at times during the flare.

  4. FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments): A Major Next-Step for Laboratory Studies of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W.; Bale, Stuart D.; Carter, T.; Crocker, N.; Drake, J.; Egedal, J.; Sarff, J.; Fox, W.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C.; Ren, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.

    2015-04-01

    A new intermediate-scale plasma experiment, called the Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments or FLARE (flare.pppl.gov), is under construction at Princeton as a joint project by five universities and two national labs to study magnetic reconnection in regimes directly relevant to heliophysical and astrophysical plasmas. The currently existing small-scale experiments have been focusing on the single X-line reconnection process in plasmas either with small effective sizes or at low Lundquist numbers, both of which are typically very large in natural plasmas. These new regimes involve multiple X-lines as guided by a reconnection "phase diagram", in which different coupling mechanisms from the global system scale to the local dissipation scale are classified into different reconnection phases [H. Ji & W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 111207 (2011)]. The design of the FLARE device is based on the existing Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) (mrx.pppl.gov) and is to provide experimental access to the new phases involving multiple X-lines at large effective sizes and high Lundquist numbers, directly relevant to magnetospheric, solar wind, and solar coronal plasmas. After a brief summary of recent laboratory results on the topic of magnetic reconnection, the motivating major physics questions, the construction status, and the planned collaborative research especially with heliophysics communities will be discussed.

  5. Fine Structure of Metric Type IV Radio Bursts Observed with the ARTEMIS-IV Radio-Spectrograph: Association with Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouratzis, C.; Hillaris, A.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Caroubalos, C.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fine structures embedded in type IV burst continua may be used as diagnostics of the magnetic-field restructuring and the corresponding energy release associated with the low-corona development of flare or coronal mass ejection (CME) events. A catalog of 36 type IV bursts observed with the SAO receiver of the ARTEMIS-IV solar radio-spectrograph in the 450 - 270 MHz range at high cadence (0.01 sec) was compiled; the fine structures were classified into five basic classes with two or more subclasses each. The time of fine-structure emission was compared with the injection of energetic electrons as recorded by hard X-ray and microwave emission, the soft X-ray (SXR) light curves and the CME onset time. Our results indicate a very tight temporal association between energy release episodes and pulsations, spikes, narrow-band bursts of the type III family, and zebra bursts. Of the remaining categories, the featureless broadband continuum starts near the time of the first energy release, between the CME onset and the SXR peak, but extends for several tens of minutes after that, covering almost the full extent of the flare-CME event. The intermediate drift bursts, fibers in their majority, mostly follow the first energy release, but have a wider distribution than other fine structures.

  6. Post-flare loops embedded in a hot coronal fan-like structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Farnik, F.; Hudson, H. S.; Hick, P.

    1997-01-01

    Limb events were demonstrated on the sun in which rising post-flare loops were embedded in hot structures looking in soft X-rays like fans of rays, formed during the flare and extending high into the corona. One of these structures is analyzed and it is suggested that these fans of rays represent temporary ministreamers, along which mass flows into interplanetary space. This suggestion is supported by maps of solar wind density constructed from scintillation measurements.

  7. Performance of Major Flare Watches from the Max Millennium Program (2001 - 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. S.; Gallagher, P. T.; Marquette, W. H.; Milligan, R. O.; Canfield, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    The physical processes that trigger solar flares are not well understood, and significant debate remains around processes governing particle acceleration, energy partition, and particle and energy transport. Observations at high resolution in energy, time, and space are required in multiple energy ranges over the whole course of many flares to build an understanding of these processes. Obtaining high-quality, co-temporal data from ground- and space- based instruments is crucial to achieving this goal and was the primary motivation for starting the Max Millennium program and Major Flare Watch (MFW) alerts, aimed at coordinating observations of all flares ≥ X1 GOES X-ray classification (including those partially occulted by the limb). We present a review of the performance of MFWs from 1 February 2001 to 31 May 2010, inclusive, which finds that (1) 220 MFWs were issued in 3407 days considered (6.5 % duty cycle), with these occurring in 32 uninterrupted periods that typically last 2 - 8 days; (2) 56% of flares ≥ X1 were caught, occurring in 19 % of MFW days; (3) MFW periods ended at suitable times, but substantial gain could have been achieved in percentage of flares caught if periods had started 24 h earlier; (4) MFWs successfully forecast X-class flares with a true skill statistic (TSS) verification metric score of 0.500, that is comparable to a categorical flare/no-flare interpretation of the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Centre probabilistic forecasts (TSS = 0.488).

  8. ON THE INJECTION OF HELICITY BY THE SHEARING MOTION OF FLUXES IN RELATION TO FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Ambastha, A.; Maurya, R. A.; Chae, J. E-mail: ambastha@prl.res.in E-mail: jcchae@snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-20

    An investigation of helicity injection by photospheric shear motions is carried out for two active regions (ARs), NOAA 11158 and 11166, using line-of-sight magnetic field observations obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We derived the horizontal velocities in the ARs from the differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE) technique. Persistent strong shear motions at maximum velocities in the range of 0.6-0.9 km s{sup -1} along the magnetic polarity inversion line and outward flows from the peripheral regions of the sunspots were observed in the two ARs. The helicities injected in NOAA 11158 and 11166 during their six-day evolution period were estimated as 14.16 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2} and 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The estimated injection rates decreased up to 13% by increasing the time interval between the magnetograms from 12 minutes to 36 minutes, and increased up to 9% by decreasing the DAVE window size from 21 Multiplication-Sign 18 to 9 Multiplication-Sign 6 pixel{sup 2}, resulting in 10% variation in the accumulated helicity. In both ARs, the flare-prone regions (R2) had inhomogeneous helicity flux distribution with mixed helicities of both signs and coronal mass ejection (CME) prone regions had almost homogeneous distribution of helicity flux dominated by a single sign. The temporal profiles of helicity injection showed impulsive variations during some flares/CMEs due to negative helicity injection into the dominant region of positive helicity flux. A quantitative analysis reveals a marginally significant association of helicity flux with CMEs but not flares in AR 11158, while for the AR 11166, we find a marginally significant association of helicity flux with flares but not CMEs, providing evidence of the role of helicity injection at localized sites of the events. These short-term variations of helicity flux are further discussed in view of possible

  9. EVIDENCE FOR INTERNAL TETHER-CUTTING IN A FLARE/CORONAL MASS EJECTION OBSERVED BY MESSENGER, RHESSI, AND STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, Claire L.; Gallagher, Peter T.; McAteer, R. T. James; Delahunt, Gareth; Lin, Chia-Hsien

    2010-10-01

    The relationship between eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a topic of ongoing debate, especially regarding the possibility of a common initiation mechanism. We studied the kinematic and hydrodynamic properties of a well-observed event that occurred on 2007 December 31 using data from MESSENGER, RHESSI, and STEREO in order to gain new physical insight into the evolution of the flare and CME. The initiation mechanism was determined by comparing observations to the internal tether-cutting, breakout, and ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. Evidence of pre-eruption reconnection immediately eliminated the ideal MHD model. The timing and location of the soft and hard X-ray sources led to the conclusion that the event was initiated by the internal tether-cutting mechanism. In addition, a thermal source was observed to move in a downward direction during the impulsive phase of the event, followed by upward motion during the decay phase, providing evidence for X- to Y-type magnetic reconnection.

  10. Comparing SSN Index to X-Ray Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection Rates from Solar Cycles 22 - 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, L. M.; Pernak, R. L.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    The newly revised sunspot-number series allows for placing historical geoeffective storms in the context of several hundred years of solar activity. Using statistical analyses of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray observations from the past {≈} 30 years and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) catalog (1996 - present), we present sunspot-number-dependent flare and CME rates. In particular, we present X-ray flare rates as a function of sunspot number for the past three cycles. We also show that the 1 - 8 Å X-ray background flux is strongly correlated with sunspot number across solar cycles. Similarly, we show that the CME properties (e.g. proxies related to the CME linear speed and width) are also correlated with sunspot number for Solar Cycles 23 and 24. These updated rates will enable future predictions for geoeffective events and place historical storms in the context of present solar activity.

  11. Solar flares associated coronal mass ejections in case of type II radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Beena; Prasad, Lalan; Chandra, Harish; Garia, Suman

    2016-08-01

    We have statistically studied 220 events from 1996 to 2008 (i.e. solar cycle 23). Two set of flare-CME is examined one with Deca-hectometric (DH) type II and other without DH type II radio burst. Out of 220 events 135 (flare-halo CME) are accompanied with DH type II radio burst and 85 are without DH type II radio burst. Statistical analysis is performed to examine the distribution of solar flare-halo CME around the solar disk and to investigate the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters in case of with and without DH type II radio burst. In our analysis we have observed that: (i) 10-20° latitudinal belt is more effective than the other belts for DH type II and without DH type II radio burst. In this belt, the southern region is more effective in case of DH type II radio burst, whereas in case of without DH type II radio burst dominance exits in the northern region. (ii) 0-10° longitudinal belt is more effective than the other belts for DH type II radio burst and without DH type II radio burst. In this belt, the western region is more effective in case of DH type II radio burst, while in case of without DH type II radio burst dominance exits in the eastern region. (iii) Mean speed of halo CMEs (1382 km/s) with DH type II radio burst is more than the mean speed of halo CMEs (775 km/s) without DH type II radio burst. (iv) Maximum number of M-class flares is found in both the cases. (v) Average speed of halo CMEs in each class accompanied with DH type II radio burst is higher than the average speed of halo CMEs in each class without DH type II radio burst. (vi) Average speed of halo CMEs, associated with X-class flares, is greater than the other class of solar flares in both the cases.

  12. Electron acceleration in a flare plasma via coronal circuits. (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung im Flareplasma modelliert mit koronalen Schaltkreisen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önel, Hakan

    2008-08-01

    The Sun is a star, which due to its proximity has a tremendous influence on Earth. Since its very first days mankind tried to "understand the Sun", and especially in the 20th century science has uncovered many of the Sun's secrets by using high resolution observations and describing the Sun by means of models. As an active star the Sun's activity, as expressed in its magnetic cycle, is closely related to the sunspot numbers. Flares play a special role, because they release large energies on very short time scales. They are correlated with enhanced electromagnetic emissions all over the spectrum. Furthermore, flares are sources of energetic particles. Hard X-ray observations (e.g., by NASA's RHESSI spacecraft) reveal that a large fraction of the energy released during a flare is transferred into the kinetic energy of electrons. However the mechanism that accelerates a large number of electrons to high energies (beyond 20 keV) within fractions of a second is not understood yet. The thesis at hand presents a model for the generation of energetic electrons during flares that explains the electron acceleration based on real parameters obtained by real ground and space based observations. According to this model photospheric plasma flows build up electric potentials in the active regions in the photosphere. Usually these electric potentials are associated with electric currents closed within the photosphere. However as a result of magnetic reconnection, a magnetic connection between the regions of different magnetic polarity on the photosphere can establish through the corona. Due to the significantly higher electric conductivity in the corona, the photospheric electric power supply can be closed via the corona. Subsequently a high electric current is formed, which leads to the generation of hard X-ray radiation in the dense chromosphere. The previously described idea is modelled and investigated by means of electric circuits. For this the microscopic plasma parameters

  13. Solar Flares and Coronal Physics Using P/OF as a Research Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg, E. (Editor); Wilson, R. M. (Editor); Hudson, R. M. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This NASA Conference Publication contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Solar High-Resolution Astrophysics Using the Pinhole/Occulter Facility held at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, on May 8 to 10, 1985. These proceedings include primarily the invited tutorial papers, extended abstracts of contributed poster papers, and summaries of subpanel (X-Ray and Coronal Physics) discussions. Both observational and theoretical results are presented. Although the emphasis of the Workshop was focused primarily on topics peculiar to solar physics, one paper is included that discusses the P/0F as a tool for X-ray astronomy.

  14. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda; Qiu, Jiong; Judge, Philip G.

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  15. Coronal O VI emission observed with UVCS/SOHO during solar flares: Comparison with soft X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we derive the O VI 1032 Å luminosity profiles of 58 flares, during their impulsive phase, based on off-limb measurements by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The O VI luminosities from the transition region plasma (here defined as the region with temperatures 5.0 ≤ log T (K) ≤ 6.0) were inferred from the analysis of the resonantly scattered radiation of the O VI coronal ions. The temperature of maximum ionization for O VI is log Tmax (K) = 5.47. By comparison with simultaneous soft X-ray measurements, we investigate the likely source (chromospheric evaporation, footpoint emission, or heated prominence ejecta) for the transition region emission observed during the impulsive phase. In our study, we find evidence of the main characteristics predicted by the evaporation scenario. Specifically, most O VI flares precede the X-ray peaks typically by several minutes with a mean of 3.2 ± 0.1 min, and clear correlations are found between the soft X-ray and transition region luminosities following power laws with indices ~ 0.7 ± 0.3. Overall, the results are consistent with transition region emission originating from chromospheric evaporation; the thermal X-ray emission peaks after the emission from the evaporation flow as the loops fill with hot plasma. Finally, we were able to infer flow speeds in the range ~20-100 km s-1 for one-third of the events, 14 of which showed speeds between 60 and 80 km s-1. These values are compatible with those found through direct spectroscopic observations at transition region temperatures by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode.

  16. Evidence of Thermal Conduction Suppression in a Solar Flaring Loop by Coronal Seismology of Slow-mode Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong; Provornikova, Elena; Davila, Joseph M.

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ˜12 minutes and a decay time of ˜9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s‑1 matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ˜10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit.

  17. Coronal Dynamics and Complete Flare Energy Budget for the M Dwarf AD Leo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander; Sonneborn, Georgwe (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the observing and data analysis for FUSE Cycle 3 project C114 to observe the flare star AD Leo for 50 ksec coordinated with HST (Hubble Space Telescope) STIS ultraviolet spectroscopy and Chandra X-ray spectroscopy. Unfortunately, it was impossible to obtain the planned FUSE observations because AD Leo is a low declination target (delta approximately 20 degrees) and was rendered unobservable by restrictions in the sky coverage for FUSE observations. In April 2002 another M dwarf star, EV Lac, which is at significantly higher declination, was substituted for this project. EV Lac was observed by FUSE for a cumulative exposure of 35 ksec on 2002 July 1. The observation used the large LWRS aperture and collected data in time-tagged mode. The LWRS aperture is large enough that the target should remain within the aperture despite the normal level of pointing jitter and target drift experienced during FUSE observing. Our examination of the stellar signal showed that the target was well within the aperture throughout the observation. The data were split into night-time and day-time data so that the effects of airglow emission were recognizable. No obvious flaring, the primary science objective, was detected during the observation. The only stellar lines detected are 0 VI 1031.9, 1037.6 Angstrom, and the C III 1175 Angstrom, UV multiplet and the 977 Angstrom, resonance line. A comparison of the day-time and night-time spectra show that the 0 VI lines and the C III intersystem multiplet are unaffected by airglow features. The day-time data 977 Angstrom profile shows the presence of significant scattered solar C III photons, which should not be present in the night time spectrum. Emission fluxes for these lines were measured by direct summation of the emission lines. No continuum signal was detected in the region of these lines. The cleanest emission line profiles are for the O VI lines and we performed Gaussian fitting for these profiles. Both lines are

  18. Large-scale Contraction and Subsequent Disruption of Coronal Loops During Various Phases of the M6.2 Flare Associated with the Confined Flux Rope Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Upendra; Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-07-01

    We investigate evolutionary phases of an M6.2 flare and the associated confined eruption of a prominence. The pre-flare phase exhibits spectacular large-scale contraction of overlying extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal loops during which the loop system was subjected to an altitude decrease of ∼20 Mm (40% of the initial height) for an extended span of ∼30 minutes. This contraction phase is accompanied by sequential EUV brightenings associated with hard X-ray (HXR; up to 25 keV) and microwave (MW) sources from low-lying loops in the core region which together with X-ray spectra indicate strong localized heating in the source region before the filament activation. With the onset of the flare’s impulsive phase, we detect HXR and MW sources that exhibit intricate temporal and spatial evolution in relation to the fast rise of the prominence. Following the flare maximum, the filament eruption slowed down and subsequently became confined within the large overlying active region loops. During the confinement process of the erupting prominence, we detect MW emission from the extended coronal region with multiple emission centroids, which likely represent emission from hot blobs of plasma formed after the collapse of the expanding flux rope and entailing prominence material. RHESSI spectroscopy reveals high plasma temperature (∼30 MK) and substantial non-thermal characteristics (δ ∼ 5) during the impulsive phase of the flare. The time evolution of thermal energy exhibits a good correspondence with the variations in cumulative non-thermal energy, which suggests that the energy of accelerated particles is efficiently converted to hot flare plasma, implying an effective validation of the Neupert effect.

  19. Onset of the Magnetic Explosion in Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Hudson, H.; Lemen, J. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present observations of the magnetic field configuration and its transformation in six solar eruptive events that show good agreement with the Hirayama-Shibata model for eruptive flares. The observations arc X-ray images from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) and magnetograms from Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory, interpreted together with the 1-8 Angstrom X-ray flux observed by GOES. The observations show: 1. Each event is a magnetic explosion that occurs in an initially closed magnetic bipole in which the core field is sheared and twisted in the shape of a sigmoid, having an oppositely curved elbow on each end. The arms of the opposite elbows are sheared past each other so that they overlap and are crossed low above the neutral line in the middle of the bipole. 2. Although four of the explosions arc ejective (blow open the bipole) and two are confined (arc arrested within the closed bipole), all six begin the same way. In the SXT iniages, the explosion begins with brightening and expansion of the two elbows together with the appearance of short bright sheared loops low over the neutral line under the crossed arms and, rising up from the crossed arms, long strands connecting the far ends of the elbows. 3. All six events arc single-bipole events in that during the onset and early development of the explosion they show no evidence for reconnection between the exploding bipole and any surrounding magnetic fields. We conclude that in each of our events the magnetic explosion was unleashed by runaway tether-cutting via implosive/explosive rcconnection in the middle of the sigmoid, as in the Hirayama-Shibata model. The similarity of the onsets of the two confined explosions to the onsets of the four ejective explosions and their agreement with the model indicate that runaway reconnection inside a sheared core field can begin whether or not the overlying fields (the envelope field and contiguous fields that press down on the envelope) allow the explosion to be

  20. THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

  1. LATERAL OFFSET OF THE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM THE X-FLARE OF 2006 DECEMBER 13 AND ITS TWO PRECURSOR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Harra, Louise K. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2011-12-10

    Two GOES sub-C-class precursor eruptions occurred within {approx}10 hr prior to and from the same active region as the 2006 December 13 X4.3-class flare. Each eruption generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) with center laterally far offset ({approx}> 45 Degree-Sign ) from the co-produced bright flare. Explaining such CME-to-flare lateral offsets in terms of the standard model for solar eruptions has been controversial. Using Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data, and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data, we find or infer the following. (1) The first precursor was a 'magnetic-arch-blowout' event, where an initial standard-model eruption of the active region's core field blew out a lobe on one side of the active region's field. (2) The second precursor began similarly, but the core-field eruption stalled in the side-lobe field, with the side-lobe field erupting {approx}1 hr later to make the CME either by finally being blown out or by destabilizing and undergoing a standard-model eruption. (3) The third eruption, the X-flare event, blew out side lobes on both sides of the active region and clearly displayed characteristics of the standard model. (4) The two precursors were offset due in part to the CME originating from a side-lobe coronal arcade that was offset from the active region's core. The main eruption (and to some extent probably the precursor eruptions) was offset primarily because it pushed against the field of the large sunspot as it escaped outward. (5) All three CMEs were plausibly produced by a suitable version of the standard model.

  2. Unusual Emissions at Various Energies Prior to the Impulsive Phase of the Large Solar Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection of 4 November 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Holman, Gordon D.; Su, Yang; de Castro, C. Guillermo Gimenez; Correia, Emilia; Fernandes, Luis O. T.; de Souza, Rodney V.; Marun, Adolfo; Pereyra, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The GOES X28 flare of 4 November 2003 was the largest ever recorded in its class. It produced the first evidence for two spectrally separated emission components, one at microwaves and the other in the THz range of frequencies.We analyzed the pre-flare phase of this large flare, twenty minutes before the onset of the major impulsive burst. This periodis characterized by unusual activity in X-rays, sub-THz frequencies, H, and microwaves.The CME onset occurred before the onset of the large burst by about 6 min.

  3. A major 15 GHz radio flare in the blazar Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovatta, Talvikki; Richards, Joseph L.; Aller, Margo F.; Aller, Hugh D.; Max-Moerbeck, Walter; Pearson, Timothy J.; Readhead, Anthony C. S.

    2012-10-01

    We have observed a major 15 GHz radio flare in Mrk 421, a high-synchrotron-peaked (HSP) BL Lac object. A major gamma-ray flare in this source was detected on 16 July 2012. This was reported by the Fermi-LAT collaboration (ATel #4261), with the source reaching its highest flux (E>100 MeV) observed during the Fermi mission. A simultaneous TeV detection was later reported by ARGO-YBJ (ATel #4272). Since 2008, Mrk 421 has been observed approximately twice per week at 15 GHz with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) 40m Telescope as part of our gamma-ray blazar monitoring program (Richards et al.

  4. Reply. [to comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    In replying to a comment by Hudson et. al. (1995) in regards to Gosling (1993), Gosling (1995) holds that solar flares do not play a major role in geomagnetic storms. According to Gosling, Hudson et. al. has done nothing to demonstrate that flares either produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or cause major disturbances in the near-Earth space environment.

  5. The spectroscopic imprint of the pre-eruptive configuration resulting into two major coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syntelis, P.; Gontikakis, C.; Patsourakos, S.; Tsinganos, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present a spectroscopic analysis of the pre-eruptive configuration of active region NOAA 11429, prior to two very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on March 7, 2012 that are associated with this active region. We study the thermal components and the dynamics associated with the ejected flux ropes. Methods: Using differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of Hinode/EIS and SDO/AIA observations, we identify the emission components of both the flux rope and the host active region. We then follow the time evolution of the flux rope emission components by using AIA observations. The plasma density and the Doppler and non-thermal velocities associated with the flux ropes are also calculated from the EIS data. Results: The eastern and western parts of the active region, in which the two different fast CMEs originated during two X-class flares, were studied separately. In both regions we identified an emission component in the temperature range of log T = 6.8-7.1 associated with the presence of flux ropes. The time evolution of the eastern region showed an increase in the mean DEM in this temperature range by an order of magnitude, 5 h prior to the first CME. This was associated with a gradual rise and heating of the flux rope as manifested by blue-shifts and increased non-thermal velocities in Ca xv 200.97 Å, respectively. An overall upward motion of the flux ropes was measured (relative blue-shifts of ~ 12 km s-1). The measured electron density was found to be 4 × 109-2 × 1010 cm-3 (using the ratio of Ca xv 181.90 Å over Ca xv 200.97 Å). We compare our findings with other works on the same AR to provide a unified picture of its evolution.

  6. JET PROPULSION OF WIND EJECTA FROM A MAJOR FLARE IN THE BLACK HOLE MICROQUASAR SS433

    SciTech Connect

    Blundell, Katherine M.; Hirst, Paul

    2011-07-01

    We present direct evidence, from adaptive-optics near-infrared imaging, of the jets in the Galactic microquasar SS433 interacting with enhanced wind-outflow off the accretion disk that surrounds the black hole in this system. Radiant quantities of gas are transported significant distances away from the black hole approximately perpendicular to the accretion disk from which the wind emanates. We suggest that the material that comprised the resulting 'bow-tie' structure is associated with a major flare that the system exhibited 10 months prior to the observations. During this flare, excess matter was expelled by the accretion disk as an enhanced wind, which in turn is 'snow-ploughed', or propelled, out by the much faster jets that move at approximately a quarter of the speed of light. Successive instances of such bow-ties may be responsible for the large-scale X-ray cones observed within the W50 nebula by ROSAT.

  7. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN X-RAY LUMINOSITY AND MAJOR FLARE LAUNCHING IN GRS 1915+105

    SciTech Connect

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jerome E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com

    2013-02-20

    We perform the most detailed analysis to date of the X-ray state of the Galactic black hole candidate GRS 1915+105 just prior to (0-4 hr) and during the brief (1-7 hr) ejection of major (superluminal) radio flares. A very strong model independent correlation is found between the 1.2 keV-12 keV X-ray flux 0-4 hr before flare ejections with the peak optically thin 2.3 GHz emission of the flares. This suggests a direct physical connection between the energy in the ejection and the luminosity of the accretion flow preceding the ejection. In order to quantify this concept, we develop techniques to estimate the intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosity, L {sub intrinsic}, from RXTE All Sky Monitor data and to implement known methods to estimate the time-averaged power required to launch the radio emitting plasmoids, Q (sometimes called jet power). We find that the distribution of intrinsic luminosity from 1.2 keV-50 keV, L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50), is systematically elevated just before ejections compared to arbitrary times when there are no major ejections. The estimated Q is strongly correlated with L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) 0-4 hr before the ejection, the increase in L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) in the hours preceding the ejection and the time-averaged L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) during the flare rise. Furthermore, the total time-averaged power during the ejection (Q + the time average of L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) during ejection) is strongly correlated with L {sub intrinsic} (1.2-50) just before launch with near equality if the distance to the source is Almost-Equal-To 10.5 kpc.

  8. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  9. Magnetic-field variations in the active region NOAA 10486 and their relationship to X-ray flares and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumak, O. V.; Zhang, H.-Q.; Guo, J.

    2008-10-01

    SOHO/MDI magnetograms are used to analyze the time variations in the magnetic parameters of the active region (AR) NOAA 10486, which was part of a large activity complex that passed over the solar disk from October 26 to 31, 2003, during solar cycle 23. The results are compared with X-ray flares in the AR and the parameters of coronal mass ejections associated with the AR. The time variations in the distributions of themagnetic-field strengths associated with the total magnetic flux (Fa), the flux imbalance between the northern and southern polarities (Im), the complexity of the field, as a measure of the mutual overlapping of the opposite polarities (Co), and the tilt angle of the magnetic axis (An) are considered. The time variations in the free energy accumulated in current sheets of ARs were traced using a parameter introduced for this purpose (Sh). The following results were obtained. First, the parameters Fa, Im, Co, An, and Sh quantitatively describe the current state of the AR and can be used to trace and analyze the dynamical evolution of its magnetic field. Second, variations in the magnetic-field-strength distributions and the mean values of Fa, Im, Co, An, and Sh are associated with flares and coronal mass ejections, and the variations have considerable amplitudes. Third, the parameter Sh characterizing the degree to which the magnetic field is non-potential in regions adjacent to the main neutral line increases before eruptive events, and is thus particular interest for monitoring the states of ARs in real time. Fourth, the magnetic field of the AR manifests a sort of quasi-elasticity, so that the field structure is restored after active events, on average, within 1 3 h.

  10. Solar flare nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    1995-03-01

    The evolution of solar flare nomenclature is reviewed in the context of the paradigm shift, in progress, from flares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar-terrestrial physics. Emphasis is placed on: the distinction between eruptive (Class II) flares and confined (Class I) flares; and the underlying similarity of eruptive flares inside (two-ribbon flares) and outside (flare-like brightenings accompanying disappearing filaments) of active regions. A list of reserach questions/ problems raised, or brought into focus, by the new paradigm is suggested; in general, these questions bear on the inter- relationships and associations of the two classes (or phases) or flares. Terms such as 'eruptive flare' and 'eruption' (defined to encompass both the CME and its associated eruptive flare) may be useful as nominal links between opposing viewpoints in the 'flares vs CMEs' controversy.

  11. Study of the Three-dimensional Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    We apply a data-driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare that occurred on 2010 October 25. The MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photosphere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria based on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory around the time of the flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most cases. The magnetic configuration changes very little during the studied time interval of 2 hr. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by ~1030 erg, which seems to be adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare.

  12. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. VII - A long-duration X-ray flare associated with a coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreplin, R. W.; Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Seely, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized that very long duration X-ray events (lasting several hours) are frequently associated with coronal mass ejection. Thus, Sheeley et al. (1983) found that the probability of the occurrence of a coronal mass ejection (CME) increases monotonically with the X-ray event duration time. It is pointed out that the association of long-duration, or long-decay, X-ray events (LDEs) with CMEs was first recognized from analysis of solar images obtained by the X-ray telescopes on Skylab and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) slitless spectroheliograph. Recently high-resolution Bragg crystal X-ray spectrometers have been flown on three spacecraft, including the Department of Defense P78-1 spacecraft, the NASA Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), and the Japanese Hinotori spacecraft. In the present paper, P78-1 X-ray spectra of an LDE which had its origin behind the solar west limb on November 14, 1980 is presented. The obtained data make it possible to estimate temperatures of the hottest portion of the magnetic loops in which the emission arises.

  13. On the statistical characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet halo coronal mass ejections and their associated flares during solar cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Nishant; Sharma, Joginder; Verma, Virendar Kumar; Garg, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the characteristics of radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) front side halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) (angular width 360°) observed between the time period years 1996-2014. RL-HCMEs are associated with type II radio bursts, while RQ-HCMEs are not associated with type II radio bursts. CMEs near the Sun in the interplanetary medium associated with radio bursts also affect the magnetosphere. The type II radio burst data was observed by WIND/WAVES instrument and HCMEs were observed by LASCO/ SOHO instruments. In our study, we have examined the properties of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs and found that RL-HCMEs follow the solar cycle variation. Our study also shows that the 26% of slow speed HCMEs and 82% of fast speed HCMEs are RL. The average speed of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs are 1370 km/s and 727 km/s, respectively. Most of the RQ-HCMEs occur around the solar disc center while most of RL-HCMEs are uniformly distributed across the solar disc. The mean value of acceleration of RL-HCMEs is more than twice that of RQ-HCMEs and mean value of deceleration of RL- HCMEs is very small compare to RQ-HCMEs events. It is also found that RQ-HCMEs events are associated with C- and M-class of SXR flares, while RL-HCMEs events are associated with M and X-class of SXR flares, which indicates that the RQ-HCMEs are less energetic than the RL-HCMEs. We have also discussed the various results obtained in present investigation in view of recent scenario of solar physics.

  14. Evidence of elevated X-ray absorption before and during major flare ejections in GRS 1915+105

    SciTech Connect

    Punsly, Brian; Rodriguez, Jérôme

    2014-03-10

    We present time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1915+105 with the MAXI observatory in order to study the accretion state just before and during the ejections associated with its major flares. Radio monitoring with the RATAN-600 radio telescope from 4.8-11.2 GHz has revealed two large, steep-spectrum major flares in the first eight months of 2013. Since the RATAN has received one measurement per day, we cannot determine the jet-forming time without more information. Fortunately, this is possible since a distinct X-ray light curve signature that occurs preceding and during major ejections has been determined in an earlier study. The X-ray luminosity spikes to very high levels in the hours before ejection, then becomes variable (with a nearly equal X-ray luminosity when averaged over the duration of the ejection) during a brief 3-8 hr ejection process. By comparing this X-ray behavior with MAXI light curves, we can estimate the beginning and end of the ejection episode of the strong 2013 flares to within ∼3 hr. Using this estimate in conjunction with time-resolved spectroscopy from the data in the MAXI archives allows us to deduce that the X-ray absorbing hydrogen column density increases significantly in the hours preceding the ejections and remains elevated during the ejections responsible for the major flares. This finding is consistent with an outflowing wind or enhanced accretion at high latitudes.

  15. SWUSV: a microsatellite mission for space weather early forecasting of major flares and CMEs and the complete monitoring of the ultraviolet solar variability influence on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc

    The SWUSV (Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability) proposed microsatellite mission encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (using Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging and H-Alpha ground support); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 10 to 20 nm, including ozone, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous local radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The mission is on a sun-synchronous polar orbit and proposes 5 instruments to the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200-220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2020-2021. With opening to Chinese collaboration (ESA-CAS Small Mission) a further instrument could be added (HEBS, High Energy Burst Spectrometers) to reinforced Space Weather flares prediction objectives.

  16. Coronal extension of flaring region magnetic fields inferred from high-resolution microwave and type III burst observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantos, P.; Pick, M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of three solar radio bursts, obtained with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at 6 cm wavelength, have been combined with meter observations from the Mark III Nancay Radioheliograph. There is a good correlation between solar activity observed at the two wavelength domains. A small change by about 10 sec in the centimetric burst location corresponds to a large change, by about 0.5 solar radius, in the related metric type III burst location. This indicates discrete injection/acceleration regions and the presence of very divergent magnetic fields. The bursts come from two distinct active regions. With two-dimensional spatial resolution, it is shown that, in this sample, each active region possesses a coronal extension that is separated from that of the neighboring active region.

  17. Evidence of a Plasmoid-Looptop Interaction and Magnetic Inflows During a Solar Flare/Coronal Mass Ejection Eruptive Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; McAteer, R. T. James; Dennis, Brian R.; Young, C. Alex

    2010-01-01

    Observational evidence is presented for the merging of a downward-propagating plasmoid with a looptop kernel during an occulted limb event on 2007 January 25. RHESSI light curves in the 9-18 keV energy range, as well as that of the 245 MHz channel of the Learmonth Solar Observatory, show enhanced nonthermal emission in the corona at the time of the merging suggesting that additional particle acceleration took place. This was attributed to a secondary episode of reconnection in the current sheet that formed between the two merging sources. RHESSI images were used to establish a mean downward velocity of the plasmoid of 12 km/s. Complementary observations from the SECCHI suite of instruments on board STEREO-B showed that this process occurred during the acceleration phase of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME). From wavelet-enhanced EUV Imager, image evidence of inflowing magnetic field lines prior to the CME eruption is also presented. The derived inflow velocity was found to be 1.5 km/s. This combination of observations supports a recent numerical simulation of plasmoid formation, propagation, and subsequent particle acceleration due to the tearing mode instability during current sheet formation.

  18. FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments): A Major Next-Step for Laboratory Studies of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Bale, S.; Carter, T.; Crocker, N.; Drake, J.; Egedal, J.; Wallace, J.; Belova, E.; Ellis, R.; Fox, W.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Kalish, M.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C.; Que, W.; Ren, Y.; Titus, P.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Daughton, W.

    2014-10-01

    A new intermediate-scale plasma experiment, called the Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments or FLARE, is under construction at Princeton as a joint project by five universities and two national labs to study magnetic reconnection in regimes directly relevant to space, solar, astrophysical, and fusion plasmas. The currently existing small-scale experiments have been focusing on the single X-line reconnection process in plasmas either with small effective sizes or at low Lundquist numbers, but both of which are typically very large in natural and fusion plasmas. The design of the FLARE device is motivated to provide experimental access to the new regimes involving multiple X-lines at large effective sizes and high Lundquist numbers. The motivating major physics questions, the construction status, and the planned collaborative research will be discussed.

  19. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  20. Evaporative cooling of flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    We investigate a one-dimensional loop model for the evaporative cooling of the coronal flare plasma. The important assumptions are that conductive losses dominate radiative cooling and that the evaporative velocities are small compared with the sound speed. We calculate the profile and evolution of the temperature and verify the accuracy of our assumptions for plasma parameters typical of flare regions. The model is in agreement with soft X-ray observations on the evolution of flare temperatures and emission measures. The effect of evaporation is to greatly reduce the conductive heat flux into the chromosphere and to enhance the EUV emission from the coronal flare plasma.

  1. The effect of solar flares, coronal mass ejections, and co-rotating interaction regions on the Venusian 557.7 nm oxygen green line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Candace L.; Chanover, Nancy; Slanger, Tom; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Peter, Kerstin; Häusler, Bernd; Tellmann, Silvia; Pätzold, Martin; Witasse, Olivier; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Collinson, Glyn

    2015-11-01

    The Venusian 557.7nm OI (1S - 1D) (oxygen green line) nightglow emission is known to be highly temporally variable. The reason for this variability is unknown. We propose that the emission is due to electron precipitation from intense solar storms. For my dissertation, I observed the Venusian green line after solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and co-rotating interaction regions from December 2010 to April 2015 using the high resolution Astrophysical Research Consortium Echelle Spectrograph on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. Combining these observation with all other published observations, we find that the strongest detections occur after CME impacts and we conclude electron precipitation is required to produce green line emission. We do not detect emission from the 630.0nm OI (1D - 3P) oxygen red line for any observation.In an effort to determine the emitting altitude, thereby constraining the possible emission processes responsible for green line emission, and quantify the electron energy and flux entering the Venusian nightside, we conducted analyses of space-based observations of the Venusian nightglow and ionosphere collected by the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft. We were unable to detect the green line but confirmed that electron energy and flux increases after CME impacts.In order to determine the effect of storm condition electron precipitation on the Venusian green line, we modeled the Venusian ionosphere using the TRANSCAR model (a 1-D magnetohydrodynamic ionospheric model that simulates auroral emission from electron precipitation) by applying observed electron energies and fluxes. We found that electron energy plays a primary role in producing increased green line emission in the Venusian ionosphere.Based on observation and modeling results, we conclude that the Venusian green line is an auroral-type emission that occurs after solar storms with the largest intensities observed after CMEs. Post-CME electron fluxes and energies

  2. Ionospheric and dayglow responses to the radiative phase of the Bastille Day flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R. R.; Warren, H. P.; Nicholas, A. C.; Bishop, J.; Huba, J. D.; Drob, D. P.; Lean, J. L.; Picone, J. M.; Mariska, J. T.; Joyce, G.; Judge, D. L.; Thonnard, S. E.; Dymond, K. F.; Budzien, S. A.

    2002-05-01

    The Sun's Bastille Day flare on July 14, 2000 produced a variety of geoeffective events. This solar eruption consisted of an X-class flare followed by a coronal mass ejection that produced a major geomagnetic storm. We have undertaken a study of this event beginning with an analysis of the effects of the radiative phase of the flare on the dayglow and the ionosphere. The key new enabling work is a novel method of evaluating the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance changes associated with the flare. We find that the solar radiative output enhancements modeled during the flare are consistent with measurements of both solar EUV irradiance and far UV Earth thermospheric dayglow. We use the SAMI2 model to predict global ionospheric changes along a magnetic meridian that show significantly different northern and southern effects, suggesting that flares can be used to study ionospheric dynamics.

  3. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-11-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  4. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  5. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  6. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-10-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind-stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code developed here can be used for analysis of existing Solar TErrestrial RElationship Observatory (STEREO) data, but primarily serves for a design study of a future mission with dedicated diagnostics of non-potential magnetic fields. For a pixel size of 0.6^'' (corresponding to the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) spatial resolution of 1.4^''), we find an optimum spacecraft-separation angle of αs ≈5°.

  7. Relationship of great soft X-ray flares with other solar activity phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V. K.

    2011-07-01

    We present study of relationship of GSXR flares with H α flares, hard X-ray (HXR) bursts, microwave (MW) bursts at 15.4 GHz, type II/IV radio bursts, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), protons flares (>10 MeV) and ground level enhancement (GLE) events we find that about 85.7%, 93%, 97%, 69%, 60%, 11.1%, 79%, 46%, and 23%% GSXR flares are related/associated with observed H α flares, HXR bursts, MW bursts at 15.4 GHz, type II radio bursts, type IV radio bursts, GLE events, CMEs, halo CMEs, and proton flares (>10 MeV), respectively. In the paper we have studied the onset time delay of GSXR flares with H α flares, HXR, and MW bursts which shows the during majority GSXR flares SXR emissions start before the H α, HXR and MW emissions, respectively while during 15-20% of GSXR flares the SXR emissions start after the onset of H α, HXT and MW emissions, respectively indicating two types of solar flares. The, onset time interval between SXR emissions and type II radio bursts, type IV radio bursts, GLE events CMEs, halo CMEs, and protons flares are 1-15 min, 1-20 min, 21-30 min, 21-40 min, 21-40 min, and 1-4 hrs, respectively. Following the majority results we are of the view that the present investigations support solar flares models which suggest flare triggering first in the corona and then move to chromospheres/ photosphere to starts emissions in other wavelengths. The result of the present work is largely consistent with "big flare syndrome" proposed by Kahler (1982).

  8. CORONAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil

    2012-04-10

    We have recently noticed cellular features in Fe XII 193 A images of the 1.2 MK corona. They occur in regions bounded by a coronal hole and a filament channel, and are centered on flux elements of the photospheric magnetic network. Like their neighboring coronal holes, these regions have minority-polarity flux that is {approx}0.1-0.3 times their flux of majority polarity. Consequently, the minority-polarity flux is 'grabbed' by the majority-polarity flux to form low-lying loops, and the remainder of the network flux escapes to connect with its opposite-polarity counterpart in distant active regions of the Sun. As these regions are carried toward the limb by solar rotation, the cells disappear and are replaced by linear plumes projecting toward the limb. In simultaneous views from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, these plumes project in opposite directions, extending away from the coronal hole in one view and toward the hole in the other view, suggesting that they are sky-plane projections of the same radial structures. We conclude that these regions are composed of closely spaced radial plumes, extending upward like candles on a birthday cake and visible as cells when seen from above. We suppose that a coronal hole has this same discrete, cellular magnetic structure, but that it is not seen until the encroachment of opposite-polarity flux closes part or all of the hole.

  9. Towards Predicting Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa; Balasubramaniam, Karatholuvu S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of solar X-ray flares observed using GOES X-ray observations of the ~50,000 fares that occurred from 1986 - mid-2014. Observed X-ray parameters are computed for each of the flares, including the 24-hour non-flare X-ray background in the 1-8 A band and the maximum ratio of the short (0.5 - 4 A) to long band (1-8 A) during flares. These parameters, which are linked to the amount of active coronal heating and maximum flare temperature, reveal a separation between the X-, M-, C-, and B- class fares. The separation was quantified and verified through machine-learning algorithms (k nearest neighbor; nearest centroid). Using the solar flare parameters learned from solar cycles 22-23, we apply the models to predict flare categories of solar cycle 24. Skill scores are then used to assess the success of our models, yielding correct predictions for ~80% of M-, C-, and B-class flares and 100% correct predictions for X-flares. We present details of the analysis along with the potential uses of our model in flare forecasting.

  10. FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments): A Major Next-Step for Laboratory Studies of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W. S.; Bale, S. D.; Carter, T. A.; Crocker, N.; Drake, J. F.; Egedal, J.; Sarff, J.; Wallace, J.; Belova, E.; Ellis, R.; Fox, W. R., II; Heitzenroeder, P.; Kalish, M.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C. E.; Que, W.; Ren, Y.; Titus, P.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.

    2014-12-01

    A new intermediate-scale plasma experiment, called the Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments or FLARE, is under construction at Princeton as a joint project by five universities and two national labs to study magnetic reconnection in regimes directly relevant to space, solar and astrophysical plasmas. The currently existing small-scale experiments have been focusing on the single X-line reconnection process in plasmas either with small effective sizes or at low Lundquist numbers, both of which are typically very large in natural plasmas. These new regimes involve multiple X-lines as guided by a reconnection "phase diagram", in which different coupling mechanisms from the global system scale to the local dissipation scale are classified into different reconnection phases [H. Ji & W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 111207 (2011)]. The design of the FLARE device is based on the existing Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) at Princeton (http://mrx.pppl.gov) and is to provide experimental access to the new phases involving multiple X-lines at large effective sizes and high Lundquist numbers, directly relevant to space and solar plasmas. The motivating major physics questions, the construction status, and the planned collaborative research especially with space and solar research communities will be discussed.

  11. Evaporative cooling of flare plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    A one-dimensional loop model for the evaporative cooling of the coronal flare plasma was investigated. Conductive losses dominated radiative cooling, and the evaporative velocities were small compared to the sound speed. The profile and evolution of the temperature were calculated. The model was in agreement with soft X-ray observations on the evolution of flare temperatures and emission measures. The effect of evaporation was to greatly reduce the conductive heat flux into the chromosphere and to enhance the EUV emission from the coronal flare plasma.

  12. Impact of Major Coronal Mass Ejections on Geospace during 2005 September 7-13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Xue, Xianghui; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.; Zhang, Jie

    2006-07-01

    We have analyzed five major CMEs originating from NOAA active region (AR) 808 during the period of 2005 September 7-13, when the AR 808 rotated from the east limb to near solar meridian. Several factors that affect the probability of the CMEs' encounter with the Earth are demonstrated. The solar and interplanetary observations suggest that the second and third CMEs, originating from E67° and E47°, respectively, encountered the Earth, while the first CME originating from E77° missed the Earth, and the last two CMEs, although originating from E39° and E10°, respectively, probably only grazed the Earth. On the basis of our ice cream cone mode and CME deflection model, we find that the CME span angle and deflection are important for the probability of encountering Earth. The large span angles allowed the middle two CMEs to hit the Earth, even though their source locations were not close to the solar central meridian. The significant deflection made the first CME totally miss the Earth even though it also had wide span angle. The deflection may also have made the last CME nearly miss the Earth even though it originated close to the disk center. We suggest that, in order to effectively predict whether a CME will encounter the Earth, the factors of the CME source location, the span angle, and the interplanetary deflection should all be taken into account.

  13. Impact of major coronal mass ejections on geo-space during September 7 -- 13, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Xue, X.; Shen, C.; Ye, P.; Wang, S.; Zhang, J.

    2006-05-01

    We have analyzed five major CMEs originating from NOAA active region (AR) 808 during the period of September 7 to 13, 2005, when the AR 808 rotated from the east limb to near solar meridian. Several factors that affect the probability of the CMEs' encounter with the Earth are demonstrated. The solar and interplanetary observations suggest that the 2nd and 3rd CMEs, originating from E67 and E47 respectively, encountered the Earth, while the 1st CME originating from E77 missed the Earth, and the last two CMEs, originating from E39 and E10 respectively, probably only grazed the Earth. Based on our ice-cream cone model (Xue et al. 2005a) and CME deflection model (Wang et al. 2004b), we find that the CME span angle and deflection are important for the probability of encountering. The large span angles make middle two CMEs hit the Earth, though their source locations were not close to the solar central meridian. The significant deflection makes the first CME totally missed the Earth though it also had wide span angle. The deflection may also make the last CME nearly missed the Earth though it originated close to the disk center. We suggest that, in order to effectively predict whether a CME will encounter the Earth, the factors of the CME source location, the span angle, and the interplanetary deflection should all be taken into account.

  14. Sunquake Generation by Coronal Magnetic Restructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Mooney, M.; Leake, J. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are powered by major restructurings of the coronal magnetic field, which appear to strongly perturb the magnetic field in the photosphere as well. Could the associated Lorentz forces generate sunquakes, as suggested by Hudson et al. 2008? Here, we present the first MHD simulations of sunquake generation by magnetic field perturbations, and explore the details of this mechanism. The downgoing magnetic field change is modelled as an Alfven wave, which propagates into the lower atmosphere. When it reaches the vicinity of the beta=1 layer (where the Alfven and sound speeds are equal), non-linear coupling excites a downgoing acoustic wave, which we interpret as a sunquake. The amplitude of the acoustic wave increases nonlinearly with the amplitude of the magnetic perturbation, reaching a limit where around 35% of the injected Poynting flux is transferred to the seismic wave - enough energy to match sunquake observations.

  15. The great flare of 1982 June 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, K.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    The great soft X-ray (SXR) flare (X12) of the past solar maximum was observed by Hinotori and by Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) on June 6, 1982. Hinotori data consist of hard X-ray (HXR) and SXR images in the rise and decay of the flare, high-resolution soft X-ray spectra throughout the flare, and HXR and gamma-ray data. The BBSO data include films of H-alpha, H-alpha blue wing, D3 and longitudinal magnetic field, as well as video tapes of continuum. Images in HXR, SXR, H-alpha, D3 and the continuum are compared and SXR spectra analyzed. The flare resulted from extended motion of a large spot shearing the magnetic field. D3 and white-light images exhibit a progression from fast flashes to two ribbons, while both HXR and SXR are centered on the optical kernels. The continuum emission shows the same temporal behavior as the HXR at 160 keV. In its early phases, the Fe XXV line was double-peaked, and a decreasing blueshifted (up to 400 km/sec) component was observed, from which the evaporation rate of chromospheric material was estimated. It is suggested that this upflow is adequate to supply the coronal cloud. Flare energetics are discussed in detail, and it is concluded that a significant amount of energy was deposited in the corona, and that nonthermal electrons are the major energy input.

  16. The study of a spatial relationship between the Equatorial coronal hole and the Active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Mahendra; Karna, Nishu

    2016-05-01

    The 11-year solar cycle is characterized by the periodic change in the solar activity like sunspot numbers, coronal holes, active regions, eruptions such as flares and coronal mass ejections. We study the relationship between equatorial coronal holes (ECH) and the active regions (AR) as coronal hole positions and sizes change with the solar cycle. We made a detailed study for two solar maximum: Solar Cycle 23 (1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002) and Solar Cycle 24 (2011, 2012 and 2013). We used publically available Heliophysics Feature Catalogue and NOAA Solar Geophysical data for. Moreover, we used daily Solar Region Summary (SRS) data from SWPC/NOAA website. We examined the position of ECH and AR and noted that during a maximum of 23, the majority of ECH were not near active regions. However, in cycle 24 coronal holes and equatorial holes were more close to each other. Moreover, we noticed the asymmetry in AR migrations towards the lower latitude in both Northern and Southern hemisphere in cycle 23. While, no such notable asymmetrical behavior was observed in a maximum of cycle 24. Our goal is to extend the study with cycle 21 and 22 and examine the correlation between equatorial holes, the active regions, and the flares. This combined study will shed light in determining the distribution of flares.

  17. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures. PMID:10859129

  18. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  19. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in describing and interpreting coronal plasma processes and the relationship between the solar corona and its stellar counterparts is reported. Topics covered include: stellar X-ray emission, HEAO 2 X-ray survey of the Pleiades, closed coronal structures, X-ray survey of main-sequence stars with shallow convection zones, implications of the 1400 MHz flare emission, and magnetic field stochasticity.

  20. FLUX ROPE FORMATION PRECEDING CORONAL MASS EJECTION ONSET

    SciTech Connect

    Green, L. M.; Kliem, B. E-mail: bhk@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-08-01

    We analyze the evolution of a sigmoidal (S-shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  1. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, Bernhard; Green, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    We analyse the evolution of a sigmoidal (S shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  2. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, L. M.; Kliem, B.

    2009-08-01

    We analyze the evolution of a sigmoidal (S-shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  3. Study of the Photospheric Magnetic Field and Coronal Emission from Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Jordan Armando Guerra

    2016-01-01

    Solar explosive phenomena (flares and Coronal Mass Ejections, CMEs) are examples of how the most dynamical processes within the heliosphere are interconnected and powered by the Sun. Solar flares originate in active regions (AR) -- areas of strong magnetic field on the solar surface. The electromagnetic (EM) energy released during flares, along with the often-seen CMEs, propagate through the heliosphere. In the Earth's vicinity, EM radiation and charged particles have the potential to produce unfavorable conditions for humans and technology in space. From many points of view (scientific, operational, economical) it is thus important to understand and try to predict when solar flares and associated eruptive phenomena will occur. This dissertation explores how to best leverage the available observational data to provide predictive information about the future flaring activity. This dissertation consists of two main components: 1) investigation of the photosphere-corona coupling by analyzing photospheric magnetic field and coronal data in search for signals or behaviors that precede eruptions; and 2) the combination of existing flare prediction methods in order to develop a novel ensemble prediction. For the first part, the data employed correspond to line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and EUV intensity maps from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both instruments onboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Photospheric magnetic field and coronal EUV emissions were characterized by measuring the power-law decay of their spatio-temporal spectra and the data statistical associations (auto- and cross-correlations). These measures, calculated with high spatio-temporal resolution, appeared to characterize the AR evolution, provide information about the state of the photospheric plasma, reveal insights into the photospheric conditions for flares, and expose the potential of combining coronal and photospheric

  4. Coronal abundances determined from energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide a measurement of coronal element abundances that is highly independent of the ionization states and temperature of the ions in the source plasma. The most complete measurements come from large 'gradual' events where ambient coronal plasma is swept up by the expanding shock wave from a coronal mass ejection. Particles from 'impulsive' flares have a pattern of acceleration-induced enhancements superimposed on the coronal abundances. Particles accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams at corotating shocks show a different abundance pattern corresponding to material from coronal holes. Large variations in He/O in coronal material are seen for both gradual and impulsive-flare events but other abundance ratios, such as Mg/Ne, are remarkably constant. SEP measurements now include hundreds of events spanning 15 years of high-quality measurement.

  5. The 2011 February 15 X2 Flare, Ribbons, Coronal Front, and Mass Ejection: Interpreting the Three-dimensional Views from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and STEREO Guided by Magnetohydrodynamic Flux-rope Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Title, Alan M.; Pariat, Etienne; Delannée, Cecile

    2011-09-01

    The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central δ-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ("EIT wave"), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere. The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the "EIT wave," are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 Å (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 Å (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 Å (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much

  6. THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2 FLARE, RIBBONS, CORONAL FRONT, AND MASS EJECTION: INTERPRETING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL VIEWS FROM THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND STEREO GUIDED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC FLUX-ROPE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Pariat, Etienne; Delannee, Cecile E-mail: title@lmsal.com E-mail: etienne.pariat@obspm.fr

    2011-09-10

    The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central {delta}-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ('EIT wave'), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere. The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the 'EIT wave', are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 A (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 A (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 A (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much

  7. Particle acceleration in solar flares - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1992-01-01

    Contrary to our historical understanding, the energetic particles in most major solar proton events do not come from the flare itself. The particle abundances, ionization states, time evolution, and longitude distributions all indicate that the particles are accelerated from the ambient plasma by a shock wave driven by a coronal mass ejection in these events. In contrast, the particles that do come from impulsive solar flares are unique in character. These particles are electron rich, have He-3/He-4 enhancements of up to 10,000, and enhancements in heavy elements such as Fe/C by factors of 10. The high ionization state of Fe, +20 indicates that the material has been heated to temperatures of about 2 x 10 exp 7 K. It is generally believed that preferential heating by selective absorption of plasma waves is combined with stochastic acceleration in these events. Recent studies of the broad gamma-ray lines emitted by energetic particles within the flare loops indicate that they are also Fe-rich, He-3 rich and proton-poor like the particles seen at 1 AU. In large impulsive events, particles from the impulsive phase may be reaccelerated by a coronal blast-wave shock.

  8. Flare Activity on Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskanian, V. S.

    A review of the existing flare data analyses indicates that most probably the flare phenomenon should be considered as one of the manifestation forms of solar-type chromospheric activity on stars and therefore has to be investigated in common with other phenomena specifying this activity. In order to estimate the reliability of such an approach different types of observational data are discussed. It could be shown that most of the phenomena specifying the solar chromospheric activity (BY Dra syndrome, indicating the spottedness of the stellar surface, long-term cyclic variations of emission line intensities, variable local magnetic fields, flares, coronal phenomena, etc.) are observable on a constantly growing number of stars of almost all spectral types and luminosity classes. This fact indicates that the proposed approach could be the right way to solve the problem of the flare phenomenon.

  9. Do All Candle-Flame-Shaped Flares Have the Same Temperature Distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Tingyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming

    2015-08-01

    We performed a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of candle-flame-shaped flares observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The DEM profile of flaring plasmas generally exhibits a double peak distribution in temperature, with a cold component around log T≈6.2 and a hot component around log T≈7.0. Attributing the cold component mainly to the coronal background, we propose a mean temperature weighted by the hot DEM component as a better representation of flaring plasma than the conventionally defined mean temperature, which is weighted by the whole DEM profile. Based on this corrected mean temperature, the majority of the flares studied, including a confined flare with a double candle-flame shape sharing the same cusp-shaped structure, resemble the famous Tsuneta flare in temperature distribution, i.e., the cusp-shaped structure has systematically higher temperatures than the rounded flare arcade underneath. However, the M7.7 flare on 19 July 2012 poses a very intriguing violation of this paradigm: the temperature decreases with altitude from the tip of the cusp toward the top of the arcade; the hottest region is slightly above the X-ray loop-top source that is co-spatial with the emission-measure-enhanced region at the top of the arcade. This signifies that a different heating mechanism from the slow-mode shocks attached to the reconnection site operates in the cusp region during the flare decay phase.

  10. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR A FAST CORONAL MASS EJECTION DRIVEN BY THE PRIOR FORMATION AND SUBSEQUENT DESTABILIZATION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.

    2013-02-20

    Magnetic flux ropes play a central role in the physics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Although a flux-rope topology is inferred for the majority of coronagraphic observations of CMEs, a heated debate rages on whether the flux ropes pre-exist or whether they are formed on-the-fly during the eruption. Here, we present a detailed analysis of extreme-ultraviolet observations of the formation of a flux rope during a confined flare followed about 7 hr later by the ejection of the flux rope and an eruptive flare. The two flares occurred during 2012 July 18 and 19. The second event unleashed a fast (>1000 km s{sup -1}) CME. We present the first direct evidence of a fast CME driven by the prior formation and destabilization of a coronal magnetic flux rope formed during the confined flare on July 18.

  11. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  12. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  13. Microflares and the Statistics of X-Ray Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.; Battaglia, M.; Christe, S.; Kasparova, J.; Krucker, S.; Kundu, M. R.; Veronig, A.

    2011-01-01

    This review surveys the statistics of solar X-ray flares, emphasising the new views that Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has given us of the weaker events (the microflares). The new data reveal that these microflares strongly resemble more energetic events in most respects; they occur solely within active regions and exhibit high-temperature/nonthermal emissions in approximately the same proportion as major events. We discuss the distributions of flare parameters (e.g., peak flux) and how these parameters correlate, for instance via the Neupert effect. We also highlight the systematic biases involved in intercomparing data representing many decades of event magnitude. The intermittency of the flare/microflare occurrence, both in space and in time, argues that these discrete events do not explain general coronal heating, either in active regions or in the quiet Sun.

  14. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2011-07-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modelling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems to play an important role in rapid excitation of the standing slow mode. Several seismology applications such as determination of the magnetic field, temperature, and density in coronal loops are demonstrated. Further, some open issues are discussed.

  15. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  16. Coronal Energy Release via Explosive Three-Dimensional Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2003-05-01

    It is widely believed that most coronal phenomena involve the release of magnetic free energy that is stored within stressed magnetic field configurations. The availability of sufficient free energy to explain everything from coronal heating to flares and coronal mass ejections is well established, but how this energy is released remains a major puzzle. Observations reveal that an important property of the energy release mechanism is its ``switch on" character. The mechanism must remain dormant for long periods of time to allow the magnetic stresses build, then it must operate very vigorously once it finally turns on. We discuss a mechanism called the ``secondary instability" which exhibits this behavior. It is essentially the ideal kinking of thin twisted magnetic flux tubes that form from the resistive instability of current sheets. We relate the mechanism to the coronal heating idea of Parker in which the coronal magnetic field becomes tangled by random motions of the photospheric footpoints. Global energy balance considerations imply that magnetic energy dissipation occurs at a particular angle in the field, and the secondary instability offers the first quantitative explanation for why this should be. It thus places Parker's popular idea on a much firmer physical footing. This research was funded by NASA.

  17. Outer Atmospheres of Low Mass Stars — Flare Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-04-01

    We compare the coronal properties during flares on active low mass stars CN Leonis, AB Doradus A and Proxima Centauri observed with XMM-Newton. From the X-ray data we analyze the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure and coronal abundance. The nature of these flares are with secondary events following the first flare peak in the light curve, raising the question regarding the involved magnetic structure. We infer from the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure that the flare originates from a compact arcade rather than in a single loop.

  18. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  19. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  20. Dual instrument for Flare and CME onset observations - Double solar Coronagraph with Solar Chromospheric Detector and Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter at Lomnicky stit Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Ales; Tomczyk, Steven; Rybak, Jan; Sewell, Scott; Gomory, Peter; Schwartz, Pavol; Ambroz, Jaroslav; Kozak, Matus

    2015-08-01

    We report on unique dual instrument developed for simultaneous measurements of velocity and magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere and corona. We describe the technical parameters and capability of the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP-S) and Solar Chromospheric detector (SCD) mounted at the Double solar coronagraph at Lomnicky Stit Observatory and working simultaneously with strictly parallel pointing of both coronagraphs. The CoMP-S is 2D spectropolarimeter designed for observations of VIS and near-IR emission lines of prominences and corona with operating spectral range: 500 - 1100 nm, sequential measurement of several VIS and near-IR lines. Its field of view is 14 arcmin x 11 arcmin. It consists of 4-stage calcite Lyot filter followed by the ferro-liquid crystal polarizer and four cameras (2 visible, 2 infrared). The capability is to deliver 2D full Stokes I, Q, U, V, using registration with 2 IR cameras (line + background) and 2 VIS cameras (line + background) SCD is a single beam instrument to observe bright chromosphere. It is a combination of tunable filter and polarimeter. Spectral resolution of the SCD ranges from 0.046 nm for observations of the HeI 1083 nm line up to to 25 pm is for observation of the HeI 587.6 nm line. The birefringent filter of the SCD has high spectral resolution, as well as spatial resolution (1.7 arcseconds) and temporal resolution (10 seconds) First results are also reported and discussed.

  1. Two Components in Major Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Cane, H. V.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    A study has been made of 29 intense, solar particle events observed in the energy range 25-100 MeV/nuc near Earth in the years 1997 through 2001. It is found that the majority of the events (19/29) had Fe to O ratios which were reasonably constant with time and energy, and with values above coronal. These all originated on the Sun s western hemisphere and most had intensities that rose rapidly at the time of an associated flare, and coronal mass ejection (CME), and then decayed more gradually. Few interplanetary shocks were observed during these increases. The spectra were mainly power laws. The remaining 10 events had different intensity-time profiles and Fe to O ratios that varied with time and energy with values at or below coronal. Most of these originated near central meridian and 6 had strong interplanetary shocks that were observed near Earth. In general the spectra were not power laws but steepened at high energies, particularly for Fe. There were four events with two peaks in the intensity-time profiles, the first near the time of the associated flare and the other at shock passage. The results, considered in the light of other recent work, suggest that the high energy particles that occur shortly after flares are indeed flare particles. At the highest rigidities considered here shock-accelerated particles are uncommon and are observed only in association with unusually fast shocks.

  2. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events. MAG4 does not forecast that a flare will occur at a particular time in the next 24 or 48 hours; rather the probability of one occurring.

  3. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  4. Predicting Major Solar Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are two examples of major explosions from the surface of the Sun but theyre not the same thing, and they dont have to happen at the same time. A recent study examines whether we can predict which solar flares will be closely followed by larger-scale CMEs.Image of a solar flare from May 2013, as captured by NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]Flares as a Precursor?A solar flare is a localized burst of energy and X-rays, whereas a CME is an enormous cloud of magnetic flux and plasma released from the Sun. We know that some magnetic activity on the surface of the Sun triggers both a flare and a CME, whereas other activity only triggers a confined flare with no CME.But what makes the difference? Understanding this can help us learn about the underlying physical drivers of flares and CMEs. It also might help us to better predict when a CME which can pose a risk to astronauts, disrupt radio transmissions, and cause damage to satellites might occur.In a recent study, Monica Bobra and Stathis Ilonidis (Stanford University) attempt to improve our ability to make these predictions by using a machine-learning algorithm.Classification by ComputerUsing a combination of 6 or more features results in a much better predictive success (measured by the True Skill Statistic; higher positive value = better prediction) for whether a flare will be accompanied by a CME. [Bobra Ilonidis 2016]Bobra and Ilonidis used magnetic-field data from an instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory to build a catalog of solar flares, 56 of which were accompanied by a CME and 364 of which were not. The catalog includes information about 18 different features associated with the photospheric magnetic field of each flaring active region (for example, the mean gradient of the horizontal magnetic field).The authors apply a machine-learning algorithm known as a binary classifier to this catalog. This algorithm tries to predict, given a set of features

  5. THE MAGNETIC SYSTEMS TRIGGERING THE M6.6 CLASS SOLAR FLARE IN NOAA ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Iida, Yusuke; Bamba, Yumi; Kusano, Kanya; Imada, Shinsuke; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-20

    We report a detailed event analysis of the M6.6 class flare in the active region (AR) NOAA 11158 on 2011 February 13. AR 11158, which consisted of two major emerging bipoles, showed prominent activity including one X- and several M-class flares. In order to investigate the magnetic structures related to the M6.6 event, particularly the formation process of a flare-triggering magnetic region, we analyzed multiple spacecraft observations and numerical results of a flare simulation. We observed that, in the center of this quadrupolar AR, a highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL) was formed through proper motions of the major magnetic elements, which built a sheared coronal arcade lying over the PIL. The observations lend support to the interpretation that the target flare was triggered by a localized magnetic region that had an intrusive structure, namely, a positive polarity penetrating into a negative counterpart. The geometrical relationship between the sheared coronal arcade and the triggering region is consistent with the theoretical flare model based on the previous numerical study. We found that the formation of the trigger region was due to the continuous accumulation of small-scale magnetic patches. A few hours before the flare occurred, the series of emerged/advected patches reconnected with a pre-existing field. Finally, the abrupt flare eruption of the M6.6 event started around 17:30 UT. Our analysis suggests that in the process of triggering flare activity, all magnetic systems on multiple scales are included, not only the entire AR evolution but also the fine magnetic elements.

  6. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  7. Magnetic reconnection models of flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    The most feasible energy source for solar and stellar flares is the energy stored in coronal magnetic fields. To convert a significant fraction of this energy into heat and kinetic energy in a short time requires rapid change in the topology of the magnetic fields, and hence, rapid reconnection of field lines. Recent numerical and analytical models of solar flares suggest that the magnetic energy released by reconnection drives chromospheric ablation in the flare ribbons. Simple theoretical arguments based on compressible reconnection theory predict that the temperature of the ablated plasma should be about 1.03 x 10 to the 6th B exp 0.62 K where B is the coronal magnetic field strength in Gauss.

  8. Prior Flaring as a Complement to Free Magnetic Energy for Forecasting Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    From a large database of (1) 40,000 SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms covering the passage of 1,300 sunspot active regions across the 30 deg radius central disk of the Sun, (2) a proxy of each active region's free magnetic energy measured from each of the active region's central-disk-passage magnetograms, and (3) each active region's full-disk-passage history of production of major flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find new statistical evidence that (1) there are aspects of an active region's magnetic field other than the free energy that are strong determinants of the active region's productivity of major flares and fast CMEs in the coming few days, (2) an active region's recent productivity of major flares, in addition to reflecting the amount of free energy in the active region, also reflects these other determinants of coming productivity of major eruptions, and (3) consequently, the knowledge of whether an active region has recently had a major flare, used in combination with the active region's free-energy proxy measured from a magnetogram, can greatly alter the forecast chance that the active region will have a major eruption in the next few days after the time of the magnetogram. The active-region magnetic conditions that, in addition to the free energy, are reflected by recent major flaring are presumably the complexity and evolution of the field.

  9. PRIOR FLARING AS A COMPLEMENT TO FREE MAGNETIC ENERGY FOR FORECASTING SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.

    2012-09-20

    From a large database of (1) 40,000 SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms covering the passage of 1300 sunspot active regions across the 30 Degree-Sign radius central disk of the Sun, (2) a proxy of each active region's free magnetic energy measured from each of the active region's central-disk-passage magnetograms, and (3) each active region's full-disk-passage history of production of major flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find new statistical evidence that (1) there are aspects of an active region's magnetic field other than the free energy that are strong determinants of the active region's productivity of major flares and fast CMEs in the coming few days; (2) an active region's recent productivity of major flares, in addition to reflecting the amount of free energy in the active region, also reflects these other determinants of coming productivity of major eruptions; and (3) consequently, the knowledge of whether an active region has recently had a major flare, used in combination with the active region's free-energy proxy measured from a magnetogram, can greatly alter the forecast chance that the active region will have a major eruption in the next few days after the time of the magnetogram. The active-region magnetic conditions that, in addition to the free energy, are reflected by recent major flaring are presumably the complexity and evolution of the field.

  10. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  11. The radiated energy budget of chromospheric plasma in a major solar flare deduced from multi-wavelength observations

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.; Kerr, Graham S.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Dennis, Brian R.; Allred, Joel C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Ireland, Jack

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents measurements of the energy radiated by the lower solar atmosphere, at optical, UV, and EUV wavelengths, during an X-class solar flare (SOL2011-02-15T01:56) in response to an injection of energy assumed to be in the form of nonthermal electrons. Hard X-ray observations from RHESSI were used to track the evolution of the parameters of the nonthermal electron distribution to reveal the total power contained in flare accelerated electrons. By integrating over the duration of the impulsive phase, the total energy contained in the nonthermal electrons was found to be >2 × 10{sup 31} erg. The response of the lower solar atmosphere was measured in the free-bound EUV continua of H I (Lyman), He I, and He II, plus the emission lines of He II at 304 Å and H I (Lyα) at 1216 Å by SDO/EVE, the UV continua at 1600 Å and 1700 Å by SDO/AIA, and the white light continuum at 4504 Å, 5550 Å, and 6684 Å, along with the Ca II H line at 3968 Å using Hinode/SOT. The summed energy detected by these instruments amounted to ∼3 × 10{sup 30} erg; about 15% of the total nonthermal energy. The Lyα line was found to dominate the measured radiative losses. Parameters of both the driving electron distribution and the resulting chromospheric response are presented in detail to encourage the numerical modeling of flare heating for this event, to determine the depth of the solar atmosphere at which these line and continuum processes originate, and the mechanism(s) responsible for their generation.

  12. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  13. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION: FROM 'OPEN' EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS TO CLOSED POST-FLARE ONES OBSERVED BY SDO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping; Jiang, Chaowei E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2013-10-10

    We employ Solar Dynamics Observatory observations and select three well-observed events including two flares and one extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) brightening. During the three events, the EUV loops clearly changed. One event was related to a major solar flare that took place on 2012 July 12 in active region NOAA AR 11520. 'Open' EUV loops rooted in a facula of the AR deflected to the post-flare loops and then merged with them while the flare ribbon approached the facula. Meanwhile, 'open' EUV loops rooted in a pore disappeared from top to bottom as the flare ribbon swept over the pore. The loop evolution was similar in the low-temperature channels (e.g., 171 Å) and the high-temperature channels (e.g., 94 Å). The coronal magnetic fields extrapolated from the photospheric vector magnetograms also show that the fields apparently 'open' prior to the flare become closed after it. The other two events were associated with a B1.1 flare on 2010 May 24 and an EUV brightening on 2013 January 03, respectively. During both of these two events, some 'open' loops either disappeared or darkened before the formation of new closed loops. We suggest that the observations reproduce the picture predicted by the standard magnetic reconnection model: 'open' magnetic fields become closed due to reconnection, manifesting as a transformation from 'open' EUV loops to closed post-flare ones.

  14. Coordinated Einstein and IUE observations of a disparitions brusques type flare event and quiescent emission from Proxima Centauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, B. M.; Linsky, J. L.; Bornmann, P. L.; Stencel, R. E.; Antiochos, S. K.; Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Einstein Imaging Particle Counter observed a major X-ray flare in its entirety during a 5-hr period of simultaneous observations, with the IUE, of the dM5e flare star Proxima Centauri in August, 1980. The detailed X-ray light curve, temperature determinations during various intervals, and UV line fluxes obtained before, during, and after the flare indirectly indicate a 'two-ribbon flare' prominence eruption. The calculated ratio of coronal to bolometric luminosity for the event is about 100 times the solar ratio. The Proxima Cen corona is analyzed in the context of static loop models, in light of which it is concluded that less than 6% of the stellar surface seems to be covered by X-ray emitting active regions.

  15. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORONAL DIMMING AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    Coronal dimmings are closely related to the footpoints of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and, as such, offer information about CME origins and evolution. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between CME and dimming properties. In particular, we compare CME quantities for events with and without associated dimmings. We find that dimming-associated CMEs, on average, have much higher speeds than non-dimming-associated events. In fact, CMEs without an associated dimming do not appear to travel faster than 800 km s{sup -1}, i.e., the fast solar wind speed. Dimming-associated events are also more likely to be associated with flares, and those flares tend to have the highest magnitudes. We propose that each of these phenomena is affected by the energy available in the source region. Highly energetic source regions produce fast CMEs that are accompanied by larger flares and visible dimmings, while less energetic source regions produce slow CMEs that are accompanied by smaller flares and may or may not have dimmings. The production of dimmings in the latter case may depend on a number of factors including initiation height of the CME, source region magnetic configuration, and observational effects. These results have important implications for understanding and predicting CME initiations.

  16. ORIGIN OF CORONAL SHOCK WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenic, J.; Marque, C.; Zhukov, A. N.; Vrsnak, B.; Zic, T.

    2010-07-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of five coronal mass ejection/flare events (CME/flare) and associated coronal shock waves manifested as type II radio bursts. The study is focused on the events in which the flare energy release, and not the associated CME, is the most probable source of the shock wave. Therefore, we selected events associated with rather slow CMEs (reported mean velocity below 500 km s{sup -1}). To ensure minimal projection effects, only events related to flares situated close to the solar limb were included in the study. We used radio dynamic spectra, positions of radio sources observed by the Nancay Radioheliograph, GOES soft X-ray flux measurements, Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph, and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations. The kinematics of the shock wave signatures, type II radio bursts, were analyzed and compared with the flare evolution and the CME kinematics. We found that the velocities of the shock waves were significantly higher, up to one order of magnitude, than the contemporaneous CME velocities. On the other hand, shock waves were closely temporally associated with the flare energy release that was very impulsive in all events. This suggests that the impulsive increase of the pressure in the flare was the source of the shock wave. In four events the shock wave was most probably flare-generated, and in one event results were inconclusive due to a very close temporal synchronization of the CME, flare, and shock.

  17. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  18. GALEX Observes Nearby Cool Stars: Constraints on Ultraviolet Coronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Jonathan; Welsh, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The GALEX ultraviolet mission (1350-2800A) has detected many late-type dwarf stars. Numerous M-type dwarf stars exhibit flaring and coronal activity; we use GALEX UV photometry to measure the variability of coronal emission in the GALEX NUV and FUV wavebands.

  19. Solar and stellar coronal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1989-01-01

    Progress in observational, theoretical, and radio studies of coronal plasmas is summarized. Specifically work completed in the area of solar and stellar magnetic fields, related photospheric phenomena and the relationships between magnetism, rotation, coronal and chromospheric emission in solar-like stars is described. Also outlined are theoretical studies carried out in the following areas, among others: (1) neutral beams as the dominant energy transport mechanism in two ribbon-flares; (2) magneto hydrodynamic and circuit models for filament eruptions; and (3) studies of radio emission mechanisms in transient events. Finally, radio observations designed for coronal activity studies of the sun and of solar-type coronae are described. A bibliography of publications and talks is provided along with reprints of selected articles.

  20. Coronal manifestations of preflare activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Webb, D. F.; Woodgate, B.; Waggett, P.; Bentley, R.; Hurford, G.; Schadee, A.; Schrijver, J.; Harrison, R.; Martens, P.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of coronal manifestations of precursors or preheating for flares are discussed. Researchers found that almost everyone with a telescope sees something before flares. Whether an all-encompassing scenario will ever be developed is not at all clear at present. The clearest example of preflare activity appears to be activated filaments and their manifestations, which presumably are signatures of a changing magnetic field. But researchers have seen two similar eruptions, one without any evidence of emerging flux (Kundu et al., 1985) and the other with colliding poles (Simon et al., 1984). While the reconnection of flux is generally agreed to be required to energize a flare, the emergence of flux from below (at least on short timescales and in compact regions) does not appear to be a necessary condition. In some cases the cancelling of magnetic flux (Martin, 1984) by horizontal motions instead may provide the trigger (Priest, 1985) Researchers found similarities and some differences between these and previous observations. The similarities, besides the frequent involvement of filaments, include compact, multiple precursors which can occur both at and near (not at) the flare site, and the association between coronal sources and activity lower in the atmosphere (i.e., transition zone and chromosphere).

  1. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments. PMID:18063789

  2. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  3. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  4. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  5. Ion acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinacker, Jurgen; Jaekel, Uwe; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    1993-01-01

    Nonrelativistic spectra of protons and ions accelerated in impulsive solar flares are derived using more realistic turbulence power spectra. The calculation is based on a particle transport equation extracted from a second step acceleration model containing stochastic acceleration. The turbulence model is generalized to waves with a small angle to the magnetic field vector and to turbulence power spectra with spectral indices s smaller than 2. Due to the occurrence of impulsive flares at low coronal heights, Coulomb losses at the dense coronal plasma and diffusive particle escape are taken into account. The ion spectra show deviations from long-duration spectra near the Coulomb barrier, where the losses become maximal. The Z-squared/A-dependence of the Coulomb losses leads to spectral variations for different ions. We present a method to estimate the turbulence parameters and injection conditions of the flare particles using ion ratios like Fe/O of impulsive flares.

  6. An Observational Overview of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Battaglia, M.; Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, W.; Milligan, R. O.; Hudson, H. S.; Krucker, S.; Phillips, K.; Bone, L.; Veronig, A.; Caspi, A.; Temmer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview of solar flares and associated phenomena, drawing upon a wide range of observational data primarily from the RHESSI era. Following an introductory discussion and overview of the status of observational capabilities, the article is split into topical sections which deal with different areas of flare phenomena (footpoints and ribbons, coronal sources, relationship to coronal mass ejections) and their interconnections. We also discuss flare soft X-ray spectroscopy and the energetics of the process. The emphasis is to describe the observations from multiple points of view, while bearing in mind the models that link them to each other and to theory. The present theoretical and observational understanding of solar flares is far from complete, so we conclude with a brief discussion of models, and a list of missing but important observations.

  7. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  8. Gamma-Ray Burst Flares: Ultraviolet/Optical Flaring. I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional "breaks" to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T start, T stop, and T peak. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ~2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 105 s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with Δt/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  9. Solar origins of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The large scale properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), such as morphology, leading edge speed, and angular width and position, have been cataloged for many events observed with coronagraphs on the Skylab, P-78, and SMM spacecraft. While considerable study has been devoted to the characteristics of the SMEs, their solar origins are still only poorly understood. Recent observational work has involved statistical associations of CMEs with flares and filament eruptions, and some evidence exists that the flare and eruptive-filament associated CMEs define two classes of events, with the former being generally more energetic. Nevertheless, it is found that eruptive-filament CMEs can at times be very energetic, giving rise to interplanetary shocks and energetic particle events. The size of the impulsive phase in a flare-associated CME seems to play no significant role in the size or speed of the CME, but the angular sizes of CMEs may correlate with the scale sizes of the 1-8 angstrom x-ray flares. At the present time, He 10830 angstrom observations should be useful in studying the late development of double-ribbon flares and transient coronal holes to yield insights into the CME aftermath. The recently available white-light synoptic maps may also prove fruitful in defining the coronal conditions giving rise to CMEs.

  10. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  11. Anemone structure of AR NOAA 10798 and related geo-effective flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, A.; Ishii, T. T.; Shibata, K.; Gopalswamy, N.

    We report coronal features of an active region NOAA 10798 This active region was located in the middle of a small coronal hole and generated 3 M-class flares The flares are associated with high speed CMEs which produced a magnetic storm on 2005 August 24 We examined the coronal features by using observational data in soft X-rays in extreme ultraviolets and in microwaves obtained with GOES SOHO TRACE satellites and Nobeyama Radioheliograph

  12. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 Flare-rich but CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-05-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of 2014 October hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24 so far, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be “big but mild” its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  13. A study of the flaring and quiescent X-ray and UV emission from II Pegasi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; White, N. E.; Doyle, J. G.; Culhane, J. L.; Hassall, B. J. M.; Swank, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted of the rotational modulation of the transition-region UV and coronal X-ray emission for the RS CVn system II Pegasi. The X-ray light curve is dominated by a strong flare detected at orbital phase, where the minimum of the photometric wave occurred. The flare parameters derived show that the flare originates with a height greater than half the stellar radius. The characteristics of the flare are similar to those of a solar two-ribbon flare; a comparison of the midtransition region density with that in the coronal region shows a very steep pressure gradient.

  14. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Warren, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  15. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  16. Solar and Stellar Flares over Time: Effects on Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; DeWarf, Laurence E.; Engle, Scott G.; Gropp, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are presented. Also discussed are the flare properties of cooler, commonplace main-sequence K-M stars. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These studies are based on ground-based observations, UV and X-ray space missions (IUE & HST, ROSAT & Chandra) as well as a wealth of data from the Kepler Mission. The ultra-high precision photometry available from the Kepler Mission (and K2) has made it possible to study starspots, flare properties, and rotations of thousands of G, K, M stars. Superflares (defined as E > 10+33 ergs ~X-100 flares) on hundreds of mostly G and K stars have been found. (See e.g. Shibayama et al. 2013; Maehara et al. 2015; Notsu et al. 2013/15; Saar et al. 2015; Guinan et al. 2015). Using our Age-Rotation relations, we determine correlations of flares properties of the Sun and solar-type over a wide range of ages. We also compare these flare histories with the cooler, more common K- and M-type stars. The analysis of these datasets imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles the evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestrial planets. The strong X-UV fluxes and proton fluences from flares and associated plasmas from coronal mass ejection events can greatly affect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also discussed are the effects of superflares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though solar superflares are rarer (~1 per 300-500 yrs) than from the young Sun (> 1-2 per year), they could cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space..This research is supported by grants from NSF/RUI and NASA: NSF, AST 1009903; Chandra GO2-13020X, HST GO

  17. He-3-rich flares - A possible explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A plasma mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancements in He-3 observed in He-3-rich flares. It is shown that a common current instability in the corona may heat ambient He-3(2+) over any other ion and thus may preferentially inject He-3 into the flare acceleration process. This mechanism operates when the abundance of He-4 and heavier elements is larger than normal in the coronal plasma. It may also preferentially heat and thus inject certain ions of iron. The mechanism thus provides a possible explanation for the observed correlation between He-3 and heavy enhancements in He-3-rich flares.

  18. THE COOLING OF CORONAL PLASMAS. IV. CATASTROPHIC COOLING OF LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2013-07-20

    We examine the radiative cooling of coronal loops and demonstrate that the recently identified catastrophic cooling is due to the inability of a loop to sustain radiative/enthalpy cooling below a critical temperature, which can be >1 MK in flares, 0.5-1 MK in active regions, and 0.1 MK in long tenuous loops. Catastrophic cooling is characterized by a rapid fall in coronal temperature, while the coronal density changes by a small amount. Analytic expressions for the critical temperature are derived and show good agreement with numerical results. This effect considerably limits the lifetime of coronal plasmas below the critical temperature.

  19. Modeling an X-ray flare on Proxima Centauri: Evidence of two flaring loop components and of two heating mechanisms at work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.; Güdel, M.; Peres, G.; Audard, M.

    2004-03-01

    We model in detail a flare observed on Proxima Centauri with the EPIC-PN on board XMM-Newton at high statistics and high time resolution and coverage. Time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling is used to describe the rise and peak of the light curve, and a large fraction of the decay, including its change of slope and a secondary maximum, over more than 2 h. The light curve, the emission measure and the temperature derived from the data allow us to constrain the loop morphology and the heating function and to show that this flare can be described with two components: a major one triggered by an intense heat pulse injected in a single flaring loop with half-length ≈1.0 × 1010 cm, the other one by less intense heat pulses released about 1/2 h after the first one in related loop systems, probably arcades, with the same half-length. The heat functions of the two loop systems appear very similar: an intense pulse located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The latter result and the similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicate that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member states and the USA (NASA).

  20. Flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few though constrained components: two loop systems, i.e., a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicates that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  1. New flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observedwith XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few - though constrained - components: two loop systems, i.e. a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicate that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  2. Pulsed acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1994-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of particle acceleration in solar flares by analyzing the time series of various quasi-periodic radio signatures during flares. In particular we present the radio and hard X-ray data of three flares which suppport the following tentative conclusions: (1) Particle acceleration and injection into magnetic structures occurs intrinsically in a pulsed mode (with a typical period of 1-2 s), produced by a single, spatially coherent, nonlinear system, rather than by a stochastic system with many spatially independent components ('statistical flare' produced by a fragmented primary energy release). (2) The nonlinear (quasi-periodic) mode of pulsed particle acceleration and injection into a coronal loop can be stabilized by phase locking with an MHD wave (oscillation) mode, if both periods are close to each other. (3) Pulsed injection of electron beams into a coronal loop may trigger nonlinear relaxational oscillations of wave-particle interactions. This is particularly likely when the limit cycles of both systems are similar.

  3. Solar activity during Skylab: Its distribution and relation to coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speich, D. M.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Wilson, R. M.; Mcintosh, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Solar active regions observed during the period of Skylab observations (May 1973-February 1974) were examined for properties that varied systematically with location on the sun, particularly with respect to the location of coronal holes. Approximately 90 percent of the optical and X-ray flare activity occurred in one solar hemisphere (136-315 heliographic degrees longitude). Active regions within 20 heliographic degrees of coronal holes were below average in lifetimes, flare production, and magnetic complexity. Histograms of solar flares as a function of solar longitude were aligned with H alpha synoptic charts on which active region serial numbers and coronal hole boundaries were added.

  4. Avalanches and the distribution of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is proposed to be in a self-organized critical state, thus explaining the observed power-law dependence of solar-flare-occurrence rate on flare size which extends over more than five orders of magnitude in peak flux. The physical picture that arises is that solar flares are avalanches of many small reconnection events, analogous to avalanches of sand in the models published by Bak and colleagues in 1987 and 1988. Flares of all sizes are manifestations of the same physical processes, where the size of a given flare is determined by the number of elementary reconnection events. The relation between small-scale processes and the statistics of global-flare properties which follows from the self-organized magnetic-field configuration provides a way to learn about the physics of the unobservable small-scale reconnection processes. A simple lattice-reconnection model is presented which is consistent with the observed flare statistics. The implications for coronal heating are discussed and some observational tests of this picture are given.

  5. Why is a Flare-rich Active Region CME-poor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijuan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Jingxiu; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, S.

    2016-08-01

    Solar active regions (ARs) are the major sources of two of the most violent solar eruptions, namely flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The largest AR in the past 24 years, NOAA AR 12192, which crossed the visible disk from 2014 October 17 to 30, unusually produced more than one hundred flares, including 32 M-class and 6 X-class ones, but only one small CME. Flares and CMEs are believed to be two phenomena in the same eruptive process. Why is such a flare-rich AR so CME-poor? We compared this AR with other four ARs; two were productive in both and two were inert. The investigation of the photospheric parameters based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram reveals that the flare-rich AR 12192, as with the other two productive ARs, has larger magnetic flux, current, and free magnetic energy than the two inert ARs but, in contrast to the two productive ARs, it has no strong, concentrated current helicity along both sides of the flaring neutral line, indicating the absence of a mature magnetic structure consisting of highly sheared or twisted field lines. Furthermore, the decay index above the AR 12192 is relatively low, showing strong constraint. These results suggest that productive ARs are always large and have enough current and free energy to power flares, but whether or not a flare is accompanied by a CME is seemingly related to (1) the presence of a mature sheared or twisted core field serving as the seed of the CME, or (2) a weak enough constraint of the overlying arcades.

  6. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  7. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  8. IUE spectra of a flare in HR 5110: A flaring RS CVn or Algol system?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the RS CVn type binary system HR 5110 were obtained with IUE on May 31, 1979 during a period of intense radio flaring of this star. High temperature transition region lines are present, but are not enhanced above observed quiescent strengths. The similarities of HR 5110 to the Algol system, As Eri, suggest that the 1979 May to June flare may involve mass exchange rather than annihilation of coronal magnetic fields.

  9. Neutral-Line Magnetic Shear and Enhanced Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Gary, G. A.; Shimizu, T.

    1997-01-01

    By examining the magnetic structure at sites in the bright coronal interiors of active regions that are not flaring but exhibit persistent strong coronal heating, we establish some new characteristics of the magnetic origins of this heating. We have examined the magnetic structure of these sites in five active regions, each of which was well observed by both the Yohkoh SXT and the Marshall Space Flight Center Vector Magnetograph and showed strong shear in its magnetic field along part of at least one neutral line (polarity inversion). Thus, we can assess whether this form of nonpotential field structure in active regions is a characteristic of the enhanced coronal heating and vice versa. From 27 orbits' worth of Yohkoh SXT images of the five active regions, we have obtained a sample of 94 persistently bright coronal features (bright in all images from a given orbit), 40 long (greater than or approximately equals 20,000 km) neutral-line segments having strong magnetic shear throughout (shear angle greater than 45 deg), and 39 long neutral-line segments having weak magnetic shear throughout (shear angle less than 45 deg). From this sample, we find that: (1) all of our persistently bright coronal features are rooted in magnetic fields that are stronger than 150 G; (2) nearly all (95%) of these enhanced coronal features are rooted near neutral lines (closer than 10,000 km); (3) a great majority (80%) of the bright features are rooted near strong-shear portions of neutral lines; (4) a great majority (85%) of long strong-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; (5) a large minority (40%) of long weak-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; and (6) the brightness of a persistently bright Coronal feature often changes greatly over a few hours. From these results, we conclude that most persistent enhanced heating of coronal loops in active regions: (1) requires the

  10. Field Topology Analysis of a Long-lasting Coronal Sigmoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, A. S.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first field topology analysis based on nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models of a long-lasting coronal sigmoid observed in 2007 February with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode. The NLFFF models are built with the flux rope insertion method and give the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field as constrained by observed coronal loop structures and photospheric magnetograms. Based on these models, we have computed horizontal maps of the current and the squashing factor Q for 25 different heights in the corona for all six days of the evolution of the region. We use the squashing factor to quantify the degree of change of the field line linkage and to identify prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). We discuss the major properties of these QSL maps and devise a way to pick out important QSLs since our calculation cannot reach high values of Q. The complexity in the QSL maps reflects the high degree of fragmentation of the photospheric field. We find main QSLs and current concentrations that outline the flux rope cavity and that become characteristically S-shaped during the evolution of the sigmoid. We note that, although intermittent bald patches exist along the length of the sigmoid during its whole evolution, the flux rope remains stable for several days. However, shortly after the topology of the field exhibits hyperbolic flux tubes (HFT) on February 7 and February 12 the sigmoid loses equilibrium and produces two B-class flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The location of the most elevated part of the HFT in our model coincides with the inferred locations of the two flares. Therefore, we suggest that the presence of an HFT in a coronal magnetic configuration may be an indication that the system is ready to erupt. We offer a scenario in which magnetic reconnection at the HFT drives the system toward the marginally stable state. Once this state is reached, loss of equilibrium occurs via the torus instability, producing a CME.

  11. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O

  12. ROSAT investigation of flaring and activity on Prox Cen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate with high sensitivity the low-level flare activity which may underlie coronal heating. This was done. The ROSAT observations of Prox Cen were scheduled for 50 ks spread out from 26 Feb. - 10 Mar. 1992. Unfortunately because of spacecraft problems many of these pointings turned out to contain no useful data or extremely truncated valid data sets. Considerable time was spent trying to determine which of the data would be scientifically useful and which would not. Fortunately, several developments took place to augment the original data in such a way that the scientific goal of advancing the study of flaring and variability was able to be achieved after all. These are as follows: (1) a second round of ROSAT observations was carried out in Feb. 1993 which only came to the attention of the PI in Apr. 1993 when a new data tape arrived; (2) simultaneous IUE observations were requested and obtained; (3) data from the UK WFC are available via the collaboration with Dr. G. Bromage; and (4) the 'cleaned-up' original data set was found to include one major flare and 2 moderate flares. Because of the problems with the original data set, the unexpected acquisition of new data only two months ago, and the availability of IUE and WFC data, an article on Prox Cen for publication is not ready at this time. Such an article is being developed and can be completed as part of ongoing ROSAT research efforts on stellar coronae and flaring.

  13. Enabling Solar Flare Forecasting at an Unprecedented Level: the FLARECAST Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Pariat, Etienne; Massone, Anna Maria; Vilmer, Nicole; Jackson, David; Buchlin, Eric; Csillaghy, Andre; Bommier, Veronique; Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Gallagher, Peter; Gontikakis, Costis; Guennou, Chloé; Murray, Sophie; Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Alingery, Pablo; Baudin, Frederic; Benvenuto, Federico; Bruggisser, Florian; Florios, Konstantinos; Guerra, Jordan; Park, Sung-Hong; Perasso, Annalisa; Piana, Michele; Sathiapal, Hanna; Soldati, Marco; Von Stachelski, Samuel; Argoudelis, Vangelis; Caminade, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    We attempt a brief but informative description of the Flare Likelihood And Region Eruption Forecasting (FLARECAST) project, European Commission's first large-scale investment to explore the limits of reliability and accuracy for the forecasting of major solar flares. The consortium, objectives, and first results of the project - featuring an openly accessible, interactive flare forecasting facility by the end of 2017 - will be outlined. In addition, we will refer to the so-called "explorative research" element of project, aiming to connect solar flares with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possibly pave the way for CME, or eruptive flare, prediction. We will also emphasize the FLARECAST modus operandi, namely the diversity of expertise within the consortium that independently aims to science, infrastructure development and dissemination, both to stakeholders and to the general public. Concluding, we will underline that the FLARECAST project responds squarely to the joint COSPAR - ILWS Global Roadmap to shield society from the adversities of space weather, addressing its primary goal and, in particular, its Research Recommendations 1, 2 and 4, Teaming Recommendations II and III, and Collaboration Recommendations A, B, and D. The FLARECAST project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 640216.

  14. On the theory of coronal heating mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperus, M.; Ionson, J. A.; Spicer, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models describing solar coronal heating mechanisms are reviewed in some detail. The requirements of chromospheric and coronal heating are discussed in the context of the fundamental constraints encountered in modelling the outer solar atmosphere. Heating by acoustic processes in the 'nonmagnetic' parts of the atmosphere is examined with particular emphasis on the shock wave theory. Also discussed are theories of heating by electrodynamic processes in the magnetic regions of the corona, either magnetohydrodynamic waves or current heating in the regions with large electric current densities (flare type heating). Problems associated with each of the models are addressed.

  15. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  16. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  17. A multiwavelength study of a double impulsive flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, K. T.; Benz, A. O.; Dennis, B. R.; Poland, A. I.; Leibacher, J. W.; Mewe, R.; Schrijver, J.; Simnett, G.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Sylwester, J.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and ground-based observations are given for two flares which occurred 3 min apart in the same section of the active region. The physical characteristics of the two flares are derived and compared, and the main difference between them is noted to be in the preflare state of the coronal plasma at the flare site. These data suggest that the plasma filling the flaring loops absorbed most of the energy released during the impulsive phase of the second flare, so that only a fraction of the energy could reach the chromosphere to produce mass motions and turbulence. Since a study of the brightest flares observed by SMM shows that at least 43 percent of them are multiple, the situation presently studied may be quite common, and the difference in initial plasma conditions could explain at least some of the large variations in observed flare parameters.

  18. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  19. LYRA Observations of Two Oscillation Modes in a Single Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Doorsselaere, T.; De Groof, A.; Zender, J.; Berghmans, D.; Goossens, M.

    2011-10-01

    We analyze light curves from the LYRA irradiance experiment on board PROBA2 during the flare of 2010 February 8. We see both long- and short-period oscillations during the flare. The long-period oscillation is interpreted in terms of standing slow sausage modes; the short-period oscillation is thought to be a standing fast sausage mode. The simultaneous presence of two oscillation modes in the same flaring structure allows for new coronal seismological applications. The periods are used to find seismological estimates of the plasma-β and the density contrast of the flaring loop. Also the wave mode number is estimated from the observed periods.

  20. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, CMEs, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been well known since the earliest observations that solar energetic particle events are well associated with solar flares it is often considered that the association is not physically significant. Instead, in large events, the particles are considered to be only accelerated at a shock driven by the coronal mass ejection (CME) that is also always present. If particles are accelerated in the associated flare, it is claimed that such particles do not find access to open field lines and therefore do not escape from the low corona. However recent work has established that long lasting type III radio bursts extending to low frequencies are associated with all prompt solar particle events. Such bursts establish the presence of open field lines. Furthermore, tracing the radio bursts to the lowest frequencies, generated near the observer, shows that the radio producing electrons gain access to a region of large angular extent. It is likely that the electrons undergo cross field transport and it seems reasonable that ions do also. Such observations indicate that particle propagation in the inner heliosphere is not yet fully understood. They also imply that the contribution of flare particles in major particle events needs to be properly addressed.

  1. Solar flares and magnetic reconnection in quasi-separatrix layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulanier, G.; Demoulin, P.; Janvier, M.; Masson, S.; Pariat, E.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma physics process which is believed to be responsible for the bulk of energy release in solar flares. One the one hand, the onset of fast reconnection in high-Reynolds plasmas has long since been regarded as, perhaps, the major issue to understand. On the other hand, little attention has relatively been given to the three-dimensional nature of this phenomenon. Up to very recently, the latter has mostly been addressed by the solar physics community, presumably due to the wealth of space-borne and ground-based observations of three-dimensional solar coronal features during flares. Among other 3D concept, finite-B ``quasi-separatrix layers'' (QSLs) have been introduced in the nineties, as a generalization of the concept of true separatrices emanating from null-points. In this talk, I will show how both solar and experimental physics have revealed that these QSLs physically behave like true separatrices, in terms of current sheet formation and magnetic reconnection, albeit for the continuous slippage of field lines during the process. I will then show how this ``slip-running reconnection'' occurs in the wake of flux-ropes erupting from the solar corona towrds the heliosphere, and how it it eventually forms the observed post-flare loops in the Sun's corona.

  2. Solar coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H. H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with Z = 6-30. It is found that the ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  3. Solar Coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with 3 Z or = 30. It is found that the ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  4. Solar coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with 3 = or Z or = 30. The ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  5. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  6. Associations between coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M. J.; Michels, D. J.; Schwenn, R.; Muhlhauser, K. H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly continuous complementary coronal observations and interplanetary plasma measurements for the years 1979-1982 are compared. It is shown that almost all low latitude high speed coronal mass ejections (CME's) were associated with shocks at HELIOS 1. Some suitably directed low speed CME's were clearly associated with shocks while others may have been associated with disturbed plasma (such as NCDE's) without shocks. A few opposite hemisphere CME's associated with great flares seem to be associated with shocks at HELIOS.

  7. Automatic recognition of coronal type II radio bursts: The ARBIS 2 method and first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, Vasili; Cairns, Iver; Robinson, Peter; Steward, Graham; Patterson, Garth

    Major space weather events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompa-nied by solar radio bursts, which can potentially be used for real-time space weather forecasts. Type II radio bursts are produced near the local plasma frequency and its harmonic by fast electrons accelerated by a shock wave moving through the corona and solar wind with a typi-cal speed of 1000 km s-1 . The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency gradually falling with time and durations of several minutes. We present a new method developed to de-tect type II coronal radio bursts automatically and describe its implementation in an extended Automated Radio Burst Identification System (ARBIS 2). Preliminary tests of the method with spectra obtained in 2002 show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ˜ 80%, while the probability of false positives is reasonably low, with one false positive per 100-200 hr for high solar activity and less than one false event per 10000 hr for low solar activity periods. The first automatically detected coronal type II radio bursts are also presented. ARBIS 2 is now operational with IPS Radio and Space Services, providing email alerts and event lists internationally.

  8. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  9. Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David

    1998-01-01

    The Sun is constantly changing. Not an hour goes by without a rise or fall in solar x-radiation or radio emission. Not a day goes by without a solar flare. Our active star, this inconsistent Sun, this gaseous cloud that blows in all directions, warms the air we breathe and nourishes the food we eat. From Earth, it seems the very model of stability, but in space it often creates havoc. Over the past century, solar physicists have learned how to detect even the weakest of solar outbursts or flares. We know that flares must surely trace their origins to the magnetic strands stretched and tangled by the rolling plasma of the solar interior. Although a century of astrophysical research has produced widely accepted, fundamental understanding about the Sun, we have yet to predict successfully the emergence of any magnetic fields from inside the Sun or the ignition of any flare. As in any physical experiment, the ability to predict events not only validates the scientific ideas, it also has practical value. In astrophysics, a demonstrated understanding of sunspots, flares, and ejections of plasma would allow us to approach many other mysteries, such as stellar X-ray bursters, with tested theories.

  10. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.