Science.gov

Sample records for major ions volatile

  1. Major volatile compounds in head-space above olive oil analysed by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brett M; Senthilmohan, Senti T; Wilson, Paul F; McEwan, Murray J

    2005-01-01

    Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is a technique that is well suited to the real-time analysis of head-space. SIFT-MS gives a non-discriminatory snapshot of the volatiles present and their amounts, and is considered to display less bias than chromatographic techniques as neither sample pre-treatment nor separation are necessary in most cases. The technique has been used for analysis of virgin olive oil head-space on more than 100 different oils. Twenty of these are reported. The results obtained using this technique differ from those normally reported from chromatographic analyses in that the dominant species in the head-space of all oils tested were methanol and ethanol. These volatiles were present in the head-space in the concentration ranges of 2.8-11.3 ppm (methanol) and 0.4-4.9 ppm (ethanol). (E)-2-Hexenal, normally reported as the dominant olive oil volatile, is found in significantly lower concentrations and is in the range of 0.02-1.6 ppm. PMID:16021615

  2. Major odorants released as urinary volatiles by urinary incontinent patients.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Si On; Sa, In Young; Oh, Soo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, volatile urinary components were collected using three different types of samples from patients suffering from urinary incontinence (UI): (1) urine (A); (2) urine + non-used pad (B); and (3) urine + used pad (C). In addition, urine + non-used pad (D) samples from non-patients were also collected as a reference. The collection of urinary volatiles was conducted with the aid of a glass impinger-based mini-chamber method. Each of the four sample types (A through D) was placed in a glass impinger and incubated for 4 hours at 37 °C. Ultra pure air was then passed through the chamber, and volatile urine gas components were collected into Tedlar bags at the other end. These bag samples were then analyzed for a wide range of VOCs and major offensive odorants (e.g., reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), carbonyls, trimethylamine (TMA), ammonia, etc.). Among the various odorants, sulfur compounds (methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, butylaldehyde, and isovaleraldehyde) were detected above odor threshold and predicted to contribute most effectively to odor intensity of urine incontinence. PMID:23823973

  3. Major Odorants Released as Urinary Volatiles by Urinary Incontinent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Si On; Sa, In Young; Oh, Soo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, volatile urinary components were collected using three different types of samples from patients suffering from urinary incontinence (UI): (1) urine (A); (2) urine + non-used pad (B); and (3) urine + used pad (C). In addition, urine + non-used pad (D) samples from non-patients were also collected as a reference. The collection of urinary volatiles was conducted with the aid of a glass impinger-based mini-chamber method. Each of the four sample types (A through D) was placed in a glass impinger and incubated for 4 hours at 37 C. Ultra pure air was then passed through the chamber, and volatile urine gas components were collected into Tedlar bags at the other end. These bag samples were then analyzed for a wide range of VOCs and major offensive odorants (e.g., reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), carbonyls, trimethylamine (TMA), ammonia, etc.). Among the various odorants, sulfur compounds (methanethiol and hydrogen sulfide) and aldehydes (acetaldehyde, butylaldehyde, and isovaleraldehyde) were detected above odor threshold and predicted to contribute most effectively to odor intensity of urine incontinence. PMID:23823973

  4. Identification and Quantification of Oxidoselina-1,3,7(11)-Trien-8-One and Cyanidin-3-Glucoside as One of the Major Volatile and Non-Volatile Low-Molecular-Weight Constituents in Pitanga Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Ehrnhfer-Ressler, Miriam Margit; Walker, Jessica; Montenegro Brasil, Isabella; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    The pulp of pitanga (Eugenia uniflora L.) is used to prepare pitanga juice. However, there are no reports on the identification and quantification of the main constituents in pitanga pulp. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the major volatile and non-volatile low-molecular-weight constituents of the pulp. Isolation of volatile compounds was performed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation technique. Characterization of the main volatile and non-volatile constituents was performed by GC-MS, LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy. For quantitative measurements, the main volatile compound needed to be isolated from pitanga pulp to obtain a commercially not available reference standard. Cyanidin-3-glucoside was determined as one of the most abundant non-volatile pulp compound yielding 53.8% of the sum of the intensities of all ions detected by LC-MS. Quantification of cyanidin-3-glucoside in pitanga pulp resulted in a concentration of 344 66.4 ?g/mL corresponding to 688 133 ?g/g dried pulp and 530 102 ?g/g fruit. For the volatile fraction, oxidoselina-1,3,7(11)-trien-8-one was identified as the main volatile pulp constituent (27.7% of the sum of the intensities of all ions detected by GC-MS), reaching a concentration of 89.0 16.9 ?g/mL corresponding to 1.34 0.25 ?g/g fresh pulp and 1.03 0.19 ?g/g fruit. The results provide quantitative evidence for the occurrence of an anthocyanin and an oxygenated sesquiterpene as one of the major volatile and non-volatile low-molecular-weight compounds in pitanga pulp. PMID:26394146

  5. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  6. Effect of packaging materials and storage on major volatile compounds in three Australian native herbs.

    PubMed

    Chaliha, Mridusmita; Cusack, Andrew; Currie, Margaret; Sultanbawa, Yasmina; Smyth, Heather

    2013-06-19

    Lemon myrtle, anise myrtle, and Tasmanian pepper leaf are commercial Australian native herbs with a high volatile or essential oil content. Packaging of the herbs in high- or low-density polyethylene (HDPE and LDPE) has proven to be ineffective in preventing a significant loss of volatile components on storage. This study investigates and compares the effectiveness of alternate high-barrier property packaging materials, namely, polyvinylidene chloride coated polyethylene terephthalate/casted polypropylene (PVDC coated PET/CPP) and polyethylene terephthalate/polyethylene terephthalate/aluminum foil/linear low-density polyethylene (PET/PET/Foil/LLDPE), in prevention of volatile compound loss from the three native herbs stored at ambient temperature for 6 months. Concentrations of major volatiles were monitored using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. After 6 months of storage, the greatest loss of volatiles from lemon myrtle was observed in traditional LDPE packaging (87% loss) followed by storage in PVDC coated PET/CPP (58% loss) and PET/PET/Foil/LLDPE (loss of 23%). The volatile loss from anise myrtle and Tasmanian pepper leaf stored in PVDC coated PET/CPP and PET/PET/Foil/LLDPE packaging was <30%. This study clearly indicates the importance of selecting the correct packaging material to retain the quality of herbs with high volatile content. PMID:23682630

  7. Major constituents and anthelmintic activity of volatile oils from leaves and flowers of Cymbopogon martini Roxb.

    PubMed

    Nirmal, S A; Girme, A S; Bhalke, R D

    2007-11-01

    The major volatile constituents of leaves and flowers of Cymbopogon martini from the volatile oil obtained by steam distillation were identified by GC/MS. Five constituents were identified from the volatile oil of leaves and flowers, which constituted about 82.49 and 75.63% of the total amount, respectively. A monoterpene, piperitone (6.00%), was identified in the flowers of C. martini; in addition, flowers were found to contain more olefinic terpenes, namely geraniol (69.63%), compared with leaves (53.41%). Leaves contain bicyclic monoterpene, nerol (24.76%) and alpha-pinene (4.32%). Anthelmintic activity of these oils was evaluated on adult Indian earthworms Pheretima posthuma and results showed that the volatile oil of C. martini flower required less time to cause paralysis and death of the earthworms. PMID:17987504

  8. Major Volatiles from MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses: Yellowknife Bay Through Lower Mount Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Stern, J. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McKay, C. P.; Wilhelm, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of <150 µm fines from five sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN") and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). One was drilled from the Windjana ("WJ") site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation investigated on route to Mount Sharp. Another was drilled from the Confidence Hills ("CH") site on a sandstone of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp (Pahrump Hills). Outcrops are sedimentary rocks that are largely of fluvial or lacustrine origin, with minor aeolian deposits.. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature (T) of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). They can also give constraints on sample organic chemistry. Here, we discuss trends in major evolved volatiles from SAM EGA analyses to date.

  9. Gas Chromatographic-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds by Ion-Molecule Reactions Using the Electron-Deficient Reagent Ion CCl{3/+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhong; Su, Yue; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2011-10-01

    When using tetrachloromethane as the reagent gas in gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with hybrid ionization source, the cation CCl{3/+} was generated in high abundance and further gas-phase experiments showed that such an electron-deficient reagent ion CCl{3/+} could undergo interesting ion-molecule reactions with various volatile organic compounds, which not only present some informative gas-phase reactions, but also facilitate qualitative analysis of diverse volatile compounds by providing unique mass spectral data that are characteristic of particular chemical structures. The ion-molecule reactions of the reagent ion CCl{3/+} with different types of compounds were studied, and results showed that such reactions could give rise to structurally diagnostic ions, such as [M + CCl3 - HCl]+ for aromatic hydrocarbons, [M - OH]+ for saturated cyclic ether, ketone, and alcoholic compounds, [M - H]+ ion for monoterpenes, M·+ for sesquiterpenes, [M - CH3CO]+ for esters, as well as the further fragment ions. The mechanisms of ion-molecule reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic ketones and alcoholic compounds with the reagent ion CCl{3/+} were investigated and proposed according to the information provided by MS/MS experiments and theoretical calculations. Then, this method was applied to study volatile organic compounds in Dendranthema indicum var. aromaticum and 20 compounds, including monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbon and sesquiterpenes were identified using such ion-molecule reactions. This study offers a perspective and an alternative tool for the analysis and identification of various volatile compounds.

  10. Assessment of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near major roads in urban Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Zhao, W.

    2008-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major component of atmospheric pollutants in Nanjing, a large city in the east of China. Accordingly, 12-h diurnal monitoring for ten consecutive days was performed adjacent to major roads in five districts, ca.1.5 m above ground level, in April, July and October 2006, and January 2007. The most numerous species of VOCs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m/ p-xylene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethane and tetrachloroethane) were selected as the target pollutants for this field study of atmospheric distribution. The eleven VOCs were mostly found in gas phase due to their high vapor pressures. Gas-phase concentrations ranged between 0.6 and 67.9 ?g m - 3 . Simultaneously, the levels of those VOCs measured near major roads were associated slightly with their regional background level. For all these areas, as expected, the high traffic area was the highest in terms of concentration. A positive correlation was also found between the VOC levels and traffic density. Our studies also provided VOC distribution, and vertical/horizontal profiles. The results show that traffic-related exposure to VOCs in major road microenvironments is higher than elsewhere and poses a potential threat to pedestrians, commuters, and traffic-exposed workers.

  11. Modeling interactions in major ion toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various anthropogenic activities can cause exposures of freshwater systems to greatly elevated concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) with widely-varying compositions. A data set on the acute toxicity of single salts and binary salt mixtures to Ceriodaphnia d...

  12. Modeling interactions in major ion toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various anthopogenic activities can cause exposures of freshwater systems to greatly elevated concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) with widely-varying compositions. A data set on the acute toxicity of single salts and binary salt mixtures to Ceriodaphnia d...

  13. MAJOR ION CHEMISTRY OF LAKES ON THE KENAI PENINSULA, ALASKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probability sample of 59 lakes was conducted in August, 1988 to characterize the major ion chemistry of a population of over 800 lakes on the Kenai Peninsula, AK. here were two groups of lakes: those with alkalinity <300 ueq/L, representing 78t of the lakes, and those with alka...

  14. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  15. The partitioning of sulfur and chlorine between andesite melts and magmatic volatiles and the exchange coefficients of major cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacz, Zoltn; Candela, Philip A.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Andesite melts were equilibrated with an H-O-S-bearing volatile phase to determine the partition coefficients for S and Cl as a function of melt composition and oxygen fugacity. The experiments were conducted in rapid-quench MHC vessel assemblies at 200 MPa and 1000 C, and over a range of imposed fO2 between NNO-1.2 and NNO+1.8. High fluid/melt mass ratios (?15) were employed, allowing precise and accurate partition coefficients to be obtained by mass balance calculations. Chlorine exhibits Henrian behavior at ClO-0.5 activities typical for arc magmas, with D Cl volatile/melt = 1.36 0.06 (1?) below 0.2 wt.% Cl in the melt; at higher ClO-0.5 activities, D Cl volatile/melt increases linearly to 2.11 0.02 at 1 wt.% Cl in the melt. In the volatile phase: FeCl2 ? NaCl > KCl ? HCl. The determination of cation exchange coefficients for major cations yielded: K K,Na volatile/melt = 1.23 0.10 (1?) and ?K Fe,Na volatile/melt = D Fe volatile/melt / D Na volatile/melt = 1.08 0.16 (1?). Under these conditions, the concentration of HCl in the vapor is negatively correlated with the (Na + K)/(Al + Fe3+) ratio in the melt. Reduced sulfur (S2-) appears to obey Henry's law in andesite melt-volatile system at fH2S below pyrrhotite saturation. The partition coefficient for S at fO2 = NNO-0.5 correlates negatively with the FeO concentration in the melt, changing from 254 25 at 4.0 wt.% FeO to 88 6 at 7.5 wt.% FeO. Pyrrhotite saturation is reached when approximately 3.2 mol% S is present in the volatile phase at fO2 = NNO-0.5. At the sulfide/sulfate transition, the partition coefficient of S drops from 171 23 to 21 1 at a constant FeO content of ?6 wt.% in the melt. At fO2 = NNO+1.8, anhydrite saturation is reached at ?3.3 mol% S present in the volatile phase. Aqueous volatiles exsolving from intermediate to mafic magmas can efficiently extract S, and effect its transfer to sites of magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposit formation.

  16. Volatile Emissions from Subduction-related Volcanoes: Major and Trace Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T. P.; Hilton, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Present-day volatile emissions associated with subduction zone volcanism can be estimated in two ways. One approach is to assume magma production rate at arcs is 20% that of MOR and scale to the MOR 3He flux (1000 mol/yr) to obtain a mantle-derived arc He-3 flux of 200+/-40 mol/yr. This flux and measured gas ratios (xI/3He where xI is the gas species of interest) obtained from volcanic and hydrothermal samples is then used to calculate volatile emissions. A global arc CO2 flux of 0.3 to 3.1 x 1012 mol/yr has been obtained in this way. Another approach is to use individual arc volcano SO2 fluxes (determined by remote sensing) in combination with CO2/SO2 ratios of high temperature fumaroles to calculate volcanic CO2 fluxes. Integrating over an individual arc, and using a power-law distribution to include non-measured volcanoes, it is possible to produce a volatile flux estimate for a particular arc. Summing over all arcs allows a global estimate (e.g. 1.6 x1012 mol/yr for arc CO2). There are caveats with both methods. In the former case, it is assumed that the mantle wedge is characterized by a similar 3He content to MORB-source. In the latter case, the distribution of SO2 fluxes is decidedly uneven necessitating poorly-justified extrapolations. For example, there is little data available from the I-B-M, Lesser Antilles and Philippines whereas Central American volcanoes have numerous published SO2 fluxes. A further issue (in addition to geographical bias), is the absence of volatile fluxes from submarine arcs. Despite these problems, global estimates of SO2 and CO2 fluxes by both methods vary by only one order of magnitude [1]. It is emphasized that these are present-day estimates as paleo-degassing rates of arc magmas are poorly constrained and depend entirely on estimates of magma intrusion and extrusion rates [2]. The same approach has been used for other species although the flux of magmatic N2, H2O, HCl, HF from arcs remains poorly constrained (N2: 6 x108 to 2 x1010 mol/yr; H2O: 8 x1012 mol/yr; HCl 1 x1010 to 4x1011 mol/yr, HF: 3 x109 to 3 x1011 mol/yr)[1,3]. Due to the preferential partitioning of HCl and HF into volcano hosted hydrothermal systems, fluxes from magma bodies are probably much larger than what is emitted into the atmosphere. Trace element emissions from subduction related volcanoes are also poorly constrained but are potentially significant. High temperature (>700C) volcanic gas samples show that concentrations of Be, Rb, Sr, Ru, Rh, Pd, Cd, W, Re, Pt, Pb, Bi, Se, Sc are in the 5 to 1300 ug/L range and up to 25000 ug/L of B have been measured [4,5]. Using these concentrations and the global arc SO2 flux gives estimates of trace element fluxes on the order of 3 x104 to 8 x106 mol/yr (and 3 x109 mol/yr of B). These flux estimates are certainly upper limits because low temperature (<200C) gases that make up the majority of emissions have much lower trace element concentrations. Further work is needed to better constrain volatile contributions of volcanoes to the atmosphere, and to improve global geochemical models which assess the impact of volcanic gases on the atmosphere. {[1]} Hilton, Fischer & Marty (2002) Rev. Min. vol 47 for review [2] Kerrick Rev. Geophys. (2001) vol. 39 #4. [3] Symnods, Rose & Reed (1988) nature vol 334, p. 415 [4] Fischer, Shuttleworth & O'Day (1998) Fres. J. Anal. Chem. vol 362, p. 457 [5] Taran et al., (1995) Gochim. Cosmochim. Acta vol. 59, p. 1749

  17. Gas chromatographic-ion trap mass spectrometric analysis of volatile organic compounds by ion-molecule reactions using the electron-deficient reagent ion CCl3(+).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Zhong; Su, Yue; Wang, Hao-Yang; Guo, Yin-Long

    2011-10-01

    When using tetrachloromethane as the reagent gas in gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry equipped with hybrid ionization source, the cation CCl(3)(+) was generated in high abundance and further gas-phase experiments showed that such an electron-deficient reagent ion CCl(3)(+) could undergo interesting ion-molecule reactions with various volatile organic compounds, which not only present some informative gas-phase reactions, but also facilitate qualitative analysis of diverse volatile compounds by providing unique mass spectral data that are characteristic of particular chemical structures. The ion-molecule reactions of the reagent ion CCl(3)(+) with different types of compounds were studied, and results showed that such reactions could give rise to structurally diagnostic ions, such as [M+CCl(3) - HCl](+) for aromatic hydrocarbons, [M - OH](+) for saturated cyclic ether, ketone, and alcoholic compounds, [M - H](+) ion for monoterpenes, M(+) for sesquiterpenes, [M - CH(3)CO](+) for esters, as well as the further fragment ions. The mechanisms of ion-molecule reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic ketones and alcoholic compounds with the reagent ion CCl(3)(+) were investigated and proposed according to the information provided by MS/MS experiments and theoretical calculations. Then, this method was applied to study volatile organic compounds in Dendranthema indicum var. aromaticum and 20 compounds, including monoterpenes and their oxygen-containing derivatives, aromatic hydrocarbon and sesquiterpenes were identified using such ion-molecule reactions. This study offers a perspective and an alternative tool for the analysis and identification of various volatile compounds. PMID:21952897

  18. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the ``unattached`` fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ``unattached`` fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  19. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  20. Effects of light and copper ions on volatile aldehydes of milk and milk fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeno, W.; Bassette, R.; Crang, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    Raw, laboratory-pasteurized and plant-pasteurized homogenized milks were exposed to copper ions (5 ppm), to sunlight or fluorescent light and the effects determined on the composition of volatile aldehydes. The greatest change due to copper treatment was an increase in n-hexanal; acetaldehyde showed the least response in each of the sources of milk. The responses were similar from all three sources of milk with laboratory-pasteurized milk samples showing the greatest responses for each aldehyde analyzed. Similar milk samples exposed to sunlight also showed an increase in volatile aldehydes from all milk sources but with the greatest response being acetaldehyde and n-pentanal components. The milk fraction most susceptible to changes in the presence of light was neutralized whey, whereas resuspended cream was most susceptible to copper exposure. Overall, dialyzed whey appeared to be influenced more than other milk fractions by both light and copper ions.

  1. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Kellogg, James; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Lefavor, Matthew; Hengemihle, Jerome; Jaeger, Ferzan; Lyness, Eric; Maurer, John; Melak, Anthony; Noreiga, Felix; Noriega, Marvin; Patel, Kiran; Prats, Benito; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence; Weidner, Edwin; Gundersen, Cynthia; Battel, Steven; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan; Cooper, Curt; Edmonson, Charles; Nolan, J. Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  2. Common volatiles are major attractants for neonate larvae of the specialist flea beetle Altica koreana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Huai-Jun; Yang, Xing-Ke

    2008-07-01

    Olfactory stimuli play an important role in the host searching of larval phytophagous insects. Previous studies indicate that larvae that have to find feeding sites after hatching are generally attracted to host volatiles. However, there are few studies on the olfactory responses of neonate larvae to host volatiles in cases when those larvae hatched on the host plant. In the present study, we determined the olfactory responses of neonate larvae of the specialist flea beetle, Altica koreana Ogloblin, to host and six non-host plants, using a static-air “arena.” Larvae responded significantly to the host plant Potentilla chinensis Ser. and five of six non-host plants, compared to the control. Larvae did not prefer the host plant over the non-host plants (except Artemisia sp.) when offered a choice. Additionally, odours of a non-host plant, which were unattractive to neonate larvae, may have masked the attractive odour of the host plant. These results indicate that common volatiles can play a major role in attracting larvae of this specialist to plants, but attraction to such odours may not be the major mechanism of host choice.

  3. Volatilization of PM2.5 Inorganic Ions in a Filter Pack System with Backup Filter and Denuders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Concentrations of PM2.5 inorganic ions were measured at the rooftop of the 5-story building on the hill (37.02oN, 127.16oE, 167 m above sea level) in the Global Campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul, Korea. The measurements were made four times during one-year span between 2011 and 2012 by considering the climate of Korea with distinct seasonal variations: July 29 to August 26 (summer); September 14 to October 13 (fall); November 28 to January 4 (winter); February 14 to May 31 (spring). A filter pack system was composed of PM2.5 cyclone, two annular denuders, Teflon filter, nylon filter, and an annular denuder, in series. Two annular denuders were to remove acidic and basic gases prior to collecting particles on the Teflon filter. Nylon filter and an annular denuder were to back up the Teflon filter by absorbing acidic and basic gases, respectively, which were volatilized from collected particles on the Teflon filter. Samplings were made for 24 hours every day. Extracts from filters and denuders were analyzed by ion chromatography to measure concentrations of anions (SO42-, NO3-, Cl-) and cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, Na+, K+). The amounts of ionic species absorbed at the backup nylon filter and denuder were examined in terms of meteorological parameters, the amounts of gases removed in front of the Teflon filter, and the amounts of particulate ions collected on the Teflon filter. Major factors to affect the volatilization from particles collected on the Teflon filter were discussed.

  4. Multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry of volatile metabolites emitted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E; Blank, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control. PMID:25197771

  5. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control. PMID:25197771

  6. Screening volatile organics by direct sampling ion trap and glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Hurst, G.B.; Thompson, C.V.; Buchanan, M.V.; Guerin, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Two different types of direct sampling mass spectrometers are currently being evaluated in our laboratory for use as rapid screening tools for volatile organics in a wide range of environmental matrices. These include a commercially available ITMS ion trap mass spectrometer and a specially designed tandem source glow discharge quadrupole mass spectrometer. Both of these instruments are equipped with versatile sampling interfaces which enable direct monitoring of volatile organics at part-per-billion (ppb) levels in air, water, and soil samples. Direct sampling mass spectrometry does not utilize chromatographic or other separation steps prior to admission of samples into the analyzer. Instead, individual compounds are measured using one or more of the following methods: spectral subtraction, selective chemical ionization, and tandem mass spectroscopy (MS/MS). For air monitoring applications, an active sniffer'' probe is used to achieve instantaneous response. Water and soil samples are analyzed by means of high speed direct purge into the mass spectrometer. Both instruments provide a range of ionization options for added selectivity and the ITMS can also provide high efficiency collision induced dissociation MS/MS for target compound analysis. Detection limits and response factors have been determined for a large number volatile organics in air, water, and number of different soil types. 4 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. The Major-ion Composition of Permian Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, T K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.; Kovalevych, Volodymyr M.; Horita, Juske

    2005-01-01

    The major-ion (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and Cl{sup -}) composition of Permian seawater was determined from chemical analyses of fluid inclusions in marine halites. New data from the Upper Permian San Andres Formation of Texas (274--272 Ma) and Salado Formation of New Mexico (251 Ma), analyzed by the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) method, along with published chemical compositions of fluid inclusions in Permian marine halites from North America (two formations of different ages) and the Central and Eastern European basins (eight formations of four different ages) show that Permian seawater shares chemical characteristics with modern seawater, including SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} > Ca{sup 2+} at the point of gypsum precipitation, evolution into Mg{sup 2+}-Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Cl{sup -} brines, and Mg{sup 2+}/K{sup +} ratios {approx} 5. Permian seawater, however, is slightly depleted in SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and enriched in Ca{sup 2+}, although modeling results do not rule out Ca{sup 2+} concentrations close to those in present-day seawater. Na{sup +} and Mg{sup 2+} in Permian seawater are close to (slightly below) their concentrations in modern seawater. Permian and modern seawater are both classified as aragonite seas, with Mg{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} ratios >2, conditions favorable for precipitation of aragonite and magnesian calcite as ooids and cements. The chemistry of Permian seawater was modeled using the chemical composition of brine inclusions for three periods: Lower Permian Asselian-Sakmarian (296--283 Ma), Lower Permian Artinskian-Kungurian (283--274 Ma), and Upper Permian Tatarian (258--251 Ma). Parallel changes in the chemistry of brine inclusions from equivalent age evaporites in North America, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe show that seawater underwent secular variations in chemistry over the 50 million years of the Permian. Modeled SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations are 20 mmol per kg H{sub 2}O (mmolal) and 19 mmolal in the Asselian-Sakmarian and Artinskian-Kungurian, with higher concentrations in the Upper Permian Tatarian (23 mmolal). Modeled Ca{sup 2+} is at or above its concentration in modern seawater throughout the Permian. Mg{sup 2+} is close to (slightly below) its concentration in modern seawater (55 mmolal) in the Asselian-Sakmarian (52 mmolal), and Tatarian (52 mmolal), but slightly higher than modern seawater in the Artinskian-Kungurian (60 mmolal). Mg{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} ratios are 3.5 (total range = 2.7 to 5.5) in the Lower Permian and rose slightly to 3.7 (total range = 3.1 to 5.8) in the Upper Permian, primarily due to decreases in Ca{sup 2+}. These results are consistent with models that predict oscillations in the major-ion composition of Phanerozoic seawater on the basis of changes in the midocean ridge/river water flux ratio driven by changes in the rate of midocean ridge crust production. The Permian was characterized by low sea levels, icehouse conditions, and southern hemisphere glaciation. Such conditions, analogous to the present ice age, and the similarities between Permian seawater and modern seawater, all suggest that general Phanerozoic supercycles, driven by mantle convection and global volcanicity, also control the major-ion chemistry of seawater.

  8. Revalidation of the Volatile Organic Analyzer Following a Major On-Orbit Maintenance Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    The Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) contributes to the assessment of air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by identifying and quantifying target airborne volatile organic contaminants in the module air. This on-orbit contaminant monitoring capability becomes particularly important during an air quality degradation event such as a system leak. During several ISS air quality degradations, the VOA has generated near real-time data that was used to make decisions or to better understand the contingency. The VOA was operational from January 2002 through June 2003, during which time it was validated by comparing VOA data to simultaneously acquired grab sample containers (GSCs). In January 2003, one of the two analytical channels of the VOA was shutdown because of a component failure, but a redundant channel continued to supply the necessary analytical data. In June 2003, the sole remaining channel was deactivated. Initial assessments of the channel shutdowns pointed to failed fuses or heaters, but neither was considered repairable on orbit. In 2005, it was determined that failed fuses could be replaced on orbit and the crew conducted a diagnostic procedure to identify the failed component. The crew discovered that both channels incurred failed fuses, which lead to a subsequent on orbit maintenance activity and return of the VOA to operational status in December 2005. The VOA has been providing data on the ISS atmosphere since its reactivation in 2005 and this paper will present the VOA data collected during 2006. Special emphasis will be placed upon the revalidation of the repaired VOA using GSCs as well as a summary of the diagnostic and repair procedures.

  9. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M. ); Hopke, P.K. )

    1993-07-01

    The theoretical potential for the formation of clusters of vapor-phase organic compounds found in indoor air around the [sup 218]PoO[sub x][sup +] ion was investigated as well as which compounds were most likely to form clusters. A compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds has been made for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. Forty-four volatile and semivolatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 that have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the [sup 218]PoO[sub x][sup +] ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones, and the acetates) and the semivolatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos). Although the estimated diameters are consistent with the measured diameters for the unattached fraction, the state of experimental and theoretical knowledge in this area is not sufficiently developed to judge the quantitative validity of these predictions. 48 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Major-ion chemistry of the Rocky Mountain snowpack, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turk, J.T.; Taylor, H.E.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.; Campbell, D.H.; Melack, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    During 1993-97, samples of the full depth of the Rocky Mountain snowpack were collected at 52 sites from northern New Mexico to Montana and analyzed for major-ion concentrations. Concentrations of acidity, sulfate, nitrate, and calcium increased from north to south along the mountain range. In the northern part of the study area, acidity was most correlated (negatively) with calcium. Acidity was strongly correlated (positively) with nitrate and sulfate in the southern part and for the entire network. Acidity in the south exceeded the maximum acidity measured in snowpack of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Mountains. Principal component analysis indicates three solute associations we characterize as: (1) acid (acidity, sulfate, and nitrate), (2) soil (calcium, magnesium, and potassium), and (3) salt (sodium, chloride, and ammonium). Concentrations of acid solutes in the snowpack are similar to concentrations in nearby wetfall collectors, whereas, concentrations of soil solutes are much higher in the snowpack than in wetfall. Thus, dryfall of acid solutes during the snow season is negligible, as is gypsum from soils. Snowpack sampling offers a cost-effective complement to sampling of wetfall in areas where wetfall is difficult to sample and where the snowpack accumulates throughout the winter. Copyright ?? 2001 .

  11. Ethylene and 1-MCP regulate major volatile biosynthetic pathways in apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaotang; Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Forney, Charles; Campbell-Palmer, Leslie; Fillmore, Sherry; Wismer, Paul; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2016-03-01

    The effects of ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on apple fruit volatile biosynthesis and gene expression were investigated. Statistical analysis identified 17 genes that changed significantly in response to ethylene and 1-MCP treatments. Genes encoding branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (BCAT), aromatic amino acid aminotransferase (ArAT) and amino acid decarboxylases (AADC) were up-regulated during ripening and further enhanced by ethylene treatment. Genes related to fatty acid synthesis and metabolism, including acyl-carrier-proteins (ACPs), malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase (MCAT), acyl-ACP-desaturase (ACPD), lipoxygenase (LOX), hydroperoxide lyase (HPL), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC2), β-oxidation, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHD), acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD), and alcohol acyltransferases (AATs) also increased during ripening and in response to ethylene treatment. Allene oxide synthase (AOS), alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (ADH1), 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase 2 (BCAT2) decreased in ethylene-treated fruit. Treatment with 1-MCP and ethylene generally produced opposite effects on related genes, which provides evidence that regulation of these genes is ethylene dependent. PMID:26471562

  12. A Volatile Organic Analyzer for Space Station - Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Brokenshire, John; Cumming, Colin; Overton, ED; Carney, Ken; Cross, Jay; Eiceman, Gary; James, John

    1992-01-01

    An on-board Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA), an essential component of the Environmental Health System (EHS) air-quality monitoring strategy, is described. The strategy is aimed at warning the crew and ground personnel if volatile compounds exceed safe exposure limits. The VOA uses a combination of gas chromatography (GC) and ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) for environmental monitoring and analysis. It is concluded that the VOA dual-mode detection capability and the ion mobilities in the drift region are unique features that can assist in the resolution of coeluting GC peaks. The VOA is capable of accurately identifying and quantifying target compounds in a complex mixture.

  13. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN 600 U.S. HOMES: MAJOR SOURCES OF PERSONAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA carried out the Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) Study (1980-85) on 600 subjects in five cities representing a total population of more than 700,000 persons. Personal exposures to all prevalent target compounds exceeded outdoor concentrations. Major sources ...

  14. Volatile organic compounds in 600 US homes: major sources of personal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.; Clayton, C.A.

    1987-05-01

    The USEPA carried out the Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (TEAM) Study (1980-85) on 600 subjects in five cities representing a total population of more than 700,000 persons. Personal exposures to all prevalent target compounds exceeded outdoor concentrations. Major sources were smoking (benzene, styrene, xylenes, and octane); using hot water (chloroform); wearing dry-cleaned clothes (tetrachloroethylene); and using moth crystals or room air deodorants (para-dichlorobenzene). Eleven of 14 occupations also showed elevated exposures to one or more chemicals (particularly aromatics). Auto related activities (lengthy commuting, filling gas tanks) were associated with increased exposures to several aromatics. Breath concentrations were significantly associated with personal air exposures but not with outdoor concentrations. Residence in major chemical-manufacturing and petroleum-refining areas did not significantly affect personal exposures.

  15. Controlling volatility in solid-state, redox-based memory devices using heterojunction barriers to ion transport.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Ramesh; Rahman, G M Aminur; Thomson, Douglas J; Freund, Michael S

    2012-09-28

    In this work, we show the ability to tune the volatility of redox-based memory by designing barriers to ion drift. By changing the nature and properties of the barrier material, the key performance metric (ratio of retention time to read/write time) could be altered to yield ratios in the range of 1 to 10(9). PMID:22890511

  16. Major ion toxicity of six produced waters to three freshwater species: Application of ion toxicity models and TIE procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tietge, J.E.; Hockett, J.R.; Evans, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Previous research to characterize the acute toxicity of major ions to freshwater organisms resulted in the development of statistical toxicity models for three freshwater species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Daphnia magna). These ion toxicity models estimate the toxicity of seven major ions utilizing logistic regression. In this study, the ion toxicity models were used in conjunction with Phase 1 toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures to evaluate the contribution of major ion toxicity to the total toxicity of six produced water samples ranging in total salinity from 1.7 to 58.1 g/L. Initial toxicities of all six samples were compared to the model predictions. Four produced waters were found to have toxicity consistent with toxicity attributable to major ion concentrations only. Two produced waters were found to exhibit more toxicity than expected from ion concentrations alone. These samples were subjected to Phase 1 TIE procedures. Toxicities were reduced by specific Phase 1 TIE manipulations to those predicted by the ion toxicity models. Mock effluents were used to verify the results. The combination of the ion toxicity models with Phase 1 TIE procedures successfully quantified the toxicity due to major ions in six produced water samples.

  17. Major and rare gases at White Island Volcano, New Zealand: Origin and flux of volatiles

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, B. ); Giggenbach, W.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Analyses of fumarolic gases at White Island, New Zealand, are reported with special emphasis on rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe). Normalization of major species to rare gases have lead to the identification of several sources: air-saturated meteoric (or marine) water, a magma body, the crust and/or sediments. When compared to Mid Ocean Ridge discharges, the White Island gas discharge represents about 3%, 0.7%, 0.1% and 0.05% of the global water, carbon, sulfur and Helium-3 discharges, respectively. This balance shows that, except for {sup 3}He which derives from the mantle, practically all rare gases, water and carbon, and part of sulfur, derive from originally superficial sources.

  18. The major-ion composition of Carboniferous seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Nora M.; García-Veigas, Javier; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Giles, Peter S.; Williams-Stroud, Sherilyn

    2014-06-01

    The major-ion chemistry (Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, SO42-, and Cl-) of Carboniferous seawater was determined from chemical analyses of fluid inclusions in marine halites, using the cryo scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) technique. Fluid inclusions in halite from the Mississippian Windsor and Mabou Groups, Shubenacadie Basin, Nova Scotia, Canada (Asbian and Pendleian Substages, 335.5-330 Ma), and from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, Utah, USA, (Desmoinesian Stage 309-305 Ma) contain Na+-Mg2+-K+-Ca2+-Cl- brines, with no measurable SO42-, which shows that the Carboniferous ocean was a “CaCl2 sea”, relatively enriched in Ca2+ and low in SO42- with equivalents Ca2+ > SO42- + HCO3-. δ34S values from anhydrite in the Mississippian Shubenacadie Basin (13.2-14.0 ‰) and the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation (11.2-12.6 ‰) support seawater sources. Br in halite from the Shubenacadie Basin (53-111 ppm) and the Paradox Basin (68-147 ppm) also indicate seawater parentages. Carboniferous seawater, modeled from fluid inclusions, contained ∼22 mmol Ca2+/kg H2O (Mississippian) and ∼24 mmol Ca2+/kg H2O (Pennsylvanian). Estimated sulfate concentrations are ∼14 mmol SO42-/kg H2O (Mississippian), and ∼12 mmol SO42-/kg H2O (Pennsylvanian). Calculated Mg2+/Ca2+ ratios are 2.5 (Mississippian) and 2.3 (Pennsylvanian), with an estimated range of 2.0-3.2. The fluid inclusion record of seawater chemistry shows a long period of CaCl2 seas in the Paleozoic, from the Early Cambrian through the Carboniferous, when seawater was enriched in Ca2+ and relatively depleted in SO42-. During this ∼200 Myr interval, Ca2+ decreased and SO42- increased, but did not cross the Ca2+-SO42- chemical divide to become a MgSO4 sea (when SO42- in seawater became greater than Ca2+) until the latest Pennsylvanian or earliest Permian (∼309-295 Ma). Seawater remained a MgSO4 sea during the Permian and Triassic, for ∼100 Myr. Fluid inclusions also record a long interval, from the Early Cambrian to the Middle Devonian, when seawater had low Mg2+/Ca2+ ratios (<2) that coincide with calcite seas. The Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of seawater rose from 0.9 in the Middle Devonian, to 2.5 in the Middle/Late Mississippian, 2.3 in the Middle Pennsylvanian, and 3.5 in the Early Permian. The transition from calcite seas to aragonite seas, established from the mineralogy of oölites and early marine cements, occurred in the Late Mississippian. Fluid inclusions show that seawater Mg2+/Ca2+ ratios rose above 2 by the Middle to Late Mississippian coinciding exactly with the shift to aragonite seas. Aragonite seas existed for ∼100 Myr, from the Late Mississippian until the Late Triassic/Early Jurassic.

  19. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  20. Detection of volatile metabolites of Escherichia coli by multi capillary column coupled ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maddula, Sasidhar; Blank, Lars Mathias; Schmid, Andreas; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo

    2009-06-01

    Detection and immediate quantification of microbial metabolic activities is of high interest in fields as diverse as biotechnology and infection biology. Interestingly, the most direct signals of microbial metabolism, the evolution of volatile metabolites, is largely ignored in the literature, and rather, metabolite concentrations in the microbial surrounding or even disruptive methods for intracellular metabolite measurements (i.e., metabolome analysis) are favored. Here, the development of a multi capillary column coupled ion mobility spectrometer (MCC-IMS) was described for the detection of volatile organic compounds from microbes and the MCC-IMS was used for characterization of metabolic activity of growing Escherichia coli. The MCC-IMS chromatogram of the microbial culture off-gas of the acetone-producing E. coli strain BL21 pLB4 revealed four analytes that positively correlated with growth, which were identified as ethanol, propanone (acetone), heptan-2-one, and nonan-2-one. The occurrence of these analytes was cross-validated by solid-phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis. With this information in hand, the dynamic relationship between the E. coli biomass concentration and the metabolite concentrations in the headspace was measured. The results suggest that the metabolic pathways of heptan-2-one and nonan-2-one synthesis are regulated independent of each other. It is shown that the MCC-IMS in-line off-gas analysis is a simple method for real-time detection of microbial metabolic activity and discussed its potential for application in metabolic engineering, bioprocess control, and health care. PMID:19330511

  1. Silencing of the olfactory co-receptor gene in Dendroctonus armandi leads to EAG response declining to major host volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ranran; Gao, Guanqun; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on homology genes of Orco was utilized to identify DarmOrco, which is essential for olfaction in D. armandi. The results showed that DarmOrco shares significant sequence homology with Orco proteins had known in other insects. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis suggested that DarmOrco was abundantly expressed in adult D. armandi; by contrast, DarmOrco showed trace amounts of expression level in other stages. Of different tissues, DarmOrco expression level was the highest in the antennae. In order to understand the functional significance of Orco, we injected siRNA of DarmOrco into the conjunctivum between the second and third abdominal segments, and evaluated its expression after siRNA injected for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The results of qRT-PCR demonstrated that the reduction of mRNA expression level was significant (~80%) in DarmOrco siRNA-treated D. armandi than in water-injected and non-injected controls. The electroantennogram responses of females and males to 11 major volatiles of its host, were also reduced (30~68% for females; 16~70% for males) in siRNA-treated D. armandi compared with the controls. These results suggest that DarmOrco is crucial in mediating odorant perception. PMID:26979566

  2. Elevated major ion concentrations inhibit larval mayfly growth and development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brent R; Weaver, Paul C; Nietch, Christopher T; Lazorchak, James M; Struewing, Katherine A; Funk, David H

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances, including those from developing energy resources, can alter stream chemistry significantly by elevating total dissolved solids. Field studies have indicated that mayflies (Order Ephemeroptera) are particularly sensitive to high total dissolved solids. In the present study, the authors measured 20-d growth and survivorship of larval Neocloeon triangulifer exposed to a gradient of brine salt (mixed NaCl and CaCl2 ) concentrations. Daily growth rates were reduced significantly in all salt concentrations above the control (363?S?cm(-1) ) and larvae in treatments with specific conductance >812?S?cm(-1) were in comparatively earlier developmental stages (instars) at the end of the experiment. Survivorship declined significantly when specific conductance was >1513?S?cm(-1) and the calculated 20-d 50% lethal concentration was 2866?S?cm(-1) . The present study's results provide strong experimental evidence that elevated ion concentrations similar to those observed in developing energy resources, such as oil and gas drilling or coal mining, can adversely affect sensitive aquatic insect species. PMID:25307284

  3. Textural characterization, major and volatile element quantification and Ar-Ar systematics of spherulites in the Rocche Rosse obsidian flow, Lipari, Aeolian Islands: a temperature continuum growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, P. L.; O'Driscoll, B.; Gertisser, R.; Busemann, H.; Sherlock, S. C.; Kelley, S. P.

    2013-02-01

    Spherulitic textures in the Rocche Rosse obsidian flow (Lipari, Aeolian Islands, Italy) have been characterized through petrographic, crystal size distribution (CSD) and in situ major and volatile elemental analyses to assess the mode, temperature and timescales of spherulite formation. Bulk glass chemistry and spherulite chemistry analyzed along transects across the spherulite growth front/glass boundary reveal major-oxide and volatile (H2O, CO2, F, Cl and S) chemical variations and heterogeneities at a ≤5 μm scale. Numerous bulk volatile data in non-vesicular glass (spatially removed from spherulitic textures) reveal homogenous distributions of volatile concentrations: H2O (0.089 ± 0.012 wt%), F (950 ± 40 ppm) and Cl (4,100 ± 330 ppm), with CO2 and S consistently below detection limits suggesting either complete degassing of these volatiles or an originally volatile-poor melt. Volatile concentrations across the spherulite boundary and within the spherulitic textures are highly variable. These observations are consistent with diffusive expulsion of volatiles into melt, leaving a volatile-poor rim advancing ahead of anhydrous crystallite growth, which is envisaged to have had a pronounced effect on spherulite crystallization dynamics. Argon concentrations dissolved in the glass and spherulites differ by a factor of ~20, with Ar sequestered preferentially in the glass phase. Petrographic observation, CSD analysis, volatile and Ar data as well as diffusion modeling support continuous spherulite nucleation and growth starting at magmatic (emplacement) temperatures of ~790-825 °C and progressing through the glass transition temperature range ( T g ~ 750-620 °C), being further modified in the solid state. We propose that nucleation and growth rate are isothermally constant, but vary between differing stages of spherulite growth with continued cooling from magmatic temperatures, such that there is an evolution from a high to a low rate of crystallization and low to high crystal nucleation. Based on the diffusion of H2O across these temperature ranges (~800-300 °C), timescales of spherulite crystallization occur on a timescale of ~4 days with further modification up to ~400 years (growth is prohibitively slow <400 °C and would become diffusion reliant). Selective deformation of spherulites supports a down-temperature continuum of spherulite formation in the Rocche Rosse obsidian; indeed, petrographic evidence suggests that high-strain zones may have catalyzed progressive nucleation and growth of further generations of spherulites during syn- and post-emplacement cooling.

  4. Influence of extraction methodologies on the analysis of five major volatile aromatic compounds of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) grown in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infusions of citronella grass (Cymbopogon nardus) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) have been commonly used in folk medicine in Thailand and other Asian countries. This study focuses on a systematic comparison of two extraction methods for major volatile aromatic compounds (VACs) of citronella g...

  5. The major volatile compound 2-phenylethanol from the biocontrol yeast Pichia anomala inhibits growth and expression of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a globally distributed fungus and an important food contaminant because it produces the most potent natural carcinogenic compound known as aflatoxin (AF) B1. The major volatile from a yeast strain, Pichia anomala WRL-076 was identified by SPEM-GC/MS analysis to be 2-phenylethan...

  6. Relationships determining the toxicity of major ion mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant impacts to aquatic systems can occur due to increases in major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) from various anthropogenic activities, these impacts varying with both the specific combination of ions that are elevated and the chemistry of the background water. A s...

  7. Inconsistent relationships between major ions and water stable isotopes in Antarctic snow under different accumulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Yu; Fujita, Koji; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Motoyama, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Major ions, stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O), and accumulation rates are analyzed using high temporal resolution data from shallow ice cores and snow pits from East and West Antarctica. Seasonal cycles of major ions and δ18O are well preserved at sites with an accumulation rate threshold of >100 kg m-2 a-1 and calm wind conditions. The seasonal cycle is unclear at sites with high wind speeds, even if the accumulation rate is greater than the threshold. To eliminate the influences of different source regions on major ion and δ18O signals in ice cores, we calculate correlation coefficients between annually averaged major ion concentrations and δ18O, and then compare these with accumulation rates and other geographical variables such as latitude, elevation, and distance from the coast. We find that accumulation rates are highly correlated with elevation and the 10-m snow temperature, and that major ions and δ18O are negatively correlated at low accumulation sites in inland Antarctica. Negative correlations could reflect inconsistent accumulation due to a large inter-annual variability in the accumulation rate. The results show that the relationships between major ions and δ18O may not reflect climatic signatures, and could be a result of the unique characteristics of this arid environment.

  8. Zonation of volatile and major elements in basaltic melt inclusions: a snapshot of syn-eruptive processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, M.; Fabbrizio, A.; Zhang, Y.; Le Voyer, M.; Guan, Y.; Ma, C.; Eiler, J. M.; Saal, A. E.; Stolper, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Significant zonation in volatile and major elements has been discovered in olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from glassy pillow margins from the Siqueiros Fracture Zone [samples previously studied in 1]. For the most part, components that are compatible in olivine (e.g. MgO) are depleted at the edges of the zoned MIs relative to their centers, whereas components that are incompatible in olivine (e.g. Al2O3, SiO2, Na2O, and S) are enriched near the MI edges. H2O and F are exceptions in that they are incompatible, yet in several MIs they are depleted near the olivine-melt boundary. FeO and CaO are also exceptions in that they show complex features attributable to uphill diffusion. Another complexity is the similarity between the shapes of the SiO2 and Na2O profiles (despite significant differences in measured self and tracer diffusivities of these components [2, 3]), suggesting that the diffusion of these components is strongly coupled. All MIs from this sample suite exhibit zoning profiles, as do a suite of MIs from the Galapagos Islands and the inclusions studied in [4], so this feature may be common in rapidly quenched, glassy inclusions. Preservation of strong zonation in the Siqueiros MIs suggests that it formed in response to crystallization of olivine on the walls of the MIs during or just prior to eruption because, based on known diffusion coefficients, such profiles would be erased by diffusion on time scales on the order of 1 hr. The MgO concentration profiles in several Siqueiros MIs have been used to constrain the cooling history of the inclusions using the results of [5]. The profiles are consistent with an initial slow cooling rate followed by a period of more rapid cooling over a total timescale of ~10 min. Given that they are incompatible in olivine, the observed decreases in the concentrations of H2O and F toward the edges of some Siqueiros inclusions could suggest either uphill diffusion of H2O and F (as observed for H2O in [6] in a granitic composition) or loss of H2O and F into/through the host olivine (observed for H2O in [7-9]). The latter hypothesis would complement the results of [10], who observed elevated H2O and F in olivine adjacent to volatile-rich MIs. [1] Saal et al. (2002) Nature, 419, 451-455. [2] Lesher et al. (1996) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 60, 405-413. [3] Jambon (1982) Journal of Geophysical Research, 87, 10797-10810. [4] Mercier (2009) PhD thesis, Université Paris - Sud 11. [5] Chen & Zhang (2008) GCA, 72, 4756-4777. [6] Mungall et al. (1998) American Mineralogist, 83, 685-699. [7] Hauri (2002) Chemical Geology, 183, 115-141. [8] Massare et al. (2002) Chemical Geology, 183, 87-98. [9] Portnyagin et al. (2008) EPSL, 272, 541-552. [10] Le Voyer et al. (2010) AGU abstract #V23E-07.

  9. Water quality in the Tibetan Plateau: major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Sillanpää, Mika; Gjessing, Egil T; Vogt, Rolf D

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau covers an area of about one fourth of Europe, has an average elevation over 4000m above sea level, and is the water sources for about 40% of world's population. In order to foresee future changes in water quality, it is important to understand what pressures are governing the spatial variation in water chemistry. In this paper the chemistry including major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers (i.e. the Salween, Mekong, Yangtze River and Yarlung Tsangpo) in the Tibetan Plateau was studied. The results showed that the content of dissolved salts in these Tibetan rivers was relatively high compared to waters from other parts of the world. The chemical composition of the four rivers were rather similar, with Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) being the dominating ions. The exception was the Yangtze River on the Plateau, which was enriched in Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and Li due to silicate weathering followed by strong evaporation caused by a negative water balance, dissolution of evaporites in the catchment and some drainage from saline lakes. The concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Hg) and As, NH(4)(+) were generally low in all the rivers. Anthropogenic impacts on the quality of the rivers were identified at a few locations in the Mekong River and Yarlung Tsangpo basins. Generally, the main spatial variation in chemical compositions of these under studied rivers was found to be governed mainly by difference in geological variation and regional climatic-environment. Climate change is, therefore, one of main determining factors on the water chemical characteristics of these headwaters of Asian major rivers in the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:19783282

  10. Confined direct analysis in real time ion source and its applications in analysis of volatile organic compounds of Citrus limon (lemon) and Allium cepa (onion).

    PubMed

    Li, Yue

    2012-05-30

    The DART (direct analysis in real time) ion source is a novel atmospheric pressure ionization technique that enables efficient ionization of gases, liquids and solids with high throughput. A major limit to its wider application in the analysis of gases is its poor detection sensitivity caused by open-air sampling. In this study, a confined interface between the DART ion source outlet and mass spectrometer sampling orifice was developed, where the plasma generated by the atmospheric pressure glow discharge collides and ionizes gas-phase molecules in a Tee-shaped flow tube instead of in open air. It leads to significant increase of collision reaction probability between high energy metastable molecules and analytes. The experimental results show that the ionization efficiency was increased at least by two orders of magnitude. This technique was then applied in the real time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of Citrus Limon (lemon) and wounded Allium Cepa (onion). The confined DART ion source was proved to be a powerful tool for the studies of plant metabolomics. PMID:22499194

  11. Quantification of volatile compounds in the headspace of aqueous liquids using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spanel, Patrik; Diskin, Ann M; Abbott, Sian M; Wang, Tianshu; Smith, David

    2002-01-01

    We describe a method by which the concentrations of volatile compounds in the headspace of their dilute aqueous solutions in sealed containers can be determined using on-line selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). Thus, the changing number density of the molecules of the volatile compound in the carrier gas of the SIFT-MS instrument is described in terms of its changing flow rate as the pressure in the sealed container decreases during the sampling procedure. It is shown that the best analytical procedure is to determine the mean concentration of the trace gas in the liquid headspace over a given sampling time and relate this to the required concentration, which is the initial equilibrium concentration established before the pressure in the sealed container reduces significantly. To test the validity of this analytical approach, the headspace concentrations of acetaldehyde, ethanol and acetone above aqueous solutions of known concentrations have been determined. Hence, the Henry's Law constants for these compounds have been determined and found to agree with the published values. The confirmation of the quality of this sampling methodology combined with SIFT-MS for the analysis of volatile compounds in liquid headspace paves the way for the rapid analyses of biological liquids such as urine and serum for clinical diagnosis and physiological monitoring. PMID:12415548

  12. Effects of environmentally relevant mixtures of major ions on a freshwater mussel.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Phipps, Andrew; Soucek, David J; Zipper, Carl E; Jones, Jess W

    2015-12-01

    The Clinch and Powell Rivers (Virginia, USA) support diverse mussel assemblages. Extensive coal mining occurs in both watersheds. In large reaches of both rivers, major ion concentrations are elevated and mussels have been extirpated or are declining. We conducted a laboratory study to assess major ion effects on growth and survival of juvenile Villosa iris. Mussels were exposed to pond water and diluted pond water with environmentally relevant major ion mixtures for 55 days. Two treatments were tested to mimic low-flow concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] , K(+) and Cl(-) in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, total ion concentrations of 419mg/L and 942mg/L, respectively. Mussel survival (>90%) and growth in the two treatments showed little variation, and were not significantly different than in diluted pond water (control). Results suggest that major ion chronic toxicity is not the primary cause for mussel declines in the Clinch and Powell Rivers. PMID:26412268

  13. Direct trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in air using ion trap mass spectrometers with filtered noise fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, S.M.; Callahan, P.J.; Kenny, D.V.; Pleil, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Two ion trap mass spectrometers and direct air sampling interfaces are being evaluated in the laboratory for monitoring toxic air pollutants in real time. The mass spectrometers are the large, laboratory-based Finnigan MAT ion trap (ITMS{trademark}) and the compact, field-deployable Teledyne 3DQ Discovery{trademark} ion trap. Both instruments are equipped with filtered noise field (FNF) technology, which minimizes the effects due to space charging normally associated with ion traps, provides a unique means of isolating individual target compounds in complex mixtures, and permits tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) operation for unambiguous characterization of individual compounds with high sensitivity and specificity. The combination direct air sampling/ion trap/FNF systems are being evaluated using a semipermeable tubular membrane interface and an atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization (ASGDI) source to measure selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air continuously in real time. Nonpolar and polar VOCs are measured at trace levels, using an environmental test chamber as the source of the target compound mixtures at known concentrations. Experiments conducted with the combination systems demonstrate the power of the FNF method and delineate the advantages and disadvantages of the two direct air sampling interfaces for monitoring VOCs.

  14. ANALYSIS OF AMBIENT POLAR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING CHEMICAL IONIZATION -- ION TRAP DETECTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current approach to measuring trace levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air requires cryogenic trapping of the analytes, followed by thermal desorption and low-temperature refocussing onto a column for analysis by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrome...

  15. Ultrafiltration behavior of major ions (Na, Ca, Mg, F, Cl, and SO4) in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Hunt, B J; Santschi, P H

    2001-04-01

    Aquatic colloids, including macromolecules and microparticles, with sizes ranging between 1 nm to 1 micron, play important roles in the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants in natural waters. Cross-flow ultrafiltration has become one of the most commonly used techniques for isolating aquatic colloids. However, the ultrafiltration behavior of chemical species remains poorly understood. We report here the permeation behavior of major ions (Na, Ca, Mg, F, Cl, and SO4) in natural waters during ultrafiltration using an Amicon 1 kDa ultrafiltration membrane (S10N1). Water samples across a salinity gradient of 0-20@1000 were collected from the Trinity River and Galveston Bay. The permeation behavior of major ions was well predicted by a permeation model, resulting in a constant permeation coefficient for each ion. The value of the model-derived permeation coefficient (Pc) was 0.99 for Na, 0.97 for Cl, and 0.95 for F, respectively, in Trinity River waters. Values of Pc close to 1 indicate that retention of Na, Cl, and F by the 1 kDa membrane during ultrafiltration was indeed minimal (< 1-5%). In contrast, significant (14-36%) retention was observed for SO4, Ca, and Mg in Trinity River waters, with a Pc value of 0.64, 0.82, and 0.86 for SO4, Ca and Mg, respectively. However, these retained major ions can further permeate through the 1 kDa membrane during diafiltration with ultrapure water. The selective retention of major ions during ultrafiltration may have important implications for the measurement of chemical and physical speciation of trace elements when using cross-flow ultrafiltration membranes to separate colloidal species from natural waters. Our results also demonstrate that the percent retention of major ions during ultrafiltration decreases with increasing salinity or ionic strength. This retention is largely attributed to electrostatic repulsion by the negatively charged cartridge membrane. PMID:11317897

  16. Interactive toxicity of major ion salts: Comparisons among species and between acute and chronic endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) in freshwater systems can result from a variety of anthropogenic activities, and can adversely affect aquatic organisms if the increase is sufficiently severe. Laboratory tests have indicated that the toxicity...

  17. Mesocosm Community Response Sensitivities to Specific Conductivity Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional toxicity test assays have been used to evaluate the relative sensitivity to different major ion mixtures as a proxy for understanding what the response of aquatic species growing in their natural environment would be during exposure to specific conductivity stress ema...

  18. Major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne Aquifer, Southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radell, M.J.; Katz, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne aquifer was characterized as part of the Florida Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Network Program, a multiagency cooperative effort concerned with delineating baseline water quality for major aquifer systems in the State. The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined and serves as the sole source of drinking water for more than 3 million people in southeast Florida. The Biscayne aquifer consists of highly permeable interbedded limestone and sandstone of Pleistocene and Pliocene age underlying most of Dade and Broward Counties and parts of Palm Beach and Monroe Counties. The high permeability is largely caused by extensive carbonate dissolution. Water sampled from 189 wells tapping the Biscayne aquifer was predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type with some mixed types occurring in coastal areas and near major canals. Major - ion is areally uniform throughout the aquifer. According to nonparametric statistical tests of major ions and dissolved solids, the concentrations of calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids increased significantly with well depth ( 0.05 significance level ), probably a result of less circulation at depth. Potassium and nitrate concentrations decreased significantly with depth. Although the source of recharge to the aquifer varies seasonally, there was no statistical difference in the concentration of major ions in pared water samples from 27 shallow wells collected during wet and dry seasons. Median concentrations for barium, chromium, copper, lead, and manganese were below maximum or secondary maximum contaminant levels set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The median iron concentration only slightly exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level. The concentration of barium was significantly related (0.05 significance level) to calcium and bicarbonate concentration. No distinct areal pattern or vertical distribution of the selected trace metals was evident in water from the Biscayne aquifer. Sources for trace metals found in water from the Biscayne aquifer may include local contamination, well-construction techniques, canal - aquifer interactions, and natural occurrence in area soils and rock.

  19. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; pan?l, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses. PMID:26583448

  20. Major Ion Content of Aerosols from Denali Base Camp during Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, C. P.; Burakowski, E. A.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on Teflon filters at a site up-glacier from Denali Base Camp (2380 m) in Denali National Park, Alaska during May and June of 2013 using an autonomous aerosol sampler powered by solar panels and batteries. The samples were analyzed for major ions via ion chromatography. Surface and fresh snow samples were also collected over the same time period and analyzed for major ions. Ion concentrations in the aerosol samples are completely dominated by NH4+ (mean concentration of 6.6 nmol/m3) and SO4= (mean concentration of 4.0 nmol/m3). Overall, the ion burden in aerosol samples from Denali Base Camp was much lower compared to aerosol samples collected from the Denali National Park and Trapper Creek IMPROVE sites over the same time period. In contrast to the aerosol chemistry, the snow chemistry is more balanced, with NH4+, Ca2+, and Na+ dominating the cation concentrations and NO3-, Cl-, and SO4= dominating the anion concentrations. The higher levels of Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- in the snow (relative to NH4+ and SO4=) compared to relative concentrations in the aerosol samples suggest that dry deposition of sea salt and dust are important contributors to the major ion signals preserved in the snow. This has important ramifications for improving our understanding of the reconstruction of North Pacific climate variability and change from glaciochemical records currently being developed from the 208 m ice cores recovered from the Mt. Hunter plateau (3900 m) during the summer of 2013.

  1. On-site Rapid Detection of Trace Non-volatile Inorganic Explosives by Stand-alone Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Acid-enhanced Evaporization

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liying; Hua, Lei; Wang, Weiguo; Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-01-01

    New techniques for the field detection of inorganic improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are urgently developed. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been proved to be the most effective method for screening organic explosives, it still faces a major challenge to detect inorganic explosives owing to their low volatilities. Herein, we proposed a strategy for detecting trace inorganic explosives by thermal desorption ion mobility spectrometry (TD-IMS) with sample-to-sample analysis time less than 5 s based on in-situ acidification on the sampling swabs. The responses for typical oxidizers in inorganic explosives, such as KNO3, KClO3 and KClO4 were at least enhanced by a factor of 3000 and their limits of detection were found to be subnanogram. The common organic explosives and their mixtures with inorganic oxidizers were detected, indicating that the acidification process did not affect the detection of organic explosives. Moreover, the typical inorganic explosives such as black powders, firecrackers and match head could be sensitively detected as well. These results demonstrated that this method could be easily employed in the current deployed IMS for on-site sensitive detection of either inorganic explosives or organic ones. PMID:25318960

  2. On-site rapid detection of trace non-volatile inorganic explosives by stand-alone ion mobility spectrometry via acid-enhanced evaporization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liying; Hua, Lei; Wang, Weiguo; Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-01-01

    New techniques for the field detection of inorganic improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are urgently developed. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been proved to be the most effective method for screening organic explosives, it still faces a major challenge to detect inorganic explosives owing to their low volatilities. Herein, we proposed a strategy for detecting trace inorganic explosives by thermal desorption ion mobility spectrometry (TD-IMS) with sample-to-sample analysis time less than 5 s based on in-situ acidification on the sampling swabs. The responses for typical oxidizers in inorganic explosives, such as KNO3, KClO3 and KClO4 were at least enhanced by a factor of 3000 and their limits of detection were found to be subnanogram. The common organic explosives and their mixtures with inorganic oxidizers were detected, indicating that the acidification process did not affect the detection of organic explosives. Moreover, the typical inorganic explosives such as black powders, firecrackers and match head could be sensitively detected as well. These results demonstrated that this method could be easily employed in the current deployed IMS for on-site sensitive detection of either inorganic explosives or organic ones. PMID:25318960

  3. On-site Rapid Detection of Trace Non-volatile Inorganic Explosives by Stand-alone Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Acid-enhanced Evaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liying; Hua, Lei; Wang, Weiguo; Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-10-01

    New techniques for the field detection of inorganic improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are urgently developed. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been proved to be the most effective method for screening organic explosives, it still faces a major challenge to detect inorganic explosives owing to their low volatilities. Herein, we proposed a strategy for detecting trace inorganic explosives by thermal desorption ion mobility spectrometry (TD-IMS) with sample-to-sample analysis time less than 5 s based on in-situ acidification on the sampling swabs. The responses for typical oxidizers in inorganic explosives, such as KNO3, KClO3 and KClO4 were at least enhanced by a factor of 3000 and their limits of detection were found to be subnanogram. The common organic explosives and their mixtures with inorganic oxidizers were detected, indicating that the acidification process did not affect the detection of organic explosives. Moreover, the typical inorganic explosives such as black powders, firecrackers and match head could be sensitively detected as well. These results demonstrated that this method could be easily employed in the current deployed IMS for on-site sensitive detection of either inorganic explosives or organic ones.

  4. Origin of major ions in monthly rainfall events at the Bamenda Highlands, Northwest Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Wirmvem, Mengnjo J; Ohba, Takeshi; Fantong, Wilson Y; Ayonghe, Samuel N; Hogarh, Jonathan N; Suila, Justice Y; Asaah, Asobo Nkengmatia E; Ooki, Seigo; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph V

    2014-04-01

    Rainwater characteristics can reveal emissions from various anthropogenic and natural sources into the atmosphere. The physico-chemical characteristics of 44 monthly rainfall events (collected between January and December 2012) from 4 weather stations (Bamenda, Ndop plain, Ndawara and Kumbo) in the Bamenda Highlands (BH) were investigated. The purpose was to determine the sources of chemical species, their seasonal inputs and suitability of the rainwater for drinking. The mean pH of 5 indicated the slightly acidic nature of the rainwater. Average total dissolved solids (TDS) were low (6.7 mg/L), characteristic of unpolluted atmospheric moisture/air. Major ion concentrations (mg/L) were low and in the order K(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) for cations and NO3(-)?HCO3(-)>SO4(2-)>Cl(-)>PO4(3-)>F(-) for anions. The average rainwater in the area was mixed Ca-Mg-SO4-Cl water type. The Cl(-)/Na(+) ratio (1.04) was comparable to that of seawater (1.16), an indication that Na(+) and Cl(-) originated mainly from marine (Atlantic Ocean) aerosols. High enrichments of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and SO(2-)4 to Na(+) ratios relative to seawater ratios (constituting 44% of the total ions) demonstrated their terrigenous origin, mainly from Saharan and Sahelian arid dusts. The K(+)/Na(+) ratio (2.24), which was similar to tropical vegetation ash (2.38), and NO3(-) was essentially from biomass burning. Light (< 100 mm) pre-monsoon and post-monsoon convective rains were enriched in major ions than the heavy (> 100 mm) monsoon rains, indicating a high contribution of major ions during the low convective showers. Despite the acidic nature, the TDS and major ion concentrations classified the rainwater as potable based on the WHO guidelines. PMID:25079410

  5. Real-time detection of common microbial volatile organic compounds from medically important fungi by Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    PubMed

    Scotter, Jennifer M; Langford, Vaughan S; Wilson, Paul F; McEwan, Murray J; Chambers, Stephen T

    2005-11-01

    We describe a new method, Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) for the rapid and sensitive real-time detection and quantification of volatile organic compounds from medically important fungi, grown on a range of laboratory media. SIFT-MS utilises the chemical ionisation reactions of mass-selected ions to characterise volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are produced as metabolites from fungi. This technique has the distinct advantage over others in that it readily detects low molecular weight, reactive volatiles, and allows for real-time, quantitative monitoring. The fungi examined in this study were Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, Mucor racemosus, Fusarium solani, and Cryptococcus neoformans grown on or in malt extract agar, Columbia agar, Sabouraud's dextrose agar, blood agar, and brain-heart infusion broth. Common metabolites (ethanol, methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, methanethiol, and crotonaldehyde) were detected and quantified. We found the fingerprint of volatiles, in terms of presence and quantity of volatiles to be strongly dependent on the culture medium, both in terms of variety and quantity of volatiles produced, but may form the basis for species specific identification of medically important fungi. PMID:15893831

  6. DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: MAJOR ION AND PH DATA FOR USE ON THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    C. WILSON; D.M. JENKINS; T. STEINBORN; R. WEMHEUER

    2000-08-23

    This data qualification report uses technical assessment and corroborating data methods according to Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q, Rev. 0, ICN 2, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data'', to qualify major ion and pH data. This report was prepared in accordance with Data Qualification Plan TDP-NBS-GS-00003 1, Revision 2. Additional reports will be prepared to address isotopic and precipitation-related data. Most of the data considered in this report were acquired and developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data qualification team considers the sampling and analytical protocols employed by the USGS over the time period of data acquisition to be state-of-the-art. The sample collection methodologies have evolved with no significant change that could affect the quality of the data considered in this report into the currently used Hydrologic Procedures that support the Yucca Mountain Project-approved USGS Quality Assurance Program Plan. Consequently, for USGS data, the data collection methods, documentation, and results are reasonable and appropriate in view of standard practice at the time the data were collected. A small number of data sets were collected by organizations other than the USGS and were reviewed along with the other major ion and pH data using corroborating data methods. Hydrochemical studies reviewed in this qualification report indicate that the extent and quality of corroborating data are sufficient to support qualification of both USGS and non-USGS major ion and pH data for generalized hydrochemical studies. The corroborating data included other major ion and pH data, isotope data, and independent hydrological data. Additionally, the analytical adequacy of the major ion data was supported by a study of anion-cation charge balances. Charge balance errors for USGS and non-USGS data were under 10% and acceptable for all data. This qualification report addresses the specific major ion data sets selected to support the hydrochemical studies in Analysis/Model Report (AMR) S0040 and pH data used in AMRs U0100 and U0085. Based on a preponderance of evidence, these data are recommended to be qualified for inclusion in technical products in support of the Site Recommendation for generalized uses as described in this report.

  7. Product ion distributions for the reactions of NO+ with some physiologically significant volatile organosulfur and organoselenium compounds obtained using a selective reagent ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Mochalski, Pawe?; Unterkofler, Karl; pan?l, Patrik; Smith, David; Amann, Anton

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE The reactions of NO+ with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Selective Reagent Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SRI-TOF-MS) reactors are relatively poorly known, inhibiting their use for trace gas analysis. The rationale for this product ion distribution study was to identify the major product ions of the reactions of NO+ ions with 13 organosulfur compounds and 2 organoselenium compounds in an SRI-TOF-MS instrument and thus to prepare the way for their analysis in exhaled breath, in skin emanations and in the headspace of urine, blood and cell and bacterial cultures. METHODS Product ion distributions have been investigated by a SRI-TOF-MS instrument at an E/N in the drift tube reactor of 130 Td for both dry air and humid air (4.9% absolute humidity) used as the matrix gas. The investigated species were five monosulfides (dimethyl sulfide, ethyl methyl sulfide, methyl propyl sulfide, allyl methyl sulfide and methyl 5-methyl-2-furyl sulfide), dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, thiophene, 2-methylthiophene, 3-methylthiophene, methanethiol, allyl isothiocyanate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and two selenium compounds dimethyl selenide and dimethyl diselenide. RESULTS Charge transfer was seen to be the dominant reaction mechanism in all reactions under study forming the M+ cations. For methanethiol and allyl isothiocyanate significant fractions were also observed of the stable adduct ions NO+M, formed by ion-molecule association, and [MH]+ ions, formed by hydride ion transfer. Several other minor product channels are seen for most reactions indicating that the nascent excited intermediate (NOM)+* adduct ions partially fragment along other channels, most commonly by the elimination of neutral CH3, CH4 and/or C2H4 species that are probably bound to an NO molecule. Humidity had little effect on the product ion distributions. CONCLUSIONS The findings of this study are of particular importance for data interpretation in studies of volatile organosulfur and volatile organoselenium compounds employing SRI-TOF-MS in the NO+ mode. 2014 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:24975248

  8. Mars heavy ion precipitating flux as measured by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Modolo, R.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J.; Lillis, R.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J.; Eparvier, F.; Larson, D.; Connerney, J.; Jakosky, B.

    2015-11-01

    In the absence of an intrinsic dipole magnetic field, Mars' O+ planetary ions are accelerated by the solar wind. Because of their large gyroradius, a population of these planetary ions can precipitate back into Mars' upper atmosphere with enough energy to eject neutrals into space via collision. This process, referred to as sputtering, may have been a dominant atmospheric loss process during earlier stages of our Sun. Yet until now, a limited number of observations have been possible; Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms-3/Mars Express observed such a precipitation only during extreme conditions, suggesting that sputtering might be not as intense as theoretically predicted. Here we describe one example of precipitation of heavy ions during quiet solar conditions. Between November 2014 and April 2015, the average precipitating flux is significant and in agreement with predictions. From these measured precipitating fluxes, we estimate that a maximum of 1.0 1024 O/s could have been lost due to sputtering.

  9. Sources and cycling of major ions and nutrients in Devils Lake, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lent, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Devils Lake is a saline lake in a large, closed drainage basin in northeastern North Dakota. Previous studies determined that major-ion and nutrient concentrations in Devils Lake are strongly affected by microbially mediated sulfate reduction and dissolution of sulfate and carbonate minerals in the bottom sediments. These studies documented substantial spatial variability in the magnitude of calculated benthic fluxes coincident with the horizontal salinity gradient in Devils Lake. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate seasonal variability in benthic-flux rates, and to understand the effect of these fluxes on the major- chemistries in Devils Lake between May and October 1991. During the study period, the water column was well mixed, and specific conductance, pH, and temperature did not vary with depth. Dissolved oxygen was enriched near the lake surface due to photosynthesis. Major-ion concentrations and nutrient concentrations did not vary with depth. Because the water-quality data were obtained during open-water periods, the vertical profiles reflect well-mixed conditions. However, the first and last profiles for the study period did document near-bottom maxima of major cations. Secchi-disk depth varied from 0.82 meter on May 7, 1991, to 2.13 meters on June 5, 1991. The mean Secchi-disk depth during the study period was 1.24 meters. Seasonal variations in Secchi-disk depths were attributed to variations in primary productivity and phytoplankton communities. Nutrient cycles in Devils Lake were evaluated using gross primary productivity rate data, sediment trap data, and major-ion and nutrient benthic-flux rate data. Gross primary productivity rate was smallest in May (0.076 gram of carbon per square meter per day) and largest in September (1.8 grams of carbon per square meter per day). Average gross primary productivity for the study period was 0.87 gram of carbon per square meter per day. Average gross primary productivity is consistent with historic data from Devils Lake and with data from other eutrophic lakes. The average flux of organic carbon for the study period was 12 grams per square meter per day. The calculated carbon to nitrogen to phosphorus ratio (317:25:1) is similar to the Redfield ratio (106:16:1); therefore, most organic matter probably is derived from lacustrine phytoplankton. Calculated benthic-flux rates indicated that bottom sediments are important sources of majorions and nutrients to Devils Lake. Only one of the cores collected during this study indicated a net sulfate flux from the lake into the sediments. Seasonal variations in major-ion and nutrient benthic fluxes generally were small. However, there were important differences between the calculated benthic fluxes for this study and the calculated benthic fluxes for 1990. Calculated benthic fluxes of bicarbonate, ammonia, and phosphorus for this study were smaller than calculated benthic fluxes for 1990. The large differences between fluxes for 1990 and 1991 were attributed to calm, stratified water-column conditions in 1990 and well-mixed water-column conditions in 1991. The role of benthic fluxes in the chemical mass balances in Devils Lake was evaluated by calculating response times for major ions and nutrients in Devils Lake. The calculated response times for major ions in Devils Lake ranged from 6.7 years for bicarbonate to 34 years for sulfur (as S04). The response times for major ions are significantly shorter than previous estimates that did not include benthic fluxes. In addition, the relatively short response times for nitrogen (4.2 years) and phosphorus (0.95 year) indicate that nutrients are recycled rapidly between bottom sediments and the lake. During the study period, benthic fluxes were the dominant source of major ions and nutrients to Devils Lake and greatly reduced the response times of all major ions and nutrients for Devils Lake. As a result, bottom-sediment processes appear to buffer major-ion and nutrient concent

  10. The major volatile compound 2-phenylethanol from the biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, inhibits growth and expression of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes of Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Beck, John J; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L; Gee, Wai

    2014-05-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a ubiquitous saprophyte that is able to produce the most potent natural carcinogenic compound known as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). This toxin frequently contaminates crops including corn, cotton, peanuts, and tree nuts causing substantial economic loss worldwide. Consequently, more than 100 countries have strict regulations limiting AFB1 in foodstuffs and feedstuffs. Plants and microbes are able to produce volatile compounds that act as a defense mechanism against other organisms. Pichia anomala strain WRL-076 is a biocontrol yeast currently being tested to reduce AF contamination of tree nuts in California. We used the SPME-GC/MS analysis and identified the major volatile compound produced by this strain to be 2-phenylethanol (2-PE). It inhibited spore germination and AF production of A. flavus. Inhibition of AF formation by 2-PE was correlated with significant down regulation of clustering AF biosynthesis genes as evidenced by several to greater than 10,000-fold decrease in gene expression. In a time-course analysis we found that 2-PE also altered the expression patterns of chromatin modifying genes, MYST1, MYST2, MYST3, gcn5, hdaA and rpdA. The biocontrol capacity of P. anomala can be attributed to the production of 2-PE, which affects spore germination, growth, toxin production, and gene expression in A. flavus. PMID:24504634

  11. Major Ion concentrations in the new NEEM ice core in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, A.; Azuma, K. G.; Hirabayashi, M.; Schmidt, K.; Hansson, M.; Twarloh, B.

    2012-12-01

    The drilling of the new deep ice core in NEEM (77.45°N 51.06°W) was terminated in 2010. Using a continuous flow analysis system (CFA), discrete samples were filled and analyzed for major ion concentrations (Na, K, Mg, Ca, Cl, SO_4 and NO_3) using Ion Chromatography (IC). The samples were measured at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (Germany) and National Institute of Polar Research (Japan). Here we present preliminary results of the major Ion concentrations. We found highest variations in concentrations of Calcium and Magnesium which are mainly originating from terrestrial sources with concentrations between 5-10 ppb and 4 ppb during the Holocene compared to 800 ppb and 80 ppb during the LGM. This is in line with measurements of particulate dust concentrations. Sulphate concentrations closely follow DO events and vary between 25 ppb during the Holocene and ~400 ppb during the LGM. Sodium concentrations vary between ~ 8 ppb during the Holocene and up to 100 ppb during the LGM. We discuss influences of changes in the source areas and atmospheric transport intensity on the different time scales.

  12. Effect of cobalt ions on the metabolism of some volatile and polar compounds in the marine invertebrates Mytilus galloprovincialis and Actinia equina.

    PubMed

    Nechev, Jordan; Stefanov, Kamen; Nedelcheva, Diana; Popov, Simeon

    2007-04-01

    The compositions of the volatile and polar fractions from two coexisting Black Sea invertebrates, the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the beadlet anemone Actinia equina, were established. The main metabolites in the volatile fraction from the investigated animals appeared to be methyl esters of fatty acids and fatty aldehydes. In the polar fraction from both animals low concentrations of free acids and nitrogen-containing compounds were obtained. Free carbohydrates were in much higher concentrations in M. galloprovincialis than in A. equina. Some sterols, probably as polar conjugates, were identified mainly in A. equina. Significant changes among all compounds appeared after treatment of both invertebrates with two different concentrations of cobalt ions. The variety of changes in each invertebrate could be due to their different evolutionary status. The effect of cobalt ions was often stronger at medium cobalt-ion concentrations. PMID:17276120

  13. Major ion and electrical potential distribution in soil under electrokinetic remediation.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Umegaki, Y

    2001-06-01

    To assess the effect of pore water chemistry on the contaminant removal rate, we monitored major ion concentrations in the pore water and the electrical potential distribution of a soil during electrokinetic remediation treatment. On application of the voltage, the soil near the anode became acidic due to the electrolytic generation of H+, and the acid region gradually spread toward the cathode. The major cation in the acid region was, however, not H+ but Al3+ that arose from the acid-induced dissolution of soil minerals, and it migrated very slowly toward the cathode. The measured pH and accompanying ion concentrations indicated that the anomalously slow migration of Al3+ was due to its precipitation-dissolution reaction at the acid front. The stagnancy of Al3+ increased the ionic concentration, flattened the electrical potential profile, and in turn, diminished electromigration in the acid region. This seems to be one of the causes of the relatively low removal rate of cationic and anionic contaminants in electrokinetic treatments. PMID:11414012

  14. Major ion chemistry of shallow groundwater of a fast growing city of central India.

    PubMed

    Marghade, Deepali; Malpe, D B; Zade, A B

    2012-04-01

    Nagpur City located in semiarid area of central India is a fast-growing industrial centre. In recent years, rapid development has created an increased demand for drinking water, which is increasingly being fulfilled by groundwater abstraction. The present study was undertaken to assess major ion chemistry of shallow groundwater to understand geochemical evolution of groundwater and water quality for promoting sustainable development and effective management of groundwater resources. A total of 47 water samples were collected from shallow aquifer of selected parts of the city and the water chemistry of various ions viz. Ca(2?+), Mg(2?+), Na(+), K(+), CO(3)(2-), HCO(3)(-), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) are carried out. The chemical relationships in Piper diagram identify Ca-HCO(3)-Cl and mixed Ca-Na-HCO(3)-Cl as most prevalent water types. Alkaline earth exceeds alkalis and weak acids exceed strong acids. Ionic ratios and Gibb's diagram suggest that silicate rock weathering and anthropogenic activities are the main processes that determine the ionic composition in the study area. The nitrate appeared as a major problem of safe drinking water in this region. We recorded highest nitrate concentration, i.e., 411 mg/l in one of the dug well. A comparison of groundwater quality in relation to drinking water quality standards revealed that about half of the shallow aquifer samples are not suitable for drinking. PMID:21617965

  15. Mobilization of major inorganic ions during experimental diagenesis of characterized peats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, A.M.; Cohen, A.D.; Orem, W.H.; Blackson, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to study changes in concentrations of major inorganic ions during simulated burial of peats to about 1.5 km. Cladium, Rhizophora, and Cyrilla peats were first analyzed to determine cation distributions among fractions of the initial materials and minerals in residues from wet oxidation. Subsamples of the peats (80 g) were then subjected to increasing temperatures and pressures in steps of 5??C and 300 psi at 2-day intervals and produced solutions collected. After six steps, starting from 30??C and 300 psi, a final temperature of 60??C and a final pressure of 2100 psi were achieved. The system was then allowed to stand for an additional 2 weeks at 60??C and 2100 psi. Treatments resulted in highly altered organic solids resembling lignite and expelled solutions of systematically varying compositions. Solutions from each step were analyzed for Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, total dissolved Si (Si(T)), Cl-, SO42-, and organic acids and anions (OAAs). Some data on total dissolved Al (Al(T)) were also collected. Mobilization of major ions from peats during these experiments is controlled by at least three processes: (1) loss of dissolved ions in original porewater expelled during compaction, (2) loss of adsorbed cations as adsorption sites are lost during modification of organic solids, and (3) increased dissolution of inorganic phases at later steps due to increased temperatures (Si(T)) and increased complexing by OAAs (Al(T)). In general, results provide insight into early post-burial inorganic changes occurring during maturation of terrestrial organic matter. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of nutrients and major ions in streams-implications of different timescale procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaussê, Thais Carvalho Cerqueira; Dos Santos Brandão, Camila; da Silva, Lenilda Pita; Salamim Fonseca Spanghero, Pedro Enrico; da Silva, Daniela Mariano Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Small watersheds are characterized by a high degree of sensitivity to changes observed in their environment, making them important sampling and management units. Due to this high sensitivity, several studies have shown that intensive collecting may be more effective in these systems compared to other timescale procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of organic and inorganic nutrients and major ions dissolved in two small watersheds with different land uses to determine whether there are differences between these watersheds with different levels of impact and to identify the most appropriate timescale procedure for the variables under analysis. Therefore, monthly, daily, and hourly samples were taken in the two streams in the northeast of Brazil. One of the streams is located in an undisturbed area (environmental protected area) (S1) and one in a disturbed area (S2). The results showed significant differences for conductivity, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (%), sodium (Na(+)), and chloride (Cl(-)) ions and higher values presented in the anthropogenic stream. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in S2 mainly comprised ammonium (NH4 (+)), while nitrate (NO3 (-)) predominated in S1. The considerable increase in the concentration of NO3 (-) and dilution of Na(+) and Cl(-) after rain in April in S1 shows how precipitation may change the chemical composition of the water in a 1-day period. No changes were observed in the concentrations of major ions and nutrients that could be related to the cyclical variation of the hours during the day in both small watersheds. Daily collections allow better monitoring of the dynamics of streams and greater robustness of the data. PMID:26681182

  17. Quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds using ion mobility spectra and cascade correlation neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Peter DEB.; Zheng, Peng

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique for trace organic analysis in the gas phase. Quantitative measurements are difficult, because IMS has a limited linear range. Factors that may affect the instrument response are pressure, temperature, and humidity. Nonlinear calibration methods, such as neural networks, may be ideally suited for IMS. Neural networks have the capability of modeling complex systems. Many neural networks suffer from long training times and overfitting. Cascade correlation neural networks train at very fast rates. They also build their own topology, that is a number of layers and number of units in each layer. By controlling the decay parameter in training neural networks, reproducible and general models may be obtained.

  18. Mineral dust and major ion concentrations in snowpit samples from the NEEM site, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Ho; Hwang, Heejin; Hong, Sang Bum; Hur, Soon Do; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Jeonghoon; Hong, Sungmin

    2015-11-01

    Polar ice sheets conserve atmospheric aerosols at the time of snowfall, which can be used to reconstruct past climate and environmental conditions. We investigated mineral dust and major ion records in snowpit samples obtained from the northwestern Greenland ice sheet near the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) camp in June 2009. We analyzed the samples for mineral dust concentrations as well as stable water isotopes (δ18O, δD, and deuterium excess) and major ions (Cl-, SO42-, methanesulfonic acid (MSA), Na+, and Ca2+). Seasonal δ18O and δD cycles indicate that the snowpit samples covered a six-year period from spring 2003 to early summer 2009. Concentrations of mineral dust, nss-Ca2+, and nss-SO42- showed seasonal deposition events with maxima in the winter-spring layers. On the other hand, the Cl-/Na+ ratio and the concentrations of MSA exhibited maxima in the summer layers, making them useful indicators for the summer season. Moreover, an anomalous atmospheric mineral dust event was recorded at a depth of 165-170 cm corresponding to late winter 2005 to spring 2006. A back trajectory analysis suggests that a major contributor to the Greenland aerosol was an air mass passing over the Canadian Arctic and North America. Several trajectories point to Asian regions as a dust source. The mineral dust deposited at NEEM was strongly influenced by long-range atmospheric transport and dust input from arid source areas in northern China and Mongolia.

  19. Year-Round Major Ion Measurements at Greenland Environmental Observatory, Summit (GEOSummit)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, J. R.; Bales, R. C.; McConnell, J. R.; Zhao, L.; Moon, C.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term year-round surface snow sampling at remote high latitude locations is fundamental to better understanding arctic geophysical processes. Research at the Greenland Environmental Observatory, Summit Station (GEOSummit) from 2003 to present includes high temporal resolution year-round ion chromatography (IC) measurements of surface snow and snow pit samples for Na, NH4, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3, SO42-, oxalate, MSA, acetate and formate. Many of these species exhibit annual cycles corresponding to source emissions. For example, Ca2+ exhibits a spring peak attributed to dust deposition, and formate exhibits a summer/fall peak associated with biomass burning. Monthly snow-pit major-ion sample measurements at 3-cm resolution indicate variability of many species are preserved within the snow pack. Concentrations are generally consistent with prior ice-core concentrations. Concurrently measured snow-accumulation rates exhibited relatively uniform intra-annual accumulation (5.9 cm/month +/- 4.3 cm, 1 sigma) with significant inter-annual variability. Snow-pit density values also show consistent trends with time as snow accumulates. These baseline measurements at GEOSummit will continue through another 5-year period to better characterize concentrations in snow on annual to decadal scales, and connections with source apportionment and atmospheric transport pathways.

  20. Geochemical processes in the Onyx River, Wright Valley, Antarctica: Major ions, nutrients, trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William J.; Stage, Brian R.; Preston, Adam; Wagers, Shannon; Shacat, Joseph; Newell, Silvia

    2005-02-01

    We present data on major ions, nutrients and trace metals in an Antarctic stream. The Onyx River is located in Wright Valley (77-32 S; 161-34 E), one of a group of ancient river and glacier-carved landforms that comprise the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The river is more than 30 km long and is the largest of the glacial meltwater streams that characterize this relatively ice-free region near the Ross Sea. The complete absence of rainfall in the region and the usually small contributions of glacially derived tributaries to the main channel make this a comparatively simple system for geochemical investigation. Moreover, the lack of human impacts, past or present, provides an increasingly rare window onto a pristine aquatic system. For all major ions and silica, we observe increasing concentrations with distance from Lake Brownworth down to the recording weir near Lake Vanda. Chemical weathering rates are unexpectedly high and may be related to the rapid dissolution of ancient carbonate deposits and to the severe physical weathering associated with the harsh Antarctic winter. Of the nutrients, nitrate and dissolved reactive phosphate appear to have quite different sources. Nitrate is enriched in waters near the Lower Wright Glacier and may ultimately be derived from stratospheric sources; while phosphate is likely to be the product of chemical weathering of valley rocks and soils. We confirm the work of earlier investigations regarding the importance of the Boulder Pavement as a nutrient sink. Dissolved Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Cd are present at nanomolar levels and, in all cases, the concentrations of these metals are lower than in average world river water. We hypothesize that metal uptake and exchange with particulate phases along the course of the river may serve as a buffer for the dissolved load. Concurrent study of these three solute classes points out significant differences in the mechanisms and sites of their removal from the Onyx River.

  1. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  2. Major Ion Chemistry and Mixing Proportions of Nitrate Sources in Urban Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munster, J.; Hanson, G. N.; Bokuniewicz, H.

    2007-05-01

    Working with Dr. Gilbert Hanson has allowed me to apply general mixing equations to identification of nonpoint sources of groundwater contamination. These methods have not commonly been used in hydrologic studies, as they involve a more classical petrologic approach, one which Dr. Hanson has pioneered. Our drinking water supplies are becoming more susceptible to contamination and knowing the chemistry of contaminate sources will yield precise determination of potential sources to groundwater and allow government agencies to adopt policies to reduce or prevent contamination. The geochemistry of soil water from below fertilized turfgrass sites and of sewage from septic tank/cesspools was used to place constraints on the sources of nitrate in groundwater of an unconsolidated aquifer in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York, USA. Twenty four sewage samples were acquired from Suffolk County Public Works. Soil water samples, from suction lysimeters, were acquired monthly during 2003, totaling 70 samples. We found that soil water concentrations were elevated in Ca, Mg and SO4 relative to sewage and sewage had higher concentrations of Cl, N-NO3, PO4, Na and K. This difference in the major ion chemistry allows identification of the source signatures in groundwater. We then compared the source signatures to 28 groundwater wells on binary ion diagrams of SO4, Cl and N- NO3 and created a cation sorption model for Na, Ca, Mg and K, in order to model cation concentrations on binary ion diagrams. These diagrams allow estimates of the relative contributions of each source to each well. Groundwater wells plotted according to their major land use and show that wells of similar land use have similar geochemistry and similar source contributions. The estimates of source contributions show that the proportions of soil water and sewage increase as residential land use increases. Although volumetric source proportions to groundwater wells are similar for soil water and sewage within a given land use, sewage contributes a greater proportion to the nitrate concentration in groundwater wells. For example, sewage contributes between 86-100% of the nitrate in wells sourced in medium density residential land use, even when accounting for a 50% reduction in nitrate concentrations from the septic tank/cesspool system. Our results indicate that to decrease the nitrate concentrations in groundwater one must reduce the load from septic tank/cesspool systems.

  3. Median density altitude profiles of the major ions in the central nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, William C.; Miller, Kent L.; Spenner, Karl

    1986-01-01

    Altitude profiles of median values for total ion density, constituent ion densities, and the molecular ion group of the central nightside Venus ionosphere are presently derived from the Pioneer Venus retarding potential analyzer's measurements during the first five seasonal passages of the spacecraft through the nightside hemisphere. The altitude profiles for total ion density, constituent ions and the molecular ion group are compared with previously predicted profiles derived from numerical models in which the ionization source was O(+) ions transported from the dayside ionosphere and electron impact-produced ionization. The electron impact-produced profiles for O(+) is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than that observed.

  4. PCBs and OCPs on a east-to-west transect: the importance of major currents and net volatilization for PCBs in the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Rainer; Klanova, Jana; Kukucka, Petr; Yonis, Shifra; Bollinger, Kevyn

    2012-10-01

    Air-water exchange gradients of selected polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners across a large section of the tropical Atlantic suggested net volatilization of PCBs to the atmosphere. Only for the higher chlorinated PCB 153 and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were gradients near equilibrium detected. The use of passive samplers also enabled the detection of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its transformation products across the tropical Atlantic, indicating net deposition. There were clear differences between the southern and northern hemisphere apparent in terms of atmospheric concentrations: Once the ship moved from the southern into the northern hemisphere air, concentrations of HCB and other organochlorine pesticides increased several-fold. For large swaths of the tropical Atlantic Ocean, neither PCB nor organochlorine pesticide dissolved concentrations varied much longitudinally, probably due to efficient mixing by ocean currents. In selected samples, dissolved concentrations reflected the influence of river plumes and major ocean currents far away from the continents. Dissolved concentrations of PCBs 28, 52, 101, 118, and HCB increased in the Amazon plume and the Gulf Stream. While the Amazon plume flushed only a few kg of PCBs and HCB, the Gulf Stream is potentially delivering tons of PCBs into the North Atlantic annually. PMID:22303957

  5. Major ion chemistry of the Son River, India: Weathering processes, dissolved fluxes and water quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharana, Chinmaya; Gautam, Sandeep Kumar; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Tripathi, Jayant K.

    2015-08-01

    River Son, draining diverse lithologies in the subtropical climate of the peninsular sub-basin of the Ganga basin, is one of the major tributaries of the Ganga River. The chemistry of major ions in the surface water of the Son River was studied in detail to determine various source(s) and processes controlling its water chemistry, seasonal and spatial variations in water chemistry, dissolved fluxes and chemical denudation rate (CDR). The study shows that Ca2+, Mg2+ and HCO 3- are major ionic species in the river water. Most of the measured parameters exhibit a relatively lower concentration in the post-monsoon as compared to pre-monsoon season. The water chemistry highlights the influence of continental weathering aided by secondary contributions from ground water, saline/alkaline soils and anthropogenic activities in the catchment. Results also reflect the dominance of carbonate weathering over silicate weathering in controlling water composition. The Son River delivers about 4.2 million tons of dissolved loads annually to the Ganga River, which accounts for ˜6% of the total annual load carried by the Ganga River to the Bay of Bengal. The average CDR of the Son River is 59.5 tons km -2 yr -1, which is less than the reported 72 tons km -2 yr -1 of the Ganga River and higher than the global average of 36 tons km -2 yr -1. The water chemistry for the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon periods shows a strong seasonal control on solute flux and CDR values. The water chemistry indicates that the Son River water is good to excellent in quality for irrigation and also suitable for drinking purposes.

  6. Evaluation of environmental factors affecting yields of major dissolved ions of streams in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.

    1984-01-01

    The seven major dissolved ions in streams-sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate and their sum dissolved solids from 56 basins in the conterminous United States and Hawaii were correlated with bedrock type, annual precipitation, population density, and average stream temperature of their respective basins through multiple linear-regression equations to predict annual yields. The study was restricted to basins underlain by limestone, sandstone, or crystalline rock. Depending on the constituent, yields ranged from about 10 to 100,000 kilograms per square kilometer. Predicted yields were within 1 order of magnitude of measured yields. The most important factor in yield prediction was annual precipitation, which accounted for 58 to 71 percent of all yields. Rock type was second in importance. Yields of magnesium, calcium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids from limestone basins were 4 to 10 times larger than those from sandstone or crystalline basins as a result of carbonate weathering. Population density was an ineffective indicator of all constituents except sodium and chloride; it accounted for 13 percent of the annual sodium yield and 20 percent of the annual chloride yield. Average stream temperature was significant only for calcium and bicarbonate in limestone basins. Its relationship with yields was consistently negative. Either carbonate dissolution increases at low temperatures, or weathering in northern basins, which contain glacial deposits and have the lowest stream temperatures, is greater than in southern basins. Average ion contributions from atmospheric deposition accounted for 30 percent of the sodium and chloride and 60 percent of the sulfate in annual yields. The amount of sulfate derived from atmospheric contributions was higher in sandstone and crystalline basins (65 and 80 percent, respectively) than limestone basins (38 percent). This disparity is attributed to the lack of available sulfate in crystalline rock and the chemical precipitation of sulfate in the sandstone basins, most of which are in semi-arid or arid areas.

  7. Seasonal changes in the major ion and ?13CDIC geochemistry of Arctic Alaskan rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, G. O.; Jacobson, A. D.; Douglas, T. A.; McClelland, J. W.; Khosh, M. S.; Barker, A.

    2010-12-01

    Model predications indicate anthropogenic greenhouse warming will be most severe at high latitudes where permafrost stores large quantities of organic carbon. Permafrost thaw could reintroduce this carbon into the carbon cycle and transform the Arctic into a source of CO2 and possibly, CH4. Thus, tracking the rate and extent of permafrost thaw bears on understanding feedbacks between Arctic climate change and global warming. Downward movement of the seasonally thawed active layer into previously frozen soils may yield unique mineral weathering signatures that relate to changes in carbon storage. We present two potential tracking methods, namely seasonal changes in dissolved major ion concentrations and the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (?13CDIC). We also present a novel method for measuring carbonate alkalinity in organic-rich rivers. Water samples were collected from six watersheds on the North Slope of Alaska. All rivers drain continuous permafrost but three drain tussock tundra-dominated watersheds and three drain bare bedrock catchments with minor tundra influences. Water samples were collected from April until October in 2009 and 2010. In organic-rich rivers, carbonate alkalinity and alkalinity associated with dissolved organic matter may contribute to total alkalinity. Carbonate alkalinity is difficult to measure at the low pH conditions common in organic-rich rivers. Moreover, conventional methods for measuring alkalinity, such as Gran titration, tend to overestimate total alkalinity, presumably because organic matter absorbs more protons than its functional charge equivalent. Thus, we measured dissolved CO2 in-situ using a customized NDIR sensor, and we calculated carbonate alkalinity using carbonate equilibria equations. Initial results suggest this method accurately characterizes the carbonate geochemistry of organic-rich rivers. Major ion and ?13CDIC trends suggest that silicate weathering dominates during the spring melt while carbonate weathering dominates as the summer progresses and the active layer deepens. In tundra streams, early season ?13CDIC values indicate carbonic acid-silicate weathering. Late season ?13CDIC values indicate carbonic acid-carbonate weathering. In both cases, the microbial decomposition of C3 organic matter provides the dissolved CO2 that forms carbonic acid. Bedrock streams display high and nearly constant ?13CDIC values from spring melt to fall base flow. These streams also have high dissolved sulfate concentrations. The ?13CDIC values may originate from sulfuric acid-carbonate weathering, although isotopic equilibration with atmospheric CO2 could be important. The difference between the tundra versus bedrock streams isolates the geochemical signature of active layer weathering processes. Our study indicates how seasonal changes in mineral weathering can track deepening of the active layer.

  8. Feasibility of halogen determination in noncombustible inorganic matrices by ion chromatography after a novel volatilization method using microwave-induced combustion.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rodrigo M; Costa, Vanize C; Hartwig, Carla A; Picoloto, Rochele S; Flores, Erico M M; Duarte, Fabio A; Mesko, Marcia F

    2016-01-15

    A microwave-induced combustion (MIC) system based on the volatilization process was applied for subsequent halogen determination from noncombustible inorganic matrices. Portland cement samples were selected to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method, allowing the subsequent determination of Cl and F by ion chromatography (IC). Samples were mixed with high-purity microcrystalline cellulose, wrapped with a polyethylene film and combusted in quartz closed vessels pressurized with oxygen (20bar). Water and NH4OH (10, 25 or 50mmolL(-1)) were evaluated for Cl and F absorption, but water was selected, using 5min of reflux after volatilization. Final solutions were also suitable for analysis by pontentiometry with ion-selective electrode (ISE) for both analytes, and no difference was found when comparing the results with IC. The accuracy of the proposed method for Cl was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials (CRMs), and agreement with certified values ranged from 98% to 103%. Results were also compared to those using the procedure recommended by the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) for the determination of total chlorides (C114-13), and no difference was found. Volatilization by MIC using a mixture of cement, cellulose and a biological CRM was carried out in order to evaluate the accuracy for F, and recovery was about 96%. The proposed method allowed suitable limits of detection for Cl and F by IC (99 and 18mgkg(-1), respectively) for routine analysis of cement. Using the proposed method, a relatively low standard deviation (<7%), high throughput (up to eight samples can be processed in less than 30min) and lower generation of laboratory effluents, when compared to the ASTM method, were obtained. Therefore, the method for volatilization of Cl and F by MIC and subsequent determination by IC can be proposed as a suitable alternative for cement analysis. PMID:26592579

  9. Wet precipitation of major ions, polonium-210, and organic carbon in a metropolitan city, Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, G.; Kim, G.

    2011-12-01

    An extensive survey of chemical constituents in precipitation including dissolved organic carbon, dissolved nitrogen, major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides was conducted in a representative urban environment of Seoul over one-year period from 2009 to 2010. The sources for these chemical species were apportioned by applying principal component analysis (PCA) in association with commonly acknowledged key tracers, such as Na, K, Ca, and V. The fossil fuel combustion (especially coal) was shown to be the dominant source for most constituents being investigated, with biomass burning being recognized as another significant source. With the aid of air mass backward trajectory analyses, we concluded that the primary fraction of the chemical species in our precipitation samples originated locally in Korea, albeit the frequent long-range transport from the eastern and northeastern China might contribute substantially. Overall, our study suggests the significant role of human activities in altering the atmospheric environment of Seoul and presumably most urban areas around the world, highlighting its profound environmental implications, such as health risks posed by excessive polonium-210, enhanced rainwater acidity from organic acids, and radiative forcing by organic aerosols.

  10. Measured and estimated benzene and volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions at a major U.S. refinery/chemical plant: Comparison and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Daniel; Raun, Loren H

    2015-08-01

    Estimates of emissions for processes and point sources at petroleum refineries and chemical plants provide the foundation for many other environmental evaluations and policy decisions. The most commonly used method, based on emission factors, results in unreliable estimates. More information regarding the actual emissions within a facility is necessary to provide a foundation for improving emission factors and prioritizing which emission factors most need improvement. Identification of which emission factors both perform poorly and introduce the largest error is needed to provide such a prioritization. To address this need, benzene and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions within a major chemical plant/refinery were measured and compared with emission factor estimates. The results of this study indicate estimated emissions were never higher and commonly lower than the measured emissions. At one source location, VOC emissions were found to be largely representative of those measured (i.e., the catalytic reformer), but more often, emissions were significantly underestimated (e.g., up to 448 times greater than estimated at a floating roof tank). The sources with both the largest relative error between the estimate and the measurement and the largest magnitude of emissions in this study were a wastewater treatment process, an aromatics concentration unit and benzene extraction unit process area, and two sets of tanks (sets 7 and 8). Emission factors for these sources are priorities for further evaluation and improvement in this chemical plant/refinery. This study presents empirical data that demonstrate the need to validate and improve emission factors. Emission factors needing improvement are prioritized by identifying those that are weak models and introduce the largest error in magnitude of emissions. The results can also be used to prioritize evaluations of the emissions sources and controls, and any operational conditions or erroneous assumptions that may be contributing to the error. PMID:26067830

  11. Detecting volatile compounds from Kraft lignin degradation in the headspace of microbial cultures by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    PubMed

    Gibson, Andrew; Malek, Lada; Dekker, Robert F H; Ross, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) was used to quantify methanol and other volatile compounds in the headspace of one bacterial and 12 fungal lignin-degrading microbial cultures. Cultures were grown in 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks capped with aluminum foil containing 40 mL of nutrient media using Kraft lignin (0.3% w/v) as the sole carbon source. Analysis was done using SIFT-MS with H3O(+) and NO(+) precursors. Product ions were identified with multiple ion mode (MIM). Full scan (FS) mode was used to identify other compounds of interest. Absidia cylindrospora, Ischnoderma resinosum and Pholiota aurivella increased headspace methanol concentration by 136 ppb, 1196 ppb and 278 ppb, respectively, while Flammulina velutipes and Laetiporus sulphureus decreased concentration below ambient levels. F. velutipes and L. sulphureus were found to produce products of methanol oxidation (formaldehyde and formic acid) and were likely metabolizing methanol. Some additional unidentified compounds generated by the fungal cultures are intriguing and will require further study. SIFT-MS can be used to quantify methanol and other volatile compounds in the headspace of microbial cultures and has the potential to be a rapid, sensitive, non-invasive tool useful in elucidating the mechanisms of lignin degradative pathways. PMID:25771342

  12. Cometary coma ions. [which occur when water is the major constituent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    For comets whose nuclei are composed of water ice conglomerates it is shown that the ion H3O(+) can predominate to distances of 5000 km in the subsolar direction. Beyond this distance H2O(+) is the most important ion. The crossover point is a sensitive function of the rate of evaporation from the nucleus. The presence of ammonia or metals such as sodium, in concentrations greater than 0.1% H2O, can lead to NH4(+) and Na(+) ions.

  13. The general description of major ion concentrations in groundwater of Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, A.; Delina, A.

    2012-04-01

    Latvia is situated at the North central part of the Baltic sedimentary basin where the crystalline basement is found in depth between 0.6 to 2 km. Three large aquifer complexes with distinct chemical composition of groundwater are identified: the stagnant water exchange zone where Na-Ca-Cl brine is found; the slow water exchange zone where Na-Ca-Cl-SO4 brackish water is found and active water exchange zone where the freshwater resides. These are separated by distinct regional aquicludes. The composition of the Cl- dominated brines at the base of sedimentary basin is characterised by shift from Na+ towards Ca++ as dominant cation, partially associated with depth of the aquifer and the strength of the brine. The concentration of SO4-- here is inversely linked to the concentration of Ca++ and, according to geochemical modelling, often is close to the solubility limit of the gypsum. The major ion concentrations in the E and W part of the territory are rather different. Therefore two different initial sources of the formation brine were suggested. Alternatively the observations can be explained by different thermal histories of different parts of the basin, affecting the rate of albitization - exchange of the Na for Ca in the solution due to water-rock interaction. The groundwater composition in the slow exchange zone can be nicely explained by the mixing of freshwater and brine residing deeper in the presence of gypsum during some but no all stages of mixing. In some shallow parts of the zone still bound by the Narva regional aquiclude freshwater is found. The question is posted - could this be a paleogroundwater originating from the extensive continental glaciations that override the territory several times during the Pleistocene? Initial isotope studies presented elsewhere seems to give negative answer to this question. The active water exchange zone is characterised by fresh Ca-Mg-HCO3 water with exceptions in cases where gypsum are abundant in sedimentary rocks and sulphate ion prevails. The freshwater composition seems to be mostly controlled by three minerals - calcite, dolomite and gypsum. It is suggested that clay minerals can play a significant role in controlling the relative concentrations of cations, but this is not strictly proven jet. Well documented modern seawater intrusion induced by water abstraction is found in the territory of Liepāja city. The upwelling of slat water from below can be spotted across the territory as well. These zones are usually associated with tectonic faults, enabling the upwelling of salty water across regional aquicludes. Particularly prominent is the saltwater body in the vicinity of the Riga city. Three major rives are discharging in the sea there making it a natural confluence zone of groundwater as well. The intensive groundwater abstraction in the city probably enhanced the upwelling of saltwater here, but primary it is a natural phenomenon. The interesting question is if there is any paleogroundwater trapped in the active or slow water exchange zone of the sedimentary basin that could be distinguished from modern infiltration water due to particular isotope signal originating in the quaternary cold stages or chemical composition - remains of relict sea water or sedimentation water. This study is supported by the ESF project No. 2009/0212/1DP/1.1.1.2.0/09/APIA/VIAA/060.

  14. Comparison of Volatile and Major Element Concentrations in Melt Inclusions from Juan de Fuca Ridge Seamounts and the Adjacent Ridge Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanless, V. D.; Behn, M. D.; Perfit, M. R.; Clague, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Here we present volatile (CO2, H2O, F, S, Cl) and major element data from >200 naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions and glasses erupted from five seamounts proximal to the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This includes 90 analyses of melt inclusions from the Vance Seamount chain and 126 analyses from two small, mafic (glass MgO > 9 wt%) near-axis cones (T461 and T881). We provide geochemical constraints on both the compositional variations and the depths of crystallization beneath the seamounts using vapor-saturation pressures derived from CO2-H2O concentrations. These data suggest crystallization occurs beneath the two near-axis cones from seafloor pressures to 6400 bars corresponding to depths up to 9 km below the seafloor. This range of crystallization is similar to that calculated from olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the adjacent Juan de Fuca Ridge axis. By contrast, crystallization pressures from Vance Seamounts are more limited with pressures ranging from 400 to 1300 bars or depths of 0.7 to 3.8 km below seafloor. The Vance Seamounts have a prominent peak in depths of crystallization at ~2-3 km below seafloor in histograms, perhaps suggesting that it is the preferred depth of melt storage and crystallization beneath seamounts chains. By contrast, crystallization peaks beneath the small, near-axis cones are less prominent and occur slightly deeper at 3-4 km below seafloor. Overall, S and F concentrations in the seamount melt inclusions are similar to on-axis inclusions; however, Cl concentrations in the seamounts are remarkably low. On-axis inclusions have an average of 61 ppm Cl and range from 4-163 ppm. By contrast, Cl concentrations in the seamounts range from 3-82 ppm, but have an average of only 11 ppm. Excess Cl in mid-ocean ridge lavas is often attributed to contamination by seawater or brines associated with hydrothermal circulation. We suggest that the low Cl concentrations in the seamount inclusions may result from either a seamount mantle source that is depleted in Cl compared to the on-axis source (perhaps from a previous melting event on-axis) or it may indicate that the off-axis melt inclusions preserve the true upper mantle compositions, while all on-axis lavas are contaminated by interaction with the pervasive hydrothermal system or previously altered crust.

  15. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  16. Time sequence of ring current ion-flux enhancements and ion injections around outer radiation belt during a major storm on 15 May, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.

    2012-04-01

    A complete record is available in ENA data of ring current activity recorded by the NUADU instrument aboard TC-2 on 15 May, 2005 during a major magnetic storm (including a substorm that occurred in the recovery phase). Comparisons of the ion fluxes in 4-minute temporal resolution derived from ENA data in the energy ranges 50-81 keV and 81-158 keV with in situ particle fluxes measured by the LANL-SOPA instruments aboard LANL-01, LANL-02, LANL-97 and LANL-84 (a series of geosynchronous satellites that encircle the equatorial plane at ~ 6.6 RE near the outer radiation belt) are presented. It is the first we found that the ring current ion flux increasing began before ion injections from magnetotail. When the convection electric field was restrained and convection flows were anti-Earthward at the very beginning of the substorm onset, ring current ion fluxes, observed and derived from ENA data globally, began enhanced in the dusk-night sector. If only the ring current ion-flux attained its maximum the diagnostic signature of the ion injection, observed by the LANL-SOPA instruments, was occurred with convection flows turned Earthward. So that the ion injections from the magnetotail can not be identified as the reason of causing ring current ion-flux enhancements, but rather the result of the ring current decaying, which challenge the traditional ion injection concept and still need further investigations. This study was supported by the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation Committee grant 40974100.

  17. Determination of major sodium iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors in drinking waters using ion chromatography with conductivity detector.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Bilgin, Ayse Kevser

    2016-02-20

    Goiter is an important health problem all over the world and iodine deficiency is its most common cause. Perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate (called as major NIS inhibitors) are known to competitively inhibit iodide uptake by the thyroid gland and thus, human exposure to major NIS inhibitors is a public health concern. In this study, an ion chromatographic method for the determination of most common NIS inhibitor ions in drinking waters was developed and validated. This is the first study where an analytical method is used for the determination of major NIS inhibitors in drinking water by an ion chromatography system in a single run. Chromatographic separations were achieved with an anion-exchange column and separated ions were identified by a conductivity detector. The method was found to be selective, linear, precise accurate and true for all of interested ions. The limits of the detections (LOD) were estimated at 0.003, 0.004 and 0.025mgL(-1) for perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate, respectively. Possible interference ions in drinking waters were examined for the best separation of NIS inhibitors. The excellent method validation data and proficiency test result (Z-score for nitrate: -0.1) of the FAPAS(®) suggested that the developed method could be applied for determination of NIS inhibitor residues in drinking waters. To evaluate the usefulness of the method, 75 drinking water samples from Antalya/Turkey were analyzed for NIS inhibitors. Perchlorate concentrations in the samples ranged from not detected (less than LOD) to 0.07±0.02mgL(-1) and the range of nitrate concentrations were found to be 3.60±0.01mgL(-1) and 47.42±0.40mgL(-1). No thiocyanate residues were detected in tested drinking water samples. PMID:26744989

  18. Effect of enzyme activity and frozen storage on jalapeño pepper volatiles by selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Azcarate, Carolina; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2010-01-01

    Samples of unblanched (fresh), stannous chloride-treated, or blanched jalapeño peppers were measured for real-time generation of lipoxygenase-derived volatiles during 10 min after tissue disruption. Volatiles were also measured before and after 1.5, 2.5, 3, 6, and 9 mo of frozen storage at -15 °C. The concentration of all lipoxygenase-derived compounds was significantly higher in unblanched jalapeño peppers compared to enzyme inhibited peppers. The maximum concentration of (Z)-3-hexenal, (E)-2-hexenal, and hexanal was detected at about 1.2, 1.5, and 1.5 min after tissue disruption, respectively. A decrease in (Z)-3-hexenal and an increase in dimethyl sulfide and methylbutanal occurred in blanched compared to stannous chloride-treated peppers due to heat. Frozen storage resulted in no major changes in the lipoxygenase-derived volatiles of whole and pureed blanched peppers after 9 mo. However, in whole unblanched peppers a gradual decrease of (Z)-3-hexenal, (E)-2-hexenal, hexanal, hexenol, and hexanol was observed over time; whereas in pureed unblanched peppers these compounds increased, reached maximum concentration, and then decreased. Similarly, the minor volatiles 2-pentenal, 1-penten-3-one, (E)-2-heptenal, (E)-2-octenal, and (E)-2-nonenal showed an initial increase followed by a decline in both whole and pureed unblanched peppers. Tissue disruption increased generation and degradation rates during frozen storage. The compounds (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal, n-propyl aldehyde, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, and a mixture of terpenes decreased in unblanched and blanched frozen samples, while nonanal and methylbutanal increased only in unblanched samples. PMID:21535582

  19. DIRECT TRACE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR USING ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETERS WITH FILTERED NOISE FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ion trap mass spectrometers and direct air sampling interfaces are being evaluated in the laboratory for monitoring toxic air pollutants in real time. he mass spectrometers are the large, laboratory-based Finnigan MAT ion trap (ITMS) and the compact, field-deployable Teledyne...

  20. Thermal Structure and Major Ion Composition of the Venus Ionosphere: First RPA Results from Venus Orbiter.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, W C; Spenner, K; Whitten, R C; Spreiter, J R; Miller, K L; Novak, V

    1979-02-23

    Thermal plasma quantities measured by, the retarding potential analyzer (RPA) are, together with companion Pioneer Venus measurements, the first in situ measurements of the Venus ionosphere. High ionospheric ion and electron temperatures imply significant solar wind heating of the ionosphere. Comparison of the measured altitude profiles of the dominant ions with an initial modlel indicates that the ionosphere is close to diffusive equilibrium. The ionopause height was observed to vary from 400 to 1000 kilometers in early orbits. The ionospheric particle pressure at the ionopause is apparently balanced at a solar zenith angle of about 70 degrees by the magnetic field pressure with little contribution from energetic solar wind particles. The measured ratio of ionospheric scale height to ionopause radius is consistent with that inferred from previously measured bow shock positions. PMID:17832987

  1. A major host plant volatile, 1-octen-3-ol, contributes to mating in the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Bendera, M; Ekesi, S; Ndung'u, M; Srinivasan, R; Torto, B

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies on the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), a serious pest of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabales: Fabaceae), in sub-Saharan Africa have focused on sex pheromones, but the role of the host plant on sexual behavior has not been explored. We investigated this interaction in the laboratory using behavioral assays and chemical analyses. We found that the presence of cowpea seedlings and a dichloromethane extract of the leaf increased coupling in the legume pod borer by 33 and 61 %, respectively, compared to the control, suggesting the involvement of both contact and olfactory cues. We used coupled gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC/EAD) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify compounds from the cowpea leaf extract, detected by M. vitrata antenna. We found that the antennae of the insect consistently detected four components, with 1-octen-3-ol identified as a common and dominant component in both the volatiles released by the intact cowpea plant and leaf extract. We therefore investigated its role in the coupling of M. vitrata. In dose-response assays, 1-octen-3-ol increased coupling in M. vitrata with increasing dose of the compound compared to the control. Our results suggest that the cowpea volatile 1-octen-3-ol contributes to M. vitrata sexual behavior. PMID:26280704

  2. A major host plant volatile, 1-octen-3-ol, contributes to mating in the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendera, M.; Ekesi, S.; Ndung'u, M.; Srinivasan, R.; Torto, B.

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies on the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), a serious pest of cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (Fabales: Fabaceae), in sub-Saharan Africa have focused on sex pheromones, but the role of the host plant on sexual behavior has not been explored. We investigated this interaction in the laboratory using behavioral assays and chemical analyses. We found that the presence of cowpea seedlings and a dichloromethane extract of the leaf increased coupling in the legume pod borer by 33 and 61 %, respectively, compared to the control, suggesting the involvement of both contact and olfactory cues. We used coupled gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC/EAD) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify compounds from the cowpea leaf extract, detected by M. vitrata antenna. We found that the antennae of the insect consistently detected four components, with 1-octen-3-ol identified as a common and dominant component in both the volatiles released by the intact cowpea plant and leaf extract. We therefore investigated its role in the coupling of M. vitrata. In dose-response assays, 1-octen-3-ol increased coupling in M. vitrata with increasing dose of the compound compared to the control. Our results suggest that the cowpea volatile 1-octen-3-ol contributes to M. vitrata sexual behavior.

  3. Statistical models to predict the toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows)

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Gulley, D.D.; Hockett, J.R.; Garrison, T.D.; Evans, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Toxicity of fresh waters with high total dissolved solids has been shown to be dependent on the specific ionic composition of the water. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity attributable to major ions, the authors tested the toxicity of over 2,900 ion solutions using the daphnids, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna, and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Multiple logistic regression was used to relate ion composition to survival for each of the three test species. In general, relative ion toxicity was K{sup +} > HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} {approx} Mg{sup 2+} > Cl{sup {minus}} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}; Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} were not significant variables in the regressions, suggesting that the toxicity of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} salts was primarily attributable to the corresponding anion. For C. dubia and D. magna, toxicity of Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and K{sup +} was reduced in solutions enriched with more than one cation. Final regression models showed a good quality of fit to the data (R{sup 2} = 0.767--0.861). Preliminary applications of these models to field-collected samples indicated a high degree of accuracy for the C. dubia model, while the D. magna and fathead minnow models tended to overpredict ion toxicity. Studies of oil and gas produced waters, irrigation drain waters, shale oil leachates, sediment pore waters, and industrial process waters have shown toxicity caused by elevated concentrations of common ions.

  4. Direct trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in air using filtered noise field ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, S.M.; Callahan, P.J.; Kenny, D.V.

    1994-12-31

    There is increasing interest in the development of field portable mass spectrometers to monitor environmental pollutants in real time. A direct air sampling filtered noise field (FNF) ion trap mass spectrometer has been evaluated in the laboratory under controlled conditions with an environmental test chamber serving as the source of the target compound mixtures at known concentrations. The FNF ion trap technology developed by Teledyne has been used with direct sampling interfaces (semipermeable membrane; glow discharge ionization source) to measure nonpolar and polar VOCs at trace levels. This ion trap is capable of true selective ion monitoring and, when operated in the MS/MS mode, provides a unique means of simultaneously isolating individual target compounds in complex mixtures with high sensitivity and specificity. The device is small and light-weight, and can be easily deployed in the laboratory or the field. Using the combination direct sampling/ion trap system, experiments have been carried out to evaluate the specificity, sensitivity, response time, and effects of relative humidity on the detection of 44 nonpolar and 15 polar VOCs of environmental interest.

  5. A major constituent of brown algae for use in high-capacity Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Igor; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Magasinski, Alexandre; Hertzberg, Benjamin; Milicev, Zoran; Burtovyy, Ruslan; Luzinov, Igor; Yushin, Gleb

    2011-10-01

    The identification of similarities in the material requirements for applications of interest and those of living organisms provides opportunities to use renewable natural resources to develop better materials and design better devices. In our work, we harness this strategy to build high-capacity silicon (Si) nanopowder-based lithium (Li)-ion batteries with improved performance characteristics. Si offers more than one order of magnitude higher capacity than graphite, but it exhibits dramatic volume changes during electrochemical alloying and de-alloying with Li, which typically leads to rapid anode degradation. We show that mixing Si nanopowder with alginate, a natural polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, yields a stable battery anode possessing reversible capacity eight times higher than that of the state-of-the-art graphitic anodes. PMID:21903777

  6. A Major Constituent of Brown Algae for Use in High-Capacity Li-Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Igor; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Magasinski, Alexandre; Hertzberg, Benjamin; Milicev, Zoran; Burtovyy, Ruslan; Luzinov, Igor; Yushin, Gleb

    2011-10-01

    The identification of similarities in the material requirements for applications of interest and those of living organisms provides opportunities to use renewable natural resources to develop better materials and design better devices. In our work, we harness this strategy to build high-capacity silicon (Si) nanopowder-based lithium (Li)-ion batteries with improved performance characteristics. Si offers more than one order of magnitude higher capacity than graphite, but it exhibits dramatic volume changes during electrochemical alloying and de-alloying with Li, which typically leads to rapid anode degradation. We show that mixing Si nanopowder with alginate, a natural polysaccharide extracted from brown algae, yields a stable battery anode possessing reversible capacity eight times higher than that of the state-of-the-art graphitic anodes.

  7. Wet deposition of major ions in a rural area impacted by biomass burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Cidelmara H.; Allen, Andrew G.; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Orlando, Eduardo A.; Grigoletto, Tahuana L. B.; Campos, M. Lucia A. M.

    2011-09-01

    This work concerns the influence of industrialized agriculture in the tropics on precipitation chemistry. A total of 264 rain events were sampled using a wet-only collector in central São Paulo State, Brazil, between January 2003 and July 2007. Electroneutrality balance calculations (considering H +, K +, Na +, NH4+, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Cl -, NO3-, SO42-, F -, PO43-, H 3CCOO -, HCOO -, CO42- and HCO3-) showed that there was an excess of cations (˜15%), which was attributed to the presence of unmeasured organic anion species originating from biomass burning and biogenic emissions. On average, the three ions NH4+, NO 3- and H + were responsible for >55% of the total ion concentrations in the rainwater samples. Concentrations (except of H +) were significantly higher ( t-test; P = 0.05), by between two to six-fold depending on species, during the winter sugar cane harvest period, due to the practice of pre-harvest burning of the crop. Principal component analysis showed that three components could explain 88% of the variance for measurements made throughout the year: PC1 (52%, biomass burning and soil dust resuspension); PC2 (26%, secondary aerosols); PC3 (10%, road transport emissions). Differences between harvest and non-harvest periods appeared to be mainly due to an increased relative importance of road transport/industrial emissions during the summer (non-harvest) period. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of ammonium (23.4 μmol L -1) and nitrate (17.5 μmol L -1) in rainwater samples collected during the harvest period were similar to those found in rainwater from São Paulo city, which emphasizes the importance of including rural agro-industrial emissions in regional-scale atmospheric chemistry and transport models. Since there was evidence of a biomass burning source throughout the year, it appears that rainwater composition will continue to be affected by vegetation fires, even after sugar cane burning is phased out as envisaged by recent São Paulo State legislation.

  8. TRPV3 and TRPV4 ion channels are not major contributors to mouse heat sensation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels provided a potential molecular explanation for the perception of innocuous and noxious heat stimuli. TRPV1 has a significant role in acute heat nociception and inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Yet, substantial innocuous and noxious heat sensitivity remains in TRPV1 knockout animals. Here we investigated the role of two related channels, TRPV3 and TRPV4, in these capacities. We studied TRPV3 knockout animals on both C57BL6 and 129S6 backgrounds, as well as animals deficient in both TRPV3 and TRPV4 on a C57BL6 background. Additionally, we assessed the contributions of TRPV3 and TRPV4 to acute heat nociception and inflammatory heat hyperalgesia during inhibition of TRPV1. Results TRPV3 knockout mice on the C57BL6 background exhibited no obvious alterations in thermal preference behavior. On the 129S6 background, absence of TRPV3 resulted in a more restrictive range of occupancy centered around cooler floor temperatures. TRPV3 knockout mice showed no deficits in acute heat nociception on either background. Mice deficient in both TRPV3 and TRPV4 on a C57BL6 background showed thermal preference behavior similar to wild-type controls on the thermal gradient, and little or no change in acute heat nociception or inflammatory heat hyperalgesia. Masking of TRPV1 by the TRPV1 antagonist JNJ-17203212 did not reveal differences between C57BL6 animals deficient in TRPV3 and TRPV4, compared to their wild-type counterparts. Conclusions Our results support the notion that TRPV3 and TRPV4 likely make limited and strain-dependent contributions to innocuous warm temperature perception or noxious heat sensation, even when TRPV1 is masked. These findings imply the existence of other significant mechanisms for heat perception. PMID:21586160

  9. Continuous ice core melter system with discrete sampling for major ion, trace element and stable isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, Erich C; Handley, Michael J; Sneed, Sharon B; Mayewski, Paul A; Kreutz, Karl J

    2006-05-15

    We present a novel ice/firn core melter system that uses fraction collectors to collect discrete, high-resolution (<1 cm/sample possible), continuous, coregistered meltwater samples for analysis of eight major ions by ion chromatography (IC), >32 trace elements by inductively coupled plasma sectorfield mass spectrometry (ICP-SMS), and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The new continuous melting with discrete sampling (CMDS) system preserves an archive of each sample, reduces the problem of incomplete particle dissolution in ICP-SMS samples, and provides more precise trace element data than previous ice melter models by using longer ICP-SMS scan times and washing the instrument between samples. CMDS detection limits are similar to or lower than those published for ice melter systems coupled directly to analytical instruments and are suitable for analyses of polar and mid-low-latitude ice cores. Analysis of total calcium and sulfur by ICP-SMS and calcium ion, sulfate, and methanesulfonate by IC from the Mt. Logan Prospector-Russell Col ice core confirms data accuracy and coregistration of the split fractions from each sample. The reproducibility of all data acquired by the CMDS system is confirmed by replicate analyses of parallel sections of the GISP2 D ice core. PMID:16749705

  10. Tropical Greenhouse Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Switchable Reagent Ion Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectromety (PTR-TOF-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, P.; Auld, J.; Williams, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this presentation, we will summarize the results of measurements made in an approximately 1300 m3 tropical greenhouse at the Johannes Gutenberg University botanical garden in Mainz Germany conducted over a one month period. The greenhouse is home to a large variety of plant species from hot and humid regions of the world. The greenhouse is also host to several crops such as Cocoa and Cola Nut as well as ornamental plants. A particular focus of the species maintained are those which are considered ant plants, or plants which have an intimate relationship with ants in tropical habitats. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a Switchable Reagent Ion Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) using H3O+, NO+, and O2+ ion chemistry. Measurements will be presented both for primary emissions observed in the closed greenhouse atmosphere as well as the oxidation products observed after the introduction of ambient ozone. The high resolving power (5000 m/?m) of the time-of-flight instrument allows for the separation of isobaric species. In particular, both isoprene (68.1170 amu) and furan (68.0740 amu) were observed and separated as primary emissions during this study. The significance of this will be discussed in terms of both atmospheric implications as well as with respect to previous measurements of isoprene obtained using quadrupole PTR-MS where isobaric separation of these compounds is not possible. Additionally observed species (e.g. Methanol, Acetaldehyde, MVK and MEK) will be discussed in detail with respect to their behavior as a function of light, temperature and relative humidity. The overall instrument performance of the PTR-TOF-MS technique using the H3O+, NO+, and O2+ primary ions for the measurement of VOCs will be evaluated.

  11. Nanocrystals manufacturing by ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis for non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Dimitrakis, P.; Skarlatos, D.; Beltsios, K.; Tsoukalas, D.; Bonafos, C.; Ben Assayag, G.; Cherkashin, N.; Claverie, A.; Van Den Berg, J. A.; Soncini, V.; Agarwal, A.; Ameen, M.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M.

    2004-02-01

    An overview of recent developments regarding the fabrication and structure of thin silicon dioxide films with embedded nanocrystals through ultra-low-energy ion-beam-synthesis (ULE-IBS) is presented. Advances in fabrication, increased understanding of structure formation processes and ways to control them allow for the fabrication of reproducible and attractive silicon-nanocrystal memory devices for a wide-range of memory applications as herein demonstrated in the case of low-voltage EEPROM-like applications.

  12. A 20 Year Record of Major Ions in Aerosol and Rainwater from a Remote Location in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A.

    2013-12-01

    High frequency ambient air sampling conducted near continuously for a period of 20 years from 1989 to 2009 at the second highest point of land on the island of Bermuda has provided a valuable record of major ion (H+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, SO42-, Cl-, and NO3-) chemistry in aerosol and rainwater representative of the marine atmospheric boundary layer over the North Atlantic Ocean. Over this period the acidity of rainwater has shown a significant decrease from a monthly volume weighted mean pH 4.4 to pH 5.5, and the monthly volume weighted mean concentration of non-sea-salt sulfate in rainfall also exhibited a significant decrease over the same time period, suggesting a decrease in anthropogenic sources of acidifying species in rainwater. The long term record of major ion constituents in rainwater and in aerosol are presented, and relationships between the chemical constituents and regional seasonal meteorology are analyzed and discussed.

  13. Application of ?(18)O, ?(13)CDIC, and major ions to evaluate micropollutant sources in the Bay of Vidy, Lake Geneva.

    PubMed

    Halder, Janine; Pralong, Charles; Bonvin, Florence; Lambiel, Frederic; Vennemann, Torsten W

    2014-10-30

    Waters were sampled monthly from a profile at the wastewater outlet and a reference point in the Bay of Vidy (Lake Geneva) for a year. The samples were analyzed for (18)O/(16)O of water, (13)C/(12)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), major ions, and selected micropollutant concentrations. ?(18)O values, combined with the major ion concentrations, allowed discharged waste and storm-drainage water to be traced within the water column. On the basis of ?(18)O values, mole fractions of wastewater (up to 45?%), storm-drainage (up to 16?%), and interflowing Rhne River water (up to 34?%) could be determined. The results suggest that the stormwater fractions do not influence micropollutant concentrations in a measurable way. In contrast, the Rhne River interflow coincides with elevated concentrations of Rhne River-derived micropollutants in some profiles. ?(13)C values of DIC suggest that an increase in micropollutant concentrations at the sediment-water interface could be related to remineralization processes or resuspension. PMID:25358053

  14. Simultaneous analysis of strychnine and brucine and their major metabolites by liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueguo; Lai, Yongquan; Cai, Zongwei

    2012-04-01

    A liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-ITMS) method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of strychnine, brucine and their major metabolites. Strychnine and brucine were individually incubated with rat liver S9 fraction. The incubation samples were pooled together and analyzed with LC-ESI-ITMS in positive ion and full-scan detection mode. The calibration curves of strychnine and brucine in rat liver showed good linearity in ranges of 0.020 to 8.0 µg/mL for strychnine and 0.020 to 8.5 µg/mL for brucine. The limits of detections were both 0.008 µg/mL and the recoveries were 88.3 and 83.2% for strychnine and brucine, respectively. Two metabolites were identified as strychnine N-oxide and brucine N-oxide by comparing the molecular mass, retention time, full-scan mass spectra, tandem MS and MS(3) spectra with those of strychnine and brucine. The developed method provided high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of poisonous alkaloids and their major metabolites and can be applied in the determination of samples in forensic and clinically toxicological cases. PMID:22417832

  15. Primary emissions and secondary formation of volatile organic compounds from natural gas production in five major U.S. shale plays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Lui, R.; Koss, A.; Yuan, B.; Murphy, S. M.; Alvarez, S. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Min, K. E.; Brown, S. S.; Roberts, J. M.; Osthoff, H. D.; Hatch, C. D.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    According to the U.S. Energy and Information Administration (EIA), domestic production of natural gas from shale formations is currently at the highest levels in U.S. history. Shale gas production may also result in the production of natural gas plant liquids (NGPLs) such as ethane and propane as well as natural gas condensate composed of a complex mixture of non-methane hydrocarbons containing more than ~5 carbon atoms (e.g., hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene). The amounts of natural gas liquids and condensate produced depends on the particular reservoir. The source signature of primary emissions of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere within each shale play will therefore depend on the composition of the raw natural gas as well as the industrial processes and equipment used to extract, separate, store, and transport the raw materials. Characterizing the primary emissions of VOCs from natural gas production is critical to assessing the local and regional atmospheric impacts such as the photochemical formation of ozone and secondary formation of organic aerosol. This study utilizes ground-based measurements of a full suite of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in two western U.S. basins, the Uintah (2012-2014 winter measurements only) and Denver-Julesburg (winter 2011 and summer 2012), and airborne measurements over the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and Marcellus shale basins (summer 2013). By comparing the observed VOC to propane enhancement ratios, we show that each basin has a unique VOC source signature associated with oil and natural gas operations. Of the shale basins studied, the Uintah basin had the largest overall VOC to propane enhancement ratios while the Marcellus had the lowest. For the western basins, we will compare the composition of oxygenated VOCs produced from photochemical oxidation of VOC precursors and contrast the oxygenated VOC mixture to a "typical" summertime urban VOC mixture. The relative roles of alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, and cycloalkanes as precursors for C2-C6 aldehydes and ketones, and C3-C4 alkyl nitrates will be investigated.

  16. One-year observations of size distribution characteristics of major aerosol constituents at a coastal receptor site in Hong Kong - Part 1: Inorganic ions and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Size distribution data of major aerosol constituents are essential in source apportioning of visibility degradation, testing and verification of air quality models incorporating aerosols. We report here one-year observations of mass size distributions of major inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and oxalate at a coastal suburban receptor site in Hong Kong, China. A total of 43 sets of size segregated samples in the size range of 0.056-18 μm were collected from March 2011 to February 2012. The size distributions of sulfate, ammonium, potassium and oxalate were characterized by a dominant droplet mode with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) in the range of ~0.7-0.9 μm. Oxalate had a slightly larger MMAD than sulfate on days with temperatures above 22 °C as a result of the process of volatilization and repartitioning. Nitrate was mostly dominated by the coarse mode but enhanced presence in fine mode was detected on winter days with lower temperature and lower concentrations of sea salt and soil particles. This data set reveals an inversely proportional relationship between the fraction of nitrate in the fine mode and product of the sum of sodium and calcium in equivalent concentrations and the dissociation constant of ammonium nitrate (i.e., (1/[Na+] + 2[Ca2+]) × (1/Ke')). The seasonal variation observed for sea salt aerosol abundance, with lower values in summer and winter, is possibly linked with the lower marine salinities in these two seasons. Positive matrix factorization was applied to estimate the relative contributions of local formation and transport to the observed ambient sulfate level through the use of the combined datasets of size-segregated sulfate and select gaseous air pollutants. On average, the regional/super-regional transport of air pollutants was the dominant source at this receptor site, especially on high sulfate days, while local formation processes contributed approximately 30% of the total sulfate. This work provides field measurement-based evidence for importance of understanding both local photochemistry and regional/super-regional transport in order to properly simulate sulfate aerosols in air quality models.

  17. One-year observations of size distribution characteristics of major aerosol constituents at a coastal receptor site in Hong Kong - Part 1: Inorganic ions and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2014-09-01

    Size distribution data of major aerosol constituents are essential in source apportioning of visibility degradation, testing and verification of air quality models incorporating aerosols. We report here 1-year observations of mass size distributions of major inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and oxalate at a coastal suburban receptor site in Hong Kong, China. A total of 43 sets of size-segregated samples in the size range of 0.056-18 μm were collected from March 2011 to February 2012. The size distributions of sulfate, ammonium, potassium and oxalate were characterized by a dominant droplet mode with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) in the range of ~ 0.7-0.9 μm. Oxalate had a slightly larger MMAD than sulfate on days with temperatures above 22 °C as a result of the process of volatilization and repartitioning. Nitrate was mostly dominated by the coarse mode but enhanced presence in fine mode was detected on winter days with lower temperature and lower concentrations of sea salt and soil particles. This data set reveals an inversely proportional relationship between the fraction of nitrate in the fine mode and product of the sum of sodium and calcium in equivalent concentrations and the dissociation constant of ammonium nitrate (i.e., (1/([Na+] + 2[Ca2+]) × (1/Ke')) when Pn_fine is significant (> 10%). The seasonal variation observed for sea salt aerosol abundance, with lower values in summer and winter, is possibly linked with the lower marine salinities in these two seasons. Positive matrix factorization was applied to estimate the relative contributions of local formation and transport to the observed ambient sulfate level through the use of the combined data sets of size-segregated sulfate and select gaseous air pollutants. On average, the regional/super-regional transport of air pollutants was the dominant source at this receptor site, especially on high-sulfate days while local formation processes contributed approximately 30% of the total sulfate. This work provides field-measurement-based evidence important for understanding both local photochemistry and regional/super-regional transport in order to properly simulate sulfate aerosols in air quality models.

  18. Landscape controls on dissolved nutrients, organic matter and major ions in a suburbanizing watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, M. L.; McDowell, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural landscape features that drive spatial variability in water quality is a central challenge in studying the biogeochemistry of heterogeneous landscapes. We quantified the average annual flux and concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphate-P (PO4-P), sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) at ~40 stream sites in three major (51 to 903 km2) NH basins. We used GIS to quantify anthropogenic (e.g. human population density, % impervious surface cover and % agriculture) and natural (e.g. % forest, % wetlands and soil C:N) landscape features for each sub-basin and then employed multiple-regression analysis to relate water quality parameters to landscape characteristics. Anthropogenic features were strong predictors of DIN flux and Na+ and Cl- concentrations, whereas wetland cover (a natural feature) was a significant, but weak predictor of DOC (r2=0.26, p<0.01) and DON (r2 = 0.14, p<0.05) flux. Anthropogenic features could not explain a significant amount of variance in DON or DOC flux. Mean PO4-P concentrations were surprisingly low (<0.015 mg P/L) when compared to the larger range in mean DIN concentrations (0.03 to 0.96 mg/L) and consequently no landscape characteristics could explain a significant amount of spatial variability in PO4-P flux or concentration. Human population density was the single best predictor of DIN flux (r2=0.76, p<0.01), and together with % impervious surface and % agriculture explained 86% (p<0.01) of the total variance. Among all sites, % road pavement was a strong predictor of stream Na+ and Cl- concentrations (r2 = 0.75 to 0.78, p<0.01) and % impervious surface was a stronger predictor (r2 = 0.86 to 0.92, p<0.01) among a subset of sites. Our results suggest that DIN and DON result from different sources in the landscape and although sources of DON and DOC are similar, DON and DOC concentrations respond differently to hydrologic events. Concentrations of DON were negatively correlated with discharge (r2= 0.06, p < 0.01), but DOC concentrations did not respond to discharge, suggesting there is much to learn about the decoupling of C and N rich dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our landscape models do not account for spatial variability in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic P (DOP) or particulate C, N and P; however, at our site with the longest record, the Lamprey River, DIC and particulate C account for only 25% and 5% respectively of the total C flux. Among three sites ranging from 3-16% development, particulate N only accounted for 12-18% of total N, but particulate P accounted for 30-50% and DOP accounted for an additional 40-50% of total P. Landscape characteristics may in fact be better predictors of spatial variability in particulate-P and DOP than PO4-P. Nonetheless, the landscape models that we have developed for DIN and DOM flux can be used by local watershed managers to predict changes in water quality in response to changes in land use.

  19. Application of ion-implantation for improved non-volatile resistive random access memory (ReRAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliman, R. G.; Saleh, M. S.; Kim, T.-H.; Venkatachalam, D. K.; Belay, K.; Ruffell, S.; Kurunczi, P.; England, J.

    2013-07-01

    Resistive switching in transition metal oxides is believed to be controlled by the migration of oxygen vacancies and many interesting device structures employ substoichiometric oxide layers as a source of these active defects. However, the growth of thin (10 nm) oxide/suboxide heterostructures (e.g. HfO2/HfOx or Ta2O5/TaOx) is difficult using conventional film deposition techniques. In this study, ion-implantation is shown to provide an alternative means of synthesizing such structures, with results reported for Ta2O5/TaOx heterostructures fabricated by oxygen-implantation of Ta. The electrical properties of the fabricated heterostructures are discussed with reference to the physical structure of the samples determined from transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  20. A novel method for the determination of three volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath by solid-phase microextraction-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allafchian, Ali Reza; Majidian, Zahra; Ielbeigi, Vahideh; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    A method was carried out for the quantitative determination of the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using solid-phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry (SPME-IMS). This method was optimized and evaluated. The best results were obtained at sorption temperature 70C, desorption temperature 200C, and extraction time 15min. Under the optimized conditions, the linear dynamic range was found to be 0.01-4.0ppb (R (2)?>?0.995), 2.3-400ppm (R (2)?>?0.994), and 2.5-76ppb (R (2)?>?0.998) for acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile, respectively. The detection limits for acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile were 0.001ppb, 0.18ppm, and 0.22ppb, respectively. As a practical application, the method was applied for the determination of acetone, acetaldehyde, and acetonitrile in human breath matrix. Therefore, the proposed method was found to be effective and simple enough to be strongly recommended for real sample analysis. PMID:26558761

  1. Self-Volatilization Approach to Mesoporous Carbon Nanotube/Silver Nanoparticle Hybrids: The Role of Silver in Boosting Li Ion Storage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Haoxuan; Fu, Yao; Guo, Shaojun; Hu, Yanjie; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Yu; Liu, Honglai; Li, Chunzhong

    2016-01-26

    One of the biggest challenging issues of carbon nanomaterials for Li ion batteries (LIBs) is that they show low initial Coulombic efficiency (CE), leading to a limited specific capacity. Herein, we demonstrate a simple template self-volatilization strategy for in situ synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanotube/Ag nanoparticle (NP) hybrids (Ag-MCNTs) to boost the LIBs' performance. The key concept of Ag-MCNTs for enhancing LIBs is that a small trace of Ag NPs on MCNTS can greatly restrict the formation of a thicker solid electrolyte interphase film, which has been well verified by both transmission electron microscopy results and quantum density functional theory calculations, leading to the highest initial CE in all the reported carbon nanomaterials. This uncovered property of Ag NPs from Ag-MCNTs makes them exhibit a very high reversible capacity of 1637 mAh g(-1) after 400 discharge/charge cycles at 100 mA g(-1), approximately 5 times higher than the theoretical value of a graphite anode (372 mAh g(-1)), excellent rate capability, and long cycle life. PMID:26691283

  2. The Calcium Goes Meow: Effects of Ions and Glycosylation on Fel d 1, the Major Cat Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Pol-Fachin, Laércio; Verli, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The major cat allergen, Fel d 1, is a structurally complex protein with two N-glycosylation sites that may be filled by different glycoforms. In addition, the protein contains three putative Ca2+ binding sites. Since the impact of these Fel d 1 structure modifications on the protein dynamics, physiology and pathology are not well established, the present work employed computational biology techniques to tackle these issues. While conformational effects brought upon by glycosylation were identified, potentially involved in cavity volume regulation, our results indicate that only the central Ca2+ ion remains coordinated to Fel d 1 in biological solutions, impairing its proposed role in modulating phospholipase A2 activity. As these results increase our understanding of Fel d 1 structural biology, they may offer new support for understanding its physiological role and impact into cat-promoted allergy. PMID:26134118

  3. Use of reconstituted waters to evaluate effects of elevated major ions associated with mountaintop coal mining on freshwater invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunz, James L.; Conley, Justin M.; Buchwalter, David B.; Norberg-King; Teresa, J.; Kemble, Nile E.; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    In previous laboratory chronic 7-d toxicity tests conducted with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, surface waters collected from Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining have shown toxic effects associated with elevated total dissolved solids (TDS). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of elevated major ions in chronic laboratory tests with C. dubia (7-d exposure), a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure), an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 28-d exposure), and a mayfly (Centroptilum triangulifer; 35-d exposure) in 3 reconstituted waters designed to be representative of 3 Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining. Two of the reconstituted waters had ionic compositions representative of alkaline mine drainage associated with mountaintop removal and valley fill-impacted streams (Winding Shoals and Boardtree, with elevated Mg, Ca, K, SO4, HCO3), and a third reconstituted water had an ionic composition representative of neutralized mine drainage (Upper Dempsey, with elevated Na, K, SO4, and HCO3). The waters with similar conductivities but, with different ionic compositions had different effects on the test organisms. The Winding Shoals and Boardtree reconstituted waters were consistently toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the mayfly. In contrast, the Upper Dempsey reconstituted water was toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the cladoceran but was not toxic to the mayfly. These results indicate that, although elevated TDS can be correlated with toxicity, the specific major ion composition of the water is important. Moreover, the choice of test organism is critical, particularly if a test species is to be used as a surrogate for a range of faunal groups.

  4. Use of reconstituted waters to evaluate effects of elevated major ions associated with mountaintop coal mining on freshwater invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kunz, James L; Conley, Justin M; Buchwalter, David B; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Kemble, Nile E; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-12-01

    In previous laboratory chronic 7-d toxicity tests conducted with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, surface waters collected from Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining have shown toxic effects associated with elevated total dissolved solids (TDS). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of elevated major ions in chronic laboratory tests with C. dubia (7-d exposure), a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure), an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 28-d exposure), and a mayfly (Centroptilum triangulifer; 35-d exposure) in 3 reconstituted waters designed to be representative of 3 Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining. Two of the reconstituted waters had ionic compositions representative of alkaline mine drainage associated with mountaintop removal and valley fill-impacted streams (Winding Shoals and Boardtree, with elevated Mg, Ca, K, SO₄, HCO₃), and a third reconstituted water had an ionic composition representative of neutralized mine drainage (Upper Dempsey, with elevated Na, K, SO₄, and HCO₃). The waters with similar conductivities but, with different ionic compositions had different effects on the test organisms. The Winding Shoals and Boardtree reconstituted waters were consistently toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the mayfly. In contrast, the Upper Dempsey reconstituted water was toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the cladoceran but was not toxic to the mayfly. These results indicate that, although elevated TDS can be correlated with toxicity, the specific major ion composition of the water is important. Moreover, the choice of test organism is critical, particularly if a test species is to be used as a surrogate for a range of faunal groups. PMID:24243594

  5. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, M.M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B.L.K. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the worlds's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO{sub 3} account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers, HCO{sub 3} excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and ground waters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons{center dot}km{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  6. Characterizing interactions between surface water and groundwater in the Jialu River basin using major ion chemistry and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Song, X.; Zhang, Y.; Han, D.; Zhang, B.; Long, D.

    2012-11-01

    The Jialu River, a secondary tributary of the Huaihe River, has been severely contaminated from major contaminant sources, such as a number of untreated or lightly treated sewage waste in some cities. Groundwater along the river is not an isolated component of the hydrologic system, but is instead connected with the surface water. This study aims to investigate temporal and spatial variations in water chemistry affected by humans and to characterize the relationships between surface water (e.g. reservoirs, lakes and rivers) and groundwater near the river in the shallow Quaternary aquifer. Concentration of Cl- in north Zhengzhou City increased prominently due to the discharge of a large amount of domestic water. Nitrate and potassium show maximum concentrations in groundwater in Fugou County. These high levels can be attributed to the use of a large quantity of fertilizer over this region. Most surface water appeared to be continuously recharged from the surrounding groundwater (regional wells) based on comparison surface water with groundwater levels, stable-isotopes and major ion signatures. However, the groundwater of a transitional well (location SY3) seemed to be recharged by river water via bank infiltration in September 2010. Fractional contributions of river water to the groundwater were calculated based on isotopic and chemical data using a mass-balance approach. Results show that the groundwater was approximately composed of 60-70% river water. These findings should be useful for a better understanding of hydrogeological processes at the river-aquifer interface and ultimately benefit water management in the future.

  7. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

  8. HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC/MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETERMINATION OF VOLATILE CARBOXYLIC ACIDS USING ION-PAIR EXTRACTION AND THERMALLY INDUCED ALKYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low molecular weight volatile carboxylic acids have been analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) using post-column derivatization and a moving belt interface. In order to prevent loss of the volatile solutes during transport to the mass spec...

  9. The major-ion composition of Cenozoic seawater: the past 36 million years from fluid inclusions in marine halite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, Sean T.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Cendon, Dioni I.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusions from ten Cenozoic (Eocene-Miocene) marine halites are used to quantify the major-ion composition (Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, Na+, SO42−, and Cl−) of seawater over the past 36 My. Criteria used to determine a seawater origin of the halites include: (1) stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and paleontologic observations; (2) Br− in halite; (3) δ34S of sulfate minerals; (4) 87Sr/86Sr of carbonates and sulfates; and (5) fluid inclusion brine compositions and evaporation paths, which must overlap from geographically separated basins of the same age to confirm a “global” seawater chemical signal. Changes in the major-ion chemistry of Cenozoic seawater record the end of a systematic, long term (>150 My) shift from the Ca2+-rich, Mg2+- and SO42−-poor seawater of the Mesozoic (“CaCl2 seas”) to the “MgSO4 seas” (with higher Mg2+ and SO42−>Ca2+) of the Cenozoic. The major ion composition of Cenozoic seawater is calculated for the Eocene-Oligocene (36-34 Ma), Serravallian-Tortonian (13.5-11.8 Ma) and the Messinian (6-5 Ma), assuming chlorinity (565 mmolal), salinity, and the K+ concentration (11 mmolal) are constant and the same as in modern seawater. Fluid inclusions from Cenozoic marine halites show that the concentrations of Mg2+and SO42− have increased in seawater over the past 36 My and the concentration of Ca2+ has decreased. Mg2+ concentrations increased from 36 mmolal in Eocene-Oligocene seawater (36-34 Ma) to 55 mmolal in modern seawater. The Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of seawater has risen from ∼2.3 at the end of the Eocene, to 3.4 and 4.0, respectively, at 13.5 to 11.8 Ma and 6 to 5 Ma, and to 5 in modern seawater. Eocene-Oligocene seawater (36-34 Ma) has estimated ranges of SO42− = 14–23 mmolal and Ca2+ = 11–20 mmolal. If the (Ca2+)(SO42−) product is assumed to be the same as in modern seawater (∼300 mmolal2), Eocene-Oligocene seawater had Ca2+ ∼16 mmolal and SO42− ∼19 mmolal. The same estimates of Ca2+ and SO42− for Serravallian-Tortonian seawater (13.5-11.8 Ma) are SO42− = 19–27 mmolal and Ca2+ = 8–16 mmolal and SO42− ∼24 mmolal and Ca2+ ∼ 13 mmolal if the (Ca2+)(SO42−) product is equal to that in modern seawater. Messinian seawater has an estimated range of SO42− ∼21–29 mmolal and Ca2+ ∼7–15 mmolal with SO42− ∼26 mmolal and Ca2+ ∼12 mmolal assuming the (Ca2+)(SO42−) product is equal to that in modern seawater. Regardless of the estimation procedure, SO42− shows progressively increasing concentrations from 36 Ma to the present values, which are the highest of the Cenozoic.

  10. Hexahydrated magnesium ions bind in the deep major groove and at the outer mouth of A-form nucleic acid duplexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.-G.; Sanishvili, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Wang, A. H.-J.; Univ. of Illinois; Northwestern Univ.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium ions play important roles in the structure and function of nucleic acids. Whereas the tertiary folding of RNA often requires magnesium ions binding to tight places where phosphates are clustered, the molecular basis of the interactions of magnesium ions with RNA helical regions is less well understood. We have refined the crystal structures of four decamer oligonucleotides, d(ACCGGCCGGT), r(GCG)d(TATACGC), r(GC)d(GTATACGC) and r(G)d(GCGTATACGC) with bound hexahydrated magnesium ions at high resolution. The structures reveal that A-form nucleic acid has characteristic [Mg(H2O)6]2+ binding modes. One mode has the ion binding in the deep major groove of a GpN step at the O6/N7 sites of guanine bases via hydrogen bonds. Our crystallographic observations are consistent with the recent NMR observations that in solution [Co(NH3)6]3+, a model ion of [Mg(H2O)6]2+, binds in an identical manner. The other mode involves the binding of the ion to phosphates, bridging across the outer mouth of the narrow major groove. These [Mg(H2O)6]2+ ions are found at the most negative electrostatic potential regions of A-form duplexes. We propose that these two binding modes are important in the global charge neutralization, and therefore stability, of A-form duplexes.

  11. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarin, M. M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.; Moore, W. S.

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the world's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers (upper reaches of the Ganga, the Yamuna, the Brahmaputra, the Gandak and the Ghaghra) are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO 3 account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers (the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken), HCO 3 excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and groundwaters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. Illite is the dominant clay mineral (about 80%) in the bedload sediments of the highland rivers. Kaolinite and chlorite together constitute the remaining 20% of the clays. In the Chambal, Betwa and Ken, smectite accounts for about 80% of the clays. This difference in the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments is a reflection of the differences in the geology of their drainage basins. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons· km -· yr -1, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  12. HCO+ Observations toward Comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1): Ion-Molecule Chemistry and Evidence for a Volatile Secondary Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, S. N.; Savage, C.; Ziurys, L. M.; Wyckoff, S.

    2004-11-01

    Several millimeter-wave transitions of HCO+ have been detected toward comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. The J=2-->1 transition at 178 GHz was observed toward the comet nucleus near perihelion on 1997 March 10 and 20, as well as the J=3-->2 transition at 268 GHz on 1997 March 9, with angular resolutions of 36" and 23", respectively. These data all show a slight velocity shift (~1.2 km s-1) from the nominal comet velocity, and the J=3-->2 profile is asymmetric with a redshifted wing. These differences likely arise from ion acceleration by the solar wind. A rotational diagram analysis of the data yielded a column density of 1.1×1012 cm-2 for HCO+ in Hale-Bopp, which corresponds to an average number density of 36 cm-3. The data taken on March 9 show a second velocity component redshifted by 7.0+/-0.6 km s-1, which is considerably weaker than the main feature and appears to have a counterpart in the HNC, J=3-->2 data, observed within an hour of the HCO+ measurements. The velocity difference between the main and secondary emission lines deprojected onto the extended solar radius vector is ~10 km s-1 for both HCO+ and HNC, and the weak-to-strong line intensity ratios (~5%) are identical to within observational errors, suggesting a common high-velocity volatile secondary source. A plausible model that may account for the redshifted velocity components is a comoving, localized debris field of submicron refractory grains accelerated by solar radiation pressure located ~105-106 km from the nucleus. The parent material of the weaker redshifted HNC and HCO+ lines may be predominately complex organic polymers. An examination of the production rates for HCO+ suggests that the reaction H2+CO+ is likely to be an important route to this ion in the outer coma beyond the collisionopause, where it has its peak abundance.

  13. Predicting the toxicity of major ions in seawater to mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnow (Menidia beryllina)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillard, D.A.; DuFresne, D.L.; Caudle, D.D.; Tietge, J.E.; Evans, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Although marine organisms are naturally adapted to salinities well above those of freshwater, elevated concentrations of specific ions have been shown to cause adverse effects on some saltwater species. Because some ions are also physiologically essential, a deficiency of these ions can also cause significant effects. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity associated with major ions, mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnows (Menidia beryllina) were exposed to saline solutions containing calcium, magnesium, potassium, strontium, bicarbonate, borate, bromide, and sulfate at concentrations above and below what would be found in seawater. Solution salinity was maintained at approximately 31% by increasing or decreasing sodium and chloride concentrations. Logistic regression models were developed with both the ion molar concentrations and ion activity. Toxicity to all three species was observed when either a deficiency or an excess of potassium and calcium occurred. Significant mortality occurred in all species when exposed to excess concentrations of magnesium, bicarbonate, and borate. The response to the remaining ions varied with species. Sheepshead minnows were the most tolerant of both deficient and elevated levels of the different ions. Mysid shrimp and inland silverside minnows demonstrated similar sensitivities to several ions, but silverside minnow response was more variable. As a result, the logistic models that predict inland silverside minnow survival generally were less robust than for the other two species.

  14. Hydro-chemical evolution of groundwater and mixing between aquifers: a statistical approach based on major ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Linhua; Gui, Herong

    2015-03-01

    Geochemical analysis is a useful tool in hydrogeological assessment, particularly in constructing a conceptual model of a hydrogeological system. In this study, major ion concentrations of 53 groundwater samples from the coal-bearing aquifer in the Qidong coal mine, northern Anhui Province of China have been processed by statistical analysis for understanding either hydro-chemical characteristics or hydrological evolution, which will be useful for the safety of coal mining. The results suggest that most of the samples are Na-SO4 and Na-HCO3 types, and their hydro-chemical compositions are mainly controlled by dissolution of more soluble minerals (e.g. calcite) and weathering of silicate minerals (e.g. plagioclase). Two groups of samples have been subdivided by quantile and scatter plots of factor scores, one is related to different degrees of water-rock interactions and another is related to groundwater mixing. Moreover, four end members have been identified and the mixing calculation suggests that the groundwater samples affected by mixing have 20-100 % contribution from the loose layer aquifer (LA), and therefore, groundwater from the LA in the coal mine should be taken seriously during coal mining. The study demonstrated that statistical analysis is useful for connecting the hydrochemistry of groundwater with hydrological evolution of the aquifer.

  15. Volatiles from Syzygium paniculatum fruit.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Clis, Clara E; Echeverri-Gil, Daniel; Ruiz, Yinet; Pino, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    The volatile compounds of Syzygium paniculatum Banks ex Gaertn. fruit were isolated by simultaneous distillation-solvent extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detectection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 155 volatile constituents were identified, accounting for 24.5 mg/kg of the fruit composition. Major compounds were alpha-pinene (32.8% of the total composition), (Z)-beta-ocimene (21.8%), limonene (6.9%), and alpha-terpineol (5.1%), indicating that the volatile composition of the fruit is more rich in terpenes. PMID:23472477

  16. Tracing groundwater input into Lake Vanda, Wright Valley, Antarctica using major ions, stable isotopes and noble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, C. B.; Poreda, R. J.; Snyder, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica, is the largest ice-free region on Antarctica. Lake Vanda, located in central Wright Valley, is the deepest lake among the MDV lakes. It has a relatively fresh water layer above 50 m with a hypersaline calcium-chloride brine below (50-72 m). The Onyx River is the only stream input into Lake Vanda. It flows westward from the coastal Lower Wright Glacier and discharges into Lake Vanda. Suggested by the published literature and this study, there has been and may still be groundwater input into Lake Vanda. Stable isotopes, major ions, and noble gas data from this study coupled with previously published data indicate that the bottom waters of Lake Vanda have had significant contributions from a deep groundwater system. The dissolved gas of the bottom waters of Lake Vanda display solubility concentrations rather than the Ar-enriched dissolved gas seen in the Taylor Valley lakes (such as Lake Bonney). The isotopic data indicate that the bottom calcium-chloride-brine of Lake Vanda has undergone very little evaporation. The calcium-chloride chemistry of the groundwater that discharges into Lake Vanda most likely results from the chemical weathering and dissolution of cryogenic evaporites (antarcticite and gypsum) within the glacial sediments of Wright Valley. The high calcium concentrations of the brine have caused gypsum to precipitate on the lake bottom. Our work also supports previous physical and chemical observations suggesting that the upper portion actively circulates and the hypersaline bottom layer does not. The helium and calcium chloride values are concentrated at the bottom, with a very narrow transition layer between it and the above fresh water. If the freshwater layer did not actively circulate, then diffusion over time would have caused the helium and calcium chloride to slowly permeate upwards through the water column.

  17. Biochar-induced concomitant decrease in ammonia volatilization and increase in nitrogen use efficiency by wheat.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sanchita; Thangarajan, Ramya; Bolan, Nanthi S; Sarkar, Binoy; Khan, Naser; Ok, Yong Sik; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is a major nitrogen (N) loss from the soil, especially under tropical conditions, NH3 volatilization results in low N use efficiency by crops. Incubation experiments were conducted using five soils (pH 5.5-9.0), three N sources such as, urea, di-ammonium phosphate (DAP), and poultry manure (PM) and two biochars such as, poultry litter biochar (PL-BC) and macadamia nut shell biochar (MS-BC). Ammonia volatilization was higher at soil with higher pH (pH exceeding 8) due to the increased hydroxyl ions. Among the N sources, urea recorded the highest NH3 volatilization (151.6 mg kg(-1)soil) followed by PM (124.2 mg kg(-1)soil) and DAP (99 mg kg(-1)soil). Ammonia volatilization was reduced by approximately 70% with PL-BC and MS-BC. The decreased NH3 volatilization with biochars is attributed to multiple mechanisms such as NH3 adsorption/immobilization, and nitrification. Moreover, biochar increased wheat dry weight and N uptake as high as by 24.24% and 76.11%, respectively. This study unravels the immense potential of biochar in decreasing N volatilization from soils and simultaneously improving use efficiency by wheat. PMID:25959224

  18. Major ions, nutrients, and trace elements in the Mississippi River near Thebes, Illinois, July through September 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Brinton, Terry I.; Roth, David A.; Moody, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Extensive flooding in the upper Mississippi River Basin during summer 1993 had a significant effect on the water quality of the Mississippi River. To evaluate the change in temporal distribution and transport of dissolved constituents in the Mississippi River, six water samples were collected by a discharge-weighted method from July through September 1993 near Thebes, Illinois. Sampling at this location provided water-quality information from the upper Mississippi, the Missouri, and the Illinois River Basins. Dissolved major constituents that were analyzed in each of the samples included bicarbonate, calcium (Ca), carbonate (CO3), chloride (C1), dissolved organic carbon, magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), silica (SiO2) , sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4). Dissolved nutrients included ammonium ion (NH4), nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), and orthophosphate (PO4). Dissolved trace elements included aluminum (A1), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), boron (B), beryllium (Be), bromide (Br), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt, (Co), copper (Cu), fluoride (F), iron (Fe), lead, lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), strontium (Sr), thallium, uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Other physical properties of water that were measured included specific conductance, pH and suspended-sediment concentration (particle size, less than 63 micrometers). Results of this study indicated that large quantifies of dissolved constituents were transported through the river system. Generally, pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance and the concentrations of B, Br, Ca, C1, Cr, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Na, SO4, Sr, U, and V increased as water discharge decreased, while concentrations of F, Hg, and suspended sediment sharply decreased as water discharge decreased after the crest of the flood. Concentrations of other constituents, such as A1, As, Ba, Be, Co, Cu, Ni, NO3, NO2, NH4, PO 4, and SiO2, varied with time as discharge decreased after the crest of the flood. For most constituents, the load transported during floods generally is much greater than that transported during low-flow conditions. However, for Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, V, and Zn, loads increased substantially as water discharge decreased after the crest of the flood.

  19. Estimates of average major ion concentrations in bulk precipitation at two high-altitude sites near the continental divide in Southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Claassen, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The composition of bulk precipitation from two high-altitude sites, established in 1971 near the Continental Divide in southwestern Colorado, has been monitored by season during the past decade. Calcium ions are the predominant cationic species; sulfate is the major anionic constituent. Bulk precipitation major ion concentrations exhibit log-normal distributions. Representative mean and standard deviation values for the major inorganic ionic species present in bulk precipitation have been calculated for three years of consecutive seasons. Standard deviations for all species, except nitrate, are similar. For two years of data grouped into quarters, deviations from mean values fall well within the plus or minus two standard deviation limit. There does not seem to be a systematic deviation from the mean concentration values, with respect to either ionic component or season.

  20. Principal Locations of Major-Ion, Trace-Element, Nitrate, and Escherichia coli Loading to Emigration Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah, October 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Briant A.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Housing development and recreational activity in Emigration Canyon have increased substantially since 1980, perhaps causing an observed decrease in water quality of this northern Utah stream located near Salt Lake City. To identify reaches of the stream that contribute to water-quality degradation, a tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study was done to quantify mass loading of major ions, trace elements, nitrate, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the stream. The resulting mass-loading profiles for major ions and trace elements indicate both geologic and anthropogenic inputs to the stream, principally from tributary and spring inflows to the stream at Brigham Fork, Burr Fork, Wagner Spring, Emigration Tunnel Spring, Blacksmith Hollow, and Killyon Canyon. The pattern of nitrate loading does not correspond to the major-ion and trace-element loading patterns. Nitrate levels in the stream did not exceed water-quality standards at the time of synoptic sampling. The majority of nitrate mass loading can be considered related to anthropogenic input, based on the field settings and trends in stable isotope ratios of nitrogen. The pattern of E. coli loading does not correspond to the major-ion, trace-element, or nitrate loading patterns. The majority of E. coli loading was related to anthropogenic sources based on field setting, but a considerable part of the loading also comes from possible animal sources in Killyon Canyon, in Perkins Flat, and in Rotary Park. In this late summer sampling, E. coli concentrations only exceeded water-quality standards in limited sections of the study reach. The mass-loading approach used in this study provides a means to design future studies and to evaluate the loading on a catchment scale.

  1. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  2. Volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis in blood using spray extraction

    SciTech Connect

    St-Germain, F.; Vachon, B.; Brunet, J.

    1995-12-31

    The quantitation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in gaseous or liquid media has important ramifications for identifying environmental and medical risks. Due to the volatile nature of these compounds, they are difficult to measure accurately. The authors describe here a new device which extracts volatile and semi-volatile compounds from aqueous samples and transfers them to an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) for analysis.

  3. Skimming-trajectory effect for energy loss of medium-energy He ions passing along major crystal axes of KI(001) and RbI(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhara, K.; Matsuda, T.; Tominaga, K.; Grande, P. L.; Schiwietz, G.; Kido, Y.

    2013-04-01

    The energy loss of an ion passing along a major crystal axis before and/or after undergoing a large-angle collision is strongly enhanced, because its path is close to a lattice-site atom located at the crystal axis; this is the so-called skimming effect. One may find this effect in high-resolution medium-energy ion scattering (MEIS) spectra from submonolayers of single crystals. In the present study, the MEIS spectra were observed for medium-energy He+ ions backscattered from KI(001) and RbI(001) crystals at various scattering geometries. The observed surface peaks were decomposed into scattering components from top-, second-, and third-layer atoms considering the hitting probabilities, which were derived from Monte Carlo simulations of ion trajectories, taking account of the enhanced and correlated thermal vibrations. The results obtained here demonstrate that the energy loss of the ions which move skimming trajectories is expressed reasonably well by the impact-parameter-dependent energy loss calculated using the nonperturbative coupled-channel method.

  4. Geochemistry of the upper Han River basin, China. 2: Seasonal variations in major ion compositions and contribution of precipitation chemistry to the dissolved load.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2009-10-30

    A total of 252 water samples were collected from 42 sites across the upper Han River basin during the time period from 2005-2006. Major ions (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-), Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+), Si, water temperature, pH, EC and TDS were determined and consequently correlation matrix, analysis of variance, factor analysis and principal component analysis were performed in order to identify their seasonal variations and atmospheric inputs into river solutes. The results reveal that pH, EC, TDS, Cl(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-), Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ and Si generally tend to show the minimum compositions in months belong to the rainy season, while the dry season for NO3(-) and Na+. NO3(-), Mg2+ and Si have the maximum concentrations in months belong to the rainy season. By comparing the major ions relating to hydrological regime, NO3(-), contrary to other elements, has higher concentration in the rainy season. The overall water quality is non-polluted, while there are indications of enrichment of inorganic anions including NO3(-) causing water entrophication in the near future. The atmospheric inputs contribute to river solutes is limited with a mean inputs of approximate 1% in the basin. The understanding of the major ion dynamics would help water quality conservation in the basin for China's interbasin water transfer project. PMID:19523765

  5. Quantify the loss of major ions induced by CO2 enrichment and nitrogen addition in subtropical model forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi; Li, Yuelin; Liu, Shizhong

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that atmospheric CO2 enrichment would increase the ion concentrations in the soil water. However, none of these studies could exactly quantify the amount of ion changes in the soil water induced by elevated CO2 and all of these experiments were carried out only in the temperate areas. Using an open-top chamber design, we studied the effects of CO2 enrichment alone and together with nitrogen (N) addition on soil water chemistry in the subtropics. Three years of exposure to an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 700 ppm resulted in accelerated base cation loss via leaching water below the 70 cm soil profile. The total of base cation (K+ + Na+ + Ca2+ + Mg2+) loss in the elevated CO2 treatment was higher than that of the control by 220%, 115%, and 106% in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. The N treatment decreased the effect of high CO2 treatment on the base cation loss in the leachates. Compared to the control, N addition induced greater metal cation (Al3+ and Mn2+) leaching loss in 2008 and net Al3+ and Mn2+ loss in the high N treatment increased by 100% and 67%, respectively. However, the CO2 treatment decreased the effect of high N treatment on the metal cation loss. Changes of ion export followed by the exposure to the elevated CO2, and N treatments were related to both ion concentrations and leached water amount. We hypothesize that forests in subtropical China might suffer from nutrient limitation and some poisonous metal activation in plant biomass under future global change.

  6. A Test of a Major-ion Toxicity Model to Predict the Toxicity of Coal Bed Methane Product Waters to Aquatic Biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, M. B.; Meyer, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) accounts for about 7.5% of the total natural gas production in the United States, and the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Montana and Wyoming has recently become a major production area. During CBM extraction, a coal seam is partially de-watered to relieve hydraulic pressure, thus causing methane gas to desorb. Some of this water (called product water) is discharged on the land surface and allowed to run into local drainages in the PRB. Due to the massive amounts of product water being discharged (rates up to 64,000 L/day per well), studies are needed to examine the potential effects on aquatic organisms. Additionally, models to predict such effects would be useful regulatory screening tools. To that end, we tested the ability of a multivariate logistic regression model of the toxicity of major inorganic ions (i.e., Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, HCO3-, SO42-) to predict the acute toxicity of CBM-related waters to two aquatic invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). First, we entered water chemistry data for several CBM product and receiving waters from the PRB into the major-ion model. Then we compared the model's predicted survival to the survival of the three species in toxicity tests we had previously conducted with those waters. For the majority of CBM product water and stream water samples in which CBM product water constituted the entire flow of the stream, the major-ion model consistently under-predicted survival by >50%. Therefore, from a regulatory standpoint, this model is conservative for detecting toxicity of CBM product waters (i.e., it over-predicts toxicity). Although the model appeared to be an excellent predictor of survival for receiving waters that contained no inputs from CBM processing (i.e., the difference between predicted and observed survival was <=10%), the majority of those cases were inconclusive tests of the model because the predicted and observed survival were either both >90% or both <10%. In such cases, it was not possible to test the accuracy of the regression coefficients in the major-ion model.

  7. The study of capacity fading processes of Li-ion batteries: major factors that play a role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovsky, B.; Rodkin, A.; Cohen, Y. S.; Palchik, O.; Levi, E.; Aurbach, D.; Kim, H.-J.; Schmidt, M.

    In this work, we studied the impact of some factors on the behavior of practical electrodes of Li-ion batteries. These included elevated temperatures (45-80 C), prolonged storage of Li-ion cells, and additives in the electrolyte solution. The Li-ion battery systems studied included negative electrodes (anodes) comprising of mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) and mesocarbon fibers (MCF), and Li xCoO 2 positive electrodes (cathodes) in an ethylene carbonate (EC)/ethyl-methyl carbonate (EMC) (1:2)/LiPF 6 1 M solution. Vinylene carbonate (VC) and a Li-organo-borate complex (Li-OBC) were tested as additives. It is shown that the electrochemical response of Li-C negative electrodes depends on the structure of the surface films controlling their behavior, which change upon storage, temperature, and cycling. We established that impedance of these electrodes increased with storage time due to the enrichment of the surface films by LiF and other fluorine-containing species. The capacity fading of the Li xCoO 2 electrodes in cycling/storage processes at elevated temperatures relates mostly to surface phenomena, whereas the bulk structural characteristics of the electrodes do not change.

  8. Establishing the occurrence of major and minor glucosinolates in Brassicaceae by LC-ESI-hybrid linear ion-trap and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lelario, Filomena; Bianco, Giuliana; Bufo, Sabino A; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2012-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GLSs) are sulfur-rich plant secondary metabolites which occur in a variety of cruciferous vegetables and among various classes of them, genus Brassica exhibits a rich family of these phytochemicals at high, medium and low abundances. Liquid chromatography (LC) with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode (ESI-) coupled to a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap (LTQ) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS) was employed for the selective and sensitive determination of intact GLSs in crude sample extracts of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Var. italica), cauliflower (B. oleracea L. Var. Botrytis) and rocket salad (Eruca sativa L.) with a wide range of contents. When LTQ and FTICR mass analyzers are compared, the magnitude of the limit of detection was ca. 5/6-fold lower with the FTICR MS. In addition, the separation and detection by LC-ESI-FTICR MS provides a highly selective assay platform for unambiguous identification of GLSs, which can be extended to lower abundance (minor) GLSs without significant interferences of other compounds in the sample extracts. The analysis of Brassicaceae species emphasized the presence of eight minor GLSs, viz. 1-methylpropyl-GLS, 2-methylpropyl-GLS, 2-methylbutyl-GLS, 3-methylbutyl-GLS, n-pentyl-GLS, 3-methylpentyl-GLS, 4-methylpentyl-GLS and n-hexyl-GLS. The occurrence of these GLSs belonging to the saturated aliphatic side chain families C(4), C(5) and C(6), presumably formed by chain elongation of leucine, homoleucine and dihomoleucine as primary amino acid precursors, is described. Based on their retention behavior and tandem MS spectra, all these minor compounds occurring in plant extracts of B. oleracea L. Var. italica, B. oleracea L. Var. Botrytis and E. sativa L. were tentatively identified. PMID:22030302

  9. Reverse ion exchange as a major process controlling the groundwater chemistry in an arid environment: a case study from northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Faisal K; Nazzal, Yousef; Jafri, Muhammad Kamran; Naeem, Muhammad; Ahmed, Izrar

    2015-10-01

    Assessment of groundwater quality is of utmost significance in arid regions like Saudi Arabia where the lack of present-day recharge and high evaporation rates coupled with increasing groundwater withdrawal may restrict its usage for domestic or agricultural purposes. In the present study, groundwater samples collected from agricultural farms in Hail (15 samples), Al Jawf (15 samples), and Tabuk (30 samples) regions were analyzed for their major ion concentration. The objective of the study was to determine the groundwater facies, the main hydrochemical process governing the groundwater chemistry, the saturation index with respect to the principal mineral phases, and the suitability of the groundwater for irrigational use. The groundwater samples fall within the Ca-Cl type, mixed Ca-Mg-Cl type, and Na-Cl type. Evaporation and reverse ion exchange appear to be the major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry though reverse ion exchange process is the more dominating factor. The various ionic relationships confirmed the reverse ion exchange process where the Ca and Mg in the aquifer matrix have been replaced by Na at favorable exchange sites. This phenomenon has accounted for the dominance of Ca and Mg ions over Na ion at all the sites. The process of reverse ion exchange was further substantiated by the use of modified Piper diagram (Chadha's classification) and the chloro-alkaline indices. Evaporation as a result of extreme aridity has resulted in the groundwater being oversaturated with aragonite/calcite and dolomite as revealed by the saturation indices. The groundwater samples were classified as safe (less than 10) in terms of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values, good (less than 1.25) in terms of residual sodium carbonate (RSC) values, and safe to moderate (between 0 and 3) in terms of Mg hazard for irrigation purposes. Though the high salinity groundwater in the three regions coupled with low SAR values are good for the soil structure, it can have a negative impact on the crop production by adversely affecting the crop physiology. Cultivation of high-salinity-resistant varieties of crops is recommended for maximum agricultural productivity. PMID:26329266

  10. The major ion, 87Sr/86Sr, and δ11B geochemistry of groundwater in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed aquifer (Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Damien; Jacobson, Andrew D.; Cividini, Damien; Chabaux, François

    2015-11-01

    We developed a multicomponent, 1D advective transport model that describes the downgradient evolution of solute concentrations, 87Sr/86Sr ratios, and δ11B values in the Wyodak-Anderson Coal Bed (WACB) aquifer located in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the chemical vulnerability of groundwater to potential environmental change stemming from the extraction of coal bed methane and shale gas. Model calculations demonstrate that coupling between microbial activity and the dissolved carbonate system controls major ion transport in the WACB aquifer. The analysis of 87Sr/86Sr ratios further reveals the importance of ion-exchange reactions. Similarly, δ11B data emphasize the significance of pH-dependent surface reactions and demonstrate the vulnerability of the aquifer to the long-term acidification of recharge water.

  11. The use of laboratory-determined ion exchange parameters in the predictive modelling of field-scale major cation migration in groundwater over a 40-year period.

    PubMed

    Carlyle, Harriet F; Tellam, John H; Parker, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate quantitatively cation concentration changes as estuary water invades a Triassic Sandstone aquifer in northwest England. Cation exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients for Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. Selectivity coefficients were also determined using a method involving optimized back-calculation from flushing experiments, thus permitting better representation of field conditions; in all cases, the Gaines-Thomas/constant cation exchange capacity (CEC) model was found to be a reasonable, though not perfect, first description. The exchange parameters interpreted from the laboratory experiments were used in a one-dimensional reactive transport mixing cell model, and predictions compared with field pumping well data (Cl and hardness spanning a period of around 40 years, and full major ion analyses in approximately 1980). The concentration patterns predicted using Gaines-Thomas exchange with calcite equilibrium were similar to the observed patterns, but the concentrations of the divalent ions were significantly overestimated, as were 1980 sulphate concentrations, and 1980 alkalinity concentrations were underestimated. Including representation of sulphate reduction in the estuarine alluvium failed to replicate 1980 HCO(3) and pH values. However, by including partial CO(2) degassing following sulphate reduction, a process for which there is 34S and 18O evidence from a previous study, a good match for SO(4), HCO(3), and pH was attained. Using this modified estuary water and averaged values from the laboratory ion exchange parameter determinations, good predictions for the field cation data were obtained. It is concluded that the Gaines-Thomas/constant exchange capacity model with averaged parameter values can be used successfully in ion exchange predictions in this aquifer at a regional scale and over extended time scales, despite the numerous assumptions inherent in the approach; this has also been found to be the case in the few other published studies of regional ion exchanging flow. PMID:14698871

  12. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present results suggest that in addition to the commonly cited naphthenic acids, remediation of OSPW-impacted groundwater will need to address high concentrations of major ions contributing to salinization.

  13. Identification of muscadine wine sulfur volatiles: pectinase versus skin-contact maceration.

    PubMed

    Grbz, Ozan; Rouseff, June; Talcott, Stephen T; Rouseff, Russell

    2013-01-23

    Muscadine grapes ( Vitis rotundifolia ) are widely grown in the southern United States, as the more common Vitis vinifera cannot be cultivated due to Pierce's disease. There is interest to determine if certain cultivars can be used for good-quality wine production. This study compared the effect of pectolytic enzyme pretreatment with conventional skin-contact fermentation on Muscadine (Noble, Vitis rotundifolia ) wine major volatiles, aroma active volatiles, and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). Volatile composition, aroma activity, and VSCs in the initial juice and wine samples after 3 years were determined by gas chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), olfactory detection (GC-O), and pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD). Forty-three nonethanol MS volatiles were common to all samples. Total ion chromatogram (TIC) MS peak area increased 91% in the skin-contact wines from the initial juice but only 24% in the enzyme-treated wine. Thirty-one VSCs were detected. Twenty-four sulfur volatiles were identified by matching their retention characteristics on polar and nonpolar columns with those of standards or MS spectrum matches. Six of these (sulfur dioxide, 1-propanethiol, 3-mercapto-2-pentanone, 3-mercapto-2-butanone, 2,8-epithio-cis-p-menthane, and 1-p-menthene-8-thiol) were reported for the first time in muscadine wine. Five additional VSCs were tentatively identified by matching standardized retention values with literature values, and two remain unidentified. Total sulfur peak areas increased 400% in the skin-contact wine and 560% in the enzyme-treated wine compared to the initial juice. There were 42 aroma-active volatiles in the initial juice, 48 in the skin-contact wine, and 66 in the enzyme-treated wine. Eleven aroma-active volatiles in the skin-contact wine and 16 aroma volatiles in the enzyme-treated wine appear to be due to sulfur volatiles. Pectolytic enzyme-treated wines contained less total volatiles but more sulfur and aroma-active volatiles than the traditional skin-contact wine. PMID:23289372

  14. [Composition characteristics and source analysis of major ions in four small lake-watersheds on the Tibetan Plateau, China].

    PubMed

    Li, He; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao-Long; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jie; Niu, Ying-Quan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the ionic compositions of small lake-watersheds on the Tibetan Plateau, water samples from the brackish lakes (Pung Co (lake), Angrenjin Co and Dajia Co), the freshwater lake (Daggyaima Co), their inflowing rivers and the hot spring (Dagejia Geothermal Field), were collected during July-August 2013. The results showed that the major anions and cations of the brackish lakes were HCO3-, SO4(2-) and Na+, respectively, and the hydrochemical types were HCO3-SO4-Na and HCO3-Na. The major anions and cations of the inflowing rivers and the freshwater lake were HCO3-, SO4(2-) and Ca2+, Mg2+, respectively, and the hydrochemical types were HCO3-Ca, HCO3-Ca-Mg, HCO3-Mg-Ca, HCO3-SO4-Ca and SO4-HCO3- Ca. The major anions and cations of the hot spring were HCO3- and Na+, respectively, and the hydrochemical type was HCO3-Na. Water chemistry in the brackish lakes was primarily dominated by evaporation-crystallization processes, while the inflowing rivers and the freshwater lake were mainly influenced by carbonate weathering, and the hot spring was mainly controlled by hot water-granite interaction. Ca2+ was preferentially removed over Mg2+ from the water when carbonate minerals precipitation occured, which resulted in the high Mg2+/Ca2+ molar ratios of the brackish lakes. In the contribution of cation compositions, the largest contribution was carbonate weathering (54% - 79%), followed by silicate weathering (13% -29%) and evaperite dissolution (4% -23%), and the smallest was atmospheric input (3% - 7%). PMID:26031067

  15. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 ?m. At a flow-rate of 10 Lmin-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from ?-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009). Furthermore, in summer 2011 the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was successfully tested in field measurements during the "Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study" (BEACHON-RoMBAS) in a ponderosa pine woodland in the southern Rocky Mountains of North America. The study was focused on understanding the formation, growth and properties of biogenic organic aerosol. We measured the composition of the aerosol particles and determined the concentration of pinic acid and isobaric substances. By means of intercomparison studies with other instruments like an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a MOVI coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) we could validate our measurements.

  16. Chemical weathering in the plain and peninsular sub-basins of the Ganga: Impact on major ion chemistry and elemental fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Santosh K.; Singh, Sunil K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2010-04-01

    Concentrations of major ions, Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr have been measured in the Gomti, the Son and the Yamuna, tributaries of the Ganga draining its peninsular and plain sub-basins to determine their contribution to the water chemistry of the Ganga and silicate and carbonate erosion of the Ganga basin. The results show high concentrations of Na and Sr in the Gomti, the Yamuna and the Ganga (at Varanasi) with much of the Na in excess of Cl. The use of this 'excess Na' (Na∗ = Na riv - Cl riv) a common index of silicate weathering yield values of ˜18 tons km -2 yr -1 for silicate erosion rate (SER) in the Gomti and the Yamuna basins. There are however, indications that part of this Na∗ can be from saline/alkaline soils abundant in their basins, raising questions about its use as a proxy to determine SER of the Ganga plain. Independent estimation of SER based on dissolved Si as a proxy give an average value of ˜5 tons km -2 yr -1 for the peninsular and the plain drainages, several times lower than that derived using Na∗. The major source of uncertainty in this estimate is the potential removal of Si from rivers by biological and chemical processes. The Si based SER and CER (carbonate erosion rate) are also much lower than that in the Himalayan sub-basin of the Ganga. The lower relief, runoff and physical erosion in the peninsular and the plain basins relative to the Himalayan sub-basin and calcite precipitation in them all could be contributing to their lower erosion rates. Budget calculations show that the Yamuna, the Son and Gomti together account for ˜75% Na, 41% Mg and ˜53% Sr and 87Sr of their supply to the Ganga from its major tributaries, with the Yamuna dominating the contribution. The results highlight the important role of the plain and peninsular sub-basins in determining the solute and Sr isotope budgets of the Ganga. The study also shows that the anthropogenic contribution accounts for ⩽10% of the major ion fluxes of the Ganga at Rajmahal during high river stages (October). The impact of both saline/alkaline soils and anthropogenic sources on the major ion abundances of the Ganga is minimum during its peak flow and therefore the SER and CO 2 consumption rates of the river is best determined during this period.

  17. Major ion chemistry and hydrochemical studies of groundwater of parts of Palar river basin, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Dar, Mithas Ahmad; Sankar, K; Dar, Imran Ahmad

    2011-05-01

    Groundwater is almost globally important for human consumption as well as for the support of habitat and for maintaining the quality of base flow to rivers, while its quality assessment is essential to ensure sustainable safe use of the resources for drinking, agricultural, and industrial purposes. In the current study, 50 groundwater samples were collected from parts of Palar river basin to assess water quality and investigate hydrochemical nature by analyzing the major cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K) and anions (HCO(3), Cl, F,SO(4), NO(3), PO(4),CO(3), HCO(3), and F) besides some physical and chemical parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, alkalinity, and total hardness). Also, geographic information system-based groundwater quality mapping in the form of visually communicating contour maps was developed using ArcGIS-9.2 to delineate spatial variation in physicochemical characteristics of groundwater samples. Wilcox classification and US Salinity Laboratory hazard diagram suggests that 52% of the groundwater fall in the field of C2-S1, indicating water of medium salinity and low sodium, which can be used for irrigation in almost all types of soil with little danger of exchangeable sodium. Remaining 48% is falling under C1-SI, indicating water of low salinity and low sodium. PMID:20886289

  18. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Oconnell, R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution are addressed.

  19. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrametz, K.; Kofler, L.

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution were addressed.

  20. Quantitative analysis of methadone and two major metabolites in hair by positive chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, D G; Nagasawa, P R; Gygi, S P; Foltz, R L; Rollins, D E

    1996-10-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantitative determination of D,L-methadone (MD) and its metabolites, D,L-2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3, 3-diphenylpyrrolinium (EDDP) and D,L-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3, 3-diphenyl-1-pyrroline (EMDP), in hair has been developed. Deuterated internal standards of MD, EMDP, and EDDP were added to 20-mg hair samples and digested overnight at room temperature with 1N sodium hydroxide. Calibration standards containing known concentrations of MD, EMDP, and EDDP dried onto human hair were also digested. Digest solutions were extracted by a liquid-liquid extraction procedure and analyzed with splitless injection on a Finnigan MagnumTM ion trap mass spectrometer. Chromatographic separation was achieved with helium carrier gas on a DB-5MS-30M-0.25-micron capillary column. Positive chemicaionization was used with acetone as the reagent gas. The assay was linear from 0.5 ng/mg (MD and EDDP) or 1.0 ng/mg (EMDP) to 50.0 ng/mg of human hair with correlation coefficients greater than 0.99. Intra-assay and interassay coefficients of variation were determined to be less than 20% for all three analytes at 2.0 and 10.0 ng/mg of hair. Recovery was estimated to be greater than 70% (MD and EDDP) and 53% (EMDP) at 2.0 and 10.0 ng/mg of hair. The method has been applied to the analysis of both human and rat hair. Male long-Evans rats were shaved prior to dosing to obtain their drug-free hair. Animals were then administered 15 mg/kg MD by intraperitoneal injection daily for five days. Fourteen days after the first dose, hair was collected and analyzed for MD, EMDP, and EDDP. The mean plus standard error of the mean (SEM; n = 3) concentrations of MD and EDDP in pigmented hair were 31.1 ng/mg +/- 9.6 ng/mg and 8.6 +/- 2.4 ng/mg, respectively. EMDP was detected in the hair of one of three rats. In another experiment, hair was collected from two human subjects who had received long-term methadone therapy for the treatment of heroin addiction. Subject A received 60 mg of methadone daily for at least six months; subject B received 80 mg of methadone daily for at least six months. The hair concentrations of MD were 10.1 ng/mg and 21.0 ng/mg for Subjects A and B, respectively. The hair concentrations of EDDP were 0.5 ng/mg and 2.6 ng/mg for Subjects A and B, respectively. EMDP was not detected in the hair of these two subjects. This method is being used to evaluate the incorporation of MD, EMDP, and EDDP in human and rat hair in dose-response studies. PMID:8889670

  1. Estimating Major Ion and Nutrient Concentrations in Mangrove Estuaries in Everglades National Park Using Leaf and Satellite Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagomasino, David; Price, Rene; Whitman, Dean; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Melesse, Assefa

    2015-01-01

    Coastal mangrove ecosystems are under duress worldwide because of urban development, sea-level rise, and climate change, processes that are capable of changing the salinity and nutrient concentration of the water utilized by the mangroves. This study correlates long-term water chemistry in mangrove environments, located in Everglades National Park,with mangrove spectral reflectance measurements made at both the leaf and canopy scales. Spectral reflectance measurements were collected using a handheld spectrometer for leaf-level measurements and Landsat 5TMdata for regional coverage. Leaf-level reflectance data were collected from three mangrove species (i.e., red, black and white mangroves) across two regions; a tall mangrove (approximately 18m) and dwarf mangrove (1- 2 m) region. The reflectance data were then used to calculate a wide variety of biophysical reflectance indices (e.g., NDVI, EVI, SAVI) to determine signs of stress. Discrete, quarterly water samples from the surface water, groundwater, and pore water (20 and 85 cm depths) and daily autonomous surface water samples were collected at each site and analyzed for major anions (Cl(-) and SO(2(-)/4)), cations (Na(+), K(+), Mg(sup 2(+)), and Ca(sup 2(+)), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP).Mangrove sites that exhibited the highest salinity and ionic concentrations in the surface and subsurface water also had the lowest near-infrared reflectance at both the leaf and satellite levels. Seasonal reflectance responses were measured in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths at both the leaf and canopy scales and were strongly correlated with nutrient and ionic concentrations in the surface and subsurface water, even though there was no significant separability between the three mangrove species. Study sites that experienced the greatest variability in surface and subsurface water ionic concentrations also exhibited the greatest fluctuations in NIR spectral reflectance. Landsat 5TM images were able to detect tall and dwarf mangroves by the differences in spectral indices (e.g., NDVI, NDWI, and EVI) because of the variability in the background conditions amongst the environments. In addition, Landsat 5TM images spanning 16 years (1993- 2009) were successfully used to estimate the seasonal variability in ionic concentrations in the surface water across the Florida Coastal mangrove ecotone. This study has shown that water chemistry can be estimated indirectly by measuring the change in spectral response at the leaf- or satellite-scale. Furthermore, the results of this research may be extrapolated to similar coastal mangrove systems throughout the Caribbean and world-wide wherever red, black, and white mangroves occur.

  2. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  3. Effect of ?-irradiation on the volatile compounds of medicinal herb, Paeoniae Radix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Sung-Lye; Hwang, In-Min; Ryu, Keun-Young; Jung, Min-Seok; Seo, Hye-young; Kim, Hee-Yeon; Song, Hyun-Pa; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2009-07-01

    A study was carried out to find the effect of ?-irradiation on contents of volatile compounds from medicinal herb, Paeoniae Radix ( Paenia albiflora Pallas var. trichocarpa Bunge). The volatile compounds of control, 1, 3, 5 and 10 kGy irradiated samples were extracted by simultaneous steam distillation and extraction (SDE) method and analyzed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. The major volatile compounds were paeonol, ( E)-carveol, ( E, E)-2,4-octadienal, methyl salicylate, myrtanol and eugenol acetate. Volatile compounds belonging to chemical classes of acids, alcohols, aldehydes, esters, hydrocarbons and miscellaneous were identified in all experimental samples. The types of volatile compounds in irradiated samples were similar to those of non-irradiated sample and the concentrations of these compounds differed between treatments. 1,3-Bis (1,1-dimethylethyl)-benzene was identified by using the selected ion monitoring (GC/MS-SIM) mode. The concentration of this compound increased with the increase of irradiation dose level. These results suggest that it could be used as the base data for the effect of ?-irradiation on medicinal herb.

  4. Volatile Constituents of Montanoa tomentosa and Lippia graveolens.

    PubMed

    Compadre, C M; Hussain, R A; Leon, I; Enrquez, R G

    1987-10-01

    The constituents of the volatile oils of MONTANOA TOMENTOSA and LIPPIA GRAVEOLENS, were investigated using capillary GC/MS. Borneol acetate, beta-cubebene, and beta-caryophyllene were found to be the major constituents of the volatile oil of M. TOMENTOSA, while P-cymene, 1,8-cineol, thymol, and carvacrol were the major volatile components of L. GRAVEOLENS. The possible correlation between the high concentration of monoterpenes and the alleged antifertility effect of the title plants is discussed. PMID:17269076

  5. Multi-Decadal Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Loading Based on Major Ion and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Glacial Ice From the Siberian Altai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joswiak, D.; Aizen, E.; Aizen, V.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of a deep alpine ice core from the mid-latitude Siberian Altai is presented. The 170m core in storage and processing at the University of Idaho is examined to 50m on the basis of annual layer identification and dating, visual stratigraphy, major ion concentration, stable (?18O,?2H) and radiogenic (?3H) isotope variability using multivariate and time series statistical methods. The core depth has recorded atmospheric precipitation since the recent industrial (post-1940) time period and into the intermediate transition of the early 20^{th}Century based on multi-parameter dating techniques. The time series is evaluated as a proxy for high-resolution examination of aerosol loading through the ion chemistry and mineral dust records preserved in the glacial ice. Aerosol loading estimations are achieved through major element analysis (to 20m depth) for dust particles ranging in size from 0.52-5.04?m. Average ion concentrations corroborate well with another ice core from the Altai Mts. for the industrialized (post-1940) time in this geographic region, with slightly elevated concentrations of all species analyzed and localized differences in peak variability. The ion chemistry is characterized by a significant increase in sulfate concentrations (0-33m mean SO4=10.54?Eq/L, 33-50m mean SO4=2.91?Eq/L) and a slight increase in nitrate concentrations in the upper portion of core corresponding to the recent (<50yrs) past. This level of increased aerosol loading is typically associated with anthropogenic activities, including industrialization, biomass burning, and agricultural activity that may accompany increasing temperature trends. However, oxygen isotopes ratios do not show a statistically significant difference in mean oxygen isotope ratios expected for the associated (0-33m, 33-50m) time periods of increased sulfate and nitrate concentrations. Other central Asian aeolian dust species (magnesium, calcium, chloride and sodium) do not show significant increasing trends for this time period. Highest correlations are present for Na and Cl (0.88), Mg and Ca (0.81), and NO3 and SO4 (0.81), with all ion concentrations correlated due to the strong seasonality at this continental location. With a Cl/Na ratio of 1.21, significant sea salt input is evident. The stable isotope record (?18O with mean -14.18 and ?2H mean ratio of -97.05) shows well preserved annual variability associated with ambient temperatures during deposition. However, an increasing (less negative) oxygen isotope ratio, corresponding to increasing atmospheric temperatures, is not observed at this location. Our acknowledgements and thanks to Dr. Paul Mayewski and Sharon Sneed for their kind support in ice-core processing and ion analysis at the UMClimate Change Institute.

  6. Aquifer wise seasonal variations and spatial distribution of major ions with focus on fluoride contamination-Pandharkawada block, Yavatmal district, Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Madhnure; Malpe, D B; Rao, A D; Rao, P N

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal variations in groundwater reveal lesser concentrations of major ions except NO3 (-) during post-monsoon seasons in shallow aquifers as compared to deeper aquifers. The F(-) concentration from deeper aquifers is high in both seasons and shows a moderate positive relationship with weathering depth and is >5 mg/L in compound lava flow. Groundwater is mainly a Ca-HCO3 type in shallow aquifers and mixed type in deeper aquifers. Fluoride shows a positive correlation with pH, Na(+), HCO3 (-) in shallow aquifers and an inverse correlation with Ca(2+) and HCO3 (-) from deeper aquifers in both seasons. Approximately 45 % of the samples are not suitable for drinking from both aquifers but suitable for irrigation purposes. Rock-water interaction, moderate alkalinity, sluggish movement, and higher residence time are the main causes for high F(-) in deeper aquifers as compared to shallow aquifers. As recommendations, drinking water requirement may be met from shallow aquifers/surface water and fluoride rich groundwater for other purposes. Most effective defluoridation techniques like ion exchange and reverse osmosis may be adopted along with integrated fluorosis mitigation measures and rooftop rainwater harvesting. Supplementary calcium and phosphorous rich food should be provided to children and creating awareness about safe drinking water habits, side effects of high F(-), and NO3 (-) rich groundwater, improving oral hygiene conditions are other measures. PMID:26728981

  7. Molecular detection of targeted major histocompatibility complex I-bound peptides using a probabilistic measure and nanospray MS3 on a hybrid quadrupole-linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Bruce; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2010-11-01

    A nanospray MS(3) method deployed on a quadrupole linear ion trap hybrid can detect targeted peptides with high dynamic range and high sensitivity from complex mixtures without separations. The method uses a recognition algorithm that is a modification of the relative (Kullback-Leibler, KL) entropy characterization of probabilistic distance to detect if reference MS(3) fragmentation patterns are components of acquired MS(3) spectra. The recognition reflects the probabilistic structure of physical MS measurements unlike the Euclidean or inner product metrics widely used for comparing spectra. It capably handles spectra with a significant chemical ion background in contrast to the Euclidean metric or the direct relative entropy. The full nanospray MS(3) method allows both the detection and quantitation of targets without the need to obtain isotopically labeled standards. By avoiding chromatographic separations and its associated surface losses, the detection can be applied to complex samples on a very limited material scale. The methodology is illustrated by applications to the medically important problem of detecting targeted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I associated peptides extracted from limited cell numbers. PMID:20932029

  8. Extreme times for volatility processes.

    PubMed

    Masoliver, Jaume; Perell, Josep

    2007-04-01

    Extreme times techniques, generally applied to nonequilibrium statistical mechanical processes, are also useful for a better understanding of financial markets. We present a detailed study on the mean first-passage time for the volatility of return time series. The empirical results extracted from daily data of major indices seem to follow the same law regardless of the kind of index thus suggesting an universal pattern. The empirical mean first-passage time to a certain level L is fairly different from that of the Wiener process showing a dissimilar behavior depending on whether L is higher or lower than the average volatility. All of this indicates a more complex dynamics in which a reverting force drives volatility toward its mean value. We thus present the mean first-passage time expressions of the most common stochastic volatility models whose approach is comparable to the random diffusion description. We discuss asymptotic approximations of these models and confront them to empirical results with a good agreement with the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model. PMID:17500964

  9. Extreme times for volatility processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume; Perelló, Josep

    2007-04-01

    Extreme times techniques, generally applied to nonequilibrium statistical mechanical processes, are also useful for a better understanding of financial markets. We present a detailed study on the mean first-passage time for the volatility of return time series. The empirical results extracted from daily data of major indices seem to follow the same law regardless of the kind of index thus suggesting an universal pattern. The empirical mean first-passage time to a certain level L is fairly different from that of the Wiener process showing a dissimilar behavior depending on whether L is higher or lower than the average volatility. All of this indicates a more complex dynamics in which a reverting force drives volatility toward its mean value. We thus present the mean first-passage time expressions of the most common stochastic volatility models whose approach is comparable to the random diffusion description. We discuss asymptotic approximations of these models and confront them to empirical results with a good agreement with the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model.

  10. Major ion chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a human-disturbed mountainous river (the Luodingjiang River) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shurong; Lu, X X; Sun, Huiguo; Han, Jingtai; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2009-04-01

    Major ion chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon system (DIC, mainly HCO3(-) and gaseous CO2) in the Luodingjiang River, a mountainous tributary of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China, were examined based on a seasonal and spatial sampling scheme in 2005. The diverse distribution of lithology and anthropogenic impacts in the river basin provided the basic idea to assess the effects of lithology vs. human activities on water chemistry and carbon biogeochemistry in river systems. Major ions showed great spatial variations, with higher concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and DIC in the regions with carbonate rocks and clastic sedimentary rocks, while lower in the regions with metamorphic sandstones and schists as well as granites. pCO2 at all sampling sites was oversaturated in June, ranging with a factor from 1.6 to 18.8 of the atmospheric concentration, reflecting the enhanced contribution from baseflow and interflow influx as well as in situ oxidation of organic matter. However, in April and December, undersaturated pCO2 was found in some shallow, clean rivers in the upstream regions. delta13C of DIC has a narrow range from -9.07 to -13.59 per thousand, which was more depleted in the regions with metamorphic rocks and granites than in the carbonate regions. Seasonally, it was slightly more depleted in the dry season (December) than in the wet season (June). The results suggested that lithological variability had a dominant control on spatial variations of water chemistry and carbon geochemistry in river systems. Besides, anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural and urban activities and in-stream damming, as well as river physical properties, such as water depth and transparency, also indicated their impacts. The seasonal variations likely reflected the changes of hydrological regime, as well as metabolic processes in the river. PMID:19185905

  11. Assessment of major ions and heavy metals in groundwater: a case study from Guangzhou and Zhuhai of the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yintao; Tang, Changyuan; Chen, Jianyao; Yao, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Anthropogenic activities in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) have caused a deterioration of groundwater quality over the past twenty years as a result of rapid urbanization and industrial development. In this study, the hydrochemical characteristics, quality, and sources of heavy metals in the groundwater of the PRD were investigated. Twenty-five groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), δ18O, δ2H, major ions, and heavy metals. The groundwater was slightly acidic and presented TDS values that ranged from 35.5 to 8,779.3 mg·L-1. The concentrations of the major ions followed the order Cl->HCO{3/-}>Na+>SO{4/2-}>NO{3/-}>NH{4/+}>Ca2+>K+>Mg2+>Fe2+/3+>Al3+. Ca-Mg-HCO3 and Na-K-HCO3 were the predominant types of facies, and the chemical composition of the groundwater was primarily controlled by chemical weathering of the basement rocks, by mixing of freshwater and seawater and by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal pollution index (HPI) indicated that 64% of the samples were in the low category, 16% were in the medium category and 20% were in the high category, providing further evidence that this groundwater is unsuitable for drinking. Lead, arsenic, and manganese were mainly sourced from landfill leachate; cadmium from landfill leachate and agricultural wastes; mercury from the discharge of leachate associated with mining activities and agricultural wastes; and chromium primarily from industrial wastes. According to the irrigation water quality indicators, the groundwater in the PRD can be used for irrigation in most farmland without strong negative impacts. However, approximately 9 million people in the Guangdong Province are at risk due to the consumption of untreated water. Therefore, we suggest that treating the groundwater to achieve safer levels is necessary.

  12. Identification of the hydrogeochemical processes in groundwater using major ion chemistry: a case study of Penna-Chitravathi river basins in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A G S; Kumar, K Niranjan

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogeochemical studies were carried out in the Penna-Chitravathi river basins to identify and delineate the important geochemical processes which were responsible for the evolution of chemical composition of groundwater. The area is underlain by peninsular gneissic complex of Archaean age, Proterozoic meta-sediments, and strip of river alluvium. Groundwater samples were collected covering all the major hydrogeological environs in pre- and post-monsoon seasons. The samples were analyzed for major constituents such as Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, CO3-, HCO3-, Cl-, SO2(-4), NO3-, and F-. The groundwater in general is of Na+-Cl-, Na+-HCO3-, Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3-, and Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl- types. Na+ among cations and Cl- and/or HCO3- among anions dominate the water; Na+ and Ca2+ are in the transitional state with Na+ replacing Ca2+ and HCO3- Cl- due to physiochemical changes in the aquifer and water-rock interactions. The Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl- HCO3- type water in one third samples suggest that ion exchange and dissolution processes are responsible for its origin. Change in storage of aquifer in a season does not influence the major geochemical makeup of groundwater. Gibbs plots indicate that the evolution of water chemistry is influenced by water-rock interaction followed by evapotranspiration process. The aquifer material mineralogy together with semiarid climate, poor drainage system, and low precipitation factors played major role in controlling groundwater quality of the area. PMID:19941064

  13. The effect of H2O gas on volatilities of planet-forming major elements. I - Experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of Ca-, Al-, and Si-hydroxide gas molecules and its application to the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Akihiko

    1992-01-01

    The vapor pressures of Ca(OH)2(g), Al(OH)3(g), and Si(OH)4(g) molecules in equilibrium with solid calcium-, aluminum, and silicon-oxides, respectively, were determined, and were used to derive the heats of formation and entropies of these species, which are expected to be abundant under the currently postulated physical conditions in the primordial solar nebula. These data, in conjunction with thermodynamic data from literature, were used to calculate the relative abundances of M, MO(x), and M(OH)n gas species and relative volatilities of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Al for ranges of temperature, total pressure, and H/O abundance ratio corresponding to the plausible ranges of physical conditions in the solar nebula. The results are used to explain how Ca and Al could have evaporated from Ca,Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, while Si, Mg, and Fe condensed onto them during the preaccretion alteration of CAIs.

  14. High-Time Resolution In-situ Investigation of Major Cometary Volatiles around 67P/C-G at 3.1 - 2.3 AU Measured with ROSINA-RTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mall, U.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Bar-Nun, A.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Bieler, A.; Bochsler, P.; Briois, C.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M. R.; Dabrowski, B.; De Keyser, J.; Dhooghe, F.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Garnier, P.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Hoang, M.; Jäckel, A.; Kopp, E.; Korth, A.; Le Roy, L.; Magee, B.; Marty, B.; Mousis, O.; Rème, H.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Waite, J. H.; Wurz, P.

    2016-03-01

    Comets considered to be pristine objects contain key information about the early formation of the solar system. Their volatile components can provide clues about the origin and evolution of gases and ices in the comets. Measurements with ROSINA/RTOF at 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko have now allowed, for the first time, a direct in situ high-time resolution measurement of the most abundant cometary molecules originating directly from a comet’s nucleus over a long time-period, much longer than any previous measurements at a close distance to a comet between 3.1 and 2.3 au. We determine the local densities of H2O, CO2, and CO, and investigate their variabilities.

  15. Integrated Chemical and Microorganism Monitoring of Air Using Gas Chromatography/Ion Mobility Spectometry: Toward an Expanded-Use Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this research program originated with the choice by NASA of an ion mobility spectrometer for air quality monitoring on-board the international spacestation. Though the gas chromatograph-ion mobility spectrometer analyzer known as VOA met or exceeded expectations, limitations in the basic understanding of response and the utilization of foundational principles into usable technology was considered unacceptable. In this research program, a comprehensive model for the origins of mobility spectra was proposed, tested and verified. The principles considered responsible for the appearance of mobility spectra have now been elucidated through this project. This understanding has been applied in automated identification of mobility spectra using neural networks and routine procedures for this now exist. Finally, the limitation on linear range has been shown to be a technical limitation and not a fundamental limitation so that a hardware component was crafted to extend the linear range of a mobility spectrometer by 10X. This project has led to one Ph.D. dissertation and one MS thesis. In addition, over ten public presentations at professional meetings and six journal publications have resulted from this program of research. The findings are so plentiful that total analysis of the findings may require four to six years or more. The findings confirm that the decision to use VOA was sound and that the chemical and physical principles of mobility spectrometry are both understandable and predictable.

  16. The use of isotopes and major ions in a watershed model to better understand the fluxes of water through the Rio Blanco Watershed, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M.; Scholl, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Most climate change scenarios predict that Puerto Rico will experience more intense wet periods and extended droughts in the future. This is a significant concern as the reservoirs supplying the majority of the population have limited capacity such that rationing occurs whenever dry periods extend for several months. Therefore it is critically important to develop a reliable water balance model that accounts for water as it moves through the watersheds in response to a variety of future climate scenarios. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes and major ions in precipitation vary seasonally in Puerto Rico providing natural tracers of the water as it travels through canopies, soils, and ground water on its way to the streams and reservoirs. WEBMOD (the Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model) simulations for the Rio Blanco watershed are being calibrated to fit concentrations of these constituents in rainfall, soil water, and streams measured under the auspices of the U.S. Geological Surveys Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budget Program. The results will help to constrain possible changes in residence time and chemical weathering rates in the Rio Blanco watershed, under conditions of rising temperatures and more infrequent but more intense storms.

  17. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  18. Direct analysis of volatile organic compounds in human breath using a miniaturized cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer with a membrane inlet.

    PubMed

    Riter, Leah S; Laughlin, Brian C; Nikolaev, Eugene; Cooks, R Graham

    2002-01-01

    Membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) coupled to a miniature mass spectrometer equipped with a cylindrical ion trap (CIT) analyzer was used to monitor the flavor components, 3-phenyl-2-propenal and methyl salicylate, found in cinnamon and wintergreen candies, respectively, directly from human breath. The poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane was operated in a trap-and-release mode, where the temperature of the membrane was cycled during the experiments, which permitted temporal resolution of the two compounds of interest, facilitating their observation in the complex sample. Under these thermally driven conditions, the 10-90% rise times for both compounds are similar (15 s for methyl salicylate, 17 s for 3-phenyl-2-propenal), but the difference in diffusivity means that the signal for 3-phenyl-2-propenal is delayed and the 10% point occurs 6 s later than that for wintergreen. Additional specificity needed for complex samples was gained by using tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:12478583

  19. Food price volatility

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C. L.; Morgan, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The high food prices experienced over recent years have led to the widespread view that food price volatility has increased. However, volatility has generally been lower over the two most recent decades than previously. Variability over the most recent period has been high but, with the important exception of rice, not out of line with historical experience. There is weak evidence that grains price volatility more generally may be increasing but it is too early to say. PMID:20713400

  20. Iodine volatility. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this program is to couple experimental aqueous iodine volatilities to a fission product release model. Iodine partition coefficients, for inorganic iodine, have been measured during hydrolysis and radiolysis. The hydrolysis experiments have illustrated the importance of reaction time on iodine volatility. However, radiolysis effects can override hydrolysis in determining iodine volatility. In addition, silver metal in radiolysis samples can react to form silver iodide accompanied by a decrease in iodine volatility. Experimental data are now being coupled to an iodine transport and release model that was developed in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  1. Determination of nanogram per liter concentrations of volatile organic compounds in water by capillary gas chromatography and selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry and its use to define groundwater flow directions in Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buszka, P.M.; Rose, D.L.; Ozuna, G.B.; Groschen, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure nanogram per liter amounts of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including dichlorodifluoromethane, trichlorofluoromethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and the isomers of dichlorobenzene in water. The method uses purge-and-trap techniques on a 100 mL sample, gas chromatography with a megabore capillary column, and electron impact, selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry. Minimum detection levels for these compounds ranged from 1 to 4 ng/L in water. Recoveries from organic-free distilled water and natural groundwater ranged from 70.5% for dichlorodifluoromethane to 107.8% for 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Precision was generally best for cis-1,2-dichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and the dichlorobenzene isomers and worst for dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane. Blank data indicated persistent, trace-level introduction of dichlorodifluoromethane, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and tetrachloroemene to samples during storage and shipment at concentrations less than the method reporting limits. The largest concentrations of the selected VOCs in 27 water samples from the Edwards aquifer near San Antonio, TX, were from confined-zone wells near an abandoned landfill. The results defined a zone of water with no detectable VOCs in nearly all of the aquifer west of San Antonio and from part of the confined zone beneath San Antonio.

  2. Comparisons between ion distributions retrieved from ENA images of the ring current and contemporaneous, multipoint ion measurements recorded in situ during the major magnetic storm of 15 May 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, L.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.; Barabash, S.; Brandt, P. C.; Balaz, J.; Liu, Z. X.; He, Z. H.; Reeves, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Neutral Atom Detector Unit (NUADU) aboard the TC-2 spacecraft recorded energetic neutral atom (ENA) image data for >3 h during part of the main and recovery phases of a major magnetic storm on 15 May 2005. A custom designed, constrained linear inversion method was applied to retrieve ring current ion distributions in the ENA records out to L = 6.6. Comparisons were then made between the ion fluxes retrieved from these ENA data (energy ranges 50-81 keV and 81-158 keV) and complementary, contemporaneous particle fluxes measured in situ by Synchronous Orbit Particle Analyzer (SOPA) instruments aboard a series of geosynchronous satellites that were launched to encircle the equatorial plane at L ˜ 6.6 by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ENA data revealed the development of two emission peaks during the main phase of the storm which corresponded to the arrival from the magnetotail of a pair of particle injections. These injections reached, in each case, maximum value before the corresponding AL index amplitude peak was attained. The main phase of the storm concluded (Dst ≈ -256 nT) in the aftermath of this event pair, and the ring current ion fluxes thereafter gradually decayed over several hours (the storm recovery phase). This is the first time that the linear inversion method developed for NUADU data has been globally validated using multipoint in situ measurements made at different magnetic local times. It was found that the higher the derived flux values were on the duskside/nightside, the closer they were to the in situ measurements. The retrieved fluxes obtained on the duskside/nightside tended, however, to be still somewhat underestimated since the ENA measurements concerned were made around the outer edge of the ring current at an altitude where the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere deviates from that dipole configuration assumed in the inversion procedure to pertain there. The two methods utilized to study ions during a large magnetic storm are complementary in that the retrieved ion fluxes provide high time resolution information concerning the changing, large-scale structure of ring current events, whereas in situ flux sampling presents "measurement truth" at particular locations within individual ring currents.

  3. Characterization of major-ion chemistry and nutrients in headwater streams along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail and within adjacent watersheds, Maine to Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Argue, Denise M.; Pope, Jason P.; Dieffenbach, Fred

    2012-01-01

    An inventory of water-quality data on field parameters, major ions, and nutrients provided a summary of water quality in headwater (first- and second-order) streams within watersheds along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (Appalachian Trail). Data from 1,817 sampling sites in 831 catchments were used for the water-quality summary. Catchment delineations from NHDPlus were used as the fundamental geographic units for this project. Criteria used to evaluate sampling sites for inclusion were based on selected physical attributes of the catchments adjacent to the Appalachian Trail, including stream elevation, percentage of developed land cover, and percentage of agricultural land cover. The headwater streams of the Appalachian Trail are generally dilute waters, with low pH, low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and low concentrations of nutrients. The median pH value was slightly acidic at 6.7; the median specific conductance value was 23.6 microsiemens per centimeter, and the median ANC value was 98.7 milliequivalents per liter (?eq/L). Median concentrations of cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium) were each less than 1.5 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and median concentrations of anions (bicarbonate, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and nitrate) were less than 10 mg/L. Differences in water-quality constituent levels along the Appalachian Trail may be related to elevation, atmospheric deposition, geology, and land cover. Spatial variations were summarized by ecological sections (ecosections) developed by the U.S. Forest Service. Specific conductance, pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions (calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium, and sulfate) were all negatively correlated with elevation. The highest elevation ecosections (White Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, and Allegheny Mountains) had the lowest pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions. The lowest elevation ecosections (Lower New England and Hudson Valley) generally had the highest pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions. The geology in discrete portions of these two ecosections was classified as containing carbonate minerals which has likely influenced the chemical character of the streamwater. Specific conductance, pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions (calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium, and sulfate) were all positively correlated with percentages of developed and agricultural land uses at the lower elevations of the central region of the Appalachian Trail (including the Green-Taconic-Berkshire Mountains, Lower New England, Hudson Valley, and Northern Ridge and Valley ecosections). The distinctly different chemical character of the streams in the central sections of the Appalachian Trail is likely related to the lower elevations, the presence of carbonate minerals in the geology, higher percentages of developed and agricultural land uses, and possibly the higher inputs of sulfate and nitrate from atmospheric deposition. Acid deposition of sulfate and nitrate are important influences on the acid-base chemistry of the surface waters of the Appalachian Trail. Atmospheric deposition estimates are consistently high (more than 18 kilograms per hectare (kg/ha) for sulfate, and more than 16 kg/ha for nitrate) at both the highest and lowest elevations. However, the lowest elevation (Green-Taconic-Berkshire Mountains, Lower New England, Hudson Valley, Northern Glaciated Allegheny Plateau, and Northern Ridge and Valley ecosections) included the largest spatial area of sustained high estimates of atmospheric deposition. Calcium-bicarbonate was the most frequently calculated water type in the Lower New England and Hudson Valley ecosections. In the northern and southern sections of the Appalachian Trail mix-cation water types were most prevalent and sulfate was the predominate anion. The predominance of the sulfate anion in the surface waters of the northern and southern ecosections likely reflects the influence of sulfate deposition. Although the central portion of the Appalachian Trail has the largest spatial area of high atmospheric acid deposition, the lower ionic strength waters in the northern and southern ecosections of the Appalachian Trail may have been more adversely affected by acid deposition. The low ionic strength of the streams in the White Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, and Allegheny Mountains ecosections makes parts of these regions susceptible to seasonal or event-driven episodic acidification, which can be detrimental to health of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Median catchment ANC values were classified into three groups - acidic, sensitive, and insensitive. The White Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, and Allegheny Mountains ecosections included the highest frequency of catchments classified as acidic or sensitive. More than 56 percent of the catchments from the White Mountains ecosection were classified as sensitive to acidic inputs. In the Blue Ridge ecosection, 1.6 percent of the catchments were classified as acidic, and 38.2 percent of the catchments were classified as sensitive to acidic inputs. In the Allegheny Mountains ecosection, 17.6 percent of the catchments were classified as acidic, and 29.4 percent of the catchments were classified as sensitive to acidic inputs. Median concentrations of nitrogen species were less than 0.4 mg/L, and median concentrations of total phosphorus were less than 0.02 mg/L along the Appalachian Trail. A comparison of median catchment concentrations of nutrients to estimated national background concentrations demonstrated that concentrations along the Appalachian Trail are generally lower. A comparison of median concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) nutrient criteria for the Eastern U.S. ecoregions showed that the concentrations of total nitrogen in the northern section of the Appalachian Trail were generally higher than the USEPA criterion. Similarly, median concentrations of total phosphorus in the southern regions of the Appalachian Trail were approximately twice as high as USEPA criteria. Sections of the Appalachian Trail are adjacent to modest amounts of agricultural and developed land areas. These nonforested land areas may be contributing to the percentage of catchments in which concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus are higher than USEPA nutrient ecoregion criteria.

  4. Lunar apatite with terrestrial volatile abundances.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Stolper, Edward M; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2010-07-22

    The Moon is thought to be depleted relative to the Earth in volatile elements such as H, Cl and the alkalis. Nevertheless, evidence for lunar explosive volcanism has been used to infer that some lunar magmas exsolved a CO-rich and CO(2)-rich vapour phase before or during eruption. Although there is also evidence for other volatile species on glass spherules, until recently there had been no unambiguous reports of indigenous H in lunar rocks. Here we report quantitative ion microprobe measurements of late-stage apatite from lunar basalt 14053 that document concentrations of H, Cl and S that are indistinguishable from apatites in common terrestrial igneous rocks. These volatile contents could reflect post-magmatic metamorphic volatile addition or growth from a late-stage, interstitial, sulphide-saturated melt that contained approximately 1,600 parts per million H(2)O and approximately 3,500 parts per million Cl. Both metamorphic and igneous models of apatite formation suggest a volatile inventory for at least some lunar materials that is similar to comparable terrestrial materials. One possible implication is that portions of the lunar mantle or crust are more volatile-rich than previously thought. PMID:20651686

  5. An exploratory comparative study of volatile compounds in exhaled breath and emitted by skin using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Turner, Claire; Parekh, Bhavin; Walton, Christopher; Spanel, Patrik; Smith, David; Evans, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) has been used to carry out a pilot parallel study on five volunteers to determine changes occurring in several trace compounds present in exhaled breath and emitted from skin into a collection bag surrounding part of the arm, before and after ingesting 75 g of glucose in the fasting state. SIFT-MS enabled real-time quantification of ammonia, methanol, ethanol, propanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, isoprene and acetone. Following glucose ingestion, blood glucose and trace compound levels were measured every 30 min for 2 h. All the above compounds, except formaldehyde, were detected at the expected levels in exhaled breath of all volunteers; all the above compounds, except isoprene, were detected in the collection bag. Ammonia, methanol and ethanol were present at lower levels in the bag than in the breath. The aldehydes were present at higher levels in the bag than in breath. The blood glucose increased to a peak about 1 h post-ingestion, but this change was not obviously correlated with temporal changes in any of the compounds in breath or emitted by skin, except for acetone. The decrease in breath acetone was closely mirrored by skin-emitted acetone in three volunteers. Breath and skin acetone also clearly change with blood glucose and further work may ultimately enable inferences to be drawn of the blood glucose concentration from skin or breath measurements in type 1 diabetes. PMID:18215004

  6. Volatile Analyzer for Lunar Polar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibons, Everett K.; Pillinger, Colin T.; McKay, David S.; Waugh, Lester J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major questions remaining for the future exploration of the Moon by humans concerns the presence of volatiles on our nearest neighbor in space. Observational studies, and investigations involving returned lunar samples and using robotic spacecraft infer the existence of volatile compounds particularly water [1]. It seems very likely that a volatile component will be concentrated at the poles in circumstances where low-temperatures exist to provide cryogenic traps. However, the full inventory of species, their concentration and their origin and sources are unknown. Of particular importance is whether abundances are sufficient to act as a resource of consumables for future lunar expeditions especially if a long-term base involving humans is to be established. To address some of these issues requires a lander designed specifically for operation at a high-lunar latitude. A vital part of the payload needs to be a volatile analyzer such as the Gas Analysis Package specifically designed for identification quantification of volatile substances and collecting information which will allow the origin of these volatiles to be identified [1]. The equipment included, particularly the gas analyzer, must be capable of operation in the extreme environmental conditions to be encountered. No accurate information yet exists regarding volatile concentration even for sites closer to the lunar equator (because of contamination). In this respect it will be important to understand (and thus limit) contamination of the lunar surface by extraneous material contributed from a variety of sources. The only data for the concentrations of volatiles at the poles comes from orbiting spacecraft and whilst the levels at high latitudes may be greater than at the equator, the volatile analyzer package under consideration will be designed to operate at the highest specifications possible and in a way that does not compromise the data.

  7. Assessment of spatial variability of major-ion concentrations and del oxygen-18 values in surface snow, Upper Fremont Glacier, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    One hundred samples were collected from the surface of the Upper Fremont Glacier at equally spaced intervals defined by an 8100m2 snow grid to asesss the significance of lateral variability in major-ion concentrations and del oxygen-18 values. Comparison of the observed variability of each chemical constituent to the variability expected by measurement error indicated substantial lateral variability with the surface-snow layer. Results of the nested ANOVA indicate most of the variance for every constituent is in the values grouped at the two smaller geographic scales (between 506m2 and within 506m2 sections). The variance data from the snow grid were used to develop equations to evaluate the significance of both positive and negative concentration/value peaks of nitrate and del oxygen-18 with depth, in a 160m ice core. Values of del oxygen-18 in the section from 110-150m below the surface consistently vary outside the expected limits and possibly represents cooler temperatures during the Little Ice Age from about 1810 to 1725 A.D. -from Authors

  8. Major depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Ferri FF. Major depression. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015.

  9. Pluto's Volatile Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Leslie

    2012-10-01

    Pluto's varying subsolar latitude and heliocentric distance leads to large variations in the surface volatile distribution and surface pressure. I present results of new volatile transport models (Young 2012a, b). The models include insolation, thermal emission, subsurface conduction, heating of a volatile slab, internal heat flux, latent heat of sublimation, and strict global mass balance. Numeric advances include initial conditions that allow for rapid convergence, efficient computation with matrix arithmetic, and stable Crank-Nicholson timesteps for both bare and volatile-covered areas. Runs of the model show six distinct seasons on Pluto. (1) As Pluto approaches perihelion, the volatiles on the old winter pole (the Rotational North Pole, RNP) becomes more directly illuminated , and the pressure and albedo rise rapidly. (2) When a new ice cap forms on the Rotational South Pole, RSP, volatiles are exchanged between poles. The pressure and albedo change more slowly. (3) When all volatiles have sublimed from the RNP, the albedo and pressure drop rapidly. (4-6) A similar pattern is repeated near aphelion with a reversal of the roles and the poles. I will compare results with earlier Pluto models of Hansen and Paige (1996), show the dependence on parameters such as substrate inertia, and make predictions for the New Horizons flyby of Pluto in 2015. This work was supported, in part, by funding from NASA Planetary Atmospheres Grant NNG06GF32G and the Spitzer project (JPL research support Agreement 1368573). Hansen, C. J. and D. A. Paige 1996. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto. Icarus 120, 247-265. Young, L. A. 2012a. Volatile transport on inhomogeneous surfaces: I - Analytic expressions, with application to Plutos day. Icarus, in press Young, L. A. 2012b. Volatile transport on inhomogeneous surfaces: II. Numerical calculations, with application to Pluto's season. In preparation.

  10. Volatile Organic Compounds in Uremia

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Luzia; Slodzinski, Rafael; Jankowski, Joachim; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although uremic fetor has long been felt to be diagnostic of renal failure, the compounds exhaled in uremia remain largely unknown so far. The present work investigates whether breath analysis by ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of volatile organic compounds retained in uremia. Methods Breath analysis was performed in 28 adults with an eGFR ?60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, 26 adults with chronic renal failure corresponding to an eGFR of 1059 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and 28 adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before and after a hemodialysis session. Breath analysis was performed by ion mobility spectrometryafter gas-chromatographic preseparation. Identification of the compounds of interest was performed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Breath analyses revealed significant differences in the spectra of patients with and without renal failure. Thirteen compounds were chosen for further evaluation. Some compounds including hydroxyacetone, 3-hydroxy-2-butanone and ammonia accumulated with decreasing renal function and were eliminated by dialysis. The concentrations of these compounds allowed a significant differentiation between healthy, chronic renal failure with an eGFR of 1059 ml/min, and ESRD (p<0.05 each). Other compounds including 4-heptanal, 4-heptanone, and 2-heptanone preferentially or exclusively occurred in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusion Impairment of renal function induces a characteristic fingerprint of volatile compounds in the breath. The technique of ion mobility spectrometry can be used for the identification of lipophilic uremic retention molecules. PMID:23049998

  11. Volatility cluster and herding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Friedrich

    2003-05-01

    Stock markets can be characterized by fat tails in the volatility distribution, clustering of volatilities and slow decay of their time correlations. For an explanation models with several mechanisms and consequently many parameters as the Lux-Marchesi model have been used. We show that a simple herding model with only four parameters leads to a quantitative description of the data. As a new type of data we describe the volatility cluster by the waiting time distribution, which can be used successfully to distinguish between different models.

  12. Volatile flavor compounds in yogurt: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa

    2010-11-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated on the volatile compounds contributing to the aroma and flavor of yogurt. This review outlines the production of the major flavor compounds in yogurt fermentation and the analysis techniques, both instrumental and sensory, for quantifying the volatile compounds in yogurt. The volatile compounds that have been identified in plain yogurt are summarized, with the few key aroma compounds described in detail. Most flavor compounds in yogurt are produced from lipolysis of milkfat and microbiological transformations of lactose and citrate. More than 100 volatiles, including carbonyl compounds, alcohols, acids, esters, hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, sulfur-containing compounds, and heterocyclic compounds, are found in yogurt at low to trace concentrations. Besides lactic acid, acetaldehyde, diacetyl, acetoin, acetone, and 2-butanone contribute most to the typical aroma and flavor of yogurt. Extended storage of yogurt causes off-flavor development, which is mainly attributed to the production of undesired aldehydes and fatty acids during lipid oxidation. Further work on studying the volatile flavor compounds-matrix interactions, flavor release mechanisms, and the synergistic effect of flavor compounds, and on correlating the sensory properties of yogurt with the compositions of volatile flavor compounds are needed to fully elucidate yogurt aroma and flavor. PMID:21108074

  13. Major ion chemistry in the headwaters of the Yamuna river system:. Chemical weathering, its temperature dependence and CO 2 consumption in the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, T. K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sarin, M. M.

    2002-10-01

    The Yamuna river and its tributaries in the Himalaya constitute the Yamuna River System (YRS). The YRS basin has a drainage area and discharge comparable in magnitude to those of the Bhagirathi and the Alaknanda rivers, which merge to form the Ganga at the foothills of the Himalaya. A detailed geochemical study of the YRS was carried out to determine: (i) the relative significance of silicate, carbonate and evaporite weathering in contributing to its major ion composition; (ii) CO 2 consumption via silicate weathering; and (iii) the factors regulating chemical weathering of silicates in the basin. The results show that the YRS waters are mildly alkaline, with a wide range of TDS, ˜32 to ˜620 mg l-1. In these waters, the abundances of Ca, Mg and alkalinity, which account for most of TDS, are derived mainly from carbonates. Many of the tributaries in the lower reaches of the Yamuna basin are supersaturated with calcite. In addition to carbonic acid, sulphuric acid generated by oxidation of pyrites also seems to be supplying protons for chemical weathering. Silicate weathering in YRS basin contributes, on average, ˜25% (molar basis) of total cations on a basin wide scale. Silicate weathering, however, does not seem to be intense in the basin as evident from low Si/(Na*+K) in the waters, ˜1.2 and low values of chemical index of alteration (CIA) in bed sediments, ˜60. CO 2 drawdown resulting from silicate weathering in the YRS basin in the Himalaya during monsoon ranges between (4 to 7) × 10 5 moles km -2 y -1. This is higher than that estimated for the Ganga at Rishikesh for the same season. The CO 2 consumption rates in the Yamuna and the Ganga basins in the Himalaya are higher than the global average value, suggesting enhanced CO 2 drawdown in the southern slopes of the Himalaya. The impact of this enhanced drawdown on the global CO 2 budget may not be pronounced, as the drainage area of the YRS and the Ganga in the Himalaya is small. The CO 2 drawdown by silicates in the YRS basin is marginally higher than the reported values of CO 2 release from oxidation of organic rich sediments, estimated using Re as a proxy. This comparison shows the need to constrain CO 2 sources and sinks better to balance its budget in a regional scale. The results also show that silicate weathering rate in the YRS basin is ˜10 mm ky -1 and on the Ganga basin, it is ˜5 mm ky -1, which are several times lower than the carbonate weathering rates. The significantly higher silicate weathering rate observed in the YRS basin seems to be governed by rapid physical erosion in this region. The apparent activation energy for overall silicate weathering in the YRS basin, derived from Na* and Si concentrations and water temperature, ranges from ˜50 to 80 kJ mol -1. These values are comparable to those reported for granitoid weathering in natural watersheds and feldspar weathering in laboratory experiments. This study brings to light the sources contributing to major ions, enhanced chemical weathering rates in the Yamuna River Basin and interdependence of silicate weathering on physical erosion and temperature.

  14. Volatile composition and aroma activity of guava puree before and after thermal and dense phase carbon dioxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Maria Lourdes; Marshall, Maurice R; Rouseff, Russell Lee

    2015-02-01

    Volatiles from initially frozen, dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD)- and thermally treated guava purees were isolated by solid phase microextraction (SPME), chromatographically separated and identified using a combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), GC-olfactometry (GC-O), and GC-pulsed flame photometric detector (GC-PFPD, sulfur mode). Fifty-eight volatiles were identified using GC-MS consisting of: 6 aldehydes, 2 acids, 15 alcohols, 6 ketones, 21 esters, and 8 terpenes. Eleven volatiles were newly identified in guava puree. Hexanal was the most abundant volatile in all 3 types of guava puree. Ten sulfur compounds were identified using GC-PFPD of which 3 possessed aroma activity and 3 were not previously reported in guava puree. Both treatments profoundly reduced total sulfur peak areas and produced different peak patterns compared to control. Thermal treatment reduced total sulfur peak area 47.9% compared to a loss of 34.7% with DPCD treatment. Twenty-six volatiles possessed aroma activity. (Z)-3-Hexenyl hexanoate was the major contributor to the aroma of the freshly thawed and DPCD-treated guava puree. DPCD treatment reduced total MS ion chromatogram (MS TIC) peak area 35% but produced a GC-O aroma profile very similar to control. Whereas thermal treatment reduced total TIC peak area only 8.7% compared to control but produced a 35% loss in total GC-O peak intensities. PMID:25588413

  15. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  16. Confirmation of diosmetin 3-O-glucuronide as major metabolite of diosmin in humans, using micro-liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Luigi; Tarcomnicu, Isabela; Dulea, Constanta; Attili, Nageswara Rao B N; Ciuca, Valentin; Peru, Dan; Rizea Savu, Simona

    2013-10-01

    Diosmin is a flavonoid often administered in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, and related affections. Diosmin is rapidly hydrolized in the intestine to its aglicone, diosmetin, which is further metabolized to conjugates. In this study, the development and validations of three new methods for the determination of diosmetin, free and after enzymatic deconjugation, and of its potential glucuronide metabolites, diosmetin-3-O-glucuronide, diosmetin-7-O-glucuronide, and diosmetin-3,7-O-glucuronide from human plasma and urine are presented. First, the quantification of diosmetin, free and after deconjugation, was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, on an Ascentis RP-Amide column (150 × 2.1 mm, 5 μm), in reversed-phase conditions, after enzymatic digestion. Then glucuronide metabolites from plasma were separated by micro-liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on a HALO C18 (50 × 0.3 mm, 2.7 μm, 90 Å) column, after solid-phase extraction. Finally, glucuronides from urine were measured using a Discovery HSF5 (100 × 2.1 mm, 5 μm) column, after simple dilution with mobile phase. The methods were validated by assessing linearity, accuracy, precision, low limit of quantification, selectivity, extraction recovery, stability, and matrix effects; results in agreement with regulatory (Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency) guidelines acceptance criteria were obtained in all cases. The methods were applied to a pharmacokinetic study with diosmin (450 mg orally administered tablets). The mean C max of diosmetin in plasma was 6,049.3 ± 5,548.6 pg/mL. A very good correlation between measured diosmetin and glucuronide metabolites concentrations was obtained. Diosmetin-3-O-glucuronide was identified as a major circulating metabolite of diosmetin in plasma and in urine, and this finding was confirmed by supplementary experiments with differential ion-mobility mass spectrometry. PMID:23949323

  17. Seasonal hydrology drives rapid shifts in the flux and composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and major and trace ions in the Fraser River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, B. M.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Bulygina, E.; Galy, V.; Lamborg, C. H.; Ganguli, P. M.; Montluçon, D. B.; Marsh, S.; Gillies, S. L.; Fanslau, J.; Epp, A.; Luymes, R.

    2015-10-01

    Rapid changes in the volume and sources of discharge during the spring freshet lead to pronounced variations in biogeochemical properties in snowmelt-dominated river basins. We used daily sampling during the onset of the freshet in the Fraser River (southwestern Canada) in 2013 to identify rapid changes in the flux and composition of dissolved material, with a focus on dissolved organic matter (DOM). Previous time series sampling (at twice monthly frequency) of dissolved inorganic species in the Fraser River has revealed smooth seasonal transitions in concentrations of major ions and tracers of water and dissolved load sources between freshet and base flow periods. In contrast, daily sampling reveals a significant increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (200 to 550 μmol L-1) occurring over a matter of days, accompanied by a shift in DOM optical properties, indicating a transition towards higher molecular weight, more aromatic DOM composition. Comparable changes in DOM composition, but not concentration, occur at other times of year, underscoring the role of seasonal climatology in DOM cycling. A smaller data set of total and dissolved Hg concentrations also showed variability during the spring freshet period, although dissolved Hg dynamics appear to be driven by factors beyond DOM as characterized here. The time series records of DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations indicate that the Fraser River exports 0.25-0.35 % of its annual basin net primary productivity. The snowmelt-dominated hydrology, forested land cover, and minimal reservoir impoundment of the Fraser River may influence the DOC yield of the basin, which is high relative to the nearby Columbia River and of similar magnitude to that of the Yukon River to the north. Anticipated warming and decreased snowfall due to climate changes in the region may cause an overall decrease in DOM flux from the Fraser River to the coastal ocean in coming decades

  18. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed during spring and autumn 2008. Results from the aerosol mass spectrometry indicate that the non-volatile residual consists of nitrate and organic compounds, especially during autumn. These compounds may be low-volatile organic nitrates or salts. During winter and spring the non-volatile core (black carbon removed) correlated markedly with carbon monoxide, which is a tracer of anthropogenic emissions. Due to this, the non-volatile residual may also contain other pollutants in addition to black carbon. Thus, it seems that the amount of different compounds in submicron aerosol particles varies with season and as a result the chemical composition of the non-volatile residual changes within a year. This work was supported by University of Helsinki three-year research grant No 490082 and Maj and Tor Nessling Foundation grant No 2010143. Aalto et al., (2001). Physical characterization of aerosol particles during nucleation events. Tellus B, 53, 344-358. Jayne, et al., (2000). Development of an aerosol mass spectrometer for size and composition analysis of submicron particles. Aerosol Sci. Technol., 33(1-2), 49-70. Kalberer et al., (2004). Identification of Polymers as Major Components of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols. Science, 303, 1659-1662. Smith et al., (2010). Observations of aminium salts in atmospheric nanoparticles and possible climatic implications. P. Natl. Acad. Sci., 107(15). Vesala et al., (1998). Long-term field measurements of atmosphere-surface interactions in boreal forest combining forest ecology, micrometeorology, aerosol physics and atmospheric chemistry. Trends Heat, Mass Mom. Trans., 4, 17-35. Wehner et al., (2002). Design and calibration of a thermodenuder with an improved heating unit to measure the size-dependent volatile fraction of aerosol particles. J. Aerosol Sci., 33, 1087-1093.

  19. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF VOLATILE CONSTITUENTS OF TAHEEBO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatiles were isolated from the dried inner bark of Tabebuia impetiginosa using steam distillation under reduced pressure followed by continuous liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major volatile const...

  20. Sodium channels as targets for volatile anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Herold, Karl F; Hemmings, Hugh C

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of modern inhaled anesthetics are still poorly understood although they are widely used in clinical settings. Considerable evidence supports effects on membrane proteins including ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels of excitable cells. Na(+) channels are crucial to action potential initiation and propagation, and represent potential targets for volatile anesthetic effects on central nervous system depression. Inhibition of presynaptic Na(+) channels leads to reduced neurotransmitter release at the synapse and could therefore contribute to the mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics produce their characteristic end points: amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. Early studies on crayfish and squid giant axon showed inhibition of Na(+) currents by volatile anesthetics at high concentrations. Subsequent studies using native neuronal preparations and heterologous expression systems with various mammalian Na(+) channel isoforms implicated inhibition of presynaptic Na(+) channels in anesthetic actions at clinical concentrations. Volatile anesthetics reduce peak Na(+) current (I(Na)) and shift the voltage of half-maximal steady-state inactivation (h(?)) toward more negative potentials, thus stabilizing the fast-inactivated state. Furthermore recovery from fast-inactivation is slowed, together with enhanced use-dependent block during pulse train protocols. These effects can depress presynaptic excitability, depolarization and Ca(2+) entry, and ultimately reduce transmitter release. This reduction in transmitter release is more potent for glutamatergic compared to GABAergic terminals. Involvement of Na(+) channel inhibition in mediating the immobility caused by volatile anesthetics has been demonstrated in animal studies, in which intrathecal infusion of the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin increases volatile anesthetic potency, whereas infusion of the Na(+) channels agonist veratridine reduces anesthetic potency. These studies indicate that inhibition of presynaptic Na(+) channels by volatile anesthetics is involved in mediating some of their effects. PMID:22479247

  1. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore »and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  2. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D.; Thornton, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25-50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.

  3. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Thornton, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas and particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO-HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25-50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.

  4. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas andmore » particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO–HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  5. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from α-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore » and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  6. Volatile halocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kroneld, R.

    1986-11-01

    Volatile halocarbons in drinking water have attracted increasing attention during recent years. These substances are also found in body fluids. All disinfectant chemicals used in water treatment seem to produce by-products. Of particular concern are the following substances from the use of various disinfectants according to US EPA: chlorine, bromine and iodine, and chlorine dioxide. The aim of the present study was to follow the formation and occurrence of volatile halocarbons in different types of water.

  7. PREDICTING THE TOXICITY OF MAJOR IONS IN SEAWATER TO MYSID SHRIMP (MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA), SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS), AND INLAND SILVERSIDE MINNOW (MENIDIA BERYLLINA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although marine organisms are naturally adapted to salinities well above those of freshwater, elevated concentrations of specific ions have been shown to cause adverse effects on some saltwater species. Because some ions are also physiologically essential, a deficiency of these i...

  8. Microbial Small Talk: Volatiles in Fungal–Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ruth; Etalo, Desalegn W.; de Jager, Victor; Gerards, Saskia; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in the interactions between fungi and bacteria, two major groups of soil inhabiting microorganisms. Yet, most of the research has been focused on effects of bacterial volatiles on suppression of plant pathogenic fungi whereas little is known about the responses of bacteria to fungal volatiles. In the current study we performed a metabolomics analysis of volatiles emitted by several fungal and oomycetal soil strains under different nutrient conditions and growth stages. The metabolomics analysis of the tested fungal and oomycetal strains revealed different volatile profiles dependent on the age of the strains and nutrient conditions. Furthermore, we screened the phenotypic responses of soil bacterial strains to volatiles emitted by fungi. Two bacteria, Collimonas pratensis Ter291 and Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C, showed significant changes in their motility, in particular to volatiles emitted by Fusarium culmorum. This fungus produced a unique volatile blend, including several terpenes. Four of these terpenes were selected for further tests to investigate if they influence bacterial motility. Indeed, these terpenes induced or reduced swimming and swarming motility of S. plymuthica PRI-2C and swarming motility of C. pratensis Ter291, partly in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall the results of this work revealed that bacteria are able to sense and respond to fungal volatiles giving further evidence to the suggested importance of volatiles as signaling molecules in fungal–bacterial interactions. PMID:26779150

  9. Volatile terpenoids from aeciospores of Cronartium fusiforme.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Identification of the terpenoids present in the volatile fraction from aeciospores of the gall rust fungus Cronartium fusiforme. The major monoterpenoid hydrocarbons found to be present with only traces of camphene include alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene, myrcene, linonene, beta-phellandrene, and delta-terpinene. A number of monoterpenoid alcohols, acyclic sesquiterpenes, and aromatic compounds were also present.

  10. Volatiles in Kimberlite Magmas: Experimental Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, S. R.; Brooker, R.; Field, M.; Kavanagh, J.

    2009-05-01

    Kimberlites are volatile-rich magmas, and primary igneous carbonate and phlogopite indicate of the presence of CO2 and H2O. However, there are few constraints on their volatile content and solubility of CO2 and H2O. Studies of volatile solubility and effects on phase equilibria are limited by the incomplete understanding of the exact compositions of kimberlite melts, which is a consequence of the almost ubiquitous groundmass alteration. It is widely accepted that kimberlite melts must be silica deficient with a high proportion of cations, notably Mg and Ca. We carried out experiments at 100 and 200 MPa pressure with excess CO2, excess H2O, and CO2-H2O mixtures, using some recently proposed generic kimberlite magma compositions as well as a composition with an even lower silica to cation ratio (reconstructed to remove the effects of serpentinization). At 1250C, the generic kimberlite compositions typically have <30% melt and are dominated by Ca-rich (~2-4% CaO) olivine, with lesser amounts of spinel and monticellite. The experimental melt compositions have SiO2 contents of 20 to 25% and are very Ca-rich (25 to 35%). Although these experimental melt compositions are not exact matches to natural kimberlite melts, they provide an opportunity for investigating CO2 and H2O solubilities in silica-poor Ca-rich melts, which are sufficiently close to the silica to cation ratio characteristics of proposed generic kimberlite compositions to place constraints on volatile behaviour. The CO2 and H2O contents of the experimental glasses were measured by ion probe. The pressure-dependent solubility of H2O as a function of pressure is 20 to 30% less than in basalt melts with a best-fit solubility coefficient of 2.2 x 10-6 Pa-1/2, assuming a parabolic solubility law. These results confirm the broad trend of decreasing H2O solubility as SiO2 decreases, and is likely reflects decreasing melt polymerisation. In contrast these melts can dissolve several percent CO2 at 100 MPa and solubility increases approximately linearly with increasing pressure. This is also consistent with the general trend of increasing CO2 solubility with decreasing SiO2 in natural silicate melts, with a continuum through to carbonatites as the cations become completely over SiO2. Recent work on groundmass mineralogy suggests that kimberlite melts were originally lower in silica and magnesium, and higher in calcium and carbonate prior to the ubiquitous alteration processes that produce serpentinization. Our experiments on such a reconstructed composition show up to 60% melt at 1250C with a significantly higher CO2 solubility, but water solubility remains low, similar to the other more silica-rich melt compositions. These reconstructed low silica compositions can better explain higher CO2 contents (~10 wt%) observed in emplaced rocks, although even lower silica compositions closer to carbonatites are required if the magmas are to reach the root zone without exsolving their CO2 (as suggested by high level carbonate-rich dykes and sills). If kimberlites have high H2O contents ( > 5 wt%) then the low solubility in the experimental kimberlite melts indicates that gas exsolution can initiate at great depth and H2O may thus be the major propellant in their explosive eruption. A conundrum is that pure carbonate melts have very high H2O solubility. Thus, if kimberlites crystallize to generate carbonatitic residual melts, the solubility of H2O might actually increase with decreasing pressure.

  11. Theoretical predictions of volatile bearing phases and volatile resources in some carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Saxena, Surendra K.

    1989-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are usually believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Diemos, and are potential resources of fuels which may be exploited for future planetary missions. The nature and abundances are calculated of the major volatile bearing and other phases, including the vapor phase that should form in C1 and C2 type carbonaceous chondrites as functions of pressure and temperature. The results suggest that talc, antigorite plus or minus magnesite are the major volatile bearing phases and are stable below 400 C at 1 bar in these chondritic compositions. Simulated heating of a kilogram of C2 chondrite at fixed bulk composition between 400 and 800 C at 1 bar yields about 135 gm of volatile, which is made primarily of H2O, H2, CH4, CO2 and CO. The relative abundances of these volatile species change as functions of temperature, and on a molar basis, H2 becomes the most dominant species above 500 C. In contrast, Cl chondrites yield about 306 gm of volatile under the same condition, which consist almost completely of 60 wt percent H2O and 40 wt percent CO2. Preliminary kinetic considerations suggest that equilibrium dehydration of hydrous phyllosilicates should be attainable within a few hours at 600 C. These results provide the framework for further analyses of the volatile and economic resource potentials of carbonaceous chondrites.

  12. Occurrence and Origin of Methane in Relation to Major Ion Concentrations in Groundwater Wells of the Denver-Julesburg and Piceance Basins of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Sherwood, O.; Lackey, G.; Burke, T. L.; Osborn, S. G.; Ryan, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America has generated intense public concerns about potential impacts to groundwater quality. To address these concerns, we examined geochemical data from a publicly available Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database. The data consist of over 17,000 samples from 4,756 unique surface and groundwater locations collected since 1990, representing one of the most extensive databases of groundwater quality in relation to oil and gas development anywhere. Following rigorous data QA/QC, we classified groundwater samples with respect to major ion composition and compared the assigned water "types" along with other geochemical parameters to methane concentrations and carbon isotopes in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) and Piceance Basins in Colorado. 88% of samples with elevated methane (defined as > 1 mg L-1) were classified as Na-HCO3 type in the DJ basin and 78% were classified as either Na-HCO3 or Na-Cl type in the Piceance basin. Of the elevated methane samples, 96% and 69% in the DJ and Piceance basins respectively had microbial gas signatures, as determined by d13C values < - 60 ‰. Samples with elevated methane concentrations had higher pH, higher concentrations of chloride and sodium and lower concentrations of calcium in both the DJ and Piceance Basin. Elevated methane concentrations were predominately microbial in origin and correlated to indicators of increased water-rock interactions and anaerobic groundwater conditions, indicating that methane observed in these groundwater samples are largely a result of natural processes. Rare occurrences of stray thermogenic gas (d13C > 55 ‰, gas wetness > 5 % C2+ hydrocarbons) were most frequently associated with the Na-HCO3 water type in the DJ basin (67% of occurrences) and were randomly distributed across water types in the Piceance Basin. Investigation of natural and anthropogenic causes for the presence of methane is ongoing, using the full suite of water quality parameters contained in the COGCC database, combined with information on underlying geological frameworks and industry infrastructure. With these data, we are working towards a more complete and objective understanding of the effects of oil and gas operations on regional groundwater quality.

  13. Volatility of ten priority pollutants from fortified avian toxicity test diets

    SciTech Connect

    McCrady, J.K.; Johnson, D.E.; Turner, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    With a few important exceptions, most pesticides have low volatility. However, a significant number of the industrial chemicals under the jurisdiction of TSCA have sufficient volatility to affect availability in fortified test diets and consequently the test results. Although extremely volatile chemicals might evaportate from test diets, there is insufficient data to indicate what levels of volatility are of concern. Volatility may be only one of a variety of factors influencing the fate of organic chemicals in test diets. Other mechanisms such as hydrolysis, adsorption, and photolysis should also be considered, but for many chemicals having significant vapor pressures, volatility is likely to be the major source of loss.

  14. Volatile compound formation during argan kernel roasting.

    PubMed

    El Monfalouti, Hanae; Charrouf, Zoubida; Giordano, Manuela; Guillaume, Dominique; Kartah, Badreddine; Harhar, Hicham; Gharby, Sad; Denhez, Clment; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Virgin edible argan oil is prepared by cold-pressing argan kernels previously roasted at 110 degrees C for up to 25 minutes. The concentration of 40 volatile compounds in virgin edible argan oil was determined as a function of argan kernel roasting time. Most of the volatile compounds begin to be formed after 15 to 25 minutes of roasting. This suggests that a strictly controlled roasting time should allow the modulation of argan oil taste and thus satisfy different types of consumers. This could be of major importance considering the present booming use of edible argan oil. PMID:23472454

  15. Evaluation of ?-radiation on green tea odor volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanaro, G. B.; Duarte, R. C.; Arajo, M. M.; Purgatto, E.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gamma radiation effects on green tea odor volatiles in green tea at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy. The volatile organic compounds were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS. The green tea had a large influence on radiation effects, increasing the identified volatiles in relation to control samples. The dose of 10 kGy was responsible to form the majority of new odor compounds following by 5 and 20 kGy. However, the dose of 5 kGy was the dose that degraded the majority of volatiles in non-irradiated samples, following by 20 kGy. The dose of 15 kGy showed has no effect on odor volatiles. The gamma radiation, at dose up to 20 kGy, showed statistically no difference between irradiated and non irradiated green tea on odors compounds.

  16. REDUCTION OF INGESTION EXPOSURE TO TRIHALOMETHANES DUE TO VOLATILIZATION. (R825362)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ingestion of tap water is one of the principal exposure
    pathways for disinfection byproducts (DBPs). One major
    class of DBPs, trihalomethanes (THM), are highly volatile,
    and volatilization will tend to lower ingestion exposures.
    This study quantifies volatilization...

  17. Effects of temperature and soil type on ammonia volatilization from slow-release nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is the major pathway for mineral nitrogen (N) loss from N sources applied to soils. The information on NH3 volatilization from slow-release N fertilizers is limited. Ammonia volatilization, over a 78-d period, from four slow-release N fertilizers with different proportio...

  18. Sources of Terrestrial Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Dones, L.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheres are found enveloping those planets and satellites best able to hold them. The obvious conclusion is that volatile escape must have played nearly as great a role as volatile supply. A consequence of this view is that volatile supplies were probably much greater than the atmospheres that remain. The likeliest candidates are sources associated with the main events of planetary accretion itself such as volatile-rich planetesimals, or direct gravitational capture of nebular gases. Late asteroidal or cometary volatile-rich veneers are attractive, but they present quantitative difficulties. Comets in particular are inadequate, because the associated mass of stray comets that would have been scattered to the Oort Cloud or beyond is excessive. This difficulty applies to Uranus-Neptune planetesimals as well as to a putative massive early Kuiper Belt. Another potential problem with comets is that the D/H ratio in the three comets for which this has been measured is about twice that of Earth's oceans. Objects falling from a much augmented ancient asteroid belt remain a viable option, but timing is an issue: Can the depopulation of the asteroid belt be delayed long enough that it makes sense to talk of asteroids as a late veneer? Early accretion of asteroids as objects scattered into the maw of infant Earth makes more sense. Another appealing candidate population of volatile-rich objects for the inner solar system would be scattered planetesimals associated with the accretion of Jupiter, for two reasons: (1) Before there was Jupiter, there was no object in the solar system capable of expelling comets efficiently, and (2) the cross section of the inner solar system to stray objects was Greater when there were m many planetesimals.

  19. Analyses of Plant UDP-Dependent Glycosyltransferases to Identify Their Volatile Substrates Using Recombinant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kamiyoshihara, Yusuke; Tieman, Denise M; Klee, Harry J

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of major modifications for plant secondary metabolites. In the case of volatile compounds, glycosylation makes them nonvolatile and odorless. Identification of UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases responsible for volatile glycosylation is essential to understand the regulatory mechanism of volatile release from plant tissues. Here, we describe an efficient protocol to find possible combinations of volatiles/glycosyltransferases using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli. The presented method requires a basic gas chromatography system and conventional laboratory tools. PMID:26577791

  20. Mechanism of Formation of the Major Estradiol Product Ions Following Collisional Activation of the Molecular Anion in a Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooding, Kerry M.; Barkley, Robert M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Johnson, Christopher A.; Bradford, Andrew P.; Santoro, Nanette; Murphy, Robert C.

    2013-10-01

    The importance of the mass spectral product ion structure is highlighted in quantitative assays, which typically use multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), and in the discovery of novel metabolites. Estradiol is an important sex steroid whose quantitation and metabolite identification using tandem mass spectrometry has been widely employed in numerous clinical studies. Negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of estradiol (E2) results in several product ions, including the abundant m/z 183 and 169. Although m/z 183 is one of the most abundant product ions used in many quantitative assays, the structure of m/z 183 has not been rigorously examined. We suggest a structure for m/z 183 and a mechanism of formation consistent with collision induced dissociation (CID) of E2 and several stable isotopes ([D4]-E2, [13C6]-E2, and [D1]-E2). An additional product ion from E2, namely m/z 169, has also been examined. MS3 experiments indicated that both m/z 183 and m/z 169 originate from only E2 [M - H]- m/z 271. These ions, m/z 183 and m/z 169, were also present in the collision induced decomposition mass spectra of other prominent estrogens, estrone (E1) and estriol (E3), indicating that these two product ions could be used to elucidate the estrogenic origin of novel metabolites. We propose two fragmentation schemes to explain the CID data and suggest a structure of m/z 183 and m/z 169 consistent with several isotopic variants and high resolution mass spectrometric measurements.

  1. Can we control price volatility?

    SciTech Connect

    Hedden, B.

    1997-02-01

    Three steps for controlling the price volatility of petroleum products are discussed. These are: (1) speak to an expert. Oil dealers have never had more creative financial tools at our disposal for reducing price volatility. There are several experts that specialize in the industry. Let them help design a program that is best for you and your customers, (2) summer fill. Design a program to give customers incentives to fill their tanks in the late spring and early summer. If you have storage tanks, you should fill them by Labor Day. One of the major reasons prices stayed high this fall was that we filled the secondary and tertiary storage in September instead of June, and (3) talk to your suppliers. Fred Sacco, FMA-NJ`s executive vice president, has issued a warning that it is time for dealers to reexamine their relationship with their suppliers. {open_quotes}1996 may not be the season for marketers to stand back and see which terminal is posting the best number in the point-spread-per-gallon derby that has been so evident in recent heating seasons.

  2. Impact of particle size on distribution of major ions in acid- and water-soluble components of PM 10 atmospheric aerosols in the coastal region of Mumbai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Mishra, Manish K.; Divkar, J. K.; Rout, Sabyasachi; Narayanan, Usha; Hegde, A. G.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the concentration of acid and water-soluble ions (Na+, K+, Mg++, Ca++, F-, Cl-, NO3- and SO4- -) in different particle size range (> 1.1-<2.0 ?m, > 2.0-<3.3 ?m, > 3.3-<4.7 ?m, > 4.7-<5.8 ?m, > 5.8-<9.0 ?m and > 9 ?m-<10 ?m) of PM10 atmospheric aerosols collected by six stages Anderson Cascade Impactor were determined using conductivity suppressed ion-chromatography system. Suspended particulate matters in the form of respirable (PM10) aerosols were collected on the roof of a three storied building at a height of 20 m above the ground, at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai using Hi-Volume Sampler (HVS) with Whatman glass fiber filter paper during the period of March-June 2009. The sequence of solubility of ions in both extractants (acid + water) of PM10 aerosols from greatest to least was found to be Na+ > Ca++ > K+ > Cl- > F- > Mg++ > NO3- ? SO4--. The average concentration of Na+, K+, Mg++, Ca++, F-, Cl-, NO3- and SO4-- in PM10 aerosols was estimated to be 13.36 g/kg, 3.76 g/kg,0.251 g/kg,3.771 g/kg,0.833 g/kg,1.17 g/kg, 81 ?g/kg and 290 ?g/kg respectively. The enrichment of particular ion in soluble components may be due to its high abundance in PM10 aerosols, less sorptivity with the tiny solid particles of atmospheric dust, high extractability and leachability, high solubility and mobility. By classifying the PM10 aerosols into two categories viz fine particle (< 2.5 ?m) and coarse particle (> 2.5 ?m-<10 ?m), it was found that generally, in the fine particle, the geometric mean concentration of total soluble ions in acid and water components was found to be higher than coarse particle. Overall, it was also observed that generally as particle size increases, the geometric mean concentration of soluble ions in both extractants of PM10 aerosols decreases.

  3. Theoretical predictions of volatile bearing phases and volatile resources in some carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Saxena, Surendra K.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from theoretical calculations to predict the modal abundances and compositions of the major mineral phases and the vapor phase that could develop in the bulk compositions of carbonaceous chondrites. The abundances and compositions are obtained as functions of temperature and pressure. The calculations are used to evaluate the volatile and mineralogical resource potential of C1 and C2 carbonaceous chondrites.

  4. A triple sector, guided-ion-beam mass spectrometer for cluster ion and fullerene scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basir, Yousef J.; Christian, James F.; Wan, Zhimin; Anderson, Scott L.

    1997-12-01

    The design and operation of a unique 5-octapole, triple sector, guided ion beam mass spectrometer is described in this article. The instrument was designed to do cluster ion reactive scattering, and the available cluster sources and the kinematics of these reactions impose some difficult design considerations. Many of these considerations also apply to ion-fullerene scattering, and this was a major application. The instrument incorporates a radio-frequency storage/thermalization trap to control the internal temperature of reactant cluster ions. Cluster ions are mass-selected by a large gap, large radius magnetic sector that can be electrically floated. Reactions are studied in a three section octapole ion guide, equipped with a reaction cell. The reaction cell also serves as an oven to generate target vapor from non-volatile materials such as fullerenes. Product mass analysis is done by a large gap, large radius double focusing mass filter, all of which floats at acceleration potential. Ions are detected by an in-line scintillation detector that can operate at voltages up to 50 kV to allow efficient detection of heavy ions. Sample results are given for reaction of carbon cluster ions with O2, and for Mo+ scattering from C60. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. Monitoring plant bioremediation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using open path Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R.M.; Visser, V.P.; Davis, L.C.; Erickson, L.E.; Muralidharan, N.; Hammaker, R.M.; Fateley, W.G.

    1994-12-31

    This study addresses a viable and natural solution to the elimination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are pollutants, through the bioremediation process. Plants and associated rhizosphere bacteria have the ability to bioremediate both volatile and non-volatile organic compounds. For volatile compounds, intersystem transfer by transpiration may be a matter for concern when plants interact with such materials. The authors have monitored, using FT-IR, the potential transfer from subsurface water in the presence of toluene-adapted alfalfa plants. These experiments show that the plants and/or their associated micro-organisms effectively degrade toluene so that potential intersystem transfer of VOCs by transpiration may be quite manageable with adapted plants. Presently, the authors are monitoring 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}), and, trichloroethylene (TCE) from the subsurface water and the gas phase above the plants. TCA does not show an indication of degradation, whereas TCE does. Methane is produced in the groundwater but not transferred to the atmosphere, indicating the presence of a consortium of methanogens and methanotrophs in this soil. The TCE presumably is the substrate for methane production based on chloride ion accumulation. The majority of the TCE must be degraded aerobically to yield CO{sub 2} in the vadose zone. The FT-IR spectrometer can quickly determine and analyze contaminants in the gas phase, groundwater and plant tissue.

  6. Major Ion Geochemistry of Horseshoe Lake, Mammoth Lakes, California: Water Quality in a Region with Elevated CO2 from Sub-Surface Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilena, R.; Szutu, D.; Ellis, A. S.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    Tree-kill areas around Horseshoe Lake indicate how naturally high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from a cooling magma chamber are affecting the ecosystem. CO2 leakage from geologically sequestered CO2 sites may have similar effects. Weathering processes and water quality changes are two other environmental impacts of high levels of CO2 leaking from subsurface CO2 reservoirs. This studys focus was to conduct a geochemical study of Horseshoe Lake with emphasis on water chemistry to determine any quantifiable effects from the high release of volcanic CO2. We collected 22 water samples, including 5 samples from streams that drained into the lake. Two interior locations were sampled at the surface and at depths of 2-meter intervals. The interior lake samples showed increasing Mg and Ca concentrations from the surface to 12 m in depth, and increasing Sr and Si from the surface to 4 m in depth. Water samples were measured for temperature, conductivity, pH, alkalinity, and analyzed for major ions Ca2+, K+, Na+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, and HCO3- (from alkalinity). Amounts of Al, Ca, K, Mg, Na, and high levels of Si from elemental data are consistent with waters in granitic environments. Temperature in the lakes and streams ranged from 3.5 to 16 C, pH ranged from 5.9-7.2, conductivity ranged from 8.66 to 21.93 ?S/cm, and alkalinity ranged from 0.137- 0.408 meq/L. A TSI Q-Trak measured soil and ambient CO2 concentrations in July and a Vernier LabQuest was used in August. A bottomless bottle was placed in the soil in a10cm deep hole with the probe inserted in the top. A probe about 1 m above ground measured the ambient CO2 concentrations. To determine the flux of soil CO2, concentrations were read over a 5-minute time period. CO2 gas concentrations in the tree kill area ranged from 600 to 1,700 ppm in ambient air, and over 99,000 ppm in the soil. Maximum readings were exceeded so actual values of CO2 in the soil are not known. The stream samples had a different solute composition than the lake. Stream samples tended to have higher Al and Si concentrations than the lake. For Al 9.3 x 10-7 to 1.8 x 10-6 moles/L in the streams and 4.8 x 10-7 to 1.2 x 10-6 moles/L in the lake, and for Si 1.3 x 10-4 to 2.1 x 10 -4 moles/L in the streams, 1.1 x 10-4 to 1.2 x 10-4 moles/L in the lake. Stream samples had and lower concentrations of Mg and Ca than lake perimeter and interior surface samples. Values for Mg were 6.0 x 10-6 to 1.1 x 10-5 moles/L in the streams and about 1.1 x 10-5 in the lake, and for Ca 9.3 x 10-7 to 1.8 x 10-6 moles/L in the stream, 4.3 x 10-5 to 4.5 x 10-5 in the lake. The difference could be because of weathering processes or because of unknown other inputs such as springs or groundwater. Additionally, Horseshoe Lake may be stratified, with different solutes dominating at different depths. Evaporation from the lake could also cause more concentrated solutes in solution. The data was generally consistent with results from previous USGS, but our samples were more dilute showing the impact of high precipitation during 2009 and 2010.

  7. Herbivore induced plant volatiles

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul Rashid; Sharma, Hari Chand; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; War, Mohd Yousf; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory through different defensive mechanisms. The induction of volatile emission is one of the important and immediate response of plants to herbivory. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are involved in plant communication with natural enemies of the insect herbivores, neighboring plants, and different parts of the damaged plant. Release of a wide variety of HIPVs in response to herbivore damage and their role in plant-plant, plant-carnivore and intraplant communications represents a new facet of the complex interactions among different trophic levels. HIPVs are released from leaves, flowers, and fruits into the atmosphere or into the soil from roots in response to herbivore attack. Moreover, HIPVs act as feeding and/or oviposition deterrents to insect pests. HIPVs also mediate the interactions between the plants and the microorganisms. This review presents an overview of HIPVs emitted by plants, their role in plant defense against herbivores and their implications for pest management. PMID:22105032

  8. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  9. Volatile Selenium Flux in the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Volatilization of selenium has been proven to be the major source of selenium vapor from oceans and estuaries and it may be the major mechanism of permanent selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake (other than brine shrimp harvest). However, the volatilization flux of selenium from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hyper-saline environment. This work presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of volatile selenium (geographical and with depth) in the South Arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of volatile selenium in a cryo-focusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryo-trapped volatile selenium was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-MS. The results show concentrations of volatile selenium that are much greater than values reported for marine estuaries and oceans. Volatile selenium flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport equations corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the South Arm of the Great Salt Lake.

  10. Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

    1994-07-01

    Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

  11. Effects of daylight savings time changes on stock market volatility.

    PubMed

    Berument, M Hakan; Dogan, Nukhet; Onar, Bahar

    2010-04-01

    The presence of daylight savings time effects on stock returns and on stock volatility was investigated using an EGARCH specification to model the conditional variance. The evidence gathered from the major United States stock markets for the period between 1967 and 2007 did not support the existence of the daylight savings time effect on stock returns or on volatility. Returns on the first business day following daylight savings time changes were not lower nor was the volatility higher, as would be expected if there were an effect. PMID:20524568

  12. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  13. PERTURBATION OF VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE Ca2+ CHANNEL FUNCTION BY VOLATILE ORGANIC SOLVENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms underlying the acute neurophysiological and behavioral effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) remain to be elucidated. However, the function of neuronal ion channels is perturbed by VOCs. The present study examined effects of toluene (TOL), trichloroethylene ...

  14. Volatilization of Mercury By Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Magos, L.; Tuffery, A. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1964-01-01

    Volatilization of mercury has been observed from various biological media (tissue homogenates, infusion broth, plasma, urine) containing mercuric chloride. That micro-organisms were responsible was indicated by the finding that the rates of volatilization were highly variable, that a latent period often preceded volatilization, that toluene inhibited the process, and that the capacity to volatilize mercury could be transferred from one biological medium to another. Two species of bacteria when isolated and cultured from these homogenates were able to volatilize mercury. Two other bacteria, one of which was isolated from the local water supply, were also highly active. The volatile mercury was identified as mercury vapour. The importance of these findings in relation to the storage of urine samples prior to mercury analysis is discussed. PMID:14249899

  15. Differential mercury volatilization by tobacco organs expressing a modified bacterial merA gene.

    PubMed

    He, Y K; Sun, J G; Feng, X Z; Czak, M; Mrton, L

    2001-09-01

    Mercury pollution is a major environmental problem accompanying industrial activities. Most of the mercury released ends up and retained in the soil as complexes of the toxic ionic mercury (Hg2+), which then can be converted by microbes into the even more toxic methylmercury which tends to bioaccumulate. Mercury detoxification of the soil can also occur by microbes converting the ionic mercury into the least toxic metallic mercury (Hg0) form, which then evaporates. The remediation potential of transgenic plants carrying the MerA gene from E. coli encoding mercuric ion reductase could be evaluated. A modified version of the gene, optimized for plant codon preferences (merApe9, Rugh et al. 1996), was introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disk transformation. Transgenic seeds were resistant to HgCl2 at 50 microM, and some of them (10-20% ) could germinate on media containing as much as 350 microM HgCl2, while the control plants were fully inhibited or died on 50 microM HgCl2. The rate of elemental mercury evolution from Hg2+ (added as HgCl2) was 5-8 times higher for transgenic plants than the control. Mercury volatilization by isolated organs standardized for fresh weight was higher (up to 5 times) in the roots than in shoots or the leaves. The data suggest that it is the root system of the transgenic plants that volatilizes most of the reduced mercury (Hg0). It also suggests that much of the mercury need not enter the vascular system to be transported to the leaves for volatilization. Transgenic plants with the merApe9 gene may be used to mercury detoxification for environmental improvement in mercury-contaminated regions more efficiently than it had been predicted based on data on volatilization of whole plants via the upper parts only (Rugh et al. 1996). PMID:11642409

  16. Predicting the emission of volatile organic compounds from silage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major VOC emission source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols wit...

  17. Wet deposition and related atmospheric chemistry in the São Paulo metropolis, Brazil: Part 1. Major inorganic ions in rainwater as evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Flávio R.; Fracassi da Silva, José A.; Lago, Claudimir L.; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Gutz, Ivano G. R.

    The metropolitan region of São Paulo (17.8 million inhabitants) presents serious air quality problems. An official network monitors key air pollutants, however, there is no regular program of evaluation of the wet deposition and data about rainwater composition is scarce. Opening a series of articles on this subject, capillary zone electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection (CZE-CCD) is proposed and applied as a quick and inexpensive alternative to ion chromatography for the determination of the ionic composition of rainwater. Excellent resolution of the peaks and sufficient sensitivity were obtained for major ions. Switching from anion to cation determination is fast (30 min) and as simple as inverting the polarity of the voltage supply and changing the modifier added to the buffer solution. CZE-CCD was applied to the study of wet-only deposition collected in São Paulo during the period from May l997 to March 1998. The volume weighted means of the anions, sulfate, nitrate and chloride, were, respectively, 17, 22 and 29 μmol l -1. Among the cations, ammonium was the dominating one, with 28 μmol l -1, followed by calcium, 23 μmol l -1, sodium, 12 μmol l -1, and potassium, 5.8 μmol l -1. The wet flux of these anions and cations were, respectively, 2.5, 2.2, 1.6, 0.78, 1.4, 0.43 and 0.35 g m -2 yr -1. By attributing all sodium to marine origin, half of the chloride and more than 90% of all other ions are ascribable to continental/anthropogenic sources. Literature data for rainwater from inland regions (˜200 km apart from São Paulo) reveals lower deposition of all ions but H +. Absorption of NH 3 and incorporation of calcium carbonate, mainly in the metropolitan region itself, accounts for decreased acidity. The enrichment in all other ions during the studied period indicates the prevalence of the anthropogenic emissions from the metropolis over continental sources and explains the high correlation between the ions NO 3-, SO 42-, and NH 4+; the same ions responsible for a factor that, alone, explains 42% of the variability in the PCA.

  18. Classification of Volatile Engine Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2013-01-01

    Volatile particles cannot be detected at the engine exhaust by an aerosol detector. They are formed when the exhaust is mixed with ambient air downstream. Lack of a precise definition of volatile engine particles has been an impediment to engine manufacturers and regulatory agencies involved in the development of an effective control strategy. It is beyond doubt that volatile particles from combustion sources contribute to the atmospheric particulate burden, and the effect of that contribution is a critical issue in the ongoing research in the areas of air quality and climate change. A new instrument, called volatile particle separator (VPS), has been developed. It utilizes a proprietary microporous metallic membrane to separate particles from vapors. VPS data were used in the development of a two-parameter function to quantitatively classify, for the first time, the volatilization behavior of engine particles. The value of parameter A describes the volatilization potential of an aerosol. A nonvolatile particle has a larger A-value than a volatile one. The value of parameter k, an effective evaporation energy barrier, is found to be much smaller for small engine particles than that for large engine particles. The VPS instrument provides a means beyond just being a volatile particle remover; it enables a numerical definition to characterize volatile engine particles.

  19. Molecular plant volatile communication.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jarmo K; Blande, James D

    2012-01-01

    Plants produce a wide array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have multiple functions as internal plant hormones (e.g., ethylene, methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate), in communication with conspecific and heterospecific plants and in communication with organisms of second (herbivores and pollinators) and third (enemies of herbivores) trophic levels. Species specific VOCs normally repel polyphagous herbivores and those specialised on other plant species, but may attract specialist herbivores and their natural enemies, which use VOCs as host location cues. Attraction of predators and parasitoids by VOCs is considered an evolved indirect defence, whereby plants are able to indirectly reduce biotic stress caused by damaging herbivores. In this chapter we review these interactions where VOCs are known to play a crucial role. We then discuss the importance of volatile communication in self and nonself detection. VOCs are suggested to appear in soil ecosystems where distinction of own roots from neighbours roots is essential to optimise root growth, but limited evidence of above-ground plant self-recognition is available. PMID:22399393

  20. Volatile metabolites from actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Schller, Charlotte E G; Grtler, Hanne; Pedersen, Rita; Molin, Sren; Wilkins, Ken

    2002-04-24

    Twenty-six Streptomyces spp. were screened for their volatile production capacity on yeast starch agar. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were concentrated on a porous polymer throughout an 8-day growth period. VOCs were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and identified or characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 120 VOCs were characterized by retention index and mass spectra. Fifty-three compounds were characterized as terpenoid compounds, among which 18 could be identified. Among the VOCs were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, esters, ketones, sulfur compounds, and isoprenoid compounds. Among the most frequently produced compounds were isoprene, acetone, 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, cyclopentanone, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, 2-phenylethanol, and geosmin. The relationship between the excretion of geosmin and the production of spores was examined for one isolate. A good correlation between headspace geosmin and the number of spores was observed, suggesting that VOCs could be used to indicate the activity of these microorganisms in heterogeneous substrates. PMID:11958631

  1. Two Contrasting Volatile Element Compositions in Primary Melt Inclusions From Mount Shasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voyer, M.; Rose-Koga, E. F.; Shimizu, N.; Grove, T. L.; Schiano, P.

    2008-12-01

    In order to get the pre-eruptive volatile contents of Mount Shasta lavas, we selected primary melt inclusions from samples 85-38 (high alumina olivine tholeite, HAOT), 85-47, 85-1a and 95-15 (basaltic andesites, BA; Baker et al., 1994, CMP; Grove et al., 2002, CMP). We analyzed the H2O, CO2, F, Cl and S contents from olivine-hosted (Fo86-91) primitive melt inclusions (SiO2 <50 wt% and MgO >8 wt%) using the CAMECA 1280 ion probe of WHOI (MA, USA) and a broad range of standard compositions. As the melt inclusions were partially crystallized, they were experimentally heated in order to melt the daughter minerals. A preliminary study show that our heating procedure did not create any significant loss in the CO2, F, Cl, and S content of the melt inclusions and may not even result in a partial loss of the H2O content of the melt inclusions. The major element compositions of the Shasta melt inclusions fall on a continuous extension of the trend defined by the whole rocks and represent a more primitive endmember. Regarding the volatile contents, they can be divided into two groups: HAOT melt inclusions have low and clustered volatiles compositions (H2O: ~0.04 wt%; F: ~120 ppm; Cl: ~30 ppm; CO2: 250-450 ppm and S: 800- 1100 ppm), similar to primitive MORB compositions, whereas BA melt inclusions show higher and more variable volatile compositions (H2O: 0.1-2.6 wt%; CO2: 70-840, F: 120-1180 ppm; Cl: 480-1230 ppm and S: 480-4600 ppm). They are enriched in volatile elements compared to the primitive MORB compositions. Moreover, the BA melt inclusions are enriched in mobile elements such as K, Ba and B. The results suggest that HAOT melt inclusions and more enriched BA melt inclusions represent two endmembers of a mixing process between a depleted mantle melt and a slab-derived fluid component. The variations in the BA volatiles compositions can indicate an addition of various amounts of aqueous fluid into the mantle source, at different stage of the lavas formation. The division of the melt inclusions into two groups, a dry one (HAOT melt inclusions) and a wet one (BA melt inclusions), is in good agreement with the previous results on the formation of the Mount Shasta lavas.

  2. Pricing of options on assets with level dependent stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skabelin, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    Many asset classes, such as interest rates, exchange rates, commodities, and equities, often exhibit a strong relationship between asset prices and asset volatilities. This paper examines an analytical model that takes into account this level dependence of volatility. We demonstrate how prices of European options under stochastic volatility can be calculated analytically via inverse Laplace transformations. We also examine a Hull-White stochastic volatility expansion. While a success of this expansion in approximate computation of option prices has already been established empirically, the question of convergence has been left unanswered. We demonstrate, in this paper, that this expansion diverges essentially for all possible stochastic volatility processes. In contrast to a majority of volatility expansion models reported in the literature, we construct expansions that explicitly show the contribution of all of the variance moments. Such complete expansions are very useful in analyzing properties of option prices, as we demonstrate by examining why empirical volatility surfaces plotted as a function of the rescaled strike can sometimes exhibit striking time invariance.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Tomato Volatiles Positively Contributing to Tomato Flavor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jiantao; Xu, Yao; Liang, Jing; Chang, Peipei; Yan, Fei; Li, Mingjun; Liang, Yan; Zou, Zhirong

    2015-01-01

    Tomato volatiles, mainly derived from essential nutrients and health-promoting precursors, affect tomato flavor. Taste volatiles present a major challenge for flavor improvement and quality breeding. In this study, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to investigate potential chromosome regions associated with the tomato flavor volatiles. We observed significant variation (1200x) among the selected 28 most important volatiles in tomato based on their concentration and odor threshold importance across our sampled accessions. Using 174 tomato accessions, GWAS identified 125 significant associations (P < 0.005) among 182 SSR markers and 28 volatiles (27 volatiles with at least one significant association). Several significant associations were co-localized in previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL). This result provides new potential candidate loci affecting the metabolism of several volatiles. PMID:26640472

  4. Determination of volatile compounds in cider spirits by gas chromatography with direct injection.

    PubMed

    Rodrguez Madrera, Roberto; Surez Valles, Beln

    2007-08-01

    Two analytical methods based on gas chromatography with direct injection are described for the quantitative analysis of volatile compounds (acetals, aldehydes, esters, alcohols, and volatile phenols) in cider brandies. Analytes were divided into major, 15, and minor volatile, 24, compounds depending on their usual concentration in samples. Parameters usually tested for method validation are evaluated. Correlation coefficients are calculated to estimate linearity, obtaining values higher than 0.999. Detection limits range between 0.325 mg/L (1-propanol) and 1.663 mg/L (methanol) among the major volatile compounds and between 0.086 mg/L (ethyl 2-methylbutyrate) and 0.332 mg/L (ethyl tetradecanoate) among the minor volatiles. Mean recoveries ranged between 109% (ethyl lactate) and 95% (1-butanol) for major volatiles and between 109% (1-octen-3-ol) and 94% (ethyl 2-methylbutyrate) for minor volatiles, thus confirming the accuracy of both methods. Reproducibility for major volatiles is < 5.4% (furfural) in all cases and < 9.6% (hexyl acetate) for minor volatiles. Moreover, the accuracy of the methods is evaluated by analyzing a certified whisky and five samples from interlaboratory assays, generally obtaining results in accordance with previous values. PMID:17725870

  5. Simultaneous sampling of volatile and non-volatile analytes in beer for fast fingerprinting by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Hu, Zhong; Gamez, Gerardo; Law, Wai Siang; Chen, HuanWen; Yang, ShuiPing; Chingin, Konstantin; Balabin, Roman M; Wang, Rui; Zhang, TingTing; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-09-01

    By gently bubbling nitrogen gas through beer, an effervescent beverage, both volatile and non-volatile compounds can be simultaneously sampled in the form of aerosol. This allows for fast (within seconds) fingerprinting by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) in both negative and positive ion mode, without the need for any sample pre-treatment such as degassing and dilution. Trace analytes such as volatile esters (e.g., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate), free fatty acids (e.g., caproic acid, caprylic acid, and capric acid), semi/non-volatile organic/inorganic acids (e.g., lactic acid), and various amino acids, commonly present in beer at the low parts per million or at sub-ppm levels, were detected and identified based on tandem MS data. Furthermore, the appearance of solvent cluster ions in the mass spectra gives insight into the sampling and ionization mechanisms: aerosol droplets containing semi/non-volatile substances are thought to be generated via bubble bursting at the surface of the liquid; these neutral aerosol droplets then collide with the charged primary electrospray ionization droplets, followed by analyte extraction, desolvation, ionization, and MS detection. With principal component analysis, several beer samples were successfully differentiated. Therefore, the present study successfully extends the applicability of EESI-MS to the direct analysis of complex liquid samples with high gas content. PMID:20644917

  6. Identification of Campylobacter infection in chickens from volatile faecal emissions.

    PubMed

    Garner, Catherine E; Smith, Stephen; Elviss, Nicola C; Humphrey, Tom J; White, Paul; Ratcliffe, Norman M; Probert, Christopher S

    2008-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds from chicken faeces were investigated as biomarkers for Campylobacter infection. Campylobacter are major poultry-borne zoonotic pathogens, colonizing the avian intestinal tract. Chicken faeces are the principal source of contamination of carcasses. Fresh faeces were collected on farm sites, and Campylobacter status established microbiologically. Volatile organic compounds were pre-concentrated from the headspace above 71 separate faecal samples using solid-phase microextraction and separated and identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A Campylobacter-specific profile was identified using six of the extracted volatile organic compounds. The model developed reliably identified the presence or absence of Campylobacter in >95% of chickens. The volatile biomarker identification approach for assessing avian infection is a novel approach to enhancing biosecurity in the poultry industry and should reduce the risk of disease transmission to humans. PMID:18484355

  7. Areal distribution of selected trace elements, salinity, and major ions in shallow ground water, Tulare Basin, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujii, Roger; Swain, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of salinity and selected trace elements in shallow ground water in the Tulare Basin, California, was assessed to evaluate potential problems related to disposal in evaporation ponds of irrigation drain water containing elevated concentrations of selenium and other trace elements. The constituents of primary concern were selenium, arsenic, and salinity; uranium, boron, and molybdenum also were evaluated. Samples from 117 shallow wells were analyzed, and the results for samples from 110 of the wells were interpreted in relation to surficial geology, sediment depositional environment, soil characteristics, and hydrologic processes to determine the geochemical and hydrologic factors affecting the distribution of these constituents in ground water. In general, shallow ground water in areas where concentrations of salinity and most trace elements are elevated is influenced primarily by sediments derived from marine sedimentary rocks originating in the Coast Range, San Emigdio Mountains, and Tehachapi Mountains, and probably by unusual exposures of similar marine formations in the Sierra Nevada. Ground water in areas where concentrations of salinity and trace elements are significantly lower generally is influenced by igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Sierra Nevada. In addition to sources of sediments, evaporation of shallow ground water, as indicated by isotopic enrichment of oxygen-18 and deuterium, increases salinity and concentrations of conservative trace elements such as selenium (under oxidizing conditions) and boron. Redox conditions affect the oxidation state of all trace elements of concern, except boron, and were found to be a major influence on trace-element solubility. Under oxidized conditions, selenate predominates and behaves conservatively, and arsenate predominates and is affected by sorption reactions that can limit arsenic solubility. Under reduced conditions, selenium is reduced to insoluble elemental selenium and arsenite predominates and generally is more soluble than arsenate. Elevated concentrations of uranium in shallow ground water probably are associated with uranium deposits in Kern County and other parts of the basin where oxidized conditions cause the more solubleuranyl species to predominate. Boron was correlated with salinity and behaved conservatively, whereas adsorption and precipitation of molybdenum minerals probably limited molybdenum solubility. Inter- relations among constituents were examined with principal component analysis. The first two principal components explained 50.7 percent of the variance in the data. The first principal component was related to salinity, and the second principal component was related to redox conditions, reflecting two of the major influences on shallow ground-water quality found in this study.

  8. Arsenic(III, V) adsorption on a goethite-based adsorbent in the presence of major co-existing ions: Modeling competitive adsorption consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G.; Darby, Jeannie L.

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of the two oxyanions, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorbent is studied in the presence of major co-existing ions in groundwater (i.e., phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, and calcium) and predicted using the extended triple layer model (ETLM), a dipole modified single-site triple layer surface complexation model consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence. Surface species of all ions were selected according to the previous ETLM studies and published experimental spectroscopic/theoretical molecular information. The adsorption equilibrium constants for all ions were determined using adsorption data obtained in single-solute systems. The adsorption equilibrium constants referenced to the site-occupancy standard state (indicated by K?) were compared with those for goethite in the literature if available. The values of these constants for the goethite-based adsorbent are found to be close to the values for goethite previously studied. These "constrained" adsorption equilibrium constants determined in single-solute systems were used in the ETLM to predict the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with the co-existing ions in binary-solute systems. The ETLM is capable of predicting As(III, V) adsorption in the presence of oxyanions (phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, and carbonate). This study presents the first successful and systematic prediction of the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with these oxyanions using the ETLM. The ETLM prediction of surface (and aqueous) speciation also provides insights into the distinct adsorption behavior of As(III, V) in the presence of the oxyanions. Magnesium and calcium significantly enhanced As(V) adsorption at higher pH values, while they had little effect on As(III) adsorption. The enhanced adsorption of As(V), however, could not be predicted by the ETLM using the surface species proposed in previous ETLM studies. Further studies are necessary to identify ternary complexes, especially at high pH. Adsorption isotherms of As(V), a dominant form of arsenic in adsorptive water treatment systems, in the presence of the co-existing ions under relevant conditions of water treatment systems are also obtained and predicted by the ETLM to study and compare the effect of the co-existing ions on As(V) removal.

  9. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  10. VOLATILIZATION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volatilization of organic environmental contaminants from water bodies to the atmosphere was investigated. The general aim was to elucidate the factors that control the volatilization process and develop predictive methods for calculating volatilization rates for various comp...

  11. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history, scientists were fascinated with Syrtis Major because this dark region varied so much through the seasons and years. Some people thought it might be a changing sea, and others thought it might be vegetation. Early spacecraft like Mariner and Viking revealed for the first time that the changes were caused by the wind blowing dust and sand across the surface. What we can see in this image is exactly that: evidence of a lot of wind action. Bright dust patches streak across this image, formed through wind interference from craters and other landforms. These wispy, bright streaks are spread on the surface by a vigorous, east-west wind that kicked up huge dust storms, scattering the fine particles of sand and dust in an almost etherial pattern. The bright streaks in the top part of the image might have formed in a slightly different way, because there is no landform standing in the wind's way. Beneath the bright surface dust are raised ridges that mark the edges of earlier lava flows from Nili Patera, a Martian 'caldera.' A caldera is a collapsed, bowl-shaped depression at the top of a volcano cone. Can you imagine how Christian Huygens would feel if he lived today and could see all of this knowledge unfold? Or how it would feel to be the first person to stand in this dark volcanic and cratered region, knowing how many discovers had paved the way to that moment? Yes, exploration lives!

  12. Determination of non-volatile and volatile organic acids in Korean traditional fermented soybean paste (Doenjang).

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Choi, Tae Bong; Park, Hae-Kyong; Kim, Myunghee; Lee, In Koo; Kim, Jong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids are formed in food as a result of metabolism of large molecular mass compounds. These organic acids play an important role in the taste and aroma of fermented food products. Doenjang is a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste product that provides a major source of protein. The quantitative data for volatile and non-volatile organic acid contents of 18 samples of Doenjang were determined by comparing the abundances of each peak by gas (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean values of volatile organic acids (acetic acid, butyric acid, propionic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid), determined in 18 Doenjang samples, were found to be 91.73, 29.54, 70.07 and 19.80 mg%, respectively, whereas the mean values of non-volatile organic acids, such as oxalic acid, citric acid, lactic acid and succinic acid, were noted to be 14.69, 5.56, 9.95 and 0.21 mg%, respectively. Malonic and glutaric acids were absent in all the tested samples of Doenjang. The findings of this study suggest that determination of organic acid contents by GC and HPLC can be considered as an affective approach to evaluate the quality characteristics of fermented food products. PMID:20434502

  13. Detection of signature volatiles for cariogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Hertel, M; Preissner, R; Gillissen, B; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Paris, S; Preissner, S

    2016-02-01

    The development of a breath test by the identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by cariogenic bacteria is a promising approach for caries risk assessment and early caries detection. The aim of the present study was to investigate the volatile profiles of three major cariogenic bacteria and to assess whether the obtained signatures were species-specific. Therefore, the headspaces above cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus salivarius?and Propionibacterium acidifaciens were analysed after 24 and 48h of cultivation using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. A volatile database was queried for the obtained VOC profiles. Sixty-four compounds were detected within the analysed culture headspaces and were absent (36) or at least only present in minor amounts (28) in the control headspace. For S. mutans 18, for L. salivarius three and for P. acidifaciens five compounds were found to be unique signature VOCs. Database matching revealed that the identified signatures of all bacteria were unique. Furthermore, 13 of the 64 detected substances have not been previously reported to be emitted by bacteria or fungi. Specific VOC signatures were found in all the investigated bacteria cultures. The obtained results encourage further research to investigate the transferability to in vivo conditions towards the development of a breath test. PMID:26610336

  14. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  15. Transformations of snow chemistry in the boreal forest: Accumulation and volatilization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomeroy, J.W.; Davies, T.D.; Jones, H.G.; Marsh, P.; Peters, N.E.; Tranter, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the processes and dynamics of ecologically-important inorganic chemical (primarily NO3-N) accumulation and loss in boreal forest snow during the cold winter period at a northern and southern location in the boreal forest of western Canada. Field observations from Inuvik, Northwest Territories and Waskesiu, Saskatchewan, Canada were used to link chemical transformations and physical processes in boreal forest snow. Data on the disposition and overwinter transformation of snow water equivalent, NO3-, SO42- and other major ions were examined. No evidence of enhanced dry deposition of chemical species to intercepted snow was found at either site except where high atmospheric aerosol concentrations prevailed. At Inuvik, concentrations of SO42- and Cl- were five to six times higher in intercepted snow than in surface snow away from the trees. SO4-S and Cl loads at Inuvik were correspondingly enhanced three-fold within the nearest 0.5 m to individual tree stems. Measurements of snow affected by canopy interception without rapid sublimation provided no evidence of ion volatilization from intercepted snow. Where intercepted snow sublimation rates were significant, ion loads in sub-canopy snow suggested that NO3- volatized with an efficiency of about 62% per snow mass sublimated. Extrapolating this measurement from Waskesiu to sublimation losses observed in other southern boreal environments suggests that 19-25% of snow inputs of NO3- can be lost during intercepted snow sublimation. The amount of N lost during sublimation may be large in high-snowfall, high N load southern boreal forests (Quebec) where 0.42 kg NO3-N ha-1 is estimated as a possible seasonal NO3- volatilization. The sensitivity of the N fluxes to climate and forest canopy variation and implications of the winter N losses for N budgets in the boreal forest are discussed.This paper examines the processes and dynamics of ecologically-important inorganic chemical (primarily NO3-N) accumulation and loss in boreal forest snow during the cold winter period at a northern and southern location in the boreal forest of western Canada. Field observations from Inuvik. Northwest Territories and Waskesiu, Saskatchewan, Canada were used to link chemical transformations and physical processes in boreal forest snow. Data on the disposition and overwinter transformation of snow water equivalent, NO3-, SO42- and other major ions were examined. No evidence of enhanced dry deposition of chemical species to intercepted snow was found at either site except where high atmospheric aerosol concentrations prevailed. At Inuvik, concentrations of SO42- and Cl- were five to six times higher in intercepted snow than in surface snow away from the trees. SO4-S and Cl loads at Inuvik were correspondingly enhanced three-fold within the nearest 0.5 m to individual tree stems. Measurements of snow affected by canopy interception without rapid sublimation provided no evidence of ion volatilization from intercepted snow. Where intercepted snow sublimation rates were significant, ion loads in sub-canopy snow suggested that NO3- volatized with an efficiency of about 62% per snow mass sublimated. Extrapolating this measurement from Waskesiu to sublimation losses observed in other southern boreal environments suggests that 19-25% of snow inputs of NO3- can be lost during intercepted snow sublimation. The amount of N lost during sublimation may be large in high-snowfall, high N load southern boreal forests (Quebec) where 0.42 kg NO3-N ha-1 is estimated as a possible seasonal NO3- volatilization. The sensitivity of the N fluxes to climate and forest canopy variation and implications of the winter N losses for N budgets in the boreal forest are discussed.

  16. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt has been traced back to an ancient Ethiopian word 'basal,' which means 'a rock from which you can obtain iron.' That must have made it a very desired material with ancient Earth civilizations long ago. Basalt is actually one of the most abundant types of rock found on Earth. Most of the volcanic islands in the ocean are made of basalt, including the large shield volcano of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which is often compared to Martian shield volcanoes. Shield volcanoes don't have high, steep, mountain-like sides, but are instead low and broad humps upon the surface. They're created when highly fluid, molten-basalt flows spread out over wide areas. Over several millennia of basaltic layering upon layering, these volcanoes can reach massive sizes like the ones seen on Mars. You can see the wrinkly texture of dark lava flows (now hard and cool) in the above image beneath the brighter dust.

  17. Volatile phytochemicals as mosquito semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Nyasembe, Vincent O.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Plant biochemical processes result in the release of an array of volatile chemical substances into the environment, some of which are known to play important plant fitness enhancing functions, such as attracting pollinators, thermal tolerance of photosynthesis, and defense against herbivores. Cunningly, phytophagous insects have evolved mechanisms to utilize these volatiles to their own advantage, either to colonize a suitable host for feeding, reproduction and oviposition or avoid an unsuitable one. The volatile compounds involved in plant–insect chemical interactions have been widely exploited in the management of agricultural pests. On the other hand, use of plant volatiles in the management of medically important insects is limited, mainly due to paucity of information on their role in disease vector–plant interactions. To date, a total of 29 plant volatile compounds from various chemical classes, including phenols, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones and terpenes, have been identified as mosquito semiochemicals. In this review, we present highlights of mosquito–plant interactions, the available evidence of nectar feeding, with particular emphasis on sources of plant attractants, methods of plant volatile collection and the candidate plant volatile compounds that attract mosquitoes to nectar sources. We also highlight the potential application of these phytochemical attractants in integrated mosquito management. PMID:25383131

  18. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dr) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of ?-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of ?-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than ?-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than ?-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  19. Chemically-resolved aerosol volatility measurements from two megacity field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Docherty, K. S.; Aiken, A. C.; Cubison, M. J.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-09-01

    The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54-230C) with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS standard aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA) showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6%K-1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA), oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA), and biomass-burning OA (BBOA) separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. A new technique using the AMS background signal was demonstrated to quantify the fraction of species up to four orders-of-magnitude less volatile than those detectable in the MS mode, which for OA represent ~5% of the non-refractory (NR) OA signal. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered semivolatile in models. The study in Riverside identified organosulfur species (e.g. CH3HSO3+ ion, likely from methanesulfonic acid), while both studies identified ions indicative of amines (e.g. C5H12N+) with very different volatility behaviors than inorganic-dominated ions. The oxygen-to-carbon ratio of OA in each ambient study was shown to increase both with TD temperature and from morning to afternoon, while the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio showed the opposite trend.

  20. Characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of the major photoproducts of temoporfin (m-THPC) and bacteriochlorin (m-THPBC).

    PubMed

    Angotti, M; Maunit, B; Muller, J F; Bezdetnaya, L; Guillemin, F

    2001-07-01

    The photobleaching of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (temoporfin, m-THPC) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(m-hydroxyphenyl)bacteriochlorin (bacteriochlorin, m-THPBC) was studied in ethanol-water (1 : 99, v/v) and in physiological medium (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) with or without fetal calf serum (FCS). m-THPC solution was irradiated with the laser radiation of 650 nm, whereas m-THPBC solution underwent two consecutive irradiations at 532 and 650 nm. The photoproducts were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry and by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). Independent of the solvent used, the phototransformation of either photosensitizer yielded the formation of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (m-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (m-THPP) through a major dehydrogenation process. PMID:11473406

  1. Volatiles on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term evolution of both the atmosphere and the surface of Mars can be understood by examining the history of volatiles in the Mars atmosphere, their non-atmospheric reservoirs, and the processes of exchange between the two. Clearly, the present state of both the surface and the atmosphere can only be seen, so that any inferences about the evolution of the climate system are just that, inferences. The processes which control the atmosphere and surface on a seasonal basis, however, are the same processes which can act on longer timescales; only the specific solar and atmospheric forcing will differ. Once the ability of each process to affect the seasonal behavior is understood, the long-timescale forcing may be applied to the various processes in order to clearly identify the ability of the processes to act over the entire history of Mars. The areas of surface-atmospheric interaction of Mars are addressed in the ongoing research. The climate system on Mars is controlled by processes involving the exchange between the surface and atmosphere, so it is important to understand the current behavior of those processes. This is especially so in light of the current interest in understanding Mars; the upcoming Mars Observer mission, and the potential for a future sample-return or human-exploration mission will focus emphasis on this area of Mars science.

  2. Field sampling method for quantifying volatile sulfur compounds from animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are a major class of chemicals associated with odor from animal feeding operations (AFO). Identifying and quantifying VSCs in air is challenging due to their volatility, reactivity, and low concentrations in ambient air. In the present study, a canister based metho...

  3. Radiation chemistry of major food components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter summarizes radiolysis of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and vitamins. The major focuses of the chapter are on recent developments in radiation chemistry and the use of irradiation to reduce undesirable chemicals in foods. Specifically, formation of volatile sulfur compounds from...

  4. Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonate complexes of einsteinium

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, E.V.; Aizenberg, M.I.; Travnikov, S.S.; Davydov, A.V.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1988-07-01

    Volatile hexafluoroacetylacetonate complexes of einsteinium have been synthesized. Their sublimation and thermochromatographic behavior in the presence of free ..beta..-diketone were studied. The reaction of einsteinium di- and tri-chlorides with hexafluoroacetylacetone vapor is discussed.

  5. Interactions between volatile and nonvolatile coffee components. 2. Mechanistic study focused on volatile thiols.

    PubMed

    Charles-Bernard, Marielle; Roberts, Deborah D; Kraehenbuehl, Karin

    2005-06-01

    This study is the second of two publications that investigate the interactions between volatile and nonvolatile components in coffee brew. The purpose here was to shed some light into the chemical mechanisms responsible for the decrease of volatile thiols when in contact with coffee nonvolatiles. A mixture of volatile thiols covering a large range of physicochemical properties was monitored over time in the presence of a coffee brew model. The binding potential was estimated by SPME-GC-MS. Additives inhibiting specific reaction pathways were preincubated with the coffee brew 1 h prior to addition of the volatile compounds. Degradation kinetics of the volatile thiols were characterized by their rate constants k(obs). The effect of individual additives was shown by calculating k(rel), the relative rate constant as compared to the reference without additive. The conclusion was that thiols, mainly responsible for the "roasty" and "burnt" notes, disappear via two main chemical mechanisms. The results suggest that nucleophilic addition is the major pathway for thiol degradation. Addition occurs on oxidized species generated in the matrix in the presence of air. This mechanism prevails for aliphatic thiols (e.g., ethanethiol, methanethiol). Benzylic thiols (such as 2-furfurylthiol) can react in parallel via another pathway that is slowed in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of a radical scavenger. This points to a radical mechanism, but further work is needed to support this hypothesis. A direct correlation between thiol hydrophobicity and the magnitude of the interactions was shown as well. Therefore, weak physical interactions or hydrophobic assistance accelerating chemical reactions cannot be excluded at this point of the study. PMID:15913305

  6. Evolution of Triton's volatile budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's volatile budget provides important links to planetary formation processes in the cold outer solar nebula. However, the budget has been modified by processes subsequent to the accretion of this body. It is of interest to assess whether certain formation environments can be ruled out for Triton on the basis of its current volatile abundances, and also to quantify some of the post-accretional processes by which the abundances have been modified.

  7. C. elegans and volatile anesthetics.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, P G; Kayser, E-B; Sedensky, M M

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics remains an enigma, despite their worldwide use. The nematode C. elegans has served as an excellent model to unravel this mystery. Genes and gene sets that control the behavior of the animal in volatile anesthetics have been identified, using multiple endpoints to mimic the phenomenon of anesthesia in man. Some of these studies have clear translational implications in more complicated organisms. PMID:18050492

  8. Volatile Emission of Mechanically Damaged Almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mature almonds from the Monterey variety were evaluated for their volatile composition after mechanical damage and compared to the volatile composition of the corresponding undamaged almonds. Volatiles were collected on Tenax, desorbed with diethyl ether, and identified via GC-MS analyses. Volatile ...

  9. Interactions between wine volatile compounds and grape and wine matrix components influence aroma compound headspace partitioning.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Anthony L; Ebeler, Susan E; Heymann, Hildegarde; Boss, Paul K; Solomon, Peter S; Trengove, Robert D

    2009-11-11

    A full-factorial design was used to assess the matrix effects of ethanol, glucose, glycerol, catechin, and proline on the volatile partitioning of 20 volatile compounds considered to play a role in wine aroma. Analysis of variance showed that the two-way interactions of ethanol and glucose, ethanol and glycerol, and glycerol and catechin significantly influenced headspace partitioning of volatiles. Experiments were conducted to observe the effect of varied ethanol and glucose concentrations on headspace partitioning of a constant concentration of volatiles. Analysis of variance and linear regression analysis showed that the presence of glucose increased the concentration of volatiles in the headspace, whereas increasing ethanol concentration was negatively correlated with headspace partitioning of volatiles. A subsequent study assessed the effect of diluting white and red wines with water and ethanol. It was again observed that increased ethanol concentration significantly reduced the relative abundance of volatile compounds in the sample headspace. This study investigates some of the complex matrix interactions of the major components of grape and wine that influence volatile compound headspace partitioning. The magnitude of each matrix-volatile interaction was ethanol > glucose > glycerol > catechin, whereas proline showed no apparent interaction. The results clearly identify that increasing ethanol concentrations significantly reduce the headspace concentration of volatile aroma compounds, which may contribute to explaining recent sensory research observations that indicate ethanol can suppress the fruit aroma attributes in wine. PMID:19845354

  10. Eco-evolutionary factors drive induced plant volatiles: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rowen, Elizabeth; Kaplan, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) mediate critical ecological functions, but no studies have quantitatively synthesized data published on HIPVs to evaluate broad patterns. We tested three hypotheses that use eco-evolutionary theory to predict volatile induction: feeding guild (chewing arthropods > sap feeders), diet breadth (specialist herbivores > generalists), and selection history (domesticated plants < wild species). To test these hypotheses, we extracted data from 236 experiments that report volatiles produced by herbivore-damaged and undamaged plants. These data were subjected to meta-analysis, including effects on total volatiles and major biochemical classes. Overall, we found that chewers induced more volatiles than sap feeders, for both total volatiles and most volatile classes (e.g. green leaf volatiles, monoterpenes). Although specialist herbivores induced more total volatiles than generalists, this was inconsistent across chemical classes. Contrary to our expectation, domesticated species induced stronger volatile responses than wild species, even when controlling for plant taxonomy. Surprisingly, this is the first quantitative synthesis of published studies on HIPVs. Our analysis provides support for perceptions in the published literature (chewers > sap feeders), while challenging other commonly held notions (wild > crop). Despite the large number of experiments, we identified several gaps in the existing literature that should guide future investigations. PMID:26725245

  11. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical smog is a major air pollution problem and a significant cause of premature death in the U.S. Smog forms in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are emitted primarily from industry and motor vehicles in the U.S. However, dairy farms may be an important source in so...

  12. Volatile analysis of ground almonds contaminated with naturally occurring fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxigenic aspergilli inflict major economic damage to the tree nut industry of California, with the highest negative impact to almonds. Aspergilli and fungi in general are known to emit volatiles in varying quantity and composition dependent upon their growth media. The goal of the study was to ...

  13. Volatile compounds in samples of cork and also produced by selected fungi.

    PubMed

    Barreto, M C; Vilas Boas, L; Carneiro, L C; San Romo, M V

    2011-06-22

    The production of volatile compounds by microbial communities of cork samples taken during the cork manufacturing process was investigated. The majority of volatiles were found in samples collected at two stages: resting after the first boiling and nontreated cork disks. Volatile profiles produced by microbiota in both stages are similar. The releasable volatile compounds and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) produced in cork-based culture medium by five isolated fungal species in pure and mixed cultures were also analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS).The results showed that 1-octen-3-ol and esters of fatty acids (medium chain length C8-C20) were the main volatile compounds produced by either pure fungal species or their mixture. Apparently, Penicillium glabrum is the main contributor to the overall volatile composition observed in the mixed culture. The production of releasable TCA on cork cannot be attributed to any of the assayed fungal isolates. PMID:21574572

  14. Volatilization of mercury by resting mercury-resistant bacterial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Sadhukhan, P.C.; Ghosh, D.K.

    1996-02-01

    The mercuric ion reduction systems encoded by the Hg{sup 2+}inducible mer operon confers bacterial resistance to mercuric ion. The mer A gene product which is a FAD-containing enzyme catalyzes the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to volatile elemental mercury with the helo of intracellular thiols and NADP as a cofactor Our earlier studies have shown that growing cells of different mercury-resistant bacteria reduce Hg{sup 2+} compounds to Ha(O). We have also shown the effect of thiol compounds and flavins on mercury-degrading enzyme activities in mercury-resistant bacteria. Here we report that resting cells of mercury-resistant bacteria survive in a buffer system for several hours, synthesize inducible mercury-degrading enzymes and volatilize mercury from a mercury-containing buffer system. We know of no information regarding studies of mercury-degrading enzymes in resting mercury-resistant bacterial cells.

  15. Fruit volatile analysis using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Simona; Lloyd, Nathan W; Ebeler, Susan E; Zakharov, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Numerous and diverse physiological changes occur during fruit ripening, including the development of a specific volatile blend that characterizes fruit aroma. Maturity at harvest is one of the key factors influencing the flavor quality of fruits and vegetables. The validation of robust methods that rapidly assess fruit maturity and aroma quality would allow improved management of advanced breeding programs, production practices and postharvest handling. Over the last three decades, much research has been conducted to develop so-called electronic noses, which are devices able to rapidly detect odors and flavors. Currently there are several commercially available electronic noses able to perform volatile analysis, based on different technologies. The electronic nose used in our work (zNose, EST, Newbury Park, CA, USA), consists of ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with a surface acoustic wave sensor (UFGC-SAW). This technology has already been tested for its ability to monitor quality of various commodities, including detection of deterioration in apple; ripeness and rot evaluation in mango; aroma profiling of thymus species; C(6) volatile compounds in grape berries; characterization of vegetable oil and detection of adulterants in virgin coconut oil. This system can perform the three major steps of aroma analysis: headspace sampling, separation of volatile compounds, and detection. In about one minute, the output, a chromatogram, is produced and, after a purging cycle, the instrument is ready for further analysis. The results obtained with the zNose can be compared to those of other gas-chromatographic systems by calculation of Kovats Indices (KI). Once the instrument has been tuned with an alkane standard solution, the retention times are automatically converted into KIs. However, slight changes in temperature and flow rate are expected to occur over time, causing retention times to drift. Also, depending on the polarity of the column stationary phase, the reproducibility of KI calculations can vary by several index units. A series of programs and graphical interfaces were therefore developed to compare calculated KIs among samples in a semi-automated fashion. These programs reduce the time required for chromatogram analysis of large data sets and minimize the potential for misinterpretation of the data when chromatograms are not perfectly aligned. We present a method for rapid volatile compound analysis in fruit. Sample preparation, data acquisition and handling procedures are also discussed. PMID:22491160

  16. Chemically-resolved aerosol volatility measurements from two megacity field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Docherty, K. S.; Aiken, A. C.; Cubison, M. J.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54-230C) with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA) showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6% K-1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA), oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA), and biomass-burning OA (BBOA) separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered semivolatile in models. The study in Riverside identified organosulfur species (e.g. CH3HSO3+ ion, likely from methanesulfonic acid), while both studies identified ions indicative of amines (e.g. C5H12N+) with very different volatility behaviors than inorganic-dominated ions. The oxygen-to-carbon ratio of OA in each ambient study was shown to increase both with TD temperature and from morning to afternoon, while the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio showed the opposite trend.

  17. Chemically-Resolved Aerosol Volatility Measurements from Two Megacity Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Docherty, K. S.; Aiken, A. C.; Cubison, M. J.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54-230oC) with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA) showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6%K-1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF) and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA), oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA), and biomass-burning OA (BBOA) separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered semivolatile in models. The study in Riverside identified organosulfur species (e.g. CH3HSO3+ ion, likely from methanesulfonic acid), while both studies identified ions indicative of amines (e.g. C5H12N+) with very different volatility behaviors than inorganic-dominated ions. The oxygen-to-carbon ratio of OA in each ambient study was shown to increase both with TD temperature and from morning to afternoon, while the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio showed the opposite trend.

  18. Changes in streamflow and summary of major-ion chemistry and loads in the North Fork Red River basin upstream from Lake Altus, northwestern Texas and western Oklahoma, 1945-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Wahl, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Upstream from Lake Altus, the North Fork Red River drains an area of 2,515 square miles. The quantity and quality of surface water are major concerns at Lake Altus, and water-resource managers and consumers need historical information to make informed decisions about future development. The Lugert-Altus Irrigation District relies on withdrawals from the lake to sustain nearly 46,000 acres of agricultural land. Kendall's tau tests of precipitation data indicated no statistically significant trend over the entire 100 years of available record. However, a significant increase in precipitation occurred in the last 51 years. Four streamflow-gaging stations with more than 10 years of record were maintained in the basin. These stations recorded no significant trends in annual streamflow volume. Two stations, however, had significant increasing trends in the base-flow index, and three had significant decreasing trends in annual peak flows. Major-ion chemistry in the North Fork Red River is closely related to the chemical composition of the underlying bedrock. Two main lithologies are represented in the basin upstream from Lake Altus. In the upper reaches, young and poorly consolidated sediments include a range of sizes from coarse gravel to silt and clay. Nearsurface horizons commonly are cemented as calcium carbonate caliche. Finer-grained gypsiferous sandstones and shales dominate the lower reaches of the basin. A distinct increase in dissolved solids, specifically sodium, chloride, calcium, and sulfate, occurs as the river flows over rocks that contain substantial quantities of gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. These natural salts are the major dissolved constituents in the North Fork Red River.

  19. Comparative Characterization of Aroma Volatiles and Related Gene Expression Analysis at Vegetative and Mature Stages in Basmati and Non-Basmati Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Hinge, Vidya; Patil, Hemant; Nadaf, Altafhusain

    2016-02-01

    Aroma volatiles in Basmati-370, Ambemohar-157 (non-basmati scented), and IR-64 (non-scented) rice cultivars were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed at vegetative and maturity stages to study their differential accumulation using headspace solid-phase microextraction, followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GCMS) with selected ion monitoring (SIM) approach. In addition, expression analysis of major aroma volatile 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2AP)-related genes, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (badh2) and Δ(1)-pyrolline-5-carboxylic acid synthetase (P5CS), were studied by real-time PCR. Maximum number of volatiles recorded at vegetative (72-58) than at mature stage (54-39). Twenty new compounds (12 in scented and 8 in both) were reported in rice. N-containing aromatic compounds were major distinguishing class separating scented from non-scented. Among quantified 26 volatiles, 14 odor-active compounds distinguished vegetative and mature stage. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for 2AP was 0.001 mg/kg of 2AP and 0.01 g of rice, respectively. 2AP accumulation in mature grains was found three times more than in leaves of scented rice. Positive correlation of 2AP with 2-pentylfuran, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and (E)-2-nonenal suggests their major role as aroma contributors. The badh2 expression was inversely and P5CS expression was positively correlated with 2AP accumulation in scented over non-scented cultivar. PMID:26481230

  20. Seasonal Variability of Riverine Geochemistry (87Sr/86Sr, δ13CDIC, δ44/40Ca, and major ions) in Permafrost Watersheds on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, G. O.; Jacobson, A. D.; Douglas, T. A.; McClelland, J. W.; Khosh, M. S.; Barker, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate models predict amplified warming at high latitudes, where permafrost soils have historically acted as a carbon sink. As warming occurs, the seasonally thawed active layer will propagate downward into previously frozen mineral-rich soil, releasing carbon and introducing unique chemical weathering signatures into rivers. We use variations in the 87Sr/86Sr, δ13CDIC, δ44/40Ca, and major ion geochemistry of rivers to track seasonal active layer dynamics. We collected water from six streams on the North Slope of Alaska between May and October, 2009 and 2010. All rivers drain continuous permafrost but three drain tussock tundra-dominated watersheds and three drain steeper bedrock catchments with minor tundra coverage. In tundra streams, elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios, low δ13CDIC values and major ions ([Na+]+[K+]/ [Ca+2]+[Mg+2]) in spring melt runoff suggest flushing of shallow soils with relatively low carbonate content. By July, 87Sr/86Sr ratios stabilize at relatively low values and δ13CDIC at relatively higher values, indicating the active layer thawed into deeper carbonate-rich soils. In bedrock streams, elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios correlate with high discharge. By late fall, bedrock stream 87Sr/86Sr ratios decrease steadily, consistent with increased carbonate weathering. Nearly constant δ13CDIC values and high [SO4-2] for most of the melt season imply significant sulfuric acid-carbonate weathering in bedrock streams. δ13CDIC values suggest a shift to carbonic acid-carbonate weathering in late 2010, possibly due to limited oxygen for pyrite oxidation during freezing of the active layer. δ44/40Ca values in both tundra and bedrock streams increase during the seasons, suggesting increased uptake of 40Ca by plants. δ44/40Ca values of rivers are at least 0.1-0.2‰ higher than their watershed soils, rocks and sediments, suggesting significant plant uptake. Our findings show how seasonal changes in mineral weathering have potential for tracking active layer dynamics.

  1. Fragrance volatiles of developing and senescing carnation flowers.

    PubMed

    Schade, F; Legge, R L; Thompson, J E

    2001-04-01

    Thirteen major volatiles of the carnation flower fragrance signature have been identified by GC/MS. Of these, ten, hexanal, (2E)-hexenal, 1-hexanol, 2-hexanol, 3-hexen-1-ol, nonanal, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, benzyl benzoate and caryophyllene, were quantified. The steady-state levels of these ten volatiles change independently as the flowers develop and senesce, suggesting that their synthesis is developmentally regulated. In addition, the chemical composition of the fragrance signature in naturally senesced flowers proved to be very different from that for flowers that had been induced to senesce prematurely by treatment with ethylene. Thus, senescence-related changes in carnation floral scent appear not to be directly regulated by ethylene. From cellular fractionation studies, it is evident that all of the volatiles, except 2-hexanol, are present in both membranous and cytosolic compartments, suggesting that their synthesis is membrane-associated and that they subsequently partition into the cytosol in accordance with partition coefficients. PMID:11314956

  2. Composition of volatiles of banana cultivars from Madeira Island.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, J M F; Fernandes, P J P; Nascimento, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The composition of the volatiles of banana fruit from various cultivars grown on Madeira Island has been determined. Using GC-MS, the volatiles were shown to be complex mixtures of several classes of components, mainly esters, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and acids. The average contents of the total volatiles from cultivars "Dwarf Cavendish", "Giant Cavendish", "Robusta" and "Williams" were 93.0, 116.5, 157.3 and 157.0 mg/kg, respectively. The ester and alcoholic fractions appear to play a decisive role in the organoleptic characteristics of banana fruit, presenting a substantial content ranging from 57.2 to 89.8 mg/ kg and 19.0 to 47.7 mg/kg, respectively, in all cultivars from Madeira Island studied. 3-Methyl butyl butanoate ester was the major constituent. PMID:12693632

  3. Volatile components from mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pino, Jorge A; Mesa, Judith; Muoz, Yamilie; Mart, M Pilar; Marbot, Rolando

    2005-03-23

    The volatile components of 20 mango cultivars were investigated by means of simultaneous distillation-extraction, GC, and GC-MS. Three hundred and seventy-two compounds were identified, of which 180 were found for the first time in mango fruit. The total concentration of volatiles was approximately 18-123 mg/kg of fresh fruit. Terpene hydrocarbons were the major volatiles of all cultivars, the dominant terpenes being delta-3-carene (cvs. Haden, Manga amarilla, Macho, Manga blanca, San Diego, Manzano, Smith, Florida, Keitt, and Kent), limonene (cvs. Delicioso, Super Haden, Ordonez, Filipino, and La Paz), both terpenes (cv. Delicia), terpinolene (cvs. Obispo, Corazon, and Huevo de toro), and alpha-phellandrene (cv. Minin). Other qualitative and quantitative differences among the cultivars could be demonstrated. PMID:15769159

  4. Observability of market daily volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  5. Modeling the influence of precursor volatility and molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation using evaporated fuel experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, S. H.; Donahue, N. M.; Adams, P. J.; Robinson, A. L.

    2013-09-01

    We use SOA production data from an ensemble of evaporated fuels to test various SOA formation models. Except for gasoline, traditional SOA models focusing exclusively on volatile species in the fuels under-predict the observed SOA formation. These models can be improved dramatically by accounting for lower volatility species, but at the cost of a large set of free parameters. In contrast, a SOA model based only on the volatility of the precursor, starting with the volatility distribution of the evaporated fuels and optimized for the volatility reduction of first-generation products, reasonably reproduces the observed SOA formation with relatively few free parameters. The exceptions are exotic fuels such as Fischer-Tropsch fuels that expose the central assumption of the volatility based model that most emissions consist of complex mixtures displaying reasonably average behavior. However, for the vast majority of fuels, the volatility based model performs well.

  6. Thermochromatography study of volatile tellurium species in various gas atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maugeri, Emilio Andrea; Neuhausen, Jrg; Eichler, Robert; Piguet, David; Schumann, Dorothea

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption interaction of tellurium species with fused silica was studied by thermochromatography. Trace amounts of tellurium were obtained by irradiating elemental tin with ?-particles. Different tellurium species were obtained using carrier gases with varied redox potential. Adsorption enthalpies of the obtained species were calculated allowing for the identification of some species. Elemental tellurium or SnTe was deposited in thermochromatography experiments when using both dried and deoxygenated He and H2 as carrier gases. Tellurium dioxide was deposited in thermochromatography experiments when using dry oxygen as carrier gas. Tellurium dioxide was found to be significantly less volatile compared to elemental Te or SnTe. The deposition of a species with still lower volatility occurring under less oxidizing conditions was tentatively assigned to tellurium monoxide, TeO. Species more volatile than elemental tellurium or SnTe, most likely Te-hydroxides, were detected in experiments using moist H2 as carrier gas. In moist oxidizing gas, species more volatile than TeO2 were found, most likely Te-oxyhydroxides. The obtained results provide valuable input to design experiments for studying the volatility of tellurium's heavier homologue polonium and its compounds, which represent one of the major radiological concerns for the use of lead-bismuth-eutectic as coolant and target material for innovative accelerator-driven systems or spallation sources.

  7. First evidence of a volatile sex pheromone in lady beetles.

    PubMed

    Fassotte, Brnice; Fischer, Christophe; Durieux, Delphine; Lognay, Georges; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frdric; Verheggen, Franois J

    2014-01-01

    To date, volatile sex pheromones have not been identified in the Coccinellidae family; yet, various studies have suggested that such semiochemicals exist. Here, we collected volatile chemicals released by virgin females of the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), which were either allowed or not allowed to feed on aphids. Virgin females in the presence of aphids, exhibited "calling behavior", which is commonly associated with the emission of a sex pheromone in several Coleoptera species. These calling females were found to release a blend of volatile compounds that is involved in the remote attraction (i.e., from a distance) of males. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that (-)-?-caryophyllene was the major constituent of the volatile blend (ranging from 80 to 86%), with four other chemical components also being present; ?-elemene, methyl-eugenol, ?-humulene, and ?-bulnesene. In a second set of experiments, the emission of the five constituents identified from the blend was quantified daily over a 9-day period after exposure to aphids. We found that the quantity of all five chemicals significantly increased across the experimental period. Finally, we evaluated the activity of a synthetic blend of these chemicals by performing bioassays which demonstrated the same attractive effect in males only. The results confirm that female H. axyridis produce a volatile sex pheromone. These findings have potential in the development of more specific and efficient biological pest-control management methods aimed at manipulating the behavior of this invasive lady beetle. PMID:25514321

  8. Study of cesium volatility from sodium carbonate based melts

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Krikorian, O.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fleming, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    Purpose of this study was to obtain thermodynamic data on cesium volatility from sodium carbonate-based molten salts for application to the Rockwell-ETEC molten salt oxidation process. At 1073 to 1373 K, volatility tests were conducted on a horizontal and a vertical transpiration apparatus using a carrier gas composed of CO{sub 2}(g) and H{sub 2}O(g) which was passed over or bubbled through a sodium carbonate bath containing cesium carbonate and various additives. The major vapor species was identified to be CsOH(g) except when greater than 3% chloride is present in the melt, then the major vapor species is CsCl(g). The decrease in volatility of cesium as a function of cesium concentration in Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3{minus}}Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures follows Raoult`s law very closely. Thus, this system exhibits close to ideal solution behavior. Addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate decreases the cesium volatility by just under a factor of 2, and the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride increases the cesium volatility about an order of magnitude. The addition of 2.0 wt % ash, molecular sieve, or silica show little or no effect. However, the data indicate that higher concentrations of ash will decrease the cesium volatility. For the addition of 22.5 wt % sodium sulfate the activity coefficient, {gamma}(Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}){sup {1/2}}, is calculated to be 0.720 {plus_minus} 0.068, and for the addition of 10.0 wt % sodium chloride, the activity coefficient, {gamma}(CsCl), is calculated to be 8.118 {plus_minus} 2.317. Assuming that Henry`s law applies, these activity coefficients are used to extrapolate the effect on cesium retention in the molten salt oxidizer of sulfate and chloride at lower cesium concentrations.

  9. Planetary volatile history - Principles and practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.

    1986-01-01

    The history and evolution of planetary volatile inventories are considered. Planetary bulk volatile inventories are greatly affected by the distance from the preplanetary nebula center at which material accreted, with volatile contents increasing with increasing distance from the nebula center. Other significant factors include: planetary energetics and internal thermal history, planetary volatile sinks (including space), and operation of external variables such as solar energy on the transient, steady-state array of surface volatiles. The net result of all these processes is a volatile history that is itself a controlling factor in overall planetary history.

  10. Direct injection ion chromatography for the control of chlorinated drinking water: simultaneous estimation of nine haloacetic acids and quantitation of bromate, chlorite and chlorate along with the major inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Raposo Funcia, César; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Toruño Fonseca, Ivania M; Espinosa Nieto, Miguel; Espuelas India, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Most methods for the analysis of haloacetic acids published in recent years are based on ion chromatography with direct injection, employing a gradient elution with potassium hydroxide (KOH). This work reports the exploration of an alternative eluent, a buffer of sodium carbonate/sodium hydrogen carbonate, aimed at the simultaneous analysis of nine haloacetic acids along with bromate, chlorite and chlorate. The alternative of both a less alkaline eluent and a lower temperature of operation may prevent the partial decomposition of some of the haloacetic acids during the analytical process, especially the more vulnerable brominated ones. Gradient elution at temperature of 7 °C yielded the best results, with an acceptable separation of 17 analytes (which includes the major natural inorganic anions) and a good linearity. Precision ranges from 0.3 to 23.4 (% V.C.), and detection limits are within units of μg L⁻¹, except for tribromoacetic acid - somewhat high in comparison with those of the official methods. Nonetheless, with the basic instrumentation setup herein described, this method may be suitable for monitoring when the drinking water treatments are to be optimized. This is especially interesting for small communities or for developing/developed countries in which regulations on disinfection by-products others than trihalomethanes are being addressed. PMID:25252348

  11. Mechanisms of volatile production from non-sulfur amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Eun Joo; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Non-sulfur amino acid monomers were used to study the mechanisms of volatile production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only produced many volatiles but also increased the amounts of volatiles from non-sulfur amino acid monomers. The major reaction mechanisms involved in volatile production from each group of the amino acids by irradiation differ significantly. However, we speculate that the radiolysis of amino acid side chains were the major mechanism. In addition, Strecker degradation, especially the production of aldehydes from aliphatic group amino acids, and deamination, isomerization, decarboxylation, cyclic reaction and dehydrogenation of the initial radiolytic products were also contributed to the production of volatile compounds. Each amino acid monomers produced different odor characteristics, but the intensities of odor from all non-sulfur amino acid groups were very weak. This indicated that the contribution of volatiles produced from non-sulfur amino acids was minor. If the volatile compounds from non-sulfur amino acids, especially aldehydes, interact with other volatiles compounds such as sulfur compounds, however, they can contribute to the off-odor of irradiated meat significantly.

  12. Identification of a volatile phytotoxin from algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garavelli, J. S.; Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives were to develop a trap system for isolating fractions of volatile algal phytotoxin and to characterize the major components of the isolated phytotoxin fractions. A bioassay using Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings was developed to aid in investigating the properties of the phytotoxin produced by cultures of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris and Chlorella vulgaris. Two traps were found, 1.0 M hydrochloric acid and 0 C, which removed the phytotoxin from the algal effluent and which could be treated to release that phytotoxin as judged with the bioassay procedure. It was also determined that pretraps of 1.0 M sodium hydroxide and 1.0 M potassium biocarbonate could be used without lowering the phytotoxin effect. Ammonia was identified in trap solutions by ninhydrin reaction, indophenol reaction and derivatization with dansyl chloride and phenylisothiocyanate. Ammonia at the gaseous concentrations detected was found to have the same effects in the bioassay system as the volatile phytotoxin. It is possible that other basic, nitrogen containing compounds which augment the effects of ammonia were present at lower concentrations in the algal effluent.

  13. Magmatic volatiles and the weathering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The sources for volatiles on Mars have been the subject of many hypotheses for exogenous influences including late accretion of volatile-enriched material, impact devolatilization to create massive early atmospheres, and even major bombardment by comets. However, the inventory of chemically active volatiles observable at the contemporary surface of Mars is consistent with domination by endogenous, subsequent planetary processes, viz., persistent magmatic outgassing. Volcanism on Mars has been widespread in both space and time. Notwithstanding important specific differences between the mantles of Earth and Mars, the geochemical similarities are such that the suite of gases emitted from Martian volcanic activity should include H2O, CO2, S-containing gases (e.g. H2S and/or SO2), and Cl-containing gases (e.g., Cl2 and/or HCl). H2O and CO2 exist in the atmosphere of Mars. Both are also present as surface condensates. However, spectroscopic observations of the Martian atmosphere clearly show that the S- and Cl-containing gases are severely depleted, with upper limits of less than or equal to 10(exp -7) the abundance of CO2. Likewise, there is no evidence of polar condensates of compounds of these elements as there is for CO2 and H2O. Within the soil, on the other hand, there has been direct measurement of incorporated H2O and abundant compounds containing S and Cl. Barring some as yet implausible geochemical sequestering process, the S/Cl ratio of about 6:1 in Martian soils implies a limit of 5% on the contribution of matter of solarlike composition (e.g., carbonaceous chondrite or cometary material) to these volatiles. Hence, exogenous sources are minor or not yet observed. From analysis of elemental trends in Martian soils, it has been recently shown that a simple two-component model can satisfy the Viking in situ measurements. Component A includes Si and most or all the Al, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Component B, taken as 16 +/- 3% by weight of the total, contains S and most or all the Cl and Mg. These results constrain several models of Martian soil mineralogy but are consistent with a mixture of silicates (such as Fe-rich clays and accessory minerals and soluble salts). The overall element profile is notably like shergottites, with significant incorporation of chemically reactive atmospheric gases from magmatic degassing.

  14. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kai; Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigated volatilization of rhenium (Re), sulfur, cesium, and iodine during the course of conversion of high-level waste melter feed to glass and compared the results for Re volatilization with those in low-activity waste borosilicate glasses. Whereas Re did not volatilize from high-level waste feed heated at 5 K min-1 until 1000 °C, it began to volatilize from low-activity waste borosilicate glass feeds at ∼600 °C, a temperature ∼200 °C below the onset temperature of evaporation from pure KReO4. Below 800 °C, perrhenate evaporation in low-activity waste melter feeds was enhanced by vigorous foaming and generation of gases from molten salts as they reacted with the glass-forming constituents. At high temperatures, when the glass-forming phase was consolidated, perrhenates were transported to the top surface of glass melt in bubbles, typically together with sulfates and halides. Based on the results of this study (to be considered preliminary at this stage), the high-level waste glass with less foaming and salts appears a promising medium for technetium immobilization.

  15. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  16. Trends in major-ion constituents and properties for selected sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds, Montana and Wyoming, based on data collected during water years 1980-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Sando, Thomas R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Lorenz, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information relating to flow-adjusted temporal trends in major-ion constituents and properties for 16 sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds based on data collected during 19802010. In association with this primary purpose, the report presents background information on major-ion characteristics (including specific conductance, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium adsorption ratio, sodium, alkalinity, chloride, fluoride, dissolved sulfate, and dissolved solids) of the sampling sites and coal-bed methane (CBM) produced water (groundwater pumped from coal seams) in the site watersheds, trend analysis methods, streamflow conditions, and factors that affect trend results. The Tongue and Powder River watersheds overlie the Powder River structural basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. Limited extraction of coal-bed methane (CBM) from the PRB began in the early 1990s, and increased dramatically during the late 1990s and early 2000s. CBM-extraction activities produce discharges of water with high concentrations of dissolved solids (particularly sodium and bicarbonate ions) relative to most stream water in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds. Water-quality of CBM produced water is of concern because of potential effects of sodium on agricultural soils and potential effects of bicarbonate on aquatic biota. Two parametric trend-analysis methods were used in this study: the time-series model (TSM) and ordinary least squares regression (OLS) on time, streamflow, and season. The TSM was used to analyze trends for 11 of the 16 study sites. For five sites, data requirements of the TSM were not met and OLS was used to analyze trends. Two primary 10-year trend-analysis periods were selected. Trend-analysis period 1 (water years 198695; hereinafter referred to as period 1) was selected to represent variability in major-ion concentrations in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds before potential effects of CBM-extraction activities. Trend analysis period 2 (water years 200110; hereinafter referred to as period 2) was selected because it encompassed substantial CBM-extraction activities and therefore might indicate potential effects of CBM-extraction activities on water quality of receiving streams in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds. For sites that did not satisfy data requirements for the TSM, OLS was used to analyze trends for period 2 (if complete data were available) or a 6-year period (200510). Flow-rate characteristics of CBM-produced water were estimated to allow general comparisons with streamflow characteristics of the sampling sites. The information on flow-rate characteristics of CBM-produced water in relation to streamflow does not account for effects of disposal, treatment, or other remediation activities on the potential quantitative effects of CBM-produced water on receiving streams. In many places, CBM-produced water is discharged into impoundments or channels in upper reaches of tributary watersheds where water infiltrates and does not directly contribute to streamflow. For Tongue River at State line (site 4) mean annual pumping rate of CBM-produced water during water years 200110 (hereinafter referred to as mean CBM pumping rate) was 6 percent of the mean of annual median streamflows during water years 200110 (hereinafter referred to as 200110 median streamflow). For main-stem Tongue River sites 5, 7, and 10, mean CBM pumping rate was 812 percent of 200110 median streamflow. For main-stem Powder River sites (sites 12, 13, and 16), mean CBM pumping rates were 26, 28, and 34 percent of 200110 median streamflows, respectively. For main-stem Tongue River sites analyzed by using the TSM and downstream from substantial CBM-extraction activities [Tongue River at State line (site 4), Tongue River at Tongue River Dam (site 5), Tongue River at Birney Day School (site 7), and Tongue River at Miles City (site 10)], generally small significant or nonsignificant decreases in most constituents are in

  17. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  18. Volatilizing toxic metals from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D.A.; Shensin Chen; Reznik, C. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This study revealed that lead, cadmium, mercury, zinc, arsenic, and selenium can be volatilized from both spiked and actual contaminated soils by heating in inert or reducing atmospheres. Generally oxygen proved to be detrimental to the remediation process. An apparatus capable of rapidly heating soil samples to as high as 1,100 C was designed and built to volatilize toxic inorganic contaminants from 500-mg soil samples while purging with hydrogen, nitrogen, or nitrogen/oxygen mixtures. An average of 93% lead removal was observed for PbSO[sub 4]-, Pb(NO[sub 3])[sub 2]-, PbCO[sub 3]-, Pb[sup 0]-, and PbO-spiked soil samples aged for up to two years with initial lead concentrations of 2,000 mg/kg soil when heated for 20 minutes at 900 C in a flowing stream of hydrogen or nitrogen. About 50% lead removal was achieved at 750 C for all the compounds at these conditions. Similar results were obtained for lead-contaminated soil from a battery waste site. Under the same conditions, a sample containing 8,220 mg Pb/kg soil yielded 93% lead removal in hydrogen or nitrogen, but only 73% lead removal in air. Other toxic metals and metalloids also proved amenable to removal from soil by volatilization. The temperatures required for approximately 90% removal during 10 minutes heating in nitrogen were as follows: mercury 370 C, cadmium 550 C, zinc 850 C, arsenic 500 C, and selenium 700 C. Further experiments with oxygen added to the purge gas showed that as little as 1% oxygen significantly lowered the removal of metals, particularly at the lower volatilization temperatures. These experimental results are encouraging; they suggest that the controlled-temperature-metal-volatilization technique is potentially applicable for the permanent lean up of metal contaminated soil.

  19. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  20. Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

  1. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles: a review.

    PubMed

    Gibson, E K

    1992-03-25

    The paper presents a review of the volatiles found within interplanetary dust particles. These particles have been shown to represent primitive material from early in the solar system's formation and also may contain records of stellar processes. The organogenic elements (i.e., H, C, N, O, and S) are among the most abundant elements in our solar system, and their abundances, distributions, and isotopic compositions in early solar system materials permit workers to better understand the processes operating early in the evolutionary history of solar system materials. Interplanetary dust particles have a range of elemental compositions, but generally they have been shown to be similar to carbonaceous chondrites, the solar photosphere, Comet Halley's chondritic cores, and matrix materials of chondritic chondrites. Recovery and analysis of interplanetary dust particles have opened new opportunities for analysis of primitive materials, although interplanetary dust particles represent major challenges to the analyst because of their small size. PMID:11537855

  2. Characterisation of bound volatile compounds of a low flavour kiwifruit species: Actinidia eriantha.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Coralia V; Quek, Siew-Young; Stevenson, Ralph J; Winz, Robert A

    2012-09-15

    Aroma compounds in fruit are known to occur in free and glycosidically bound forms. The bound volatile fraction of a low flavour kiwifruit species, Actinidia eriantha, was studied. The fruit have a bland and grassy flavour. Glycosidic precursors were isolated from juice by adsorption onto an Amberlite XAD-2 column. After enzymatic hydrolysis with Rapidase AR2000, the released aglycones were analysed by GC-MS. Alcohols, terpenoids and phenolics were the most numerously represented compound classes. Alcohols, benzenoids and phenolics showed the highest concentrations. Major compounds were 2-phenylethanol, furfuryl alcohol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, coniferyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol and linolenic acid. Several of the bound compounds found, including linoleic, linolenic and benzoic acids and coniferyl alcohol, are precursors of odorous volatiles. Many compounds detected as bound volatiles have not been previously reported as free volatiles in A. eriantha. The bound volatile composition of A. eriantha also showed differences with those of other kiwifruit species. PMID:23107675

  3. Detection of variable groundwater inflow in rivers with geochemical tracers: Using major ion chemistry and radiochemistry to evaluate radon 222Rn as possible tracer, an example from the Avon and Mitchell rivers, southeast Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, H.; Cartwright, I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface water-groundwater interactions are an important part of the hydrological cycle from ecological and resource perspectives. The dynamics have implications for ecosystems, pollutant transport, and the quality and quantity of water supply for domestic use, agriculture and recreational purposes. Chemical tracers are a valuable tool for understanding the interaction of rivers and the surrounding groundwater. The Gippsland Basin is a significant agricultural area in Southeast Australia. Increasing population has resulted in increased demand of water resources for domestic and agricultural supply. Despite the fact that the Gippsland area receives substantial rainfall, irrigation is still necessary to maintain agricultural production during summer and drier years. The used water resources encompass mostly shallow groundwater and surface water (reservoirs and streams). The effect on the environment range from rising water levels and soil salinisation in the case of irrigation and falling water levels with subsequent necrotization of the vegetation and land subsidence in the case of communal and industrial water extraction. While the surface water components of the hydrological cycle are relatively well understood, groundwater has often been neglected. In particular, constraining the interaction between surface water and groundwater is required for sustainable water management. Gaining and loosing conditions in streams are subject to high temporal and spatial variability and hence, influence the amount of water accessible for agricultural purposes. Following a general assumption recharge to the aquifer occurs during the winter and spring month whereas the river receives water from the aquifer mainly during low flow (base flow) conditions in summer and autumn on a larger scale. Spatial variation, however, are a function of the hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed and the head differences between the aquifer and the river along the river banks. Infiltration and exfiltration rates from changing water levels in the river based on hydraulic models are often underestimated. The hydraulic models do not take into account the complexity of the system and are purely based on discharge figures. Radon (222Rn), stable isotopes and major ion chemistry were used to locate groundwater inputs to the Mitchell and Avon rivers. While stable isotopes and major ion chemistry are useful tracers to determine long-term variability, radon can be used to detect very localised groundwater discharge. Using hydrogeochemistry to locate and quantify groundwater discharge to rivers allows a more accurate assumption on the dynamics of the interaction between surface water and groundwater in the Gippsland area. Radon has been used in similar applications elsewhere. Input parameters for mass balance equations, however, were often approximated and averaged. Radioisotope concentrations in groundwater has been assessed from 20 bores and 5 soil profiles to deliver a more confidential groundwater input water radon concentration by assessing spatial variability and emanation potential of the above-mentioned elements.

  4. Identification of anthropogenic and natural inputs of sulfate into a karstic coastal groundwater system in northeast China: evidence from major ions, δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D.; Song, X.; Currell, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    The hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater evolution in the Daweijia area of Dalian, northeast China, were characterized using hydrochemistry and isotopes of carbon and sulfur (δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4). The aim was to distinguish anthropogenic impacts as distinct from natural processes, with a particular focus on sulfate, which is found at elevated levels (range: 54.4 to 368.8 mg L-1; mean: 174.4 mg L-1) in fresh and brackish groundwater. The current investigation reveals minor seawater intrusion impact (not exceeding 5 % of overall solute load), in contrast with extensive impacts observed in 1982 during the height of intensive abstraction. This indicates that measures to restrict groundwater abstraction have been effective. However, hydrochemical facies analysis shows that the groundwater remains in a state of ongoing hydrochemical evolution (towards Ca-Cl type water) and quality degradation (increasing nitrate and sulphate concentrations). The wide range of NO3 concentrations (74.7-579 mg L-1) in the Quaternary aquifer indicates considerable input of fertilizers and/or leakage from septic systems. Both δ13C (-14.5 to -5.9 ‰) and δ34SSO4 (+5.4-+13.1 ‰) values in groundwater show increasing trends along groundwater flow paths. While carbonate minerals may contribute to increasing δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4 values in deep karstic groundwater, high loads of agricultural fertilizers reaching the aquifer via irrigation return flow are likely the main source of the dissolved sulfate in Quaternary groundwater, as shown by distinctive isotopic ratios and a lack of evidence for other sources in the major ion chemistry. According to isotope mass balance calculations, the fertilizer contribution to overall sulfate has reached an average of 62.1 % in the Quaternary aquifer, which has a strong hydraulic connection to the underlying carbonate aquifer. The results point to an alarming level of impact from the local intensive agriculture on the groundwater system, a widespread problem throughout China.

  5. [In-situ measurement on volatilization loss of ammonia in the vegetable field and its influencing factors].

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Yi-Sheng; He, Ling-Yan; Luan, Sheng-Ji

    2011-02-01

    In order to obtain ammonia volatilization flux and volatilization loss rate in the vegetable field and investigate their relationship with environmental factors, an on-line monitoring system was used to measure the ammonia volatilization in the vegetable (Brassica rapa L. and lettuce) field after urea application during January to September, 2009. The system included a wind tunnel system, a gas collector and an online analyzer system with ion chromatography. The time resolution of measurement was 15 min. The recovery of the system was (92.6 +/- 3.4)%; the accumulated ammonia volatilization within 15 d continuous sampling after fertilization was regarded as the total loss. The accumulated ammonia volatilization of 12 d continuous sampling after fertilization accounted for (85.4 +/- 5.2)% of the total volatilization. The ammonia volatilization loss of broadcasting basal dressing and top dressing for Brassica rapa L. were 23.6% and 21.3%, respectively. The ammonia volatilization loss of holing basal dressing and top dressing for lettuce were 17.6% and 24.0%, respectively. The ammonia volatilization in the vegetable field mostly occurred in the first 2-3 weeks after fertilization. The ammonia volatilization flux had significant positive correlation with the nitrogen application rate, while the ammonia volatilization loss rate had negative correlation with the nitrogen application rate. The ammonia volatilization flux was positively correlated with the soil temperature (r = 0.041, p < 0.05) and the air temperature (r = 0.049, p < 0.01), while not significantly associated with the air humidity and the soil moisture. Temperature was found to be a main factor influencing the ammonia volatilization in the vegetable field. PMID:21528553

  6. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210

    SciTech Connect

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    Organic ion exchangers (IEX) play a major and increasing role in the reactor coolant and other water purification processes. During their operation time they receive significant amounts of radioactivity, making their disposal, together with their organic nature, as medium active waste challenging. Processes applied so far do not eliminate the organic matter, which is unwanted in disposal facilities, or, if high temperatures are applied, raise problems with volatile radionuclides. NUKEM Technologies offers their well introduces process for the destruction of spent solvent (TBP), the pebble bed pyrolysis, now for the treatment of spent IEX (and other problematic waste), with the following benefits: the pyrolysis product is free of organic matter, and the operation temperature with approx. 500 deg. C keeps Cs radionuclides completely in the solid residue. (authors)

  7. Biogenic volatile organic compound analyses by PTR-TOF-MS: Calibration, humidity effect and reduced electric field dependency.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) emitted by plants after stress or damage induction are a major part of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) is a high-resolution and sensitive technique for in situ GLV analyses, while its performance is dramatically influenced by humidity, electric field, etc. In this study the influence of gas humidity and the effect of reduced field (E/N) were examined in addition to measuring calibration curves for the GLVs. Calibration curves measured for seven of the GLVs in dry air were linear, with sensitivities ranging from 5 to 10 ncps/ppbv (normalized counts per second/parts per billion by volume). The sensitivities for most GLV analyses were found to increase by between 20% and 35% when the humidity of the sample gas was raised from 0% to 70% relative humidity (RH) at 21°C, with the exception of (E)-2-hexenol. Product ion branching ratios were also affected by humidity, with the relative abundance of the protonated molecular ions and higher mass fragment ions increasing with humidity. The effect of reduced field (E/N) on the fragmentation of GLVs was examined in the drift tube of the PTR-TOF-MS. The structurally similar GLVs are acutely susceptible to fragmentation following ionization and the fragmentation patterns are highly dependent on E/N. Overall the measured fragmentation patterns contain sufficient information to permit at least partial separation and identification of the isomeric GLVs by looking at differences in their fragmentation patterns at high and low E/N. PMID:26040746

  8. A taste of sweet pepper: Volatile and non-volatile chemical composition of fresh sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) in relation to sensory evaluation of taste.

    PubMed

    Eggink, P M; Maliepaard, C; Tikunov, Y; Haanstra, J P W; Bovy, A G; Visser, R G F

    2012-05-01

    In this study volatile and non-volatile compounds, as well as some breeding parameters, were measured in mature fruits of elite sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) lines and hybrids from a commercial breeding program, several cultivated genotypes and one gene bank accession. In addition, all genotypes were evaluated for taste by a trained descriptive sensory expert panel. Metabolic contrasts between genotypes were caused by clusters of volatile and non-volatile compounds, which could be related to metabolic pathways and common biochemical precursors. Clusters of phenolic derivatives, higher alkanes, sesquiterpenes and lipid derived volatiles formed the major determinants of the genotypic differences. Flavour was described with the use of 14 taste attributes, of which the texture related attributes and the sweet-sour contrast were the most discriminatory factors. The attributes juiciness, toughness, crunchiness, stickiness, sweetness, aroma, sourness and fruity/apple taste could be significantly predicted with combined volatile and non-volatile data. Fructose and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol were highly correlated with aroma, fruity/apple taste and sweetness. New relations were found for fruity/apple taste and sweetness with the compounds p-menth-1-en-9-al, (E)-?-ocimene, (Z)-2-penten-1-ol and (E)-geranylacetone. Based on the overall biochemical and sensory results, the perspectives for flavour improvement by breeding are discussed. PMID:26434294

  9. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, Roberta

    1991-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected by specially equipped aircraft flying in the stratosphere have generated a lot of interest during the last decade. These particles, consisting of primitive materials originating in small solar system bodies such as comets and asteroids, are complex heterogeneous species with a variety of components. In order to understand the past histories of IDP's, it is particularly important to know the nature of the volatiles present. Volatiles released from a number of IDP's have been studied; however, a large number of particles must be studied in order to establish trends, to classify types of IDP's, and to have comparison data for determining the origins of IDP's. This study involves the analysis of six IDP's using laser microprobe mass spectrometry.

  10. Phosphorus as a lunar volatile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, Matthew A.

    2015-07-01

    Phosphorus is an important minor element on the Moon. It is moderately volatile and is found as both phosphates and phosphides in lunar material. The phosphides, such as schreibersite, are common to impact breccias at all Apollo sites. The origin of this schreibersite has been proposed to be a meteoritic contaminant, or alternatively produced in situ by reduction on the lunar surface. I propose that schreibersite and other siderophilic P phases have an origin from impact volatilization of phosphates at the lunar oxygen fugacity, followed by reaction of P gases with metal to form metal phosphides. This pathway is broadly consistent with the composition and structure of metal grains, as well as the native oxygen fugacity of the lunar surface. Additionally, this pathway suggests schreibersite is widespread across the lunar surface and likely on other planetary bodies, and hence may serve as a good P source for in situ resource utilization.

  11. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  12. Arbitrage and Volatility in Chinese Stock's Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shu Quan; Ito, Takao; Zhang, Jianbo

    From the point of view of no-arbitrage pricing, what matters is how much volatility the stock has, for volatility measures the amount of profit that can be made from shorting stocks and purchasing options. With the short-sales constraints or in the absence of options, however, high volatility is likely to mean arbitrage from stock market. As emerging stock markets for China, investors are increasingly concerned about volatilities of Chinese two stock markets. We estimate volatility's models for Chinese stock markets' indexes using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and GARCH. We find that estimated values of volatility parameters are very high for all data frequencies. It suggests that stock returns are extremely volatile even at long term intervals in Chinese markets. Furthermore, this result could be considered that there seems to be arbitrage opportunities in Chinese stock markets.

  13. Human skin volatiles: a review.

    PubMed

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessire, Jean-Marie; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Odors emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields; applications range from forensic studies to diagnostic tools, the design of perfumes and deodorants, and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Numerous studies have investigated the chemical composition of skin odors, and various sampling methods have been used for this purpose. The literature shows that the chemical profile of skin volatiles varies greatly among studies, and the use of different sampling procedures is probably responsible for some of these variations. To our knowledge, this is the first review focused on human skin volatile compounds. We detail the different sampling techniques, each with its own set of advantages and disadvantages, which have been used for the collection of skin odors from different parts of the human body. We present the main skin volatile compounds found in these studies, with particular emphasis on the most frequently studied body regions, axillae, hands, and feet. We propose future directions for promising experimental studies on odors from human skin, particularly in relation to the chemical ecology of blood-sucking insects. PMID:23615881

  14. Polar Volatiles on Moon and Mercury: Similarity and Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent data from Messenger together with the earlier Arecibo radar measurements shown that practically all polar shadowed craters on Mercury should contain the valuable masses of water ice deposits. On the hand, data from LEND instrument onboard LRO detected no signatures of water ice for the majority of lunar polar craters with the permanent shadow, except for three southern craters Shoemaker, Cabeus and Haworth. Possible physical reasons are considered to explain the difference of volatiles distribution at poles of Mercury and Moon.

  15. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities. PMID:26733959

  16. Characterization of ammonia volatilization from liquid dairy manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Kedar

    Emission of gases, odor, and particulate matters from livestock manure is a major concern because of their potential adverse environmental impacts. For example, ammonia in the air has the potential to: negatively affect animal, human health and environment. Mitigation of ammonia emissions from livestock manure to protect animal and human health, and the environment, in general, is thus an important agenda for livestock producers, engineers, and environmental scientists. Proper understanding of the mechanisms or process of its volatilization from manure is the first step towards designing or formulating appropriate emissions mitigation strategies. This research investigated the effects of suspended solids, anaerobic digestion, and ionic strength on the ammonia (NH3) volatilization mechanism from liquid dairy manure. Experiments were conducted to: (i) assess the role of suspended solids characteristics on ammonia volatilization, (ii) evaluate the impacts of anaerobic digestion on the process governing NH 3 volatilization, and (iii) delineate the influences of suspended solids (SS) and ionic strength (IS) on the ammonia volatilization process from dairy manure. Two key parameters (the ammonia dissociation and the overall mass transfer coefficient (KoL)) that govern ammonia volatilization were evaluated to achieve these objectives. The physical and chemical properties of manure were also evaluated to further elucidate the respective processes. The suspended solids ammoniacal nitrogen adsorption properties did not significantly affect either the ammonium dissociation or the K oL; suggesting that the characteristics of manure suspended solids did not play a significant role in ammonia volatilization from liquid dairy manure. The dissociation of ammonium in anaerobically digested (AD) manure was significantly higher than in the undigested (UD) manure. However, KoL was less in AD manure than in UD manure, while an increase in total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) was observed after anaerobic digestion of manure. Overall, increases in ammonium dissociation and TAN after anaerobic digestion indicated higher potential of NH3 volatilization in AD manure. Significant increases in SS concentration and IS were necessary to influence the ammonium dissociation in dairy manure. For all practical purposes, therefore, the individual effects of suspended solids and ionic strength were deemed negligible within the normal ranges of liquid dairy manure characteristics.

  17. Volatile fatty acids as malodorous compounds in wool scouring water and lanolin. Origin and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Jover, E; Abalos, M; Ortiz, L; Bayona, J M

    2003-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (C2-C7) analysis in wool scouring water and lanolin is presented. These substances are of major interest as malodorous compounds in urban and industrial wastewaters. In this work, they have been analysed in wool scouring water by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography negative chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. Most of the volatile fatty acids have been identified at microg g(-1) levels. In addition, since lanolin is a major impurity of raw wool, volatile fatty acid patterns of wool scouring water and lanolin have been compared in order to establish the origin of these compounds in the wastewater. Finally, the efficiency of the deodorization step, mandatory to obtain commercial lanolin, has been assessed taking into account the decrease in volatile fatty acid content from the raw wool to the lanolin. PMID:14977142

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on curcuminoids and volatile oils of fresh turmeric ( Curcuma longa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, R.; Mishra, B. B.; Khaleel, K. M.

    2011-11-01

    In our earlier study a radiation dose of 5 kGy was reported to be suitable for microbial decontamination and shelf life extension of fresh turmeric ( Curcuma longa), while maintaining its quality attributes. In continuation of that work, the effect of gamma radiation on curcuminoids and volatile oil constituents in fresh turmeric was studied. Fresh peeled turmeric rhizomes were gamma irradiated at doses of 1, 3 and 5 kGy. Curcuminoid content and volatile oils were analyzed by reverse phase HPLC and GC-MS, respectively. The curcuminoid content was slightly increased by gamma irradiation. No statistically significant changes were observed due to irradiation in majority of the volatile oil constituents.

  19. Streptopyridines, volatile pyridine alkaloids produced by Streptomyces sp. FORM5

    PubMed Central

    Groenhagen, Ulrike; Maczka, Michael; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Streptomyces sp. FORM5 is a bacterium that is known to produce the antibiotic streptazolin and related compounds. We investigated the strain for the production of volatiles using the CLSA (closed-loop stripping analysis) method. Liquid and agar plate cultures revealed the formation of new 2-alkylpyridines (streptopyridines), structurally closely related to the already known 2-pentadienylpiperidines. The structures of the streptopyridines A to E were confirmed by total synthesis. The analysis of the liquid phase by solvent extraction or extraction with an Oasis adsorbent showed that streptazolin and 2-pentadienylpiperidine are the major compounds, while the streptopyridines are only minor components. In the gas phase, only the streptopyridines could be detected. Therefore, an orthogonal set of analysis is needed to assess the metabolic profile of bacteria, because volatile compounds are obviously overlooked by traditional analytical methods. The streptopyridines are strain specific volatiles that are accompanied by a broad range of headspace constituents that occur in many actinomycetes. Volatiles might be of ecological importance for the producing organism, and, as biosynthetic intermediates or shunt products, they can be useful as indicators of antibiotic production in a bacterium. PMID:24991297

  20. Investigation of the volatile fraction of rosemary infusion extracts.

    PubMed

    Tschiggerl, Christine; Bucar, Franz

    2010-01-01

    The relative proportions of chemical classes (hydrocarbons, oxides, alcohols, ketones, esters) in the essential oil of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L., Lamicaeae) and in the volatile fraction of the infusion extracts were examined and showed remarkable differences.The volatile compounds of the infusion were isolated by two different methods, hydrodistillation and solid phase extraction (SPE). The main constituents of the volatile fraction of the infusion were (hydrodistillation/SPE): 1,8-cineole (42.4%/44.7%), camphor (31.4%/31.8%), -terpineol (8.6%/8.1%) and borneol (8.3%/7.8%). The qualitative and quantitative composition of the volatile compounds of the infusion was compared to the essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation directly from the leaves. The major constituents of the essential oil of the leaves were 1,8-cineole (41.6%), camphor (17.0%), -pinene (9.9%), -terpineol (4.9%) and borneol (4.8%). Comparison of the total essential oil yield quantified by hydrodistillation of the infusion (0.36% v/w) with the essential oil yield of the leaves (1.84% v/w) revealed that only 19.6% of the initial oil could be extracted by infusion. PMID:21179360

  1. Characterization of volatile aroma compounds in cooked black rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong Sik; Lee, Kyu-Seong; Jeong, O-Young; Kim, Kee-Jong; Kays, Stanley J

    2008-01-01

    Black rice ( Oryza sativa L.), an aromatic specialty rice popular in Asia, has a unique flavor, the volatile chemistry of which has not been reported. The objectives of this research were to study volatile profiles of cooked black rice and to characterize the odor-active compounds. Thirty-five volatile compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a dynamic headspace system with Tenax trapping. Aldehydes and aromatics were quantitatively in the greatest abundance, accounting for 80.1% of total relative concentration of volatiles. The concentration of 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2-AP) was high, exceeded only by hexanal, nonanal, and 2-pentylfuran. A total of 25 odor-active compounds, determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry, were applied to principal component analysis, demonstrating significant differences between a black and a traditional white rice cultivar in terms of aroma and explaining 93.0% of the total variation. 2-AP, guaiacol, indole, and p-xylene largely influenced the difference between the aroma in cooked black and white rice. 2-AP and guaiacol were major contributors to the unique character of black rice based on odor thresholds, relative concentrations, and olfactometry. PMID:18081248

  2. Volatile compounds in chorizo and their changes during ripening.

    PubMed

    Mateo, J; Zumalacárregui, J

    1996-12-01

    The volatile compounds extracted from both traditional and industrial chorizo-a dry fermented sausage-were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). One hundred and twenty-six peaks were detected relating to volatile extracts of which 115 were identified. The substances identified belonged to several classes of chemical: acids, alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes, sulphur compounds, ketones, esters, ethers, phenolic compounds, aromatic hydrocarbons, lactones, nitrogen compounds, terpenes, chloroform and benzofurane. Among the major compounds isolated were acetic acid, allyl-1-thiol and phenol. Larger quantities of most of the chemical groups were found in industrial compared to traditional chorizo, except for sulphur compounds. Typical breakdown products derived from lipid autooxidation were virtually negligible in chorizo. Of the chemicals isolated, sulphur compounds, phenols, acids, ethyl esters and carbonyls could have particular importance to the overall chorizo flavour. In addition, the changes in the proportions of volatile compounds during the ripening of chorizo were tracked. Most of the volatiles increased during ripening, especially acids, alcohols, esters, phenols, ketones and terpenes. On comparing the distribution of the sulphur compounds observed in chorizo with that of garlic, some noteworthy differences were observed. The reason for these differences is based upon several transformations of the sulphur compounds derived from garlic during the ripening and storage of chorizo. PMID:22060942

  3. Forecasting volatility of fuel oil futures in China: GARCH-type, SV or realized volatility models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu

    2012-11-01

    In most previous works on forecasting oil market volatility, squared daily returns were taken as the proxy of unobserved actual volatility. However, as demonstrated by Andersen and Bollerslev (1998) [22], this proxy with too high measurement noise could be perfectly outperformed by a so-called realized volatility (RV) measure calculated by the cumulative sum of squared intraday returns. With this motivation, we further extend earlier works by employing intraday high-frequency data to compare the performance of three typical volatility models in the daily out-of-sample volatility forecasting of fuel oil futures on the Shanghai Futures Exchange (SHFE): the GARCH-type, stochastic volatility (SV) and realized volatility models. By taking RV as the proxy of actual daily volatility and then computing forecasting errors, we find that the realized volatility model based on intraday high-frequency data produces significantly more accurate volatility forecasts than the GARCH-type and SV models based on daily returns. Furthermore, the SV model outperforms many linear and nonlinear GARCH-type models that capture long-memory volatility and/or the asymmetric leverage effect in volatility. These results also prove that abundant volatility information is available in intraday high-frequency data, and can be used to construct more accurate oil volatility forecasting models.

  4. Stochastic volatility models and Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Alex; Sepp, Artur

    2008-08-01

    We use stochastic volatility models to describe the evolution of an asset price, its instantaneous volatility and its realized volatility. In particular, we concentrate on the Stein and Stein model (SSM) (1991) for the stochastic asset volatility and the Heston model (HM) (1993) for the stochastic asset variance. By construction, the volatility is not sign definite in SSM and is non-negative in HM. It is well known that both models produce closed-form expressions for the prices of vanilla option via the Lewis-Lipton formula. However, the numerical pricing of exotic options by means of the finite difference and Monte Carlo methods is much more complex for HM than for SSM. Until now, this complexity was considered to be an acceptable price to pay for ensuring that the asset volatility is non-negative. We argue that having negative stochastic volatility is a psychological rather than financial or mathematical problem, and advocate using SSM rather than HM in most applications. We extend SSM by adding volatility jumps and obtain a closed-form expression for the density of the asset price and its realized volatility. We also show that the current method of choice for solving pricing problems with stochastic volatility (via the affine ansatz for the Fourier-transformed density function) can be traced back to the Kelvin method designed in the 19th century for studying wave motion problems arising in fluid dynamics.

  5. Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor Integrated Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, D. A.; Boynton, W. V.; Crisp, D.; Harri, A. M.; Hansen, C. J.; Keller, H. U.; Leshin, L. A.; May, R. D.; Smith, P. H.; Zurek, R. W.

    1997-07-01

    The Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor (MVACS) integrated payload package is being developed for NASA's Mars Surveyor Program (MSP) '98 lander mission. The lander will be targeted to a landing site at 77 degrees south during the Martian late southern spring season. Landed science activities will be conduced during a primary mission which starts in December, 1999, and ends 86 Earth-days later during mid-Martian summer. The MVACS payload will consist of four major science elements: (1) A mast-mounted Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) which will be used to characterize the general environment at the landing site, to make observations of aerosol opacities and column water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere, and to provide imaging support for the other payload elements; (2) A two-meter Robotic Arm (RA), which will be used to acquire samples of surface and subsurface materials; and a Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) which will be used to image the surface and subsurface at close range; (3) A mast-mounted Meteorology Package (MET), which will include pressure, wind, and temperature sensors, as well as a Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) sensor for accurately determining the surface concentration of atmospheric water vapor, as well as the abundances of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopes in atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide; and (4) A Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which will use a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) to determine the abundances of ices and volatile-bearing minerals in surface and subsurface samples acquired by the robotic arm, and a two-wavelength TDL sensor to determine the abundances of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopes within carbon dioxide and water vapor gas evolved from samples heated in the DSC.

  6. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS INHIBIT HUMAN AND RAT NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN XENOPUS OOCYTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript provides evidence to indicate that rats and humans are equally sensitive at the pharmacodynamic level to effects of volatile organic compounds.

    ? This manuscript also presents novel data that provides a plausible mechanism, disruption of ion channel functi...

  7. AMBIENT LEVEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) MONITORING USING SOLID ADSORBANTS - RECENT U.S. EPA STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air spiked with 1-10 ppbv concentrations of 41 toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) listed in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Compendium Method TO-14A was monitored using solid sorbents for sample collection and a Varian Saturn 2000 ion trap mass spectrome...

  8. COMPARISON OF EMISSION PROFILES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM COTTON AND POLYPROPYLENE-BASED TARP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high electric field, radio-frequency ion mobility analyzer (RF-IMS) was used as a small detector in gas chromatographic separations of mixtures of volatile organic compounds including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, pheromes, and other chemical attractants for insects. The detector was equip...

  9. Consumer palatability scores and volatile beef flavor compounds of five USDA quality grades and four muscles.

    PubMed

    Legako, J F; Brooks, J C; O'Quinn, T G; Hagan, T D J; Polkinghorne, R; Farmer, L J; Miller, M F

    2015-02-01

    Proximate data, consumer palatability scores and volatile compounds were investigated for four beef muscles (Longissimus lumborum, Psoas major, Semimembranosus and Gluteus medius) and five USDA quality grades(Prime, Upper 2/3 Choice, Low Choice, Select, and Standard). Quality grade did not directly affect consumer scores or volatiles but interactions (P < 0.05) between muscle and grade were determined. Consumer scores and volatiles differed (P < 0.05) between muscles. Consumers scored Psoas major highest for tenderness, juiciness, flavor liking and overall liking, followed by Longissimus lumborum, Gluteus medius, and Semimembranosus (P < 0.05). Principal component analysis revealed clustering of compound classes, formed by related mechanisms. Volatile n-aldehydes were inversely related to percent fat. Increases in lipid oxidation compounds were associated with Gluteus medius and Semimembranosus, while greater quantities of sulfur-containing compounds were associated with Psoas major. Relationships between palatability scores and volatile compound classes suggest that differences in the pattern of volatile compounds may play a valuable role in explaining consumer liking. PMID:25460139

  10. The origins of volatiles in the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, Alex N.

    2013-03-01

    This paper re-evaluates the data for inner Solar System volatiles with particular reference to the Earth. The mass balance afforded by 40Ar/36Ar shows that the mantle as sampled by volcanism contains at most a small proportion (1-3%) of Earth's primordial argon regardless of the exact K/U. This mass balance is derived from MORB, OIB and well gases. Assuming it represents the total mantle therefore, it can be combined with estimated MORB- and OIB-source budgets to derive a ratio of (seismic) lower to upper mantle primordial noble gas concentrations of 6.9 ± 5.6. The upper and lower mantle concentrations can be made to balance if there have been major (˜40%) losses of highly incompatible elements by impact erosion and the K/U of the MORB source is high (19,000) as recently proposed. Both impact erosion and lower K/U serve to reduce the 4.0 Ga apparent K-Ar age of the mantle, which would be more consistent with significant levels of K and noble gas recycling over geological time. Using noble gases, two extreme models are derived for the H, C and N budgets of Earth's mantle: a layered mantle model, and an impact erosion (uniform) mantle with a composition like that of the MORB source. The impact erosion model better replicates the budgets derived from direct measurement of H, C and N in basaltic glasses but how representative these are of the lower mantle is unknown. These models are independent of the ultimate origins of the noble gases, which are evaluated using non-radiogenic ratios. The 20Ne/36Ar, 20Ne/22Ne and 36Ar/38Ar of Earth, Venus and Mars are consistent with derivation from chondritic materials with admixed Solar components. The Solar proportions of Ne in Earth's atmosphere (˜20%) and mantle (˜75%) are used to derive a likely 3He budget of 4.0 × 1038 atoms for the primordial atmosphere. The heavy noble gases are inconsistent with these simple mixtures and present clear evidence of a major component derived from amorphous cometary ices fractionated from Solar and CI-like compositions that could contribute about 20-50% of the Kr in the atmosphere and potentially more in the mantle. The heavy noble gases in the mantle are not just elementally fractionated but also include Xe that is isotopically heavy, like the atmospheric Xe in Earth and Mars. Therefore, the mantle probably includes protoplanetary and early atmospheric noble gases with cometary and EUV-fractionated components incorporated during accretion and/or by subduction. Earth's Solar normalised primordial abundances of 1H, 3He (determined from the 36Ar mass balance), 12C, 14N, 20Ne, 36Ar, 84Kr and 130Xe, all ignoring the core, correlate with those in chondrites. Primordial 3He, 20Ne, 36Ar and 84Kr proportions are especially close to chondritic but are two orders of magnitude lower in abundance than those of Venus. This may reflect bulk loss of the atmosphere during the Moon-forming Giant Impact. Assuming CI chondrites are Earth's main starting materials for volatiles, 1H is as depleted as 130Xe, and 12C and 14N are the most depleted stable elements in the bulk silicate Earth. The most highly volatile elements 3He, 20Ne, 36Ar and 84Kr are two orders of magnitude more abundant, and are less depleted even than the most highly siderophile elements (PGEs, Re, Au, Te, Se and S), commonly used to define the mass of a late veneer. The inferred amorphous ice cometary noble gas contributions cannot explain the budgets of 1H, 12C, 14N; these can only be derived from chondrites otherwise noble gas budgets would be far higher. A veneer of chondritic material with a minor amount (10-30 ppm) of admixed model cometary composition would explain the noble gas elemental proportions and their overall budget relative to C. However, Earth's H/C and C/N neglecting unknown core contributions are strongly non-chondritic and inconsistent with any combination of chondritic or cometary materials. If a late chondritic veneer contributed most of Earth's nitrogen more than 70% of the hydrogen, presumably in the form of water, would need to predate it. Therefore, Earth probably acquired volatile elements from chondritic material admixed with Solar and cometary contributions during the main stages of accretion, but this was accompanied or followed by greater but variable depletion in 1H, 12C, 14N and 130Xe possibly supplemented by the addition of a late veneer. Venus and Mars display a broadly similar pattern of C and N depletion relative to noble gases when chondrite normalised, based on the minimum budgets deduced from their atmospheres. The strong depletion of 1H, 12C, 14N and 130Xe relative to other noble gases in terrestrial planets, and possibly Xe isotopic fractionation as well, could be explained by the early removal of these elements from the inner circumstellar disk, from the planets, or from silicate reservoirs themselves. Some of the lost 1H, 12C, 14N and possibly 130Xe could be in the metallic cores of terrestrial planets. However, carbon, nitrogen and xenon also all form low temperature species with ionization potentials less than that of hydrogen. The depletion of these four elements as well as the strong Xe isotopic fractionation may therefore also relate to loss of ions formed from solar EUV in the inner circumstellar disk and in protoplanetary atmospheres.

  11. Volatile communication in plant-aphid interactions.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Volatile communication plays an important role in mediating the interactions between plants, aphids, and other organisms in the environment. In response to aphid infestation, many plants initiate indirect defenses through the release of volatiles that attract ladybugs, parasitoid wasps, and other aphid-consuming predators. Aphid-induced volatile release in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana requires the jasmonate signaling pathway. Volatile release is also induced by infection with aphid-transmitted viruses. Consistent with mathematical models of optimal transmission, viruses that are acquired rapidly by aphids induce volatile release to attract migratory aphids, but discourage long-term aphid feeding. Although the ecology of these interactions is well-studied, further research is needed to identify the molecular basis of aphid-induced and virus-induced changes in plant volatile release. PMID:20627668

  12. Volatile pollutants in suburban and industrial air

    SciTech Connect

    Kroneld, R. )

    1989-06-01

    Several studies are concerned with the occurrence of volatile pollutants, as hydrocarbons, halogenated alkanes, alkenes and methanes, chlorophenols and benzene derivatives in the air of cities and industrial facilities. A continuous exposure to volatile pollutants results in a body burden of long duration depending on the storage in tissues with high lipid content. Knowledge of the toxicity of and long-term exposure of humans to volatile pollutants is still limited. Several reports also show that volatile halocarbons are toxic. They are also carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic. There are already threshold values for some volatile halocarbons in some European countries, but Finland is not yet in this position. Because of the possible health significance of the organic constituents, the aim of this study has been to determine volatile pollutants in suburban and industrial air compared to the countryside on the south-west coast of Finland.

  13. Volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Makoto; Toyoda, Masatake; Saito, Yukio

    1995-02-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds were determined in foods. Statistical treatment of the data for 13 sampled from 20 families living in suburban Tokyo (Saitama prefecture) indicated that the foods were contaminated by water pollution and/or substances introduced by the process of food production. Butter and margarine were contaminated by chlorinated ethylene, ethane, and related compounds released by dry cleaning and other operations. Soybean sprouts and tofu (soybean curd) contained chloroform and related trihalomethanes absorbed during the production process. 27 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  15. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  16. Improved Ambient Pressure Pyroelectric Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kim, Hugh I.; Kanik, Isik; Ryu, Ernest K.; Beckett, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The detection of volatile vapors of unknown species in a complex field environment is required in many different applications. Mass spectroscopic techniques require subsystems including an ionization unit and sample transport mechanism. All of these subsystems must have low mass, small volume, low power, and be rugged. A volatile molecular detector, an ambient pressure pyroelectric ion source (APPIS) that met these requirements, was recently reported by Caltech researchers to be used in in situ environments.

  17. Electroantennogram and behavioral responses of Cotesia plutellae to plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, You-Nan; Gurr, Geoff M; Vasseur, Liette; You, Min-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    Plant volatiles have been demonstrated to play an important role in regulating the behavior of Cotesia plutellae, a major larval parasitoid of the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, but little is currently known about the function of each volatile and their mixtures. We selected 13 volatiles of the DBM host plant, a cruciferous vegetable, to study the electroantennogram (EAG) and behavioral responses of C. plutellae. EAG responses to each of the compounds generally increased with concentration. Strong EAG responses were to 100 μL/mL of trans-2-hexenal, benzaldehyde, nonanal and cis-3-hexenol, and 10 μL/mL of trans-2-hexenal and benzaldehyde with the strongest response provoked by trans-2-hexenal at 100 μL/mL. In the Y-tube olfactometer, C. plutellae, was significantly attracted by 1 μL/mL of trans-2-hexenal and benzaldehyde. β-caryophyllene, cis-3-hexenol or trans-2-hexenal significantly attracted C. plutellae at 10 μL/mL, while nonanal, benzyl alcohol, cis-3-hexenol or benzyl cyanide at 100 μL/mL significantly attracted C. plutellae. Trans-2-hexenal significantly repelled C. plutellae at 100 μL/mL. EAG of C. plutellae showed strong responses to all mixtures made of five various compounds with mixtures 3 (trans-2-hexenal, benzaldehyde, nonanal, cis-3-hexenol, benzyl cyanide, farnesene, eucalyptol) and 4 (trans-2-hexenal, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, (R)-(+)-limonene, β-ionone, farnesene, eucalyptol) significantly attracting C. plutellae. These findings demonstrate that the behavior of C. plutellae can be affected either by individual compounds or mixtures of plant volatiles, suggesting a potential of using plant volatiles to improve the efficiency of this parasitoid for biocontrol of P. xylostella. PMID:26711914

  18. First Evidence of a Volatile Sex Pheromone in Lady Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Fassotte, Bérénice; Fischer, Christophe; Durieux, Delphine; Lognay, Georges; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Verheggen, François J.

    2014-01-01

    To date, volatile sex pheromones have not been identified in the Coccinellidae family; yet, various studies have suggested that such semiochemicals exist. Here, we collected volatile chemicals released by virgin females of the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), which were either allowed or not allowed to feed on aphids. Virgin females in the presence of aphids, exhibited “calling behavior”, which is commonly associated with the emission of a sex pheromone in several Coleoptera species. These calling females were found to release a blend of volatile compounds that is involved in the remote attraction (i.e., from a distance) of males. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that (–)-β-caryophyllene was the major constituent of the volatile blend (ranging from 80 to 86%), with four other chemical components also being present; β-elemene, methyl-eugenol, α-humulene, and α-bulnesene. In a second set of experiments, the emission of the five constituents identified from the blend was quantified daily over a 9-day period after exposure to aphids. We found that the quantity of all five chemicals significantly increased across the experimental period. Finally, we evaluated the activity of a synthetic blend of these chemicals by performing bioassays which demonstrated the same attractive effect in males only. The results confirm that female H. axyridis produce a volatile sex pheromone. These findings have potential in the development of more specific and efficient biological pest-control management methods aimed at manipulating the behavior of this invasive lady beetle. PMID:25514321

  19. Deodorization of garlic breath volatiles by food and food components.

    PubMed

    Munch, Ryan; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2014-04-01

    The ability of foods and beverages to reduce allyl methyl disulfide, diallyl disulfide, allyl mercaptan, and allyl methyl sulfide on human breath after consumption of raw garlic was examined. The treatments were consumed immediately following raw garlic consumption for breath measurements, or were blended with garlic prior to headspace measurements. Measurements were done using a selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometer. Chlorophyllin treatment demonstrated no deodorization in comparison to the control. Successful treatments may be due to enzymatic, polyphenolic, or acid deodorization. Enzymatic deodorization involved oxidation of polyphenolic compounds by enzymes, with the oxidized polyphenols causing deodorization. This was the probable mechanism in raw apple, parsley, spinach, and mint treatments. Polyphenolic deodorization involved deodorization by polyphenolic compounds without enzymatic activity. This probably occurred for microwaved apple, green tea, and lemon juice treatments. When pH is below 3.6, the enzyme alliinase is inactivated, which causes a reduction in volatile formation. This was demonstrated in pH-adjusted headspace measurements. However, the mechanism for volatile reduction on human breath (after volatile formation) is unclear, and may have occurred in soft drink and lemon juice breath treatments. Whey protein was not an effective garlic breath deodorant and had no enzymatic activity, polyphenolic compounds, or acidity. Headspace concentrations did not correlate well to breath treatments. PMID:24592995

  20. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitudes, distributions, controlling processes and uncertainties associated with North American natural emissions of oxidant precursors are reviewed. Natural emissions are repsonsible for a major portion of the compounds, including non-methane volatile organic compounds (N...

  1. Conference on Deep Earth and Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are covered in the presented papers: (1) rare gases systematics and mantle structure; (2) volatiles in the earth; (3) impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates; (4) D/H ratios and H2O contents of mantle-derived amphibole megacrysts; (5) thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates; (6) modeling of the effect of water on mantle rheology; (7) noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds; (8) origin and loss of the volatiles of the terrestrial planets; (9) structure and the stability of hydrous minerals at high pressure; (10) recycling of volatiles at subduction zones and various other topics.

  2. Fatty Acid Composition and Volatile Constituents of Protaetia brevitarsis Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyelim; Youn, Kumju; Kim, Minji; Yun, Eun-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2013-01-01

    A total of 48 different volatile oils were identified form P. brevitarsis larvae by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Acids (48.67%) were detected as the major group in P. brevitarsis larvae comprising the largest proportion of the volatile compounds, followed by esters (19.84%), hydrocarbons (18.90%), alcohols (8.37%), miscellaneous (1.71%), aldehydes (1.35%) and terpenes (1.16%). The major volatile constituents were 9-hexadecenoic acid (16.75%), 6-octadecenoic acid (14.88%) and n-hexadecanoic acid (11.06%). The composition of fatty acid was also determined by GC analysis and 16 fatty acids were identified. The predominant fatty acids were oleic acid (C18:1, 64.24%) followed by palmitic acid (C16:0, 15.89%), palmitoleic acid (C16:1, 10.43%) and linoleic acid (C18:2, 4.69%) constituting more than 95% of total fatty acids. The distinguished characteristic of the fatty acid profile of P. brevitarsis larvae was the high proportion of unsaturated fatty acid (80.54% of total fatty acids) versus saturated fatty acids (19.46% of total fatty acids). Furthermore, small but significant amounts of linoleic, linolenic and ?-linolenic acids bestow P. brevitarsis larvae with considerable nutritional value. The novel findings of the present study provide a scientific basis for the comprehensive utilization of the insect as a nutritionally promising food source and a possibility for more effective utilization. PMID:24471125

  3. Volatile Release from the Siberian Traps Inferred from Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Rowe, M. C.; Ukstins Peate, I.

    2009-12-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province is one of the largest known continental flood volcanic provinces in the Phanerozoic. The quantification of volatile degassing is particularly important because the Siberian Traps have often been invoked as a possible trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction (e.g. Campbell et al., 1992; Wignall, 2001). Volatile degassing provides a crucial mechanism to link mafic volcanic eruption to global environmental change. Mafic flood basalt magmas are expected to have low volatile contents (similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts). However, Siberian Traps magmas were chambered in and erupted through a thick sedimentary basin and may have interacted with, and obtained volatiles from, sedimentary lithologies such as limestone, coal, and evaporite. Melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps provide insight into the potential total volatile budget throughout the evolution of the large igneous province. These droplets of trapped melt may preserve volatile species that would otherwise have degassed at the time of eruption (Thordarson et al., 1996). Mafic pyroclastic deposits from the lowermost Arydzhangsky suite (basal Siberian Traps) contain clinopyroxene phenocrysts hosting melt inclusions. Electron microprobe analysis of clinopyroxene-hosted re-homogenized melt inclusions indicates maximum measured concentrations of up to 1500 - 2000 ppm sulfur, 500 - 760 ppm chlorine, and 1900 - 2400 ppm fluorine. Olivines from the Maymechinsky suite, recognized as the last extrusive products of Siberian Traps volcanism, contain melt inclusions with maximum sulfur concentrations in the range of 5000 ppm, and less substantial concentrations of chlorine and fluorine. Intrusive igneous rocks from the province also display significant volatile contents. A sill from the Ust-Ilimsk region yielded plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions which contain chlorine and fluorine concentrations nearing one weight percent. Visscher et al. (2004) proposed that chlorofluorocarbon compounds (CFCs) may have played a major role in the terrestrial end-Permian extinction. These CFCs are powerful catalysts for the breakdown of ozone, a process which can expose the biosphere to increased ultraviolet radiation. Measurements of elevated chlorine and fluorine from the Siberian Traps may thus provide a concrete source for CFCs that could have triggered this kill mechanism.

  4. Volatile Release From The Siberian Traps Inferred From Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Benjamin A.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Rowe, Michael C.; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    The Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province is one of the largest known continental flood volcanic provinces in the Phanerozoic. The quantification of volatile degassing is particularly important because the Siberian Traps have often been invoked as a possible trigger for the end-Permian mass extinction (e.g. Campbell et al., 1992; Wignall, 2001). Volatile degassing provides a crucial mechanism to link mafic volcanic eruption with global environmental change. Mafic flood basalt magmas are expected to have low volatile contents (similar to mid-ocean ridge basalts). However, Siberian Traps magmas were chambered in and erupted through a thick sedimentary basin and may have interacted with, and obtained volatiles from, sedimentary lithologies such as limestone, coal, and evaporite. Melt inclusions from the Siberian Traps provide insight into the potential total volatile budget throughout the evolution of the large igneous province. These droplets of trapped melt may preserve volatile species that would otherwise have degassed at the time of eruption. We present data from the analysis of more than 100 melt inclusions, including both homogenized inclusions and rare glassy inclusions with low crystallinity. Many melt inclusions from tuffs and flows near the base of the Siberian Traps sequence are substantially enriched in chlorine and fluorine compared to Deccan Traps and Laki melt inclusions (Self et al., 2008; Thordarson et al., 1996). These inclusions record chlorine concentrations up to ~1400 ppm, and fluorine concentrations up to ~5000 ppm. Olivines from the Maymechinsky suite, recognized as the last extrusive products of Siberian Traps volcanism, contain melt inclusions with maximum sulfur concentrations in the range of ~5000 ppm and substantial concentrations of chlorine. Intrusive igneous rocks from the province also display significant volatile contents. A sill from the Ust-Ilimsk region yielded plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions which contain chlorine and fluorine concentrations in the range of one weight percent. Visscher et al. (2004) proposed that chlorofluorocarbon compounds (CFCs) may have played a major role in the terrestrial end-Permian extinction. These CFCs are powerful catalysts for the breakdown of ozone, a process which can expose the biosphere to increased ultraviolet radiation. Measurements of elevated chlorine and fluorine from the Siberian Traps may thus provide a concrete source for CFCs that could have triggered this kill mechanism.

  5. Asymmetric volatility, volatility clustering, and herding agents with a borrowing constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2010-03-01

    Recent empirical research has documented asymmetric volatility and volatility clustering in stock markets. We conjecture that a limit of arbitrage due to a borrowing constraint and herding behavior by investors are related to these phenomena. This study conducts simulation analyses on a spin model where borrowing constrained agents imitate their nearest neighbors but switch their strategies to a different one intermittently. We show that herding matters for volatility clustering while a borrowing constraint intensifies the asymmetry of volatility through the herding effect.

  6. Configuration of Pluto's Volatile Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Berry, K.; Buie, M. W.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on near-infrared remote sensing by New Horizons' Ralph instrument (Reuter et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129-154) of Pluto's N2, CO, and CH4 ices. These especially volatile ices are mobile even at Pluto's cryogenic surface temperatures. Sunlight reflected from these ices becomes imprinted with their characteristic spectral absorption bands. The detailed appearance of these absorption features depends on many aspects of local composition, thermodynamic state, and texture. Multiple-scattering radiative transfer models are used to retrieve quantitative information about these properties and to map how they vary across Pluto's surface. Using parameter maps derived from New Horizons observations, we investigate the striking regional differences in the abundances and scattering properties of Pluto's volatile ices. Comparing these spatial patterns with the underlying geology provides valuable constraints on processes actively modifying the planet's surface, over a variety of spatial scales ranging from global latitudinal patterns to more regional and local processes within and around the feature informally known as Sputnik Planum. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  7. Contribution of volatiles to the antifungal effect of Lactobacillus paracasei in defined medium and yogurt.

    PubMed

    Aunsbjerg, S D; Honoré, A H; Marcussen, J; Ebrahimi, P; Vogensen, F K; Benfeldt, C; Skov, T; Knøchel, S

    2015-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria with antifungal properties can be used to control spoilage of food and feed. Previously, most of the identified metabolites have been isolated from cell-free fermentate of lactic acid bacteria with methods suboptimal for detecting possible contribution from volatiles to the antifungal activity. The role of volatile compounds in the antifungal activity of Lactobacillus paracasei DGCC 2132 in a chemically defined interaction medium (CDIM) and yogurt was therefore investigated with a sampling technique minimizing volatile loss. Diacetyl was identified as the major volatile produced by L. paracasei DGCC 2132 in CDIM. When the strain was added to a yogurt medium diacetyl as well as other volatiles also increased but the metabolome was more complex. Removal of L. paracasei DGCC 2132 cells from CDIM fermentate resulted in loss of both volatiles, including diacetyl, and the antifungal activity towards two strains of Penicillium spp. When adding diacetyl to CDIM or yogurt without L. paracasei DGCC 2132, marked inhibition was observed. Besides diacetyl, the antifungal properties of acetoin were examined, but no antifungal activity was observed. Overall, the results demonstrate the contribution of diacetyl in the antifungal effect of L. paracasei DGCC 2132 and indicate that the importance of volatiles may have been previously underestimated. PMID:25461608

  8. Dynamic modeling of biodegradation and volatilization of hazardous aromatic substances in aerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Mozo, I; Lesage, G; Yin, J; Bessiere, Y; Barna, L; Sperandio, M

    2012-10-15

    The aerobic biological process is one of the best technologies available for removing hazardous organic substances from industrial wastewaters. But in the case of volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, naphthalene), volatilization can contribute significantly to their removal from the liquid phase. One major issue is to predict the competition between volatilization and biodegradation in biological process depending on the target molecule. The aim of this study was to develop an integrated dynamic model to evaluate the influence of operating conditions, kinetic parameters and physical properties of the molecule on the main pathways (biodegradation and volatilization) for the removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). After a comparison with experimental data, sensitivity studies were carried out in order to optimize the aerated biological process. Acclimatized biomass growth is limited by volatilization, which reduces the bioavailability of the substrate. Moreover, the amount of biodegraded substrate is directly proportional to the amount of active biomass stabilized in the process. Model outputs predict that biodegradation is enhanced at high SRT for molecules with low H and with a high growth rate population. Air flow rate should be optimized to meet the oxygen demand and to minimize VOC stripping. Finally, the feeding strategy was found to be the most influential operating parameter that should be adjusted in order to enhance VOC biodegradation and to limit their volatilization in sequencing batch reactors (SBR). PMID:22877879

  9. Flavour compounds in tomato fruits: identification of loci and potential pathways affecting volatile composition

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Sandrine; Cin, Valeriano Dal; Fei, Zhangjun; Li, Hua; Bliss, Peter; Taylor, Mark G.; Klee, Harry J.; Tieman, Denise M.

    2009-01-01

    The unique flavour of a tomato fruit is the sum of a complex interaction among sugars, acids, and a large set of volatile compounds. While it is generally acknowledged that the flavour of commercially produced tomatoes is inferior, the biochemical and genetic complexity of the trait has made breeding for improved flavour extremely difficult. The volatiles, in particular, present a major challenge for flavour improvement, being generated from a diverse set of lipid, amino acid, and carotenoid precursors. Very few genes controlling their biosynthesis have been identified. New quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that affect the volatile emissions of red-ripe fruits are described here. A population of introgression lines derived from a cross between the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum and its wild relative, S. habrochaites, was characterized over multiple seasons and locations. A total of 30 QTLs affecting the emission of one or more volatiles were mapped. The data from this mapping project, combined with previously collected data on an IL population derived from a cross between S. lycopersicum and S. pennellii populations, were used to construct a correlational database. A metabolite tree derived from these data provides new insights into the pathways for the synthesis of several of these volatiles. One QTL is a novel locus affecting fruit carotenoid content on chromosome 2. Volatile emissions from this and other lines indicate that the linear and cyclic apocarotenoid volatiles are probably derived from separate carotenoid pools. PMID:19088332

  10. Non-volatile, solid state bistable electrical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A bistable switching element is made of a material whose electrical resistance reversibly decreases in response to intercalation by positive ions. Flow of positive ions between the bistable switching element and a positive ion source is controlled by means of an electrical potential applied across a thermal switching element. The material of the thermal switching element generates heat in response to electrical current flow therethrough, which in turn causes the material to undergo a thermal phase transition from a high electrical resistance state to a low electrical resistance state as the temperature increases above a predetermined value. Application of the electrical potential in one direction renders the thermal switching element conductive to pass electron current out of the ion source. This causes positive ions to flow from the source into the bistable switching element and intercalate the same to produce a non-volatile, low resistance logic state. Application of the electrical potential in the opposite direction causes reverse current flow which de-intercalates the bistable logic switching element and produces a high resistance logic state.

  11. Sorption of volatile flavor compounds by microcellular cereal starch.

    PubMed

    Buttery, R G; Glenn, G M; Stern, D J

    1999-12-01

    Wheat starch based microcellular foam (MCF) forms of (dry) starch possess a significant percentage of micropores in the range of 5-14 A. The present study confirmed earlier preliminary studies that MCF starch (in a 0.25-1.0 mm diameter bead form) is effective in sorbing and lowering the headspace partial pressure of many volatile compounds in a manner similar (although less efficient) to that exhibited by other microcavity sorbants such as charcoal. It was found that the proportion of polar compounds sorbed was much greater than the proportion of nonpolar compounds. A major portion of the sorbed volatile compound was readily displaced from the MCF microcellular starch by the addition of water. These properties make this form of edible starch a potential useful carrier of flavor compounds for dried foods. PMID:10606596

  12. On-Plant Volatile Analysis Utilizing Solid-Phase Microextraction and a New Volatile Collection Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile emission of plants is typically measured by removal of the plant-part, transportation to a laboratory, and subsequent volatile analyses via a number of accepted methodologies. Studies performed by our laboratory have shown the volatile emission of removed plant parts are essentially identic...

  13. Wall-loss distribution of charge breeding ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. C.; Oyaizu, M.; Imai, N.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Miyatake, H.; Niki, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Otokawa, Y.; Osa, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the ion-loss distribution on the sidewall of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chamber using the 18-GHz ECR charge breeder at the Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC). Similarities and differences between the ion-loss distributions (longitudinal and azimuthal) of different ion species (i.e., radioactive {sup 111}In{sup 1+} and {sup 140}Xe{sup 1+} ions that are typical volatile and nonvolatile elements) was qualitatively discussed to understand the element dependence of the charge breeding efficiency. Especially, the similarities represent universal ion loss characteristics in an ECR charge breeder, which are different from the loss patterns of electrons on the ECRIS wall.

  14. Non-volatile memory based on transition metal perovskite oxide resistance switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nian, Yibo

    Driven by the non-volatile memory market looking for new advanced materials, this dissertation focuses on the study of non-volatile resistive random access memory (RRAM) based on transition metal perovskite oxides. Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (PCMO), one of the representative materials in this family, has demonstrated a large range of resistance change when short electrical pulses with different polarity are applied. Such electrical-pulse-induced resistance (EPIR), with attractive features such as fast response, low power, high-density and non-volatility, makes PCMO and related materials promising candidates for non-volatile RRAM application. The objective of this work is to investigate, optimize and understand the properties of this universal EPIR behavior in transition metal perovskite oxide, represented by PCMO thin film devices. The research work includes fabrication of PCMO thin film devices, characterization of these EPIR devices as non-volatile memories, and investigation of their resistive switching mechanisms. The functionality of this perovskite oxide RRAM, including pulse magnitude/width dependence, power consumption, retention, endurance and radiation-hardness has been investigated. By studying the "shuttle tail" in hysteresis switching loops of oxygen deficient devices, a diffusion model with oxygen ions/vacancies as active agents at the metal/oxide interface is proposed for the non-volatile resistance switching effect in transition metal perovskite oxide thin films. The change of EPIR switching behavior after oxygen/argon ion implantation also shows experiment support for the proposed model. Furthermore, the universality, scalability and comparison with other non-volatile memories are discussed for future application.

  15. Volatiles in Submarine HIMU Basalts from the Austral Islands, South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. R.; Hanyu, T.; Shimizu, K.; Dosso, L.

    2014-12-01

    Submarine basalts have been collected from the slopes of Rurutu and Tubuai in the Austral Islands, South Pacific with the manned submersible Shinkai 6500. Previous work on the bulk radiogenic isotope and trace element chemistry of these samples suggests that the basalts were generated from a HIMU reservoir derived from an ancient subducted slab that was entrained and mixed with the depleted asthenospheric mantle. Olivines and glasses from the submarine basalts show lower 3He/4He than MORB, similar to subaerial basalts from these islands. Sixteen glass chips from the same submarine samples have now undergone in-situ analysis for major elements (including S and Cl) by EPMA, trace elements by LA-ICP-MS, H2O and CO2 by FTIR, and bulk volatile analysis (S, Cl, F) by ion chromatography combined with pyrohydrolysis. H2O ranges from 0.62-2.44 wt%, while CO2 is below detection (<20 ppm). S measured by EPMA ranges from 612-1889 ppm and by bulk analysis from 582-1301 ppm and, with the exception of one sample, concentrations agree well. Cl measured by EPMA ranges from 151-538 ppm, and by bulk analysis from 188-980 ppm. The higher values suggest that the bulk samples may be contaminated by seawater; otherwise Cl correlates strongly with incompatible elements. F measured in the bulk samples ranges from 221-1243 ppm. S correlates positively with FeO and Cu, but not with incompatible elements, suggesting sulfide saturation. While the highest H2O contents may reflect late-stage hydration and are oversaturated at the depth of collection, the low H2O contents (11 samples with 0.62-0.96 wt%) are undersaturated, and there is a positive correlation between the H2O contents of all chips and their incompatible element concentrations. This suggests that H2O/Ce and Cl/Ce filtered for shallow level processes may reflect source compositions, providing constraints on volatiles in the sources of Rurutu and Tubuai, and indications about the efficiency of subduction-related volatile-loss in the HIMU component.

  16. Comparative study of volatile oil content and antimicrobial activity of pecan cultivars growing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El Hawary, Seham S; Zaghloul, Soumaya S; El Halawany, Ali M; El Bishbishy, Mahitab H

    2013-11-01

    The volatile oils obtained from the leaves of four pecan cultivars growing in Egypt were evaluated for their chemical composition and antimicrobial activity. The selected cultivars (cv.) were Carya illinoinensis (Wangneh.) K. Koch. cv. Wichita, C. illinoinensis cv. Western Schley, C. illinoinensis cv. Cherokee, and C. illinoinensis cv. Sioux. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the volatile oils from samples of the different cultivars differ in composition and percentage of their components. β-Curcumene was found as the major constituent of the cv. Wichita oil, whereas germacrene D was the major component of cv. Sioux, cv. Cherokee, and cv. Western Schley. The antimicrobial activity was assayed using the Kirby-Bauer Method by measuring the zone of inhibition of growth. All volatile oils displayed an antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial strains. On the other hand, only the volatile oil of cv. Wichita showed an antifungal effect on Aspergillus flavus. This work has identified candidates of volatile oils for future in vivo studies to develop antibiotic substitutes for the diminution of human and animal pathogenic bacteria. Nevertheless, the variations of the volatile oil components and antimicrobial potencies of the different studied cultivars, necessitate identifying the cultivars used in future studies. PMID:24180553

  17. Citrus Leaf Volatiles as Affected by Developmental Stage and Genetic Type

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Muhammad; Jiang, Qian; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Changjie; Chen, Kunsong

    2013-01-01

    Major volatiles from young and mature leaves of different citrus types were analyzed by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-GC-MS. A total of 123 components were identified form nine citrus cultivars, including nine aldehydes, 19 monoterpene hydrocarbons, 27 oxygenated monoterpenes, 43 sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, eight oxygenated sesquiterpenes, two ketones, six esters and nine miscellaneous. Young leaves produced higher amounts of volatiles than mature leaves in most cultivars. The percentage of aldehyde and monoterpene hydrocarbons increased, whilst oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes compounds decreased during leaf development. Linalool was the most abundant compound in young leaves, whereas limonene was the chief component in mature ones. Notably, linalool content decreased, while limonene increased, during leaf development in most cultivars. Leaf volatiles were also affected by genetic types. A most abundant volatile in one or several genotypes can be absent in another one(s), such as limonene in young leaves of lemon vs. Satsuma mandarin and ?-terpinene in mature leaves of three genotypes vs. the other four. Compositional data was subjected to multivariate statistical analysis, and variations in leaf volatiles were identified and clustered into six groups. This research determining the relationship between production of major volatiles from different citrus varieties and leaf stages could be of use for industrial and culinary purposes. PMID:23994837

  18. Ion composition and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    Measurements from the Vega and Giotto probes are used to study the composition and chemistry of Comet Halley. The missing parent molecules of the C+ and S+ ions which are very abundant in the outer coma of Comet Halley at a radial distance of 100,000 km are examined. Consideration is given to the atomic ions, C+, S+, He+, and Na+, the molecular ions, NH4(+), H2CN(+), and HCS(+), formaldehyde polymers and polycylic aromatic hydrogen carbons. It is suggested that the deficiency of N2 and NH3(+) and the abundance of CO and CO2 with a significant amount of H2CO cloud result from the condensation of volatile ices in the solar nebula.

  19. Birds exploit herbivore-induced plant volatiles to locate herbivorous prey.

    PubMed

    Amo, Luisa; Jansen, Jeroen J; van Dam, Nicole M; Dicke, Marcel; Visser, Marcel E

    2013-11-01

    Arthropod herbivory induces plant volatiles that can be used by natural enemies of the herbivores to find their prey. This has been studied mainly for arthropods that prey upon or parasitise herbivorous arthropods but rarely for insectivorous birds, one of the main groups of predators of herbivorous insects such as lepidopteran larvae. Here, we show that great tits (Parus major) discriminate between caterpillar-infested and uninfested trees. Birds were attracted to infested trees, even when they could not see the larvae or their feeding damage. We furthermore show that infested and uninfested trees differ in volatile emissions and visual characteristics. Finally, we show, for the first time, that birds smell which tree is infested with their prey based on differences in volatile profiles emitted by infested and uninfested trees. Volatiles emitted by plants in response to herbivory by lepidopteran larvae thus not only attract predatory insects but also vertebrate predators. PMID:24103093

  20. Volatility and composition of aerosols in tropical stratosphere and TTL over Biak, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, T.; Hara, K.; Hasebe, F.

    2014-12-01

    Number concentration and volatility of aerosols in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) over Biak (1.2 oS, 136.1 oE) were observed using balloon-borne dual optical particle counters (OPC) in January 2011, 2012, and 2013. One OPC observed number concentration of ambient aerosols and another OPC had an inlet with a thermo denuder, whose temperature were set at 100 to 300 oC, in order to observe volatility. The results suggest that major composition of aerosol change with altitude, from sulfate in upper troposphere to sulfuric acid in stratosphere through TTL region. The ratios of number concentrations of un-volatile aerosol, to those of ambient aerosol in sub-micrometer size range are few percent in stratosphere and several percent in TTL. In addition, un-volatile aerosol concentrations were similar to the concentration of ice particle in sub-visible cirrus.

  1. Role of an esterase in flavor volatile variation within the tomato clade.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Charles; Mageroy, Melissa H; Lam, Nghi B; Floystad, Abbye; Tieman, Denise M; Klee, Harry J

    2012-11-13

    Tomato flavor is dependent upon a complex mixture of volatiles including multiple acetate esters. Red-fruited species of the tomato clade accumulate a relatively low content of acetate esters in comparison with the green-fruited species. We show that the difference in volatile ester content between the red- and green-fruited species is associated with insertion of a retrotransposon adjacent to the most enzymatically active member of a family of esterases. This insertion causes higher expression of the esterase, resulting in the reduced levels of multiple esters that are negatively correlated with human preferences for tomato. The insertion was evolutionarily fixed in the red-fruited species, suggesting that high expression of the esterase and consequent low ester content may provide an adaptive advantage in the ancestor of the red-fruited species. These results illustrate at a molecular level how closely related species exhibit major differences in volatile production by altering a volatile-associated catabolic activity. PMID:23112200

  2. Role of an esterase in flavor volatile variation within the tomato clade

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Charles; Mageroy, Melissa H.; Lam, Nghi B.; Floystad, Abbye; Tieman, Denise M.; Klee, Harry J.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato flavor is dependent upon a complex mixture of volatiles including multiple acetate esters. Red-fruited species of the tomato clade accumulate a relatively low content of acetate esters in comparison with the green-fruited species. We show that the difference in volatile ester content between the red- and green-fruited species is associated with insertion of a retrotransposon adjacent to the most enzymatically active member of a family of esterases. This insertion causes higher expression of the esterase, resulting in the reduced levels of multiple esters that are negatively correlated with human preferences for tomato. The insertion was evolutionarily fixed in the red-fruited species, suggesting that high expression of the esterase and consequent low ester content may provide an adaptive advantage in the ancestor of the red-fruited species. These results illustrate at a molecular level how closely related species exhibit major differences in volatile production by altering a volatile-associated catabolic activity. PMID:23112200

  3. Ion sources for light-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, R.A.; Bieg, K.W.; Dreike, P.L.; McKay, P.F.; Pregenzer, A.L.; Tisone, G.C.; Woodworth, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Light-ion drivers offer a potentially efficient and low-cost method to compress and heat an Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) target. In order to produce a significant thermonuclear burn of the fuel, focused ion-beam intensities of 100 TW/cm/sup 2/ are required. The ion sources for these pulsed-power drivers should produce a single-ion species and should be capable of providing current-density levels up to 5 kA/cm/sup 2/, in pulse widths of 10 ns to 20 ns, at voltages up to several tens of megavolts. Most ion sources used in the past have produced multiple-ion species, including protons and heavier ions, such as carbon and oxygen. In the last few years there has been a substantial research effort to produce single-species sources. The major effort since 1983 has been directed towards developing a pure, high-current Li/sup +/ source for the light-ion fusion accelerator, PBFA II. There are two types of ion sources being used for intense in-beam generation: passive sources, which are produced directly or indirectly by the diode voltage itself, and active sources, in which a preformed plasma is generated before the arrival of the power pulse. A survey of existing ion sources and those under development will be given. Emphasis will be given to the lithium-ion sources being developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). 39 refs., 7 figs.

  4. IN-HOUSE REFORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF MAJOR MANUFACTURER'S VEHICLE REFINISHING COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal is to develop high quality vehicle refinishing paint formulations that contain much less toxi and volatile solvents than the major manufacturer's Federal compliant and California complaint coatings. The reformulated coatings being developed will maintain or improve upo...

  5. VOLATILIZED LUBRICANT EMISSIONS FROM STEEL ROLLING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the volatilization of lubricants used in steel rolling. Data from nine steel mills were used to: define the volatilized portion of lubricants used in rolling; and prepare total oil, grease, and hydraulic material balances for actual and typi...

  6. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods, or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography i...

  7. Seasonal long-memory stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzaga, Alex C.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an alternative approach to estimation of seasonal long-memory stochastic volatility based on the generalized long-memory stochastic volatility (GLMSV) model. We show that the estimator is consistent. We investigate the small sample performance of the estimator by simulation. An application to actual data is also presented.

  8. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  9. Ambient orchard volatiles from California almonds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The volatile emissions of various plant parts of almonds have been studied via various techniques in the past. These analyses have typically been performed on single cultivars and hence may not be representative of the volatiles found in an entire almond orchard. Recent reports suggest some almond v...

  10. Volatile Exchange between Undamaged Plants - a New Mechanism Affecting Insect Orientation in Intercropping

    PubMed Central

    Ninkovic, Velemir; Dahlin, Iris; Vucetic, Andja; Petrovic-Obradovic, Olivera; Glinwood, Robert; Webster, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Changes in plant volatile emission can be induced by exposure to volatiles from neighbouring insect-attacked plants. However, plants are also exposed to volatiles from unattacked neighbours, and the consequences of this have not been explored. We investigated whether volatile exchange between undamaged plants affects volatile emission and plant-insect interaction. Consistently greater quantities of two terpenoids were found in the headspace of potato previously exposed to volatiles from undamaged onion plants identified by mass spectrometry. Using live plants and synthetic blends mimicking exposed and unexposed potato, we tested the olfactory response of winged aphids, Myzus persicae. The altered potato volatile profile deterred aphids in laboratory experiments. Further, we show that growing potato together with onion in the field reduces the abundance of winged, host-seeking aphids. Our study broadens the ecological significance of the phenomenon; volatiles carry not only information on whether or not neighbouring plants are under attack, but also information on the emitter plants themselves. In this way responding plants could obtain information on whether the neighbouring plant is a competitive threat and can accordingly adjust their growth towards it. We interpret this as a response in the process of adaptation towards neighbouring plants. Furthermore, these physiological changes in the responding plants have significant ecological impact, as behaviour of aphids was affected. Since herbivore host plants are potentially under constant exposure to these volatiles, our study has major implications for the understanding of how mechanisms within plant communities affect insects. This knowledge could be used to improve plant protection and increase scientific understanding of communication between plants and its impact on other organisms. PMID:23922710

  11. Volatile exchange between undamaged plants - a new mechanism affecting insect orientation in intercropping.

    PubMed

    Ninkovic, Velemir; Dahlin, Iris; Vucetic, Andja; Petrovic-Obradovic, Olivera; Glinwood, Robert; Webster, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Changes in plant volatile emission can be induced by exposure to volatiles from neighbouring insect-attacked plants. However, plants are also exposed to volatiles from unattacked neighbours, and the consequences of this have not been explored. We investigated whether volatile exchange between undamaged plants affects volatile emission and plant-insect interaction. Consistently greater quantities of two terpenoids were found in the headspace of potato previously exposed to volatiles from undamaged onion plants identified by mass spectrometry. Using live plants and synthetic blends mimicking exposed and unexposed potato, we tested the olfactory response of winged aphids, Myzus persicae. The altered potato volatile profile deterred aphids in laboratory experiments. Further, we show that growing potato together with onion in the field reduces the abundance of winged, host-seeking aphids. Our study broadens the ecological significance of the phenomenon; volatiles carry not only information on whether or not neighbouring plants are under attack, but also information on the emitter plants themselves. In this way responding plants could obtain information on whether the neighbouring plant is a competitive threat and can accordingly adjust their growth towards it. We interpret this as a response in the process of adaptation towards neighbouring plants. Furthermore, these physiological changes in the responding plants have significant ecological impact, as behaviour of aphids was affected. Since herbivore host plants are potentially under constant exposure to these volatiles, our study has major implications for the understanding of how mechanisms within plant communities affect insects. This knowledge could be used to improve plant protection and increase scientific understanding of communication between plants and its impact on other organisms. PMID:23922710

  12. Volatile constituents of Aristolochia argentina.

    PubMed

    Priestap, Horacio A; van Baren, Catalina M; Di Leo Lira, Paola; Coussio, J D; Bandoni, Arnaldo L

    2003-05-01

    The essential oils from leaves, aerial stems and underground organs of Aristolochia argentina Gris., a medicinal plant popularly known as "charrúa", were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Forty-three components were identified in the oils. All parts of the plant afforded volatile oils characterized by high levels of argentilactone (57-89%) and the presence of undecatriene isomers (0.3-4.0%), these latter compounds providing the essential oils and extracts with an intense particular odor. Terpenes account for the remaining portion of the essential oils (5-29%). Bicyclogermacrene predominates in the aerial parts of the plant, whereas ishwarane is the main terpene of the subterranean organs. Argentilactone, a suspected carcinogenic compound, was also identified in a medicinal commercial tincture of A. argentina. PMID:12711145

  13. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  14. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  15. Lunar Volatiles: An Earth-Moon Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been accepted that the Moon is depleted in volatile elements. However, the recent discovery of measurable water in lunar glasses and apatites suggests that volatiles are not as depleted as was once thought. And, in fact, some authors have claimed that water contents of the lunar and terrestrial mantles are similar. Moderately volatile alkali elements may have a bearing on this issue. In general, bulk Moon alkalis are depleted relative to the bulk silicate Earth. Although the bulk lunar chemical composition is difficult to reconstruct, good correlations of alkali elements with refractory lithophile incompatible trace elements make this conclusion robust. These observations have been taken to mean that the Moon overall is depleted in volatiles relative to the Earth. Since water is more volatile than any of the alkali elements, presumably this conclusion is true for water, or even more so.

  16. Space-weathering processes and products on volatile-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D.; Schelling, P.; Consolmagno, G.; Bradley, T.

    2014-07-01

    Space weathering is a generic term for the effects on atmosphereless solid bodies in the solar system from a range of processes associated with direct exposure to the space environment. These include impact processes (shock, vaporization, fragmentation, heating, melting, and ejecta formation), radiation damage (from galactic and solar cosmic rays), solar-wind effects (irradiation, ion implantation, and sputtering), and the chemical reactions driven by these processes. The classic example of space weathering is the formation of the lunar spectral red slope associated with the production of nanophase Fe (npFe0) in the dusty lunar regolith (C.R. Chapman, 2004, Annual Review of Earth & Planet. Sci. 32, C.M. Pieters, 2000, MAPS 35). Similar npFe0 has been recovered from asteroid (25143) Itokawa and some asteroid classes do exhibit modest spectral red slopes (T. Noguchi, 2011, Science 333). Space weathering can be thought of as driven by a combination of the chemical environment of space (hard vacuum, low oxygen fugacity, solar-wind implantation of hydrogen) along with thermal energy supplied by micrometeorite impacts. The forward modeling of space weathering as thermodynamically-driven decomposition of common rock-forming minerals suggests the production of a range of daughter products: (1) The silicate products typically lose oxygen, other volatile elements (i.e., sulfur and sodium), and metallic cations, producing minerals that are typically more disordered and less optically active than the original parent materials. (2) The decomposed metallic cations form in nano-sized blebs including npFe0, on the surfaces or in condensing rims of mineral grains. This creates a powerful optical component as seen in the lunar red slope. Surfaces with exposed npFe0 are an ideal environment for catalyzing further reactions. (3) The liberated volatile elements and gases (O, S, Na) may form an observable exosphere (e.g., Moon and Mercury) and can either escape from the body or recombine with available solar-wind-implanted hydrogen to form trace amounts of water and OH. Mineral decomposition can be thought of as the first stage of space weathering. It produces weathered surfaces somewhat depleted in volatile elements, creates a predictable set of minor or trace minerals, and leaves the surfaces with catalytic species, primarily npFe0. However, a second stage of further reactions and weathering depends upon the presence of ''feed-stock'' components that can participate in catalyzed chemical reactions on exposed surfaces. For volatile-rich small bodies, the available materials are not only silicates, but a volatile feedstock that can include water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, to name a few. Thermodynamically-driven decomposition of silicates will produce trace amounts of npFe0 which are ideal sites for Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) catalytic reactions that can produce organics in situ on the asteroids including alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and amino acids (J.E. Elsila, 2012, MAPS 47). The mix and range of products depends on the composition and morphology of the mineral surface, energy inputs produced by the micrometeorite impacts or other processes, and the composition of the input volatile feedstock. FFT reactions generate long-chain carbon compounds and amino acids. Secondary reactions that generate more complex carbon compounds and amino acids are likely to occur as the organic material matures. Weathering maturity can be thought of as a function of the abundance and diversity of the weathering products. Since the npFe0 is not destroyed in the reaction, continued micrometeorite bombardment would result in continuing processing and recombination of the existing organic feedstock. More weathering would result in progressively longer-chain carbon compounds as well as more complex and diverse amino acids, and eventually the kerogen-like insoluble-organic matter that forms a large fraction of carbonaceous meteorites. This insight has several major implications for our planetary science and, potentially, the formation of the precursors of life. First, the range of weathering products seen in remotely-sensed data, meteorites, and returned samples are not random, but the predictable outcome of the source region's mineral kinetics and chemical feedstock. Weathering products do not have to be optically active like the npFe0 that produces the lunar red slope; on the contrary, probably most weathering products are spectrally neutral or even suppress an object's near-IR reflectance spectrum. In the case of volatile-rich parent bodies, a major weathering product is a range of carbon-rich compounds. But an additional result of considerable interest is the generation of pre-biotic compounds as a routine and predictable byproduct of common space-weathering processes. Any atmosphereless body around any star with mafic silicate mineral compositions and volatile feedstocks should create amino acids as a standard byproduct of space weathering. The precursors of life are probably abundant in any space-weathered asteroid belt, in any solar system, and only wait being accreted to a hospitable environment.

  17. SELECTION GUIDE FOR VOLATILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The guide presents a methodology for evaluating applicability of volatilization technologies for removing volatile organics from water. The volatilization technologies assessed in the study include: surface sprayers, surface aerators, bubble columns, cooling towers, steam strippe...

  18. Volatile fingerprints of seeds of four species indicate the involvement of alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions in seed deterioration during ageing and desiccation stress

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The volatile compounds released by orthodox (desiccation-tolerant) seeds during ageing can be analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Comparison of three legume species (Pisum sativum, Lathyrus pratensis, and Cytisus scoparius) during artificial ageing at 60% relative humidity and 50 °C revealed variation in the seed volatile fingerprint between species, although in all species the overall volatile concentration increased with storage period, and changes could be detected prior to the onset of viability loss. The volatile compounds are proposed to derive from three main sources: alcoholic fermentation, lipid peroxidation, and Maillard reactions. Lipid peroxidation was confirmed in P. sativum seeds through analysis of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal. Volatile production by ageing orthodox seeds was compared with that of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) seeds of Quercus robur during desiccation. Many of the volatiles were common to both ageing orthodox seeds and desiccating recalcitrant seeds, with alcoholic fermentation forming the major source of volatiles. Finally, comparison was made between two methods of analysis; the first used a Tenax adsorbent to trap volatiles, whilst the second used solid phase microextraction to extract volatiles from the headspace of vials containing powdered seeds. Solid phase microextraction was found to be more sensitive, detecting a far greater number of compounds. Seed volatile analysis provides a non-invasive means of characterizing the processes involved in seed deterioration, and potentially identifying volatile marker compounds for the diagnosis of seed viability loss. PMID:23175670

  19. Photochemically volatilized polysilanes: a new class of self-developing deep uv resists

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, J.M.; Harrah, L.A.; Johnson, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    A resist material which combines high short-wavelength sensitivity, ''self-development'' (i.e., generation of the resist image directly upon exposure), and resistance to dry-etching procedures is a major goal. While sensitive self-developing materials are known for use in the deep-uv, e.g., poly(olefin sulfones) reported by Bowden and coworkers and sensitized end-capped poly(phthalaldehyde), their resistance to plasma etchants is marginal. A number of groups have reported the direct deep-uv laser etching of a variety of organic polymeric materials, but exposures of >1 J/cm/sup 2/ are required for removal of a 1 ..mu.. thick film in these cases. In this paper, we describe a new class of alkyl polysilane copolymers which exhibit relatively efficient self-developing behavior and have excellent resistance to O/sub 2/ reactive ion etchants. Films of these new polysilanes 1 ..mu.. in thickness can be completely photochemically volatilized to give submicron feature resolution at total exposures of 500 to 1000 mJ/cm/sup 2/ of deep-uv from a KrF excimer laser (248 nm) or low-pressure Hg lamp (254 nm). 13 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Ion and neutral mass spectrometry of the isotopic composition of Titan's upper atmosphere: Implications for the atmospheric dynamics and photochemistry, and the evolution of the major species over geological time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, Kathleen E.

    The atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is an analog for the Earth's atmosphere in the distant past when life first emerged, and may also be used to study the distant future when the abundance of water in the atmosphere may be reduced by photochemical loss processes associated with climate change. This Dissertation investigates the evolution of Titan's atmosphere utilizing measurements of the stable isotope ratios in molecular nitrogen and methane. The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measures the composition of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere as it flies through the atmosphere, approaching altitudes as low as 950 km above the surface. INMS measurements of the 14N/15N in N2 as a function of altitude for 30 Titan flybys are compared, using a basic diffusion model, to the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) measurement of the 14N/15N in N2 on the surface. This comparison provides the input parameters needed to extrapolate the INMS measurements of 12C/13C in CH4 from the upper atmosphere to the surface where the ratio is within the range of expected primordial values. Although the 12C/13C at Titan is close to the primordial value, escape and photochemistry fractionate the isotope ratio over time. This suggests that methane has been present in Titan's atmosphere for no more than one billion years. A cross-calibration of INMS ion densities with the electron densities measured by the Cassini Radio Plasma Wave Spectrometer (RPWS) constrains the energy response of INMS and provides a new approach for determining the densities of ions in Titan's ionosphere. These ion densities validate an updated coupled Ion-Neutral-Thermal model that constrains the fractionation of the nitrogen isotopes due to photochemistry. Modeling the evolution of the nitrogen isotopes over geological times scales based on chemistry and escape limits the initial 14N/15N to a heavier ratio than the 14N/ 15N observed in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodologies developed for this Dissertation are relevant not only to Titan, but also to Earth. They can be used to evaluate dynamics and photochemistry of the nitrogen isotopes in the upper atmosphere and to define future missions to study the composition of the Earth's thermosphere.

  1. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  2. Ammonia volatilization loss from surface applied livestock manure.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, S; Jayaraman, K; Wilson, Takela C; Alva, Ashok K; Kelson, Luma; Jones, Leandra B

    2009-03-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) emission from livestock manures used in agriculture reduces N uptake by crops and negatively impacts air quality. This laboratory study was conducted to evaluate NH(3)emission from different livestock manures applied to two soils: Candler fins sand (CFS; light-textured soil, pH 6.8 and field capacity soil water content of 70 g kg(-1)) from Lake Alfred, Florida and Ogeechee loamy sand (OLS; medium-textured soil, pH 5.2 and field capacity soil water content of 140 g kg(-1)) from Savannah, Georgia. Poultry litter (PL) collected from a poultry farm near Douglas, Georgia, and fresh solid separate of swine manure (SM) collected from a farm near Clinton, North Carolina were used. Each of the soil was weighed in 100 g sub samples and amended with either PL or SM at rates equivalent to either 0, 2.24, 5.60, 11.20, or 22.40 Mg ha(-1) in 1L Mason jars and incubated in the laboratory at field capacity soil water content for 19 days to monitor NH(3) volatilization. Results indicated a greater NH(3) loss from soils amended with SM compared to that with PL. The cumulative NH(3)volatilization loss over 19 days ranged from 4 to 27% and 14 to 32% of total N applied as PL and SM, respectively. Volatilization of NH(3) was greater from light-textured CFS than that from medium-textured OLS. Volatilization loss increased with increasing rates of manure application. Ammonia volatilization was lower at night time than that during the day time. Differences in major factors such as soil water content, temperature, soil type and live stock manure type influenced the diurnal variation in volatilization loss of NH(3) from soils. A significant portion (> 50%) of cumulative NH(3) emission over 19 d occurred during the first 5-7 d following the application of livestock manures. Results of this study demonstrate that application of low rates of livestock manure (< or = 5.60 Mg ha(-1)) is recommended to minimize NH(3) emissions. PMID:19280486

  3. From Purgatory to Paradise: The Volatile Life of Hawaiian Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Hauri, E. H.; Trusdell, F.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Variations in radiogenic isotope ratios and magmatic volatile abundances (e.g., CO2 or H2O) in Hawaiian lavas reveal key processes within a deep-seated mantle plume (e.g., mantle heterogeneity, source lithology, partial melting, and magma degassing). Shield-stage Hawaiian lavas likely originate from a mixed plume source containing peridotite and recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite) based on variations of radiogenic isotopes (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb). The mantle source region may also be heterogeneous with respect to volatile contents, yet the link between pre-eruptive volatile budgets and mantle source lithology in the Hawaiian plume is poorly constrained due to shallow magmatic degassing and mixing. Here, we use a novel approach to investigate this link using Os isotopic ratios, and major, trace, and volatile elements in olivines and mineral-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from 34 samples from Koolau, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kilauea, and Loihi. These samples reveal a strong correlation between volatile contents in olivine-hosted MIs and Os isotopes of the same olivines, in which lavas that originated from greater proportions of recycled oceanic crust/pyroxenite (i.e. 'Loa' chain volcanoes: Koolau, Mauna Loa, Loihi) have MIs with the lower H2O, F, and Cl contents than 'Kea' chain volcanoes (i.e. Kilauea) that contain greater amounts of peridotite in the source region. No correlation is observed with CO2 or S. The depletion of fluid-mobile elements (H2O, F, and Cl) in 'Loa' chain volcanoes indicates ancient dehydrated oceanic crust is a plume component that controls much of the compositional variation of Hawaiian Volcanoes. The presence of dehydrated recycled mafic material in the plume source suggests that subduction effectively devolatilizes the mafic part of the oceanic crust. These results are similar to the observed shifts in H2O/Ce ratios near the Easter and Samoan hotspots [1,2]. Thus, it appears that multiple hotspots may record relative H2O depletions and possibly other volatiles. [1] Dixon et al. 2002, Nature 420:385-89 [2] Workman et al. 2006, EPSL 241:932-51

  4. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. PMID:8933027

  5. Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.; Buckley, T.; Pellizzari, E.; Gordon, S.

    1996-10-01

    A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times, {tau}{sub i} in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water. 81 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Acidic volatiles and the Mars Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banin, A.; Han, F. X.; Kan, I.; Cicelsky, A.

    1997-06-01

    Large portions of Mars' surface are covered with deposits of fine, homogeneous, weathered dusty-soil material. Nanophase iron oxides, silicate mineraloids, and salts prevail in the soil. The mode of formation of this somewhat peculiar type of soil is still far from being clear. One scenario suggests that weathering took place during early epochs when Mars may have been ``warm and wet.'' The properties of the soil are not easily reconciled with this scenario. We propose another possible scenario that attributes, in part, the peculiar nature of the Martian dust and soil to a relatively ``young'' weathering product formed during the last few hundreds of millions of years in a process that involves acidic volatiles. We tested this hypothesis in an experimental study of the first step of acidolytic weathering of a partly palagonitized volcanic tephra of hawaiitic lava origin, using sulfuric, hydrochloric and nitric acids and their mixtures. The tephra effectively ``neutralize'' the added acidity. The protonic acidity added to the tephra attacks the primary minerals, releasing Fe, Al, and Mg, which control the pH, acting as Lewis-acid species of varying acid strengths. The full amount of acidity added to the tephra is stored in it, but only a very small fraction is preserved as the original protonic acidity. The majority of the added sulfate and chloride were present as salts and easily solubilized minerals. Well-crystallized sulfate salt minerals of aluminum and calcium were detected by powder X ray diffractometry, whereas secondary magnesium and iron minerals were not detected, due probably to lack of crystallinity. The presence of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) and alunogen (Al2(SO4)3.17H2O) is probably responsible for the observed increased hygroscopicity of the acidified tephra and their tendency to form hardened crusts. We suggest that if this mechanism is of importance on Mars, then the chemically weathered component of the Martian soil consists of a salt-rich mineral mixture containing the salts of the anionic-ligands SO4 and Cl resulting from volatiles emitted from volcanoes during more recent eruptions (up to 109 years B.P.). The lack of liquid water on Mars surface during that time slowed or halted mineralogical evolution into highly crystallized minerals having large mineral grains. The chemically weathered components are mixed with the products of physical weathering. The recently formed soil may cover and coat more evolved, hydrothermally modified, mineral deposits formed in earlier epochs of Mars.

  7. Analysis of volatile organic compounds of Fuji apples following electron beam irradiation and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyun-Pa; Shim, Sung-Lye; Lee, Sun-Im; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2012-08-01

    The volatile organic compounds of non-irradiated and electron-beam irradiated 'Fuji' apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) at 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy were isolated through simultaneous distillation extractions and analyzed using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. A total of 53 volatile organic compounds were characterized in 0 and 1 kGy irradiated samples, whereas two more compounds related to ketone and terpenoid group were identified in 0.5 kGy irradiated samples. The contents of volatile compounds were 24.33, 36.49, and 35.28 mg/kg in 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy irradiated samples, respectively. The major compounds identified were butanol, hexanal, [E]-2-hexenal, and hexanol in all samples. The relative content of alcohol increased after 30 days of storage in all samples, whereas that of aldehyde decreased. Although the contents of some volatile compounds were changed by electron-beam irradiation, the total yield and major flavor compounds of irradiated 'Fuji' apples were similar to, or even greater than, those of the control. Therefore, the application of e-beam irradiation if required for microbial decontamination of 'Fuji' apples is an acceptable method as it does not bring about any major quantitative changes of volatile organic compounds.

  8. The ESA Lunar Lander and the search for Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A. D.; Barber, S. J.; Pillinger, J. M.; Sheridan, S.; Wright, I. P.; Gibson, E. K.; Merrifield, J. A.; Waltham, N. R.; Waugh, L. J.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2011-10-01

    Following the Apollo era the moon was considered a volatile poor body. Samples collected from the Apollo missions contained only ppm levels of water formed by the interaction of the solar wind with the lunar regolith [1]. However more recent orbiter observations have indicated that water may exist as water ice in cold polar regions buried within craters at concentrations of a few wt. % [2]. Infrared images from M3 on Chandrayaan-1 have been interpreted as showing the presence of hydrated surface minerals with the ongoing hydroxyl/water process feeding cold polar traps. This has been supported by observation of ephemeral features termed "space dew" [3]. Meanwhile laboratory studies indicate that water could be present in appreciable quantities in lunar rocks [4] and could also have a cometary source [5]. The presence of sufficient quantities of volatiles could provide a resource which would simplify logistics for long term lunar missions. The European Space Agency (ESA's Directorate of Human Spaceflight and Operations) have provisionally scheduled a robotic mission to demonstrate key technologies to enable later human exploration. Planned for launch in 2018, the primary aim is for precise automated landing, with hazard avoidance, in zones which are almost constantly illuminated (e.g. at the edge of the Shackleton crater at the lunar south pole). These regions would enable the solar powered Lander to survive for long periods > 6 months, but require accurate navigation to within 200m. Although landing in an illuminated area, these regions are close to permanently shadowed volatile rich regions and the analysis of volatiles is a major science objective of the mission. The straw man payload includes provision for a Lunar Volatile and Resources Analysis Package (LVRAP). The authors have been commissioned by ESA to conduct an evaluation of possible technologies to be included in L-VRAP which can be included within the Lander payload. Scientific aims are to demonstrate the extraction of volatiles and determine the volatile inventory of the moon with a view for future In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Surface samples will be collected by a robotic arm with the possibility of a rover to collect more distant samples. The concentration, chemical and accurate isotopic ratios (D/H, 12C/13C, 15N/14N, 18O/16O and noble gases) of liberated volatiles will be determined, possibly using similar technology to the Philae comet lander of the Rosetta mission [6]. An additional aim is the monitoring of the chemical and isotopic composition of the tenuous lunar atmosphere [7] which will become contaminated by active human exploration. The lunar atmosphere will provide information on the processes involved in forming lunar volatiles and their concentration mechanisms. Modelling the effects of contamination from the Lander is an essential part of this study so that these can be recognized and minimized.

  9. Kinetics of volatile extraction from carbonaceous chondrites: Dehydration of talc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, Jibamitra

    1991-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Deimos, and are potential resources of fuels that may be exploited for future planetary missions. Calculations of equilibrium phase relations suggest that talc (Ta) and antigorite (Ant) are likely to be the major hydrous phases in the C1 and C2 meteorites (Ganguly and Saxena, 1989), which constitute the most volatile rich classes of carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics of talc are studied as a function of temperature, grain size, composition and fluid fugacity, as part of a systematic study of the reaction kinetics of the volatile bearing phases that are either known or likely to be present in carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics were investigated at 1 bar, 775 to 875 C by monitoring the in-situ weight loss as a function of time of a natural talc. The talc platelets had a dimension of 0.8 to 1 micron. The run durations varied from 233.3 hours at 775 C (48 percent dehydration) to 20.8 hours at 875 C (80 pct. dehydration). The results can be adequately represented by a given rate equation. Theoretical analysis suggests that the reduction in the concentration of H2O in the environment of dehydrating talc, as would be encountered in processing chondritic materials, will have negligible effect on the rate of dehydration, unless there is a change of reaction mechanism owing to the presence of other volatile species.

  10. Mercury Polar Volatiles: Complex Hydrocarbons vs Water Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Paige, D. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Ernst, C. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Mao, D.

    2012-12-01

    Radiometric measurements by MLA elucidate the emplacement and sequestration of volatiles on Mercury, repeatedly imaged by Earth-based radar. We have reported [Neumann et al., 2012, LPSC, #2651] the presence of MLA-dark deposits coinciding with many of the radar-bright regions thought to indicate the presence of subsurface ice. Thermal models [Paige et al., 2012, LPSC, #2875] suggest that at certain latitudes, maximum temperatures exceed the regime of stability of surface water ice, but average subsurface temperatures allow its persistence there against sublimation. At the highest latitudes, where radar signatures fill large portions of polar craters, measurements by MLA are at the noise limit for measuring reflectance; however, several profiles have been obtained with useful energy data. We explore the working hypothesis that dark, complex organics (common in asteroids & comets) overly water ice, providing an important constraint on thermal models of polar regions. Repeated profiles are being acquired in the extended mission in order to more clearly delineate the boundaries of volatile deposits. A good sampling of craters over the appropriate latitude range will further constrain the composition of volatiles. We will report on further mapping in the MESSENGER Extended Mission to the coldest north polar regions, where the majority of ices lie.

  11. Chemical composition of volatile extract and biological activities of volatile and less-volatile extracts of juniper berry (Juniperus drupacea L.) fruit.

    PubMed

    El-Ghorab, Ahmed; Shaaban, Hamdy A; El-Massry, Khaled F; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2008-07-01

    Volatile chemicals in a dichloromethane extract from a steam distillate of juniper berry fruit (Juniperus drupacea L.) and its two column chromatographic fractions (eluted with hexane and ethyl ether) were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The major compounds in the dichloromethane extract were alpha-pinene (23.73%), thymol methyl ether (17.32%), and camphor (10.12%). A fraction eluted with hexane contained alpha-pinene (44.24%) as the major constituent. A fraction eluted with ethyl ether had thymol methyl ether (22.27%) and camphor (19.65%) as the main components. Three samples prepared from the distillate and two additional samples prepared by petroleum ether and ethanol extraction directly from juniper berry fruits exhibited clear antioxidant activities with dose response in both 1,2-diphenyl picrylhydrazyl and beta-carotene assays. All samples except the hexane fraction showed comparable activities to that of the synthetic antioxidant t-butyl hydroquinone at a level of 200 microg/mL in the two testing systems. The extracts of dichloromethane, petroleum ether, and ethanol exhibited appreciable antimicrobial activities against six microorganisms with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.5 mg/mL (volatile extract against Candida albicans ) to 1.2 mg/mL (ethanol extract against Aspergillus niger ). The results of the present study suggest that this fruit could be a natural antioxidant supplement for foods and beverages. PMID:18547046

  12. Selenium detoxification by volatilization and precipitation in aquatic plants

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.W.M.; Higashi, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    The narrow margin of requirement and toxicity for selenium makes it a difficult pollution problem to solve. Selenium bioaccumulation has been a major threat to wildlife in California and is becoming a major concern in the San Francisco Bay/Estuaries. Despite the past efforts in Se nutrition, chemistry, and remediation, its toxicity and detoxification mechanism(s) in wildlife, particularly primary producers, is still unclear, due to a lack of understanding in Se biochemistry. This is becoming a critical issue in assessing Se risk and remediation. To address this gap, the authors have been characterizing Se speciation and its linkage to detoxification mechanism(s) of two indigenous aquatic plants, duckweed (Lemna minor) and a microphyte (Chlorella). Using GT-MS analysis, they found that Chlorella monocultures transformed Se oxyanions into volatile dimethylselenide and dimethyidiselenide and into insoluble So at extremely high Se (up to 750 ppm) concentrations. This alga did not accumulate selenomethionine which is among the most toxic forms of Se to wildlife. Dimethylsulfide was also volatilized, consistent with the hypothesis that dimethylsulfide/dimethylselenide emissions share a similar biochemical pathway. Se-treated Chlorella biomass released dimethylsulfide/dimethylselenide upon alkaline hydrolysis, suggesting the presence of dimethylsulfonium and dimethylselenonium propionates. Dimethylsulfoniumpropionate is known as an osmoprotectant in marine phytoplankton and as a major contributor to global biogenic dimethylsulfide emissions. Dimethylselenoniumpropionate has not been identified previously and may be a byproduct of dimethylsulfoniumpropionate synthesis. The unusual Se tolerance of Chlorella may be due to its ability to volatilize and precipitate Se. Such activities may be utilized for in situ Se bioremediation. Similar investigations with duckweed is underway.

  13. Identification of Major Histocompatibility Complex-Regulated Body Odorants by Statistical Analysis of a Comparative Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Belcher, Ann; Preti, George; Wahl, Jon H.; Thresher, Miranda; Yang, Peter; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary

    2005-04-15

    Gas chromatography (GC), combined with mass spectrometry (MS) detection, is a powerful analytical technique that can be used to separate, quantify, and identify volatile compounds in complex mixtures. This paper examines the application of GC-MS in a comparative experiment to identify volatiles that differ in concentration between two groups. A complex mixture might comprise several hundred or even thousands of volatile compounds. Because their number and location in a chromatogram generally are unknown, and because components overlap in populous chromatograms, the statistical problems offer significant challenges beyond traditional two-group screening procedures. We describe a statistical procedure to compare two-dimensional GC-MS profiles between groups, which entails (1) signal processing: baseline correction and peak detection in single ion chromatograms; (2) aligning chromatograms in time; (3) normalizing differences in overall signal intensities; and (4) detecting chromatographic regions that differ between groups. Compared to existing approaches, the proposed method is robust to errors made at earlier stages of analysis, such as missed peaks or slightly misaligned chromatograms. To illustrate the method, we identify differences in GC-MS chromatograms of ether-extracted urine collected from two nearly identical inbred groups of mice, to investigate the relationship between odor and genetics of the major histocompatibility complex.

  14. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions during BEARPEX 2009 measured by eddy covariance and flux-gradient similarity methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-H.; Fares, S.; Weber, R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-09-01

    The Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment (BEARPEX) took place in Blodgett Forest, a Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, during summer 2009. We deployed a Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) to measure fluxes and concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Eighteen ion species including the major BVOC expected at the site were measured sequentially at 5 heights to observe their vertical gradient from the forest floor to above the canopy. Fluxes of the 3 dominant BVOCs methanol, 2-Methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO), and monoterpenes, were measured above the canopy by the eddy covariance method. Canopy scale fluxes were also determined by the flux-gradient similarity method (K-theory). A universal K (Kuniv) was determined as the mean of individual K's calculated from the measured fluxes divided by vertical gradients for methanol, MBO, and monoterpenes. This Kuniv was then multiplied by the gradients of each observed ion species to compute their fluxes. The flux-gradient similarity method showed very good agreement with the Eddy Covariance method. Fluxes are presented for all measured species and compared to historical measurements from the same site, and used to test emission algorithms used to model fluxes at the regional scale. MBO was the dominant emission observed followed by methanol, monoterpenes, acetone, and acetaldehyde. The flux-gradient similarity method is shown to be a useful, and we recommend its use especially in experimental conditions when fast measurement of BVOC species is not available.

  15. ION CHROMATOGRAPHY OF ANIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Dionex Model 10 Ion Chromatograph was evaluated for the measurement of anionic species in water. The theoretical effect of hydrogen ion activity (pH) on the elution time of phosphate and arsenate was tested and empirical selectivity coefficients were determined for the major pr...

  16. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA is of extremely low volatility.

  17. Volatile components associated with bacterial spoilage of tropical prawns.

    PubMed

    Chinivasagam, H N; Bremner, H A; Wood, A F; Nottingham, S M

    1998-06-30

    Analysis of headspace volatiles by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry from king (Penaeus plebejus), banana (P. merguiensis), tiger (P. esculentus/semisulcatus) and greasy (Metapenaeus bennettae) prawns stored in ice or ice slurry, which is effectively an environment of low oxygen tension, indicated the presence of amines at the early stages of storage (less than 8 days) irrespective of the nature of the storage media. Esters were more prevalent in prawns stored on ice (normal oxygen conditions) at the latter stages of storage (more than 8 days) and were only produced by Pseudomonas fragi, whereas sulphides and amines occurred whether the predominant spoilage organism was Ps. fragi or Shewanella putrefaciens. The free amino acid profiles of banana and king prawns were high in arginine (12-14%) and low in cysteine (0.1-0.17%) and methionine (0.1-0.2%). Filter sterilised raw banana prawn broth inoculated with a total of 15 cultures of Ps. fragi and S. putrefaciens and incubated for two weeks at 5 degrees C, showed the presence of 17 major compounds in the headspace volatiles analysed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These were mainly amines, sulphides, ketones and esters. Principal Component Analysis of the results for the comparative levels of the volatiles produced by pure cultures, inoculated into sterile prawn broth, indicated three subgroupings of the organisms; I, Ps. fragi from a particular geographic location; II, S. putrefaciens from another geographic location; and III, a mixture of Ps. fragi and S. putrefaciens from different geographic locations. The sensory impression created by the cultures was strongly related to the chemical profile as determined by GC/MS. Organisms, even within the same subgrouping classified as identical by the usual tests, produced a different range of volatiles in the same uniform substrate. PMID:9706797

  18. Volatile element content of the heterogeneous upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, K.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E. H.; Forsyth, D. W.; Kamenetsky, V. S.; Niu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of the asthenosphere (e.g., seismic velocity, viscosity, electrical conductivity) have been attributed to either mineral properties at relevant temperature, pressure, and water content or to the presence of a low melt fraction. We resort to the geochemical studies of MORB to unravel the composition of the asthenosphere. It is important to determine to what extent the geochemical variations in axial MORB do represent a homogeneous mantle composition and variations in the physical conditions of magma generation and transport; or alternatively, they represent mixing of melts from a heterogeneous upper mantle. Lavas from intra-transform faults and off-axis seamounts share a common mantle source with axial MORB, but experience less differentiation and homogenization. Therefore they provide better estimates for the end-member volatile budget of the heterogeneous upper mantle. We present major, trace, and volatile element data (H2O, CO2, Cl, F, S) as well as Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions [1, 2] of basaltic glasses (MgO > 6.0 wt%) from the NEPR seamounts, Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar transform fault system, and Macquarie Island. The samples range from incompatible trace element (ITE) depleted (DMORB: Th/La<0.035) to enriched (EMORB: Th/La>0.07) spanning the entire range of EPR MORB. The isotopic composition of the samples correlates with the degree of trace element enrichment indicating long-lived mantle heterogeneity. Once shallow-level processes (degassing, crystallization, and crustal assimilation) have been considered, we conducted a two-component (DMORB- and EMORB-) mantle melting-mixing model. Our model reproduces the major, trace and volatile element contents and isotopic composition of our samples and suggests that (1) 90% of the upper mantle is highly depleted in ITE (DMORB source) with only 10% of an enriched component (EMORB source), (2) the EMORB source is peridotitic rather than pyroxenitic, and (3) NMORB do not represent an actual mantle source, but the product of magma mixing between D- and E-MORB. Finally we use the volatile to trace element ratios of our samples to estimate the volatile element budget of the end-member components of the upper mantle. [1] Niu, Y. et al. (2002) EPSL, 199, 327-345. [2] Kamenetsky, V. S. et al. (2000) J. Petrology, 41, 411-430.

  19. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  20. Modelling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dobešová, Anna; Klepáč, Václav; Kolman, Pavel; Bednářová, Petra

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to compare different approaches to modeling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism. For this purpose we built time-varying parameter VAR (TVP-VAR) model with stochastic volatility and VAR-DCC-GARCH model with conditional variance. The data from three European countries are included in the analysis: the Czech Republic, Germany and Slovakia. Results show that VAR-DCC-GARCH system captures higher volatility of observed variables but main trends and detected breaks are generally identical in both approaches.

  1. Concentrations of Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jeff; Taylor, Larry; Duke, Mike

    2007-01-01

    To set lower and upper limits on the overall amounts and types of volatiles released during heating of polar regolith, we examined the data for equatorial lunar regolith and for the compositions of comets. The purpose, specifically, was to answer these questions: 1. Upper/Lower limits and 'best guess' for total amount of volatiles (by weight %) released from lunar regolith up to 150C 2. Upper/Lower limit and 'best guess' for composition of the volatiles released from the lunar regolith by weight %

  2. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  3. Volatility and size of cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; da, Xiaoyu

    1996-02-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) volatility and size versus critical supersaturation Sc measurements are presented for maritime, continental, and urban areas. The measurements included both hemispheres of the globe. Although this was a nonsystematic preliminary survey, some general trends are shown. CCN in cleaner air were smaller, characteristic of completely pure soluble substances, whereas the CCN in dirtier air were larger, characteristic of insoluble and/or different soluble material mixed internally. Volatility was generally characteristic of sulfate (i.e., ammonium sulfate) except in urban areas, where more volatile material was present, which is characteristic of unneutralized acids.

  4. Malaria Parasites Produce Volatile Mosquito Attractants

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Megan; Su, Chih-Ying; Schaber, Chad; Crowley, Jan R.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Carlson, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains a nonphotosynthetic plastid organelle that possesses plant-like metabolic pathways. Plants use the plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway to produce volatile odorants, known as terpenes. In this work, we describe the volatile chemical profile of cultured malaria parasites. Among the identified compounds are several plant-like terpenes and terpene derivatives, including known mosquito attractants. We establish the molecular identity of the odorant receptors of the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae, which responds to these compounds. The malaria parasite produces volatile signals that are recognized by mosquitoes and may thereby mediate host attraction and facilitate transmission. PMID:25805727

  5. Chemical composition of Silene morganae Freyn volatile oil.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Boshra; Sohrabi, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    The essential oil composition of flowering aerial parts of Iranian Silene morganae Freyn (Caryophyllaceae) was analysed for the first time using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Thirty-one compounds consisting of 90.3% of the volatile oil were detected. The major constituents were benzaldehyde (11.6%), (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (9.6%), (E)-?-ocimene (8.2%) and linalool (7.4%). Terpenoids (43.5%), particularly monoterpene hydrocarbons (24.2%), had the highest contribution in S. morganae Freyn flowering aerial parts oil. PMID:25422069

  6. Isidis basin - Site of ancient volatile-rich debris layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzaffi, P.; Schultz, P. H.

    1989-02-01

    The differentiation of the Martian Isidis impact basin's interior plains into hillocky terrains with isolated mounds arranged in arctuate chains, and ridged terrains with systems of parallel curvilinear ridges, is presently suggested to reflect the deposition and subsequent removal of a thick layer of material within the basin. The process of terrestrial ice-cover dissintegration, which yields such landforms as moraines, kames, and eskers, furnishes a possible analog to the Isidis features; Viking orbiter images show Martian ridges with similar characteristics, suggesting that the Isidis layer may have been only part of a more general deposition period that coincided with one of major outflow channel formation involving the release of subsurface volatiles.

  7. Isidis basin - Site of ancient volatile-rich debris layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grizzaffi, Patricia; Schultz, Peter H.

    1989-01-01

    The differentiation of the Martian Isidis impact basin's interior plains into hillocky terrains with isolated mounds arranged in arctuate chains, and ridged terrains with systems of parallel curvilinear ridges, is presently suggested to reflect the deposition and subsequent removal of a thick layer of material within the basin. The process of terrestrial ice-cover dissintegration, which yields such landforms as moraines, kames, and eskers, furnishes a possible analog to the Isidis features; Viking orbiter images show Martian ridges with similar characteristics, suggesting that the Isidis layer may have been only part of a more general deposition period that coincided with one of major outflow channel formation involving the release of subsurface volatiles.

  8. Volatile-Mediated Killing of Arabidopsis thaliana by Bacteria Is Mainly Due to Hydrogen Cyanide?

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Dirk; Fabbri, Carlotta; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2011-01-01

    The volatile-mediated impact of bacteria on plant growth is well documented, and contrasting effects have been reported ranging from 6-fold plant promotion to plant killing. However, very little is known about the identity of the compounds responsible for these effects or the mechanisms involved in plant growth alteration. We hypothesized that hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a major factor accounting for the observed volatile-mediated toxicity of some strains. Using a collection of environmental and clinical strains differing in cyanogenesis, as well as a defined HCN-negative mutant, we demonstrate that bacterial HCN accounts to a significant extent for the deleterious effects observed when growing Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence of certain bacterial volatiles. The environmental strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 was less cyanogenic and less plant growth inhibiting than the clinical strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. Quorum-sensing deficient mutants of C. violaceum CV0, P. aeruginosa PAO1, and P. aeruginosa PUPa3 showed not only diminished HCN production but also strongly reduced volatile-mediated phytotoxicity. The double treatment of providing plants with reactive oxygen species scavenging compounds and overexpressing the alternative oxidase AOX1a led to a significant reduction of volatile-mediated toxicity. This indicates that oxidative stress is a key process in the physiological changes leading to plant death upon exposure to toxic bacterial volatiles. PMID:21115704

  9. Comparison of volatile profiles of nine litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) cultivars from Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuwen; Pan, Qiuhong; Qu, Wenjun; Duan, Changqing

    2009-10-28

    Volatile components of nine litchi cultivars (10 samples) with high commercial value from Southern China were investigated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with headspace solid phase microextraction. A total of 96 volatiles were detected, of which 43 were identified. Seventeen common volatiles in all the samples included linalool, cis-rose oxide, alpha-terpineol, beta-citronellol, geraniol, p-cymene, ethanol, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, 1-hexanol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octanol, ethyl acetate, p,alpha-dimethylstyrene and 3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole. Although the volatile composition and concentration varied between these cultivars, the components with the highest OAVs in most cultivars were still cis-rose oxide, trans-rose oxide, 1-octen-3-ol, and geraniol. Two Huaizhi samples from two producing areas exhibited similar volatile profiles, and significantly different from other cultivars according to cluster analysis performed on amounts of major volatile components. PMID:19803519

  10. Sulfur volatiles in guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaves: possible defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rouseff, Russell L; Onagbola, Ebenezer O; Smoot, John M; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2008-10-01

    Volatiles from crushed and intact guava leaves (Psidium guajava L.) were collected using static headspace SPME and determined using GC-PFPD, pulsed flame photometric detection, and GC-MS. Leaf volatiles from four common citrus culitvars were examined similarly to determine the potential component(s) responsible for guava's protective effect against the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama), which is the insect vector of Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening disease. Seven sulfur volatiles were detected: hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methional, and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). Identifications were based on matching linear retention index values on ZB-5, DB-Wax, and PLOT columns and MS spectra in the case of DMDS and DMS. DMDS is an insect toxic, defensive volatile produced only by wounded guava but not citrus leaves and, thus, may be the component responsible for the protective effect of guava against the HLB vector. DMDS is formed immediately after crushing, becoming the major headspace volatile within 10 min. Forty-seven additional leaf volatiles were identified from LRI and MS data in the crushed guava leaf headspace. PMID:18778077

  11. Advanced steady-state model for the fate of hydrophobic and volatile compounds in activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.C.; Rittmann, B.E.; Shi, J.; McAvoy, D.

    1998-09-01

    A steady-state, advanced, general fate model developed to study the fate of organic compounds in primary and activated-sludge systems. This model considers adsorption, biodegradation from the dissolved and adsorbed phases, bubble volatilization, and surface volatilization as removal mechanisms. A series of modeling experiments was performed to identify the key trends of these removal mechanisms for compounds with a range of molecular properties. With typical municipal wastewater treatment conditions, the results from the modeling experiments show that co-metabolic and primary utilization mechanisms give very different trends in biodegradation for the compounds tested. For co-metabolism, the effluent concentration increases when the influent concentration increases, while the effluent concentration remains unchanged when primary utilization occurs. For a highly hydrophobic compound, the fraction of compound removed from adsorption onto primary sludge can be very important, and the direct biodegradation of compound sorbed to the activated sludge greatly increases its biodegradation and reduces its discharge with the waste activated sludge. Volatilization from the surface of the primary and secondary systems is important for compounds with moderate to high volatilities, especially when these compounds are not biodegradable. Finally, bubble volatilization can be a major removal mechanism for highly volatile compounds even when they are highly biodegradable.

  12. Mechanisms of volatile production from sulfur-containing amino acids by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Ahn, Dong; Joo Lee, Eun; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Wangang; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jo, Cheorun; Nam, Kichang

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids were used to study the mechanisms of off-odor production in meat by irradiation. Irradiation not only increased the amounts of volatiles but also produced many new volatiles from sulfur-containing amino acid monomers. We speculate that the majority of the volatiles were the direct radiolytic products of the side chains, but Strecker degradation as well as deamination and decarboxylation of radiolytic products were also involved in the production of volatile compounds from sulfur amino acids. The volatile compounds produced in amino acids were not only the primary products of irradiation, but also the products of secondary chemical reactions after the primary compounds were produced. Cysteine and methionine produced odor characteristics similar to that of the irradiated meat, but the amounts of sulfur volatiles from methionine were far greater than that of cysteine. Although the present study was carried out using an amino acid model system, the information can be applied to the quality indexes of irradiated meats as well as other food products.

  13. Volatile Trapping in Martian Clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, Olivier; Chassefire, Eric; Lasue, Jrmie; Chevrier, Vincent; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Lakhlifi, Azzedine; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Montmessin, Franck; Picaud, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frdric; Swindle, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic conditions suggest that clathrates might exist on Mars. Despite observations which show that the dominant condensed phases on the surface of Mars are solid carbon dioxide and water ice, clathrates have been repeatedly proposed to play an important role in the distribution and total inventory of the planet's volatiles. Here we review the potential consequences of the presence of clathrates on Mars. We investigate how clathrates could be a potential source for the claimed existence of atmospheric methane. In this context, plausible clathrate formation processes, either in the close subsurface or at the base of the cryosphere, are reviewed. Mechanisms that would allow for methane release into the atmosphere from an existing clathrate layer are addressed as well. We also discuss the proposed relationship between clathrate formation/dissociation cycles and how potential seasonal variations influence the atmospheric abundances of argon, krypton and xenon. Moreover, we examine several Martian geomorphologic features that could have been generated by the dissociation of extended subsurface clathrate layers. Finally we investigate the future in situ measurements, as well as the theoretical and experimental improvements that will be needed to better understand the influence of clathrates on the evolution of Mars and its atmosphere.

  14. Prediction of stream volatilization coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are developed for predicting the liquid-film and gas-film reference-substance parameters for quantifying volatilization of organic solutes from streams. Molecular weight and molecular-diffusion coefficients of the solute are used as correlating parameters. Equations for predicting molecular-diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in water and air are developed, with molecular weight and molal volume as parameters. Mean absolute errors of prediction for diffusion coefficients in water are 9.97% for the molecular-weight equation, 6.45% for the molal-volume equation. The mean absolute error for the diffusion coefficient in air is 5.79% for the molal-volume equation. Molecular weight is not a satisfactory correlating parameter for diffusion in air because two equations are necessary to describe the values in the data set. The best predictive equation for the liquid-film reference-substance parameter has a mean absolute error of 5.74%, with molal volume as the correlating parameter. The best equation for the gas-film parameter has a mean absolute error of 7.80%, with molecular weight as the correlating parameter.

  15. Prey and Non-prey Arthropods Sharing a Host Plant: Effects on Induced Volatile Emission and Predator Attraction

    PubMed Central

    Hordijk, Cornelis A.; Posthumus, Maarten A.; Dicke, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that plants infested with a single herbivore species can attract specific natural enemies through the emission of herbivore-induced volatiles. However, it is less clear what happens when plants are simultaneously attacked by more than one species. We analyzed volatile emissions of lima bean and cucumber plants upon multi-species herbivory by spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) and caterpillars (Spodoptera exigua) in comparison to single-species herbivory. Upon herbivory by single or multiple species, lima bean and cucumber plants emitted volatile blends that comprised mostly the same compounds. To detect additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects, we compared the multi-species herbivory volatile blend with the sum of the volatile blends induced by each of the herbivore species feeding alone. In lima bean, the majority of compounds were more strongly induced by multi-species herbivory than expected based on the sum of volatile emissions by each of the herbivores separately, potentially caused by synergistic effects. In contrast, in cucumber, two compounds were suppressed by multi-species herbivory, suggesting the potential for antagonistic effects. We also studied the behavioral responses of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis, a specialized natural enemy of spider mites. Olfactometer experiments showed that P. persimilis preferred volatiles induced by multi-species herbivory to volatiles induced by S. exigua alone or by prey mites alone. We conclude that both lima bean and cucumber plants effectively attract predatory mites upon multi-species herbivory, but the underlying mechanisms appear different between these species. PMID:18185960

  16. Variation of volatile oil concentration of Mediterranean aromatic shrubs Thymus capitatus hoffmag et link, Satureja thymbra L., Teucrium polium L. and Rosmarinus officinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokou, D.; Margaris, N. S.

    1986-06-01

    The volatile oil content of four Labiatae aromatic plants, viz. Thymus capitatus, Satureja thymbra, Teucrium polium and Rosmarinus officinalis has been estimated throughout the year; leaves, braches, flowers and leaf litter were analysed. The pattern of changes in the volatile oil concentration is not the same in all four plants; it corresponds to the major adaptive strategy towards summer drought, which each has evolved.

  17. Reduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Vilela, A; Schuller, D; Mendes-Faia, A; Crte-Real, M

    2013-06-01

    Excessive volatile acidity in wines is a major problem and is still prevalent because available solutions are nevertheless unsatisfactory, namely, blending the filter-sterilized acidic wine with other wines of lower volatile acidity or using reverse osmosis. We have previously explored the use of an empirical biological deacidification procedure to lower the acetic acid content of wines. This winemaker's enological practice, which consists in refermentation associated with acetic acid consumption by yeasts, is performed by mixing the acidic wine with freshly crushed grapes, musts, or marc from a finished wine fermentation. We have shown that the commercial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae S26 is able to decrease the volatile acidity of acidic wines with a volatile acidity higher than 1.44 g?L(-1) acetic acid, with no detrimental impact on wine aroma. In this study, we aimed to optimize the immobilization of S26 cells in alginate beads for the bioreduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines. We found that S26 cells immobilized in double-layer alginate-chitosan beads could reduce the volatile acidity of an acidic wine (1.1 g?L(-1) acetic acid, 12.5 % (v/v) ethanol, pH 3.12) by 28 and 62 % within 72 and 168 h, respectively, associated with a slight decrease in ethanol concentration (0.7 %). Similar volatile acidity removal efficiencies were obtained in medium with high glucose concentration (20 % w/v), indicating that this process may also be useful in the deacidification of grape musts. We, therefore, show that immobilized S. cerevisiae S26 cells in double-layer beads are an efficient alternative to improve the quality of wines with excessive volatile acidity. PMID:23361840

  18. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  19. SOURCE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods for measuring volatile organic compounds were reviewed. Two commercially available instruments were selected and evaluated in the laboratory; one was judged unacceptable. The other analyzer was evaluated during a limited field test; results were satisfactory an...

  20. International Coordination of Lunar Polar Volatiles Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, J. E.; Suzuki, N. H.; Carpenter, J. D.

    2015-10-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has established a study team to coordinate the worldwide interest in lunar polar volatiles, and in particular water ice, in an effort to stimulate cooperation and collaboration.

  1. Reactive flash volatilization of fluid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Salge, James R.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides methods for the production of synthesis gas. More particularly, various embodiments of the invention relate to systems and methods for volatilizing fluid fuel to produce synthesis gas by using a metal catalyst on a solid support matrix.

  2. Volatile Solvent Use among Western Australian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Odgers, Peta

    1998-01-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 40 adolescents who reported inhaling volatile solvents. All were aware of the short-term health risks involved in use, and most reported experiencing ill effects. Offers suggestions for intervention. (Author/GCP)

  3. TOXIC ORGANIC VOLATILIZATION FROM LAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methodology was evaluated for estimating volatilization of toxic organic chemicals from unsaturated soils. Projections were compared with laboratory data for simulated rapid infiltration wastewater treatment systems receiving primary municipal wastewater spiked with a suite of 18...

  4. VOLATILE ORGANIC ANALYSIS BY DIRECT AQUEOUS INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatographic environmental analysis by direct aqueous injection (DAI) was studied for 24 volatile organic analytes (VOAs). Internal standardization was used to determine the precision of analyzing these compounds by DAI. Aequous samples were directly introduced to a gas ch...

  5. The Metabolism of the Volatile Amines

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Barry A.

    1963-01-01

    As part of a series of studies into the etiology of acute hepatic encephalopathy the identity of the volatile base, which had been extracted from blood and presumed to be ammonia, was investigated. In order to differentiate between ammonia and the other volatile bases with which it can be confused, a method of separating these compounds by the use of gas chromatography was developed. The technique is described in detail because it incorporates several novel ideas that can be applied to the isolation and identification of similar compounds in many biological systems. The volatile base extracted from blood was found to be ammonia, and no other volatile base was demonstrable in blood from both healthy subjects and patients suffering from acute hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:14101451

  6. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  7. Microbial volatile emissions as insect semiochemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We provide a synthesis of the literature describing biochemical interactions between microorganisms and arthropods by way of microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) production. We explored important metabolic pathways involved in MVOC production and evaluated the functionality, generality, and e...

  8. Release of volatile mercury from vascular plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Puerner, N. J.; Speitel, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile, organic solvent soluble mercury has been found in leaves and seeds of several angiosperms. Leaves of garlic vine, avocado, and haole-koa release mercury in volatile form rapidly at room temperature. In garlic vine, the most active release is temperature dependent, but does not parallel the vapor-pressure temperature relationship for mercury. Mercury can be trapped in nitric-perchloric acid digestion fluid, or n-hexane, but is lost from the hexane unless the acid mixture is present. Seeds of haole-koa also contain extractable mercury but volatility declines in the series n-hexane (90%), methanol (50%), water (10%). This suggests that reduced volatility may accompany solvolysis in the more polar media.

  9. Ammonia volatilization from sows on grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S. G.; Sgaard, H. T.; Mller, H. B.; Morsing, S.

    According to regulations, sows with piglets on organic farms must graze on pastures. Volatilization of ammonia (NH 3) from urine patches may represent a significant source of nitrogen (N) loss from these farms. Inputs of N are low on organic farms and losses may reduce crop production. This study examined spatial variations in NH 3 volatilization using a movable dynamic chamber, and the pH and total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content in the topsoil of pastures with grazing sows was measured during five periods between June 1998 and May 1999. Gross NH 3 volatilization from the pastures was also measured with an atmospheric mass balance technique during seven periods from September 1997 until June 1999. The dynamic chamber study showed a high variation in NH 3 volatilization because of the distribution of urine; losses were between 0 and 2.8 g NH 3-N m -2 day -1. Volatilization was highest near the feeding area and the huts, where the sows tended to urinate. Ammonia volatilization rate was linearly related to the product of NH 3 concentration in the boundary layer and wind speed. The NH 3 in the boundary layer was in equilibrium with NH 3 in soil solution. Gross NH 3 volatilization was in the range 0.07-2.1 kg NH 3-N ha -1 day -1 from a pasture with 24 sows ha -1. Ammonia volatilization was related to the amount of feed given to the sows, incident solar radiation and air temperature during measuring periods, and also to temperature, incident solar radiation and rain 1-2 days before measurements. Annual ammonia loss was 4.8 kg NH 3-N sow -1.

  10. Pricing foreign equity option with stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose a general foreign equity option pricing framework that unifies the vast foreign equity option pricing literature and incorporates the stochastic volatility into foreign equity option pricing. Under our framework, the time-changed Lvy processes are used to model the underlying assets price of foreign equity option and the closed form pricing formula is obtained through the use of characteristic function methodology. Numerical tests indicate that stochastic volatility has a dramatic effect on the foreign equity option prices.

  11. Stable Local Volatility Calibration Using Kernel Splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas F.; Li, Yuying; Wang, Cheng

    2010-09-01

    We propose an optimization formulation using L1 norm to ensure accuracy and stability in calibrating a local volatility function for option pricing. Using a regularization parameter, the proposed objective function balances the calibration accuracy with the model complexity. Motivated by the support vector machine learning, the unknown local volatility function is represented by a kernel function generating splines and the model complexity is controlled by minimizing the 1-norm of the kernel coefficient vector. In the context of the support vector regression for function estimation based on a finite set of observations, this corresponds to minimizing the number of support vectors for predictability. We illustrate the ability of the proposed approach to reconstruct the local volatility function in a synthetic market. In addition, based on S&P 500 market index option data, we demonstrate that the calibrated local volatility surface is simple and resembles the observed implied volatility surface in shape. Stability is illustrated by calibrating local volatility functions using market option data from different dates.

  12. Market volatility modeling for short time window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mattos Neto, Paulo S. G.; Silva, David A.; Ferreira, Tiago A. E.; Cavalcanti, George D. C.

    2011-10-01

    The gain or loss of an investment can be defined by the movement of the market. This movement can be estimated by the difference between the magnitudes of two stock prices in distinct periods and this difference can be used to calculate the volatility of the markets. The volatility characterizes the sensitivity of a market change in the world economy. Traditionally, the probability density function (pdf) of the movement of the markets is analyzed by using power laws. The contributions of this work is two-fold: (i) an analysis of the volatility dynamic of the world market indexes is performed by using a two-year window time data. In this case, the experiments show that the pdf of the volatility is better fitted by exponential function than power laws, in all range of pdf; (ii) after that, we investigate a relationship between the volatility of the markets and the coefficient of the exponential function based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann ideal gas theory. The results show an inverse relationship between the volatility and the coefficient of the exponential function. This information can be used, for example, to predict the future behavior of the markets or to cluster the markets in order to analyze economic patterns.

  13. Ion optodes

    SciTech Connect

    Janata, J.

    1992-10-01

    For reasons that are rooted in thermodynamics, the activity of any single ion cannot be measured without making some nonthermodynamic assumptions and resorting to corresponding experimental tricks. The nature and complexity of these tricks depend on the experimental conditions under which the measurement is performed. In other words, a universally acceptable and theoretically justified solution to this problem does not exist. This is true for any type of sensor. Inherent safety, the lack of requirement for a reference electrode, and the relative novelty of the subject are the three main reasons for interest in optical sensors for ions (optodes). The first two factors are often considered the major advantages of these sensors over more conventional ionselective electrodes (ISEs). The subject of optodes and optical biosensors has been reviewed and documented extensively. In this report, the critique of optical sensing applies only to the sensing of ions. Optical sensors for electrically neutral species are likely to be affected to a far lesser extent by variations in the sensing matrix. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Outgassing and degradation of polyimide induced by swift heavy ion irradiation at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, D.; Balanzat, E.; Ensinger, W.; Trautmann, C.

    2010-07-15

    Polyimide foils were irradiated with energetic Kr (740 MeV) and Pb (890 MeV) ions at cryogenic temperature (12 K). Beam-induced degradation processes were monitored by residual gas analysis and online infrared spectroscopy. The outgassing components observed at low irradiation temperatures differ in quantity but are similar in mass distribution to those identified at room temperature exposure. Besides CO as major volatile fragment, a significant contribution of short hydrocarbons like C{sub 2}H{sub x} is released. In situ infrared spectroscopy indicates accumulation of CO and CO{sub 2} molecules at 12 K in the foils. During heat-up cycles, most of these frozen gases become mobile and outgas at a temperature between 35 and 55 K. The study is motivated by the application of polyimide foils as insulating material in high radiation environment of the future accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR).

  15. Effect of ?-irradiation on volatile compounds of dried Welsh onion ( Allium fistulosum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, Rajendra; Seo, Hye-Young; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Song, Hyun-Pa; Kim, Dong-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2006-02-01

    The volatile compounds of ?-irradiated dried Welsh onion were isolated by simultaneous distillation-extraction (SDE) technique and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) along with their non-irradiated counterparts. A total of 35 volatile compounds were identified in non-irradiated and 1 kGy irradiated samples and 36 volatile compounds were identified in 3, 5, 10 and 20 kGy irradiated samples so far belong to chemical classes of acid, alcohol, aldehyde, ester, furan, ketone and S-containing compound. S-containing compounds were detected as major volatile compounds of all experimental samples. Though the content of several compounds was increased after irradiation, content of major S-containing compounds was found to decreased in the process. Application of high-dose irradiation if required for microbial decontamination of dried Welsh onion is feasible as it enhanced the total concentration of volatile compounds by 31.60% and 24.85% at 10 and 20 kGy, respectively.

  16. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  17. Semi-volatile secondary organic aerosol in urban atmospheres: meeting a measurement challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eatough, Delbert J.; Long, Russell W.; Modey, William K.; Eatough, Norman L.

    Ammonium nitrate and semi-volatile organic compounds are significant components of fine particles in urban atmospheres. These components, however, are not properly determined with current US EPA accepted methods such as the PM 2.5 FRM or other single filter samplers due to significant losses of semi-volatile material (SVM) from particles collected on the filter during sampling. Continuous PM 2.5 mass measurements are attempted using methods such as the R&P TEOM monitor. This method, however, heats the sample to remove particle-bound water which also results in evaporation of SVM. Research at Brigham Young University has resulted in samplers for both the integrated and continuous measurement of total PM 2.5, including the SVM. The PC-BOSS is a charcoal diffusion denuder based sampler for the determination of fine particulate chemical composition including the semi-volatile organic material. The RAMS is a modified TEOM monitor which includes diffusion denuders and Nafion dryers to remove gas phase material which can be absorbed by a charcoal sorbent filter. The RAMS then uses a "sandwich filter" consisting of a conventional particle collecting Teflon coated TX40 filter, followed by an activated charcoal sorbent filter which retains any semi-volatile ammonium nitrate or organic material lost from the particles collected on the TEOM monitor Teflon coated filter, thus allowing for determination of total PM 2.5 mass including the SVM. Recent research conducted by Brigham Young University using these two samplers has indicated the following about semi-volatile organic aerosol: The majority of semi-volatile fine particulate organic material is secondary organic aerosol. This semi-volatile organic aerosol is not retained on the heated filter of a regular TEOM monitor and hence is not measured by this sampling technique. In addition, secondary ammonium nitrate is also lost. Much of the semi-volatile organic aerosol is also lost during sampling from single filter samplers such as the PM 2.5 FRM sampler. The amount of semi-volatile organic aerosol lost from single filter samplers can vary from less than 1/3 that lost from heated TEOM filters during cold winter conditions to essentially all during warm summer conditions. Semi-volatile organic aerosol can only be reliably collected using an appropriate denuder sampler. Either a PM 2.5 FRM sampler or the IMPROVE sampler can be easily modified to a denuder sampler with filters which can be analyzed for semi-volatile OC, nonvolatile OC and EC using existing OC/EC analytical techniques. The research upon which these statements are based is summarized in this document.

  18. On the chemistry of mantle and magmatic volatiles on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.

    2011-03-01

    The surface of Mercury contains ancient volcanic features and signs of pyroclastic activity related to unknown magmatic volatiles. Here, the nature of possible magmatic volatiles (H, S, C, Cl, and N) is discussed in the contexts of formation and evolution of the planet, composition and redox state of its mantle, solubility in silicate melts, chemical mechanisms of magma degassing, and thermochemical equilibria in magma and volcanic gases. The low-FeO content in surface materials (<6 wt%) evaluated with remote sensing methods corresponds to less than 2.3 fO2 log units below the iron-wstite buffer. These redox conditions imply restricted involvement of hydrous species in nebular and accretion processes, and a limited loss of S, Cl, and N during formation and evolution of the planet. Reduced conditions correspond to high solubilities of these elements in magma and do not favor degassing. Major degassing and pyroclastic activity would require oxidation of melts in near-surface conditions. Low-pressure oxidation of graphite in moderately oxidized magmas causes formation of low-solubility CO. Decompression of reduced N-saturated melts involves oxidation of nitride melt complexes and could cause N2 degassing. Putative assimilation of oxide (FeO, TiO2, and SiO2) rich rocks in magma chambers could have caused major degassing through oxidation of graphite and S-, Cl- and N-bearing melt complexes. However, crustal rocks may never have been oxidized, and sulfides, graphite, chlorides, and nitrides could remain in crystallized rocks. Chemical equilibrium models show that N2, CO, S2, CS2, S2Cl, Cl, Cl2, and COS could be among the most abundant volcanic gases on Mercury. Though, these speciation models are restricted by uncertain redox conditions, unknown volatile content in magma, and the adopted chemical degassing mechanism.

  19. TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN UPFLOW WETLAND MESOCOSMS. (R828773C003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption, biodegradation and hydraulic parameters were determined in the laboratory for two candidate soil substrate mixtures for construction of an upflow treatment wetland for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a Superfund site. The major parent contaminants in the groundw...

  20. Alcohol, volatile fatty acid, phenol, and methane emissions from dairy cows and fresh manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 2.5 million dairy cows in California. Emission inventories list dairy cows and their waste as the major source of regional air pollutants, but data on their actual emissions remain sparse, particularly for smog-forming volatile organic compounds (VOC) and greenhouse gases (GH...

  1. Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis) volatile composition under elevated temperature and CO2 in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change is already occurring and may affect biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) involved in plant communication. Whether climate change will promote expansion of invasive species is still unclear. Centaurea solstitialis (yellow starthistle) is a major invasive weed in western No...

  2. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND ISOPRENE OXIDATION PRODUCTS AT A TEMPERATE DECIDUOUS FOREST SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs) and their role in atmospheric oxidant formation were investigated at a forest site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as part of the Nashville Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) in July 1995. Of 98 VOCs detected, a major fraction were anthropogenic VOCs suc...

  3. Measurement of volatile organic compounds inside automobiles.

    PubMed

    Fedoruk, Marion J; Kerger, Brent D

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the types and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the passenger cabin of selected sedan automobiles under static (parked, unventilated) and specified conditions of operation (i.e., driving the vehicle using air conditioning alone, vent mode alone, or driver's window half open). Data were collected on five different passenger sedan vehicles from three major automobile manufacturers. Airborne concentrations were assessed using 90-min time-weighted average (TWA) samples under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method IP-1B to assess individual VOC compounds and total VOCs (TVOCs) calibrated to toluene. Static vehicle testing demonstrated TVOC levels of approximately 400-800 microg/m(3) at warm interior vehicle temperatures (approximately 80 degrees F), whereas TVOCs at least fivefold higher were observed under extreme heat conditions (e.g., up to 145 degrees F). The profile of most prevalent individual VOC compounds varied considerably according to vehicle brand, age, and interior temperature tested, with predominant compounds including styrene, toluene, and 8- to 12-carbon VOCs. TVOC levels under varied operating conditions (and ventilation) were generally four- to eightfold lower (at approximately 50-160 microg/m(3)) than the static vehicle measurements under warm conditions, with the lowest measured levels generally observed in the trials with the driver's window half open. These data indicate that while relatively high concentrations of certain VOCs can be measured inside static vehicles under extreme heat conditions, normal modes of operation rapidly reduce the inside-vehicle VOC concentrations even when the air conditioning is set on recirculation mode. PMID:12595882

  4. Plant volatile compounds: sensory cues for health and nutritional value?

    PubMed

    Goff, Stephen A; Klee, Harry J

    2006-02-10

    Plants produce many volatile metabolites. A small subset of these compounds is sensed by animals and humans, and the volatile profiles are defining elements of the distinct flavors of individual foods. Flavor volatiles are derived from an array of nutrients, including amino acids, fatty acids, and carotenoids. In tomato, almost all of the important flavor-related volatiles are derived from essential nutrients. The predominance of volatiles derived from essential nutrients and health-promoting compounds suggests that these volatiles provide important information about the nutritional makeup of foods. Evidence supporting a relation between volatile perception and nutrient or health value will be reviewed. PMID:16469919

  5. Experimental investigation of the volatility of elements in respect to temperature and fO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, W.; Dingwell, D. B.; Pohl, S.

    2009-12-01

    The volatility of elements is an important variable during geological processes: its impact ranges from daily out gassing of volcanic vents to catastrophic emissions during volcanic eruptions which might result in global climate change. Volatility played, however, already a major role during the formation of our solar system regarding evaporation and condensation of matter of the solar nebula which finally formed our solar system. Precise knowledge of the parameters controlling volatility as well as condensation of elements is still lacking. We therefore initiated a systematic study of the volatility of 18 volatile elements in respect to oxygen fugacity (fO2) and temperature (T) using a modified mechanically assisted equilibration technique (MAE): Approx. 60 g of haplobasaltic starting composition (An-Di) doped with up to 5000 ppm of volatile element (Li, K, Na, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) was heated to run temperature. To investigate the fO2 dependence 2 experiments at logfO2 = -11.3 (~ IW -0.5) and - 0,7 (pure air) at constant T (1300 C) were performed, while T dependence was investigated at 1300 and 1500 C at constant fO2 in pure air. Two Al2O3 plates extending from the hot spot region up to the upper, cooler regions of the muffle tube were used as condensation traps. The temperature profile of the entire setup including the Al2O3 plates was calibrated prior to any run. Experiments lasted for up two weeks while experimental conditions were kept strictly constant and monitored. Up to 46 samples were taken from the melt by time-series sampling to monitor the loss of volatile elements due to their volatility. In this way both evaporation of the investigated elements as well as their condensation behaviour can be investigated simultaneously. Major element composition was analyzed by electron microprobe analysis, while volatile concentrations were determined by laser- ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LAMS). Preliminary results show a highly complex behaviour of the investigated volatile elements: At low fO2, Li, Na, K, Ti, Cr, Mn, Rb, and Cs show no decrease due to evaporation. At high fO2, however, e.g., Cr and Mn decrease with time due to increased volatility, while Co, Cu, Sb and Tl become less volatile. Due to the relatively small temperature range (200 C), the observed T effect is small compared to the fO2 dependence: The decrease in elemental concentrations with increasing T stays practically the same for Cr, In, Sn, Sb and Tl. Mn, Cu, Zn, and Ga show a slightly decreased volatility at a higher temperature, while Cs and Cd become slightly more volatile. The present data set indicates a complex behaviour of volatiles due to melt compositional aspects: Concentrations do not generally decrease linearly with time as anticipated earlier, but stay, e.g., constant for some elements due to the formation of stable phases. Additional experiments, however, are necessary to confirm our preliminary findings.

  6. Studies of volatiles and organic materials in early terrestrial and present-day outer solar system environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Chyba, Christopher F.; Khare, B. N.

    1991-01-01

    A review and partial summary of projects within several areas of research generally involving the origin, distribution, chemistry, and spectral/dielectric properties of volatiles and organic materials in the outer solar system and early terrestrial environments are presented. The major topics covered include: (1) impact delivery of volatiles and organic compounds to the early terrestrial planets; (2) optical constants measurements; (3) spectral classification, chemical processes, and distribution of materials; and (4) radar properties of ice, hydrocarbons, and organic heteropolymers.

  7. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  8. Nanoparticle formation by ozonolysis of inducible plant volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Loivamäki, M.; Vuorinen, T.; Miettinen, P.; Nerg, A.-M.; Holopainen, J. K.; Laaksonen, A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first laboratory experiments of aerosol formation from oxidation of volatile organic species emitted by living plants, a process which for half a century has been known to take place in the atmosphere. We have treated white cabbage crops with methyl jasmonate in order to induce the production of monoterpenes and certain less-volatile sesqui- and homoterpenes. Ozone was introduced into the growth chamber in which the crops were placed, and the subsequent aerosol formation and growth of aerosols were monitored by measuring the particle size distributions continuously during the experiments. Our observations show similar particle formation rates as in the atmosphere but much higher growth rates. The results indicate that the concentrations of nonvolatile oxidation products of plant released precursors needed to induce the nucleation are roughly an order-of-magnitude higher than their concentrations during atmospheric nucleation events. Our results therefore suggest that atmospheric nucleation events proceed via condensation of oxidized organics on pre-existing molecular clusters rather than via their homogeneous or ion-induced nucleation.

  9. Nanoparticle formation by ozonolysis of inducible plant volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joutsensaari, J.; Loivamäki, M.; Vuorinen, T.; Miettinen, P.; Nerg, A.-M.; Holopainen, J. K.; Laaksonen, A.

    2005-06-01

    We present the first laboratory experiments of aerosol formation from oxidation of volatile organic species emitted by living plants, a process which for half a century has been known to take place in the atmosphere. We have treated white cabbage plants with methyl jasmonate in order to induce the production of monoterpenes and certain less-volatile sesqui- and homoterpenes. Ozone was introduced into the growth chamber in which the plants were placed, and the subsequent aerosol formation and growth of aerosols were monitored by measuring the particle size distributions continuously during the experiments. Our observations show similar particle formation rates as in the atmosphere but much higher growth rates. The results indicate that the concentrations of nonvolatile oxidation products of plant released precursors needed to induce the nucleation are roughly an order-of-magnitude higher than their concentrations during atmospheric nucleation events. Our results therefore suggest that if oxidized organics are involved in atmospheric nucleation events, their role is to participate in the growth of pre-existing molecular clusters rather than to form such clusters through homogeneous or ion-induced nucleation.

  10. Proton Transfer Rate Coefficient Measurements of Selected Volatile Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, G.; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed an apparatus based on the selected ion flow tube (SIFT)footnote D. Smith and N.G. Adams, Ads. At. Mol. Phys. 24, 1 (1987). that allows the study of proton transfer between various positive ions and volatile organic molecules. Reactions in the flow tube occur at pressures of approximately 300 mTorr, eliminating the requirement of thermal beam production. The proton donor molecule H_3O^+ has been produced using several types of electrical discharges in water vapor, such as a capacitively coupled RF discharge and a DC hollow cathode discharge. Presently we are developing an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge using the components of a standard microwave oven that has the advantages of simple design and operation, as well as low cost. We will be presenting the results of the microwave cavity ion source to produce H_3O^+, and compare it to the other studied sources. In addition, we will be presenting a preliminary measurement of the proton transfer rate coefficient in the reaction of H_3O^+ with acetone and methanol.

  11. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K., Jr.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping. These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels. We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature. Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC-MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed. ?? 1984.

  12. Microparticles containing lemongrass volatile oil: preparation, characterization and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Weisheimer, V; Miron, D; Silva, C B; Guterres, S S; Schapoval, E E S

    2010-12-01

    Lemongrass volatile oil (LVO) is an important ingredient in cosmetics, presenting antimicrobial properties, in particular antifungal activity, and it is a promising raw material for the development of pharmaceutical products. However, its volatility and susceptibility to degradation are the major drawbacks for the use of Cymbopogon citratus oil in pharmaceutical compounding. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop and to characterize microparticles containing this oil viewing the stabilization of LVO. Two techniques of preparation were evaluated; spray drying and precipitation, and two encapsulation materials, beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) were tested. The microparticles were characterized in terms of content of water, yield, percentage of inclusion, infrared spectroscopy. Morphology was evaluated by scanning electronic microscopy. Studies of stability were also conducted. The content of citral (neral and geranial), major component of the oil, present in microparticles was assayed by a validated HPLC method. The percentage of inclusion of LVO into the microparticles was 56-60% and 26-29% using beta-CD and HP-beta-CD, respectively. The results showed that the use of the beta-CD as encapsulant material was more efficient. Additionally, an increased inclusion of lemongrass oil was observed with the precipitation technique. PMID:21284257

  13. Preconcentration and analysis of trace volatile carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingxiao; Biswas, Souvik; Nantz, Michael H; Higashi, Richard M; Fu, Xiao-An

    2012-02-01

    We describe a preconcentration device that may be suitable for quantitative analysis of trace volatile ketones and aldehydes in ambient air as well as in human breath. The approach is based on microreactor chips fabricated from silicon wafers. The microreactors have thousands of micropillars in microfluidic channels for uniformly distributing a gaseous sample flowing through the chips. The surfaces of the micropillars are functionalized with a quaternary ammonium aminooxy salt, [2-(aminooxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium iodide (ATM), for trapping trace ketones and aldehydes by means of oximation reactions. ATM adducts and unreacted ATM are eluted from the microreactor with less than 40 ?L of methanol and directly analyzed by nanospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Ketones and aldehydes at levels of 1 ppbv have been detected using this microreactor and FTICR-MS system. PMID:22145792

  14. Ammonia volatilization from a Chinese cabbage field under different nitrogen treatments in the Taihu Lake Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Shan, Linan; He, Yunfeng; Chen, Jie; Huang, Qian; Wang, Hongcai

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is a major pathway of nitrogen (N) loss from soil-crop systems. As vegetable cultivation is one of the most important agricultural land uses worldwide, a deeper understanding of NH3 volatilization is necessary in vegetable production systems. We therefore conducted a 3-year (2010-2012) field experiment to characterize NH3 volatilization and evaluate the effect of different N fertilizer treatments on this process during the growth period of Chinese cabbage. Ammonia volatilization rate, rainfall, soil water content, pH, and soil NH4(+) were measured during the growth period. The results showed that NH3 volatilization was significantly and positively correlated to topsoil pH and NH4(+) concentration. Climate factors and fertilization method also significantly affected NH3 volatilization. Specifically, organic fertilizer (OF) increased NH3 volatilization by 11.77%-18.46%, compared to conventional fertilizer (CF, urea), while organic-inorganic compound fertilizer (OIF) reduced NH3 volatilization by 8.82%-12.67% compared to CF. Furthermore, slow-release fertilizers had significantly positive effects on controlling NH3 volatilization, with a 60.73%-68.80% reduction for sulfur-coated urea (SCU), a 71.85%-78.97% reduction for biological Carbon Power® urea (BCU), and a 77.66%-83.12% reduction for bulk-blend controlled-release fertilizer (BBCRF) relative to CF. This study provides much needed baseline information, which will help in fertilizer choice and management practices to reduce NH3 volatilization and encourage the development of new strategies for vegetable planting. PMID:26702964

  15. Volatiles released by endophytic Pseudomonas fluorescens promoting the growth and volatile oil accumulation in Atractylodes lancea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Li, Xia; Zheng, Jiao-Yan; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-04-01

    Atractylodes lancea is a well-known, but endangered, Chinese medicinal plant whose volatile oils are its main active components. As the volatile oil content in cultivated A. lancea is much lower than that in the wild herb, the application of microbes or related elicitors to promote growth and volatile oil accumulation in the cultivated herb is an important area of research. This study demonstrates that the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B isolated from the geo-authentic A. lancea can release several nitrogenous volatiles, such as formamide and N,N-dimethyl-formamide, which significantly promote the growth of non-infected A. lancea. Moreover, the main bacterial volatile benzaldehyde significantly promotes volatile oil accumulation in non-infected A. lancea via activating plant defense responses. Notably, the bacterial nitrogenous volatiles cannot be detected in the A. lancea - Pseudomonas fluorescens symbiont while the benzaldehyde can be detected, indicating the nitrogenous volatiles or their precursors may have been consumed by the host plant. This study firstly demonstrates that the interaction between plant and endophytic bacterium is not limited to the commonly known physical contact, extending the ecological functions of endophyte in the phytosphere and deepening the understandings about the symbiotic interaction. PMID:26874622

  16. Potential for Measurement of Trace Volatile Organic Compounds in Closed Environments Using Gas Chromatograph/Differential Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Cheng, Patti

    2007-01-01

    For nearly 3.5 years, the Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) has routinely analyzed the International Space Station (ISS) atmosphere for a target list of approximately 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Additionally, an early prototype of the VOA collected data aboard submarines in two separate trials. Comparison of the data collected on ISS and submarines showed a surprising similarity in the atmospheres of the two environments. Furthermore, in both cases it was demonstrated that the VOA data can detect hardware issues unrelated to crew health. Finally, it was also clear in both operations that the VOA s size and resource consumption were major disadvantages that would restrict its use in the future. The VOA showed the value of measuring VOCs in closed environments, but it had to be shrunk if it was to be considered for future operations in these environments that are characterized by cramped spaces and limited resources. The Sionex Microanalyzer is a fraction of the VOA s size and this instrument seems capable of maintaining or improving upon the analytical performance of the VOA. The two design improvements that led to a smaller, less complex instrument are the Microanalyzer s use of recirculated air as the gas chromatograph s carrier gas and a micromachined detector. Although the VOA s ion mobility spectrometer and the Microanalyzer s differential mobility spectrometer (DMS) are related detector technologies, the DMS was more amenable to micromachining. This paper will present data from the initial assessment of the Microanalyzer. The instrument was challenged with mixtures that simulated the VOCs typically detected in closed-environment atmospheres.

  17. Closed cycle cooler for VOC preconcentration. Final report. [VOC (volatile organic compound)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    The use of automated gas chromatographs at air quality network monitoring stations to obtain measurements of ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been a goal of EPA's Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory. Presently, instrument designs require excessive amounts of cryogen to preconcentrate and resolve the more volatile organic compounds. The large consumption of cryogen becomes a major disadvantage when deploying the automated systems in field monitoring studies. In the current work a closed cycle cooling device was evaluated for its capability in replacing or reducing the need of cryogen for operating automated gas chromatographs.

  18. The role of sulfur in chemical weathering and atmospheric CO 2 fluxes: Evidence from major ions, ? 13C DIC, and ? 34S SO4 in rivers of the Canadian Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Jody; Telmer, Kevin

    2005-12-01

    Water samples from the Fraser, Skeena and Nass River basins of the Canadian Cordillera were analyzed for dissolved major element concentrations (HCO 3-, SO 42-, Cl -, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, K +, Na +), ? 13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (? 13C DIC), and ? 34S of dissolved sulfate (? 34S SO4) to quantify chemical weathering rates and exchanges of CO 2 between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Weathering rates of silicates and carbonates were determined from major element mass balance. Combining the major element mass balance with ? 34S SO4 (-8.9 to 14.1 CDT) indicates sulfide oxidation (sulfuric acid production) and subsequent weathering of carbonate and to a lesser degree silicate minerals are important processes in the study area. We determine that on average, 81% of the riverine sulfate can be attributed to sulfide oxidation in the Cordilleran rivers, and that 25% of the total weathering cation flux can be attributed to carbonate and silicate dissolution by sulfuric acid. This result is validated by ? 13C DIC values (-9.8 to -3.7 VPDB) which represents a mixture of DIC produced by the following weathering pathways: (i) carbonate dissolution by carbonic acid (-8.25) > (ii) silicate dissolution by carbonic acid (-17) ? (iii) carbonate dissolution by sulfuric acid derived from the oxidation of sulfides (coupled sulfide-carbonate weathering) (+0.5). ? 34S SO4 is negatively correlated with ? 13C DIC in the Cordilleran rivers, which further supports the hypothesis that sulfuric acid produced by sulfide oxidation is primarily neutralized by carbonates, and that sulfide-carbonate weathering impacts the ? 13C DIC of rivers. The negative correlation between ? 34S SO4 and ? 13C DIC is not observed in the Ottawa and St. Lawrence River basins. This suggests other factors such as landscape age (governed by tectonic uplift) and bedrock geology are important controls on regional sulfide oxidation rates, and therefore also on the magnitude of sulfide-carbonate weatheringi.e., it is more significant in tectonically active areas. Calculated DIC fluxes due to Ca and Mg silicate weathering by carbonic acid (38.3 10 3 mol C km -2 yr -1) are similar in magnitude to DIC fluxes due to sulfide-carbonate weathering (18.5 10 3 mol C km -2 yr -1). While Ca and Mg silicate weathering facilitates a transfer of atmospheric CO 2 to carbonate rocks, sulfide-carbonate weathering can liberate CO 2 from carbonate rocks to the atmosphere when sulfide oxidation exceeds sulfide deposition. This implies that in the Canadian Cordillera, sulfide-carbonate weathering can offset up to 48% of the current CO 2 drawdown by silicate weathering in the region.

  19. Volatile interaction between undamaged plants affects tritrophic interactions through changed plant volatile emission

    PubMed Central

    Vucetic, Andja; Dahlin, Iris; Petrovic-Obradovic, Olivera; Glinwood, Robert; Webster, Ben; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2014-01-01

    Volatile interactions between unattacked plants can lead to changes in their volatile emissions. Exposure of potato plants to onion plant volatiles results in increased emission of 2 terpenoids, (E)-nerolidol and TMTT. We investigated whether this is detectable by the ladybird Coccinella septempunctata. The odor of onion-exposed potato was significantly more attractive to ladybirds than that of unexposed potato. Further, a synthetic blend mimicking the volatile profile of onion-exposed potato was more attractive than a blend mimicking that of unexposed potato. When presented individually, TMTT was attractive to ladybirds whereas (E)-nerolidol was repellent. Volatile exchange between unattacked plants and consequent increased attractiveness for ladybirds may be a mechanism that contributes to the increased abundance of natural enemies in complex plant habitats. PMID:25763628

  20. Volatile interaction between undamaged plants affects tritrophic interactions through changed plant volatile emission.

    PubMed

    Vucetic, Andja; Dahlin, Iris; Petrovic-Obradovic, Olivera; Glinwood, Robert; Webster, Ben; Ninkovic, Velemir

    2014-01-01

    Volatile interactions between unattacked plants can lead to changes in their volatile emissions. Exposure of potato plants to onion plant volatiles results in increased emission of 2 terpenoids, (E)-nerolidol and TMTT. We investigated whether this is detectable by the ladybird Coccinella septempunctata. The odor of onion-exposed potato was significantly more attractive to ladybirds than that of unexposed potato. Further, a synthetic blend mimicking the volatile profile of onion-exposed potato was more attractive than a blend mimicking that of unexposed potato. When presented individually, TMTT was attractive to ladybirds whereas (E)-nerolidol was repellent. Volatile exchange between unattacked plants and consequent increased attractiveness for ladybirds may be a mechanism that contributes to the increased abundance of natural enemies in complex plant habitats. PMID:25763628

  1. Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćapraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Coşkun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Nişantaşı, 34365, İstanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Kağıthane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Kağıthane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of compounds. N-octane, 3-methylheptane, n-nonane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane and n-hexane parameters ranged between 3 ppbv and maximum value of 10 ppbv. The other VOC parameters are measured below 3 ppbv value. At participating urban locations for the year of data considered, levels of carbonyls were higher than the level of the other organic compound groups, suggesting that emissions from motor vehicles and photochemical reactions strongly influence ambient air concentrations of carbonyls. Of the most prevalent carbonyls, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant compounds, ranging from 1.5-7.4 ppbv for formaldehyde, to 0.8-2.7 ppbv for acetaldehyde. Keywords: Air quality, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), industry, meteorology, urban, Kağıthane, İstanbul. Acknowledgment: This work was part of the TUJJB-TUMEHAP-01-10 and Turkish Scientific and Technical Research Council Project No: 109Y132.

  2. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-11-24

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  3. Changes in aroma volatile compounds and ethylene production during "Hujingmilu" peach (Prunus persica L.) fruit development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Jia, Hui-Juan

    2005-02-01

    Changes in ethylene production rate, respiration rate, and aroma volatile composition was determined from the immature to mature stage in "Hujingmilu" peach (Prunus presica) fruit. Flesh firmness, fruit size, ground color of skin, and total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA) in juice were analyzed, and ACC, ACC synthase and ACC oxidase activities were measured. With the increase of fruit maturity, fruit size, L* value, and TSS and major reducing sugar contents increased, whereas fruit firmness, skin hue angle (h degrees ), and juice TA and organic acid contents decreased. In immature fruits, a C(6)-aldehydes (trans-2-hexenal) and C(6)-alcohols (cis-3-hexenol) were the major components, corresponding to the low ethylene production and high respiration rates. With increasing of fruit maturity, the C(6)-C(12) lactonic compounds, particularly gamma- and delta-lactones became the dominant volatile constituents, which increased significantly at the climacteric stage. These facts suggest that ethylene production may be involved in the regulation of lactones production in maturing peach fruit. The activity of ACC synthase in the mesocarp declined during the climacteric rise of ethylene. ACC level and ACC oxidase activity in mesocarp were consistent with the onset of ethylene production in fruit. Major aroma volatiles are thought to form in conjunction with the initiation of climacteric rises in respiration and ethylene production. Detection of changes in aroma volatile compound synthesis rate in peach may be useful as index of maturity reflecting the current physiological stage of peach fruit development. PMID:15692177

  4. CAPS and INMS Major Accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Cassini INMS) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) have provided "discovery" science at Titan, Enceladus, Rhea/Dione, and throughout the magnetosphere of Saturn during the course of the mission. In this talk we will review some of the major scientific achievements: 1) the discovery of an extremely complex ion neutral organic chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere that forms the building blocks for aerosol processes below, 2) the discovery of gases and grains emanating from Enceladus' cryo-geysers that tell us about chemical processes in an interior sea, 3) the first direct compositional measurements of sputtered icy moon surfaces, 4) the clearest example to date of the complex plasma interchange processes that occur in rapidly rotating magnetospheres of gas giants, initiating global dynamic processes that enable Saturn to shed the plasma from Enceladus' plume, and complete with a myriad of longitudinal and solar local-time variations, and 5) the dominance of Enceladus water outgassing as a source of magnetospheric plasma that stretches out to Titan and provides oxygen that can convert Titan's rich nitrile populations into amino acids.

  5. Geosmin and Related Volatiles in Bioreactor-Cultured Streptomyces citreus CBS 109.60

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, F. C.; Berger, R. G.

    1996-01-01

    Streptomyces citreus CBS 109.60 produced geosmin and a complex pattern of other volatile compounds during cultivation in a 2.5-liter laboratory bioreactor. Volatiles were isolated from disrupted cells, from the culture medium, and from the waste air of the bioreactor by adsorption on Lewatit OC 1064MD. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were carried out using capillary gas chromatography and coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. S. citreus produced 56 volatile compounds, which were mainly terpenoids but also included aliphatic ketones, alcohols, esters, pyrazines, furan(on)es, and aromatic types during the growth phase. The major components were geosmin and a germacradienol. A biosynthetic pathway for geosmin including eudesmanolides is proposed. PMID:16535293

  6. Organic Aerosol Volatility Parameterizations and Their Impact on Atmospheric Composition and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance and ubiquity in the atmosphere, organic aerosols are still very poorly parameterized in global models. This can be explained by two reasons: first, a very large number of unconstrained parameters are involved in accurate parameterizations, and second, a detailed description of semi-volatile organics is computationally very expensive. Even organic aerosol properties that are known to play a major role in the atmosphere, namely volatility and aging, are poorly resolved in global models, if at all. Studies with different models and different parameterizations have not been conclusive on whether the additional complexity improves model simulations, but the added diversity of the different host models used adds an unnecessary degree of variability in the evaluation of results that obscures solid conclusions. Aerosol microphysics do not significantly alter the mean OA vertical profile or comparison with surface measurements. This might not be the case for semi-volatile OA with microphysics.

  7. Pollen diversity and volatile variability of honey from Corsican Anthyllis hermanniae L. habitat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin; Battesti, Marie-Jos; Paolini, Julien; Costa, Jean

    2014-12-01

    Melissopalynological, physicochemical, and volatile analyses of 29 samples of Corsican 'summer maquis' honey were performed. The pollen spectrum was characterized by a wide diversity of nectariferous and/or polleniferous taxa. The most important were Anthyllis hermanniae and Rubus sp., associated with some endemic taxa. Castanea sativa was also determined in these honeys with a great variation. The volatile fraction was characterized by 37 compounds and dominated by phenolic aldehydes and linear acids. The major compounds were phenylacetaldehyde, benzaldehyde, and nonanoic acid. Statistical analysis of pollen and volatile data showed that 18 samples were characterized by a high abundance of phenylacetaldehyde, which might relate to the high amount of A. hermanniae and Rubus sp. Eleven other samples displayed a higher proportion of phenolic ketones and linear acids, which characterized the nectar contribution of C. sativa and Thymus herba-barona, respectively. PMID:25491334

  8. Volatiles as Chemosystematic Markers for Distinguishing Closely Related Species within the Pinus mugo Complex.

    PubMed

    Celi?ski, Konrad; Bonikowski, Rados?aw; Wojnicka-P?torak, Aleksandra; Chudzi?ska, Ewa; Mali?ski, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC/MS analysis was used to identify the constituents of pine-needle volatiles differentiating three closely-related pine species within the Pinus mugo complex, i.e., P. uncinata Ramond ex DC., P. uliginosa G.E.Neumann ex Wimm., and P. mugo Turra. Moreover, chemosystematic markers were proposed for the three analyzed pine species. The major constituents of the pine-needle volatiles were ?-pinene (28.4%) and bornyl acetate (10.8%) for P. uncinata, ?-car-3-ene (21.5%) and ?-pinene (16.1%) for P. uliginosa, and ?-pinene (20%) and ?-car-3-ene (18.1%) for P. mugo. This study is the first report on the application of the composition of pine-needle volatiles for the reliable identification of closely-related pine species within the Pinus mugo complex. PMID:26265572

  9. The 2013 Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Mission to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    The MAVEN mission has the goal of understanding the current structure and composition of the Mars upper atmosphere, the present-day rates of loss of atmosphere to space, and the dependence on solar and solar-wind input that will allow extrapolation backward in time. It will determine the total loss of volatiles to space through time, and therefore determine the role of loss to space in the changes in Mars climate that have occurred. Launch will be in November 2013, with orbit insertion at Mars in September 2014 and start of the one-Earth-year mapping mission in October 2014. The primary mission occurs during the declining phase of the solar cycle, and we should observe significant variation in the solar EUV flux and solar-storm events that drive upper-atmospheric behavior. Eight instruments on board the spacecraft provide detailed measurements of the neutral and ion composition and structure, EUV and solar-energetic-particle inputs into the upper atmosphere, energetic ions, solar-wind electrons and ions, electron abundance and temperature, and the magnetic field. The spacecraft will observe from an elliptical orbit that carries it through all regions of the upper atmosphere and near-Mars space, and allows both in situ and remote-sensing observations of the local and global properties of the upper atmosphere. The precessing orbit carries periapsis through all local solar times and most latitudes, providing thorough coverage. MAVEN is a Principal Investigator led mission in the Mars Scout line. Partners include NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (providing project management and oversight, two instruments, and the Project Scientist), University of Colorado (two instruments, the science operat