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Sample records for major mobility disability

  1. MAJOR MOBILITY DISABILITY-ASSESSMENT AND BASELINE PERFORMANCE IN LIFE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major mobility disability has previously been defined by self-reported inability to walk ¼ mile. Observed inability to walk 400 meters provides a valid and objective disability endpoint for clinical trials that is relevant to community walking, future advanced disability and mortality. LIFE particip...

  2. Effect of structured physical activity on prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE Study randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pahor, Marco; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Blair, Steven; Bonds, Denise E.; Church, Timothy S.; Espeland, Mark A.; Fielding, Roger A.; Gill, Thomas M.; Groessl, Erik J.; King, Abby C.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Manini, Todd M.; McDermott, Mary M.; Miller, Michael E.; Newman, Anne B.; Rejeski, W Jack; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Importance In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activity prevents or delays mobility disability. Objective To test the hypothesis that a long-term structured physical activity program is more effective than a health education program (also referred to as a successful aging program) in reducing the risk of major mobility disability. Design, Setting, and Participants The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicenter, randomized trial that enrolled participants between February 2010 and December 2011, who participated for an average of 2.6 years. Follow-up ended in December 2013. Outcome assessors were blinded to the intervention assignment. Participants were recruited from urban, suburban and rural communities at 8 field centers throughout the US. We randomized a volunteer sample of 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had physical limitations, defined as a score on the Short Physical Performance Battery of 9 or below, but were able to walk 400 m. Interventions Participants were randomized to a structured moderate intensity physical activity program (n=818) done in a center and at home that included including aerobic, resistance and flexibility training activities or to a health education program (n=817) consisting of workshops on topics relevant to older adults and upper extremity stretching exercises. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was major mobility disability objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m. Results Incident major mobility disability occurred in 30.1% (n=246/818) of physical activity and 35.5% (n=290/817) of health education participants (HR=0.82, 95%CI=0.69–0.98, p=0.03). Persistent mobility disability was experienced by 120/818 (14.7%) physical activity and 162/817 (19.8%) health education participants (HR=0.72; 95%CI=0.57–0.91; p=0.006). Serious adverse events were reported by 404/818 (49.4%) of the physical activity and 373/817 (45.7%) of the health education participants (Risk Ratio=1.08; 95%CI=0.98–1.20). Conclusions and Relevance A structured moderate intensity physical activity program, compared with a health education program, reduced major mobility disability over 2.6 years among older adults at risk of disability. These findings suggest mobility benefit from such a program in vulnerable older adults. Registration ClinicalsTrials.gov identifier NCT01072500. PMID:24866862

  3. Muscle strength and BMI as predictors of major mobility disability in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders pilot (LIFE-P)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle weakness and obesity are two significant threats to mobility facing the increasing number of older adults. To date, there are no studies that have examined the association of strength and body mass index (BMI) on event rates on a widely used performance measure of major mobility disability. T...

  4. Mobilizing the Moral Majority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebman, Robert C.

    The Moral Majority has been more successful in mobilizing conservative Christians than three other evangelical groups--Third Century Publishers, Christian Voice, and the Religious Roundtable. According to the literature on social movements, four possible explanations for the success of such groups are that they have access to financial resources,

  5. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  6. Obesity and Survival to Age 85 Years without Major Disease or Disability in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Waring, Molly E.; Kroenke, Candyce H.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Seguin, Rebecca; Bell, Christina L.; Gass, Margery; Manini, Todd M.; Masaki, Kamal H.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Context The impact of obesity on late-age survival without disease or disability in women is unknown. Objective To investigate if higher baseline body mass index and waist circumference affects womens survival to age 85 years without major chronic disease (coronary disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, or hip fracture) and mobility disability. Design, Setting, Participants Examination of 36,611 women from the Womens Health Initiative who could have reached age 85 years or older if they survived to the last outcomes evaluation on September 17, 2012. Recruitment was from 40 US Clinical Centers from October 1993December 1998. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of baseline body mass index and waist circumference with the outcomes, adjusting for demographic, behavioral, and health characteristics. Main Outcome Measures Mutually-exclusive classifications: 1) survived without major chronic disease and without mobility disability (healthy); 2) survived with ?1 major chronic disease at baseline, but without new disease or disability (prevalent diseased); 3) survived and developed ?1 major chronic disease but not disability during study follow-up (incident diseased); 4) survived and developed mobility disability with or without disease (disabled); and 5) did not survive (died). Results Mean (SD) baseline age was 72.4 (3.0) years (range: 6681). The distribution of women classified as healthy, prevalent diseased, incident diseased, disabled, and died was 19%, 15%, 23%, 18%, and 25%, respectively. Compared to normal-weight women, underweight and obese women were more likely to die before age 85 years. Overweight and obese women had higher risks of incident disease and mobility disability. Disability risks were striking. Relative to normal-weight women, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mobility disability was 1.6 (1.51.8) for overweight women and 3.2 (2.93.6), 6.6 (5.48.1), and 6.7 (4.89.2), for class I, II, and III obesity, respectively. Waist circumference >88 centimeters was also associated with higher risk of earlier death, incident disease, and mobility disability. Conclusions Overall and abdominal obesity were important and potentially modifiable factors associated with dying or developing mobility disability and major chronic disease before age 85 years in older women. PMID:24217806

  7. Orientation and Mobility for Students with Multiple Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Duncan

    This paper addresses orientation and mobility (O&M) training for people with multiple severe disabilities including visual impairments. The historical origins of O&M training are reviewed, noting difficulties with applying the traditional curriculum with such groups as very young children, the elderly, and those with multiple disabilities. A

  8. Mobility disability and the pattern of accelerometer-derived sedentary and physical activity behaviors in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ezeugwu, Victor; Klaren, Rachel E.; A. Hubbard, Elizabeth; Manns, Patricia (Trish); Motl, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity and high sedentary behavior levels are major concerns in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and these differ depending on the level of mobility disability. However, the manner in which daily activity is accumulated is currently unknown in this population. Methods A secondary analysis was performed on a combined data set of persons with MS from two previous investigations of physical activity and symptomatic or quality of life outcomes in the United States over a two year period (20072009). Mobility disability status was determined using the Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) while activity behavior was objectively monitored using an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7days. Results Persons with MS who have mobility disability were involved in sedentary behavior, light and moderate intensity activity for 65%, 34% and 1% of the day, respectively compared to 60%, 37%, and 3%, respectively in those without mobility disability (p<0.05). Breaks in sedentary time did not differ by mobility disability status. Compared to those without mobility disability, the average number of sedentary bouts longer than 30min was greater in those with mobility disability (p=0.016). Conclusion Persons with MS with mobility disability are less active, engage in more sedentary behavior and accumulate prolonged sedentary bouts.

  9. Sensory and Motor Peripheral Nerve Function and Incident Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Caserotti, Paolo; Harris, Tamara B.; Zivkovic, Sasa; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Schwartz, Ann V.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Cauley, Jane A.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives Peripheral nerve impairments are highly prevalent in older adults and are associated with poor lower-extremity function. Whether sensorimotor nerve function predicts incident mobility disability has not been determined. We assessed the relationship between sensorimotor nerve function and incident mobility disability over 10 years. Design Prospective cohort study with longitudinal analysis. Setting Two U.S. clinical sites. Participants Population-based sample of community-dwelling older adults with no mobility disability at 2000/01 exam (N = 1680; mean SD: age = 76.5 2.9, BMI = 27.1 4.6; 50.2% women, 36.6% black and 10.7% with diabetes). Measurements Motor nerve conduction amplitude (poor: <1 mV) and velocity (poor: <40 m/s) were measured on the deep peroneal nerve. Sensory nerve function was measured using 10-g and 1.4-g monofilaments and vibration detection threshold at the toe. Lower-extremity symptoms included numbness or tingling and sudden stabbing, burning, pain or aches. Incident mobility disability assessed semiannually over 8.5 years (IQR: 4.59.6) was defined as two consecutive self-reports of a lot of difficulty or inability to walk mile or climb 10 steps. Results Nerve impairments were detected in 55% of participants and 30% developed mobility disability. Worse motor amplitude (HR = 1.29 per SD, 95% CI: 1.161.44), vibration detection threshold (HR = 1.13 per SD, 95% CI: 1.041.23), symptoms (HR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.362.17), 2 motor (HR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.433.09), 2 sensory (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.372.68), and ?3 nerve impairments (HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.543.53) predicted incident mobility disability, after adjustment. Quadriceps strength mediated relationships between certain nerve impairments and mobility disability, although most remained significant. Conclusion Poor sensorimotor nerve function independently predicted mobility disability. Future work should investigate modifiable risk factors and interventions like strength training for preventing disability and improving function in older adults with poor nerve function. PMID:25482096

  10. Correlations between joint and spinal mobility, spinal sagittal configuration, segmental mobility, segmental pain, symptoms and disabilities in female homecare personnel.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, G; Gerdle, B

    2000-09-01

    The aim of a study comprising 607 women working as homecare personnel was to investigate general spinal, joint and segmental mobility, different symptoms (pain and strain) and their relation to various aspects of disability. Joint mobility (mainly peripheral) was estimated using the "Beighton" score and spinal posture and mobility were measured by kyphometer. Passive segmental mobility and pain provocation were estimated manually. Pain intensity and strain during work and leisure were estimated using visual analogue scales for defined anatomical regions. Disability was rated using defined items and two indices. The 7-day prevalence of low back pain was 48%. Peripheral joint mobility, spinal sagittal posture and thoracic sagittal mobility showed low correlations with disability. Lumbar sagittal hypomobility was associated with higher disability. Manually estimated segmental mobility and segmental pain provocation of L4-L5 and L5-S1 correlated with disability; hypo- and hypermobility or positive pain provocation tests at these levels showed higher disability than normal mobility and negative pain provocation tests, respectively. Cluster analysis revealed that the combination of positive pain provocation tests and low lumbar sagittal mobility was associated with particularly high disability levels. In conclusion, positive pain provocation tests were clearly associated with high disability levels. PMID:11028797

  11. 78 FR 41824 - Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals With Disabilities: Proposed Circular

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR... Federal Transit Administration Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals With Disabilities: Proposed... implementing the Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Program. The Moving Ahead...

  12. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a cross-sectional survey

  13. The Experiences of Students with Mobility Disabilities in Cypriot Higher Education Institutions: Listening to Their Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjikakou, Kika; Polycarpou, Vaso; Hadjilia, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of students with mobility disabilities in Cypriot higher education institutions. In order to obtain relevant information, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 Cypriot students with different forms of mobility disabilities, who attended different Cypriot higher education institutions and a

  14. Relationship between Mobility Limitations and the Places where Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Live

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Shaun; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    As the population ages, mobility limitations are associated with increased mortality and negative health-related states both in the general population and among people with intellectual disabilities. The influence of mobility limitations upon the lives and lifestyles of people with intellectual disabilities remains poorly understood. Specifically,

  15. Superior effect of forceful compared with standard traction mobilizations in hip disability?

    PubMed

    Vaarbakken, Kjartan; Ljunggren, Anne Elisabeth

    2007-09-01

    THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO COMPARE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TWO COMPILED PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAMS: one including forceful traction mobilizations, the other including traction with unknown force, in patients with hip disability according to ICF (the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, 2001; WHO), using a block randomized, controlled trial with two parallel treatment groups in a regular private outpatient physiotherapy practice. In the experimental group (E; n = 10) and control group (C; n = 9), the mean (+/-SD) age for all participants was 59 +/- 12 years. They were recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, had persistent pain located at the hip joint for >8 weeks and hip hypomobility. Both groups received exercise, information and manual traction mobilization. In E, the traction force was progressed to 800 N, whereas in C it was unknown. Major outcome measure was the median total change score >/=20 points or >/=50% of the disease- and joint-specific Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), compiled of Pain, Stiffness, Function and Hip-related quality of life (ranging 0-100). The mean (range) treatments received were 13 (7-16) over 5-12 weeks and 20 (18-24) over 12 weeks for E and C, respectively. The experimental group showed superior clinical post-treatment effect on HOOS (>/=20 points), in six of 10 participants compared with none of nine in the control group (p = 0.011). The effect size was 1.1. The results suggest that a compiled physiotherapy program including forceful traction mobilizations are short-term effective in reducing self-rated hip disability in primary healthcare. The long-term effect is to be documented. PMID:18833335

  16. Can failure on adaptive locomotor tasks independently predict incident mobility disability?

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nandini; Metter, E Jeffrey; Guralnik, Jack; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-08-01

    This study examined whether inability to perform adaptive locomotor tests predicts self-reported incident mobility disability. InCHIANTI study participants (N = 611; age, 50-85 yrs) who could walk 7 m at self-selected speed and who had no self-reported mobility disability at baseline were included. The ability to complete four adaptive locomotor tests was assessed: fast walking, walking on a narrow path, crossing obstacles while walking, and talking while walking. Mobility disability was recorded again at 3-yr follow-up. Failure in the fast-walking and narrow-path walking tests predicted approximately 2.5 times likelihood of reporting incident mobility disability (P = 0.009 and P = 0.011, respectively). Failure in the obstacle-crossing test predicted approximately two times likelihood of reporting incident mobility disability; however, this result did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.077). Failure in talking while walking did not predict incident mobility disability. Those who failed both the fast-walking and narrow-path walking tests were almost nine times as likely to report incident mobility disability. PMID:23291600

  17. Highly Mobile Children and Youth with Disabilities: Policies and Practices in Five States. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Luzanne; Ahearn, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    This document's primary focus is on a subset of the population of mobile children--infants, preschoolers, children and youth with disabilities and their families who are highly mobile. First, a background section provides information about policies and practices developed for mobile children at the federal level under the McKinney-Vento Program.

  18. Physical Mobility Limitations in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, S.; Hunter, D.; Ouellette-Kuntz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mobility limitations increase with age in the general population. Despite a growing population of older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), mobility is rarely studied in the ID literature. The specific aim of this study was to identify and summarise primary literature investigating mobility limitations in adults with ID.

  19. Addressing the nonexercise part of the activity continuum: a more realistic and achievable approach to activity programming for adults with mobility disability?

    PubMed

    Manns, Patricia J; Dunstan, David W; Owen, Neville; Healy, Genevieve N

    2012-04-01

    Participation in physical activity is fundamental for the maintenance of metabolic health and the prevention of major chronic diseases, particularly type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A whole-of-day approach to physical activity promotion is increasingly advocated and includes not only increasing moderate-intensity physical activity but also reducing sedentary time and increasing light-intensity activity (the "nonexercise" part of the activity continuum). This whole-of-day approach to tackling the challenge of inactivity may be particularly relevant for adults with mobility disabilities, who are among the most inactive segment of the population. Focusing on nonexercise activity by striving to reduce sedentary time and increase light-intensity activity may be a more successful place to begin to change behavior in someone with mobility disability. This article discusses what is known about the metabolic health consequences of sedentary behavior and light-intensity activity in adults with and without mobility disability. The concept of inactivity physiology is presented, along with possible applications or evidence from studies with adults with mobility disability. Mobility disability discussions and examples focus on stroke and spinal cord injury. Finally, clinical implications and future research directions related to sedentary behavior in adults with mobility disability are discussed. PMID:22156025

  20. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barber, Ricard; Dur-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, Jos; Muoz, Eva Mara; Serrano, Manuel; Marqus, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas. PMID:26294493

  1. Strength and Speed Training for Elders With Mobility Disability

    PubMed Central

    Protas, Elizabeth J.; Tissier, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to pilot test a function-focused exercise intervention consisting of strength and gait-speed training in elders with reduced walking speed, decreased walking endurance, and functional impairment. Twelve participants, 77.2 years old (± 7.34), whose usual gait speed was <0.85 m/s, with walking endurance of <305 m in 5 min, and who were functionally impaired participated in a moderate-intensity exercise intervention. The training occurred 3 times per week, 75 min per session, for 3 months and combined 4 weeks of gait-speed training, walking exercise, and functional strengthening. The participants demonstrated mean usual gait speeds (≥1.0 m/s), endurance (≥350 m), and functional ability (≥10 score on performance battery) that were within normal limits after 12 weeks of training. Fastest gait speed (≥1.5 m/s) and muscle strength also improved significantly. Improvements were maintained during follow-up testing after 3–6 months. In summary, a 12-week intervention for frail, mobility-disabled participants led to improvements in walking, function, and strength. PMID:19799099

  2. The Prevalence and Severity of Physical Mobility Limitations in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Shaun; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Hunter, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    Background: The population of older adults with intellectual disabilities is growing, creating new challenges for individuals, families and service providers. Although there has been increased research into the ageing process for adults with intellectual disabilities, there is little focused research investigating physical mobility. Materials and

  3. Effects of Increased Mobility Skills on Meaningful Life Participation for an Adult with Severe Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an adult with severe, multiple disabilities and discusses issues affecting meaningful life participation. Emphasis is placed on the role of functional mobility skills to increase active engagement in age-appropriate activities and opportunities to make informed choices. MOVE for Adults (Mobility Opportunities

  4. Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Belza, Basia

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. PMID:21748010

  5. Frontal function, disability and caregiver burden in elderly patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Mei; Hou, Shu-Ying; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chang, Chiung-Yi; Yen, Ju-Yu; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng

    2010-10-01

    Caregivers of patients with late-life major depressive disorder experience a significant level of general caregiver burden. Disability in patients is possibly one of the origins of caregiver burden. Frontal lobe dysfunction might be the source of disability. This study investigated if frontal lobe dysfunction (body level) of patients with late-life major depressive disorder was associated with their disability (individual level), and if it led to a high level of caregiver burden (societal level). Thirty-four unselected pairs of caregivers and their family members with late-life major depressive disorder were recruited. Frontal Assessment Battery and Timed Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TIADL) were used to assess patients' frontal function and disability, and Caregiver Burden Inventory was used to measure caregiver burden. Frontal Assessment Battery correlated with TIADL (r= -0.47; p<0.006). TIADL score was also associated with two subscales of the Caregiver Burden Inventory: social (r = 0.38, p=0.026) and time-dependent (r= 0.37, p= 0.033). This study supported the hypothesis that frontal lobe dysfunction in elderly patients with depression is associated with their disability in instrumental activities of daily living. Disability is related to social and time-dependent aspects of caregiver burden. Further studies to examine proposed cognitive interventions are suggested to reduce patient disability and caregiver burden. PMID:20950780

  6. Factors Predictive of Type of Powered Mobility Received by Veterans with Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.; Vincent, Andrea S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this observational study was to determine factors predictive of the type of powered mobility prescribed to veterans with disability. Material/Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all veterans (n=170) who received powered mobility from a designated power mobility clinic. Logistic regression analysis was used to determined factors predictive of the type of powered mobility provided. Results Sixty-four (38%) veterans were provided powered wheelchairs and 106 (62%) were provided powered scooters. Of the variables examined, only primary medical conditions for referral and disability severity (as measured by the 2-minute timed walk test; 2-MWT) were predictive of the types of powered mobility prescribed. Veterans who were able to walk longer distances were more likely to be prescribed powered scooters. Age, gender, race, level of education, marital and employment status, number of chronic medical conditions, and upper and lower limb muscle strength were not significant predictors. Conclusions This study suggests that the primary medical conditions for referral and 2-MWT can assist clinicians in the determination of the type of powered mobility to prescribe to veterans with disability. PMID:25955214

  7. Developmental Disabilities: A Summary of Major Classifications and Glossary of Terms. Parent Awareness Program, 1982-1983. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudstrup, Katherine; And Others

    Designed for use in adult education courses for parents of developmentally disabled children, this manual provides basic information about major categories of disabilities and a glossary of commonly encountered terms. After an introductory overview, the manual provides information about the characteristics and etiology of five disabling

  8. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,

  9. School Mobility, Dropout, and Graduation Rates across Student Disability Categories in Utah. REL 2015-055

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrat, Vanessa X.; Berliner, BethAnn; Voight, Adam; Tran, Loan; Huang, Chun-Wei; Yu, Airong; Chen-Gaddini, Min

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of students with disabilities in Utah public schools, and presents the single-year mobility and dropout rates for students in grades 6-12, as well as the four-year cohort dropout and graduation rates, for students who started grade 9 for the first time in 2007/08 and constituted the 2011 cohort. Results…

  10. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  11. Obstacle Course Training Can Improve Mobility and Prevent Falls in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hanegem, E.; Enkelaar, L.; Smulders, E.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) constitute a special-needs population at high risk of falling. This is the first study to evaluate whether obstacle course training can improve mobility and prevent falls in this population. Methods: The intervention was implemented as part of an institution-wide health care improvement plan

  12. Mobility Device Use in the United States. Disability Statistics Report 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, H. Stephen; Kang, Taewoon; LaPlante, Michell P.

    This report provides data on the use of mobility devices in the United States by providing a detailed profile of the population using these devices. It covers their demographic characteristics; health and disability status, including diagnoses and impairments, physical functioning, and activities of daily living; and health insurance status. The

  13. Effects of Disability on Pregnancy Experiences Among Women with Impaired Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Little is known about how functional impairments might affect the pregnancies of women with mobility disability. We aimed to explore complications that arise during pregnancy specifically related to physical functional impairments of women with significant mobility disabilities. Design Qualitative descriptive analysis Setting Telephone interviews with women from 17 USA states Sample 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years; most participants were recruited through social networks. Methods We conducted 2-hour, in-depth telephone interviews using a semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol. We used NVivo software to sort interview transcript texts for conventional content analyses. Main outcome measures Functional impairment-related complications during pregnancy. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years. Most were white, well-educated, and higher income; 8 women had spinal cord injuries, 4 cerebral palsy, and 10 had other conditions; 18 used wheeled mobility aids; and 14 had cesarean deliveries (8 elective). Impairment-related complications during pregnancy included: falls; urinary tract and bladder problems; wheelchair fit and stability problems that reduced mobility and compromised safety; significant shortness of breath, sometimes requiring respiratory support; increased spasticity; bowel management difficulties; and skin integrity problems (this was rare, but multiple women greatly increased skin monitoring during pregnancy to prevent pressure ulcers). Conclusions In addition to other pregnancy-associated health risks, women with mobility disabilities appear to experience problems relating to their functional impairments. Pre-conception planning and in-depth discussions during early pregnancy could potentially assist women with mobility disabilities to anticipate and address these difficulties. PMID:25417861

  14. Food Access Patterns and Barriers among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Deborah L.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2012-01-01

    We examined where midlife and older adults with a mobility disability accessed food outside the home in King County, Washington, USA, how they travelled to these food destinations, and facilitators and barriers to food access using qualitative interviews. Thirty-five adults aged ?50 years with a mobility disability (defined as use of an assistive device for mobility) were interviewed. Supplemental objective information was obtained from a Global Positioning System device worn by participants for 3 days. Participants primarily accessed food at grocery stores, restaurants, and coffee shops/cafs. The most common transportation modes were walking, obtaining a ride from friends, motorized chair/scooter, and public transit. Location and proximity of food destinations were factors affecting participants' ability to access these destinations. Adequate space, ease of entry, available amenities such as restrooms, and helpful people were facilitators for participants to access food outside the home. PMID:23056944

  15. A Self-Reported Screening Tool for Detecting Community-Dwelling Older Persons with Frailty Syndrome in the Absence of Mobility Disability: The FiND Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Matteo; Demougeot, Laurent; Boccalon, Henri; Guyonnet, Sophie; Abellan Van Kan, Gabor; Vellas, Bruno; Andrieu, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Background The frailty syndrome (a geriatric multidimensional condition characterized by decreased reserve and diminished resistance to stressors) represents a promising target of preventive interventions against disability in elders. Available screening tools for the identification of frailty in the absence of disability present major limitations. In particular, they have to be administered by a trained assessor, require special equipment, and/or do not discriminate between frail and disabled individuals. Aim of this study is to verify the agreement of a novel self-reported questionnaire (the Frail Non-Disabled [FiND] instrument) designed for detecting non-mobility disabled frail older persons with results from reference tools. Methodology/Principal Findings Data are from 45 community-dwelling individuals aged ?60 years. Participants were asked to complete the FiND questionnaire separately exploring the frailty and disability domains. Then, a blinded assessor objectively measured the frailty status (using the phenotype proposed by Fried and colleagues) and mobility disability (using the 400-meter walk test). Cohen's kappa coefficients were calculated to determine the agreement between the FiND questionnaire with the reference instruments. Mean age of participants (women 62.2%) was 72.5 (standard deviation 8.2) years. Seven (15.6%) participants presented mobility disability as being unable to complete the 400-meter walk test. According to the frailty phenotype criteria, 25 (55.6%) participants were pre-frail or frail, and 13 (28.9%) were robust. Overall, a substantial agreement of the instrument with the reference tools (kappa?=?0.748, quadratic weighted kappa?=?0.836, both p values<0.001) was reported with only 7 (15.6%) participants incorrectly categorized. The agreement between results of the FiND disability domain and the 400-meter walk test was excellent (kappa?=?0.920, p<0.001). Conclusions/Significance The FiND questionnaire presents a very good capacity to correctly identify frail older persons without mobility disability living in the community. This screening tool may represent an opportunity for diffusing awareness about frailty and disability and supporting specific preventive campaigns. PMID:24999805

  16. Disability levels and correlates among older mobile home dwellers, an NHATS analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rousan, Tala M.; Rubenstein, Linda M.; Wallace, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although remarkably understudied, manufactured or mobile homes are the housing choice for nearly 20 million Americans and little is known about the health of older persons living in mobile homes. Objective We sought to investigate disability levels and other health correlates among older adults living in mobile or manufactured homes compared to their counterparts living in other types of homes. Methods We sampled non-institutional adults aged 65 years or older (n = 7609), of whom 344 lived in mobile homes, from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). Results Respondents living in mobile homes (average age = 75.1 years; SD = 0.5) had lower education and income and medical insurance than older adults living in other types of community residence (average age = 77.5 years; SD = 0.2). They were more likely to smoke, have lung and heart disease, and report fair or poor general health status. Mobile home dwellers reported more difficulty or inability in performing the following activities of daily living when compared to their counterparts: stooping and kneeling (64.9% vs 60.8%, p = 0.007), walking 6 blocks (46.5% vs 41.5%, p = 0.001), walking 3 blocks (37.7% vs 33.5%, p = 0.002), and climbing up to 20 stairs (39.2% vs 34.8%, p = 0.02). Among those reporting disability, mobile home dwellers had fewer bathroom safety modifications. Conclusion There is higher prevalence of chronic conditions, functional and cognitive impairment in older mobile home dwellers compared to older adults living in other types of housing. PMID:25766655

  17. Universal accessibility of "accessible" fitness and recreational facilities for persons with mobility disabilities.

    PubMed

    Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P; Ginis, Kathleen A Martin

    2011-01-01

    This study descriptively measured the universal accessibility of "accessible" fitness and recreational facilities for Ontarians living with mobility disabilities. The physical and social environments of 44 fitness and recreational facilities that identified as "accessible" were assessed using a modified version of the AIMFREE. None of the 44 facilities were completely accessible. Mean accessibility ratings ranged between 31 and 63 out of a possible 100. Overall, recreational facilities had higher accessibility scores than fitness centers, with significant differences found on professional support and training, entrance areas, and parking lot. A modest correlation was found between the availability of fitness programming and the overall accessibility of fitness-center specific facility areas. Overall, the physical and social environments of the 44 fitness and recreational facilities assessed were limited in their accessibility for persons with mobility disabilities. Future efforts should be directed at establishing and meeting universal accessibility guidelines for Canadian physical activity facilities. PMID:21282844

  18. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and

  19. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and…

  20. Reunion Is in Hand: Princeton Enhances a Major Alumni Event with Mobile Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Mobile technology is an effective way of conveying information to alumni, especially during a major event. Alumni appreciate not only access to information in a convenient medium, but also efforts to engage with them through new technology. Like so many of the best ideas at Princeton University, the creation of Reunions Mobile emerged from

  1. Reunion Is in Hand: Princeton Enhances a Major Alumni Event with Mobile Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gossen, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Mobile technology is an effective way of conveying information to alumni, especially during a major event. Alumni appreciate not only access to information in a convenient medium, but also efforts to engage with them through new technology. Like so many of the best ideas at Princeton University, the creation of Reunions Mobile emerged from…

  2. Gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability in old age: a cross-sectional study in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Onadja, Yentma; Atchessi, Nicole; Soura, Bassiahi Abdramane; Rossier, Clmentine; Zunzunegui, Maria-Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability between older men and women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and to assess the extent to which these differences could be attributable to gender inequalities in life course social and health conditions. Data were collected on 981 men and women aged 50 and older in a 2010 cross-sectional health survey conducted in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Legans cognitive test. Mobility disability was self-reported as having any difficulty walking 400 m without assistance. We used logistic regression to assess gender differences in cognitive impairment and mobility disability. Prevalence of cognitive impairment was 27.6% in women and 7.7% in men, and mobility disability was present in 51.7% of women and 26.5% of men. The women to men odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for cognitive impairment and mobility disability was 3.52 (1.98-6.28) and 3.79 (2.47-5.85), respectively, after adjusting for the observed life course social and health conditions. The female excess was only partially explained by gender inequalities in nutritional status, marital status and, to a lesser extent, education. Among men and women, age, childhood hunger, lack of education, absence of a partner and being underweight were independent risk factors for cognitive impairment, while age, childhood poor health, food insecurity and being overweight were risk factors for mobility disability. Enhancing nutritional status and education opportunities throughout life span could prevent cognitive impairment and mobility disability and partly reduce the female excess in these disabilities. PMID:23827740

  3. Delaying Mobility Disability in People With Parkinson Disease Using a Sensorimotor Agility Exercise Program

    PubMed Central

    King, Laurie A; Horak, Fay B

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a new framework for therapists to develop an exercise program to delay mobility disability in people with Parkinson disease (PD). Mobility, or the ability to efficiently navigate and function in a variety of environments, requires balance, agility, and flexibility, all of which are affected by PD. This article summarizes recent research identifying how constraints on mobility specific to PD, such as rigidity, bradykinesia, freezing, poor sensory integration, inflexible program selection, and impaired cognitive processing, limit mobility in people with PD. Based on these constraints, a conceptual framework for exercises to maintain and improve mobility is presented. An example of a constraint-focused agility exercise program, incorporating movement principles from tai chi, kayaking, boxing, lunges, agility training, and Pilates exercises, is presented. This new constraint-focused agility exercise program is based on a strong scientific framework and includes progressive levels of sensorimotor, resistance, and coordination challenges that can be customized for each patient while maintaining fidelity. Principles for improving mobility presented here can be incorporated into an ongoing or long-term exercise program for people with PD. PMID:19228832

  4. Exploring Mobility Options for Children with Physical Disabilities: A Focus on Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The study by Tefft et al. (2011, in this issue) is one of the few studies that have explored the impact of pediatric powered mobility on families. The parents who participated in their study reported increased satisfaction with their children's social and play skills, ability to move independently, sleeping patterns, and public perception of their

  5. Exploring Mobility Options for Children with Physical Disabilities: A Focus on Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The study by Tefft et al. (2011, in this issue) is one of the few studies that have explored the impact of pediatric powered mobility on families. The parents who participated in their study reported increased satisfaction with their children's social and play skills, ability to move independently, sleeping patterns, and public perception of their…

  6. Health Status and Health Risks of the "Hidden Majority" of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the health status of and health risks faced by adults with intellectual disability who do not use intellectual disability services. Self-report data collected from 1,022 people with mild intellectual disability in England indicated that people who do not use intellectual disability services are more likely to smoke tobacco

  7. Health Status and Health Risks of the "Hidden Majority" of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the health status of and health risks faced by adults with intellectual disability who do not use intellectual disability services. Self-report data collected from 1,022 people with mild intellectual disability in England indicated that people who do not use intellectual disability services are more likely to smoke tobacco…

  8. The Effects of Obesity and Mobility Disability in Access to Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in France: Results from the National Health and Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bussière, Clémence; Sicsic, Jonathan; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to disentangle the effects of obesity and mobility limitation on cervical and breast cancer screening among community dwelling women. Methods The data source was the French national Health and Disability Survey - Household Section, 2008. The Body Mass Index (BMI) was used to categorize obesity status. We constructed a continuous score of mobility limitations to assess the severity of disability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84). Logistic regressions were performed to examine the association between obesity, mobility limitations and the use of Pap test (n = 8 133) and the use of mammography (n = 7 561). Adjusted odds ratios were calculated (AOR). Interaction terms between obesity and the disability score were included in models testing for effect modifications. Results Compared with non-obese women, the odds of having a Pap test in the past 3 years was 24% lower in obese women (AOR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.65 to 0.89), the odds of having a mammogram in the past 2 years was 23% lower (AOR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.66 to 0.91). Each time the disability score was 5 points higher, the odds of having a Pap test decreases by 20% (AOR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.98), the odds of having a mammogram decreases by 25% (AOR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.94 to 0.97). There was no significant interaction between obesity and disability score. Conclusion Obesity and mobility limitation are independently associated with a lower likelihood of cervical and breast cancer screening. Protective outreach and follow-up are necessary to reduce inequalities and thus to reduce health disparities in these vulnerable and high-risk populations of obese women with disabilities. PMID:25133662

  9. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 5086) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  10. Using Mobile Technology in an Urban High School to Decrease Adult Prompting during in School Transitions for Students Identified with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the application of video modeling on mobile technology to increase efficiency in the classroom for students identified with intellectual disabilities. Specially, this study sought to identify if video modeling on mobile technology could decrease adult prompting for students with intellectual disabilities during

  11. Density and mobility effects of the majority carriers in organic semiconductors under light excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vagenas, N.; Giannopoulou, A.; Kounavis, P.

    2015-01-21

    This study demonstrates that the effect of light excitation on the density and the mobility of the majority carriers can be explored in organic semiconductors by modulated photocurrent spectroscopy. The spectra of phase and amplitude of the modulated photocurrent of pentacene films indicate a significant increase in the density of the photogenerated mobile holes (majority carriers). This increase is accompanied by a comparatively much smaller increase of the steady state photocurrent response which can be reconciled with a decrease in the mobility (?) of holes. The decrease of ? is supported from an unusual increase of the Y/? ratio of the out-of-phase modulated photocurrent (Y) signal to the mobility under light excitation. It is proposed that the mobile holes, which are generated from the dissociation of the light-created excitons more likely near the pentacene-substrate interface by electron trapping, populate grain boundaries charging them and producing a downward band bending. As a result, potential energy barriers are build up which limit the transport of holes interacting through trapping-detrapping with deep partially occupied traps in the charged grain boundaries. On the other hand, the transport of holes interacting through trapping-detrapping with empty traps is found unaffected.

  12. Designing Clinical Trials of Intervention for Mobility Disability: Results from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Pilot Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical trials to assess interventions for mobility disability are critically needed, however data for efficiently designing such trials are lacking. Our results are described from the LIFE pilot clinical trial, in which 424 volunteers aged 70-89 years were randomly assigned to one of two intervent...

  13. A Review of the Use of Touch-Screen Mobile Devices by People with Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jennifer; Limbrick, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a review of the research on the use of mobile touch-screen devices such as PDAs, iPod Touches, iPads and smart phones by people with developmental disabilities. Most of the research has been on very basic use of the devices as speech generating devices, as a means of providing video, pictorial and/or audio self-prompting and for leisure activities such as listening to music and watching videos. Most research studies were small-n designs that provided a preponderant level of research evidence. There is a clear need for more research with younger participants and with a much wider range of apps, including educational apps. PMID:23888356

  14. Majority and Minority Ethnic Family Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Perceptions of Challenging Behaviour and Family Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Chris; Emerson, Eric; Kirby, Suzanne; Kotwal, Homayra; Baines, Susannah; Hutchinson, Christine; Dobson, Catherine; Marks, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Background: A health service in an English city was concerned about its support to families with adults with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven minority ethnic and seven majority ethnic family members to explore perceptions of challenging behaviour, support and the

  15. “How did that happen?” Public responses to women with mobility disability during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Iezzoni, Lisa I.; Wint, Amy J.; Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Ecker, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about current societal attitudes toward women with significant mobility disability who are visibly pregnant. Objective To use qualitative descriptive analysis methods to examine perceptions of women with significant mobility disability about how strangers reacted to their visible pregnancies. Methods In late 2013, we conducted 2-h telephone interviews with 22 women with significant mobility difficulties who had delivered babies within the prior 10 years. The semi-structured, open-ended interview protocol addressed wide-ranging pregnancy-related topics, including statements from strangers. Most participants were recruited through social networks, coming from 17 states nationwide. We used NVivo to sort the texts for content analysis. Results The women’s mean (standard deviation) age was 34.8 (5.3) years; most were white, well-educated, and higher income, although half had Medicaid during their pregnancies; and 18 used wheeled mobility aids. Eighteen women described memorable interactions with strangers relating to their pregnancies or newborn babies. Strangers’ statements fell into six categories: (1) curious; (2) intrusively and persistently curious; (3) hostile, including concerns that taxpayers would end up supporting the mother and child; (4) questioning woman’s competence as a potential parent; (5) oblivious, not recognizing visible pregnancy or motherhood; and (6) positive. Many women reported strangers asking how their pregnancy had happened. The women doubted that visibly pregnant women without disabilities evoke the same reactions from strangers. Conclusions Women with mobility disability who are visibly pregnant may perceive reactions from strangers that appear intrusive. Planning ahead for handling such encounters could reduce the stresses of these interactions. PMID:25944504

  16. "It's been a long journey": Exploring educationally mobile students' transition into STEM majors at a university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreygue, Aimee

    Today, one third of all college students are considered educationally "mobile," which means they will change institutions during their undergraduate careers. The concept of educational mobility challenges the traditional idea of students moving through an educational pipeline in a linear fashion, and recognizes that many of today's students, including those in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), will have multiple transition points. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the transitional experiences of educationally mobile students moving into and through the STEM disciplines at a public university. Students who move from one educational environment to another undergo a significant transition process, and understanding this process for individual students and the institution's role in supporting transition has implications for educational policy. Grounded in the conceptual framework guided by Schlossberg's Transition Theory, and Swail, Redd, and Perna's Geometric Model for Student Persistence and Achievement, this study explores the following research question: How do students who are educationally mobile experience academic, social, and institutional support while transitioning into and through STEM disciplines at a four-year public university? Eighteen science and mathematics majors participated in this study, all of whom attended at least one institution of higher education prior to their current attendance at Mountain View University, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in Southern California. Participants were interviewed utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol and completed a demographic questionnaire as well. Trustworthiness measures included member checking and peer debriefing. The findings of this study show that educationally mobile students are savvy agents of their education, and make personal and professional sacrifices in their pursuit of a STEM degree. They want to connect to like-minded individuals on campus, and make efforts to seek help. Findings also show that institutional agents play an important role in helping educationally mobile students navigate institutional obstacles in the transition process. Recommendations include increased dialogue about articulation and the transfer processes among institutions, engaging in more consistent advising practices (both at the community college and the university), enabling purposeful social interactions during the transition process, and researching disaggregated populations of educationally mobile students.

  17. Environmental barriers to and availability of healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods. Measures of the Food Environment

    Cancer.gov

    Mojtahedi MC, Boblick P, Rimmer JH, Rowland JL, Jones RA, Braunschweig CL. Environmental barriers to and availability of healthy foods for people with mobility disabilities living in urban and suburban neighborhoods.

  18. Empowered to Play: A Case Study Describing the Impact of Powered Mobility on the Exploratory Play of Disabled Children.

    PubMed

    Sonday, Amshuda; Gretschel, Pam

    2016-03-01

    Exploratory play is one of the most vital ways in which children learn about their environment and develop. It is well documented that limited mobility restricts a child's ability to engage in their environment through exploratory play. In this study, a qualitative, collective case study design explored the impact of powered mobility on the exploratory play of two children with physical disabilities. Data were collected from the children, their parents and their siblings through participant observation and in-depth, informal interviews. This paper focuses on two themes: Opportunity to Play revealed how powered mobility increased opportunities for the children to become more actively engaged in exploratory play with others across a wider array of contexts, and My Child was Transformed highlighted significant changes in the affect and motivation of each child, which seemed to be linked to their increased internal control over their play choices. The findings suggest that the provision of powered mobility is a key contributor promoting the participation of physically disabled children in exploratory play. Because of undergraduate curricular constraints, a limitation of this study was that data were only confined to 2 months; affecting the depth of data gained that prolonged engagement would have offered. The study recommends for occupational therapy practice that occupational therapists advocate for easier access to powered mobility through governmental and policy means. The study also recommends further research be conducted on the experiences of the caregivers on how these powered mobility devices have influenced their day-to-day occupations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26153363

  19. 6q22.33 microdeletion in a family with intellectual disability, variable major anomalies, and behavioral abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Hackmann, Karl; Beyer, Anke; Schallner, Jens; Novotna, Barbara; Klink, Barbara; Schrck, Evelin; Di Donato, Nataliya

    2015-11-01

    Interstitial deletions on the long arm of chromosome six have been described for several regions including 6q16, 6q22.1, and 6q21q22.1, and with variable phenotypes such as intellectual disability/developmental delay, growth retardation, major and minor facial anomalies. However, an isolated microdeletion of the sub-band 6q22.33 has not been reported so far and thus, no information about the specific phenotype associated with such a copy number variant is available. Here, we define the clinical picture of an isolated 6q22.33 microdeletion based on the phenotype of six members of one family with loss of approximately 1?Mb in this region. Main clinical features include mild intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities as well as microcephaly, heart defect, and cleft lip and palate. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26334553

  20. Major mishaps among mobile offshore drilling units, 1955-1981: time trends and fatalities.

    PubMed

    Clemmer, D I; Diem, J E

    1985-03-01

    Major mishaps among mobile offshore drilling units worldwide from 1955-1981 were identified from industry and government sources. Based on annual numbers of rigs in service and typical staffing patterns, annual mishap rates and fatality rates for rig types and mishap categories were computed. While the frequency of major mishaps has increased in recent years, the mishap rate per 100 rig-years of service has remained stable. The overall stability obscures the fact that jack-up rigs have had an increasing mishap rate while the rate for other rig types combined has gradually declined. Although the fatal mishap rate has also remained constant, the annual fatality rate per 100 000 full time equivalent (FTE) workers has risen sharply. This can be attributed to increasing numbers of lives lost in environmental mishaps while deaths from operational mishaps have declined. There were 344 fatalities during the 27-year period. Although an average of some 13 deaths per year worldwide appears minimal, the relatively small size of the workforce gives this number significance particularly when it is noted that 'occupational' fatalities, those occurring in the course of routine operations, are not included. The overall fatality rate secondary to major mishaps was 84.3 per 100 000 FTE worker-years. PMID:3988424

  1. Mobilizing Disability Experience to Inform Architectural Practice: Lessons Learned from a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeersch, Peter-Willem; Heylighen, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through their bodily interaction with the designed environment, disabled people can detect obstacles and appreciate spatial qualities architects may not be attuned to. While designers in several disciplines acknowledge disabled people as lead or critical users, in architectural practice their embodied experience is hardly recognized as a valuable…

  2. Implementing Applied Behavior Analysis for Effective Orientation and Mobility Instruction of Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mea, Melanie L.

    2013-01-01

    Working with children who have multiple disabilities that include visual impairments can be especially challenging. Many disabling conditions manifest into behavioral difficulties that may take away from learning. Acting out may be a student's way of expressing a lack of healthy coping mechanisms in relation to his or her environment. Implementing

  3. Major trends in mobility technology research and development: Overview of the results of the NSF-WTEC European study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mobility technologies, including wheelchairs, prostheses, joint replacements, assistive devices, and therapeutic exercise equipment help millions of people participate in desired life activities. Yet, these technologies are not yet fully transformative because many desired activities cannot be pursued or are difficult to pursue for the millions of individuals with mobility related impairments. This WTEC study, initiated and funded by the National Science Foundation, was designed to gather information on European innovations and trends in technology that might lead to greater mobility for a wider range of people. What might these transformative technologies be and how might they arise? Based on visits to leading mobility technology research labs in western Europe, the WTEC panel identified eight major trends in mobility technology research. This commentary summarizes these trends, which are then described in detail in companion papers appearing in this special issue. PMID:22520596

  4. Core Self-Evaluations as a Mediator between Functional Disability and Life Satisfaction in College Students with Disabilities Majoring in Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph S.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Weaver, Hayley; da Silva Cardoso, Elizabeth; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the mediational effect of core self-evaluations (CSE) on the relationship between functional disability and life satisfaction. Methods: A quantitative descriptive design using multiple regression analysis. The participants were 97 college students with disabilities receiving services through Hunter College's Minority-Disability

  5. Major discoveries in eolian sandstone: facies distribution and stratigraphy of Jurassic Norphlet sandstone, Mobile Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    Recent exploratory and development drilling in Mobile Bay, southwest Alabama, has proven prolific gas production from the Norphlet sandstone at depths greater than 20,000 ft with individual well tests of 10-27 MMCFGD. Excellent reservoir qualities are a function of preserved primary porosity and permeability developed in an eolian setting. In Mobile Bay, thick eolian sediments (200-600 ft) lie directly on Pine Hill or Louann evaporites. Three facies of the Norphlet have been recognized: (1) a thin (20-30 ft) basal wet sand flat or sabkha facies, (2) a massive dune facies, and (3) a thin (30-40 ft) upper marine reworked facies. The wet sand flat or sabkha facies is characterized by irregular to wavy horizontally bedded sandstone associated with adhesion ripples. It is probably sporadically developed in response to localized wet lows during earliest Norphlet deposition. The majority of the Norphlet section is characterized by massive wedge-planar and tabular-planar cross-stratified sandstone, interpreted to be stacked dune and dry interdune deposits. Individual dune sets range in height from a few feet to 90 ft. Cross-bed sets exhibit internal stratification patterns similar to large- and small-scale dunes described by G. Kocurek and R. Dott, Jr. The marine reworked facies is characterized by structureless to diffuse or wavy laminated sandstone that reflects a reworking of the dune deposits by the ensuing Smackover transgression. Reservoir quality is affected by textural properties determined by depositional processes associated with these various facies. Diagenetic patterns further reducing reservoir quality occur in the depositionally less-porous sediments. Dune facies sediments exhibit the best reservoir qualities. Variations of reservoir quality within the dune facies are related to dune height and dune versus interdune accumulations.

  6. Trial Development of a Mobile Feeding Assistive Robotic Arm for People with Physical Disabilities of the Extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Hideyuki; Higa, Hiroki; Soken, Takashi; Namihira, Yoshinori

    A mobile feeding assistive robotic arm for people with physical disabilities of the extremities has been developed in this paper. This system is composed of a robotic arm, microcontroller, and its interface. The main unit of the robotic arm can be contained in a laptop computer's briefcase. Its weight is 5kg, including two 12-V lead acid rechargeable batteries. This robotic arm can be also mounted on a wheelchair. To verify performance of the mobile robotic arm system, drinking tea task was experimentally performed by two able-bodied subjects as well as three persons suffering from muscular dystrophy. From the experimental results, it was clear that they could smoothly carry out the drinking task, and that the robotic arm could firmly grasp a commercially available 500-ml plastic bottle. The eating task was also performed by the two able-bodied subjects. The experimental results showed that they could eat porridge by using a spoon without any difficulty.

  7. Mobilization of major inorganic ions during experimental diagenesis of characterized peats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, A.M.; Cohen, A.D.; Orem, W.H.; Blackson, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to study changes in concentrations of major inorganic ions during simulated burial of peats to about 1.5 km. Cladium, Rhizophora, and Cyrilla peats were first analyzed to determine cation distributions among fractions of the initial materials and minerals in residues from wet oxidation. Subsamples of the peats (80 g) were then subjected to increasing temperatures and pressures in steps of 5??C and 300 psi at 2-day intervals and produced solutions collected. After six steps, starting from 30??C and 300 psi, a final temperature of 60??C and a final pressure of 2100 psi were achieved. The system was then allowed to stand for an additional 2 weeks at 60??C and 2100 psi. Treatments resulted in highly altered organic solids resembling lignite and expelled solutions of systematically varying compositions. Solutions from each step were analyzed for Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, total dissolved Si (Si(T)), Cl-, SO42-, and organic acids and anions (OAAs). Some data on total dissolved Al (Al(T)) were also collected. Mobilization of major ions from peats during these experiments is controlled by at least three processes: (1) loss of dissolved ions in original porewater expelled during compaction, (2) loss of adsorbed cations as adsorption sites are lost during modification of organic solids, and (3) increased dissolution of inorganic phases at later steps due to increased temperatures (Si(T)) and increased complexing by OAAs (Al(T)). In general, results provide insight into early post-burial inorganic changes occurring during maturation of terrestrial organic matter. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway.

    PubMed

    Riley, Erin A; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G; Simpson, Christopher D

    2014-12-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/hr) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 meters of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 1 ?m (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 ?m), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences. PMID:25364294

  9. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Erin A.; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G.; Simpson, Christopher D.

    2014-12-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/h) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 m of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <1 μm (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 μm), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences.

  10. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Erin A.; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G.; Simpson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/hr) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 meters of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 1 μm (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 μm), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences. PMID:25364294

  11. Follow that Bear! Encouraging Mobility in a Young Child with Visual Impairment and Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolla, Joan

    2000-01-01

    This article shows that unexpected gains can happen when teachers develop aggressive, innovative, and adaptive orientation and mobility (O&M) programming for children who are low-functioning. A case study illustrates strategies for using an adaptive mobility device, squaring-up, stepping out, and charting progress. Challenges to a successful O&M

  12. Core Self-Evaluations as a Mediator between Functional Disability and Life Satisfaction in College Students with Disabilities Majoring in Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedema, Susan Miller; Pfaller, Joseph S.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Weaver, Hayley; da Silva Cardoso, Elizabeth; Chan, Fong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the mediational effect of core self-evaluations (CSE) on the relationship between functional disability and life satisfaction. Methods: A quantitative descriptive design using multiple regression analysis. The participants were 97 college students with disabilities receiving services through Hunter College's Minority-Disability…

  13. Students with Disabilities Experience in Higher Education Online Courses: An Exploratory Study of Self-Efficacy, Use of Assistive Technologies and Mobile Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Chandinie Devi Parasram

    2012-01-01

    The overarching aim of this mixed methods study was to explore the online experiences of students with disabilities, with particular focus on students' use of assistive technologies, mobile media and self-efficacy. Using a multifaceted an integrative approach, this study considered a framework of universal design, Scherer's Matching…

  14. Mobilization of major and trace constituents of highway runoff in groundwater potentially caused by deicing chemical migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Church, Peter E.; Stone, Victoria J.

    1995-01-01

    The quality of water in unsaturated zones and groundwater is affected by the major ions in deicing chemicals applied to roads and highways. The assessment of the environmental effects of highway runoff requires investigations to determine whether other major and trace constituents are mobilized during deicing chemical migration through the unsaturated zone and groundwater. In this regard, groundwater samples were analyzed in February and August 1991, and March, August, and November 1993 at a test site along Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts. Analyses indicated that concentrations of major and trace chemical constituents of highway runoff in groundwater are substantially higher downgradient than upgradient from the highway.

  15. Overlapping Chat's Accessibility Requirements between Students with and without Disabilities Due to the Mobile Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Rocío; Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The use of Chats has been extended to mobile-learning (m-learning) environments in the last decade. Students and teachers can communicate in real time and they do not need waiting till their next tutoring date to solve their problems and doubts. However, Chats have many accessibility barriers and many students cannot use this collaborative tool.…

  16. Mobility and Mobility Aids for Visually Handicapped Individuals. Bibliography, No. 84-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

    The bibliography lists approximately 150 references (1973-1983) on orientation and mobility for visually impaired individuals. Citations are organized alphabetically by author's name within five major topic areas: general works, manuals and curriculum guides, research literature, mobility for special populations (multiple disabilities, children

  17. Education Predicts Incidence of Preclinical Mobility Disability in Initially High-Functioning Older Women. The Women’s Health and Aging Study II

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Patricia C.; Xue, Qian-Li; Tian, Jing; Thorpe, Roland J.; Fried, Linda P.

    2011-01-01

    Background. To examine the impact of educational attainment on the incidence of preclinical mobility disability (PCD). Methods. The Women's Health and Aging II Study is a prospective observational cohort study of 436 initially high-functioning community-dwelling women aged 70–79 years at baseline in Baltimore, Maryland. We measured the association of highest attained education level with preclinical mobility disability (PCD) over an 11-year period. PCD is defined as self-reported modification in any of four tasks without reporting difficulty in those tasks. The tasks were walking ½ mile, climbing up steps, doing heavy housework, and getting in/out of bed or chair. Results. Participants with less than 9 years of education were more likely to acquire incident PCD (hazard ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval = 1.2–7.7) than their counterparts with more education after adjusting for income, marital status, number of diseases, and high self-efficacy. Conclusions. Lower education level is an independent predictor of incident preclinical mobility disability. This association has important implications for primary and secondary prevention and can be easily assessed in clinical encounters. PMID:21382883

  18. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  19. Mobile Interspersed Repeats Are Major Structural Variants in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Schneider, Anna M.; Lu, Yunqi; Niranjan, Tejasvi; Shen, Peilin; Robinson, Matoya A.; Steranka, Jared P.; Valle, David; Civin, Curt I.; Wang, Tao; Wheelan, Sarah J.; Ji, Hongkai; Boeke, Jef D.; Burns, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Characterizing structural variants in the human genome is of great importance, but a genome wide analysis to detect interspersed repeats has not been done. Thus, the degree to which mobile DNAs contribute to genetic diversity, heritable disease, and oncogenesis remains speculative. We perform transposon insertion profiling by microarray (TIP-chip) to map human L1(Ta) retrotransposons (LINE-1 s) genome-wide. This identified numerous novel human L1(Ta) insertional polymorphisms with highly variant allelic frequencies. We also explored TIP-chip's usefulness to identify candidate alleles associated with different phenotypes in clinical cohorts. Our data suggest that the occurrence of new insertions is twice as high as previously estimated, and that these repeats are under-recognized as sources of human genomic and phenotypic diversity. We have just begun to probe the universe of human L1(Ta) polymorphisms, and as TIP-chip is applied to other insertions such as Alu SINEs, it will expand the catalog of genomic variants even further. PMID:20602999

  20. Association among measures of mobility-related disability and self-perceived fatigue among older people: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Wuber J. S.; Lima, Camila A.; Bilton, Tereza L.; Ferrioli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosângela C.; Perracini, Monica R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between self-perceived fatigue with different physical functioning tests and functional performance scales used for evaluating mobility-related disability among community-dwelling older persons. Method: This is a cross-sectional, population-based study. The sample was composed of older persons with 65 years of age or more living in Cuiabá, MT, and Barueri, SP, Brazil. The data for this study is from the FIBRA Network Study. The presence of self-perceived fatigue was assessed using self-reports based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. The Lawton instrumental activities of daily living scale (IADL) and the advanced activities of daily living scale (AADL) were used to assess performance and participation restriction. The following physical functioning tests were used: five-step test (FST), the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and usual gait speed (UGS). Three models of logistic regression analysis were conducted, and a significance level of α<0.05 was adopted. Results: The sample was composed of 776 older adults with a mean age (SD) of 71.9 (5.9) years, of whom the majority were women (74%). The prevalence of self-perceived fatigue within the participants was 20%. After adjusting for covariates, SPPB, UGS, IADL, and AADL remained associated with self-perceived fatigue in the final multivariate regression model. Conclusion: Our results suggest that there is an association between self-perceived fatigue and lower extremity function, usual gait speed and activity limitation and participation restriction in older adults. Further cohort studies are needed to investigate which physical performance measure may be able to predict the negative impact of fatigue in older adults. PMID:26039035

  1. Wheeled mobility: factors influencing mobility and assistive technology in veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss from Vietnam war and OIF/OEF conflicts.

    PubMed

    Laferrier, Justin Z; McFarland, Lynne V; Boninger, Michael L; Cooper, Rory A; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Returning wounded veterans and servicemembers to their highest level of function following traumatic injury is a priority of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. We surveyed 245 veterans from the Vietnam war and 226 servicemembers and veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) conflicts with at least one major traumatic lower-limb loss to determine their use of mobility assistive technology (AT) and patterns of limb abandonment. Prosthetic device use without wheelchair use is found in 50.5% of Vietnam and 42.8% of OIF/OEF groups. Prostheses and supplementary wheelchairs are used by Vietnam (32%) and OIF/OEF (53%) groups (p < 0.01). Exclusive wheelchair use is more frequent in the Vietnam group (18%) than in the OIF/OEF group (4.0%, p < 0.01). In Vietnam participants, multivariate analysis found that multiple-limb loss (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.5-38.5), bilateral lower-limb loss (AOR = 12.7; 95% CI 6.2-26.1), and number of comorbidities (AOR = 1.3; 95% CI 1.2-1.5) are associated with increased likelihood of wheelchair use. In OIF/OEF participants, bilateral lower-limb loss (AOR = 29.8; 95% CI 11.0-80.7), multiple-limb loss (AOR = 16.3; 95% CI 3.1-85.3), cumulative trauma disorder (AOR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.9), and number of combat injuries (AOR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7) are associated with wheelchair use. Combined use of different types of mobility ATs promotes improved rehabilitation and ability to function. PMID:20803403

  2. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  3. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  4. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  5. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  6. Inhibitory synapse dynamics: coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic mobility and the major contribution of recycled vesicles to new synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Dobie, Frederick A; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-07-20

    Dynamics of GABAergic synaptic components have been studied previously over milliseconds to minutes, revealing mobility of postsynaptic scaffolds and receptors. Here we image inhibitory synapses containing fluorescently tagged postsynaptic scaffold Gephyrin, together with presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) or postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor ?2 subunit (GABA(A)R?2), over seconds to days in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, revealing modes of inhibitory synapse formation and remodeling. Entire synapses were mobile, translocating rapidly within a confined region and exhibiting greater nonstochastic motion over multihour periods. Presynaptic and postsynaptic components moved in unison, maintaining close apposition while translocating distances of several micrometers. An observed flux in the density of synaptic puncta partially resulted from the apparent merging and splitting of preexisting clusters. De novo formation of inhibitory synapses was observed, marked by the appearance of stably apposed Gephyrin and VGAT clusters at sites previously lacking either component. Coclustering of GABA(A)R?2 supports the identification of such new clusters as synapses. Nascent synapse formation occurred by gradual accumulation of components over several hours, with VGAT clustering preceding that of Gephyrin and GABA(A)R?2. Comparing VGAT labeling by active uptake of a luminal domain antibody with post hoc immunocytochemistry indicated that recycling vesicles from preexisting boutons significantly contribute to vesicle pools at the majority of new inhibitory synapses. Although new synapses formed primarily on dendrite shafts, some also formed on dendritic protrusions, without apparent interconversion. Altogether, the long-term imaging of GABAergic presynaptic and postsynaptic components reveals complex dynamics and perpetual remodeling with implications for mechanisms of assembly and synaptic integration. PMID:21775594

  7. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization for Gene Therapy: Superior Mobilization by the Combination of GranulocyteColony Stimulating Factor Plus Plerixafor in Patients with ?-Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Karponi, Garyfalia; Zervou, Fani; Constantinou, Varnavas; Bouinta, Asimina; Tachynopoulou, Varvara; Kotta, Konstantina; Jonlin, Erica; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Successful stem cell gene therapy requires high numbers of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells collected using optimal mobilization strategies. Here we focus on stem cell mobilization strategies for thalassemia and present the results of a plerixafor-based mobilization trial with emphasis on the remobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)+plerixafor in those patients who had previously failed mobilization. Plerixafor rapidly mobilized CD34+ cells without inducing hyperleukocytosis; however, 35% of patients failed to reach the target cell dose of ?6106 CD34+ cells/kg. Four subjects who failed on either plerixafor or G-CSF were remobilized with G-CSF+plerixafor. The combination proved highly synergistic; the target cell dose was readily reached and the per-apheresis yield was significantly increased over initial mobilization, ultimately resulting in single-apheresis collections, despite a more than 50% reduction of the dose of G-CSF in splenectomized patients to avoid hyperleukocytosis. The total stem and progenitor cells mobilized in G-CSF+plerixafor patients were higher than in patients treated by plerixafor alone. Importantly, the G-CSF+plerixafor-mobilized cells displayed a primitive stem cell phenotype and higher clonogenic capacity over plerixafor-mobilized cells. G-CSF+plerixafor represents the optimal strategy when very high yields of stem cells or a single apheresis is required. The high yields and the favorable transplantation features render the G-CSF+plerixafor-mobilized cells the optimal CD34+ cell source for stem cell gene therapy applications. PMID:24001178

  8. Mobile Applications for Participation at the Shopping Mall: Content Analysis and Usability for Persons with Physical Disabilities and Communication or Cognitive Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labbé, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppée; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team’s and users’ comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  9. Mobile applications for participation at the shopping mall: content analysis and usability for persons with physical disabilities and communication or cognitive limitations.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labb, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppe; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team's and users' comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results,compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25587605

  10. Mobile applications for participation at the shopping mall: content analysis and usability for persons with physical disabilities and communication or cognitive limitations.

    PubMed

    Auger, Claudine; Leduc, Emilie; Labb, Delphine; Guay, Cassioppe; Fillion, Brigitte; Bottari, Carolina; Swaine, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the important features in content and usability of existing mobile applications evaluating environmental barriers and facilitators (EBF) to participation for persons with physical disabilities presenting mild communication or cognitive limitations. A rigorous process based on a user-centered design approach led to the identification of two relevant mobile applications to evaluate the EBF. An accessibility expert, the research team as well as five users then tested the mobile applications in a shopping mall. A thematic content analysis of the research team's and users' comments established 10 categories of key features that adequately respond to the needs of the clientele targeted in this study. In terms of content, granularity and contextualization of the information provided were considered important. With respect to usability, relevant features were place finding, rating system, presentation of results, compatibility, user-friendliness, aesthetics, credibility of the information as well as connectivity/interactiveness. The research team and the users agreed on some aspects such as aesthetics, but had different perspectives on features such as the rating system or the connectivity/interactiveness of the application. The users proposed new features suggesting that the existing mobile applications did not correspond to all their needs. PMID:25513999

  11. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Particulate Emissions on Major Highways in Southern California: Lagrangian Approach Using Mobile Monitoring System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Grady, M.; Pham, L.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010 CARB reported 9,000 people in California die prematurely each year as a result of exposure to particulate emissions. Public's exposure to particulate emissions is known to be highest on highway during daily commute. Total particle concentrations vary temporarily and spatially due to many reasons including particle nucleation, traffic, and meteorological conditions. The stationary ambient monitoring sites are too sparsely located to measure these variations on highway. Also, emissions from highways can be included in the emission inventory which can improve modeler capability to predict at much finer scale. Emissions from highways are vary temporally and spatially. This study used a mobile platform to measure total particle number, total particle surface area and average particle diameter in Lagrangian approach. The study will report occurrence and frequency of hot spots for particle nucleation on highway and temporal/ spatial variations of particle concentrations on highway. This will enable better assessment of public's exposure to particulate emissions on highway by transportation and propose a methodology how to obtain emission inventory for major highways.

  12. Increased Mobility of Major Histocompatibility Complex I-Peptide Complexes Decreases the Sensitivity of Antigen Recognition*S?

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Jean-Manuel; Guillaume, Philippe; Mark, Silke; Dojcinovic, Danijel; Johannsen, Alexandre; Bosshard, Giovanna; Angelov, Georgi; Legler, Daniel F.; Vogel, Horst; Luescher, Immanuel F.

    2008-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can recognize and kill target cells expressing only a few cognate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-peptide complexes. This high sensitivity requires efficient scanning of a vast number of highly diverse MHC I-peptide complexes by the T cell receptor in the contact site of transient conjugates formed mainly by nonspecific interactions of ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Tracking of single H-2Kd molecules loaded with fluorescent peptides on target cells and nascent conjugates with CTL showed dynamic transitions between states of free diffusion and immobility. The immobilizations were explained by association of MHC I-peptide complexes with ICAM-1 and strongly increased their local concentration in cell adhesion sites and hence their scanning by T cell receptor. In nascent immunological synapses cognate complexes became immobile, whereas noncognate ones diffused out again. Interfering with this mobility modulation-based concentration and sorting of MHC I-peptide complexes strongly impaired the sensitivity of antigen recognition by CTL, demonstrating that it constitutes a new basic aspect of antigen presentation by MHC I molecules. PMID:18579518

  13. Relationships between spinal mobility, physical performance tests, pain intensity and disability assessments in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Grönblad, M; Hurri, H; Kouri, J P

    1997-03-01

    Correlations between the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), the Pain Disability Index (PDI), PDI subscales PDI factor 1 (PDI 1), PDI factor 2 (PDI 2) and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain intensity on the one hand and spine range of motion measures and static and dynamic functional performance tests on the other, were studied in 52 chronic low back pain patients. Comparable groups of male and female patients were studied. A moderately significant (p < 0.01) inverse correlation was observed between the ODQ and rotation to the left even after correction for age, but not when men and women were studied separately. A significant (r = -0.480, p < 0.001) inverse correlation was observed between the repeated squatting test and pain intensity and in men both pain intensity and disability correlated (r = -0.607, p < 0.001) with this particular test. Only for the women were there moderately significant (p < 0.01) inverse correlations between disability assessments and all the physical performance tests with the exception of the static back muscle test. In the women only the isometric lifting test showed a moderately significant inverse correlation (r = -0.504, p < 0.01) with pain intensity. Such apparent gender differences in the overlap between physical performance tests and self-report disability assessments and pain intensity may be clinically relevant. The results will, however, require confirmation on larger groups of chronic low back pain patients. PMID:9084101

  14. Learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G R

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 5% of all public school students are identified as having a learning disability (LD). LD is not a single disorder, but includes disabilities in any of seven areas related to reading, language, and mathematics. These separate types of learning disabilities frequently co-occur with one another and with social skill deficits and emotional or behavioral disorders. Most of the available information concerning learning disabilities relates to reading disabilities, and the majority of children with learning disabilities have their primary deficits in basic reading skills. An important part of the definition of LD is its exclusions: learning disabilities cannot be attributed primarily to mental retardation, emotional disturbance, cultural difference, or disadvantage. Thus, the concept of LD focuses on the notion of a discrepancy between a child's academic achievement and his or her apparent capacity to learn. Recent research indicates, however, that disability in basic reading skills is primarily caused by deficits in phonological awareness, which is independent of any achievement-capacity discrepancy. Deficits in phonological awareness can be identified in late kindergarten and first grade using inexpensive, straightforward testing protocol. Interventions have varying effectiveness, depending largely on the severity of the individual child's disability. The prevalence of learning disability identification has increased dramatically in the past 20 years. The "real" prevalence of LD is subject to much dispute because of the lack of an agreed-upon definition of LD with objective identification criteria. Some researchers have argued that the currently recognized 5% prevalence rate is inflated; others argue that LD is still underidentified. In fact, it appears that there are both sound and unsound reasons for the increase in identification rates. Sound reasons for the increase include better research, a broader definition of disability in reading, focusing on phonological awareness, and greater identification of girls with learning disabilities. Unsound reasons for the increase include broad and vague definitions of learning disability, financial incentives to identify students for special education, and inadequate preparation of teachers by colleges of education, leading to overreferral of students with any type of special need. There is no clear demarcation between students with normal reading abilities and those with mild reading disability. The majority of children with reading disabilities have relatively mild reading disabilities, with a smaller number having extreme reading disabilities. The longer children with disability in basic reading skills, at any level of severity, go without identification and intervention, the more difficult the task of remediation and the lower the rate of success. Children with extreme deficits in basic reading skills are much more difficult to remediate than children with mild or moderate deficits. It is unclear whether children in the most severe range can achieve age- and grade-approximate reading skills, even with normal intelligence and with intense, informed intervention provided over a protracted period of time. Children with severe learning disabilities are likely to manifest an increased number of and increased severity of social and behavioral deficits. When children with disabilities in reading also manifest attention deficit disorder, their reading deficits are typically exacerbated, more severe, and more resistant to intervention. While severe reading disorders are clearly a major concern, even mild deficits in reading skills are likely to portend significant difficulties in academic learning. These deficits, too, are worthy of early identification and intervention. Even children with relatively subtle linguistic and reading deficits require the expertise of a teacher who is well trained and informed about the relationships between language development and reading development. PMID:8689262

  15. Do disabled elderly Medicare beneficiaries with major depression make less use of a consumer-directed home care voucher benefit?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with major depression may underutilize consumer-directed long-term care. Systematic underutilization would create disparities in outcomes, undermining program effectiveness. The Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration included a consumer-directed indemnity benefit that paid for goods and services not financed by traditional Medicare. Overall and for most categories of goods and services there was little difference in use and expenditures between those with and without major depression. However, among those using the benefit to hire in-home workers, arguably the most important consumer-directed purchase, average spending for workers was about 30% lower for depressed persons. While our findings are generally reassuring for public policy, future research is needed to verify that major depression is associated with less spending on in-home workers. PMID:25300034

  16. Ubiquitous Yet Unique: Perspectives of People With Disabilities on Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Mactavish, Jennifer B.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study was grounded in a qualitative framework and used a focus group method to examine the meanings that individuals with disabilities (e.g., permanent mobility impairments, sensory impairments) attach to their experiences of stress, as well as major sources or causes of stress in these individuals' lives. Overall, the data showed

  17. Rural People with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Our Nation) promotes cooperation between the transportation industry and the disability community to increase mobility for people with disabilities under the ADA and beyond. They offer numerous resources, as well as training and technical assistance, in an effort to make the ADA ...

  18. A secure operational model for mobile payments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tao-Ku

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  19. A Secure Operational Model for Mobile Payments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Instead of paying by cash, check, or credit cards, customers can now also use their mobile devices to pay for a wide range of services and both digital and physical goods. However, customers' security concerns are a major barrier to the broad adoption and use of mobile payments. In this paper we present the design of a secure operational model for mobile payments in which access control is based on a service-oriented architecture. A customer uses his/her mobile device to get authorization from a remote server and generate a two-dimensional barcode as the payment certificate. This payment certificate has a time limit and can be used once only. The system also provides the ability to remotely lock and disable the mobile payment service. PMID:25386607

  20. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    Reviewed 1998 and early 1999 court decisions related to disability discrimination in higher education. This period witnessed major developments in the law of disability discrimination as it relates to higher education. A major focus was on whether persons whose impairments are ameliorated by treatment are individuals with disabilities covered by

  1. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Learning Disabilities KidsHealth > For Teens > Learning Disabilities Print A ... study engineering as he'd hoped? What Are Learning Disabilities? For someone diagnosed with a learning disability, ...

  2. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present results suggest that in addition to the commonly cited naphthenic acids, remediation of OSPW-impacted groundwater will need to address high concentrations of major ions contributing to salinization.

  3. Mobility of major and trace elements in a coupled groundwater-surface water system: Merced River, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. A.; Domagalski, J. L.; Hering, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    Trace element transport in coupled surface water/groundwater systems is controlled not only by advective flow, but also by redox reactions that affect the partitioning of various elements between mobile and immobile phases. These processes have been examined in the context of a field project conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The Merced River flows out of Yosemite National Park and the Sierra Nevada foothills and into California's Central Valley, where it joins the San Joaquin River. Our field site is approximately twenty river kilometers from the confluence with the San Joaquin River. This deep alluvial plain has minimal topography. Agricultural development characterizes the land surrounding this reach of river; consequently, the hydrology is heavily influenced by irrigation. Riverbed groundwater samples were collected from ten wells aligned in two transects across the river located approximately 100 m apart. The wells were sampled from depths of 0.5 m, 1 m, and 3 m below the sediment-water interface. Groundwater flowpath samples were taken from wells positioned on a path perpendicular to the river and located 100 m, 500 m, and 1000 m from the river. The saturated groundwater system exists from 7 to 40 m below the surface and is confined below by a clay layer. Each well location samples from 3-5 depths in this surface aquifer. Samples were collected in December 2003, March-April, June-July, and October 2004. This served to provide an evenly-spaced sampling frequency over the course of a year, and also to allow observation of trends coinciding with the onset of winter, the spring runoff, and early and late summer irrigation. An initial survey of the elements in the riverbed samples was conducted using Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Elements for further study were selected based on variability in this survey, either with respect to depth or location, as well as to cover a range of expected geochemical behaviors. Further ICP-MS measurements focused on eight elements: strontium, barium, uranium, molybdenum, manganese, iron, phosphorus, and bromine. Bromine is a conservative tracer. Molybdenum, manganese, and iron will precipitate when oxidized, and uranium will precipitate when reduced. Strontium and barium are not redox-active but may be affected by dissolution-precipitation and sorption reactions. Phosphorus is a nutrient that will cycle actively in areas of biological productivity. Generally, these elements appear to behave as expected based on physical waterflow and assumed redox conditions. The two transects of wells across the river bracket a zone of known denitrification, which implies that sediment conditions favor oxidation upriver and reduction downriver. This trend is borne out both by the redox-sensitive elements at each transect, and by the strontium and barium, which bind to precipitated iron and manganese oxides in oxidizing conditions and are released into the dissolved state in reducing conditions. The flowpath samples appear to be enriched in strontium, phosphorus, and bromine when compared to the riverbed samples, and they are depleted in manganese and iron.

  4. Multimodal perioperative management--combining thoracic epidural analgesia, forced mobilization, and oral nutrition--reduces hormonal and metabolic stress and improves convalescence after major urologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Brodner, G; Van Aken, H; Hertle, L; Fobker, M; Von Eckardstein, A; Goeters, C; Buerkle, H; Harks, A; Kehlet, H

    2001-06-01

    We sought in this prospective study to use a multimodal approach to reduce stress and improve recovery in patients undergoing major surgery. During an initial study period, 30 patients were randomly allocated to receive general anesthesia (GA; Group 1) or a combination of GA and intraoperative thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA; Group 2) when undergoing radical cystectomy. Parenteral nutrition was provided for 5 days after surgery. During the second period, 15 patients were treated with a multimodal approach (Group 3) consisting of intraoperative GA and TEA, postoperative patient-controlled TEA, early oral nutrition, and enforced mobilization. Data for plasma and urine catecholamines, plasma cortisol, the nitrogen balance, the postoperative inflammatory nutrition index, pain relief, fatigue, sleep, overnight recovery, recovery of bowel function, and mobilization were recorded up to the fifth postoperative day. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines and cortisol were comparable in all patients, but those in Group 3 had lower levels of urinary catecholamine excretion. Protein intake was more effective with parenteral nutrition. Nitrogen balances were less negative, and the postoperative inflammatory nutrition index score increased significantly in the traditional groups but not in Group 3. Multimodally treated patients reported less fatigue and better overnight recovery. Along with improved pain relief, recovery of bowel function, and ambulation, there were no differences in the postoperative complication rates among the three groups. The multimodal approach reduced stress and improved metabolism and recovery after radical cystectomy. PMID:11375853

  5. A peptide associated with eggs causes a mobility shift in a major plasma membrane protein of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Shimomura, H; Radany, E W; Ramarao, C S; Ward, G E; Bentley, J K; Garbers, D L

    1984-12-10

    A peptide (resact) associated with the eggs of the sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, which stimulates sperm respiration rates by 5-10-fold, was purified and its amino acid sequence was determined. The sequence was found to be Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH2. The peptide was subsequently synthesized by solid phase methods, amidated at the carboxyl-terminal Leu, and shown to be identical to the isolated, native material. The peptide half-maximally stimulated A. punctulata spermatozoan respiration at 0.5 nM and half-maximally elevated cyclic GMP concentrations at 25 nM at an extracellular pH of 6.6. The increase in oxygen consumption was coupled with a stimulation of motility. However, at elevated extracellular pH (pH 8.0), resact failed to appreciably stimulate respiration while the elevations of cyclic GMP continued to occur. Resact did not cross-react with sperm cells obtained from Lytechinus pictus or Strongylocentrotus purpuratus; a peptide (speract) obtained from S. purpuratus eggs (Gly-Phe-Asp-Leu-Asn-Gly-Gly-Gly-Val-Gly) which activates S. purpuratus sperm respiration did not stimulate A. punctulata spermatozoa. Resact caused a shift in the apparent molecular weight (160,000-150,000) of a major sperm plasma membrane protein; as with cyclic GMP elevations, this response was evident at extracellular pH values of both 6.6 and 8.0. The protein exists in the cell as a phosphoprotein and 32P is released coincident with the molecular weight change. Approximately 115 nM resact caused one-half-maximal conversion of the 160,000-dalton protein after 1 min of incubation. Resact caused the apparent molecular weight conversion of the protein within 5 s and appeared to do so in an irreversible manner. The molecular weight change of the protein was also observed after the addition of monensin A (25 microM) and NH4Cl (40 mM), two agents known to elevate intracellular pH and to increase sperm respiration rates. The membrane protein appears to be the enzyme guanylate cyclase, but since concentrations of resact causing one-half-maximal conversion of the Mr = 160,000 form of the enzyme are about 250 times higher than those causing one-half-maximal stimulation of respiration, the relationship of the apparent molecular weight conversion to a subsequent physiological event remains unclear. PMID:6150045

  6. School problems and solutions for students with disabilities: a qualitative examination.

    PubMed

    Sorani-Villanueva, Sandra; McMahon, Susan D; Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities is a process that requires collaboration among multiple individuals, with teachers, aides, parents, students, and school systems playing important roles in resolving student problems. In the current study, we examined data from 75 teachers concerning 126 students about problems that students with disabilities had following a transition from a school primarily serving students with disabilities to more inclusive schools. Reported problems were reviewed and five major themes emerged: academic, behavioral, mobility/accessibility, social, and transportation issues. Teachers typically resolved academic problems by working directly with the student or collaborating with school staff. Social problems were resolved through student and teacher initiatives. Behavioral, transportation, and mobility/accessibility problems were resolved through collaboration among many key school figures and family members. Implications for theory, research, and inclusive school practices related to academic curricula, resources, services, and architectural accommodations for students with disabilities are discussed. PMID:24447159

  7. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on

  8. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  9. Adaptive computing for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Merrow, S L; Corbett, C D

    1994-01-01

    Adaptive computing is a relatively new area, and little has been written in the nursing literature on the topic. "Adaptive computing" refers to the professional services and the technology (both hardware and software) that make computing technology accessible for persons with disabilities. Nurses in many settings such as schools, industry, rehabilitation facilities, and the community, can use knowledge of adaptive computing as they counsel, advise, and advocate for people with disabilities. Nurses with an awareness and knowledge of adaptive computing will be better able to promote high-level wellness for individuals with disabilities, thus maximizing their potential for an active fulfilling life. People with different types of disabilities, including visual, mobility, hearing, learning, communication disorders and acquired brain injuries may benefit from computer adaptations. Disabled people encounter barriers to computing in six major areas: 1) the environment, 2) data entry, 3) information output, 4) technical documentation, 5) support, and 6) training. After a discussion of these barriers, the criteria for selecting appropriate adaptations and selected examples of adaptations are presented. Several cases studies illustrate the evaluation process and the development of adaptive computer solutions. PMID:8082064

  10. Mortality Risk Associated With Disability: A Population-Based Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Nusselder, Wilma J.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Klijs, Bart; van Baal, Pieter H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the association between mortality and disability and quantified the effect of disability-associated risk factors. Methods. We linked data from cross-sectional health surveys in the Netherlands to the population registry to create a large data set comprising baseline covariates and an indicator of death. We used Cox regression models to estimate the hazard ratio of disability on mortality. Results. Among men, the unadjusted hazard ratio for activities of daily living, mobility, or mild disability defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development at age 55 years was 7.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.36, 14.13), 5.21 (95% CI = 3.19, 8.51), and 1.87 (95% CI = 1.58, 2.22), respectively. People with disability in activities of daily living and mobility had a 10-year shorter life expectancy than nondisabled people had, of which 6 years could be explained by differences in lifestyle, sociodemographics, and major chronic diseases. Conclusions. Disabled people face a higher mortality risk than nondisabled people do. Although the difference can be explained by diseases and other risk factors for those with mild disability, we cannot rule out that more severe disabilities have an independent effect on mortality. PMID:22021307

  11. Confirmation of diosmetin 3-O-glucuronide as major metabolite of diosmin in humans, using micro-liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Silvestro, Luigi; Tarcomnicu, Isabela; Dulea, Constanta; Attili, Nageswara Rao B N; Ciuca, Valentin; Peru, Dan; Rizea Savu, Simona

    2013-10-01

    Diosmin is a flavonoid often administered in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, and related affections. Diosmin is rapidly hydrolized in the intestine to its aglicone, diosmetin, which is further metabolized to conjugates. In this study, the development and validations of three new methods for the determination of diosmetin, free and after enzymatic deconjugation, and of its potential glucuronide metabolites, diosmetin-3-O-glucuronide, diosmetin-7-O-glucuronide, and diosmetin-3,7-O-glucuronide from human plasma and urine are presented. First, the quantification of diosmetin, free and after deconjugation, was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, on an Ascentis RP-Amide column (150 × 2.1 mm, 5 μm), in reversed-phase conditions, after enzymatic digestion. Then glucuronide metabolites from plasma were separated by micro-liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on a HALO C18 (50 × 0.3 mm, 2.7 μm, 90 Å) column, after solid-phase extraction. Finally, glucuronides from urine were measured using a Discovery HSF5 (100 × 2.1 mm, 5 μm) column, after simple dilution with mobile phase. The methods were validated by assessing linearity, accuracy, precision, low limit of quantification, selectivity, extraction recovery, stability, and matrix effects; results in agreement with regulatory (Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency) guidelines acceptance criteria were obtained in all cases. The methods were applied to a pharmacokinetic study with diosmin (450 mg orally administered tablets). The mean C max of diosmetin in plasma was 6,049.3 ± 5,548.6 pg/mL. A very good correlation between measured diosmetin and glucuronide metabolites concentrations was obtained. Diosmetin-3-O-glucuronide was identified as a major circulating metabolite of diosmetin in plasma and in urine, and this finding was confirmed by supplementary experiments with differential ion-mobility mass spectrometry. PMID:23949323

  12. Disability Identity--Disability Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a way of thinking about disability which has emerged out of the UK Disabled People's Movement over the last three decades in opposition to the preceding medical model of disability which viewed disability as synonymous with problem. Disabled people are increasingly challenging the notion that their embodiment is inherently…

  13. Intellectual disability

    MedlinePLUS

    Intellectual disability is a condition diagnosed before age 18 that includes below-average intellectual function and a lack of ... Intellectual disability affects about 1 to 3% of the population. There are many causes of intellectual disability, but doctors ...

  14. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Learning Disabilities Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Learning Disabilities? Learning disabilities are disorders that affect the ...

  15. Prevalence of Disability and Disability Type Among Adults--United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Carroll, Dianna D; Zhang, Qing C; Stevens, Alissa C; Griffin-Blake, Shannon; Armour, Brian S; Campbell, Vincent A

    2015-07-31

    Understanding the prevalence of disability is important for public health programs to be able to address the needs of persons with disabilities. Beginning in 2013, to measure disability prevalence by functional type, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), added five questions to identify disability in vision, cognition, mobility, self-care, and independent living. CDC analyzed data from the 2013 BRFSS to assess overall prevalence of any disability, as well as specific types of disability among noninstitutionalized U.S. adults. Across all states, disabilities in mobility and cognition were the most frequently reported types. State-level prevalence of each disability type ranged from 2.7% to 8.1% (vision); 6.9% to 16.8% (cognition); 8.5% to 20.7% (mobility); 1.9% to 6.2% (self-care) and 4.2% to 10.8% (independent living). A higher prevalence of any disability was generally seen among adults living in states in the South and among women (24.4%) compared with men (19.8%). Prevalences of any disability and disability in mobility were higher among older age groups. These are the first data on functional disability types available in a state-based health survey. This information can help public health programs identify the prevalence of and demographic characteristics associated with different disability types among U.S. adults and better target appropriate interventions to reduce health disparities. PMID:26225475

  16. Disability associated with mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Pranit K.; Deka, Kamala; Chetia, Dhrubajyoti

    2006-01-01

    Background: Disability associated with mental illness is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. The present study looks at some aspects of disability associated with 7 psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, anxiety disorders, depression, obsessivecompulsive disorder, dementia, and mental and behavioural disorders due to the use of alcohol. Aims: (i) To evaluate the nature and quantity of disabilities in the study groups; (ii) to compare the degree of disability with the severity of the disorder; (iii) to compare disability among various disorders; and (iv) to study the longitudinal stability of disability in the disease groups. Methods: A total of 228 patients attending the OPD, Department of Psychiatry, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, between July 2003 and June 2004, who were diagnosed as per ICD-10 guidelines and SCAN, were included in the study. Severity was assessed by the application of some commonly used rating scales for each specific disorder. The level of disability was assessed by using the Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Scale (IDEAS). Patients were followed up at 6 and 12 months. Statistical analysis was done on SPSS version 10. Results: All the 7 disorders under study are associated with significant disability; schizophrenia being maximally disabling. Disability associated with alcohol use disorder and anxiety is comparable to disability on account of OCD. Over a period of 12 months, disability due to depression, alcohol use disorder and anxiety tend to remain significant. PMID:20703393

  17. Disabling Myths About Disability. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Beatrice A.

    Five myths regarding physical disability are examined. First, the myth that people with physical disabilities tend to be more maladjusted than the ordinary person is analyzed, and it is concluded that the common association between maladjustment and physical disability is grossly oversimplified. Second, the myth portraying people with disabilities

  18. Reassessment of the Listeria monocytogenes pan-genome reveals dynamic integration hotspots and mobile genetic elements as major components of the accessory genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and model organism for host-pathogen interaction, thus representing an invaluable target considering research on the forces governing the evolution of such microbes. The diversity of this species has not been exhaustively explored yet, as previous efforts have focused on analyses of serotypes primarily implicated in human listeriosis. We conducted complete genome sequencing of 11 strains employing 454 GS FLX technology, thereby achieving full coverage of all serotypes including the first complete strains of serotypes 1/2b, 3c, 3b, 4c, 4d, and 4e. These were comparatively analyzed in conjunction with publicly available data and assessed for pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella insect model. Results The species pan-genome of L. monocytogenes is highly stable but open, suggesting an ability to adapt to new niches by generating or including new genetic information. The majority of gene-scale differences represented by the accessory genome resulted from nine hyper variable hotspots, a similar number of different prophages, three transposons (Tn916, Tn554, IS3-like), and two mobilizable islands. Only a subset of strains showed CRISPR/Cas bacteriophage resistance systems of different subtypes, suggesting a supplementary function in maintenance of chromosomal stability. Multiple phylogenetic branches of the genus Listeria imply long common histories of strains of each lineage as revealed by a SNP-based core genome tree highlighting the impact of small mutations for the evolution of species L. monocytogenes. Frequent loss or truncation of genes described to be vital for virulence or pathogenicity was confirmed as a recurring pattern, especially for strains belonging to lineages III and II. New candidate genes implicated in virulence function were predicted based on functional domains and phylogenetic distribution. A comparative analysis of small regulatory RNA candidates supports observations of a differential distribution of trans-encoded RNA, hinting at a diverse range of adaptations and regulatory impact. Conclusions This study determined commonly occurring hyper variable hotspots and mobile elements as primary effectors of quantitative gene-scale evolution of species L. monocytogenes, while gene decay and SNPs seem to represent major factors influencing long-term evolution. The discovery of common and disparately distributed genes considering lineages, serogroups, serotypes and strains of species L. monocytogenes will assist in diagnostic, phylogenetic and functional research, supported by the comparative genomic GECO-LisDB analysis server (http://bioinfo.mikrobio.med.uni-giessen.de/geco2lisdb). PMID:23339658

  19. Workers with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Blanck, P D; Pransky, G

    1999-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities constitute a sizable portion of the workforce and represent the majority of working-age persons who are unable to work. Historically, barriers to employment have included attitudinal discrimination by employers, lack of workplace accommodations, and inadequate job training. The disability rights movement has achieved considerable success in promoting legislation to remove these barriers and uphold equal employment. Research suggests that many employers actively attempt to incorporate persons with disabilities into the workforce and gain substantial economic benefit from their participation, without incurring burdensome expenses. Occupational health providers are asked by employers and others to provide input on feasibility and safety, a difficult task given the lack of scientific study on the occupational abilities and risks associated with specific disabilities. Providers have an important role in promoting the equal employment of disabled persons, by providing objective opinions on their ability and risks on the job and suggesting workplace accommodations and treatments that enhance the ability to work. PMID:10378977

  20. People with Disabilities Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to your state see RHIhubs State Guides . What transportation services can rural communities provide for people with disabilities? Access to transportation is a major issue for people with disabilities ...

  1. Disability retirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Eligibility for disability retirement is discussed. General guidelines and a few standards are given. Usually the same basic medical principles apply to the evaluation of claims for disability retirement as apply to determining medical suitability for initial employment.

  2. Learning Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be able to go to college and study engineering as he'd hoped? What Are Learning Disabilities? ... some theories as to why they develop, including: Genetic influences. Experts have noticed that learning disabilities tend ...

  3. Ethics in neurodevelopmental disability.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Bell, Emily; Shevell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disabilities, like autism spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy are a common health problem in children. Given the impact of these conditions on children, families, and healthcare and social systems, the care of developmentally challenged children raises questions related to values and ethical principles. We review the common features of neurodevelopmental disorders that help understand the associated ethical questions. We focus on three major areas where ethical questions arise for clinicians and those involved in making decisions for or caring for these children: (1) the principles of decision-making and autonomy as they relate to developmental disability; (2) the issues related to quality of life that have long intersected with developmental disability; and (3) the use of unproven therapies and diagnostics that are particularly controversial given the extent that neurodevelopmental disabilities impact children and their families, yet active treatments options are limited. PMID:24182383

  4. Staffing Patterns for Counselors of Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego Community Coll. District, CA. Research Office.

    Nine California community colleges were surveyed in 1979-1980 to determine the ratios of certified disability counselors to students with hearing, speech, visual, or mobility impairments; students with learning disabilities (average or limited); students with other health problems; and students in convalescent and nursing homes. Survey findings

  5. Library Services to Disabled Students: Outreach and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenn, Katy

    1996-01-01

    Discusses some approaches to meeting the needs of disabled students in academic libraries in keeping with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Highlights include types of disabilities, including visual, mobility, and hearing impairments; obstacles found in libraries, including poor communication; and possible remedies. (LRW)

  6. Characterization and evolution of dissolved organic matter in acidic forest soil and its impact on the mobility of major and trace elements (case of the Strengbach watershed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangloff, Sophie; Stille, Peter; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Weber, Tiphaine; Chabaux, François

    2014-04-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) plays an important role in the behavior of major and trace elements in the soil and influences their transfer from soil to soil solution. The first objective of this study is to characterize different organic functional groups for the Water Extractable Organic Carbon (WEOC) fractions of a forest soil as well as their evolution with depth. The second objective is to clarify the influence of these organic functional groups on the migration of the trace elements in WEOC fractions compared to those in the soil solution obtained by lysimeter plates. All experiments have been performed on an acidic forest soil profile (five depths in the first meter) of the experimental spruce parcel in the Stengbach catchment. The Infra-red spectra of the freeze-dried WEOC fractions show a modification of the molecular structure with depth, i.e. a decrease of the polar compounds such as polysaccharides and an increase of the less polar hydro-carbon functional groups with a maximum value of the aromaticity at 30 cm depth. A Hierarchical Ascending Classification (HAC) of the evolution of Water Extractable Chemical Elements (WECE) with the evolution of the organic functional groups in the organic matter (OM) enriched soil compartments permits recognition of relationships between trace element behavior and the organic functional group variations. More specifically, Pb is preferentially bound to the carboxylic acid function of DOC mainly present in the upper soil compartment and rare earth elements (REE) show similar behavior to Fe, V and Cr with a good affinity to carboxy-phenolic and phenolic groups of DOC. The experimental results show that heavy REE compared to light REE are preferentially bound to the aromatic functional group. This different behavior fractionates the REE pattern of soil solutions at 30 cm depth due to the here observed aromaticity enrichment of DOC. These different affinities for the organic functional groups of the DOC explain some aspects of the behavior of trace elements in soil solutions and in the soil profile but, also the competition between trace elements in complexation with DOC. The results of this study are important for the understanding of the mobility and the migration of pollutants (as heavy metals or radionuclides) as well as nutrients in natural ecosystems. WE PrN/YbN is constant between 3 and 16 cm depth whereas SS PrN/YbN slightly decreases from 0.80 at 5 cm depth to 0.74 at 10 cm depth. This results from Pr (LREE) enrichment in the soil solution of the upper soil compartment caused by vegetation controlled LREE recycling and/or atmospheric depositions (see above). WE PrN/YbN and SS PrN/YbN show similar depth dependent distributions including the enrichment at 30 cm depth. It results from Yb depletion at this depth and enrichment in the deeper soil compartment compared to Pr. Similar to Marsac et al. (2012, 2013) one might suggest that there is competition between Fe3+, Al3+ and REE for the binding with DOC. They have a high affinity with the same organic functional groups which is confirmed by the classification scheme (Fig. 8). The studies of Marsac et al. suggest that at acidic pH and low metal/DOC ratios, Fe3+and Al3+ compete more with HREE than LREE; moreover, at high metal/DOC ratios and acidic pH, Al3+ competes with LREE. The Fig. 13 showing the variations of WECEN for Al and Fe in function of WECEN LREE and HREE confirms Marsac et al.’s observations. The slope of the extrapolation line resulting from WECEN Al and HREE values remains rather unchanged for the OM depleted and enriched soil compartments; thus, the change in the metal/DOC ratio in the soil does not change the extraction behavior of Al and HREE. However, the WECEN Fe strongly increase compared to the corresponding HREE values in the OM enriched compartment pointing to the competition between Fe and HREE. Alternatively, one observes that the WECEN Fe and LREE values in the OM enriched compartment plot on the extrapolation line derived from OM depleted soil samples. Thus, in this case, the change in the metal/DOC ratio does not affect the extraction behavior of Fe and LREE. However, the WECEN values for Al and corresponding LREE of samples from the OM enriched soil compartment plot below the extrapolation line and point to the competition between Al and LREE. These results are also in agreement with the REE distribution pattern of the soil solutions from the same site which are at greater depth LREE depleted (Stille et al., 2009).

  7. Depression, Disability, and Rehabilitation Services for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Judith A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review scientific evidence for the co-occurrence of major depressive illness and disability, and to examine this phenomenon specifically for women in the United States today. Following a discussion of different ways of operationalizing the concept of disability, the analysis addresses gender biases in disability

  8. The Transformation of Disabilities Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel-Angel

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the five major characteristics of the transformation era and describes how intellectual and closely related developmental disabilities organizations can apply specific transformation strategies associated with each characteristic. Collectively, the characteristics and strategies provide a framework for transformation

  9. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are…

  10. Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, James J.; McCarthy, Joan F.

    An attempt to collate basic knowledge concerning learning disabilities, the text discusses the background and definition of learning disabilities, and its identification, etiology, and epidemiology. Guidelines for diagnostic evaluation are presented as are approaches from perceptual motor, developmental, visual, neurophysiological, linguistic, and

  11. Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sittiprapaporn, Wichian, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Learning disability is a classification that includes several disorders in which a person has difficulty learning in a typical manner. Depending on the type and severity of the disability, interventions may be used to help the individual learn strategies that will foster future success. Some interventions can be quite simplistic, while others are

  12. Medium-/Long-Term Effects of a Specific Exercise Protocol Combined with Patient Education on Spine Mobility, Chronic Fatigue, Pain, Aerobic Fitness and Level of Disability in Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Erika; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Pigatto, Maurizia; Rampudda, Maria Elisa; Doria, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To propose a rehabilitation protocol able to produce immediate and long-term beneficial effects on level of disability and overall performance in ADLs. Materials and Methods. Forty-one FM patients were randomized to an exercise and educational-behavioral programme group (experimental group, EG = 21) or to a control group (CG = 20). Each subject was evaluated before, at the end (T1), and after 6 months (T6) from the conclusion of the rehabilitation treatment using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), tender points count (TPC), and spinal active range of motion. The exercise protocol included 20 sessions consisting in self-awareness, stretching, strengthening, spine flexibility, and aerobic exercises, which patients were subsequently educated to perform at home. Results. The two groups were comparable at baseline. At T1, the EG showed a positive trend in FIQ, VAS, HAQ, and FSS scales and significant improvement in 6MWT and in most spinal active range of motion measurements (P between 0.001 and 0.04). The positive results were maintained at the follow-up. Conclusion. The proposed programme was well tolerated and produced immediate and medium-term beneficial effects improving function and strain endurance. This trial is registered with DRKS00005071 on DRKS. PMID:24616894

  13. 28 CFR 35.137 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility devices. 35.137 Section 35.137... LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES General Requirements 35.137 Mobility devices. (a) Use of wheelchairs and... devices designed for use by individuals with mobility disabilities, in any areas open to pedestrian...

  14. 28 CFR 36.311 - Mobility devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility devices. 36.311 Section 36.311... ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES Specific Requirements 36.311 Mobility devices. (a) Use of..., or other similar devices designed for use by individuals with mobility disabilities in any areas...

  15. Implications of Mobility Impairment on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Elyse R.; Kilbridge, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Among women with chronic, preexisting mobility impairments, we sought to explore how their mobility difficulties affected the diagnosis and treatment of early-stage breast cancer Methods This is a qualitative analysis of transcripts from in-depth in-person or telephone interviews with 20 English-speaking women who had early-stage breast cancer, were <60 years of age, and had chronic difficulty walking or used wheeled mobility aids at the time of their breast cancer diagnoses Results Nine women were disabled by polio as children or had postpolio syndrome, 3 had cerebral palsy, 3 had spinal cord injury, and 5 had other conditions. Most women reported difficulty obtaining mammograms, primarily because of inaccessible equipment, positioning problems, and difficulties with uncontrollable movements. Many women made decisions about surgical approach and chemotherapy by explicitly considering how various therapies would affect their arms, which are essential to their mobility (they use ambulation aids, self-propel manual wheelchairs, or otherwise rely on their arms for mobility or safety). Managing at home after surgery posed major mobility challenges, especially for women who lived alone. Several women reported feeling they suffered more chemotherapy side effects than do women without mobility problems. Weight gains with endocrine therapy compromised the mobility of several women. Conclusions Increasing numbers of American women are living with mobility disabilities and entering age ranges with increased risks of breast cancer. Mobility impairments can affect women at every point during early-stage breast cancer diagnosis, therapy, and recovery. Clinicians must consider women's mobility functioning in making therapeutic recommendations to women with impaired mobility who develop breast cancer. PMID:21034276

  16. Academic Library Services for Students with Disabilities: A Survey at the University of South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loope, Charlene H.

    A pilot survey of 16 students at the University of South Carolina from across four disability categories evaluated the range of services and adaptive equipment necessary to meet disabled students' needs in an academic library setting. Disability categories represented were: (1) learning disabilities and attention deficit disorders, (2) mobility

  17. Mathematics and Metacognition in Adolescents and Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desoete, Annemie

    2009-01-01

    A majority of studies on learning disabilities have focused on elementary grades. Although problems with learning disabilities are life-affecting only a few studies focus on deficits in adults. In this study adults with isolated mathematical disabilities (n = 101) and adults with combined mathematical and reading disabilities (n = 130) solved

  18. Shakespeare on old age and disability.

    PubMed

    Covey, H

    2000-01-01

    The plays of William Shakespeare were reviewed for references to disabilities, aging and disability, and older characters with disabilities. Shakespeare's references draw from traditional cultural notions about older people with disabilities. These traditional notions include people with physical disabilities being evil, the entertainment value of disabilty, and those who were mentally ill being wild and animal-like. He viewed the aging process as disabling and old age as a time when individuals lost some abilities to function, particularly when it came to mental capacity and physical mobility. His writings show that he used disability as a literary tool to add dimension to characters and set them apart. Contemporary literature continues to share some of Shakespeare's view on aging and disability but also departs from them in important ways. For example, contemporary treatment of disabilities and aging places more emphasis on the human side of the affects of aging and disabilities. Disabilities and aging are not cast in the same negative terms as Shakespeare used. PMID:10987340

  19. Libraries and the Mobile Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Cody

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, cell phones and mobile devices are ubiquitous. The vast majority of Americans now own cell phones, and over half of them have mobile access to the Internet through a phone or other mobile device. For libraries to stay relevant, they must be able to offer content and services through the mobile web. In this issue of "Library Technology…

  20. Libraries and the Mobile Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Cody

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, cell phones and mobile devices are ubiquitous. The vast majority of Americans now own cell phones, and over half of them have mobile access to the Internet through a phone or other mobile device. For libraries to stay relevant, they must be able to offer content and services through the mobile web. In this issue of "Library Technology

  1. Prevalence and features of ICF-disability in Spain as captured by the 2008 National Disability Survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since 1986, the study of disability in Spain has been mainly addressed by National Disability Surveys (NDSs). While international attempts to frame NDS designs within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) have progressed, in general, the ICF has hardly been used in either the NDS or epidemiological studies. This study sought to identify ICF Activity- and Participation-related content in the most recent Spanish NDS, the 2008 Survey on Disabilities, Independence and Dependency Situations (Encuesta sobre discapacidades, autonomía personal y situaciones de Dependencia - EDAD 2008), and estimate the prevalence of such ICF-framed disability. Methods EDAD 2008 methods and questions were perused. Of the 51 EDAD items analysed, 29 were backcoded to specific d2-d7 domains of the ICF Checklist and, by rating the recorded difficulty to perform specific tasks with or without help, these were then taken as performance and capacity respectively. A global ICF score was also derived, albeit lacking data for d1, "Learning and applying knowledge", d8, "Major Life Areas" and d9, "Community, Social and Civic Life". Data were grouped by sex, age, residence and initial positive screening, and prevalence figures were calculated by disability level both for the general population, using the originally designed weights, and for the population that had screened positive to disability. Data for institutionalised persons were processed separately. Results Crude prevalence of ICF severe/complete and moderate disability among the community-dwelling population aged ≥6 years was 0.9%-2.2% respectively, and that of severe/complete disability among persons living in sheltered accommodation was 0.3%. Prevalence of severe/complete disability was: higher in women than in men, 0.8% vs. 0.4%; increased with age; and was particularly high in domains such as "Domestic Life", 3.4%, "Mobility", 1.8%, and "Self-care", 1.9%, in which prevalence decreased when measured by reference to performance. Moreover, global scores indicated that severe/complete disability in these same domains was frequent among the moderately disabled group. Conclusions The EDAD 2008 affords an insufficient data set to be ICF-framed when it comes to the Activity and Participation domains. Notwithstanding their unknown validity, ratings for available ICF domains may, however, be suitable for consideration under the ADL model of functional dependency, suggesting that there are approximately 500,000 persons suffering from severe/complete disability and 1,000,000 suffering from moderate disability, with half the latter being severely disabled in domains capable of benefiting from technical or personal aid. Application of EDAD data to the planning of services for regions and other subpopulations means that need for personal help must be assessed, unmet needs ascertained, and knowledge of social participation and support, particularly for the mentally ill, improved. International, WHO-supported co-operation in ICF planning and use of NDSs in Spain and other countries is needed. PMID:22122806

  2. Perceptions about disability among Ghanaian university students.

    PubMed

    Naami, Augustina; Hayashi, Reiko

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory/descriptive study was conducted on a sample of university students, including 305 social work and sociology majors, in Ghana to evaluate their attitudes toward disabilities. The findings indicate that the students in general agree with the idea of community integration and equal rights of persons with disabilities. At the same time, they are ambivalent about characteristics of persons with disabilities and feel uncomfortable interacting with them. Further, a substantive minority holds strong prejudices against persons with disabilities. Universities should provide their students with opportunities to improve knowledge and attitudes about disabilities. PMID:22630599

  3. Barriers to access: frustrations of people who use a wheelchair for full-time mobility.

    PubMed

    Pierce, L L

    1998-01-01

    A phenomenological study was conducted to answer the question, What is it like being an individual with a disability who uses a wheelchair for full-time mobility and lives in society with many potential barriers? A total of 9 people from Ohio and Pennsylvania composed the purposively selected sample. Colaizzi's method of data analysis was used to review transcriptions of interviews with those in the sample. The analysis identified a major theme: all participants had feelings of frustration concerning access. Four subtheme clusters related to this frustration emerged: issues of independence, attitudes of others toward people with disabilities, others' lack of understanding of the situations of individuals with disabilities, and lack of involvement of people with disabilities in decisions regarding the development of facilities for them. This study provides insights into the lived experience of accessibility in today's environment for people with disabilities who use a wheelchair for full-time mobility, offers direction for health professionals who work with these individuals, and serves as an impetus for further research. PMID:9697582

  4. Major depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Ferri FF. Major depression. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015.

  5. with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Debra L.; Jones, Vita L.; Sparks, Shannon L.; Aldridge, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Parents from culturally diverse backgrounds need to feel that they play a vital role in the future success of their sons or daughters with disabilities. Differences in culture and ethnicity can affect families' involvement in transition planning and the goals that they emphasize for their children. Families of diverse backgrounds were

  6. Impact, distress and HRQoL among Malaysian men and women with a mobility impairment

    PubMed Central

    Misajon, RoseAnne; Manderson, Lenore; Pallant, Julie F; Omar, Zaliha; Bennett, Elizabeth; Rahim, Rameezan Begam Abdul

    2006-01-01

    Background Although non-communicable and chronic disease now accounts for 47% of the global burden of disease, little is known of the everyday experiences and social aspects of disability and disablement in middle and low income countries. This article aims to address this gap by exploring the subjective experience of mobility impairment in Malaysia. Specifically, it examines health-related quality of life and the impact and distress related to impaired mobility, and investigates any gender differences in relation to the experience of disability. Methods The data were collected as part of an interdisciplinary, multi-country study known as RESILIENCE (Research into Social Inclusion, Locomotive Impairment and Empowerment through Networking, Collaboration and Education). Cluster sampling was used to administer the EQ-5D and the Perceived Impact of Problems Profile (PIPP) to 210 adults from Selangor state, west coast Peninsular Malaysia. Results The participants consisted of 94 males and 116 females, aged between 18–90 years (mean 60 years), with the majority being Malay. The majority of participants were also married, from rural areas and had primary education only. Very few participants lived alone. In addition, males were more likely to attribute their impaired mobility to an accident. The majority of participants with mobility impairment experienced a moderate to high level of pain/discomfort (79%) and anxiety/depression (72%), and at least some problems with performing usual activities (71%), as measured by the EQ-5D. In addition, using the Perceived Impact of Problems Profile (PIPP), participants also reported high levels of impact and distress related to participation in community life. In general, males reported higher impact and distress across several items, most significantly in regard to participation in community activities, moving around the neighbourhood, ability to live independently, and ability to assist their family members. Conclusion This paper provides preliminary data regarding the health-related quality of life among Malaysians with impaired mobility, and highlights the multifaceted impact of disability and the importance of acknowledging the diverse cultural contexts in which disability can occur. It also raises questions regarding gender differences in the subjective experience of disability in Malaysia. PMID:17156494

  7. Disablement, Disability and the Nigerian Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abang, Theresa B.

    1988-01-01

    The condition of the disabled in developing nations, particularly Nigeria, is considered. Discussed are prevention of disability by control of infectious diseases, effects of myth and superstition on attitudes toward the disabled, the lack of medical facilities, and the rights of the disabled to an education and building access. (Author/DB)

  8. Office of Disability Employment Policy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Order Disability Statistics February 2016 Disability Employment Statistics Ages 16 years and over Labor Force Participation People with disabilities: 19.5% People without disabilities: ... Constitution Ave. NW ...

  9. Osteoarthritis: increasing mobility and reducing disability.

    PubMed

    Quinet, R J

    1986-02-01

    Older patients taking NSAIDs or high-dose aspirin should have complete laboratory evaluations of blood count, urinalysis, BUN/creatine, potassium, and serum transaminases several times yearly; more often if the clinical picture warrants. The use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and other medications should be reviewed in detail with the patient, particularly the rationale. The physician should stress the need to take the medications regularly, not "as needed." Physicians should also take time to warn patients against unorthodox medications and "treatments." PMID:3943721

  10. Update on the Americans with Disabilities Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Osborne, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    In 1990, Congress enacted the Americans with Disabilities Act as a comprehensive mandate to eliminate discrimination against individuals with disabilities. The ADA's primary intent was to extend the protection of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The major difference between the two laws is that Section 504 applies to programs that…

  11. Women with Disabilities: Issues, Resources, Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traustadottir, Rannveig

    This four-part information package serves as an introduction to the lives of women and girls with disabilities and the social issues they specifically face. Part I comprises a paper which reviews the literature and major issues, titled "Obstacles to Equality: The Double Discrimination of Women with Disabilities." The paper examines three major…

  12. Learning Disabilities In-Service Training Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bickley

    Included in the training kit for teachers in the area of learning disabilities are materials developed by Project Lighthouse for experimental field usage to test the materials. The problem of educating children with learning disabilities is summarized, as is Piaget's model of logical activity. The major divisions of the text then deal with the

  13. Rewards of Fostering Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    A random sample of parents fostering children with disabilities in a major Canadian city was asked "what are the rewards you receive from fostering a child with a disability?" A total of 57 unique responses were obtained and grouped together by the foster parents. Two statistical analyses were applied to the grouping data: multidimensional scaling

  14. Prevention of Disabilities: Topic Paper D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper describes the major components of a comprehensive program to prevent disabilities, including programs to maximize health care, programs to maximize educational growth and sound psychological development, and programs for public

  15. A Manual on the Primary Prevention of Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Elizabeth B.; Skiles, Laura Lopater

    This manual presents information about major causes of developmental disabilities, discusses strategies to prevent development disabilities, and identifies relevant resources and reference material. Introductory information defines developmental disabilities and prevention (under Virginia statutes). The first section considers causes prior to and

  16. On a bioethical challenge to disability rights.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Ron; Tresky, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Tensions exist between the disability rights movement and the work of many bioethicists. These reveal themselves in a major recent book on bioethics and genetics, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. This book defends certain genetic policies against criticisms from disability rights advocates, in part by arguing that it is possible to accept both the genetic policies and the rights of people with impairments. However, a close reading of the book reveals a series of direct moral criticisms of the disability rights movement. The criticisms go beyond a defense of genetic policies from the criticisms of disability rights advocates. The disability rights movement is said not to have the same moral legitimacy as other civil rights movements, such as those for women or "racial" minorities. This paper documents, and in some cases shows the flaws within, these challenges to the disability rights movement. PMID:18027248

  17. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Children with kernicterus are more likely to have cerebral palsy, hearing and vision problems, and problems with their ... developmental disabilities, such as: ADHD , autism spectrum disorder , cerebral palsy , hearing loss , intellectual disability , learning disability, vision impairment , ...

  18. Using Virtual Reality To Teach Disability Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivik, Jayne; McComas, Joan; Macfarlane, Ian; Laflamme, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design and evaluation of a desktop virtual reality program that was developed to teach children about the accessibility and attitudinal barriers encountered by their peers with mobility impairments. Investigated attitudes, grade levels, familiarity with individuals with a disability, and gender. (Author/LRW)

  19. International Statements on Disability Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation International, New York, NY.

    The document brings together key policy documents related to disability proposed by the bodies of the United Nations system and of major nongovernmental organizations. Statements from nine United Nations agencies are presented: General Assembly; Economic and Social Council; Development Programme; World Conference of Decade for Women; Economic and

  20. Pediatric Disability and Caregiver Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoyd, Judith L. M.; Akincigil, Ayse; Paek, Eun Kwang

    2010-01-01

    The evidence that the birth of a child with a disability leads to divorce or separation is equivocal, with the majority of recent research suggesting that such a birth and childrearing may be stressful, but not necessarily toxic, to the caregiver relationship. Such research has been limited by small sample sizes and nonrepresentative samples and

  1. Effects of Counselor Disability on Counselor Attraction in an Analogue Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risica, Virginia J.; Nevid, Jeffrey S.

    The majority of research examining attitudes toward the disabled has demonstrated stereotypically negative biases among disabled and nondisabled populations. These biases may include avoidance or increased social distance with the disabled as well as feelings of uncomfortableness when interacting with disabled individuals. This study investigated

  2. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  3. DISABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH ALCOHOL ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V.; Popova, Svetlana; Room, Robin; Ramonas, Milita; Rehm, Jrgen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alcohol use disorders (AUD), i.e., alcohol dependence and abuse are major contributors to burden of disease. A large part of this burden is due to disability. However, there is still controversy about the best disability weighting for alcohol use disorders. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of alcohol-related disabilities. METHODS Systematic literature review and expert interviews. RESULTS There is heterogeneity in experts descriptions of disabilities related to AUD. The major core attributes of disability related to AUD are changes of emotional state, social relationships, memory and thinking. The most important supplementary attributes are anxiety, impairments of speech and hearing. CONCLUSIONS This review identified the main patterns of disability associated with alcohol use disorders. However, there was considerable variability, and data on less prominent patterns were fragmented. Further and systematic research is required for increasing the knowledge on disability related to alcohol use disorders and for application of interventions for reducing the associated burden. OBJECTIVE To provide an overview of disabilities associated with AUD. PMID:20662803

  4. Developmental Disabilities Act Reauthorization, FY 1990: Recommendations of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.

    This monograph presents the recommendations of the 15 organizations belonging to the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities concerning the reauthorization of the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, Public Law 100-146. Each issue is briefly presented with a specific recommendation for changes in the law. Major

  5. Creating a Disability Mythology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven E.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of a "disability culture" is related to the development of a "disability mythology," in which stories about people who have done heroic activities (almost all people with disabilities) are passed on within the community of people with disabilities as examples of positive change through individual heroism. (DB)

  6. Effect of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on pain, mobility, strength, and disability of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan-Woo; Kim, Won-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of thoracic manipulation and deep craniocervical flexor training on the muscle strength and endurance, range of motion, and the disability index of the neck of patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-six patients with chronic neck pain participated. They received an intervention for 35 minutes a day, three times a week for 10 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one control and two experimental groups: group A (thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training, n=16), group B (deep craniocervical flexor training, n=15), and group C (active self-exercise as a control group, n=15). Muscle strength and endurance, pain, neck disability index, and range of motion of the cervical and thoracic spine were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Group A showed significant increases in muscle strength, endurance, and cervical and thoracic range of motion, and significant decreases in the pain and neck disability index, compared with groups B and C. [Conclusion] Although deep craniocervical flexor training is effective at improving neck function, thoracic manipulation combined with deep craniocervical flexor training was a more effective intervention for pain relief and improving the range of motion, muscle function, and neck disability of patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain. PMID:26957752

  7. REST based mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jrg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  8. Disabilities research in India

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, H.; Naveen Kumar, C.; Prashanth, N. R.; Kasthuri, P.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review all articles related to psychiatric disability that have been published in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry since its inception till date. We have also added up some more relevant literature in the area of mental disability of Indian psychiatric patients. Finally the article ends up with discussion related to challenges associated with mental disability, persons with Disability Act and future directions in the area of psychiatric disability. PMID:21836695

  9. Technology, selfhood and physical disability.

    PubMed

    Lupton, D; Seymour, W

    2000-06-01

    Much has been written in recent times of the interface between technologies and the human body. The vast majority of this literature, however, focuses on a body that is assumed to be free of physical disability. This article seeks to address this lacuna by presenting findings from an exploratory study using in-depth interviews with fifteen people with physical disabilities living in the Australian city of Adelaide. The dominant research question was to explore the ways in which technologies contribute to the meanings and experiences of the lived body/self with disabilities. The data showed that the interviewees identified several technologies that they used as highly beneficial to allowing them to transcend some aspects of their disabilities. However, the interviewees also identified significant negative aspects to the use of some technologies. They noted that such technologies could serve to mark out people with disabilities as 'different' or 'lacking', acting as a barrier to the achievement and presentation of their preferred body/self. PMID:10798337

  10. Disability and coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, D

    1974-06-22

    The Industrial Injuries Advisory Council has reaffirmed the view that simple pneumoconiosis does not produce disability or shorten life. This is often true but, without overlooking the importance of chronic bronchitis, such conclusions are wrong in many instances.Chronic bronchitis is probably commoner in miners without pneumoconiosis than in those with it, and an uneven distribution of bronchitis may mask the effects of pneumoconiosis. Cough and sputum in a miner with pneumoconiosis are not always due to chronic bronchitis. Disability is usually judged on measurement of vital capacity and forced expiratory volume, factors which cannot be expected to be significantly altered by simple pneumoconiosis alone. Other tests may show abnormalities which lead to ventilation and perfusion inequalities and to an increase in the ventilatory cost of exercise. Focal emphysema, often a consequence of simple pneumoconiosis, develops slowly and its influence on disability is delayed.Disagreements arise because epidemiologists expect all lungs with simple pneumoconiosis react in the same way, and they want a quantitative relation between simple pneumoconiosis and emphysema before attributing one to the other.There are major difficulties in assessing disability but there is little justification for the regular application of the rule that if the results of ventilatory tests are normal disability is not present and if they are abnormal this is due to something other than simple pneumoconiosis. PMID:4276109

  11. Predicting disabilities in daily functioning in older people with intellectual disabilities using a frailty index.

    PubMed

    Schoufour, Josje D; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I M; Evenhuis, Heleen M; Echteld, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes compared to others of the same age. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more frequently and earlier frail compared to the general population. Frailty challenges much of health care, which will likely further increase due to the aging of the population. Before effective interventions can start, more information is necessary about the consequences of frailty in this, already disabled, population. Here we report whether frailty predicts disabilities in daily functioning. Frailty was measured with a frailty index (FI). At baseline and follow-up activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and mobility were collected by informant report. For 703 older people with ID (?50 yr) baseline and follow-up measures were known. Multivariate linear regression models were used to predict ADL, IADL and mobility at follow-up. The FI was significantly associated with disabilities in daily functioning independent of baseline characteristics (age, gender, level of ID, Down syndrome) and baseline ADL, IADL or mobility. The FI showed to be most predictive for those with relative high independence at baseline. These results stress the importance for interventions that limit the progression of frailty and, thereby, help to limit further disability. PMID:24950014

  12. Mobile robots

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.J.; Marquina, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a conference on mobile robots. Topics the conference included are the following: mobility systems for robotic vehicles; detection and control of mobile robot motion by real-time computer vision, obstacle avoidance algorithms for an autonomous land vehicle; hierarchical processor and matched filters for range image processing; asynchronous distributed control system for a mobile robot, and, planning in a hierarchical nested autonomous control system.

  13. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  14. Pregnancy in women with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Signore, Caroline; Spong, Catherine Y; Krotoski, Danuta; Shinowara, Nancy L; Blackwell, Sean C

    2011-04-01

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development sponsored a 2-day workshop to assess the body of evidence on pregnancy in women with physical disabilities, identify gaps in knowledge, and formulate recommendations for further research. A multidisciplinary group of experts discussed available data on pregnancy outcomes among women with varying physically disabling conditions, medical and psychosocial risks for mothers and children, and barriers to prenatal care and parenting for women with physical disabilities. Existing evidence is limited by a preponderance of retrospective single-site studies of small sample sizes. For most women, pregnancy outcomes are favorable. However, increased rates of certain adverse outcomes, such as low birth weight (related to preterm birth or growth restriction) and cesarean delivery, have been reported in women with spinal cord injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or other conditions. Common morbidities across conditions may include urinary tract infections, decreased mobility and independence, skin ulceration, respiratory compromise, interpersonal abuse, stress, and mood disorders. Socioeconomic, physical, and attitudinal barriers to antenatal care and independent parenting can be problematic. Current evidence, although limited, indicates that most women with physical disabilities will have good pregnancy outcomes; however, some data suggest that rates of a range of complications may be more common among women with physical disabilities, depending on the nature and severity of the underlying condition. Many questions remain unanswered. Establishment of a systematic and comprehensive registry of pregnancy course and outcomes among women with physical disabilities is of high priority for addressing persistent gaps in knowledge. PMID:21422868

  15. What is an Intellectual Disability?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Crushes What's a Booger? What Is an Intellectual Disability? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is an Intellectual Disability? ... becoming an independent person. continue What Causes Intellectual Disabilities? Intellectual disabilities happen because the brain gets injured ...

  16. The violence of disablism.

    PubMed

    Goodley, Dan; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2011-05-01

    This article addresses the multi-faceted nature of violence in the lives of disabled people, with a specific focus on the accounts of disabled children and their families. Traditionally, when violence and disability have been considered together, this has emphasised the disabled subject whom inevitably exhibits violent challenging behaviour. Recently, however, more attention has been paid to violence experienced by disabled people, most notably in relation to hate crime. This article embraces theories that do not put the problems of disablism or violence back onto disabled people but magnify and expose processes of disablism that are produced in the relationships between people, which sometimes involve violence. This, we argue, means taking seriously the role of social relationships, institutions and culture in the constitution of violence. Disabled children, we argue, are enculturated by the violence of disablism. We follow iek's advice to step back from the obvious signals of violence to 'perceive the contours of the background which generates such outbursts', and identify four elements of the violence of disablism which we define as real, psychoemotional, systemic and cultural. We come to the conclusion that violence experienced by disabled children and their families says more about the dominant culture of disablism than it does of the acts of a few seemingly irrational, unreasonable, mean or violent individuals. We conclude that there is a need for extensive cultural deconstruction and reformation. PMID:21226732

  17. Social Support and Intellectual Disabilities: A Comparison between Social Networks of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Those with Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippold, T.; Burns, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Social support has been identified as a major protective factor in preventing mental health problems and also as a major contributor to quality of life. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have been identified as having limited social support structures. Interventions have been focused on promoting their social presence and

  18. Social Support and Intellectual Disabilities: A Comparison between Social Networks of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Those with Physical Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippold, T.; Burns, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Social support has been identified as a major protective factor in preventing mental health problems and also as a major contributor to quality of life. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have been identified as having limited social support structures. Interventions have been focused on promoting their social presence and…

  19. Disability and Obesity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Disability and Obesity Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and Disability at http://www.ncpad.org/ The Obesity Epidemic Obesity affects different people in different ways ...

  20. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This National Council on Disability (NCD) annual progress report to the President and Congress covers the period December 2005 through December 2006. The report is divided into 13 chapters, each dealing with a major area of public policy. These subject-specific chapters are preceded by an introductory Major Trends section that identifies

  1. Disability Accommodation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flick-Hruska, Connie, Comp.; Blythe, Gretchen, Comp.

    Designed as a resource for two-year college faculty and staff working with students with disabilities, this handbook contains facts about various disabilities, practical suggestions for improving services, and resource points for further information. Following a brief introduction, legal implications regarding disabled students are discussed for…

  2. Work Disability in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Judith

    This paper begins by examining the history of disability payments to disabled workers, specifically disability payments to coal workers. Efforts by the United Mine Workers of America made mine health and safety an issue in the 1960s, and continuing liberalization of the law continued through the 1970s. The identification of coal miners with…

  3. Rural Economies and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Dennis

    Both the rural economy and the disability community in rural areas can benefit from a recognition that they are mutually dependent. With the decline of rural America, the economic base underpinning all aspects of disability support systems is weakening. In addition, rural disability services often are compartmentalized along functional lines with

  4. Teaching Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Laura F.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of teaching disability law and traces the development of disability law courses, tracking the emergence of disability discrimination law as a more comprehensive set of legal requirements. The extent to which schools are offering these courses and the approaches being used are examined; additional approaches are also suggested.

  5. DISABILITY STATISTICS CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Disability Statistics Center is to produce and disseminate statistical information on disability and the status of people with disabilities in American society and to establish and monitor indicators of how conditions are changing over time to meet their health...

  6. Normalizing Disability in Families.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This comment shifts Ouellette's frame of reference in linking prenatal selection against disability, laws prohibiting prenatal sex selection, and fertility specialists' discrimination against disabled adults. Viewing decisions about who can reproduce and what children will be born as fundamentally decisions about family suggests ways to promote acceptance of people with disabilities as valued family members — without limiting reproductive liberties. PMID:26242942

  7. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the

  8. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  9. Changing practice: implications of the World Report on Disability for responding to communication disability in under-served populations.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Karen; McAllister, Lindy; Davidson, Bronwyn; Marshall, Julie

    2013-02-01

    The World Report on Disability provides a major challenge to the conceptualization and delivery of services for people with communication disabilities around the world. Many people, in both Majority and Minority World countries, receive limited or no support in relation to their communication disability. In this paper the prevalence of communication disability across the world (and the challenges to obtaining these data) are discussed, particularly in relation to disability more broadly. Populations that are under-served by speech-language pathology services in both Majority and Minority World countries are described. The paper describes organizational change theory and the potential it has, together with a biopsychosocial model of disability, to assist in understanding and influencing development of relevant services for people with communication disabilities (PWCD), particularly those who are under-served. Aspects of, and influences on, service delivery for PWCD are described. The need for novel ways of conceptualizing development of services, including population-based approaches, is highlighted. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for PWCD and for speech-language pathologists which arise from the nine recommendations of the World Report on Disability are considered and readers are encouraged to consider new and novel ways of developing equitable services for people with communication disabilities, in both majority and minority world settings. PMID:23323813

  10. Disability and marginal utility of income: evidence from hypothetical choices.

    PubMed

    Tengstam, Sven

    2014-03-01

    It is often assumed that disability reduces the marginal utility of income. In this article, individuals' marginal utility of income in two states-(i) paralyzed in both legs from birth and (ii) not mobility impaired at all-is measured through hypothetical choices between imagined lotteries behind a so-called veil of ignorance. The outcomes of the lotteries include both income and disability status. It is found that most people have higher marginal utility when paralyzed than when not mobility impaired at all. The two marginal utilities are evaluated at the same levels of income. Having personal experience of mobility impairment and supporting the Left Party, the Social Democratic Party, the Green Party, or the Liberal Party are associated with having a higher marginal utility when paralyzed. The results suggest that more than full insurance of income losses connected to being disabled is optimal. The results further suggest that, given a utilitarian social welfare function, resources should be transferred to rather than from disabled people. Finally, if the transfers are not large enough to smooth out the marginal utilities of the disabled and the nondisabled, distributional weights based on disability status should be used in cost-benefit analysis. PMID:23532796

  11. 49 CFR 38.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.95 Section 38.95 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.95 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All new...

  12. 49 CFR 38.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.159 Section 38.159 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 38.159 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All...

  13. 49 CFR 38.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.23 Section 38.23 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.23 Mobility aid accessibility. (a) General. All vehicles covered...

  14. Analysis of Handoff Mechanisms in Mobile IP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraj, Maria Nadine Simonel; Issac, Biju; Haldar, Manas Kumar

    2011-06-01

    One of the most important challenges in mobile Internet Protocol (IP) is to provide service for a mobile node to maintain its connectivity to network when it moves from one domain to another. IP is responsible for routing packets across network. The first major version of IP is the Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4). It is one of the dominant protocols relevant to wireless network. Later a newer version of IP called the IPv6 was proposed. Mobile IPv6 is mainly introduced for the purpose of mobility. Mobility management enables network to locate roaming nodes in order to deliver packets and maintain connections with them when moving into new domains. Handoff occurs when a mobile node moves from one network to another. It is a key factor of mobility because a mobile node can trigger several handoffs during a session. This paper briefly explains on mobile IP and its handoff issues, along with the drawbacks of mobile IP.

  15. Beyond (Models of) Disability?

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Jonas-Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The strategy of developing an ontology or models of disability as a prior step to settling ethical issues regarding disabilities is highly problematic for two reasons. First, key definitional aspects of disability are normative and cannot helpfully be made value-neutral. Second, if we accept that the contested concept of disability is value-laden, it is far from obvious that there are definitive reasons for choosing one interpretation of the concept over another. I conclude that the concept of disability is better left ethically open-ended or broad enough to encompass the examination of various ethical issues (such as oppression, minority rights, or physical discomfort). Alternatively, the concept of disability could be altogether abandoned in order to focus on specific issues without being hindered by debates about the nature of disability. Only political costs, rather than conceptual considerations internal to the models, could be weighed against such a conclusion. PMID:26892249

  16. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history, scientists were fascinated with Syrtis Major because this dark region varied so much through the seasons and years. Some people thought it might be a changing sea, and others thought it might be vegetation. Early spacecraft like Mariner and Viking revealed for the first time that the changes were caused by the wind blowing dust and sand across the surface. What we can see in this image is exactly that: evidence of a lot of wind action. Bright dust patches streak across this image, formed through wind interference from craters and other landforms. These wispy, bright streaks are spread on the surface by a vigorous, east-west wind that kicked up huge dust storms, scattering the fine particles of sand and dust in an almost etherial pattern. The bright streaks in the top part of the image might have formed in a slightly different way, because there is no landform standing in the wind's way. Beneath the bright surface dust are raised ridges that mark the edges of earlier lava flows from Nili Patera, a Martian 'caldera.' A caldera is a collapsed, bowl-shaped depression at the top of a volcano cone. Can you imagine how Christian Huygens would feel if he lived today and could see all of this knowledge unfold? Or how it would feel to be the first person to stand in this dark volcanic and cratered region, knowing how many discovers had paved the way to that moment? Yes, exploration lives!

  17. Malnutrition and disability: unexplored opportunities for collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Groce, N; Challenger, E; Berman-Bieler, R; Farkas, A; Yilmaz, N; Schultink, W; Clark, D; Kaplan, C; Kerac, M

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing international interest in the links between malnutrition and disability: both are major global public health problems, both are key human rights concerns, and both are currently prominent within the global health agenda. In this review, interactions between the two fields are explored and it is argued that strengthening links would lead to important mutual benefits and synergies. At numerous points throughout the life-cycle, malnutrition can cause or contribute to an individuals physical, sensory, intellectual or mental health disability. By working more closely together, these problems can be transformed into opportunities: nutrition services and programmes for children and adults can act as entry points to address and, in some cases, avoid or mitigate disability; disability programmes can improve nutrition for the children and adults they serve. For this to happen, however, political commitment and resources are needed, as are better data. PMID:25309998

  18. Malnutrition and disability: unexplored opportunities for collaboration.

    PubMed

    Groce, N; Challenger, E; Berman-Bieler, R; Farkas, A; Yilmaz, N; Schultink, W; Clark, D; Kaplan, C; Kerac, M

    2014-11-01

    There is increasing international interest in the links between malnutrition and disability: both are major global public health problems, both are key human rights concerns, and both are currently prominent within the global health agenda. In this review, interactions between the two fields are explored and it is argued that strengthening links would lead to important mutual benefits and synergies. At numerous points throughout the life-cycle, malnutrition can cause or contribute to an individual's physical, sensory, intellectual or mental health disability. By working more closely together, these problems can be transformed into opportunities: nutrition services and programmes for children and adults can act as entry points to address and, in some cases, avoid or mitigate disability; disability programmes can improve nutrition for the children and adults they serve. For this to happen, however, political commitment and resources are needed, as are better data. PMID:25309998

  19. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt has been traced back to an ancient Ethiopian word 'basal,' which means 'a rock from which you can obtain iron.' That must have made it a very desired material with ancient Earth civilizations long ago. Basalt is actually one of the most abundant types of rock found on Earth. Most of the volcanic islands in the ocean are made of basalt, including the large shield volcano of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which is often compared to Martian shield volcanoes. Shield volcanoes don't have high, steep, mountain-like sides, but are instead low and broad humps upon the surface. They're created when highly fluid, molten-basalt flows spread out over wide areas. Over several millennia of basaltic layering upon layering, these volcanoes can reach massive sizes like the ones seen on Mars. You can see the wrinkly texture of dark lava flows (now hard and cool) in the above image beneath the brighter dust.

  20. Trends in Mobile Application Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Adrian; Ondrus, Jan

    Major software companies, such as Apple and Google, are disturbing the relatively safe and established actors of the mobile application business. These newcomers have caused significant structural changes by imposing and enforcing their own rules for the future of mobile application development. The implications of these changes do not only concern the mobile network operators and mobile phone manufacturers. This changed environment also brings additional opportunities and constraints for current mobile application developers. Therefore, developers need to assess what their options are and how they can take advantages of these current trends. In this paper, we take a developer’s perspective in order to explore how the structural changes will influence the mobile application development markets. Moreover, we discuss what aspects developers need to take into account in order to position themselves within the current trends.

  1. Repositioning Mothers: Mothers, Disabled Children and Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sara; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    In this article we set out to review the ways in which mothers of disabled children have been portrayed within disability studies and the more broader academic literature. We argue that within disability studies mothers of disabled children occupy a liminal position because they are often not disabled and yet they can experience forms of

  2. Shifting Patterns of Student Mobility in Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sheng-Ju

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, Asia--traditionally one of the largest exporters of mobile students--has experienced major changes in student mobility within higher education. As the worldwide competition for international students has escalated, many Asian countries have adopted a wide range of mechanisms and strategies in facilitating student mobility.

  3. Shifting Patterns of Student Mobility in Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sheng-Ju

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, Asia--traditionally one of the largest exporters of mobile students--has experienced major changes in student mobility within higher education. As the worldwide competition for international students has escalated, many Asian countries have adopted a wide range of mechanisms and strategies in facilitating student mobility.…

  4. Reasonable Accommodations: A Faculty Guide to Teaching College Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Staff Congress of the City Univ. of New York, NY.

    This handbook is designed to provide City University of New York faculty with practical information and suggestions to help them meet the needs of disabled students in their classrooms. An overview on teaching students with disabilities is provided, followed by discussions of specific topics including coping with mobility and hand-function…

  5. 76 FR 47078 - Make Inoperative Exemptions; Vehicle Modifications To Accommodate People With Disabilities, Head...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...This final rule updates and expands an existing exemption from certain requirements of our head restraints standard that is available in the context of vehicle modifications to accommodate people with disabilities. The rule facilitates the mobility of drivers and passengers with disabilities by updating the exemption to include the corresponding portions of a new, upgraded version of the......

  6. "So Much Potential in Reading!" Developing Meaningful Literacy Routines for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenlon, Amanda G.; McNabb, Jessica; Pidlypchak, Harmony

    2010-01-01

    Children with multiple disabilities, often experience challenges in communication, mobility, and learning. Despite these challenges, substantial research exists that documents successful educational methods and strategies for these students. Specifically, students with multiple disabilities have successfully been taught to use a voice output

  7. Advocating in Schools for Children with Disabilities: What's New with IDEA?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altshuler, Sandra J.; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Article provides information regarding amended Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the impact of those changes on children's education rights. Some changes and practice implications discussed include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and…

  8. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some…

  9. Evaluation of an Application for Making Palmtop Computers Accessible to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Steven E.; Davies, Daniel K.; Davies, Katelyn R.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Palmtop computers provide a promising mobile platform to address barriers to computer-based supports for people with intellectual disabilities. This study evaluated a specially designed interface to make navigation and features of palmtop computers more accessible to users with intellectual disabilities. Method: The specialised

  10. Disability and Democracy in Cambodia: An Integrative Approach to Community Building and Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, Darren C.

    2010-01-01

    The political framework through which the various communities of disabled persons in Cambodia advocate for and claim their rights is complex and confusing. Both governmental and non-governmental actors engage this political framework through the mobilization of persons from the various disabled communities, competing in the civic sphere through

  11. A Wheelchair User with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities Managing Simple Orientation Technology for Indoor Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Campodonico, Francesca; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    Persons with profound visual impairments and other disabilities, such as neuromotor and intellectual disabilities, may encounter serious orientation and mobility problems even in familiar indoor environments, such as their homes. Teaching these persons to develop maps of their daily environment, using miniature replicas of the areas or some

  12. School Vouchers and Students with Disabilities. Policy Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailor, Wayne; Stowe, Matt

    This policy paper provides a rationale for assessing the issue of school vouchers with emphasis on students with disabilities. It provides the following major findings: (1) rights under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) generally do not extend to participants in voucher programs; (2) evaluative studies of school choice and

  13. Understanding the Law To Give Students with Disabilities Full Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrow, Jane

    This paper summarizes information concerning the impact of three pieces of federal legislation on the inclusion of students with disabilities in postsecondary programs, especially those supported by the TRIO program. The paper briefly describes major points of the following laws: (1) the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which is

  14. Social Skills Training Research with Minority Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmeda, Rosa E.; Trent, Stanley C.

    2003-01-01

    Sociocultural contexts influence social behaviors in ways that may not always be reflective of majority-culture norms. They also may vary the impact social skills training (SST) programs have on minority students with learning disabilities. To better understand culturally sensitive and effective SST for students with learning disabilities, it is

  15. Wake Up Call: Pregnant and Parenting Teens with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karen H.; Woolcock-Henry, Constance O.; Domenico, Desirae M.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy among all teenagers is a major challenge facing the United States. A literature review indicated little research on the incidences of pregnancy and parenting among teenagers with disabilities, similarities and differences in their educational needs when compared to their non-disabled peers, and how programs address their specific

  16. Four Types of Disabilities: Their Impact on Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    This article introduced some of the issues and challenges faced by online learners who have disabilities by providing an overview of four major disability categories: visual impairments, hearing impairments, motor impairments, and cognitive impairments. It also discussed how assistive technologies and universal design are being incorporated in

  17. The Evolving Understanding of the Construct of Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses two major areas concerned with the evolving understanding of the construct of intellectual disability. The first part of the article discusses current answers to five critical questions that have revolved around the general question, "What is Intellectual Disability?" These five are what to call the phenomenon, how to

  18. Overweight and Obesity in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major health problems associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, which is not sufficiently studied in people with intellectual disability yet. The present study was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study. The aim of this study was to establish (1) the prevalence of overweight,

  19. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report, December 2001-December 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This annual report of the National Council on Disability surveys major legal and policy developments during the year 2002 and offers recommendations for legal/policy measures and for research. The first chapter identifies legal and policy issues that cross traditional areas, focusing on six themes: (1) the mainstreaming of disability issues; (2)

  20. Overweight and Obesity in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major health problems associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, which is not sufficiently studied in people with intellectual disability yet. The present study was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study. The aim of this study was to establish (1) the prevalence of overweight,…

  1. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  2. Injuries and Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with disabilities are at an increased risk of injury. Falls are the leading mechanism of injury regardless of the disability status and are even more common in those with moderate or severe disabilities. The setting for the injury differs with the disability status. Compared to individuals with moderate or no disabilities,

  3. Injuries and Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Chaudhry, Ramiz A.

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with disabilities are at an increased risk of injury. Falls are the leading mechanism of injury regardless of the disability status and are even more common in those with moderate or severe disabilities. The setting for the injury differs with the disability status. Compared to individuals with moderate or no disabilities,…

  4. Care of Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Developmental Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Dean; Wilson, Benjamin; Jones, Kyle Bradford; Bilder, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 4.8% of individuals in the United States are affected by developmental disabilities (DDs). These individuals have a spectrum of abilities in terms of communication, mobility, and activities of daily living (ADLs). Because there typically is no specific treatment for the underlying disability, the focus of care should be on diagnosing and managing co-occurring medical and mental or behavioral health conditions and improving function and quality of life. Care of patients with DDs is similar to care of patients without DDs, although adjustments may be needed in the physician's interactive approach, engagement of caregivers, and sensitivity to symptoms. Health care can be enhanced by obtaining information about caregivers and guardians, living and work situations, support services received, and functional and instrumental ADL levels. In managing acute conditions, physicians should assess change from baseline and identify and manage maladaptive behaviors that interfere with care. An individualized preventive care plan should be created that may include additional or adapted screening. Needs for consent/medical decision-making support should be identified and addressed, and consent obtained as appropriate. Providing caregiver support and becoming familiar with community resources are other aspects of caring for this population. PMID:26669210

  5. Disability and dignity-enabling home environments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Barbara E; Secker, Barbara; Rolfe, Debbie; Wagner, Frank; Parke, Bob; Mistry, Bhavnita

    2012-01-01

    In Canada where long-term care is primarily oriented to elderly persons and affordable accessible housing is limited, younger disabled adults may be living in circumstances that do not meet their health needs and contribute to their social exclusion. The purpose of this study was to undertake an ethical analysis of what constitute an 'adequate' home environment for adults with significant mobility disabilities. An integrated design was used that combined qualitative interviews with normative ethical analysis in an iterative process. Twenty interviews with 19 participants were conducted in Ontario, Canada with two groups: younger adults (ages 18-55) with mobility disabilities and 'decision-makers' who consisted of policy makers, program administrators and discharge planners. Data were analyzed using a critical disability ethics approach and processes of reflective equilibrium. Drawing on Nora Jacobson's (Jacobson, 2009) taxonomy of dignity and pluralistic approaches to social justice, the concept of 'social dignity' provides a lens for exploring the adequacy of home environments for disabled people. Analyses suggested seven threshold conditions necessary for a dignity-enabling home: the ability to form and sustain meaningful relationships; access to community and civic life; access to control and flexibility of daily activities; access to opportunities for self-expression and identity affirmation; access to respectful relationships with attendants; access to opportunities to participate in school, work or leisure; access to physical, psychological and ontological security. The results have implications for housing, health and social care policies, and political reform. Social dignity provides a normative ethical grounding for assessing the adequacy of home environments. The threshold elements outline specific dignity-enabling conditions that are open to further specification or elaboration in different contexts. PMID:22142787

  6. A Descriptive Study of Students with Disabilities at Montana State University Billings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Thomas Francis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze how the characteristics of age, major and type of disabilities for students who received services through Disability Support Services at Montana State University-Billings have changed from 1999 to 2011. Furthermore, this analysis contrasted local trends for types of disabilities with national

  7. Recruitment of Students with Disabilities: Exploration of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jay K.; Stumbo, Norma J.; Martin, Liam G.; Collins, Kimberly D.; Hedrick, Bradley N.; Nordstrom, Dan; Peterson, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities are underrepresented in postsecondary education; in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors; in graduate and post-doctoral work; and in faculty positions, particularly in STEM. Despite these lags behind their non-disabled counterparts, few organizations recruit persons with disabilities into

  8. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Eunsook; Park, HyunJu; Ha, Yeongmi; Hwang, Won Ju

    2012-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obesity in children with intellectual disabilities may be a major health threat. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Korean children with intellectual disabilities aged 7-18 years who did not have specific genetic syndromes or physical disabilities. Materials and methods:…

  9. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Eunsook; Park, HyunJu; Ha, Yeongmi; Hwang, Won Ju

    2012-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obesity in children with intellectual disabilities may be a major health threat. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Korean children with intellectual disabilities aged 7-18 years who did not have specific genetic syndromes or physical disabilities. Materials and methods:

  10. National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research Survey Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX. National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research.

    This report focuses on three major areas of disability research information. Part 1 discusses findings from a series of online focus groups conducted from July 2001 through June 2002 that explored types of additional disability-related research information consumers would like to see. Of the total responses received, persons with a disability

  11. Meeting the Needs of English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities in the General Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Shernaz B.; Tyler, Brenda-Jean

    2010-01-01

    To be academically successful in general education classrooms, English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities (LD) need instruction that is simultaneously responsive to their disability, English language status, and culture. Because the majority of students with LD have reading disabilities, ESL and classroom teachers must be familiar

  12. A Descriptive Study of Students with Disabilities at Montana State University Billings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Thomas Francis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze how the characteristics of age, major and type of disabilities for students who received services through Disability Support Services at Montana State University-Billings have changed from 1999 to 2011. Furthermore, this analysis contrasted local trends for types of disabilities with national…

  13. Monitoring for Accessibility and University Websites: Meeting the Needs of People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solovieva, Tatiana I.; Bock, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), people with disabilities are guaranteed access to all postsecondary programs and services. The purpose of this study, conducted by the Center for Excellence in Disabilities, was to evaluate the current status of a major university's web accessibility. The results indicated that in 2011 only 51%…

  14. Culture and Disability Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Carroll M.

    1983-01-01

    A substantial amount of literature suggests that illness behavior in the United States is a product of a patient's core culture; equally credible findings do not support this contention. Most students and graduates in the health care professions believe that illness and disability behavior are affected by a patient's culture, but they are hard put to find convincing examples of that relationship. In experience with medical students studying the social and cultural bases of illness behavior, with patients who are disabled and with persons who claim disability in the absence of physical disease or disabling psychopathology, I observed no deviant disability behavior that was typical for the members of any cultural group, and no behavior was displayed by the members of one cultural group that was not seen in members of other cultural groups. No cultural stereotypes were upheld. I did find evidence that disability behavior is influenced by personality factors, social situations and the gains derived from the disability status. Evolving concepts of “entitlement,” which are closely related to socioeconomic status, also have a significant influence. The impact of feedback from others in a person's many social and medical subcultures is a more crucial determinant of illness and disability behavior, except in those for whom illness and disability behavior is determined by the limitations imposed by the disease or by a personality structure resistant to cultural expectations and social feedback. PMID:6666106

  15. Disability and global development.

    PubMed

    Durocher, Joan; Lord, Janet; Defranco, Allison

    2012-07-01

    The United States invests billions of taxpayer dollars each year into foreign assistance programs that foster international diplomacy and development directed toward improving the quality of life for people around the world. These programs develop economies and combat poverty, promote democracy and governance, build new infrastructure, advance and protect human rights, among other development goals. The United States cannot effectively accomplish the goals of foreign assistance programs unless it undertakes measures to ensure that the programs are accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. The United States has been a leader in advancing the rights of people with disabilities and must continue to promote disability rights through its international development work. Overseas economic development will not be successful unless people with disabilities are included. Because of the significant number of people with disabilities in developing countries, if they are not included, the very economic growth the United States is trying to foster will be hindered. The goals of democracy and governance programs cannot be achieved without the inclusion of people with disabilities. In many countries, domestic law contains blatant discriminatory provisions for people with disabilities that undermine access to justice and full participation in society. The provisions that discriminate against people with disabilities include arbitrary exclusions in electoral codes, sweeping plenary guardianship laws with no due-process protections, discriminatory banking practices, and inaccessible court proceedings. National disability legal frameworks remain underdeveloped throughout the world. PMID:22726852

  16. Disability: a welfarist approach

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, Julian; Kahane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we offer a new account of disability. According to our account, some state of a person's biology or psychology is a disability if that state makes it more likely that a person's life will get worse, in terms of his or her own wellbeing, in a given set of social and environmental circumstances. Unlike the medical model of disability, our welfarist approach does not tie disability to deviation from normal species functioning, nor does it understand disability in essentialist terms. Like the social model of disability, the welfarist approach sees disability as a harmful state that results from the interaction between a person's biology and psychology and his or her surrounding environment. However, unlike the social model, it denies that the harm associated with disability is entirely due to social prejudice or injustice. In this paper, we outline and clarify the welfarist approach, answer common objections and illustrate its usefulness in addressing a range of difficult ethical questions involving disability. PMID:22140353

  17. Work place issues surrounding healthcare professionals with disabilities in the current labor market.

    PubMed

    Kontosh, Larry G; Fletcher, Ina; Frain, Michael; Winland-Brown, Jill

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare professionals, nurses with and without disabilities, administrators and personnel directors were surveyed to explore hiring practices and attitudes towards working with nurses with disabilities employed in clinical settings. Specifically the purpose of the study was to gather and analyze data regarding the perceptions of two groups towards nurses with disabilities: 1) employers and 2) other nurses (with and without a disability). The study defined a nurse with a disability as an RN who has an activity limitation, specifically an altered activity capability which limits mobility, ambulation, strength, coordination, or equilibrium. Findings suggest that nurses are more likely to be willing to work with an RN with a disability if they had worked with one in the past. However, overall acceptance of RNs with disabilities was not broad. PMID:18057569

  18. Disability Measurement for Lymphatic Filariasis: A Review of Generic Tools Used within Morbidity Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Zeldenryk, Lynne; Gordon, Susan; Gray, Marion; Speare, Richard; Melrose, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF)-related disability affects 40 million people globally, making LF the leading cause of physical disability in the world. Despite this, there is limited research into how the impacts of LF-related disability are best measured. This article identifies the tools currently being used to measure LF-related disability and reviews their applicability against the known impacts of LF. The findings from the review show that the generic disability tools currently used by LF programs fail to measure the majority of known impacts of LF-related disability. The findings from the review support the development of an LF-specific disability measurement tool and raise doubt about the suitability of generic disability tools to assess disability related to neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) globally. PMID:23029569

  19. Disability and Health: Healthy Living

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities Health Care Reform Health care reform for Americans with disabilities: Learn more about the Affordable Care Act . Getting the Best Possible Health Care People with disabilities must get the care ...

  20. Service dogs and people with physical disabilities partnerships: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Winkle, Melissa; Crowe, Terry K; Hendrix, Ingrid

    2012-03-01

    Occupational therapists have recognized the benefits that service dogs can provide people with disabilities. There are many anecdotal publications extolling the benefits of working with service dogs, but few rigorous studies exist to provide the evidence of the usefulness of this type of assistive technology option. This systematic review evaluates the published research that supports the use of service dogs for people with mobility-related physical disabilities. Articles were identified by computerized search of PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, OT Seeker, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, SportDiscus, Education Research Complete, Public Administration Abstracts, Web of Knowledge and Academic Search Premier databases with no date range specified. The keywords used in the search included disabled persons, assistance dogs or service dogs and mobility impairments. The reference lists of the research papers were checked as was the personal citation database of the lead author. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and whereas the findings are promising, they are inconclusive and limited because of the level of evidence, which included one Level I, six Level III, four Level IV and one Level V. All of the studies reviewed had research design quality concerns including small participant sizes, poor descriptions of the interventions, outcome measures with minimal psychometrics and lack of power calculations. Findings indicated three major themes including social/participation, functional and psychological outcomes; all of which are areas in the occupational therapy scope of practice. Occupational therapists may play a critical role in referral, assessment, assisting clients and consulting with training organizations before, during and after the service dog placement process. In order for health care professionals to have confidence in recommending this type of assistive technology, the evidence to support such decisions must be strengthened. PMID:21858889

  1. Disability Information & Awareness: Afghanistan. Version 2.2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, M.

    This report focuses on a project in Afghanistan that coordinates the efforts of several agencies to develop community-directed disability, rehabilitation, and education services. The program stresses community mobilization aided by skills transfer from expatriate specialists, and includes physical therapy, prosthetics, living skills and mobility…

  2. Research into Telecommunications Options for People with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Toan; Garrett, Rob; Downing, Andrew; Walker, Lloyd; Hobbs, David

    2007-01-01

    People with a disability do not have equitable access to the modern telecommunication medium. Many experience difficulty typing, handling the phone, dialing, or answering calls. For those who are unable to speak, the only option is to type messages using whatever functional control site exists on their body. The provision of accessible mobile

  3. The Genetics of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jonathan; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Major depression is the commonest psychiatric disorder and in the U.S. has the greatest impact of all biomedical diseases on disability. Here we review evidence of the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility and the current state of molecular approaches. Genome-wide association and linkage results provide constraints on the allele frequencies and effect sizes of susceptibility loci, which we use to interpret the voluminous candidate gene literature. We consider evidence for the genetic heterogeneity of the disorder and the likelihood that subtypes exist that represent more genetically homogenous conditions than have hitherto been analyzed. PMID:24507187

  4. Embodying Justice: Supporting Teacher Candidates with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antilla-Garza, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Teacher Education Departments at most liberal arts colleges serve as professional certification programs as much as departments with academic majors. We train our students to work in P-12 education in an era of inclusion and require them to support their students with disabilities in preparation for college and career. The federal government…

  5. Educating Children with Learning Disabilities in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abosi, Okey

    2007-01-01

    The increase in the number of slow learners and children with learning disabilities in schools in Africa has become a major issue and concern. The situation is reflected in various school-leaving examinations, where an average of 30 percent of the results are below average or failures each year. Although there are no statistical records available

  6. Reinforcer Preferences of Secondary Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Catharine J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Secondary students (n=110) with disabilities rated 90 potential reinforcers. Results indicated that, although student preferences represent a range of reinforcers within existing reinforcement hierarchies, the sample group tended to prefer less intrusive higher level reinforcers, with the overwhelming majority preferring academic or activity

  7. Helping Students with Mathematical Disabilities to Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlington, Elizabeth; Wadlington, Patrick L.

    2008-01-01

    Teachers and parents are often perplexed when an intelligent student performs poorly in mathematics. Research tells us that this is often due to math disability, otherwise known as "dyscalculia". The authors define dyscalculia and describe its major subtypes. Also, the authors describe characteristics of dyscalculia and explain why dyscalculia is

  8. Legal Aspects of Educating the Developmentally Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

    A major legal development in the 1970s has been the extension of the principle of egalitarianism to the developmentally disabled, particularly the mentally retarded. The principle that all persons, however unequal they may be in terms of their development, should be treated equally in the sense of being granted equal opportunities has been…

  9. Negotiating hearing disability and hearing disabled identities.

    PubMed

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2012-03-01

    Using disability theory as a framework and social science theories of identity to strengthen the arguments, this article explores empirically how working-age adults confront the medical diagnosis of hearing impairment. For most participants hearing impairment threatens the stability of social interaction and the construction of hearing disabled identities is seen as shaped in the interaction with the hearing impaired person's surroundings. In order to overcome the potential stigmatization the 'passing' as normal becomes predominant. For many the diagnosis provokes radical redefinitions of the self. The discursively produced categorization and subjectivity of senescence mean that rehabilitation technologies such as hearing aids identify a particular life-style (disabled) which determines their social significance. Thus wearing a hearing aid works against the contemporary attempt to create socially ideal bodily presentations of the self, as the hearing aid is a symbolic extension of the body's lack of function. PMID:21540252

  10. Disciplining Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Janieth

    2012-01-01

    Discipline in schools can be difficult, especially when dealing with students with disabilities. In fact, Clash (2006) reported that working with students with disabilities under stringent legal demands has become a source of stress for many principals. The typical principal has not received extensive preservice or inservice training in this area.

  11. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. Employers can make sound business decisions and gain a competitive advantage by using this guide to increase the

  12. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants to work can find a

  13. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Business is about productivity and maintaining a competitive advantage. To do this, business needs qualified workers. Hiring people with disabilities adds value to a business and will attract new customers. Disability is not inability. President Bush's position is that he "will not be satisfied until every American who wants a job can find a job,

  14. FacingDisability.com

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate A Spinal Cord Injury Affects the Entire Family FacingDisability was specifically created ... more videos of Sean BLOG – Bowel Programs for Spinal Cord Injury A new Factsheet that summarizes the latest medical ...

  15. Working with the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetherington, Cheryl; Sandmeyer, Louise

    1979-01-01

    In a period of declining college enrollments, it is important to serve all qualified students, especially disabled students who may not be attracted to a college unless the college is responding to their needs. The role of the counselor is to translate awareness of needs into positive action for the disabled student. (Author)

  16. Disabilities in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Regular education teachers may have received inadequate preparation to work with the variety of student disabilities encountered in the classroom, or they may have received limited training regarding the full range of learning disabilities and their effects on classroom performance. Along with problems in the area of math, students may also have…

  17. Learning about Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Rita Ann

    1983-01-01

    The author describes lessons provided for regular class elementary students to help them understand disabilities and disabled persons. Objectives, materials needed, and activities are outlined for six lessons focusing on the following topics: individual differences, wheelchairs; devices that help people walk; amputation, artificial limbs, and

  18. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes: "Preventing Early Reading

  19. Disability: Our Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourihan, John P., Ed.

    Ten papers from a 1978 lecture series on employment, civil rights, education, social aspects, and recreation and leisure for disabled persons are presented. It is explained that as disabled persons, the lecturers presented role models to the students at the Regional Education Program for Handicapped College Students at Teachers College, Columbia.

  20. Disciplining Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kevin P.

    This report discusses disciplining children with disabilities in schools, in the context of the legal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Practical concepts are explained in terms of the school's responsibility to: (1) maintain a safe environment; (2) teach a code of discipline to all students; (3) use the

  1. Beauty and Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    People often hold stereotypical notions about disability, assuming people with significant disabilities offer little in terms of friendship or contribution. Some are even repulsed by that person's physical appearance. Such responses, evident within the Christian community as well, fail to acknowledge the inherent worth of the person as created in

  2. The Disabled: Media's Monster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Robert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    From the early nineteenth century to the present, horror, gangster, and adventure films, television, the comics, and newspapers have shown physical and mental disabilities to connote murder, violence, and danger. Such false portrayals have promoted negative public attitudes toward people with disabilities. (Author/MJL)

  3. Learning Disabilities: Lifelong Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Shirley C., Ed.; Ellis, William, Ed.

    This book contains papers on learning disabilities based on presentations made at the "Summit on Learning Disabilities: A National Responsibility," held in September 1994. The first section provides an overview and includes "The State of Research" (G. Reid Lyon). The second section focuses on education and includes: "Preventing Early Reading…

  4. Disability: A Pacific Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donna

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a personal perspective about the disability issues within the Cook Islands. It looks at how the needs of children and adults with disabilities have been addressed over the years and the vision of many people who have worked towards building an inclusive society, starting with mainstreaming in the schools to full inclusion. It

  5. Estimating national disability risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan

    2004-06-01

    In this article, I provide a method to rebuild the active and disabled life expectancy (ALE and DLE) on the basis of 'current' death and disability risks, and to measure disability risk. This method uses national-level data, and is based on two main assumptions. The first is the Gompertz assumption that death rate rises with age exponentially, and the second is the Cox assumption that death rates of active status are proportional to those of disabled status across age. Applying this method to the US data, I find that the disability risk has increased between 1970 and 1990 for both men and women aged 40 and older. Situations in which above assumptions could be removed are also discussed. PMID:15136013

  6. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodríguez, Cathi; Strnadová, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as…

  7. Using iPads with Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from Students, Teachers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper Rodrguez, Cathi; Strnadov, Iva; Cumming, Therese

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has increased greatly in recent years. Although the research in this area is still in its infancy, preliminary studies are showing a positive impact on the skills and academic engagement of students with disabilities. This column provides an overview of a selection of research studies involving mobile devices such as

  8. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics

  9. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  10. Disability and Health: Exploring the Disablement Experience of Young Adult African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tracie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to examine disablement as experienced by young adult African American men and women with permanent mobility impairment. Methods This study included a sample of 5 male and 5 female participants ranging in age from 22 to 39. An exploratory descriptive design and qualitative methods, including interviews and fieldnotes, were used. Interview data was analyzed using the process of inductive qualitative content analysis. Results Basic desires for independence, shared intimacy, and psychological and physical health were not diminished by physical limitations. The disablement experience of this group is reflected in the themes of “Cumulative Losses” and “Sustained Desires.” The findings of this study describe the high level of motivation that young adult African American men and women with disabilities have to improve levels of health and well-being within the context of their impairments. Conclusion This study provides a better understanding of the contextual factors and experiences that may contribute to the development of further disability and subsequent health-related problems over time. Increased knowledge of the disablement experience of these young men and women may assist health care entities and social service providers in improving health care and rehabilitation efforts targeting this group. PMID:23745770

  11. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of

  12. Exploring Postsecondary Education Disability Service's Standards: Alignment with Disability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    A study analyzing the perspectives held by higher education's disability service providers in regards to disability and/or students with disabilities in the implementation of program standards was carried out using a sequential mixed-methods design. Using the knowledge gather by Disability Studies scholars, the study used the constructs of…

  13. Hall mobility in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, F.; Geilker, J.; Kwapil, W.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of the carrier mobility in silicon is of utmost importance for photovoltaic applications, as it directly influences the diffusion length and thereby the cell efficiency. Moreover, its value is needed for a correct quantitative evaluation of a variety of lifetime measurements. However, models that describe the carrier mobility in silicon are based on theoretical calculations or fits to experimental data in monocrystalline silicon. Multicrystalline (mc) silicon features crystal defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries, with the latter possibly leading to potential barriers through the trapping of charge carriers and thereby influencing the mobility, as shown, for example, by Maruska et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 36, 381 (1980)]. To quantify the mobilities in multicrystalline silicon, we performed Hall measurements in p-type mc-Si samples of various resistivities and different crystal structures and compared the data to majority carrier Hall mobilities in p-type monocrystalline floatzone (FZ) silicon. For lack of a model that provides reliable values of the Hall mobility in silicon, an empirical fit similar to existing models for conductivity mobilities is proposed based on Hall measurements of monocrystalline p-type FZ silicon. By comparing the measured Hall mobilities obtained from mc silicon with the corresponding Hall mobilities in monocrystalline silicon of the same resistivity, we found that the mobility reduction due to the presence of crystal defects in mc-Si ranges between 0% and 5% only. Mobility decreases of up to 30% as reported by Peter et al. [Proceedings of the 23rd European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, Valencia, Spain, 1-5 September 2008], or even of a factor of 2 to 3 as detected by Palais et al. [Mater. Sci. Eng. B 102, 184 (2003)], in multicrystalline silicon were not observed.

  14. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural

  15. Adaptive Technology for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipczak, Bob

    1993-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 has made it illegal to discriminate against a disabled job applicant who is capable of doing the job. Adaptive devices allow even severely disabled people to perform jobs. Employers can use technology to help disabled employees be as productive as others. (JOW)

  16. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and

  17. Disability on Irish farms--a real concern.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Shane; Ruane, Dermot J; McNamara, John; Kinsella, Anne; McNamara, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Farmers operate within hazardous environments while conducting their day-to-day tasks, potentially resulting in injury or disability. Disability can serve as a major life-changing event for the farmer, the farm family, and the farm business. In Ireland, the agricultural sector reported the highest incidence of disability, yet there is relatively little known on the impact of agricultural-based disability. In 2007, a questionnaire was appended to the Teagasc (Irish Agricultural and Food Development Authority) National Farm Survey to obtain some metric of the prevalence and impact of disability on Irish farms, in addition to quantifying service/support requirements of farm operators experiencing disability. Almost 5.9% (approximately 6611) of Irish farm operators reported disability, primarily caused through illness/disease. Arthritis (31.4%), back problems (17%), and heart circulatory problems (12.5%) were most frequently reported. The lowest prevalence of disability was found among tillage (1.4%) and dairy (4.1%) farms, with the highest prevalence among cattle farms (7.1%). Family farm income was lower on disability-experiencing farms relative to nondisability farms (123 euros per hectare), with a lower participation in off-farm employment also identified. Many farm operators (approximately 20%) ceased off-farm employment following disability. Discontinuation of off-farm employment can further precipitate family farm income decline, but also place additional pressures on the farm business if quality services/supports are not available. The current provision of services/supports to farm operators experiencing disability is perceived largely insufficient across the entire service/support spectrum from when disability was first experienced through to retirement. Awareness and issues surrounding eligibility were the primary reasons for failing to avail of currently available service/supports. PMID:19437272

  18. Dickens and disability.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1996-12-01

    The novels of Charles Dickens include many vivid portraits of individuals with physical disabilities or deformities, and these conditions are often used symbolically to highlight some of the author's recurring themes. Disabled children are depicted as innocent victims, while their older counterparts are most often viewed as corrupt victimizers whose physical deformities are outward manifestations of their inner depravity. Punishment for moral failings in non-disabled characters frequently takes the form of paralysis and/or aphasia resulting from a cerebrovascular accident. In this context the wheelchair becomes a potent metaphor of imprisonment as a form of retributive justice. PMID:9007422

  19. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  20. Disability and the transition to adulthood: issues for the disabled child, the family, and the pediatrician.

    PubMed

    Hallum, A

    1995-01-01

    The pediatrician treating a child with a disability must focus not only on the physical needs of the child but also on the emotional and social issues associated with being disabled in our society. This dual focus becomes increasingly important as the child matures through adolescence and transitions into adulthood. In addition, the pediatrician must understand the complex interrelationships between the family and their maturing, disabled child during the vital process of separation from the family. This transition is particularly difficult for an adolescent who is dependent on others for physical care and other independent living skills. Many of the transitional problems faced by disabled adolescents and their parents have roots in early childhood. With an awareness of the specific stressors on the parent caregivers and an understanding of the influence of disability on the developmental processes, the pediatrician can play a major role in easing the transition of a disabled adolescent into adulthood. By guiding the parents of a young child through the important tasks of childhood and adolescence, the pediatrician can set the stage for both the parents and their disabled child to have independent, yet supportive lives--lives that are focused not on the disability but on mutual respect and life satisfaction. It is recommended that disabled teens and young adults be given more help in independence skills, personal counseling services should be made available, and physicians should give teens age-appropriate information about disabilities. There are needs for sex education, preparation for parenthood, and genetic counseling. Other issues that should be addressed are early vocational awareness, alternatives to work, and leisure time use. Just because an adolescent is disabled, we cannot assume that he or she will have self-esteem and self-concept difficulties. To adjust to being devalued by society, the disabled person must challenge societal beliefs that strength, independence, and appearance are the essential aspects of a quality life. The importance of being kind, intelligent, and productive to one's capacity must become more important. (See Table 3 for additional resource information.) PMID:7720408

  1. Disability training in the genetic counseling curricula: bridging the gap between genetic counselors and the disability community.

    PubMed

    Sanborn, Erica; Patterson, Annette R

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, disability activists, ethicists, and genetic counselors have examined the moral complexities inherent in prenatal genetic counseling and considered whether and in what ways genetic counseling may negatively affect individuals in the disability community. Many have expressed concerns about defining disability in the context of prenatal decision-making, as the definition presented may influence prenatal choices. In the past few years, publications have begun to explore the responsibility of counselors in presenting a balanced view of disability and have questioned the preparedness of counselors for this duty. Currently, the Accreditation Council for Genetic Counseling (ACGC) only minimally includes disability training in their competencies for genetic counselors, and in their accreditation requirements for training programs. In an attempt to describe current practice, this article details two studies that assess disability training in ABGC-accredited genetic counseling programs. Results from these studies demonstrate that experience with disability is not required by the majority of programs prior to matriculation. Though most program directors agree on the importance of including disability training in the curriculum, there is wide variability in the amount and types of training students receive. Hours dedicated to disability exposure among programs ranged from 10 to 600 hours. Eighty-five percent of program directors surveyed agree that skills for addressing disability should be added to the core competencies. Establishing a set of disability competencies would help to ensure that all graduates have the skills necessary to provide patients with an accurate understanding of disability that facilitates informed decision-making. PMID:24845370

  2. A natural-language interface to a mobile robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalowski, S.; Crangle, C.; Liang, L.

    1987-01-01

    The present work on robot instructability is based on an ongoing effort to apply modern manipulation technology to serve the needs of the handicapped. The Stanford/VA Robotic Aid is a mobile manipulation system that is being developed to assist severely disabled persons (quadriplegics) in performing simple activities of everyday living in a homelike, unstructured environment. It consists of two major components: a nine degree-of-freedom manipulator and a stationary control console. In the work presented here, only the motions of the Robotic Aid's omnidirectional motion base have been considered, i.e., the six degrees of freedom of the arm and gripper have been ignored. The goal has been to develop some basic software tools for commanding the robot's motions in an enclosed room containing a few objects such as tables, chairs, and rugs. In the present work, the environmental model takes the form of a two-dimensional map with objects represented by polygons. Admittedly, such a highly simplified scheme bears little resemblance to the elaborate cognitive models of reality that are used in normal human discourse. In particular, the polygonal model is given a priori and does not contain any perceptual elements: there is no polygon sensor on board the mobile robot.

  3. Mobile-health: A review of current state in 2015.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno M C; Rodrigues, Joel J P C; de la Torre Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Saleem, Kashif

    2015-08-01

    Health telematics is a growing up issue that is becoming a major improvement on patient lives, especially in elderly, disabled, and chronically ill. In recent years, information and communication technologies improvements, along with mobile Internet, offering anywhere and anytime connectivity, play a key role on modern healthcare solutions. In this context, mobile health (m-Health) delivers healthcare services, overcoming geographical, temporal, and even organizational barriers. M-Health solutions address emerging problems on health services, including, the increasing number of chronic diseases related to lifestyle, high costs of existing national health services, the need to empower patients and families to self-care and handle their own healthcare, and the need to provide direct access to health services, regardless of time and place. Then, this paper presents a comprehensive review of the state of the art on m-Health services and applications. It surveys the most significant research work and presents a deep analysis of the top and novel m-Health services and applications proposed by industry. A discussion considering the European Union and United States approaches addressing the m-Health paradigm and directives already published is also considered. Open and challenging issues on emerging m-Health solutions are proposed for further works. PMID:26071682

  4. What Are Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have trouble generalizing and following multistep directions. 12 Visual perceptual/visual motor deficit. People with this condition mix up ... top] Learning Disabilities Association of America. (n.d.). Visual perceptual/visual motor deficit . Retrieved June 15, 2012, ...

  5. National Council on Disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 16, 2016 National Council on Disability Commends Senate Commerce Committee for Hearings on Self-Driving Cars March ... Written Submission of Chair Clyde Terry to Senate Commerce Committee on Autonomous Vehicles March 7, 2016 Medicaid ...

  6. Sexuality and Intellectual Disability

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or developmental disabilities have been thought to be asexual, having no need for loving and fulfilling relationships ... decision-making, including education about such issues as reproduction, marriage and family life, abstinence, safe sexual practices, ...

  7. Advocating in schools for children with disabilities: what's new with IDEA?

    PubMed

    Altshuler, Sandra J; Kopels, Sandra

    2003-07-01

    All social workers who work with children and families, regardless of their practice setting, should be aware of the important educational rights to which children with disabilities and their families are entitled. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (P.L. 101-476), one of the most sweeping laws protecting children with disabilities, was substantially amended in 1997, and its regulatory provisions became legally effective in October 1999. This article provides information about the requirements of the law and the impact of those changes on children's educational rights. The changes discussed and their practice implications include expansion of categories of children with disabilities; new requirements for mobile, homeless, or culturally diverse populations and participants in the individualized education program process; payment for private school placements for children with disabilities; discipline of children with disabilities; and provision of social work services in the schools. PMID:12899279

  8. Drugs, discrimination and disability.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Frances

    2009-12-01

    Whether addiction to prohibited drugs should be classified as a disability for the purposes of disability discrimination is a controversial question in Australia. The leading Australian case of Marsden v Human Rights Equal Opportunity Commission & Coffs Harbour & District Ex-Servicemen & Women's Memorial Club Ltd (HREOC, No H98/51, 30 August 1999); [2000] FCA 1619 concerned a disability discrimination complaint brought by Mr Marsden as a result of his treatment by the club. The case was brought as a public interest test case by the New South Wales Legal Aid Commission. Mr Marsden was on a methadone program at the time. The reasoning of the decision at the Federal Court opened the way for a finding that dependence on illegal drugs constituted a disability under disability discrimination legislation. The media reaction to the court's decision led to State and federal governments proposing legislation limiting legal protection from discrimination for people addicted to illegal drugs on the basis of their drug use. While the proposed federal legislation lapsed after objections from a coalition of medical, legal and other advocacy groups, the New South Wales legislation still provides that, in employment matters, it is not unlawful to discriminate against a person on the ground of disability if the disability relates to the person's addiction to a prohibited drug and the person is actually addicted to a prohibited drug at the time of the discrimination. The article details the sequence of events in the Marsden case, reflects on the role of public interest litigation in achieving social justice outcomes and suggests that Australia's recent ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on 17 July 2008 should encourage legislators to review legislation which may have a discriminatory effect on people suffering from addictions. PMID:20169800

  9. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the

  10. How to Find Good Apps: An Evaluation Rubric for Instructional Apps for Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok, Min Wook; Kim, Min Kyung; Kang, Eun Young; Bryant, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Computers can be an effective teaching method for students with learning disabilities (LD). The use of mobile devices as education tools for students with disabilities has received considerable attention in special education recently. Parents, teachers, and professionals look for effective applications (i.e., apps) that meet the needs of their…

  11. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the…

  12. Geriatric Impairments and Disability: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; McAvay, Gail; Ning, Yuming; Allore, Heather G.; Newman, Anne B.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to determine the relative importance of geriatric impairments (including those in muscle strength, physical capacity, cognition, vision, hearing and psychological status) and chronic diseases in predicting subsequent functional disability in longitudinal analyses. Design We analyzed longitudinal data from the Cardiovascular Health Study. Multivariable Cox hazards regression modeling was used to analyze associations between time-dependent predictors and onset of disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and mobility. Setting/Participants 5888 community-dwelling elderly persons were followed for up to seven years. Intervention N/A Measurements Data were collected annually through in-person examinations. Results ADL disability developed in 15% of participants and mobility disability in 30%. A single multivariable model was developed that included demographics, marital status, body mass index, and number of impairments and diseases. The hazard ratios of having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 geriatric impairments (compared with none) for the outcome of ADL disability were 2.12 (95% CI 1.63–2.75), 4.25 (3.30–5.48), and 7.87 6.10–10.17), respectively, and for having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 chronic diseases were 1.75 (1.41–2.19), 2.45 (1.95–3.07), and 3.26 (2.53–4.19), respectively. Similarly, the hazard ratios of having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 impairments for the outcome of mobility disability were 1.48 (1.27–1.73), 2.08 (1.77–2.45), and 3.70 (3.09–4.42), and for having 1, 2, and ≥ 3 diseases were 2.06 (1.76–2.40), 2.80 (2.36–3.31), and 4.20 (3.44–5.14). Conclusion As compared with number of chronic diseases, the number of geriatric impairments was more strongly associated with subsequent ADL disability, and nearly as strongly associated with the subsequent mobility disability. PMID:20863328

  13. Common Threads '93: Equitable Solutions...Because Disability Is a Natural Part of Human Experience. Proceedings of a National Conference on Rural Disability Issues (Missoula, Montana, September 10-13, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kathy, Ed.; And Others

    This proceedings contains presentations, workshop summaries, program profiles, and other highlights of a conference on rural disability issues. The major conference theme was the normalcy of having a disability. A plenary discussion developed a list of 17 rural community disability priorities. Keynote speeches were: (1) "Rural Economies and…

  14. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  15. Description and performance of a digital mobile satellite terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, N.; Jedrey, T.; Parkyn, J.; Divsalar, D.

    1990-01-01

    A major goal of the Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) program at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) is the development of an advanced digital terminal for use in land mobile satellite communication. The terminal has been developed to minimize the risk of applying advanced technologies to future commercial mobile satellite systems (MSS). Testing with existing L band satellites was performed in fixed, land mobile and aeronautical mobile environments. JPL's development and tests of its mobile terminal have demonstrated the viability of narrowband digital voice communications in a land mobile environment through geostationary satellites. This paper provides a consolidated description of the terminal architecture and the performance of its individual elements.

  16. Classical mobility of highly mobile crystal defects.

    PubMed

    Swinburne, T D; Dudarev, S L; Sutton, A P

    2014-11-21

    Highly mobile crystal defects such as crowdions and prismatic dislocation loops exhibit an anomalous temperature independent mobility unexplained by phonon scattering analysis. Using a projection operator, without recourse to elasticity, we derive analytic expressions for the mobility of highly mobile defects and dislocations which may be efficiently evaluated in molecular dynamics simulation. The theory explains how a temperature-independent mobility arises because defect motion is not an eigenmode of the Hessian, an implicit assumption in all previous treatments. PMID:25479502

  17. Effects of Cognitive Strategy Interventions on Word Problem Solving and Working Memory in Children with Math Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Lussier, Catherine; Orosco, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although current categories of learning disabilities include as specific disabilities calculation and mathematical problem solving [see IDEA reauthorization, 2004, Sec. 300.8(c)(10)], the majority of research focuses on calculation disabilities. Previous studies have shown, however, that deficits in word problem solving difficulties are persistent…

  18. A Westerner's Impression of the Place of People with a Disability in Asian Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmenter, Trevor R.

    2014-01-01

    From a Westerner's perspective of the place of people with a disability in Asian society, there are similarities and differences between the two societies. A major problem for the Asian countries is their lack of reliable disability prevalence data. The stigmatization of people with a disability remains an international problem and is not

  19. A Westerner's Impression of the Place of People with a Disability in Asian Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmenter, Trevor R.

    2014-01-01

    From a Westerner's perspective of the place of people with a disability in Asian society, there are similarities and differences between the two societies. A major problem for the Asian countries is their lack of reliable disability prevalence data. The stigmatization of people with a disability remains an international problem and is not…

  20. Encouraging the Development of Disability Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Nancy J.; Assadi, Jennifer L.; Herriott, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    The authors advocate for a constructionist interpretation of disability, grounded in a social justice perspective, by discussing disability paradigms, factors that influence attitudes and attitude change regarding disability, and disability ally development and behaviors.

  1. Bridging the Gap between Disability Studies and Disability Services in Higher Education: A Model Center on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Alan L.; Sales, Amos

    2010-01-01

    The professional field of Disability Services in Higher Education and the academic discipline of Disability Studies share a perspective on disability that considers disability as a socially constructed phenomenon. Despite this common underpinning, there has been little effort or inquiry into the ways that disability services and Disability Studies

  2. 20 CFR 718.204 - Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and total disability due to pneumoconiosis. 718.204... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Determining Entitlement to Benefits § 718.204 Total disability...

  3. 20 CFR 718.204 - Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total disability and disability causation defined; criteria for determining total disability and total disability due to pneumoconiosis. 718.204... DISABILITY OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS Determining Entitlement to Benefits § 718.204 Total disability...

  4. The Prevalence and Severity of Joint Problems and Disability in Patients with Poliomyelitis in Urban India

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, S; Mcmillan, T; Sutherland, A; Sharan, D

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis is caused by an enterovirus infection of the anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. Up to 40% of survivors recover full muscle strength, however 60–90% are left with varying degrees of residual paralysis, where the patient suffers from cramping myalgia and lower motor neuron pattern weakness. This study aimed to identify and quantify, in terms of prevalence and severity of the types of joint deformities encountered in polio sufferers. It also aimed to assess the disability caused by such problems. Finally we documented the provision and use of mobility aids, orthotics and surgery in the patient group. Impairment was confined to one lower limb, and this is consistent, as the majority of patients were infected in infancy. The study found that pes cavus, scoliosis, flexion deformity of the knee and true lower-limb shortening accounted for over half of the deformities found. The mean Barthel Disability score was 19 and over 80% of patients used at least one aid, usually in the form of a Knee-Ankle-Foot Orthosis (KAFO). Surgery also plays a large in role in the management of polio patients, however necessity needs to be assessed on an individual basis taking into account many aspects of the patient’s life. PMID:26161158

  5. Disability and Employment. Disability Statistics Abstract Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPlante, Mitchell P.; Kennedy, Jae; Kaye, H. Stephen; Wenger, Barbara L.

    This statistical abstract summarizes recent data on the relationship between disability and employment. The statistics come from the Current Population Survey, the Census Bureau's Survey of Income and Program Participation, a poll of 1,000 Americans with disabilities, and administrative data on recipients of Social Security Disability Insurance…

  6. Thrice Disabling Disability: Enabling Inclusive, Socially Just Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, S. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this inquiry was to create a social justice-oriented inclusive and enabling pedagogy by situating traditional individualised views of disability alongside three alternative understandings: a disability studies in education perspective, a First Nations view of disability and one based upon the autism pride/autism-as-culture movement.

  7. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language…

  8. Disability Services Offices for Students with Disabilities: A Campus Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) are often the starting places for conversations about students with disabilities in higher education. Section 504 and the ADA provide mandates for protection from discrimination and provision of reasonable disability accommodations (e.g., sign language

  9. Disability Studies, Disabled People and the Struggle for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Mike; Barnes, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This paper traces the relationship between the emergence of disability studies and the struggle for meaningful inclusion for disabled people with particular reference to the work of a pivotal figure in these developments: Len Barton. It is argued that the links between disability activism and the academy were responsible for the emergence of

  10. Growing Up Physically Disabled: Factors in the Evaluation of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Nancy

    1982-01-01

    Investigated how people with congenital orthopedic disabilities intially learn that they are different and how they learn the evaluative meaning associated with being disabled. Analyzed the content of 29 autobiographies. Results indicated that people born with orthopedic disabilities discover between ages 3 and 5 that they are different. (Author)

  11. Math Disabilities and Reading Disabilities: Can They Be Separated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Jerman, Olga; Zheng, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    This article synthesizes some of the published literature that selectively compares the cognitive functioning of children with math disabilities (MDs) with average-achieving children and poor readers (children with reading disabilities [RDs] or comorbid disabilities [RDs + MDs]). All studies in the synthesis report reading, IQ, and math scores for

  12. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organizations International Classification of Diseases is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the ICD has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field, requiring that all “conditions” in the ICD be named as a “disorder.” This article discusses the effect of naming on how people with intellectual disability are perceived by others and how they perceive themselves. The importance of continuing to move the field toward the adoption of functional/person-environment fit models of disability is discussed. “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1–2) PMID:23537360

  13. Commentary on measuring disability.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Howard H

    2013-09-01

    This is a commentary on 5 articles in this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation that report on several related studies of new approaches to measuring disability. The project was grounded in theory, beginning with the development of a conceptual framework enhanced by a literature review and expert consultation within and outside of the Social Security Administration. The investigators then used item response theory to develop test items, which they organized into computer adaptive testing instruments and tested them for their psychometric properties. All in all, it is a groundbreaking set of studies and an enormously valuable contribution to the field. Hopefully it will also be tested as an alternative approach to assessing disability in the Social Security Administration disability benefits programs. PMID:23770279

  14. Madness as disability.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Sander L

    2014-12-01

    How does society imagine mental illness? Does this shift radically over time and with different social attitudes as well as scientific discoveries about the origins and meanings of mental illness? What happens when we begin to think about mental illness as madness, as a malleable concept constantly shifting its meaning? We thus look at the meanings associated with 'general paralysis of the insane' in the nineteenth century and autism today in regard to disability. In this case study we examine the claims by scholars such as the anthropologist Emily Martin and the psychiatrist Kay Jamison as to the relationship between mental illness, disability and creativity. Today, the health sciences have become concerned with mental illness as a form of disability. How does this change the meaning of madness for practitioners and patients? PMID:25395442

  15. Successful Aging as a Continuum of Functional Independence: Lessons from Physical Disability Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Kristin A.; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Successful aging is a multidimensional construct that could be viewed as a continuum of achievement. Based on the disability model proposed by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, successful aging includes not only the presence or absence of disease, but also aspects of mobility and social participation. Here we review definitions of successful aging and discuss relevance of the disability model in the evaluation of successful aging and frailty. In particular, we summarize evidences that highlight the importance of measures of mobility (ability to walk and perform activities of daily living), and social participation in identifying and locating older adults across the range of the successful aging continuum. Lastly, we discuss the role of inflammation in age-related decline and in frailty. Future research directions are proposed, including identifying causal pathways among inflammatory markers, disability, and frailty. A better understanding of immunological functioning in late life may help unlock novel ways to promote successful aging. PMID:22500268

  16. Disability and Monstrosity: Further Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses possible explanations for stereotypical and negative reactions toward physically disabled persons in literature and society. Cited are examples of physical deformity, animalism, and monstrosity. The reminder of mortality and fallibility produced by disability is considered. (CL)

  17. Medical education and disability studies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Fiona Kumari

    2009-12-01

    The biomedicalist conceptualization of disablement as a personal medical tragedy has been criticized by disability studies scholars for discounting the difference between disability and impairment and the ways disability is produced by socio-environmental factors. This paper discusses prospects for partnerships between disability studies teaching/research and medical education; addresses some of the themes around the necessity of critical disability studies training for medical students; and examines a selection of issues and themes that have arisen from disability education courses within medical schools globally. The paper concludes that providing there is a commitment from senior management, universities are well positioned to apply both vertical and horizontal approaches to teaching disability studies to medical students. PMID:19756985

  18. Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for patients with CFS. Disability Evaluation Under Social Security (Blue Book - September 2008) The SSA has prepared the Disability Evaluation Under Social Security (known as the Blue Book) to help physicians ...

  19. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics…

  20. The Positive Effects of Early Powered Mobility on Children's Psychosocial and Play Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan; Tefft, Donita

    2013-01-01

    Powered mobility can have an important cognitive and psychosocial impact on young children who are unable to move independently. Twenty-three children with physical disabilities between the ages of 18 months and 6 years participated in this study. Data evaluating social skills, frequency of mobility play activities, frequency of interaction with

  1. The Impact of Early Powered Mobility on Parental Stress, Negative Emotions, and Family Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tefft, Donita; Guerette, Paula; Furumasu, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Powered mobility has been found to have positive effects on young children with severe physical disabilities, but the impact on the family has been less well documented. We evaluated the impact of early powered mobility on parental stress, negative emotions, perceived social interactions, and parental satisfaction with wheelchair characteristics

  2. Screening for Developmental Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol; Duran-Flores, Deborah; Dumars, Kenneth W.; Stills, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are responsible for a combination of severe physical, mental, psychological and social deficits. They develop before age 22 years and involve a little more than 1% of the population. Screening for developmental disabilities is the first step in their prevention. Various screening instruments are available for use throughout the developmental years that are designed to detect the wide variety of developmental problems that interfere with a developing person's optimal adaptation to his or her environment. The screening instruments must be inexpensive, reproducible, widely available and cost effective to the child, family and society. PMID:2413633

  3. Flexible Pre-Majors: Final Report of the Flexible Pre-Majors Working Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzGibbon, John; Orum, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This report provides advice for program areas contemplating the development of a Flexible Pre-Major (FPM) in their discipline. The FPM is another means of aiding student transfer in a system that expects and encourages significant student mobility. The FPM addresses a problematic area for academic students: that of completing the lower level major

  4. Working Together: Computers and People with Mobility Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes several computing tools that have been effectively used by individuals with mobility impairments. Emphasis is on tasks to be completed and how the individuals abilities (not disabilities), with possible assistance from technology, can be used to accomplish them. Preliminary information addresses the importance of

  5. Teaching Mobility to a Bilaterally Hand-Amputated Blind Person.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poss, D.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the methods used to teach mobility skills to a young man severely disabled (blind and bilaterally hand amputated) by an explosion. Stressed are the assistive devices developed and the therapist's and student's feelings during the training course. (DB)

  6. Overcoming Challenges: "Going Mobile with Your Own Video Models"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Christina R.; Basham, James D.; Christman, Jennifer; Hollingshead, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be an effective intervention for students with a variety of disabilities. Traditional video models present problems in terms of application across meaningful settings, such as in the community or even across the school environment. However, with advances in mobile technology, portable devices with video capability

  7. Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Use of Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley; Darrah, Johanna; Hollis, Vivien; Cook, Al; May, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapists and occupational therapists frequently assist parents with the exploration and use of powered wheelchairs for their children with physical disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore parents' experiences and perceptions of their children's experiences with the receipt and use of powered mobility. Qualitative methods

  8. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Light Rail Vehicles and Systems §...

  9. Overcoming Challenges: "Going Mobile with Your Own Video Models"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Christina R.; Basham, James D.; Christman, Jennifer; Hollingshead, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be an effective intervention for students with a variety of disabilities. Traditional video models present problems in terms of application across meaningful settings, such as in the community or even across the school environment. However, with advances in mobile technology, portable devices with video capability…

  10. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  11. Drama, Disability, and Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGookey, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Suggestions for using drama to help students learn about disabilities are given by a professional theatrical group in which actors portray disabled people and answer questions in character. Steps for developing a class skit about a person with a disability and for starting a similar acting troupe are given. (DB)

  12. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people…

  13. Diagnosis in Severe Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.

    The relationship between neurological impairment or brain damage and severe reading disability is investigated. Symptoms and causes of neurological impairment are listed, and reading disability theories are discussed. Smith and Carrigan offer a neurochemical explanation of reading disability based on synaptic transmission problems. Orton,

  14. Disability Studies: Information and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven, Ed.; Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.; Walker, Pamela, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This document reflects the diversity of the field of Disability Studies, including contributions representing different disability groups, perspectives, and disciplines. Resource information is presented in nine sections: (1) Books, Chapters, and Articles; (2) Films and Documentaries; (3) Academic Programs in Disability Studies in North America;

  15. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but Learning

  16. Literary Characters Who Are Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keith; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Determines which specific disability categories appear most often in literature, when they appear, and which authors have contributed most to their appearance. Physical disabilities have been portrayed most often, followed by alcoholism and sensory disorders. Most portrayals of disabilities appeared between 1900 and 1949 and Charles Dickens wrote…

  17. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward…

  18. Familial Patterns of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Pedigree analysis of 12 young adults (9 of whom had learning disabilities) indicated that learning disability (LD) was strongly familial but that the type of disability (reading or math) was not directly inherited. Autoimmune disorders were significantly correlated with LD. In seven of the LD families, adults failed to overcome earlier reading and

  19. Disabled People in Japanese Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kojima, Yoko, Ed.; And Others

    The volume is intended to give readers a glimpse of the day-to-day life of disabled people in Japan. Eight brief papers present life experiences of a mentally retarded preschooler, severely disabled children, a child with muscular dystrophy, a young girl with polio living in the community, visually disabled and recovering mentally ill people

  20. Employment and People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue offers six articles on employment of people with disabilities. "Employment and People with Disabilities: Challenges for the Nineties" (Frank Bowe) discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act, issues in unemployment and under-education, earnings, and implications for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative

  1. Emerging Technologies and Cognitive Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braddock, David; Rizzolo, Mary C.; Thompson, Micah; Bell, Rodney

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive disability entails a substantial limitation in one's capacity to think, including conceptualizing, planning, and sequencing thoughts and actions, remembering, interpreting subtle social cues, and understanding numbers and symbols. Cognitive disabilities include intellectual disabilities and can also stem from brain injury, Alzheimer's

  2. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  3. Entrepreneurship among People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holub, Tamara

    This brief paper reviews the literature on entrepreneurship among people with disabilities. It notes that entrepreneurship by individuals with disabilities is often a consequence of disability discrimination in the workforce and provides both benefits and disadvantages such as independence and freedom from access-related obstacles (benefits) and

  4. Challenging the Myth of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightman, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the rhetoric of disability, including physical, hearing, and visual impairments, highlights possible benefits that computer technology can provide. Designing for disabled individuals is discussed, and product development efforts by Apple Computer to increase microcomputer access to disabled children and adults are described. (LRW)

  5. Disability Studies and Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, John

    2011-01-01

    This article promotes the field of disability studies as a valuable resource for expanding art education's concept of disability and as a promising venue for interdisciplinary dialogue. While art education has persistently supported special education since its inception, disability advocacy has advanced in the past two decades toward

  6. The Gifted Learning Disabled Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles on gifted learning disabled students begins with an explanation of the philosophy of the Center for Talented Youth at Johns Hopkins University (Maryland), a list of characteristics of gifted disabled students, and three definitions of learning disabilities. The following papers are then provided: "Gifted but Learning…

  7. Disability Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews court cases in 1999 related to disability discrimination in higher education focusing on the Americans with Disabilities Act and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The "Garrett" case regarding Eleventh Amendment immunity is the case most likely to be significant in the development of the law of disability discrimination. (SLD)

  8. Proceedings of the Mobile Satellite Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafferty, William

    1988-01-01

    A satellite-based mobile communications system provides voice and data communications to mobile users over a vast geographic area. The technical and service characteristics of mobile satellite systems (MSSs) are presented and form an in-depth view of the current MSS status at the system and subsystem levels. Major emphasis is placed on developments, current and future, in the following critical MSS technology areas: vehicle antennas, networking, modulation and coding, speech compression, channel characterization, space segment technology and MSS experiments. Also, the mobile satellite communications needs of government agencies are addressed, as is the MSS potential to fulfill them.

  9. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  10. Disability Employment 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to acquaint business and industry with the programs and resources available to help diversify the workforce by hiring people with disabilities. It also provides information to businesses on how to access resources to better meet the growing need of business for a skilled workforce. This guide is the product of a joint

  11. Iowans with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Amy, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    "The Goldfinch" is a magazine aimed at introducing young people to Iowa history. Each issue has a different topic which is discussed in detail throughout that issue. There are articles which describe different aspects of the topic. The topic for this particular issue is "Iowans with Disabilities." Featured articles from this issue include:

  12. Disability and Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ageing in their 40s and 50s. Engaging in health risk behaviours Some studies have indicated that people with disabilities have higher rates of risky behaviours such as smoking, poor diet and ... depending on the health condition. However an investigation in the United Kingdom ...

  13. Parenting with a Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Holly

    1993-01-01

    This guide discusses how adjusting to parenthood for some persons with physical disabilities requires additional accommodations. Changes in lifestyle, environmental adaptations and assistive technology may be necessary to make independent child care possible. Project Innovative Parenting (PIP) was developed with the purpose to empower

  14. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy…

  15. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a

  16. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of

  17. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,…

  18. Feminist Disability Studies Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoll, Kristina R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to raise awareness about systems of oppression and privilege, as related to ability and disability in the classroom, and to provide tools to create instructional and institutional transformation. Feminist analyses of privilege, oppression, and intersectionality provide a framework for looking at the diverse experiences of…

  19. Health Professionals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, H. Barry; Perlman, Steven P.; Cinotti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to education from K-12 and into the college years, the literature is replete with stories of the accomplishments of youngsters and adults with any number of disabilities who surpassed the expectations of their families and teachers. Similarly, there are an increasing number of examples of young men and women with a range of…

  20. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:…

  1. Multiculturalism and Severe Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the need for educators to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to help students with severe disabilities from mainstream groups to develop cross-cultural knowledge, values, and competencies. It outlines goals for multicultural understanding for educational researches, for teacher educators, and for school leaders and

  2. Disability, Disorder, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization's "International Classification of Diseases" ("ICD") is the most important diagnostic tool, worldwide, to ensure that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities receive the supports they need to live richer, fuller lives. And yet, the "ICD" has naming conventions that create a conundrum for the field,

  3. Handbook of Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L., Ed.; Horner, Robert H., Ed.; Snell, Martha E., Ed.; Blacher, Jan, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This authoritative handbook reviews the breadth of current knowledge about developmental disabilities: neuroscientific and genetic foundations; the impact on health, learning, and behavior; and effective educational and clinical practices. Leading authorities analyze what works in intervening with diverse children and families, from infancy

  4. Medication and Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Laurie L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical syndrome which relates most frequently to the reading-disabled child is the attention deficity disorder. The child psychiatrist will generally resort to medication only when behavioral management techniques have failed. The two most frequently used medications are Ritalin and Dexedrine, central nervous system stimulants. (JN)

  5. Computers for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes adaptive technology for personal computers that accommodate disabled users and may require special equipment including hardware, memory, expansion slots, and ports. Highlights include vision aids, including speech synthesizers, magnification, braille, and optical character recognition (OCR); hearing adaptations; motor-impaired

  6. Intellectual Disability and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, C.; Picard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The association between poverty and intellectual disability (ID) has been well documented. However, little is known about persons with ID who face circumstances of extreme poverty, such as homelessness. This paper describes the situation of persons with ID who were or are homeless in Montreal and are currently receiving services from a…

  7. Designing for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Selwyn

    Implications of the merits of normality and independence for the disabled, and their relevance to architectural design criteria are discussed. The introduction reflects the philosophical approach to the design and construction of public buildings and housing. Nine principle sections provide data and recommendations on the following topics:

  8. Obesity and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, James H.; Yamaki, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    While much of the industrialized world struggles for clues to the growing rise in obesity in their respective countries, researchers and service providers involved in understanding the health characteristics and health behaviors of persons with intellectual disability (ID) struggle with their own issues regarding the increased prevalence of

  9. Societal Factors in Disablement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonak, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Examined data from a questionnaire concerning people with chronic health, emotional, mental, physical, and sensory impairments, and four respondent demographic and experiential characteristics to determine if 150 human service providers endorsed the premise that components of society disable people who are impaired. Results confirmed that

  10. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at

  11. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  12. Connecting the Demographic Dots: Geographic Mobility and Birth Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Having a child is a major determinant of geographic mobility. Little is known, however, about the opposite process--whether geographic mobility is a determinant of fertility. Drawing on social and human capital theories and research on fertility and migration to develop competing hypotheses, the author examines the effects of mobility on changes…

  13. Mobile Usability in Educational Contexts: What Have We Learnt?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of mobile learning is dependent on human factors in the use of new mobile and wireless technologies. The majority of mobile learning activity continues to take place on devices that were not designed with educational applications in mind, and usability issues are often reported. The paper reflects on progress in…

  14. Connecting the Demographic Dots: Geographic Mobility and Birth Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Having a child is a major determinant of geographic mobility. Little is known, however, about the opposite process--whether geographic mobility is a determinant of fertility. Drawing on social and human capital theories and research on fertility and migration to develop competing hypotheses, the author examines the effects of mobility on changes

  15. Assistance System for Disabled People: A Robot Controlled by Blinking and Wireless Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Val, Lara; Jimnez, Mara I.; Alonso, Alonso; de La Rosa, Ramn; Izquierdo, Alberto; Carrera, Albano

    Disabled people already profit from a lot of technical assistance that improves their quality of life. This article presents a system which will allow interaction between a physically disabled person and his environment. This system is controlled by voluntary muscular movements, particularly those of face muscles. These movements will be translated into machine-understandable instructions, and they will be sent by means of a wireless link to a mobile robot that will execute them. Robot includes a video camera, in order to show the user the environment of the route that the robot follows. This system gives a greater personal autonomy to people with reduced mobility.

  16. [Living situation of mentally disabled people with dementia in institutions for the disabled: results of a questionnaire in Lower Saxony and Bremen].

    PubMed

    Wolff, C; Mller, S V

    2014-07-01

    No empirical data about the topic "Mental Disability and Dementia" in Germany exist. The aim of this survey was to obtain current data about mentally disabled people with dementia. Therefore, the following questions need to be clarified: how many mentally disabled people are affected with dementia, which difficulties occur regarding the diagnosis of dementia and what challenges have to be solved in upcoming years. In all, 45 organisations for the mentally disabled took part in the survey, showing that dementia amongst people with mental disabilities appeared largely starting at the age of 50. Standardized diagnostics are seldom used by these organisations. Instead, observation of behaviour by care attendants plays a central role, due to the fact that speaking and introspection are not possible for a majority of the patients. In general, institutions for people with mental disabilities do not have specific offers for people with dementia, occasionally there are offers regarding their living situation and free time activities. PMID:23868699

  17. A Qualitative Investigation of Somali Immigrant Perceptions of Disability: Implications for Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Greeson, C J; Veach, P M; LeRoy, B S

    2001-10-01

    This study examined the potential utility of genetic counseling services for Somali immigrants by investigating their perceptions of disability. Five Somali women participated in structured interviews that assessed their perceptions of the nature, causes, and impact of disability, and care for persons with disabilities. Using a Heideggerian Hermeneutics qualitative method of analysis, six major themes emerged: (1) disability refers to both physical and mental conditions, with mental disability generally thought of first and as more severe; (2) in Somalia, the family cares for disabled family members, treating them as if they were "normal" (3) there are major cultural differences between Somalia and the United States in how persons with disabilities are treated; (4) caring for a person with a disability is stressful for the family; (5) Allah determines whether or not a child will be disabled, and this cannot be predicted or altered; and (6) family is the primary life focus, and therefore, risk of disability does not affect reproductive decisions. These themes suggest that traditional genetic counseling may have limited utility for Somali immigrants. We recommend several modifications to traditional genetic counseling for Somali patients that also may be useful for populations that have similar beliefs. PMID:26141265

  18. Genetic basis of cognitive disability.

    PubMed

    Flint, J

    2001-03-01

    The importance of genetic influences on cognitive disability has been recognized for a long time, but molecular analysis has only recently begun to yield insights into the pathogenesis of this common and disabling condition. The availability of genome sequences has enabled the characterization of the chromosomal deletions and trisomies that result in cognitive disability, and mutations in rare single-gene conditions are being discovered. The molecular pathology of cognitive disability is turning out to be as heterogeneous as the condition itself, with unexpected complexities even in apparently simple gene-deletion syndromes. One remarkable finding from studies on X-linked mental retardation is that mutations in different small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins result in cognitive disability without other somatic features. Advances are also being made in cognitive disability with polygenic origins, such as dyslexia and autism. However, the genetic basis of mild intellectual disability has yet to be satisfactorily explained. PMID:22034445

  19. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  20. On the Extraction of Charge Carrier Mobility in High-Mobility Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takafumi; Rolin, Cedric; Ke, Tung-Huei; Fesenko, Pavlo; Genoe, Jan; Heremans, Paul; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Transistor parameter extraction by the conventional transconductance method can lead to a mobility overestimate. Organic transistors undergoing major contact resistance experience a significant drop in mobility upon mild annealing. Before annealing, strong field-dependent contact resistance yields nonlinear transfer curves with locally high transconductances, resulting in a mobility overestimate. After annealing, a contact resistance below 200 Ω cm is achieved, which is stable over a wide V G range. PMID:26542747

  1. Changes in Disability Levels Among Older Adults Experiencing Adverse Events in Postacute Rehabilitation Care

    PubMed Central

    Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Escolar-Reina, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the relationship between adverse events (AEs) and changes in the levels of disability from admission to discharge during inpatient rehabilitation programs. A prospective cohort study was conducted among a cohort of inpatients (216 older adults) admitted to a rehabilitation unit. The occurrences of any AE were reported. The level of disability regarding mobility activities was estimated using the disability qualifiers from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Changes in the levels of disability between admission and discharge were assessed. Baseline-measured covariates were also selected. Regarding all 4 disability levels (“no limitation,” “mild,” “moderate,” “severe,” and “complete disability”), a total of 159 participants experienced an improvement at discharge (126 participants progressed 1 level, whereas 33 improved 2 disability levels), 56 made no change, and no participants experienced a decline. The occurrence of fall-related events and the diagnostic group (musculoskeletal system) are specific predictive factors of change in the level of disability. The odds of undergoing a change in any disability level between admission and discharge decreases by 68% (1–0.32) when patients experience fall-related events (odds ratio [OR] = 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.97, P = 0.041) and increases for individuals with musculoskeletal conditions (OR = 3.91, 95% CI = 1.34–11.38, P = 0.012). Our findings suggest that increased efforts to prevent the occurrence of these AEs, together with early interventions suited to the diagnosis of the affected system, may have a positive influence on the improvement of disability. Further studies should evaluate disability over time after discharge to obtain a better sense of how transient or permanent the associated disability may be. PMID:25715255

  2. The Modification of Educational Equipment and Curriculum for Maximum Utilization by Physically Disabled Persons; Design of a School for Physically Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuker, Harold E.; And Others

    Elements of modified school design for the physically disabled are considered, including mobility, classrooms, science laboratories, applied skill areas, the library, the swimming pool, and sanitary facilities. Also discussed are the cafeteria (food service, seating, and other considerations), recreational areas (play grounds,

  3. Processing of speech signals for physical and sensory disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, H

    1995-01-01

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7479816

  4. Mobility and Aging: New Directions for Public Health Action

    PubMed Central

    Guralnik, Jack M.; Jackson, Richard J.; Marottoli, Richard A.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Prohaska, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal mobility, defined as relative ease and freedom of movement in all of its forms, is central to healthy aging. Mobility is a significant consideration for research, practice, and policy in aging and public health. We examined the public health burdens of mobility disability, with a particular focus on leading public health interventions to enhance walking and driving, and the challenges and opportunities for public health action. We propose an integrated mobility agenda, which draws on the lived experience of older adults. New strategies for research, practice, and policy are needed to move beyond categorical promotion programs in walking and driving to establish a comprehensive program to enhance safe mobility in all its forms. PMID:22698013

  5. Attending to America: Personal Assistance for Independent Living. A Survey of Attendant Service Programs in the United States for People of All Ages with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvak, Simi; And Others

    Data were gathered from 154 U.S. programs providing personal assistance services for the disabled. The survey identified approximately 850,000 people receiving community-based, publicly-funded personal maintenance, hygiene, mobility, or household assistance services, with physically disabled individuals being the most often served. The report

  6. Occupational asthma in a national disability survey

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, P.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of workplace exposures to the prevalence of asthma in adults has been minimized in the epidemiology of this illness. Analysis of the 1978 Social Security Disability Survey provides a population-based assessment as a novel approach utilizing self-attributed, occupationally related asthma as a measure of disease. Of 6063 respondents, 468 (7.7 percent) identified asthma as a personal medical condition; 72 (1.2 percent (15.4 percent of all those with asthma)) attributed it to workplace exposures. These subjects were older and included more men and cigarette smokers than groups of both asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects. The relative risk for occupationally attributed asthma was elevated among industrial and agricultural workers as compared with white collar and service occupations. Analysis of disability benefit status did not indicate that this introduced major reporting bias in this survey. This study suggests that occupational factors may have a greater role in adult asthma than previously thought.

  7. Prostitution, disability and prohibition.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frej Klem

    2015-06-01

    Criminalisation of prostitution, and minority rights for disabled persons, are important contemporary political issues. The article examines their intersection by analysing the conditions and arguments for making a legal exception for disabled persons to a general prohibition against purchasing sexual services. It explores the badness of prostitution, focusing on and discussing the argument that prostitution harms prostitutes, considers forms of regulation and the arguments for and against with emphasis on a liberty-based objection to prohibition, and finally presents and analyses three arguments for a legal exception, based on sexual rights, beneficence, and luck egalitarianism, respectively. It concludes that although the general case for and against criminalisation is complicated there is a good case for a legal exception. PMID:25079067

  8. Disability Does Not Discriminate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Amy Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the "it can't happen to me" mentality, which makes humans think they are physically invincible and have been guilty of thinking so. The author learned the danger of the "it can't happen to me" syndrome when she was disabled in a car accident in February 1994. The accident happened when she was 21 years old,

  9. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  10. Age of Majority: Preparing Your Child for Making Good Choices. Parent Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Secondary Education and Transition, Minneapolis, MN.

    This brief provides information to parents of students with disabilities on preparing students for reaching the age of majority and assuming responsibility for their education and life choices. It begins by reviewing regulations under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that give states the authority to elect to transfer educational

  11. Unpacking intoxication, racialising disability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mel Y

    2015-06-01

    This article examines concepts whose strictly medical applications have only partly informed their widespread use and suggests that demonstrably shared logics motivate our thinking across domains in the interest of a politically just engagement. It considers exchanges between the culturally complex concepts of 'toxicity' and 'intoxication', assessing the racialised conditions of their animation in several geopolitically--and quite radically--distinct scenarios. First, the article sets the framework through considering the racial implications of impairment and disability language of 'non-toxic' finance capital in the contemporary US financial crisis. Shifting material foci from 'illiquid financial bodies' to opiates while insisting that neither is 'more' metaphorically toxic than the other, the article turns to address the role of opium and temporality in the interanimations of race and disability in two sites of 19th-century British empire: Langdon Down's clinic for idiocy, and China's retort on opium to Queen Victoria. The article concludes with a provocation that suggests yet another crossing of borders, that between researcher and researched: 'intoxicated method' is a hypothetical mode of approach that refuses idealised research positions by 'critically disabling' the idealised cognitive and conceptual lens of analysis. PMID:26052116

  12. Survey on Teaching Science to K-12 Students with Disabilities: Teacher Preparedness and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Sami; Lewis, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Students with disabilities are increasingly included in general education science classrooms and are expected to demonstrate academic proficiency on standardized assessments. Teacher preparation and attitudes have been cited as major factors contributing to either the success or failure of students with disabilities in science. In order to assess…

  13. The Prevalence and Determinants of Obesity in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Cooper, S. -A.; Morrison, J.; Allan, L.; Smiley, E.; Williamson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major public health concern internationally and this study aimed to measure the prevalence of obesity in adults with intellectual disabilities in comparison with general population data, and examine the factors associated with obesity. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of all adults with intellectual disabilities,…

  14. The National Agenda for Achieving Better Results for Children and Youth with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockne, Jill; Weiss-Castro, Robin

    This report presents the National Agenda for Achieving Better Results for Children and Youth with Disabilities as developed by a forum of representatives from major disability advocacy groups, direct service providers, families, related services personnel, researchers, teacher trainers, teachers, and administrators. Section 1 articulates the need

  15. Students with Disabilities in U.S. High Schools. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Nearly one third of the more than six million students with disabilities in U.S. public schools are of traditional high school age. Though research indicates that the majority of high school-age students with disabilities and their parents are satisfied with the services they receive, many still face barriers and challenges to receiving an

  16. Survey on Teaching Science to K-12 Students with Disabilities: Teacher Preparedness and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Sami; Lewis, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Students with disabilities are increasingly included in general education science classrooms and are expected to demonstrate academic proficiency on standardized assessments. Teacher preparation and attitudes have been cited as major factors contributing to either the success or failure of students with disabilities in science. In order to assess

  17. The Americans with Disabilities Act and Employment Practices in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Daniel; Swenson, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Examination of recent cases highlights major provisions and judicial treatment of higher education institutions under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Discusses: covered entity, disability, qualified individuals, reasonable accommodation, scope of protection, testing under the legislation, medical testing, drug/alcohol use.

  18. Older and Younger Family Caregivers of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Factors Associated with Future Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Lin, Li-Chan; Kroger, Teppo; Chang, Ai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    A structured interview survey was conducted in a major city in Taiwan to explore and compare older and younger family primary caregivers' well being and their future caregiving plans for these adults with intellectual disability. The sample size was 315 caregivers who were 55 years or older and who cared for adults with intellectual disability and

  19. Disability Research in Counseling Psychology Journals: A 20-Year Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Lee, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory content analysis of disability research in 5 major counseling psychology journals between 1990 and 2010. The goal was to review the counseling psychology literature to better understand the prevalence of disability research, identify research methods most often conducted, and elucidate the types of concerns most…

  20. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2015-01-01

    Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian

  1. Transitioning Youth with Intellectual and Other Developmental Disabilities: Predicting Community Employment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Monica L.; Neubert, Debra A.

    2013-01-01

    Community employment outcomes were examined for 338 transitioning youth with intellectual and other developmental disabilities in one state 18 months after exiting public school. All transitioning youth received ongoing Developmental Disability agency funding. The majority of transitioning youth (57.1%) were engaged in sheltered or nonwork

  2. Injuries, Falls and Accidents among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities. Prospective Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, J.; Morrison, J.; Jackson, A.; Mantry, D.; Cooper, S.-A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Injuries are among the leading causes of death and disability in the world and a major public health concern. Falls are a common cause. Young persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) have a higher rate and different pattern of injuries than the general population, but little is known regarding adults. Methods: The aim of this study

  3. Recipes for Fun: Play Activities and Games for Young Children with Disabilities and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Lisa

    Intended for friends and families of children with disabilities, the book contains information and suggestions on play activities, toys, and games for children (0-8) with mild and moderate disabilities. Activities are sequenced from simpler to more developmentally advanced within six major categories (1) exploring the senses (hid and find,

  4. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2015-01-01

    Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian…

  5. The Prevalence and Determinants of Obesity in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, C. A.; Cooper, S. -A.; Morrison, J.; Allan, L.; Smiley, E.; Williamson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major public health concern internationally and this study aimed to measure the prevalence of obesity in adults with intellectual disabilities in comparison with general population data, and examine the factors associated with obesity. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of all adults with intellectual disabilities,

  6. The Americans with Disabilities Act and Employment Practices in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Daniel; Swenson, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Examination of recent cases highlights major provisions and judicial treatment of higher education institutions under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Discusses: covered entity, disability, qualified individuals, reasonable accommodation, scope of protection, testing under the legislation, medical testing, drug/alcohol use.…

  7. Patterns of Decision-Making Behaviour by People with Intellectual Disability: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkinson, Jo; Nelms, Robyn

    1994-01-01

    Ten vignettes depicting either major or minor hypothetical problem situations were presented to 25 young adults with intellectual disability and 14 university students. Participants with intellectual disability tended to make fewer vigilant responses and more defensive avoidance or hypervigilant responses, compared to the university students.

  8. Identification of Disabilities and Service Receipt among Preschool Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carla A.; Wall, Shavaun; Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Swanson, Mark E.; Carta, Judith J.; Luze, Gayle J.; Eshbaugh, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of indicators of disability or potential disability among preschool-aged children enrolled in the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Longitudinal Follow-Up. Three categories of indicators were established: received Part B services, developmental risk, and biological risk. The majority of participating

  9. Meeting the Unique Needs of Minorities with Disabilities. A Report to the President and the Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tennyson J., Ed.; Leung, Paul, Ed.

    This report presents results of a 1992 conference on the unique needs of minorities with disabilities. Major recommendations include: increased coordination of government policies and programs for this population; authorization of targeted research on minorities with disabilities; outreach efforts to ensure participation by minorities with

  10. Successful Transition of Students with Disabilities to 21st-Century College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothberg, June E.; Peterson, Lori Y.; Peak, Maria; Sedaghat, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    For many students, the transition from high school to adult independent life is one of the most exciting times in their lives. However, that same transition can be daunting, particularly for students with disabilities. Studies have shown the majority of high school students--including an increasing number of students with disabilities--indicate

  11. Goals 2000: Impacting Students with Disabilities Policy Forum Report. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Alexandria, VA.

    This document reports on the design, purpose, implementation, and outcomes of an October 1994 policy forum on the impact of the Goals 2000 program on students with disabilities. Conclusions and recommendations of the forum identified 31 critical activities grouped into six major strategies to ensure the inclusion of students with disabilities in

  12. Exploring the Effects of Online Instruction on Reading Comprehension Achievement of Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Nancy Shuman

    2009-01-01

    Two major pieces of legislation, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004) and No Child Left Behind (NCLB) (2001) mandate that students with disabilities be placed in the Least Restrictive Environment and have access to the general education curriculum. To provide access to the general education curriculum, inclusion in general

  13. Disability Research in Counseling Psychology Journals: A 20-Year Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley-Nicpon, Megan; Lee, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory content analysis of disability research in 5 major counseling psychology journals between 1990 and 2010. The goal was to review the counseling psychology literature to better understand the prevalence of disability research, identify research methods most often conducted, and elucidate the types of concerns most

  14. Understanding Learning Disabilities and Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Nonnie; Shadoff, Sander

    This guide is designed to assist people with learning disabilities to recognize their disabilities and the connection between learning disabilities and substance abuse. It begins by defining learning disabilities and providing a self-test checklist for common signs and symptoms of learning disabilities. Difficulties with organization, memory,…

  15. Understanding Learning Disabilities and Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Nonnie; Shadoff, Sander

    This guide is designed to assist people with learning disabilities to recognize their disabilities and the connection between learning disabilities and substance abuse. It begins by defining learning disabilities and providing a self-test checklist for common signs and symptoms of learning disabilities. Difficulties with organization, memory,

  16. Pharmacological treatment of disabling tremor.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R; Duffis, Ennis I; Charles, P David

    2005-03-01

    Tremor is often a disabling primary condition or secondary to another disorder. No universally effective pharmacological agent exists for the treatment of essential tremor, and patients differ greatly in their response to therapies, thus requiring individualised regimens. Deep brain stimulation is the best option for patients with disabling, drug-resistant essential tremor. Resting tremor in Parkinson's disease is usually not the primary disabling feature, and in most cases, levodopa/carbidopa is satisfactory for many years. Young Parkinson's patients with dominant, disabling tremor benefit from anticholinergics in addition to dopaminergic therapies. However, older Parkinson's patients with more disabling tremor may suffer from dose-dependent side effects, and deep brain stimulation should be considered. This article outlines the available pharmacological agents and treatment considerations for various disabling tremors, including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease. PMID:15794733

  17. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  18. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  19. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  20. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  1. 20 CFR 416.1415 - Disability hearing-disability hearing officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disability hearing-disability hearing... Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Reconsideration § 416.1415 Disability hearing—disability hearing officers. (a) General. Your disability hearing will be conducted by a disability hearing officer who...

  2. A geostationary satellite system for mobile multimedia applications using portable, aeronautical and mobile terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losquadro, G.; Luglio, M.; Vatalaro, F.

    1997-01-01

    A geostationary satellite system for mobile multimedia services via portable, aeronautical and mobile terminals was developed within the framework of the Advanced Communications Technology Service (ACTS) programs. The architecture of the system developed under the 'satellite extremely high frequency communications for multimedia mobile services (SECOMS)/ACTS broadband aeronautical terminal experiment' (ABATE) project is presented. The system will be composed of a Ka band system component, and an extremely high frequency band component. The major characteristics of the space segment, the ground control station and the portable, aeronautical and mobile user terminals are outlined.

  3. The Health Mobility Is All True Mobility?

    PubMed Central

    Olivadoti, Simona; Cislaghi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    In their study, Brenna and Spandonaro analyzed the mobility into Italian regions. In particular, it analyzes the situation of 5 regions, with very different backgrounds. With this paper, we try to better define the meaning of health mobility and to find its underlying causes. Furthermore, we propose a strategy that could help in controlling mobility flows that currently are the source of health inequalities. PMID:26673342

  4. Music reduces pain and increases functional mobility in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Wilson, Andrew D.; Vase, Lene; Brattico, Elvira; Barrios, Fernando A.; Jensen, Troels S.; Romero-Romo, Juan I.; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The pain in Fibromyalgia (FM) is difficult to treat and functional mobility seems to be an important comorbidity in these patients that could evolve into a disability. In this study we wanted to investigate the analgesic effects of music in FM pain. Twenty-two FM patients were passively exposed to (1) self-chosen, relaxing, pleasant music, and to (2) a control auditory condition (pink noise). They rated pain and performed the timed-up & go task (TUG) to measure functional mobility after each auditory condition. Listening to relaxing, pleasant, self-chosen music reduced pain and increased functional mobility significantly in our FM patients. The music-induced analgesia was significantly correlated with the TUG scores; thereby suggesting that the reduction in pain unpleasantness increased functional mobility. Notably, this mobility improvement was obtained with music played prior to the motor task (not during), therefore the effect cannot be explained merely by motor entrainment to a fast rhythm. Cognitive and emotional mechanisms seem to be central to music-induced analgesia. Our findings encourage the use of music as a treatment adjuvant to reduce chronic pain in FM and increase functional mobility thereby reducing the risk of disability. PMID:24575066

  5. [Restructuring of the specialized job market for people with disabilities through legislative reform of the Rehabilitation Act--consequences for the workshops for the disabled].

    PubMed

    Wendt, S

    2001-04-01

    The legal basis for employment of people with disabilities in sheltered Workshops for the Disabled (Werksttten fr Behinderte, WfB) had hitherto been shaped by the 1961 Federal Social Assistance Act, the 1969 Employment Promotion Act, the 1974 Severely Disabled Persons Act with the related Workshop Ordinances of 1980 and 1996. The Act on Combating Unemployment of Severely Disabled Persons, effective as of Oct. 1, 2000 has now created a new legal foundation, which also is aimed at enhancing Workshop employees' horizontal mobility into the general job market, inter alia providing for access to Supported Employment arrangements and for availability of selective placement and support services (Integrationsfachdienste, IFD) throughout Germany. These Services also are intended as points of contact in the counselling of severely disabled school leavers in relation to placement opportunities in competitive jobs and/or integration projects or firms. Discussed from a legal perspective are the differences in sociolegal respects between such projects for severely disabled persons and employment in Workshops for the Disabled, as well as implications for the Workshops' own economic activity, also making reference to the forthcoming Book 9 of the Social Code. PMID:11370467

  6. Burden of major musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Anthony D.; Pfleger, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are a major burden on individuals, health systems, and social care systems, with indirect costs being predominant. This burden has been recognized by the United Nations and WHO, by endorsing the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010. This paper describes the burden of four major musculoskeletal conditions: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and low back pain. Osteoarthritis, which is characterized by loss of joint cartilage that leads to pain and loss of function primarily in the knees and hips, affects 9.6% of men and 18% of women aged > 60 years. Increases in life expectancy and ageing populations are expected to make osteoarthritis the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. Joint replacement surgery, where available, provides effective relief. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition that usually affects multiple joints. It affects 0.3-1.0% of the general population and is more prevalent among women and in developed countries. Persistent inflammation leads to joint destruction, but the disease can be controlled with drugs. The incidence may be on the decline, but the increase in the number of older people in some regions makes it difficult to estimate future prevalence. Osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration, is a major risk factor for fractures of the hip, vertebrae, and distal forearm. Hip fracture is the most detrimental fracture, being associated with 20% mortality and 50% permanent loss in function. Low back pain is the most prevalent of musculoskeletal conditions; it affects nearly everyone at some point in time and about 4-33% of the population at any given point. Cultural factors greatly influence the prevalence and prognosis of low back pain. PMID:14710506

  7. Quality of Life among Persons with Physical Disability in Udupi Taluk: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuvalekar, Kunal; Kamath, Ramachandra; Ashok, Lena; Shetty, Bhartesh; Mayya, Shreemathi; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disability is not just a health problem or attribute of individuals, but it reflects the problems individuals experience in their interaction with society and physical movements. Disabled persons remain neglected part of society and they also experience various barriers due to restriction of participation. Objectives: The aim was to assess the quality of life (QOL) of physically disabled persons, the impact of physical disability on activities of daily living (ADL) and to study the awareness about laws and facilities available for disabled persons. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional community based study was conducted among 130 physical disabled persons who were selected using convenience sampling technique. The WHO BREF scale was used to assess QOL, while assessment of ADL was done using Barthel Index. Socio-demographic assessment was done using Udai Pareek scale. SPSS version 15.0 was used to analyze data. Categorical variables were expressed as frequencies and percentages. As per guidelines physical, psychological, social, and environmental domain scores for WHO BREF scale were calculated. Results: Among the study participants, 36.2% had a disability from birth that is, congenital. The second common cause of disability was found to be postpolio residual paralysis as it was found among 26.2% respondents. Other causes found were stroke/paralysis and accidents, in 19.2% and 18.5% respondents, respectively. Activities such as transfer, mobility, and stair climbing showed greater impact of physical disability. It was found that 11.5% respondents required help in one of the ADL. QOL score was found to be low under the psychological domain reflecting on negative feelings, bodily image, appearance, spirituality, and self-esteem of respondents. Conclusion: Physical disability had affected social participation as well as marriage of the respondents. However, it was found that very few of them are aware about facilities provided under persons with disability act. PMID:25810992

  8. Establishing a disability-inclusive agenda for sustainable development in 2015 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Brian F

    2015-03-01

    Disability was omitted from the Millennium Declaration and eight Millennium Development Goals. As a result, individuals with disabilities and their advocates, health-related agencies and major United Nations (UN) groups collaborated to explicate the rights and needs of persons with disabilities. A community empowerment approach was guided by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, input from expert groups, public meetings held across the globe, questionnaires sent to civil society representatives, and rich online conversation. Persons with disabilities have the right to health, education, gainful employment, social protection, and participation in political and public life. Selected results from The World We Want consultation for the topic of 'Inequalities and a disability-inclusive agenda' illustrate the potential of reaching consensus among a broad array of constituents, informing decisions about policy and practice. PMID:24938514

  9. Constructing Disability in Online Worlds: Conceptualising Disability in Online Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Diane

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the online construction of disability is investigated and the implications for educators working in virtual worlds are considered. Based on the analysis of data collected through interviews with deaf residents of "Second Life", it is argued that research into online identity, disability and education needs to allow room for…

  10. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation…

  11. Attitudes Toward the Psychologically Disabled, Physically Disabled, and Nondisabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Carol A.; and Others

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes on nondisabled persons toward physically disabled, psychologically disabled and nondisabled persons. The type of impairment, physical, psychological or normal, degree of impairment, mild, severe, sex of stimulus person male, female and the sex of the subjects were the independent variables.

  12. Disabilities Information Flow: A Disabilities Information Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Bin; Allison, Colin; Nicholl, J. Ross; Moodley, Luke; Roberts, Dave

    2006-01-01

    The Disabilities Information Flow (DIF) project at the University of St Andrews has sought to provide a means of efficiently managing all student disabilities information within the institution and provide appropriate role-based service interfaces for all staff who need to routinely interact with this information. This paper describes the software…

  13. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID…

  14. The World Report on Disability and People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Officer, Alana; Shakespeare, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The "World Report on Disability" was requested by the World Health Assembly, the governing body of the World Health Organization (WHO). Because disability is broader than health, WHO partnered with the World Bank. The "World Report" was published in 2011 and provides a comprehensive scientific analysis on the global situation

  15. The Law's Understanding of Intellectual Disability as a Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is differently yet validly described by different professions. Legal professionals find it most useful to consider ID as a disability rather than a disorder. Because the law regulates the actions of individuals in a society and the actions of society on an individual, the law's concern in dealing with a person with ID

  16. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  17. Continuous Monitoring of Turning in Patients with Movement Disability

    PubMed Central

    El-Gohary, Mahmoud; Pearson, Sean; McNames, James; Mancini, Martina; Horak, Fay; Mellone, Sabato; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Difficulty with turning is a major contributor to mobility disability and falls in people with movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Turning often results in freezing and/or falling in patients with PD. However, asking a patient to execute a turn in the clinic often does not reveal their impairments. Continuous monitoring of turning with wearable sensors during spontaneous daily activities may help clinicians and patients determine who is at risk of falls and could benefit from preventative interventions. In this study, we show that continuous monitoring of natural turning with wearable sensors during daily activities inside and outside the home is feasible for people with PD and elderly people. We developed an algorithm to detect and characterize turns during gait, using wearable inertial sensors. First, we validate the turning algorithm in the laboratory against a Motion Analysis system and against a video analysis of 21 PD patients and 19 control (CT) subjects wearing an inertial sensor on the pelvis. Compared to Motion Analysis and video, the algorithm maintained a sensitivity of 0.90 and 0.76 and a specificity of 0.75 and 0.65, respectively. Second, we apply the turning algorithm to data collected in the home from 12 PD and 18 CT subjects. The algorithm successfully detects turn characteristics, and the results show that, compared to controls, PD subjects tend to take shorter turns with smaller turn angles and more steps. Furthermore, PD subjects show more variability in all turn metrics throughout the day and the week. PMID:24379043

  18. 77 FR 6022 - Excepted Service-Appointment of Persons With Intellectual Disabilities, Severe Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Intellectual Disabilities, Severe Physical Disabilities, and Psychiatric Disabilities AGENCY: U.S. Office of..., severe physical disabilities, and psychiatric disabilities. Paragraph (u) of section 213.3102 implements... disabilities, severe physical disabilities, and psychiatric disabilities. This Schedule A authority is...

  19. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  20. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  1. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  2. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  3. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... respect to transportation to which 14 CFR Part 254 applies, the limits to liability for loss, damage, or... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other...

  4. Long-Term Morbidity and Management Strategies of Tracheal Aspiration in Adults with Severe Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The feeding skills of 73 adults with severe developmental disabilities who aspirated were examined. Mobility, level of mental retardation, or feeding skill did not discriminate those who aspirated. Mealtime respiratory distress (65%) or chronic lung disease (55%), however, were significantly associated with aspiration. (Author/DB)

  5. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of…

  6. Guidelines for Organizing a Horseback Riding Program for Individuals with Disabilities. Bulletin 518A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ginger A.; And Others

    This manual outlines a horseback riding program, conducted by the Larimer (Colorado) County Extension Service, for persons with disabilities. The program offers such benefits as the opportunity to learn horsemanship; strengthen and relax muscles; improve balance, coordination, and posture; and increase joint mobility. Designed to provide a

  7. Effectiveness of Cognitive Skills-Based Computer-Assisted Instruction for Students with Disabilities: A Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pei-Lin; Maeda, Yukiko; Bouck, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for students with disabilities can be categorized into the following categories: visual, auditory, mobile, and cognitive skills-based CAI. Cognitive-skills based CAI differs from other types of CAI largely in terms of an emphasis on instructional design features. We conducted both systematic review of

  8. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone

  9. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  10. (Instrumental) Activities of Daily Living in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Daily living skills are important to ageing adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of these skills in older adults with ID and to investigate the influence of gender, age, level of ID and mobility on these skills. Daily living skills were measured with the Barthel Index (for Activities of

  11. Providing O&M Services to Children and Youth with Severe Multiple Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Brent R.; Head, Daniel N.

    1993-01-01

    This article argues that orientation and mobility (O&M) training should be part of functional and meaningful activities for children and youth with severe multiple disabilities including a visual impairment. Evidence is provided that out-of-context instruction has not been effective, and the role of the O&M instructor is discussed. (DB)

  12. Evaluation of the JACO robotic arm: clinico-economic study for powered wheelchair users with upper-extremity disabilities.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Veronique; Frappier, Julie; Archambault, Philippe S; Routhier, Franois

    2011-01-01

    Many activities of daily living, such as picking up glasses, holding a fork or opening a door, which most people do without thinking, can become insurmountable for people who have upper extremity disabilities. The alternative to asking for human help is to use some assistive devices to compensate their loss of mobility; however, many of those devices are limited in terms of functionality. Robotics may provide a better approach for the development of assistive devices, by allowing greater functionality. In this paper, we present results of a study (n=31) which objectives were to evaluate the efficacy of a new joystick-controlled seven-degree of freedom robotic manipulator and assess its potential economic benefits. Results show that JACO is easy to use as the majority of the participants were able to accomplish the testing tasks on their first attempt. The economic model results inferred that the use of the JACO arm system could potentially reduce caregiving time by 41%. These study results are expected to provide valuable data for interested parties, such as individuals with disabilities, their family or caregivers. PMID:22275600

  13. [Diagnostic investigations for an unexplained developmental disability].

    PubMed

    Verloes, A; Hron, D; Billette de Villemeur, T; Afenjar, A; Baumann, C; Bahi-Buisson, N; Charles, P; Faudet, A; Jacquette, A; Mignot, C; Moutard, M-L; Passemard, S; Rio, M; Robel, L; Rougeot, C; Ville, D; Burglen, L; des Portes, V

    2012-02-01

    Developmental disability/mental retardation is a major public health problem and a common cause of consultation in pediatrics, neuropediatrics, and genetics. Etiologies of mental retardation are highly heterogeneous. Diagnostic strategies have been explored in a small number of consensus publications, essentially from English-speaking countries. In these publications, the utility of the conventional karyotype, fragile X screening, metabolic workup, and brain imaging were discussed. Recently, investigations in mental disabilities have been dramatically modified by molecular cytogenetics and the emergence of new metabolic pathologies. Based on the published experiments, the Reference centers for rare disease network "mental deficiencies with rare causes" elaborated an updated protocol for the investigation of nonsyndromal mental disability that takes into account recent innovations in genetics and genomics. Whenever local facilities make it possible, we recommend array CGH investigation as the first step or, when CGH is not available, a combination of classic karyotype with systematic screening of telomeric and interstitial rearrangements by MLPA, fragile X screening in both sexes, and a reorientation of metabolic screening toward certain diseases that have recently been described: congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), thyroid hormone carrier deficiency, and creatine metabolism deficiency. We recommend MRI imaging only if head size is abnormal, if neurological examination is abnormal, or regression occurs if walking is not achieved by 2 years, or if development is severely delayed. PMID:22245660

  14. Disability Mediates the Impact of Common Conditions on Perceived Health

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; Vilagut, Gemma; Adroher, Núria D.; Chatterji, Somnath; He, Yanling; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Hu, Chiyi; Iwata, Noboru; Lee, Sing; Levinson, Daphna; Lépine, Jean Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; O'Neill, Siobhan; Hormel, J.; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Ismet Taib, Nezar; Xavier, Miguel; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the extent to which disability mediates the observed associations of common mental and physical conditions with perceived health. Methods and Findings WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys carried out in 22 countries worldwide (n = 51,344 respondents, 72.0% response rate). We assessed nine common mental conditions with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and ten chronic physical with a checklist. A visual analog scale (VAS) score (0, worst to 100, best) measured perceived health in the previous 30 days. Disability was assessed using a modified WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), including: cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, role functioning (life activities), family burden, stigma, and discrimination. Path analysis was used to estimate total effects of conditions on perceived health VAS and their separate direct and indirect (through the WHODAS dimensions) effects. Twelve-month prevalence was 14.4% for any mental and 51.4% for any physical condition. 31.7% of respondents reported difficulties in role functioning, 11.4% in mobility, 8.3% in stigma, 8.1% in family burden and 6.9% in cognition. Other difficulties were much less common. Mean VAS score was 81.0 (SD = 0.1). Decrements in VAS scores were highest for neurological conditions (9.8), depression (8.2) and bipolar disorder (8.1). Across conditions, 36.8% (IQR: 31.2–51.5%) of the total decrement in perceived health associated with the condition were mediated by WHODAS disabilities (significant for 17 of 19 conditions). Role functioning was the dominant mediator for both mental and physical conditions. Stigma and family burden were also important mediators for mental conditions, and mobility for physical conditions. Conclusions More than a third of the decrement in perceived health associated with common conditions is mediated by disability. Although the decrement is similar for physical and mental conditions, the pattern of mediation is different. Research is needed on the benefits for perceived health of targeted interventions aimed at particular disability dimensions. PMID:23762442

  15. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile

  16. Mobility, Emotion, and Universality in Future Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, Mark; Hosono, Naotsune; Fels, Deborah; Lottridge, Danielle; Waterworth, John

    The Graphical user interface has traditionally supported personal productivity, efficiency, and usability. With computer supported cooperative work, the focus has been on typical people, doing typical work in a highly rational model of interaction. Recent trends towards mobility, and emotional and universal design are extending the user interface paradigm beyond the routine. As computing moves into the hand and away from the desktop, there is a greater need for dealing with emotions and distractions. Busy and distracted people represent a new kind of disability, but one that will be increasingly prevalent. In this panel we examine the current state of the art, and prospects for future collaboration in non-normative computing requirements. This panel draws together researchers who are studying the problems of mobility, emotion and universality. The goal of the panel is to discuss how progress in these areas will change the nature of future collaboration.

  17. Magmatism of the early earth's mobile belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutts, B. G.

    Groups of Pre-Cambrian mobile belts of various ages are identified and correlated with major world-wide geotectonic cycles, and a geotectonic characterization of their interior elements is made. Magmatic complexes of volcanic and magmatic rocks are discerned and the oldest of these are compared with Phanerozoic and modern magmatic formations. Magmatism of the old mobile belts is shown to be both geosynclinal and orogenic and distinct from riftogenic magmatism.

  18. Disability Identity of Leaders in the Self-Advocacy Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Life stories and perspectives of leaders in the self-advocacy movement were explored to enhance knowledge about disability identity formation. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 leaders in the self-advocacy movement. Five major themes emerged: (a) resistance-claiming personhood and voice; (b) connection with disability…

  19. Americans with Disabilities Act as Amended: Principles and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the 2008 amendments to the act (ADAAA) as well as Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The article describes the major sections of the ADA, addresses the changes brought about to the ADA and Section 504 as a result of the ADAAA, reviews the outcome of…

  20. Sexual Health Care in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servais, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    In the past, preventive health concerning sexuality of people with intellectual disabilities was addressed through surgical sterilization as part of nationwide eugenic programs in many countries. For more than 30 years now, it has come progressively to light in the scientific literature that, besides major ethical and legal problems, these

  1. Perceptions of Self-Efficacy among STEM Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Ronda J.; Petri, Alexis N.; Day, Arden D.; Truman, Kevin Z.; Duffy, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies examine the relationship between self-efficacy and positive outcomes for postsecondary students. Collectively they echo that self-efficacy is an essential component to positive outcomes. Relatively few studies focused on students with disabilities majoring in STEM fields. Twenty postsecondary students with disabilities…

  2. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,…

  3. Critical Considerations for Teaching Students with Disabilities in Online Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Diana; Rowland, Amber L.; Smith, Sean J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide teachers and their supporting team (e.g., parents) with an understanding of the implications of blended and virtual learning for students with disabilities. To support these students, it is important to have an understanding of the manner in which a significant majority of blended and virtual learning is

  4. Sexual Health Care in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servais, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    In the past, preventive health concerning sexuality of people with intellectual disabilities was addressed through surgical sterilization as part of nationwide eugenic programs in many countries. For more than 30 years now, it has come progressively to light in the scientific literature that, besides major ethical and legal problems, these…

  5. Influences on Mothers' Employment when Children Have Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Meg; Cuskelly, Monica; Rosenman, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Empirical research has highlighted the constraints on mothers' workforce participation when children have disabilities, but the policies and associated strategies needed to address these issues have received less attention. Greater attention to explanatory theory and associated research is needed. The authors' paper identifies major explanatory…

  6. National Disability Policy: A Progress Report, December 2004-December 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report's 13 chapters address disability statistics and research, major trends, statistics, civil rights, Education, health, and long-term services and supports, children and youth, employment and the workforce development system, welfare reform, housing, transportation, assistive technology and telecommunications, international affairs, and

  7. Reflections: Returning as a Group Leader after a Severe Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Complicated issues arise when a group leader resumes practice after suffering a disability. The author, a nurse psychotherapist/researcher with a doctoral degree, director of nursing research at a veterans' hospital, and a psychodynamic practitioner in private practice, suffered a major stroke. The author felt extremely vulnerable and struggled as

  8. The Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities in Christian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Osborne, Allan G., Jr.; Massucci, Joseph D.; Cattaro, Gerald M.

    2011-01-01

    The adoption of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Education for All Handicapped Children's Act, now the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), have had a major impact on the delivery of services for children with special needs. In light of the legal issues surrounding the delivery of special education…

  9. Employment Success for Students with Mild Disabilities: Process and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Patricia L.

    This report describes activities of Project Work, a federally funded program to provide vocational preparation skills and transition services for high school students with disabilities. The program served 150 students at a large urban high school in San Diego (California). Three major objectives were accomplished: (1) development of an

  10. Americans with Disabilities Act: Its Impact on Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin E.

    1995-01-01

    The article describes the major titles of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and discusses who is affected, explaining how the ADA affects youth sport programs. The terms "readily accessible,""readily achievable," and "undue burden" are discussed according to their ADA definitions and their effect on youth sports. (SM)

  11. Perspectives on Health Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Susan L.; Moss, Kathryn; Richman, Erica L.

    2008-01-01

    A focus group study was conducted with individuals with developmental disabilities to understand their perspectives on their health status, health promotion behaviors, and health care services they receive. The majority of participants reported good to excellent health, and all had some form of medical insurance. However, participants reported…

  12. Perspectives on Health Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Susan L.; Moss, Kathryn; Richman, Erica L.

    2008-01-01

    A focus group study was conducted with individuals with developmental disabilities to understand their perspectives on their health status, health promotion behaviors, and health care services they receive. The majority of participants reported good to excellent health, and all had some form of medical insurance. However, participants reported

  13. Physical Disabilities: Education and Related Services, Fall 2002-Spring 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Barbara J., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Two issues of this journal on education and related services for students with physical disabilities contain the following major articles or reviews: "Environmental Effects on Education" (Harold F. Perla); "Using Touch Math for Students with Physical Impairments To Teach and Enhance Beginning Math Skills" (Adrienne L. Duris); "Traumatic Brain

  14. Making Online Information Accessible to Students with Disabilities, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janna Siegel; Harris, James Wallace

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the major HTML coding techniques used when making Web pages and online courses accessible to students with disabilities. Examples of accessibility features provided are not difficult for most Web authors to incorporate into their Web pages. With a few adaptations, Web page developers can make online information accessible to students

  15. Validation of the Attitudes toward Intellectual Disability--ATTID Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, D.; Crocker, A. G.; Beaulieu-Bergeron, R.; Caron, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) continue to experience major obstacles towards social, educational and vocational integration. Negative attitudes toward persons with ID has remained relevant over time and has led to discrimination and stigma. Objective: The present study describes the development of a new questionnaire…

  16. Educating Students with Mild Disabilities: Strategies and Methods. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; Vergason, Glenn A., Ed.; Whelan, Richard J., Ed.

    This book addresses inclusive environments and the shifting of instruction of children with disabilities to the general classroom teacher. The major themes are behavior management, curriculum, and instructional strategies. Individual chapters include: (1) "Discipline in Special Education and General Education Settings" (Deborah Deutsch Smith and

  17. Validation of the Attitudes toward Intellectual Disability--ATTID Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, D.; Crocker, A. G.; Beaulieu-Bergeron, R.; Caron, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) continue to experience major obstacles towards social, educational and vocational integration. Negative attitudes toward persons with ID has remained relevant over time and has led to discrimination and stigma. Objective: The present study describes the development of a new questionnaire

  18. Using Student Learning Communities to Recruit STEM Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izzo, Margaretha Vreeburg; Murray, Alexa; Priest, Sarah; McArrell, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Student Learning Communities (SLCs) for high school and college students with disabilities interested in pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees were piloted at a major Midwestern university from 2009 to 2011. Students participated in a series of weekly sessions and/or a residential campus experience as part of a

  19. Adults with Learning Disabilities. ERIC Digest No. 189.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Thanks to increased advocacy and research, several major federal laws, and heightened awareness of the changing demands of the workplace, more attention is being focused on adults with learning disabilities (LD). There is still no consensus on definitions of LD. Estimates of the incidence of LD range from 5% to 20% of the population. Adults with

  20. Reflections: Returning as a Group Leader after a Severe Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanza, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Complicated issues arise when a group leader resumes practice after suffering a disability. The author, a nurse psychotherapist/researcher with a doctoral degree, director of nursing research at a veterans' hospital, and a psychodynamic practitioner in private practice, suffered a major stroke. The author felt extremely vulnerable and struggled as…

  1. Intravenous Sedation for Dental Patients with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyawaki, T.; Kohjitani, A.; Maeda, S.; Egusa, M.; Mori, T.; Higuchi, H.; Kita, F.; Shimada, M.

    2004-01-01

    The poor quality of oral health care for people with intellectual disability (ID) has been recognized, and the strong fears about dental treatment suggested as a major reason for disturbances of visits to dentists by such patients. Intravenous sedation is a useful method for relieving the anxiety and fear of such patients about dental treatment,

  2. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    SciTech Connect

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  3. Disability disparities: a beginning model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model of disability disparities. Though the concept of health disparities is discussed in the health care literature, there is no such model that explicitly addresses disparities in the disability literature. Therefore, this model begins to fill a void in the disability literature. Part of the value of such a model is that it represents an attempt to address the question of why cultural competency is important in the disability arena at this point in the 21st century. The urgency in addressing cultural competency at this time in history is supported by understanding the multiple accountability demands on rehabilitation and disability providers these days, e.g., increasing diversification of the United States population, that render providing effective services to everyone a clear mandate. The author provides a working definition of disability disparity. The disability disparity model is described in terms of its five-domain continuum as well as its macro- and micro-level aspects that are designed to both promote clarity of the concept for researchers and offer practitioners ideas on how to explore the existence of disability disparities in working with specific service recipients. Limitations and strengths of the model are discussed along with suggested next steps in model validation. PMID:19802930

  4. The Source for Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Paula S.; Wadlington, Elizabeth M.

    This book is designed to help clinicians and teachers work more effectively with people with learning disabilities and their families. Chapter 1 provides an overview of learning disabilities. It presents commonly accepted medical and educational definitions, prevalence figures, and possible etiological explanations for various disorders. Chapter 2…

  5. Visualising Disability in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank; Van Hove, Geert; Vanobbergen, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interdisciplinary work which has argued that disability is not an isolated, individual medical pathology but instead a key defining social category like "race", class and gender. Seen in this way disability provides researchers with another analytic tool for exploring the nature of power. Running almost…

  6. The World Report on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The World Report on Disability, a joint endeavor of the World Health Organization and the World Bank, launched in June 2011, is an astonishing achievement that will set the standard for disability studies research for evidence-informed policy for years to come. The product of collaborative and participatory work between organizations of persons

  7. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.

  8. Supervising Adults with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dale

    Intended for employers, supervisors, and coworkers, the booklet presents guidelines for accommodating learning disabled (LD) employees. An introductory section explains the condition, describing its nature and the range of impairments it includes. Five types of learning disabilities are identified: visual, auditory, motor, tactile, and academic.

  9. Students, Colleges, and Disability Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Stephen B.

    As recently as the 1960s and 1970s, comparatively few persons with disabilities were able to attend college, either due to limited financial resources or to the inaccessibility of the campus and college programs. Today, colleges have substantially increased their efforts to recruit, admit, and accommodate qualified students with disabilities and

  10. Benefits for Children with Disabilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or her parents: • Must be receiving Social Security retirement or disability benefits; or • Must have died and have worked enough to qualify for Social Security. These benefits also are payable to an adult if he or she is disabled at age 18, and if they received dependents benefits on ...

  11. Voices of Disability in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her story of being a nurse with a disability who serves people with disabilities and older adults. She recounts her experience of what it is like to be stigmatized, marginalized, and to have lowered expectations because of her difference. The author had no right arm save about six inches from the shoulder down.…

  12. Library Service to the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookmark, 1981

    1981-01-01

    In recognition of 1981 as the Year of Disabled Persons, 10 out of the 13 essays in this issue deal specifically with library service to the disabled; the remaining three discuss the Public Library Association (PLA) Planning Process, the New York State Research Library Resources Access Project, and New York State public library construction needs.

  13. Dyslexia: Problems of Reading Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Herman K.; Schiffman, Gilbert B.

    The purpose of this book is to provide an understanding of both the educational and medical aspects of reading and to show how they are interrelated in reading disabilities. The various aspects of reading disabilities are presented in the following chapters: Introduction to the Reading Problem; Early Predictive Studies; Psychological Evaluation;

  14. Understanding Young Women with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramley, Jenny; And Others

    The report describes an Australian project to investigate ways in which gender issues affect adolescent girls with disabilities and associated educational implications. Interviews were conducted with 180 girls and women (ages 12-29) with mild or moderate disabilities. Additional information came from questionnaire responses and discussions with 48

  15. The Learning Disabled Preschool Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Samuel A.

    1987-01-01

    Two case studies involving preschool children with developmental learning disabilities (one with nystagmus and one with a hearing impairment) point to the need for appropriate ability as well as disability identification and assessment procedures (both had been diagnosed as mentally retarded) the potential of early diagnosis and intervention for

  16. Disability Studies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    As a topic of study, disability is not new at institutions of higher education. Psychological and intellectual disabilities have been of interest in psychiatry and psychology at least since the late 1800s and early 1900s. The post-World War II era, in particular, witnessed the rapid expansion of academic programs in special education, vocational

  17. Cognitive Development and Adolescent Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    1985-01-01

    The author offers clinical examples of ways in which the attainment of formal operations in adolescents both exacerbates chronic disabilities and contributes to the etiology of new disabilities (such as in teenage obesity, anorexia nervosa, and depression). He suggests treatment guidelines. (CL)

  18. Generalist Genes and Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2005-01-01

    The authors reviewed recent quantitative genetic research on learning disabilities that led to the conclusion that genetic diagnoses differ from traditional diagnoses in that the effects of relevant genes are largely general rather than specific. This research suggests that most genes associated with common learning disabilities--language

  19. Visualising Disability in the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlieger, Patrick; Grosvenor, Ian; Simon, Frank; Van Hove, Geert; Vanobbergen, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growth in interdisciplinary work which has argued that disability is not an isolated, individual medical pathology but instead a key defining social category like "race", class and gender. Seen in this way disability provides researchers with another analytic tool for exploring the nature of power. Running almost

  20. Attitudes Toward the Physically Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Carol A.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of non-disabled persons toward physically disabled persons. The degree of impairment, sex of stimulus persons, and sex of subjects were the independent variables. The subjects consisted of 120 psychology students from Kent State University, Ashtabula Regional Campus. Each subject