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Sample records for major physics conference

  1. THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE BOULDER CONFERENCE ON PHYSICS FOR NONSCIENCE MAJORS (BOULDER, COLORADO, JULY 20-29, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CORRELL, MALCOLM; STRASSENBURG, ARNOLD A.

    REPORTED ARE PROCEEDINGS OF THE BOULDER CONFERENCE ON PHYSICS FOR NONSCIENCE MAJORS, SPONSORED BY THE COMMISSION ON COLLEGE PHYSICS. PART I OF THIS REPORT IS AN INTRODUCTION EXPLAINING THE CONFERENCE. PART II CONTAINS EXPANDED COURSE OUTLINES OF PHYSICS COURSES FOR NONSCIENCE MAJORS THAT WERE PRESENTED TO THE GROUP BY SEVEN PARTICIPATING…

  2. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  3. Major Conference about Astronomical Technology in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Press Conference on Monday, March 27, 2000 Which are the latest astronomical discoveries made with the new 8-10 metre class astronomical telescopes? Will it be possible to construct even more powerful instruments on the ground and in space to explore the near and distant Universe at all wavelengths from gamma-rays to radio waves? Which research areas in this dynamical science are likely to achieve break-throughs with emerging new technologies? These are some of the central themes that will be discussed by more than 600 specialists from all over the world at an international conference in Munich (Germany), "Astronomical Telescopes and Instruments 2000" , beginning on Monday, March 27, 2000. During five days, the modern architecture of the new International Congress Center in the Bavarian capital will be the scene of lively exchanges about recent progress at the world's top-class astronomical research facilities and the presentation of inspired new ideas about future technological opportunities. The conference will be accompanied by numerous on-site exhibition stands by the major industries and research organisations in this wide field. This meeting is the latest in a series, organised every second year, alternatively in the USA and Europe by the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) , this year with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) as co-sponsor and host institution. The conference will be opened in the morning of March 27 by the Bavarian Minister of Science, Research and Arts, Hans Zehetmair . His address will be followed by keynote speeches by Massimo Tarenghi (European Southern Observatory), James B. Breckenridge (National Science Foundation, USA), Harvey Butcher (Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy) and Albrecht Ruediger (Max Planck Institut für Quantenoptik, Germany). The conference is subtitled "Power Telescopes and Instrumentation into the New Millennium" and will be attended by leading scientists and engineers from all

  4. The conferences for undergraduate women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessing, Susan K.

    2015-12-01

    The American Physical Society Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics are the continuation of a grassroots collaborative effort that began in 2006. The goals of the conferences are to increase retention and improve career outcomes of undergraduate women in physics. I describe the conferences, including organization and participant response, and encourage other countries to host similar programs for their undergraduate women.

  5. Second Microgravity Fluid Physics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference's purpose was to inform the fluid physics community of research opportunities in reduced-gravity fluid physics, present the status of the existing and planned reduced gravity fluid physics research programs, and inform participants of the upcoming NASA Research Announcement in this area. The plenary sessions provided an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program information on NASA's ground-based and space-based flight research facilities. An international forum offered participants an opportunity to hear from French, German, and Russian speakers about the microgravity research programs in their respective countries. Two keynote speakers provided broad technical overviews on multiphase flow and complex fluids research. Presenters briefed their peers on the scientific results of their ground-based and flight research. Fifty-eight of the sixty-two technical papers are included here.

  6. Third Microgravity Fluid Physics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference's purpose was to inform the fluid physics community of research opportunities in reduced-gravity fluid physics, present the status of the existing and planned reduced gravity fluid physics research programs, and inform participants of the upcoming NASA Research Announcement in this area. The plenary sessions provided an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, present and future areas of emphasis, information on NASA's ground-based and space-based flight research facilities-especially use of the International Space Station, and the process by which future investigators enter the program. An international forum offered participants an opportunity to hear from Russian speakers about their microgravity research programs. Three keynote speakers provided broad technical overviews on the history and future development of the moon and on multiphase flow and complex fluids research. One keynote paper and an extended abstract are included in the proceedings. One hundred and thirty-two technical papers were presented in 28 sessions. Presenters briefed their peers on the scientific results of their ground-based and flight research. One hundred and twenty-two papers are included here.

  7. Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Fleming

    2009-04-01

    The Yale Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics was held on January 18th and 19th, 2008. The conference, targeted toward undergraduates in the Northeast, was a huge success. It was well attended by both a slate of impressive speakers including Janet Conrad, Mildred Dresselhaus, Elsa Garmire, Howard Georgi, Liz Rhodes, Meg Urry and Wendy Zhang, and many interested attendees. Talks were on current research, about issues for women in physics, and on the application process for graduate school. There was also a career panel, student talks, and a student poster session. The conference ran concurrently with the third annual conference at USC, as well as a first annual conference at the University of Michigan. Our purpose in creating this conference was to provide a supportive atmosphere for young physicists to connect with peers and with successful women in the field. We hope that from this conference, attendees have become confident and knowledgeable about applying to graduate school and be further inspired to pursue a career in physics. The following describes the conference program, participation and impact, logistics of running the conference and plans for the future.

  8. Highlights From the Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee

    2014-03-01

    The Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics was held in January 2013 with more than 100 participants from 74 different institutions. The participants comprised a diverse group faculty from large and small departments, staff from industry and national labs, and graduate students and postdocs. The conference was aimed at fostering innovation and creativity in our approach to graduate education in physics. Because the majority of physics PhDs ultimately find permanent employment outside academia, and because of the many competing demands on new faculty, many departments are reviewing their graduate programs. The presentations and discussions at the conference included the increasing attention being paid to broader and more flexible graduate curricula, forming industrial partnerships, strategies to increase diversity, professional skills training for graduate students and postdocs, and improving mentoring practices and instituting family-friendly policies for graduate students.

  9. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    Just over one hundred years ago, Ernest Rutherford presented an interpretation of alpha-particle scattering experiments, performed a couple of years earlier by Geiger and Marsden, to the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. The work was summarised shortly afterwards in a paper in the Philosophical Magazine. He postulated that a dense speck of matter must exist at the centre of an atom (later to become known as the nucleus) if the details of the experiments, particularly the yield of alpha particles scattered through large angles, were to be explained. The nuclear hypothesis, combined with the experimental work by Moseley on X-rays and Bohr's theoretical ideas, both also initiated at the Victoria University of Manchester, established our view of atomic structure and gave birth to the field of nuclear physics. The Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics was held at The University of Manchester in August 2011 to celebrate this anniversary by addressing the wide range of contemporary topics that characterise modern nuclear physics. This set of proceedings covers areas including nuclear structure and astrophysics, hadron structure and spectroscopy, fundamental interactions studied within the nucleus and results of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We would like to thank all those who presented their recent research results at the conference; the proceedings stand as a testament to the excitement and interest that still pervades the pursuit of this field of physics. We would also like to thank those who contributed in other ways to the conference. To colleagues at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry for putting together an exhibition to coincide with the conference that included the manuscript of the 1911 paper, letters, notebooks and equipment used by Rutherford. These items were kindly loaned by Cambridge and Manchester Universities. Winton Capital generously supported this exhibition. We would also like to thank Professor Mary Fowler

  10. Conference Abstracts: Computers in Physics Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1989-01-01

    Provides selected abstracts from the Computers in Physics Instruction conference held on August 1-5, 1988. Topics include: wave and particle motion, the CT programing language, microcomputer-based laboratories, student written simulations, concept maps, summer institutes, computer bulletin boards, interactive video, and videodisks. (MVL)

  11. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  12. Characterizing the epistemological development of physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Jones, Barbara; Price, Edward

    2009-06-01

    Students in introductory physics courses are likely to have views about physics that differ from those of experts. However, students who continue to study physics eventually become experts themselves. Presumably these students either possess or develop more expertlike views. To investigate this process, the views of introductory physics students majoring in physics are compared with the views of introductory physics students majoring in engineering. In addition, the views of physics majors are assessed at various stages of degree progress. The Colorado learning attitudes about science survey is used to evaluate students’ views about physics, and students’ overall survey scores and responses to individual survey items are analyzed. Beginning physics majors are significantly more expertlike than nonmajors in introductory physics courses, and this high level of sophistication is consistent for most of undergraduate study.

  13. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of

  14. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    Just over one hundred years ago, Ernest Rutherford presented an interpretation of alpha-particle scattering experiments, performed a couple of years earlier by Geiger and Marsden, to the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. The work was summarised shortly afterwards in a paper in the Philosophical Magazine. He postulated that a dense speck of matter must exist at the centre of an atom (later to become known as the nucleus) if the details of the experiments, particularly the yield of alpha particles scattered through large angles, were to be explained. The nuclear hypothesis, combined with the experimental work by Moseley on X-rays and Bohr's theoretical ideas, both also initiated at the Victoria University of Manchester, established our view of atomic structure and gave birth to the field of nuclear physics. The Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics was held at The University of Manchester in August 2011 to celebrate this anniversary by addressing the wide range of contemporary topics that characterise modern nuclear physics. This set of proceedings covers areas including nuclear structure and astrophysics, hadron structure and spectroscopy, fundamental interactions studied within the nucleus and results of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We would like to thank all those who presented their recent research results at the conference; the proceedings stand as a testament to the excitement and interest that still pervades the pursuit of this field of physics. We would also like to thank those who contributed in other ways to the conference. To colleagues at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry for putting together an exhibition to coincide with the conference that included the manuscript of the 1911 paper, letters, notebooks and equipment used by Rutherford. These items were kindly loaned by Cambridge and Manchester Universities. Winton Capital generously supported this exhibition. We would also like to thank Professor Mary Fowler

  15. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of

  16. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  17. 36th International Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Australian particle physics community was honoured to host the 36th ICHEP conference in 2012 in Melbourne. This conference has long been the reference event for our international community. The announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC was a major highlight, with huge international press coverage. ICHEP2012 was described by CERN Director-General, Professor Rolf Heuer, as a landmark conference for our field. In additional to the Higgs announcement, important results from neutrino physics, from flavour physics, and from physics beyond the standard model also provided great interest. There were also updates on key accelerator developments such as the new B-factories, plans for the LHC upgrade, neutrino facilities and associated detector developments. ICHEP2012 exceeded the promise expected of the key conference for our field, and really did provide a reference point for the future. Many thanks to the contribution reviewers: Andy Bakich, Csaba Balazs, Nicole Bell, Catherine Buchanan, Will Crump, Cameron Cuthbert, Ben Farmer, Sudhir Gupta, Elliot Hutchison, Paul Jackson, Geng-Yuan Jeng, Archil Kobakhidze, Doyoun Kim, Tong Li, Antonio Limosani (Head Editor), Kristian McDonald, Nikhul Patel, Aldo Saavedra, Mark Scarcella, Geoff Taylor, Ian Watson, Graham White, Tony Williams and Bruce Yabsley.

  18. The 2005 National Conference of Black Physics Students

    SciTech Connect

    David D. Reid

    2006-09-26

    This proposal funded the 19th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students. This conference provided physics students with the opportunity to interact with world-class researchers and the facilities at which they work. The conference supports the well established need for the US to foster a larger and stronger scientific workforce through the recruitment and retention of science and engineering students.

  19. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  20. Physics for Occupational Therapy Majors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Aurora, Tarlok

    1998-03-01

    In Spring 1996, a one semester course - "Survey of Physics" - was taught for students majoring in Occupational Therapy (O. T.), in contrast to the two semester physics sequence for all other health science majors. The course was designed to expose the students to the concept of physics, develop problem solving skills and to emphasize the importance of physics to O.T. In developing the course content, students' preparedness in mathematics and the perceived future applications of physics in O. T. was taken in to consideration, and steps were taken to remedy the deficiencies in students' background. The course was comprised of lecture, laboratory, and considerable self study due to the time constraints, and these will be described.

  1. Physics Careers, Employment and Education. AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 39.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perl, Martin L., Ed.

    This publication contains the proceedings of a Conference on Changing Career Opportunities for Physicists, held at the Pennsylvania State University, August 1-3, 1977. The purpose of the conference was to study present and future manpower problems in the physics profession. The breadth and depth of the conference is demonstrated by these…

  2. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  3. XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013): Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013) was held from 20-24 August 2013 at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) present an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas. The CCP series aims to draw computational scientists from around the world and to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion and collaboration by putting together researchers interested in various fields of computational science. It is organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and has been in existence since 1989. The CCP series alternates between Europe, America and Asia-Pacific. The conferences are traditionally supported by European Physical Society and American Physical Society. This year the Conference host was Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics. The Conference contained 142 presentations, and, in particular, 11 plenary talks with comprehensive reviews from airbursts to many-electron systems. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), European Physical Society (EPS), Division of Computational Physics of American Physical Society (DCOMP/APS), Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Department of Physical Sciences of Russian Academy of Sciences, RSC Group company. Further conference information and images from the conference are available in the pdf.

  4. Advancing Successful Physics Majors - The Physics First Year Seminar Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Jason; Petkie, Douglas

    In 2012, the Wright State University physics curriculum introduced a new year-long seminar course required for all new physics majors. The goal of this course is to improve student retention and success via building a community of physics majors and provide them with the skills, mindset, and advising necessary to successfully complete a degree and transition to the next part of their careers. This new course sequence assembles a new cohort of majors annually. To prepare each cohort, students engage in a variety of activities that span from student success skills to more specific physics content while building an entrepreneurial mindset. Students participate in activities including study skills, career night, course planning, campus services, and a department social function. More importantly, students gain exposure to programming, literature searches, data analysis, technical writing, elevator pitches, and experimental design via hands-on projects. This includes the students proposing, designing, and conducting their own experiments. Preliminary evidence indicates increased retention, student success, and an enhanced sense of community among physics undergraduate students, The overall number of majors and students eventually completing their physics degrees has nearly tripled. Associate Professor, Department of Physics.

  5. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This TM is a compilation of abstracts of the papers and the posters presented at the conference. Web-based proceedings, including the charts used by the presenters, will be posted on the web shortly after the conference.

  6. 16th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choliy, V. Ya.; Ivashchenko, G.

    2009-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 23 papers presented during 16th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held at the Faculty of Physics of National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, from April 27 till May, 2, 2009. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: positional astronomy and astronomical equipment, atmospheric studies and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems and small bodies, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar and intergalactic medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, computers in astronomy and related to the mentioned above.

  7. 15th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choliy, V. Ya.; Ivashchenko, G.

    2008-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 19 papers presented during 15th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held in Kyiv, at Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Faculty of Physics, from April, 14 till April, 19, 2008. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: astrometry and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems, small bodies of the solar system, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, and related to the mentioned above.

  8. 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, G.; Golovin, A.

    2007-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 21 papers presented during 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held in Kyiv, at Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Faculty of Physics, from April, 23 to April 28, 2007. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: astrometry and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems, small bodies of the solar system, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, history of astronomy and related to the mentioned above.

  9. The Seventh Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Gerard M.

    1993-01-01

    The National Conference of Black Physics Students began in 1986 when several Black physics graduate students at MIT and Harvard decided to address the 'pipeline problem' of African Americans in physics by organizing a conference for Black physics undergraduates. The goals of the conference were: (1) to develop a network within the Black physics community, (2) to make Black students in physics, particularly at graduate level, aware of academic and professional opportunities and (3) to bring important issues and developments in the field to the attention of these students. We are pleased to announce the Seventh Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students held February 12 and 13, 1993 served the largest population of students so far. The largest conference previous to this one hosted 150 students. We registered and prepared for 240 students with 210 actually attenting. We received so many qualified abstracts for technical talks by students that instead of NCBPS's tradition of 3-4 student presentations, we ran 4 parallel sessions in different rooms with 4-5 presentations in each room. In response to comments from previous conferences, the program contained 3 workshop/discussion sessions. The topics for the interactive discussion workshops were: 'Getting Ready for Graduate School,' 'How to Succeed in Graduate School,' and 'Issues Facing Black Scientists.'

  10. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, Randall; Tafirout, Reda; Thomson, Jana

    2007-07-01

    The 2007 International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held on 2-7 September 2007 in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing experience and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing, and future activities. The CHEP'07 conference had close to 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited oral presentations, a number of parallel sessions comprising oral and poster presentations, and an industrial exhibition. Conference tracks covered topics in Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Components, Tools and Databases, Software Tools and Information Systems, Computing Facilities, Production Grids and Networking, Grid Middleware and Tools, Distributed Data Analysis and Information Management and Collaborative Tools. The conference included a successful whale-watching excursion involving over 200 participants and a banquet at the Royal British Columbia Museum. The next CHEP conference will be held in Prague in March 2009. We would like thank the sponsors of the conference and the staff at the TRIUMF Laboratory and the University of Victoria who made the CHEP'07 a success. Randall Sobie and Reda Tafirout CHEP'07 Conference Chairs

  11. PREFACE: 25th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchur, Lev N.; Barash, Lev Yu

    2014-05-01

    Participants of the XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational physics came to Moscow at the end of the August during a hot period. It was not a hot period because of the summer; in fact, the weather was quite comfortable. It was a hot period for the atmosphere amidst scientific society in Russia, especially for scientists working for the Russian Academy of Sciences. Four years ago, the C20 IUPAP Commission on Computational Physics and Computational Physics Group of the European Physical Society chose Moscow for several reasons. The first reason was connected to the high level and deep traditions of computational physics in Russia. It is known from experience at the former CCP conferences that native participants contribute about half of the presentations which form the solid scientific background of the conference, and the good level of domestic science makes the conference interesting and successful. The second reason was due to the fact that for the last twenty years there were not many IUPAP conferences in Russia, and it was a time to open more places for information exchange and intensify scientific collaboration. Thirdly, it was common opinion four years ago that the situation in Russia had become stable enough after the transition to a modern society, which took almost a quarter of a century. The conference preface is continued in the pdf.

  12. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2015-01-06

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  13. PREFACE: International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Shashank N.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Gaur, Abhijeet

    2014-09-01

    The International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2014) was held at Indore, India, during 22-23 February 2014. The conference was hosted by the School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001. The objective of the conference was to provide a platform for interaction among scientists, teachers, researchers and students, and to share their ideas, thoughts and scientific findings in various areas of physics, including condensed matter and materials physics, laser and plasma physics. ICRTP 2014 attracted a total of 103 abstracts submitted by scientists from France, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy and Portugal. The conference included an inaugural talk and 17 invited talks. PhD students presented their work in the form of posters. Presented posters were judged by a panel of five experts. Two best posters were awarded prizes. It is our pleasure to thank the members of the Advisory Committee and Local Organizing Committee for their invaluable help, especially for their proposals for invited talks. A total of 80 papers were submitted to be considered for publication and 68 papers have been accepted for inclusion in the proceedings. All the papers were reviewed, and we wish to thank all the referees for their support and prompt reviewing of the papers. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for their financial support. Personally, we would like to thank all the volunteers without whom the conference would not have been functional. We express our sincere thanks to our university administration for their continuous support. Special thanks go to all the faculty members, administrative staff and students of the School of Physics for their tireless efforts in organizing ICRTP 2014. Finally, we deeply appreciate the assistance of Ms Sarah Toms, Conference Publishing Coordinator, Journal of Physics Conference Series (JPCS), IOP Publishing Ltd, UK, for all help in getting ICRTP 2014 published in JPCS. Indore, 28 July 2014

  14. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly, computational physics stands alongside experiment and theory as an integral part of the modern approach to solving the great scientific challenges of the day on all scales - from cosmology and astrophysics, through climate science, to materials physics, and the fundamental structure of matter. Computational physics touches aspects of science and technology with direct relevance to our everyday lives, such as communication technologies and securing a clean and efficient energy future. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of the scientific contributions presented at the 23rd Conference on Computational Physics held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, USA, in November 2011. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) are dedicated to presenting an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas and from around the world. The CCP series has been in existence for more than 20 years, serving as a lively forum for computational physicists. The topics covered by this conference were: Materials/Condensed Matter Theory and Nanoscience, Strongly Correlated Systems and Quantum Phase Transitions, Quantum Chemistry and Atomic Physics, Quantum Chromodynamics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics, Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Complex Systems: Chaos and Statistical Physics, Macroscopic Transport and Mesoscopic Methods, Biological Physics and Soft Materials, Supercomputing and Computational Physics Teaching, Computational Physics and Sustainable Energy. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), IUPAP Commission on Computational Physics (C20), American Physical Society Division of Computational Physics (APS-DCOMP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Defect Physics (CDP), the University of Tennessee (UT)/ORNL Joint Institute for Computational Sciences (JICS) and Cray, Inc

  15. PREFACE: XIV Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2014-07-01

    This volume contains the invited and contributed papers presented at the 14th Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy held in Cortona, Italy, from 29-31 October, 2013. The meeting was held at the Palazzone, an elegant Renaissance Villa, commissioned by the Cardinal Silvio Passerini (1469-1529), Bishop of Cortona, and presently owned by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The aim of this biennial Conference is to bring together Italian theorists working in various fields of nuclear physics to discuss their latest results and confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. This offers the opportunity to stimulate new ideas and promote collaborations between different research groups. The Conference was attended by 46 participants, coming from 13 Italian Universities and 11 Laboratories and Sezioni of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - INFN. The program of the conference, prepared by the Organizing Committee (Ignazio Bombaci, Aldo Covello, Laura Elisa Marcucci and Sergio Rosati) focused on the following main topics: Few-Nucleon Systems Nuclear Structure Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Quark-Gluon Plasma Nuclear Astrophysics Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes Structure of Hadrons and Hadronic Matter. In the last session of the Conference there were two invited review talks related to experimental activities of great current interest. Giacomo De Angelis from the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro spoke about the INFN SPES radioactive ion beam project. Sara Pirrone, INFN Sezione di Catania, gave a talk on the symmetry energy and isospin physics with the CHIMERA detector. Finally, Mauro Taiuti (Università di Genova), National Coordinator of the INFN-CSN3 (Nuclear Physics Experiments), reported on the present status and future challenges of experimental nuclear physics in Italy. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of INFN who helped make the conference possible. I Bombaci, A Covello

  16. Careers in Patent Law for Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    An important question that many undergraduate physics students ask is, "What can one do with a physics degree?" Of course there are many answers to this question. Often a general reference to becoming a lawyer is given as a possible answer. This paper is intended to explain the field of patent law and how a physics degree can lead to an…

  17. Careers in Patent Law for Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    2010-11-01

    An important question that many undergraduate physics students ask is, "What can one do with a physics degree?" Of course there are many answers to this question. Often a general reference to becoming a lawyer is given as a possible answer. This paper is intended to explain the field of patent law and how a physics degree can lead to an interesting and potentially lucrative career as a patent examiner, a patent agent, or a patent attorney. This information may be of interest to physics students as well as those who recruit or counsel physics students.

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015) was held in Moscow, Russia, from October 5 to 10, 2015. The conference is organized by Center of Fundamental Research and Particle Physics of National Research Nuclear University ''MEPhI''. The aim of the Conference is to promote contacts between scientists and development of new ideas in fundamental research. We bring together experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical aspects of nuclear, particle, astroparticle physics and cosmology. The conference covers a wide range of topics such as accelerator physics, (astro) particle physics, cosmic rays, cosmology and methods of experimental physics - detectors and instruments. These directions are unified by development of the Standard Model (SM) which is evidently not complete. There are deviations from the Standard Model - neutrino oscillations, the dark matter existence. Together with strong interactions, they are main subjects of the Conference. New results from LHC collider as well as its future upgrade are discussed with the Higgs as the main point for discussion. Substantial development of experimental tools for astrophysical observations and new results from cosmic ray experiments is one of the main subjects of the conference. Various aspects of strong interaction are discussed. Among them: Charmonium and Bottomonium states, Flavor physics at Super B factories, Exotic Nuclei in Astrophysics. Another subject for discussion is the neutrino physics, promising and unique way to get new knowledge. In this content, several talks on BOREXINO experiment where new results in neutrino oscillations are presented. Special session is devoted to PAMELA experiment - 9 years in orbit and to the future GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with following main scientific goals: indirect dark matter origin study by the gamma-ray astronomy methods, discrete astrophysical sources observations, diffuse background γ-emission analysis

  19. Relevance of Physics to the Pharmacy Major

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective To offer a physics course that is relevant to pharmacy students, yet still contains many of the fundamental principles of physics. Design The course was modified over a period of several years to include activities and examples that were related to other courses in the curriculum. Assessment Course evaluations were given to assess student attitudes about the importance of physics in the pharmacy curriculum. Conclusion Students' attitudes have changed over time to appreciate the role that physics plays in their studies. Students gained confidence in their ability to learn in other courses. PMID:17786257

  20. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics (TROIA'11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2012-03-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'11 was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 22-25 August 2011. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. Its aim was to bring together the experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 60 participants from 12 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: Chiral Perturbation Theory QCD Sum Rules Effective Field Theory Exotic Hadrons Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD Experimental Results and Future Perspectives Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and the afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks and poster presentations. The speakers of the invited talks were: D Melikhov, M Nielsen, M Oka, E Oset, S Scherer, T T Takahashi and R Wanke. The conference venue was a resort hotel near Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient town of Troia and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Kadir Utku Can, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 13 February 2012 The Editors Güray Erkol Ayşe Küçükarslan Altuğ Özpineci Conference photograph

  1. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  2. PREFACE: NUBA Conference Series 1: Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boztosun, I.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kucuk, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The international conference series ''NUBA Conference Series 1: Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics'' was held on September 14-21 2014 in Antalya-Turkey. Akdeniz University hosted the conference and the Adrasan Training and Application Centre was chosen as a suitable venue to bring together scientists from all over the world as well as from different parts of Turkey. The conference was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBìTAK) and Akdeniz University Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center (NUBA). Based on the highly positive remarks received from the participants both during and after the conference, we believe that the event has proven to be a fulfilling experience for all those who took part. The conference provided an opportunity for the participants to share their ideas and experiences in addition to exploring possibilities for future collaborations. Participants of the conference focused on: • Nuclear Structure and Interactions • Nuclear Reactions, • Photonuclear Reactions and Spectroscopy • Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics • Nuclear Processes in Early Universe • Nuclear Applications • New Facilities and Instrumentation Participants included a number of distinguished invited speakers. There was significant interest from the international nuclear physics community and numerous abstracts and papers were submitted. The scientific committee conducted a careful and rigorous selection process, as a result of which 75 contributions were accepted. Of those, 65 of them were given as oral and 10 as poster presentations. The superb quality of the papers ensured fruitful discussion sessions. We thank all the participants for their efforts and also for promptly sending in their papers for publication. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series was peer-reviewed by expert referees and we also thank them for peer-reviewing the papers. The national and international advisory committee also deserve

  3. Innovative Physics Teaching Conferences in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milbrandt, Rod

    2010-01-01

    Even today, with all of the instant communication technologies available, we are still often unaware of all that happens in other parts of the world. In the middle of Europe, in the Czech Republic, physics teachers have created a couple of innovative conferences--or "workshops" might be a better term. Having attended two of each, I think they're…

  4. Planning Facilities for Physically Handicapped Children. Fifth Annual Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. School Planning Lab.

    The conference report on planning usable, accessible educational facilities for physically handicapped (orthopedically, visually, and aurally impaired) children features guidelines for eliminating indoor and outdoor architectural barriers. In developing and evaluating the guidelines, the Tennessee School Planning Laboratory analyzed plans of other…

  5. PREFACE: 4th International Hadron Physics Conference (TROIA'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağ, Hüseyin; Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2014-11-01

    The 4th International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'14, was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 1-5 July 2014. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. It aimed at bringing together the experts and the young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 50 participants from 10 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: . Chiral Perturbation Theory . QCD Sum Rules . Effective Field Theory . Exotic Hadrons . Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD . Experimental Results and Future Perspectives . Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks. The speakers of the invited talks were: C. Alexandrou, A. Gal, L. Tolos, J.R. Pelaez and M. Schindler. We had also guest speakers D. A. Demir and T. Senger. The conference venue was a resort hotel around Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient Troia town and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to supporting agencies and to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Bora Işıldak, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 30.10.2014 The Editors

  6. PREFACE: 17th Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb/2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkiev, Nikita S.; Poniaev, Sergey A.; Sokolovskii, Grigorii S.

    2015-12-01

    The seventeenth Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb) was held from 28-30 October 2014 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The Conference continues the tradition of Saint Petersburg Seminars on Physics and Astronomy originating from the mid-1990s. Since then PhysicA.SPb maintains both the scientific and educational quality of contributions delivered to the young audience. This is the main feature of the Conference that makes it possible to combine the whole spectrum of modern Physics and Astronomy within one event. PhysicA.SPb/2014 has brought together more than 200 students, young scientists and their professor colleagues from many universities and research institutes across the whole of Russia as well as from Belarus, Ukraine, Finland, the Netherlands, France and Germany. Oral and poster presentations were combined into the well-defined sections of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Optics and spectroscopy, Physics of ferroics, Nanostructured and thin-film materials, Mathematical physics and numerical methods, Biophysics, Plasma physics, hydro- and aero-dynamics, and Physics of quantum structures. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series presents the extended contributions from participants of PhysicA.SPb/2014 that were peer-reviewed by expert referees through processes administered by the Presiders of the Organising and Programme Committees to the best professional and scientific standards.

  7. PREFACE: 15th Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskii, Grigorii; Averkiev, Nikita

    2013-08-01

    The fifteenth Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy PhysicA.SPb was held 23-24 October 2012 in Saint-Petersburg, Russia. The Conference continues the tradition of Saint-Petersburg Seminars on Physics and Astronomy originating from the mid-90s. The main feature of PhysicA.SPb since then, remains the combination of both scientific and educational quality of the contributions delivered to the young audience. This feature makes it possible to combine the whole spectrum of modern Physics and Astronomy within one conference. PhysicA.SPb 2012 has brought together more than 150 students, young scientists and their professors from many universities and research institutes across Russia, as well as from Belarus, Ukraine, Finland, France and the United Kingdom. Oral and poster presentations were combined into a few well-defined sections among which one should name Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics of semiconductors, Physics of solid state, Physics and technology of the alternative energetics, Nanostructured and thin-film materials, THz and UHF materials and devices, and Physics of the quantum-sized structures. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series presents the extended contributions from participants of PhysicA.SPb 2012 that were peer-reviewed by expert referees through processes administered by the Presiders of the Organising and Programme Committees to the best professional and scientific standards. Grigorii S. Sokolovskii and Nikita S. Averkiev Editors

  8. PREFACE: 16th Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb/2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The sixteenth Russian Conference on Physics and Astronomy PhysicA.SPb was held 23-24 October 2013 in Saint-Petersburg, Russia. The Conference continues the tradition of Saint-Petersburg Seminars on Physics and Astronomy originating from mid-90s. Since then PhysicA.SPb maintains both scientific and educational quality of contributions delivered to the young audience. This is the main feature of the Conference that makes it possible to combine the whole spectrum of modern Physics and Astronomy within one event. PhysicA.SPb/2013 has brought together about 200 students, young scientists and their colleague professors from many universities and research institutes across whole Russia as well as from Belarus, Ukraine, Switzerland, Turkey, Finland and France. Oral and poster presentations were combined into a few well-defined sections among which one should name Astronomy and Astrophysics, Plasma physics, hydro- and aero-dynamics, Physics of quantum-sized structures, Nanostructured and thin-film materials, Biophysics, THz and UHF materials and devices, Optoelectronic devices, Optics and spectroscopy, Atomic and elementary particles physics, Defects and impurities in solid state, Physics and technology of the alternative energetics. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series presents the extended contributions from participants of PhysicA.SPb/2013 that were peer-reviewed by expert referees through processes administered by the Presiders of the Organising and Programme Committees to the best professional and scientific standards. The Editors: Nikita S. Averkiev, Sergey A. Poniaev and Grigorii S. Sokolovskii

  9. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they…

  10. PREFACE International Conference on Theoretical Physics Dubna-Nano 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury

    2010-11-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics 'Dubna-Nano2010' was held on 5-10 July 2010, at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The previous conference of this series was at Dubna in 2008. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (graphene, nanotubes, fullerenes), quantum dots, quantum transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, modelling, applications and perspectives. Approximately 120 scientists from 26 countries participated in the conference. The program included 63 oral talks and 70 posters. The 62 contributions are included in these proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference indeed successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about 'Dubna-Nano2010' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano10. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  11. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan C.

    2013-09-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they had begun the post-secondary career at a TYC. Nine percent of the physics undergraduate seniors in 2007 had started their college education at a TYC, and these students differ significantly from those who did not start at a TYC. The two graphs at right depict the high school physics experience for these two groups of students. More than one-fourth of those who started at a TYC did not take physics in high school, and only 18% took AP physics. The 6% of those who did not start at a TYC and did not take physics is consistent with the 5% of high school seniors who attend a school where physics is not offered. Their apparent difference of interest in physics in high school is also evident from their knowledge about AP physics offerings: 25% of those who started at a TYC did not know if AP physics was offered at their high school versus only 5% of those who did not start at a TYC. Since their high school physics experiences were so different, it is likely that something happened in their physics courses at the TYC that captured these students' interest in physics.

  12. PREFACE: International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, Jens

    2011-09-01

    The International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC 2010) was held from 4-9 July in Vancouver, Canada, hosted by TRIUMF, the Canadian National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics. The INPC is the main conference in the field of nuclear physics, endorsed and supported by IUPAP (International Union for Pure and Applied Physics) and held every three years. This year's conference was the 25th in the series and attracted over 750 delegates (150 graduate students) from 43 countries. The conference's hallmark is its breadth in nuclear physics; topics included structure, reactions, astrophysics, hadronic structure, hadrons in nuclei, hot and dense QCD, new accelerators and underground nuclear physics facilities, neutrinos and nuclei, and applications and interdisciplinary research. The conference started with a public lecture 'An Atom from Vancouver' by L Krauss (Arizona), who gave a broad perspective on how nuclear physics is key to a deeper understanding of how the Universe was formed and the birth, life, and death of stars. The conference opened its scientific plenary program with a talk by P Braun-Munzinger (GSI/EMMI Darmstadt) who highlighted the progress that has been made since the last conference in Tokyo 2007. The presentation showcased theoretical and experimental examples from around the world. All topics were well represented by plenary sessions and well attended afternoon parallel sessions where over 250 invited and contributed talks were presented, in addition to over 380 poster presentations. The poster sessions were among the liveliest, with high participation and animated discussions from graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Many opportunities were found to connect to fellow nuclear physicists across the globe and, particularly for conferences like the INPC which span an entire field, many unexpected links exist, often leading to new discussions or collaborations. Among the scientific highlights were the presentations in the fields of

  13. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly, computational physics stands alongside experiment and theory as an integral part of the modern approach to solving the great scientific challenges of the day on all scales - from cosmology and astrophysics, through climate science, to materials physics, and the fundamental structure of matter. Computational physics touches aspects of science and technology with direct relevance to our everyday lives, such as communication technologies and securing a clean and efficient energy future. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of the scientific contributions presented at the 23rd Conference on Computational Physics held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, USA, in November 2011. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) are dedicated to presenting an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas and from around the world. The CCP series has been in existence for more than 20 years, serving as a lively forum for computational physicists. The topics covered by this conference were: Materials/Condensed Matter Theory and Nanoscience, Strongly Correlated Systems and Quantum Phase Transitions, Quantum Chemistry and Atomic Physics, Quantum Chromodynamics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics, Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Complex Systems: Chaos and Statistical Physics, Macroscopic Transport and Mesoscopic Methods, Biological Physics and Soft Materials, Supercomputing and Computational Physics Teaching, Computational Physics and Sustainable Energy. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), IUPAP Commission on Computational Physics (C20), American Physical Society Division of Computational Physics (APS-DCOMP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Defect Physics (CDP), the University of Tennessee (UT)/ORNL Joint Institute for Computational Sciences (JICS) and Cray, Inc

  14. The 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics: Making progress in the number of women in physics around the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Beth

    2015-04-01

    A short report on the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP) will be presented. In particular, a summary of the structure of the 5th ICWIP that occurred in Waterloo, Canada in August 2014 will be provided and placed into context of the previous four conferences. In addition, a synopsis of the recent efforts that are happening around the world to encourage girls and women to participate in physics will be given. Several US projects have been very successful in introducing girls to science and physics (e.g., ``Expanding Your Horizons'' intervention) and encouraging undergraduate women physics majors to continue into physics careers (e.g., Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics). Projects from other countries, such as the Juno Project in the UK that rates physics departments on their climate for women, might be implemented by US physics professional societies as well as colleges and universities. Several projects originating from the conference will be described: the new ``HERstories: Encouraging words from women in physics'' video based on interviews with delegates of the Conference, the My STEM Story project (http://mystemstory.wlu.ca), and the proceedings of the conference. Partial support provided by NSF #PHY-1419453.

  15. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntorad, Jan; Lokajicek, Milos

    2010-11-01

    The 17th International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held on 21-27 March 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing experience and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. Recent conferences were held in Victoria, Canada 2007, Mumbai, India in 2006, Interlaken, Switzerland in 2004, San Diego, USA in 2003, Beijing, China in 2001, Padua, Italy in 2000. The CHEP'09 conference had 600 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited oral presentations, a number of parallel sessions comprising 200 oral and 300 poster presentations, and an industrial exhibition. We thanks all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Components, Tools and Databases, Hardware and Computing Fabrics, Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies, Distributed Processing and Analysis and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to Prague and other Czech cities and castles and a banquet held at the Zofin palace in Prague. The next CHEP conference will be held in Taipei, Taiwan on 18-22 October 2010. We would like thank the Ministry of Education Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic and the EU ACEOLE project for the conference support, further to commercial sponsors, the International Advisory Committee, the Local Organizing Committee members representing the five collaborating Czech institutions Jan Gruntorad (co-chair), CESNET, z.s.p.o., Prague Andrej Kugler, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR v.v.i., Rez Rupert Leitner, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and

  16. PREFACE: International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. N.; Mishra, A.; Dutta, A. K.; Sen, P.

    2012-05-01

    The International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP2012) took place in Indore, India, on 4-5 February 2012. The conference was hosted by the School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001. The objective of the conference was to provide a platform for interaction among scientists, teachers, researchers and students, and to share their ideas, thoughts and scientific findings in various areas of physics. ICRTP2012 attracted a total of 130 abstracts submitted by scientists from 7 different countries. The conference included an inaugural talk and 13 Invited talks. Aside from regular oral contributions, 118 posters were presented. A particular highlight of the conference was a special session for oral presentations by young PhD students. The aim of this session was to provide a platform for the budding scientists to present their recent findings in the presence of their community. The two best oral presentations, judged by a special three-member committee, were awarded prizes. Similarly the two best posters, judged by a committee of five experts, were also awarded prizes. It is our pleasure to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee and Local Organizing Committee for their invaluable help, especially for their proposals for invited talks. A total of 82 papers were submitted to be considered for publication and 59 papers were accepted for inclusion in the proceedings. All the papers were reviewed, and we wish to thank to all the referees for their support. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for their financial support of the organization of ICRTP2012. Support from Marketing Centre (India), Indore and Transolutions, Indore is also appreciated. Finally, we express our sincere thanks to our university administration for their continuous support. Special thanks go to all the faculty members, administrative staff and students of the School of Physics for their tireless efforts in organizing

  17. PREFACE: The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhemery, Alain; Saffari, Nader; Aristegui, Christophe

    2009-11-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 8th annual meeting at Arcachon in France, between 8 to 10 December 2008. This series of meetings is a successful collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. First established in 2001, the aim of this annual conference is to provide a forum where the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France are reviewed. AFPAC alternates between venues in the UK and France and the format has been designed to be 'small and friendly'. The conference attracts the main research leaders in the two countries and likes to encourage research students in particular to have their debut presentations at this event. Every year the organisers also invite a number of keynote speakers who are leading international authorities in their fields. For the meeting in Arcachon, the invited speakers included Dame Anne Dowling of Cambridge University, Anthony Kent of Nottingham University, Michel Bruneau of Université du Maine, Richard Hazelwood, Jérôme Vasseur of Institut d'Electronique, de Micro électronique et de Nanotechnologie and Michel Castaings of Laboratoire de Mécanique Physique of Université Bordeaux 1. The scope of the conference is kept intentionally wide so as to encourage cross-fertilisation of ideas across different application areas in the field of Physical Acoustics. Presentations in the past have covered non-destructive evaluation and material characterisation, medical ultrasound, underwater acoustics and ultrasonic sensors. This is the first time the proceedings of AFPAC are being published in the event's history and the participants were invited to submit manuscripts for publication. As a result there are 9 peer reviewed papers from a total of 34 that were presented at the meeting. In view of the high standard of

  18. 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    The 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics took place in the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil, from 16 to 20 April 2012, and was jointly organized by the following Institutions: Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP, Italy), Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e Aplicada (IMPA, Brazil), The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS, Italy) and The Scuola Internazionale di Studi Avanzati (SISSA,Italy). The Organizing Committees were composed by: E. ABDALLA (USP, Brazil), L. BONORA (SISSA, Italy), H. BURSZTYN (IMPA, Brazil), A. A. BYTSENKO (UEL, Brazil), B. DUBROVIN (SISSA, Italy), M.E.X. GUIMARÃES (UFF, Brazil), J.A. HELAYËL-NETO (CBPF, Brazil). Advisory Committee: A. V. ASHTEKAR (Penn State University, U.S.A.), V. M. BUCHSTABER (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), L. D. FADDEEV (St. Petersburg Dept. of Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), I. M. KRICHEVER (Columbia Univ., U.S.A./ Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), S. P. NOVIKOV (Univ. of Maryland, U.S.A./Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), J. PALIS (IMPA, Brazil), A. QADIR (National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan), F. QUEVEDO (ICTP, Italy), S. RANDJBAR-DAEMI (ICTP, Italy), G. THOMPSON (ICTP, Italy), C. VAFA (Harvard University, U.S.A.). The Main Goal: The aim of the Conference was to present the latest advances in Mathematical Methods of Physics to researchers, young scientists and students of Latin America in general, and Brazil in particular, in the areas of High Energy Physics, Cosmology, Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics. The main goal was to promote an updating of knowledge and to facilitate the interaction between mathematicians and theoretical physicists, through plenary sessions and seminars. This Conference can be considered as a part of a network activity in a special effort to

  19. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2013-11-03

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  20. Experiences that influence a student's choice on majoring in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbin, Donya Rae

    Currently the production of college graduates with science and engineering degrees is insufficient to fill the increasing number of jobs requiring these skills. This study focuses on physics majors with an in-depth examination of student transitions from high school to college. Many different areas of influence could affect a student's decision to major in physics. The first phase of this study addresses all of the potential areas of influence identified from the literature. The goal was to identify common influences that might be used to increase students' interest in majoring in physics. Subjects (N=35) from the first phase were recruited from physics majors at diverse Michigan colleges and universities. The second phase of this study explored, in more depth, important areas of influence identified in the first phase of the study. Subjects (N=94) from the second phase were recruited from diverse colleges and universities in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. The interviews were also conducted via email. Approximately half of the students in the study decided to major in physics while still in high school. Their reasons relate to many of the areas of influence. For example, high school physics teachers were cited as a strong influence in many students' decisions to major in physics. Influential physics teachers were described as being helpful, encouraging and interesting. The teachers also need to be their students' number one cheerleader and not their number one critic. Some areas of influence were found to be different for males vs. females. A high percentage of all physics majors had influential adults with careers in physical or biological science fields. This percentage was even larger for female physics majors. Female students also showed a greater initial interest in astronomy than the male students. Thus, high school and college physics teachers should seek to expose students to science-related careers and adults with these careers. Astronomy is also an

  1. EDITORIAL: XXVI IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, A. W.; Campbell, D. K.; Coker, D. F.; Tang, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The 26th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics, CCP2014, was held in Boston, Massachusetts, during August 11-14, 2014. Almost 400 participants from 38 countries convened at the George Sherman Union at Boston University for four days of plenary and parallel sessions spanning a broad range of topics in computational physics and related areas. The first meeting in the series that developed into the annual Conference on Computational Physics (CCP) was held in 1989, also on the campus of Boston University and chaired by our colleague Claudio Rebbi. The express purpose of that meeting was to discuss the progress, opportunities and challenges of common interest to physicists engaged in computational research. The conference having returned to the site of its inception, it is interesting to recect on the development of the field during the intervening years. Though 25 years is a short time for mankind, computational physics has taken giant leaps during these years, not only because of the enormous increases in computer power but especially because of the development of new methods and algorithms, and the growing awareness of the opportunities the new technologies and methods can offer. Computational physics now represents a ''third leg'' of research alongside analytical theory and experiments in almost all subfields of physics, and because of this there is also increasing specialization within the community of computational physicists. It is therefore a challenge to organize a meeting such as CCP, which must have suffcient depth in different areas to hold the interest of experts while at the same time being broad and accessible. Still, at a time when computational research continues to gain in importance, the CCP series is critical in the way it fosters cross-fertilization among fields, with many participants specifically attending in order to get exposure to new methods in fields outside their own. As organizers and editors of these Proceedings, we are very pleased

  2. How to double the number of undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Sacha

    2015-03-01

    Many colleges and universities around the country have a solid physics program that prepares students bound for graduate physics study. For a variety of reasons, the number of students choosing to major in physics may be small, typically <1% of the student body. When compared to other majors, this population is experiencing negligible growth. I will describe a campaign launched while at the University of Texas at Austin aimed at recruiting and retention of majors. This campaign includes actual programmatic changes in the curriculum and instruction of majors. Additionally, it includes a direct marketing campaign that attempted to change student attitudes about physics and its relation to their current major. Finally, it includes a program to reach out to local high schools and engage students in a discussion about their career choices before they apply for college. I will share some numerical and attitudinal data that suggests positive changes in the student population.

  3. PREFACE: International Conference on Theoretical Physics: Dubna-Nano 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury M.

    2012-11-01

    The International Conference 'Dubna-Nano2012' was held on 9-14 July 2012 at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The conference was the third one in the series started in 2008. 'Dubna-Nano2012' provided an opportunity for presentations and discussions about theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: graphene and other carbon nanostructures, topological insulators, quantum transport, quantum dots, atomic clusters, Josephson junctions and applications of nanosystems. About 100 scientists from 22 countries participated in the conference. The program included 38 oral talks and 39 posters. This volume contains 35 contributions. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee Professors K S Novoselov, T Ando, T Chakraborty, J Fabian, V M Galitski, F Guinea, M Z Hasan, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, R Kleiner, T Koyama, Yu I Latyshev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G. Reinhard, J M Rost and A Ya Vul. Financial support from BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Further information about 'Dubna-Nano2012' is available on the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano12. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  4. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 18-22 October 2010. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18 month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, America and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Prauge, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, California(2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000) CHEP 2010 was organized by Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre. There was an International Advisory Committee (IAC) setting the overall themes of the conference, a Programme Committee (PC) responsible for the content, as well as Conference Secretariat responsible for the conference infrastructure. There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 260 oral and 200 poster presentations, and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases, Distributed Processing and Analysis, Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies, Grid and Cloud Middleware, and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to various attractions in Northern Taiwan, including Sanhsia Tsu Shih Temple, Yingko, Chiufen Village, the Northeast Coast National Scenic Area, Keelung, Yehliu Geopark, and Wulai Aboriginal Village

  5. The pre-pharmacy major: A survey of physics requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Richard P.

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of 81 colleges of pharmacy affiliated with the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy regarding physics requirements for the pre-pharmacy major. Responses include number of semesters required, credit hours, student majors in the course, and mathematical basis. Strengths and weaknesses as reported by the college representatives are also presented. Their comments are used to point to needed changes in the pre-professional physics course.

  6. Why Do We Need 10,000 Physics Majors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    The early 1960's saw a huge increase in the number of physics majors, reaching an all time peak of just over 6000 per year. While the number plummeted in the next four decades, it has finally experienced a resurgence to nearly this number. The American Physical Society along with the American Association of Physics Teachers recently endorsed a call to double the number of undergraduate physics majors over the next decade. The main focus of this effort is to increase both the number of high school physics teachers and the fraction of women and under-represented minorities studying physics. In addition, a physics degree prepares an undergraduate with excellent skills that will serve her or him for a variety of occupations both in the sciences and in other fields. This talk will explore some of the data on physics majors and the rationale for taking the bold step of suggesting we try and educate 10,000 majors each year. Sputnik helped catalyze the nation 50 years ago -- What is the Sputnik of today? Bring your thoughts and questions... we hope for a lively discussion.

  7. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin

  8. Summary of the Conference "The Physics of Evolved Stars"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, O.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau was an astronomer of many talents. His expertise was on optical and infrared interferometry. Olivier*s tool of choice, the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), allowed him to see solutions to open questions in stellar astrophysics. These visions led to collaborations with experts in each of the fields where VLTI observations could be useful. As a result Olivier was a man in the middle of a phenomenal network of astronomers, collaborators and friends. I am fortunate to have been one of them. In this contribution I summarise the conference "Physics of Evolved Stars", held in Nice in June 2015 in memory of Olivier. The conference neatly showcased the science that Olivier had been involved with during his life and laid out the advancements that were made thanks in great part to him and to the collaborations he started. Without doubt his bubbly, happy personality, child-like in a way, made him the perfect connector bringing the technique, the questions and the experts in diverse fields together. Dear to all who worked with him, he was truly the little prince of Astronomy. We shall miss him every day.

  9. Co-publication with Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    This is a co-publication with Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 277, The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010). These conferences were held together from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China.

  10. The 2014 Gordon Research Conference: Physics Research & Education: The Complex Intersection of Biology and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Mel; Lang, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The field of biological physics and the physics education of biology and medically oriented students have experienced tremendous growth in recent years. New findings, applications, and technologies in biological and medical physics are having far reaching consequences that affect and influence the science community, the education of future scientists and health-care workers, and the general population. As a result leaders in Physics Education Research have begun to focus their attention on the specific needs of students in the biological sciences, the different ways physicists and biologists view the nature of science and the interactions of scientists in these disciplines. In this poster we highlight some of these findings and pose questions for discussion. The Complex Intersection of Biology and Physics will be the topic of the next Gordon Research Conference on Physics Research and Education to be held in June 2014. The exact date and location are still to be determined.

  11. Proceedings of the Fourth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This conference presents information to the scientific community on research results, future directions, and research opportunities in microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena within NASA's microgravity research program. The conference theme is "The International Space Station." The conference publication consists of the full Proceedings of the 4th Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference on CD-ROM, containing full papers presented at the conference. Ninety papers are presented in 21 technical sessions, and a special exposition session presents 32 posters describing the work of principal investigators new to NASA's program in this discipline. Eighty-eight papers and 25 posters are presented in their entirety on the CD-ROM.

  12. PREFACE: EPS Euroconference XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference: New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    It was with great pleasure that the Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics of the University of Pavia and the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) Structure of Pavia organised the XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the European Physical Society, which was held in the historical buildings of the University of Pavia from 5-9 September 2005. The Conference was devoted to the discussion of the most recent experimental and theoretical achievements in the field of Nuclear Physics applications, as well as of the latest developments in technological tools related to Nuclear Physics research. The University of Pavia has a long tradition in Physics and in Applied Physics, being the site where Alessandro Volta developed his "pila", the precursor of the modern battery. This is the place where the first experiments with electricity were conducted and where the term "capacitance" used for capacitors was invented. Today the University hosts a Triga Mark II nuclear reactor, which is used by the Departments of the University of Pavia and by other Universities and private companies as well. Moreover, Pavia is the site selected for the construction of the CNAO complex "Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica" (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy), planned for 2005-2008 which represents a unique facility in Italy and will be among the first complexes of this type in Europe. The Conference has gathered together experts in various fields from different countries and has been the occasion to review the present status and to discuss the new emerging trends in Nuclear Physics and its applications to multidisciplinary researches and the development of new technologies. The following topics were treated: Nuclear Techniques in Medicine and Life Sciences (Cancer Therapy, new Imaging and Diagnostics Tools, Radioisotope production, Radiation Protection and Dosimetry). Applications of Nuclear Techniques in Art, Archaeometry and other Interdisciplinary fields

  13. Qualitative Twitter analysis of participants, tweet strategies, and tweet content at a major urologic conference

    PubMed Central

    Borgmann, Hendrik; Woelm, Jan-Henning; Merseburger, Axel; Nestler, Tim; Salem, Johannes; Brandt, Maximilian P.; Haferkamp, Axel; Loeb, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The microblogging social media platform Twitter is increasingly being adopted in the urologic field. We aimed to analyze participants, tweet strategies, and tweet content of the Twitter discussion at a urologic conference. Methods: A comprehensive analysis of the Twitter activity at the European Association of Urology Congress 2013 (#eau2013) was performed, including characteristics of user profiles, engagement and popularity measurements, characteristics and timing of tweets, and content analysis. Results: Of 218 Twitter contributors, doctors (45%) were the most frequent, ahead of associations (15%), companies (10%), and journals (3%). However, journals had the highest tweet/participant rate (22 tweets/participant), profile activity (median: 1177, total tweets, 1805 followers, 979 following), and profile popularity (follower/following ratio: 2.1; retweet rank percentile: 96%). Links in a profile were associated with higher engagement (p<0.0001) and popularity (p<0.0001). Of 1572 tweets, 57% were original tweets, 71% contained mentions, 20% contained links, and 25% included pictures. The majority of tweets (88%) were during conference hours, with an average of 24.7 tweets/hour and a peak activity of 71 tweets/hour. Overall, 59% of tweets were informative, led by the topics uro-oncology (21%), urologic research (21%), and urotechnology (12%). Limitations include the analysis of a single conference analysis, assessment of global profile and not domain-specific activity, and the rapid evolution in Twitter-using habits. Conclusion: Results of this single conference qualitative analysis are promising for an enrichment of the scientific discussions at urologic conferences through the use of Twitter. PMID:26977205

  14. 12th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 12th annual meeting in Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France, from 16th to 18th January 2013. This series of meetings is a collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. This year, attendees got the opportunity to see the French Riviera with its Mediterranean vegetation covered by a nice thick snow layer. The participants heard 34 excellent oral presentations and saw 3 posters covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects and of frequencies, from ultrasonic wave propagation in chocolate to metamaterials applied to seismic waves for protecting buildings. Among them, invited talks were given by Pr F A Duck ( Enhanced healing by ultrasound: clinical effects and mechanisms), Pr. J-C Valiére, who actually gave two invited talks ( 1. Measurement of audible acoustic particle velocity using laser: Principles, signal processing and applications, 2. Acoustic pots in ancient and medieval buildings: Literary analysis of ancient texts and comparison with recent observations in French churches), Dr P Huthwaite ( Ultrasonic imaging through the resolution of inverse problems), Dr X Lurton ( Underwater acoustic systems on oceanographic research vessels: principles and applications), Dr S Guenneau ( From platonics to seismic metamaterials). For the fifth consecutive year AFPAC is followed by the publication of its proceedings with 12 peer-reviewed papers which cover the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France. Alain Lhémery (CEA, France) and Nader Saffari (UCL, United Kingdom) French Riviera 12th AFPAC — Villa Clythia, Fréjus (French Riviera), the 17th of January 2013

  15. Proceedings of the conference on numerical methods in high temperature physics

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Holm, D.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1988-11-01

    These proceedings contain full papers presented at the Los Alamos Conference on High Temperature Physics. This conference discussed many aspects of high temperature physics including hydrodynamics, radiation and particle transport and some computational issues important for efficient calculations. The meetings was held between researchers from Los Alamos and the French Commissariat a L'Energy Atomique (CEA).

  16. 2012 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS OF GRAPHITIC CARBON MATERIALS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17-22, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Herbert

    2012-06-22

    This conference will highlight the urgency for research on graphitic carbon materials and gather scientists in physics, chemistry, and engineering to tackle the challenges in this field. The conference will focus on scalable synthesis, characterization, novel physical and electronic properties, structure-properties relationship studies, and new applications of the carbon materials. Contributors

  17. MAJOR DETECOTRS IN ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS - May 1985 Suppl.

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-05-01

    This report is the second edition of a loose-leaf compendium of the properties and performance characteristics of the major detectors of elementary particle physics. This introduces the second edition of the LBL-91 Supplement 'Major Detectors in Elementary Particle Physics.' For some detectors the update merely documents minor modifications or provides additional references. Others have undergone major rebuilding or have been augmented with new subsystems. The new LEP, SLC, TRISTAN, BEPC, and FNAL detectors have had their designs fixed and are now under construction. Some detectors have completed their programs since the last edition and so are omitted. The use of colored loose-leaf paper should allow users to maintain a historical record of each detector. We again thank those physicists working with each detector who took the time to summarize its properties and supply us with the appropriate drawings.

  18. WELCOME SPEECH: EPS Euroconference XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference: New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    2006-06-01

    Ladies and gentlemen, On behalf of the European Physical Society it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Conference: NEW TRENDS IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY This is the 19th International Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the Nuclear Physics Board of the EPS. It is a relatively new experience for the Board to support a Conference in an area so closely linked to applications and technology. I am therefore very pleased to see such a good response to the initiative of Professor Scannicchio and his local Organizing Committee under Professor Zenoni's Chairmanship. I would like to take this opportunity to say a few words about the EPS Nuclear Physics Board. The Board consists of 18 people (10 elected plus up to 10 co-opted) from across Europe, with me as Chair. Elections by members of the Division are held if there is competition for a vacancy, which is announced in Europhysics News. The Board exchanges observers with NuPECC. The Board has 3 major activities: 1. Divisional Scientific Meetings of which this is one. There are usually two per year, but this year there are three. Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics 2 (NPA2), Debrecen, Hungary, 16 20 May 2005. This conference, New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology, Pavia, 5 9 September 2005. "Sandanski 3" Co-ordination Meeting in Nuclear Science organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, and the Institute for Nuclear Research and Energy, Sofia, which will be held in Albena, Bulgaria, 25 September to 2 October 2005. This grew out of two earlier meetings in 1995 and 2001 in Sandanski, Bulgaria. The aim of these meetings was to foster and support scientific collaborations in nuclear physics between eastern and western European countries. 2. The Board awards two prizes, usually in alternate years: The Lise Meitner Prize for outstanding contributions in the field of Nuclear Science. The 2004 recipients were Bent Herskind and Peter Twin for their pioneering work on rapidly

  19. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    , Helsinki University, Finland B Sharkov, ITEP Moscow, Russian Federation V Smirnov, Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russian Federation W Suttrop, IPP Garching, Germany C Varandas, IST Lisbon, Portugal F Wagner, Chair EPS-PPD, IPP Greifswald, Germany H R Wilson, UKAEA Abingdon, UK This committee selected 30 invited talks, in which the speakers were asked to address the general audience of plasma physicists and to exert their didactic skills. Out of the contributed papers, in total, 92 oral presentations were selected and distributed over parallel topical sessions. The other contributed papers (743) were presented as posters. The conference was attended by more than 700 participants from 41 countries. A major event during the conference was the award of the Hannes Alfv\\'en Prize to Professor V E Fortov who gave a spectacular lecture on non-ideal plasmas. The associated paper is included in this special issue. Following the tradition of this conference series, four-page summaries of the contributed papers are published as the Europhysics Conference Abstracts series, volume 27A. The publication is in the form of a CD-ROM sent free of charge to all participants and is also accessible via the website: http://www.ioffe.ru/EPS2003/. This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains papers of the invited talks at this conference. These papers have been assessed according to the standards of the journal and examined by referees selected from or by the members of the International Programme Committee. We are proud to provide, in this special issue, an overview of the forefront research in all major fields of plasma physics, through a set of papers accessible to the general audience of plasma physicists. The selection of this set of papers has been the work of the Programme Committee, and we would like to express our gratitude to all of its members for this successful selection. We are grateful to all authors for their efforts in providing high quality papers combining

  20. Appropriate Practices in Elementary Physical Education: Create a Foundation for Physical Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David; Strand, Brad

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors conducted a bit of action research. As a starting point, they gathered information from physical education majors regarding their knowledge of appropriate practices in elementary physical education as outlined by the Council on Physical Education for Children (COPEC). The authors constructed an 80-item survey from…

  1. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on electronics for particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blanar, G.J.; Sumner, R.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Sixth Conference on Electronics for Particle Physics continued the LeCroy tradition of providing a unique forum for the leaders in the field to meet, report and compare notes on what has become one of the most important (and expensive) components of a particle physics physics experiments today. As our field continues to depend on special electronics developed for particle physics to even make the experiments possible, this conference, along with the IEEE National Science Symposium and the LHC Electronics Conference have become essential if we are to meet the experiment`s severe time and financial commitments.

  2. Report from the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeland, Emily E.; Murphy, N.; Jang-Condell, H.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Third IUPAP (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics) International Conference on Women in Physics was held in Seoul, South Korea from October 8-10, 2008 with 283 participants from 57 countries. Topics discussed included personal and professional development, attracting girls to physics, site visits for assessing and improving the climate for women, fundraising and leadership, and organizing women in physics working groups. Resolutions unanimously passed by the conference assembly recommend (1) the formation of additional regional or national working groups for women in physics, (2) promotion of site visits as an effective tool for improving the climate of the physics workplace, (3) increased professional development opportunities and outreach activities associated with conferences, and (4) a global survey of physicists in 2009 to assess the status of women in physics. See http://www.icwip2008.org/ for the text of the resolutions and the conference program. In this poster, AAS members who participated will report on this conference as well as resolutions from the first (Paris, 2002) and second (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) conferences. The next IUPAP Conference on Women in Physics is expected to occur in South Africa in 2011.

  3. Physical size associations to offensive performance among major league leaders.

    PubMed

    Crotin, Ryan L; Forsythe, Charles M; Karakolis, Thomas; Bhan, Shivam

    2014-09-01

    Minimal work has studied physical size effects on statistical performance among Major League players. In this study, longitudinal, bivariate, and regression analyses studied the impact of physical size on offensive baseball statistics within a homogeneous talent sample of Major League batting leaders. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from heights and weights that were publicly available to form a statistical database of 4,360 offense leaders from 1950 to 2010. Repeated-measures analysis of variances examined differences in anthropometrics and baseball statistics between each decade from 1950 to 2010. Bivariate correlation and linear regression analyses evaluated BMI as an independent variable of influence, where all tests applied an a priori significance level (p ≤ 0.05). After 1980, offensive performance increased (p ≤ 0.05) concurrent to body mass and BMI growth (p < 0.001). During the 1960s, only batting average and on-base plus slugging percentages were found statistically decreased (p ≤ 0.05). All baseball statistics were positively correlated and predicted by BMI (p < 0.001). Consideration to covariant factors is required in data interpretation, yet nonetheless, our results showed physical size (BMI) to positively influence Major League offensive statistics. Over the 60-year period, greater body weight-to-height proportions owed to improved competitive performance, which suggests greater emphasis on hypertrophic stimuli in training and nutrition, as well as selection of larger professional baseball prospects. PMID:24875425

  4. Physics Majors in the US: Trends and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2015-03-01

    The number of undergraduate physics majors has doubled over the last 15 years, with more growth in sight. In that same time period the total number of PhDs awarded as well as those earned by domestic students has seen a similar rise. The picture is not so rosy when we look at underrepresented groups including women, and minority students. Nevertheless, we are now educating record numbers of physics students. This talk will explore some of the underlying issues, and present evidence for why some of these trends are present. Part of the discussion will include implications for physics programs. How big can programs become? What changes might be needed? What do we sacrifice, and what do we gain as a discipline? Will our new graduates get jobs? Bring your questions and thoughts to the discussion.

  5. Support for 26th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, Edward; Feldman, Gary

    2014-06-08

    The XXVI International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (Neutrino 2014) was held in Boston, U.S.A. from June 2 to 7, 2014. The Conference was co-­hosted by Boston University, Harvard University, M.I.T., and Tufts University. The Conference welcomed 549 registered participants from 33 countries. The Boston University Student Village offered an inexpensive housing option and was taken advantage of by 282 attendees. The lecture venue was the George Sherman Union at Boston University. There were 63 scientific presentations by speakers from 15 countries. The Conference held two poster sessions with a total of 287 posters. The Conference featured a reception at the M.I.T. Museum plus a multi-­week exhibition on neutrino physics capped by public presentations on the closing date of the conference. The banquet was a strolling buffet dinner held at the New England Aquarium.

  6. Conference report. Interview: Dr. Fred Sai. Programme expansion "a major advance".

    PubMed

    Hamand, J

    1994-01-01

    The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) scored quite a success in winning the inclusion of the improvement of women's status and the need for human resource development as part of the population dimension. It was also agreed in program terms that reproductive health is the main basis from which to proceed in family planning. The abortion debate was good in that it raised the conference profile through the world's media and forced people to consider and discuss the dangers of unsafe abortion. Overall, the program of action remains essentially unchanged from the document which came forth from New York. Abortion was not legalized everywhere, but the message was sent that something must be done to reduce the extent of unsafe abortions because they are damaging women's lives and health. Although there was not much talk about the environment, the ICPD scored big by getting its participants to agree that it is not only population pressure, but also consumption, lifestyle, and industrialization policies which are causing major environmental problems. The consumption patterns of both the North and the South must change. New approaches to development are also needed if environmental destruction is to be contained. When it came to the discussion of who would pay the program of action's bill, the US and Japan were exemplary in their failure to back down. Both countries are prepared to back their policies and the conference draft with funding and technical expertise. The Europeans were far less forthcoming. Finally, on the issue of migration, families must not be separated and documented migrants should be allowed to have their families join them in their country of employment. PMID:12319120

  7. Biological Physics major as a means to stimulate an undergraduate physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Herbert; Eid, Khalid; Yarrison-Rice, Jan

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to stress the cross-disciplinary nature of modern physics we added a Biological Physics major. Drawing from coursework in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and related disciplines, it combines a broad curriculum with physical and mathematical rigor in preparation for careers in biophysics, medical physics, and biomedical engineering. Biological Physics offers a new path of studies to a large pool of life science students. We hope to grow our physics majors from 70-80 to more than 100 students and boost our graduation rate from the mid-teens to the mid-twenties. The new major brought about a revision of our sophomore curriculum to make room for modern topics without sidelining fundamentals. As a result, we split our 1-semester long Contemporary Physics course (4 cr hrs) into a year-long sequence Contemporary Physics Foundations and Contemporary Physics Frontiers (both 3 cr hrs). Foundations starts with relativity, then focuses on 4 quantum mechanics topics: wells, spin 1/2, oscillators, and hydrogen. Throughout the course applications are woven in whenever the opportunity arises, e.g. magnetism and NMR with spin 1/2. The following semester Frontiers explores scientific principles and technological advances that make quantum science and resulting technologies different from the large scale. Frontiers covers enabling techniques from atomic, molecular, condensed matter, and particle physics, as well as advances in nanotechnology, quantum optics, and biophysics.

  8. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at New York University on 21- 25 May 2012. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the High Energy and Nuclear Physics community and related scientific and technical fields. The CHEP conference provides a forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18-month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, the Americas and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Taipei, Taiwan (2010); Prague, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, United States (2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000). CHEP 2012 was organized by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and co-sponsored by New York University. The organizational structure for CHEP consists of an International Advisory Committee (IAC) which sets the overall themes of the conference, a Program Organizing Committee (POC) that oversees the program content, and a Local Organizing Committee (LOC) that is responsible for local arrangements (lodging, transportation and social events) and conference logistics (registration, program scheduling, conference site selection and conference proceedings). There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 125 oral and 425 poster presentations and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Distributed Processing and Analysis on Grids and Clouds, Computer Facilities, Production Grids and Networking, Software Engineering, Data Stores and Databases and

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 18-22 October 2010. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18 month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, America and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Prauge, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, California(2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000) CHEP 2010 was organized by Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre. There was an International Advisory Committee (IAC) setting the overall themes of the conference, a Programme Committee (PC) responsible for the content, as well as Conference Secretariat responsible for the conference infrastructure. There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 260 oral and 200 poster presentations, and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases, Distributed Processing and Analysis, Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies, Grid and Cloud Middleware, and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to various attractions in Northern Taiwan, including Sanhsia Tsu Shih Temple, Yingko, Chiufen Village, the Northeast Coast National Scenic Area, Keelung, Yehliu Geopark, and Wulai Aboriginal Village

  10. Major detectors in elementary-particle physics. [Portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    With the 1983 issue of LBL-91 we introduce a supplement - a folio of descriptions of the world's major elementary particle physics detectors. Modern high energy physics usually involves the use of massive, costly, carefully engineered, large solid angle detectors. These detectors require a long lead time for construction, are often integrated with an accelerator, accumulate data over many years, and are in reality a combination of numerous subsystems. As was the case with bubble chambers, many experiments are performed with the same data, or with data taken after relatively minor changes or additions to the detector configuration. These experiments are often reported in journals whose space limitations make repeated full descriptions of the detector impossible. The detailed properties and performance of the detector are usually described in a fragmented series of papers in more specialized, technologically oriented journals. New additions are often not well documented. Several detectors often make similar measurements and physicists want to make quick comparisons of their respective capabilities. Designers of new large detectors and even of smaller experiments need to know what already exists and what performance has been achieved. To aid the physics community, the Particle Data Group has produced this brief folio of the world's major large detectors. This first edition has some notable omissions: in particular, the bubble chambers and any associated spectrometers, and the still somewhat tentative LEP, SLC, and TRISTAN detectors.

  11. Co-publication with Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    This is a co-publication with Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 276, the 3rd International Photonics & OptoElectronics Meetings (POEM 2010). These conferences were held together from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China.

  12. PREFACE: 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Klein, R.; Schwoerer, M.

    1993-01-01

    which traditionally has been very large, the conference was an excellent opportunity to discuss their own research work and to get an impression of the broad research field in Condensed Matter Physics on an international level and also to cultivate scientific and personal friendships. We also would like to thank the city of Regensburg with their major, Mrs Maier, and the University of Regensburg with its Rektor, Professor Altner, for their overwhelming hospitality, Mr Ernst and his about 60 coworkers for their excellent local organization and Dr. Heinicke and his staff for the production of the abstract book. Finally we would like to thank the members of the Editorial Office of Physica Scripta for the smooth cooperation in the production of these proceedings, which comprise the papers of about 70% of the Plenary and Invited Speakers.

  13. Investigating elementary education and physical therapy majors' perceptions of an inquiry-based physics content course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, John Martin

    This study investigates why physical therapy assistant majors engage and perform better than elementary education majors in an inquiry-based conceptual physics course at Mid-Atlantic Community College. The students from each major are demographically similar, both courses are similar in depth and structure, and each course supports the students' program. However, there is an observed difference in the levels of engagement with the curriculum and performance on writing-based assessments between the two groups. To explore possible explanations for the difference, I examine students' affinity for science, their beliefs about the nature of science and scientific knowledge in the classroom, and their perception of the usefulness of science to their program. During semi-structured interviews, students from both majors displayed nearly identical weak affinities for science, epistemological beliefs, and uncertainty about the usefulness of the class. However, the physical therapy majors' ability to see the relevance of the physics course experience to their program enhanced their interest and motivation. In contrast, the elementary education students do not see connections between the course and their program, and do not see a purpose for their learning of physics content. To improve the program, I propose a two-pronged approach - designing a faded-scaffolded-inquiry approach for both classes, and developing a field-based/seminar class for the elementary education majors. The scaffolded inquiry will help both groups develop better orientations toward lab activities, and the structured observations and reflection will help the elementary group connect the material to their program.

  14. Attitudes of physical education majors in Turkey towards disability are changed by adaptive physical education training.

    PubMed

    Gürsel, Ferda

    2007-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the attitudes of university students who are prospective physical education teachers toward individuals with physical disabilities. 47 college students majoring in physical education (Study group) and 34 students from other sports-related departments, i.e., sports management and training (Control group), participated in the study. The study group took a 14-week course on Adapted Physical Education (APE), whereas the control group did not. The Attitude Toward Disabled Persons scale, Form O was used to compare the attitudes of the groups. Analyses showed no significant difference between the groups in terms of attitude towards individuals with physical disabilities at the beginning of the semester but a significant difference at semester end. Results indicated that the APE course positively influenced attitude of the prospective physical education teachers towards individuals with physical disabilities. PMID:17450977

  15. "Physics and Life" - Teachers Meet Scientists at Major EIROforum Event [

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    (EPS) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) . The project is funded in part by the European Commission and takes place under the auspices of the European Science and Technology Week 2003. It is directed by the EIROforum Working Group on Outreach that brings together key members of the seven organisations' respective outreach departments. The "Physics on Stage 3" festival will be opened on Monday, November 10, by His Royal Highness, Prince Johan Friso of the Netherlands. Among the distinguished guests will also be Her Excellency, Mrs. Maria van der Hoeven, the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science, as well as several Directors-General of the EIROforum organisations. This "Physics on Stage 3" festival is the most visible event within a year-long programme with the very active involvement of National Committees in two dozen European countries, each of which organised national events or competitions, during which the 400 delegates to the festival were selected for their outstanding projects to promote science teaching. Among the many entries, for example, two young physicists from Germany focus on the beauty of physical phenomena, producing fractals and demonstrating the "Theremin", the only musical instrument played without being touched. In another demonstration, a team from the UK explore the nature of sound and the theme of genetics through drama, music and physical theatre. In this third international festival of physics education, biological and biochemical themes will also play a major role. As usual, the colourful centrepiece of the week is the Fair. Every country has its own stand where delegates show their new, exciting and surprising projects, innovative software, elegant experiments, etc. In this highly inspiring atmosphere, the teachers exchange practical experience and insights, learning from each other and preparing themselves to bring back to their respective countries a rich harvest of new ideas and inspiration for better

  16. News Competition: Physics Olympiad hits Thailand Report: Institute carries out survey into maths in physics at university Event: A day for everyone teaching physics Conference: Welsh conference celebrates birthday Schools: Researchers in Residence scheme set to close Teachers: A day for new physics teachers Social: Network combines fun and physics Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    Competition: Physics Olympiad hits Thailand Report: Institute carries out survey into maths in physics at university Event: A day for everyone teaching physics Conference: Welsh conference celebrates birthday Schools: Researchers in Residence scheme set to close Teachers: A day for new physics teachers Social: Network combines fun and physics Forthcoming events

  17. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  18. International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015) took place in the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece on June 18-20, 2015 and was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The scope of the conference was to provide a forum on the latest developments in Biomedical Instrumentation and related principles of Physical and Engineering sciences. Scientists and engineers from academic, industrial and health disciplines were invited to participate in the Conference and to contribute both in the promotion and dissemination of the scientific knowledge.

  19. Physics for the 1990s. AAPT Conference of Department Chairs in Physics. (February 19-20, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Mark N., Ed.; Wilson, Jack M., Ed.

    This book contains the proceedings of the Third Topical Conference of Department Chairs in Physics. Topics of the papers summarized include: (1) research centers sponsored by the National Science Foundation; (2) physics programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels; (3) the use of accelerators in education and research; (4) approaches to…

  20. PREFACE: The XXIII Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jenni; Halzen, Francis; Parke, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Conference logo After Jenni Adams and Stephen Parke organized a very successful Weak Interactions and Neutrino (WIN) meeting at the University of Canterbury near Christchurch, New Zealand in 2002, the idea emerged to organize Neutrino 08 in the same location. Christchurch also happens to be the gateway to Antarctica for the IceCube experiment. This idea was immediately supported by the late George Marx, the spiritual father of these conferences, and by Jack Schneps, whose advice made the organization of the meeting an easier task. We wish to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee and the International Neutrino Commission for their guidance and support. Neutrino 08 coincided with the 100th anniversary of Rutherford's Nobel, an occasion revisited in a talk by Cecilia Jarlskog that is reproduced in this volume. We thank the speakers for their long trip South to attend this a valuable meeting. With few exceptions, these proceedings report their contributions. The talks for which no written version has been submitted can be found at the SLAC e-conf website. We gratefully acknowledge the support of IUPAP and the New Zealand Government through the Ministry of Research, Science and Technology's International Conference fund, as well as the University of Canterbury, the University of Wisconsin (lead institution for the IceCube project), and Fermilab. The Los Alamos National Laboratory contributed to these proceedings. Most importantly, we thank Merrin McAuley and Claire McConchie and their team at the University of Canterbury Conference Office, Kim Kreiger from the University of Wisconsin, and Jo Robinson and her staff at the Christchurch Convention Centre for their dedication to making our meeting a success. Jenni Adams, Francis Halzen and Stephen Parke Conference photograph

  1. Characterizing the Evolution and Variation of Major Physics Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jennifer; Stewart, John

    2008-04-01

    The linguistic and structural properties of two major physics textbooks are compared. The structure of each textbook is measured and differences in the amount of space, words, and mathematics devoted to different parts of the text are reported. The linguistic richness of each text and each textual part is measured using LEXX. The readability of each textbook is characterized using standard readability formulas. A new readability formula that corrects for mathematics is proposed. The evolution of one of the textbooks over a fifteen year (four versions of the text) time span is also investigated. The reading difficulty of the textbook increased by approximately one-half a grade level over fifteen years. The lexical richness of the textbook also increased over the same period.

  2. PREFACE: Conference of Theoretical Physics and Nonlinear Phenomena (CTPNP) 2014: ''From Universe to String's Scale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical physics is the first step for the development of science and technology. For more than 100 years it has delivered new and sophisticated discoveries which have changed human views of their surroundings and universe. Theoretical physics has also revealed that the governing law in our universe is not deterministic, and it is undoubtedly the foundation of our modern civilization. Contrary to its importance, research in theoretical physics is not well advanced in some developing countries such as Indonesia. This workshop provides the formal meeting in Indonesia devoted to the field of theoretical physics and is organized to cover all subjects of theoretical physics as well as nonlinear phenomena in order to create a gathering place for the theorists in Indonesia and surrounding countries, to motivate young physicists to keep doing active researches in the field and to encourage constructive communication among the community members. Following the success of the tenth previous meetings in this conference series, the eleventh conference was held in Sebelas Maret University (UNS), Surakarta, Indonesia on 15 February 2014. In addition, the conference was proceeded by School of Advance Physics at Gadjah Mada University (UGM), Yogyakarta, on 16-17 February 2014. The conference is expected to provide distinguished experts and students from various research fields of theoretical physics and nonlinear phenomena in Indonesia as well as from other continents the opportunities to present their works and to enhance contacts among them. The introduction to the conference is continued in the pdf.

  3. Small Research Balloons in a Physics Course for Education Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Verner, E.; Long, T.; Montanaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    At The Catholic Univ. of America, we teach an experimental physics course entitled Physics 240: The Sun-Earth Connection, which is designed for the undergraduate education major. The emphasis is on providing hands-on experience and giving the students an exciting experience in physics. As part of this course, in the Spring 2013 semester, we instituted a project to plan, build, launch, and retrieve a small (~1.3 kg) research balloon payload. The payload flown was a small GPS unit that sent its position to an Internet site, a small wide-angle high-resolution video camera, and an analog refrigerator thermometer placed in the field of view of the camera. All data were stored on the camera sim-card. Students faced the problems of flying a small research balloon in the congested, densely populated Northeast Corridor of the US. They used computer simulators available on the Web to predict the balloon path and flight duration given velocities for the Jet Stream and ground winds, as well as payload mass and amount of helium in the balloon. The first flight was extremely successful. The balloon was launched 140 km NW of Washington DC near Hagerstown, MD and touched down 10 miles (16 km) NW of York, PA, within 1.6 km of what was predicted. The balloon reached 73,000 ft (22,000 m) and the thermometer indicated temperatures as low as -70 degrees Fahrenheit (-57 C) during the flight. Further balloon flights are planned in conjunction with this course. Additional exercises and experiments will be developed centered around these flights. Besides learning that science can be exciting, students also learn that science is not always easily predictable, and that these balloon flights give an understanding of many of problems that go into real scientific space missions. This project is supported in part by an educational supplement to NASA grant NNX10AC56G

  4. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, H.; Bonacorsi, D.; Ueda, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) is a major series of international conferences intended to attract physicists and computing professionals to discuss on recent developments and trends in software and computing for their research communities. Experts from the high energy and nuclear physics, computer science, and information technology communities attend CHEP events. This conference series provides an international forum to exchange experiences and the needs of a wide community, and to present and discuss recent, ongoing, and future activities. At the beginning of the successful series of CHEP conferences in 1985, the latest developments in embedded systems, networking, vector and parallel processing were presented in Amsterdam. The software and computing ecosystem massively evolved since then, and along this path each CHEP event has marked a step further. A vibrant community of experts on a wide range of different high-energy and nuclear physics experiments, as well as technology explorer and industry contacts, attend and discuss the present and future challenges, and shape the future of an entire community. In such a rapidly evolving area, aiming to capture the state-of-the-art on software and computing through a collection of proceedings papers on a journal is a big challenge. Due to the large attendance, the final papers appear on the journal a few months after the conference is over. Additionally, the contributions often report about studies at very heterogeneous statuses, namely studies that are completed, or are just started, or yet to be done. It is not uncommon that by the time a specific paper appears on the journal some of the work is over a year old, or the investigation actually happened in different directions and with different methodologies than originally presented at the conference just a few months before. And by the time the proceedings appear in journal form, new ideas and explorations have

  5. The Washington Conference on Theoretical Physics: Bringing the Spirit of Copenhagen to Foggy Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2010-02-01

    When George Gamow was offered a position at George Washington University in 1934, one of the conditions he set for acceptance was the establishment of an annual physics conference at that university, co-sponsored by the Carnegie Institution. Foggy Bottom, the Washington neighborhood where GWU is located, was not particularly known for physics. Gamow, however, wished to bring the ``spirit of Copenhagen'' to that locale and attract an international group of theorists. The Washington Conference on Theoretical Physics first convened in 1935 and assembled annually until 1947, except for a three year break during the war. Ironically, just like the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen itself, the conference was galvanized the most by Bohr's actual presence. In its fifth, and best known meeting, held in 1939, Bohr stunned the audience when he announced the successful completion of nuclear fission. After the tenth meeting in 1947, Gamow's focus had been turning from nuclear physics to cosmology, he had begun to work more closely with graduate students and local collaborators and, in light of diminished interest, the conference was no longer held. In this talk I will delineate the successes and limitations of the Washington Conference on Theoretical Physics. )

  6. "Physics and Life" - Teachers Meet Scientists at Major EIROforum Event [

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    (EPS) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) . The project is funded in part by the European Commission and takes place under the auspices of the European Science and Technology Week 2003. It is directed by the EIROforum Working Group on Outreach that brings together key members of the seven organisations' respective outreach departments. The "Physics on Stage 3" festival will be opened on Monday, November 10, by His Royal Highness, Prince Johan Friso of the Netherlands. Among the distinguished guests will also be Her Excellency, Mrs. Maria van der Hoeven, the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science, as well as several Directors-General of the EIROforum organisations. This "Physics on Stage 3" festival is the most visible event within a year-long programme with the very active involvement of National Committees in two dozen European countries, each of which organised national events or competitions, during which the 400 delegates to the festival were selected for their outstanding projects to promote science teaching. Among the many entries, for example, two young physicists from Germany focus on the beauty of physical phenomena, producing fractals and demonstrating the "Theremin", the only musical instrument played without being touched. In another demonstration, a team from the UK explore the nature of sound and the theme of genetics through drama, music and physical theatre. In this third international festival of physics education, biological and biochemical themes will also play a major role. As usual, the colourful centrepiece of the week is the Fair. Every country has its own stand where delegates show their new, exciting and surprising projects, innovative software, elegant experiments, etc. In this highly inspiring atmosphere, the teachers exchange practical experience and insights, learning from each other and preparing themselves to bring back to their respective countries a rich harvest of new ideas and inspiration for better

  7. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, January 17-19, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference was devoted to over 30 workshops and demonstrations of games and sports that may be used by teachers to improve physical fitness and cardiovascular strength in young children. There were also seminars and workshops focusing on disruptive behavior, curriculum development,…

  8. Texas Children's Medication Algorithm Project: Update from Texas Consensus Conference Panel on Medication Treatment of Childhood Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Carroll W.; Emslie, Graham J.; Crismon, M. Lynn; Posner, Kelly; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Jensen, Peter; Curry, John; Vitiello, Benedetto; Lopez, Molly; Shon, Steve P.; Pliszka, Steven R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To revise and update consensus guidelines for medication treatment algorithms for childhood major depressive disorder based on new scientific evidence and expert clinical consensus when evidence is lacking. Method: A consensus conference was held January 13-14, 2005, that included academic clinicians and researchers, practicing…

  9. Summary and highlights of the 14th Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics (HCP2002)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2002-11-13

    First of all, I would like to thank the scientific committee, the conference organizers, the University of Karlsruhe and the Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics, all of the speakers, and the conference secretariat, for making this an extremely well-organized and uniformly high-quality meeting. I would also like to thank all of the speakers who provided me with material for my talk before and during the conference. There is obviously no point in these proceedings in attempting to repeat all of the material from the individual contributions; by definition, these are all available earlier in this volume. In the written version, therefore, I will try to give a high level overview of the current state of hadron collider physics and to highlight the connections between the many presentations at this conference.

  10. A Mathematics Entrance Exam for General (Non-Majors) Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chediak, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a previous issue of "The Physics Teacher", John Hubisz explained how a mathematics background check has been used at three different colleges to determine the appropriate physics sequence for incoming students. Based on their performance, students are placed into either calculus-based physics (CBP), algebra-trig physics (ATP), or a year of…

  11. 2014 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    2014 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2014), was held at the Media Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 13-14 January 2014. The ScieTech 2014 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. ScieTech 2014 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 187 papers and after rigorous review, 50 papers were accepted. The participants come from 16 countries. There are 5 (Five) Paralell Sessions and Four Keynote Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of ScieTech 2014. The Editors of the Scietech 2014 Proceedings: Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Dr. Benfano Soewito Dr. P.N. Gajjar

  12. Engaging physics majors as partners in teaching: Learning Assistants in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Eleanor; Donnelly, David; Close, Hunter

    2012-03-01

    This semester we are running a pilot Learning Assistant (LA) program in one section of our introductory calculus-based mechanics course. The LA model of course transformation was developed at the University of Colorado (http://laprogram.colorado.edu/). In our current implementation, five undergraduate physics majors are assisting with tutorial instruction in the lecture section once a week (using primarily Tutorials in Introductory Physics); in addition, most weekly laboratory sections begin with a tutorial. Both LAs and laboratory TAs attend tutorial preparation sessions prior to instruction each week. In this talk we briefly describe the current program, including implementation issues; give preliminary notes on the experiences of the new LAs; and discuss future plans for an expanded LA program. Overall our plan is to improve the experience of being an undergraduate physics student in our department by improving student understanding of physics concepts and by including students as legitimate participants in the mission of the department.

  13. Asilomar conference on managing complexity in high energy physics: A summary and renaming of the conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1987-02-01

    The complex aspects of high energy physics work are briefly described, and approaches to managing them are discussed. Management of software and data are covered. For managing complexity in experimental physics, the choice of building or buying processor systems is addressed and the issues of compatibility and standardization are discussed. (LEW)

  14. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics & 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38) and the 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics (IWTCP-1). Both the conference and the workshop were held from 29 July to 1 August 2013 in Pullman hotel, Da Nang, Vietnam. The IWTCP-1 was a new activity of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society (VTPS) organized in association with the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38), the most well-known annual scientific forum dedicated to the dissemination of the latest development in the field of theoretical physics within the country. The IWTCP-1 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). The overriding goal of the IWTCP is to provide an international forum for scientists and engineers from academia to share ideas, problems and solution relating to the recent advances in theoretical physics as well as in computational physics. The main IWTCP motivation is to foster scientific exchanges between the Vietnamese theoretical and computational physics community and world-wide scientists as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. About 110 participants coming from 10 countries participated in the conference and the workshop. 4 invited talks, 18 oral contributions and 46 posters were presented at the conference. In the workshop we had one keynote lecture and 9 invited talks presented by international experts in the fields of theoretical and computational physics, together with 14 oral and 33 poster contributions. The proceedings were edited by Nguyen Tri Lan, Trinh Xuan Hoang, and Nguyen Ai Viet. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the conference and the workshop successful. Nguyen Ai Viet Chair of NCTP-38 and IWTCP-1

  15. Proceedings of the Fourth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference presents information to the scientific community on research results, future directions, and research opportunities in microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena within NASA's microgravity research program. The conference theme is "The International Space Station." Plenary sessions provide an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, the International Space Station and the opportunities ISS presents to fluid physics and transport phenomena researchers, and the process by which researchers may become involved in NASA's program, including information about the NASA Research Announcement in this area. Two plenary lectures present promising areas of research in electrohydrodynamics/electrokinetics in the movement of particles and in micro- and meso-scale effects on macroscopic fluid dynamics. Featured speakers in plenary sessions present results of recent flight experiments not heretofore presented. The conference publication consists of this book of abstracts and the full Proceedings of the 4th Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference on CD-ROM, containing full papers presented at the conference (NASA/CP-1999-208526/SUPPL1).

  16. Proceedings of the Fifth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Fifth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provided the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program and research opportunities and plans for the near future. Consistent with the conference theme "Microgravity Research an Agency-Wide Asset" the conference focused not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. The conference included 14 invited plenary talks, 61 technical paper presentations, 61 poster presentations, exhibits and a forum on emerging research themes focusing on nanotechnology and biofluid mechanics. This web-based proceeding includes the presentation and poster charts provided by the presenters of technical papers and posters that were scanned at the conference site. Abstracts of all the papers and posters are included and linked to the presentations charts. The invited and plenary speakers were not required to provide their charts and are generally not available for scanning and hence not posted. The conference program is also included.

  17. PREFACE: 2013 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford

    2013-03-01

    The 2013 International Conference on Science and Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2013), was held at the Aston Rasuna Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 24-25 January 2013. The ScieTech 2013 conference aims to bring together scholars, leading researchers and experts from diverse backgrounds and applications areas. Special emphasis is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics, all areas of sciences and applied mathematics. We would like to thank the invited and plenary speakers as well as all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program. This year, we received 197 papers and, after rigorous review, 67 papers were accepted. The participants come from 21 countries. There are 6 (six) Plenary and Invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and we thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed ScieTech 2013 be be sucyh a success. The Editors of the ScieTech 2013 Proceedings Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Dr Hoga Saragih Tumpal Pandiangan Dr Mohamed Bououdina The PDF also contains the abstracts of the Invited and Plenary talks, and some photographs taken during the conference.

  18. Seventh National Conference on Physical Activity for the Exceptional Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools, CA. Div. of Special Education.

    A variety of physical activities and their applications to special education situations are presented and discussed in this collection of papers. Topics include--games for exceptional populations, mime and movement, behavioral management techniques, motor development programs for the handicapped, teacher and student motivation, yoga for the…

  19. INTRODUCTION: The 8th International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Per Olof; Hedin, Lars

    1987-01-01

    The VUV conferences series The international conferences on vacuum ultraviolet radiation physics started in 1962, and are now being held every third year. VUV-8 took place at Lund University, August 4-8, 1986. VUV-9 will be arranged at the University of Hawaii, USA, August 14-18, 1989, with Prof. C S Fadley as conference chairman. Chairman of the international advisory board for the period 1986-89 is Prof. L Hedin. The theme of the series can be summarized as experimental and theoretical progress in research fields utilizing the interaction of VUV radiation with matter. The topics cover broad areas within atomic and molecular physics, solid state physics and VUV instrumentation. The conferences emphasize interdisciplinary aspects. To these belong common experimental techniques as, e.g., synchrotron radiation instrumentation, and common theoretical foundations for the description of photon interactions with matter. The VUV-8 conference The VUV-8 conference in Lund was attended by 300 participants from 26 countries. An address list of the participants is given at the end of this volume. There were 33 invited papers given as plenary or key-note talks. As many as 229 posters were presented; 49 of them were also given orally. These numbers are typical for the VUV conferences, except for the number of posters, which was unusually large. In the conference planning the poster sessions were stressed, and particular care was taken to provide a good atmosphere at these sessions. Thus the posters were kept up during the whole conference, coffee was served in the hail with the posters and there were convenient places to sit down close to the posters. Considering the wide scope of the conference it was necessary to emphasize a limited number of topics of high current interest and importance. Thus besides traditional topics, several rapidly expanding fields were discussed in special sessions. At VUV-8 there were the following sessions. Theory of atoms and molecules

  20. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  1. FOREWORD: 10th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhémery, Alain; Saffari, Nader

    2012-03-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 10th annual meeting in Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France, from 19-21 January 2011. This series of meetings is a collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. The conference has its loyal supporters whom we wish to thank. It is their loyalty that has made this conference a success. AFPAC alternates between the UK and France and its format has been designed to ensure that it remains a friendly meeting of very high scientific quality, offering a broad spectrum of subjects, welcoming young researchers and PhD students and giving them the opportunity to give their first presentations in an 'international' conference, but with limited pressure. For the third consecutive year AFPAC is followed by the publication of its proceedings in the form of 18 peer-reviewed papers, which cover the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France. Alain Lhémery CEA, France Nader Saffari UCL, United Kingdom

  2. PREFACE: 1st International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    We are delighted to come up with thirty two (32) contributed research papers in these proceedings, focusing on Materials Science and Applied Physics as an output of the 2013 International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science (ICAMS2013) held on October 22-24, 2013 at the Ateneo de Davao University, Davao City, Philippines. The conference was set to provide a high level of international forum and had brought together leading academic scientists, industry professionals, researchers and scholars from universities, industries and government agencies who have shared their experiences, research results and discussed the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted as well as the advances in the fields of Applied Physics and Materials Science. This conference has provided a wide opportunity to establish multidisciplinary collaborations with local and foreign experts. ICAMS2013, held concurrently with 15th Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (SPVM) National Physics Conference and 2013 International Meeting for Complex Systems, was organized by the Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (Physics Society of Visayas and Mindanao) based in MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, Iligan City, Philippines. The international flavor of converging budding researchers and experts on Materials Science and Applied Physics was the first to be organized in the 19 years of SPVM operation in the Philippines. We highlighted ICAMS2013 gathering by the motivating presence of Dr. Stuart Parkin, a British Physicist, as one of our conference's plenary speakers. Equal measures of gratitude were also due to all other plenary speakers, Dr. Elizabeth Taylor of Institute of Physics (IOP) in London, Dr. Surya Raghu of Advanced Fluidics in Maryland, USA and Prof. Hitoshi Miyata of Niigata University, Japan, Prof. Djulia Onggo of Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, and Dr. Hironori Katagiri of Nagaoka National College of Technology, Japan. The warm hospitality of the host

  3. News Workshop: Teachers explore electronics Conference: ASE conference hits Nottingham Teacher training: Videoconferencing discovers asteroids Lecture: Annual education talk gets interactive Award: Britton receives a New Year's honour Multimedia: Multimedia conference 2010 will be held in France Conference series: ICPE travels to Thailand in 2009 Filming: Sixth-formers take physics on location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Workshop: Teachers explore electronics Conference: ASE conference hits Nottingham Teacher training: Videoconferencing discovers asteroids Lecture: Annual education talk gets interactive Award: Britton receives a New Year's honour Multimedia: Multimedia conference 2010 will be held in France Conference series: ICPE travels to Thailand in 2009 Filming: Sixth-formers take physics on location

  4. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  5. Conference Experience for Undergraduates in the Division of Nuclear Physics - 10 Years Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Warren

    2008-04-01

    The Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU), held annually in the APS Division of Nuclear Physics since 1998, has become a valuable addition to the fall DNP meetings. Since its inception 10 years ago, approximately 730 undergraduate students from over 60 colleges and universities from around the country (and a few from abroad) have participated. The goal of the program is to provide students who have conducted undergraduate research in nuclear science a ``capstone'' conference experience, with the goal toward strengthening retention of talented students in the field. In addition to the main conference, the CEU includes extra activities for the students, including the main research poster session, two undergraduate nuclear physics seminars, and a graduate school information session. CEU application materials are considered by an independent review committee, and travel and lodging grants are awarded based on project merit. Financial support is provided by the NSF, DOE, and DNP. At the recent 10^th anniversary CEU, a mini-symposium was organized as part of the DNP conference, at which former CEU students (now graduate students, post-docs, and professors) had opportunity to talk about their research and the influence that undergraduate research and conference participation had on their career paths. Survey and anecdotal data indicating benefits of CEU participation, as well as initial results from career path tracking will be presented.

  6. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference (9th, Atlanta, Georgia, January 22-24, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The conference reported in these proceedings focused on the sharing of recent innovations, successful programming and teaching concepts, and research in children's physical education. Materials are presented in three sections, one for each day of the conference. The first day's agenda included presentations by nationally known physical educators…

  7. Physics Computing '92: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Robert A.; Nadrchal, Jaroslav

    1993-04-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * INVITED PAPERS * Ab Initio Theoretical Approaches to the Structural, Electronic and Vibrational Properties of Small Clusters and Fullerenes: The State of the Art * Neural Multigrid Methods for Gauge Theories and Other Disordered Systems * Multicanonical Monte Carlo Simulations * On the Use of the Symbolic Language Maple in Physics and Chemistry: Several Examples * Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions in Catalysis and Population Models * Computer Algebra, Symmetry Analysis and Integrability of Nonlinear Evolution Equations * The Path-Integral Quantum Simulation of Hydrogen in Metals * Digital Optical Computing: A New Approach of Systolic Arrays Based on Coherence Modulation of Light and Integrated Optics Technology * Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Granular Materials * Numerical Implementation of a K.A.M. Algorithm * Quasi-Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random Numbers and Quasi-Error Estimates * What Can We Learn from QMC Simulations * Physics of Fluctuating Membranes * Plato, Apollonius, and Klein: Playing with Spheres * Steady States in Nonequilibrium Lattice Systems * CONVODE: A REDUCE Package for Differential Equations * Chaos in Coupled Rotators * Symplectic Numerical Methods for Hamiltonian Problems * Computer Simulations of Surfactant Self Assembly * High-dimensional and Very Large Cellular Automata for Immunological Shape Space * A Review of the Lattice Boltzmann Method * Electronic Structure of Solids in the Self-interaction Corrected Local-spin-density Approximation * Dedicated Computers for Lattice Gauge Theory Simulations * Physics Education: A Survey of Problems and Possible Solutions * Parallel Computing and Electronic-Structure Theory * High Precision Simulation Techniques for Lattice Field Theory * CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Case Study of Microscale Hydrodynamics Using Molecular Dynamics and Lattice Gas Methods * Computer Modelling of the Structural and Electronic Properties of the Supported Metal Catalysis

  8. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, H.; Bonacorsi, D.; Ueda, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) is a major series of international conferences intended to attract physicists and computing professionals to discuss on recent developments and trends in software and computing for their research communities. Experts from the high energy and nuclear physics, computer science, and information technology communities attend CHEP events. This conference series provides an international forum to exchange experiences and the needs of a wide community, and to present and discuss recent, ongoing, and future activities. At the beginning of the successful series of CHEP conferences in 1985, the latest developments in embedded systems, networking, vector and parallel processing were presented in Amsterdam. The software and computing ecosystem massively evolved since then, and along this path each CHEP event has marked a step further. A vibrant community of experts on a wide range of different high-energy and nuclear physics experiments, as well as technology explorer and industry contacts, attend and discuss the present and future challenges, and shape the future of an entire community. In such a rapidly evolving area, aiming to capture the state-of-the-art on software and computing through a collection of proceedings papers on a journal is a big challenge. Due to the large attendance, the final papers appear on the journal a few months after the conference is over. Additionally, the contributions often report about studies at very heterogeneous statuses, namely studies that are completed, or are just started, or yet to be done. It is not uncommon that by the time a specific paper appears on the journal some of the work is over a year old, or the investigation actually happened in different directions and with different methodologies than originally presented at the conference just a few months before. And by the time the proceedings appear in journal form, new ideas and explorations have

  9. Physics Computing '92: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Robert A.; Nadrchal, Jaroslav

    1993-04-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * INVITED PAPERS * Ab Initio Theoretical Approaches to the Structural, Electronic and Vibrational Properties of Small Clusters and Fullerenes: The State of the Art * Neural Multigrid Methods for Gauge Theories and Other Disordered Systems * Multicanonical Monte Carlo Simulations * On the Use of the Symbolic Language Maple in Physics and Chemistry: Several Examples * Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions in Catalysis and Population Models * Computer Algebra, Symmetry Analysis and Integrability of Nonlinear Evolution Equations * The Path-Integral Quantum Simulation of Hydrogen in Metals * Digital Optical Computing: A New Approach of Systolic Arrays Based on Coherence Modulation of Light and Integrated Optics Technology * Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Granular Materials * Numerical Implementation of a K.A.M. Algorithm * Quasi-Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random Numbers and Quasi-Error Estimates * What Can We Learn from QMC Simulations * Physics of Fluctuating Membranes * Plato, Apollonius, and Klein: Playing with Spheres * Steady States in Nonequilibrium Lattice Systems * CONVODE: A REDUCE Package for Differential Equations * Chaos in Coupled Rotators * Symplectic Numerical Methods for Hamiltonian Problems * Computer Simulations of Surfactant Self Assembly * High-dimensional and Very Large Cellular Automata for Immunological Shape Space * A Review of the Lattice Boltzmann Method * Electronic Structure of Solids in the Self-interaction Corrected Local-spin-density Approximation * Dedicated Computers for Lattice Gauge Theory Simulations * Physics Education: A Survey of Problems and Possible Solutions * Parallel Computing and Electronic-Structure Theory * High Precision Simulation Techniques for Lattice Field Theory * CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Case Study of Microscale Hydrodynamics Using Molecular Dynamics and Lattice Gas Methods * Computer Modelling of the Structural and Electronic Properties of the Supported Metal Catalysis

  10. Japan - UK Conference: Trends in Physics and Chemistry Education in Secondary Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    This conference, held in Tokyo between 3-5 April 1998, was the most recent product of a now longstanding involvement between British and Japanese physics teachers which has grown out of a personal friendship between Brenda Jennison (Cambridge University and Vice Chair of the Education Group) and Tae Ryu (Sophia University). For a number of years British teachers have hosted Japanese counterparts at the annual ASE meetings and in visits to schools following the conference. For this conference a team of four physicists, Brenda Jennison, lan Lawrence (King's School Worcester), Philip Britton (Leeds Grammar School) and Phil Scott (University of Leeds) travelled to Japan to contribute to a conference and visit schools and University Departments. Feelings on reading a conference report can too often resemble the experience of being shown a friend's holiday snaps. They are clearly very interesting but equally clearly your friend is enjoying it more than you are, because the snaps are rekindling memories and thoughts. This set of reflections is an attempt to report on just four of those memories and thoughts rather than describe the pictures. Why organize an international conference? The conference was an event that almost took more months of tireless organization than it lasted in hours. It was conceived and brought to fruition amongst a welter of e-mail communications between Brenda Jennison, Tae Ryu and Maurice Jenkins of the British Council, who sponsored the event. Given this immense organizational task, just why did we bother? What can be gained by holding such an international event? The significant benefit of discussing issues between two cultures is clarifying which are the issues that are intrinsically due to the nature of physics teaching rather than the extrinsic effects of educational systems and customs. Unsurprisingly pupil motivation, pupil numbers, relevance, `up-to-date-ness' and the role of mathematics emerged as concerns in both cultures. Also there are

  11. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    The XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, CALOR2012, was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 4-8 June 2012. The series of conferences on calorimetry started in 1990 at Fermilab, and they have been the premier event for calorimeter aficionados, a trend that CALOR2012 upheld. This year, several presentations focused on the status of the major calorimeter systems, especially at the LHC. Discussions on new and developing techniques in calorimetry took a full day. Excellent updates on uses of calorimeters or about ideas that are deeply rooted in particle physics calorimetry in astrophysics and neutrino physics were followed by talks on algorithms and special triggers that rely on calorimeters. Finally, discussions of promising current developments and ongoing R&D work for future calorimeters capped the conference. The field of calorimetry is alive and well, as evidenced by the more than 100 attendees and the excellent quality of over 80 presentations. You will find the written contributions in this volume. The presentations can be found at calor2012.ttu.edu. The first day of the conference was dedicated to the LHC. In two invited talks, Guillaume Unal (CERN) and Tommaso Tabarelli de Fatis (Universita' & INFN Milano Bicocca) discussed the critical role electromagnetic calorimeters play in the hunt for the Standard Model Higgs boson in ATLAS and CMS, respectively. The enhanced sensitivity for light Higgs in the two-gamma decay channel renders electromagnetic calorimeters indispensible. Much of the higher mass region was already excluded for the SM Higgs by the time of this conference, and after less than a month, on 4 July, CERN announced the discovery of a new boson at 125 GeV, a particle that seems consistent with the Higgs particle so far. Once again, without the electromagnetic calorimeters, this would not have been possible. Professor Geoffrey West from the Santa Fe Institute gave the keynote address. His talk, 'Universal Scaling Laws

  12. Concluding remarks. International Conference on Nuclear Physics, Berkeley, California, August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Feshbach, H.

    1980-10-01

    Not a conference summary, these concluding remarks consider five major themes that were illuminated during the conference and the problems within them that need to be resolved in the future. The five topics considered and the following: new degrees of freedom (single-particle motion, giant resonances, nuclear molecular resonances, nuclear matter, kaon-produced hypernuclei, implications of the bag model and quantum chromodynamics), new forms of matter, new reaction mechanisms (direct vs compound-nucleus reactions, heavy-ion reactions), new aspects of the weak interactions in nuclei (weak neutral currents, P invariance), and new symmetries. 4 figures. (RWR)

  13. PREFACE: International conference on Computer Simulation in Physics and beyond (CSP2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International conference on Computer Simulations in Physics and beyond (CSP2015) was held from 6-10 September 2015 at the campus of the Moscow Institute for Electronics and Mathematics (MIEM), National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow. Computer simulations are in increasingly popular tool for scientific research, supplementing experimental and analytical research. The main goal of the conference is contributing to the development of methods and algorithms which take into account trends in hardware development, which may help with intensive research. The conference also allowed senior scientists and students to have the opportunity to speak each other and exchange ideas and views on the developments in the area of high-performance computing in science. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Federal Agency of Scientific Organizations, and Higher School of Economics.

  14. 5th International conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Bikash; Alam, Jan-E.; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2006-11-01

    The 5th International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma (ICPAQGP 2005) was held on 8 - 12 February 2005 at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics campus, Kolkata, India. The conference was enriched by the august presence of about 300 participants representing 18 countries across the globe. It had plenary talks and oral presentations, which form a part of these proceedings. Besides invited and contributed talks there were also a large number of poster presentations. The conference was energized by discussions of fresh experimental data from RHIC on strong elliptic flow, jet quenching, single photon spectra etc. Moreover, new theoretical results were brought to the discussion forum during this conference. Colour glass condensates, hydrodynamical flow, jet quenching and sQGP were intensely debated by the participants. The highlight of ICPAQGP 2005 was the presentation of fresh experimental results from the RHIC-IV run. The ICPAQGP series, since its inception in 1988, has placed emphasis on the role of quark matter in the fields of astrophysics and cosmology. The subsequent conferences held in 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 had also retained this focus. The conference was preceded by a Fest Colloquium in honour of Professor Bikash Sinha. Professor Sinha, regarded as the pioneer in establishing quark gluon plasma research in India, has successfully encouraged a group of young Indian researchers to devote themselves wholeheartedly to QGP research - both theoretical and experimental. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role mainly in the selection of speakers. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from selecting the contributory talks posters down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both committees for making ICPAQGP 2005 an interesting platform for scientific deliberation. The ICPAQGP 2005 was supported financially by

  15. Japan - UK Conference: Trends in Physics and Chemistry Education in Secondary Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    This conference, held in Tokyo between 3-5 April 1998, was the most recent product of a now longstanding involvement between British and Japanese physics teachers which has grown out of a personal friendship between Brenda Jennison (Cambridge University and Vice Chair of the Education Group) and Tae Ryu (Sophia University). For a number of years British teachers have hosted Japanese counterparts at the annual ASE meetings and in visits to schools following the conference. For this conference a team of four physicists, Brenda Jennison, lan Lawrence (King's School Worcester), Philip Britton (Leeds Grammar School) and Phil Scott (University of Leeds) travelled to Japan to contribute to a conference and visit schools and University Departments. Feelings on reading a conference report can too often resemble the experience of being shown a friend's holiday snaps. They are clearly very interesting but equally clearly your friend is enjoying it more than you are, because the snaps are rekindling memories and thoughts. This set of reflections is an attempt to report on just four of those memories and thoughts rather than describe the pictures. Why organize an international conference? The conference was an event that almost took more months of tireless organization than it lasted in hours. It was conceived and brought to fruition amongst a welter of e-mail communications between Brenda Jennison, Tae Ryu and Maurice Jenkins of the British Council, who sponsored the event. Given this immense organizational task, just why did we bother? What can be gained by holding such an international event? The significant benefit of discussing issues between two cultures is clarifying which are the issues that are intrinsically due to the nature of physics teaching rather than the extrinsic effects of educational systems and customs. Unsurprisingly pupil motivation, pupil numbers, relevance, `up-to-date-ness' and the role of mathematics emerged as concerns in both cultures. Also there are

  16. The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics: Global Perspectives, Common Concerns, Worldwide Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastavker, Yevgeniya V.

    2009-03-01

    The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP), held in Seoul, Korea, in October 2008, brought together 300 participants from 57 countries, including a diverse 22-member U.S. Delegation, for a 3-day summit of stimulating discussions, thought-provoking presentations, inspirational posters, and networking. Held under the auspices of the Working Group on Women in Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), this meeting built on the successes of the 1^st (Paris, 2002) and 2^nd (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) Conferences and further clarified the importance of diversifying the field of physics worldwide. Although considerable progress has been made since 2002, it was clear that the global scientific workforce is still under-utilizing a large percentage of the available female talent pool. If human society is to benefit to its fullest from various contributions that the field of physics can offer in addressing global issues of economic crisis, energy, environment, water, health, poverty, and hunger, women of all races and nationalities need to become fully included and engaged in the national and international physical community. To address these and many other issues, the ICWIP unanimously approved a five-part resolution to IUPAP recommending actions to promote the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in physics and related fields.

  17. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    The XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, CALOR2012, was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 4-8 June 2012. The series of conferences on calorimetry started in 1990 at Fermilab, and they have been the premier event for calorimeter aficionados, a trend that CALOR2012 upheld. This year, several presentations focused on the status of the major calorimeter systems, especially at the LHC. Discussions on new and developing techniques in calorimetry took a full day. Excellent updates on uses of calorimeters or about ideas that are deeply rooted in particle physics calorimetry in astrophysics and neutrino physics were followed by talks on algorithms and special triggers that rely on calorimeters. Finally, discussions of promising current developments and ongoing R&D work for future calorimeters capped the conference. The field of calorimetry is alive and well, as evidenced by the more than 100 attendees and the excellent quality of over 80 presentations. You will find the written contributions in this volume. The presentations can be found at calor2012.ttu.edu. The first day of the conference was dedicated to the LHC. In two invited talks, Guillaume Unal (CERN) and Tommaso Tabarelli de Fatis (Universita' & INFN Milano Bicocca) discussed the critical role electromagnetic calorimeters play in the hunt for the Standard Model Higgs boson in ATLAS and CMS, respectively. The enhanced sensitivity for light Higgs in the two-gamma decay channel renders electromagnetic calorimeters indispensible. Much of the higher mass region was already excluded for the SM Higgs by the time of this conference, and after less than a month, on 4 July, CERN announced the discovery of a new boson at 125 GeV, a particle that seems consistent with the Higgs particle so far. Once again, without the electromagnetic calorimeters, this would not have been possible. Professor Geoffrey West from the Santa Fe Institute gave the keynote address. His talk, 'Universal Scaling Laws

  18. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  19. Proceedings of the International Conference on Physics Education. (Nanjing, The People's Republic of China, August 31-September 5, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Union of Pure and Applied Physics.

    This document contains 65 papers presented at the International Conference on Physics Education. Included are papers dealing with: (1) physics education in China; (2) the evaluation of physics courses in engineering colleges; (3) climate and weather; (4) the implications of physics education research for the classroom; (5) university physics…

  20. PREFACE: IC-MSQUARE 2012: International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, Theocharis; Vagenas, Elias; Vlachos, Dimitrios

    2013-02-01

    The first International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Budapest, Hungary, from Monday 3 to Friday 7 September 2012. The conference was attended by more than 130 participants, and hosted about 290 oral, poster and virtual papers by more than 460 pre-registered authors. The first IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields in which mathematical modelling is used, such as theoretical/mathematical physics, neutrino physics, non-integrable systems, dynamical systems, computational nanoscience, biological physics, computational biomechanics, complex networks, stochastic modelling, fractional statistics, DNA dynamics, and macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, two parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The mounting question is whether this occurred accidentally, or whether IC-MSQUARE is a necessity in the field of physical and mathematical modelling. For all of us working in the field, the existing and established conferences in this particular field suffer from two distinguished and recognized drawbacks: the first is the increasing orientation, while the second refers to the extreme specialization of the meetings. Therefore, a conference which aims to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with applications of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology, environmental sciences etc., appears to be a necessity. This is the key role that IC-MSQUARE will play. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to IC-MSQUARE. We would also

  1. Trieste conference on digital microelectronics and microprocessors in particle physics: Summary and concluding remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1988-08-01

    This paper is a written version of the Concluding Remarks presented at the International Conference on the Impact of Digital Microelectronics and Microprocessors on Particle Physics. The Conference emphasized on-line data acquisition and triggering problems in high energy physics. Among the participants there was a clearly growing consensus that as these real time systems become larger they require more attention from the beginning to overall system coherence and manageability issues. We consider what this means for SSC/LHC era detectors. Given the interesting results on pixel silicon, neural networks, and parallel microprocessor based computers presented at Trieste, we speculate on some surprisingly simple, though still very radical, ideas on systems solutions for those huge detectors.

  2. Report on the 4th International IUPAP Women in Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Cynthia

    2011-10-01

    Stellenbosch, South Africa was the site of the 4^th International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) International Conference on Women in Physics, which took place on April 5^th-8^th. This conference brought together the diverse contributions of 250 female physicist attendees from nearly 60 countries worldwide to dissect the challenges faced by female physicists worldwide and to propose strategies to attract and retain more girls and women to the field. Having served as a member of the U.S. Delegation, I will discuss the resolutions reached and highlight the most important results of Global Survey of Physicists, where nearly 15,000 physicists shine light on how gender affects their lives and careers.

  3. PREFACE: XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livan, Michele

    2009-07-01

    The XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics was held in Pavia, Italy, 26-30 May 2008, picking up the baton from the 2006 Conference in Chicago. The Conference took place in the unique environment of the Theresian Room of the University Library. The attendees were surrounded by over 40 000 books of general interest and culture, and had the opportunity to see precious volumes written by such people as Galileo, Volta and Faraday. The Workshop brought together more than 120 participants, including senior scientists as well as young physicists, confirming the central and ever-growing role of calorimeters in modern particle physics. The development of these detectors, as stressed by Professor Klaus Pretzl in his lectio magistralis, has made it possible to explore new frontiers in physics, and the present scenario is no exception to this rule. With the LHC experiments almost completely installed and ready to take data, the Conference was an ideal chance to review the status of the different projects, whose development has been followed and discussed throughout the entire Calor series, and to show that they are capable of meeting the design specifications. Other highlights were the performance and physics results of calorimeters installed in currently operating experiments. In the session on astrophysics and neutrinos, the contributions confirmed the key role of calorimeters in this sector and demonstrated their growing application even beyond the field of accelerator physics. Considerable time was devoted to the state-of-the-art techniques in the design and operation of the detectors, while the session on simulation addressed the importance of a thorough understanding of the shower development to meet the demanding requirements of present experiments. Finally, on the R&D side, the particle flow and dual read-out concepts confronted the challenges issued by the next generation of experiments. This complex material was reviewed in 83

  4. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, M.; Watanabe, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Takayasu, H.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains contributed papers from the 7th international conference on 'Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis (APFA)' held at Tokyo on 1-5 March 2009. The conference was organized jointly by Tokyo Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University with support from the Research Institute of Economy, Trade, and Industry (RIETI), Physical Society of Japan, Japanese Economic Association, Information Processing Society of Japan, Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence, and Japan Association for Evolutionary Economics. The first APFA conference (APFA1) was held in 1999 at Dublin, followed by APFA2 at Liege in 2000, APFA3 at London in 2001, APFA4 at Warsaw in 2003, APFA5 at Torino in 2006, and APFA6 at Lisbon in 2007. The 7th APFA conference, which is the first meeting held outside Europe, was attended by 223 researchers in physics and economics from 23 countries world-wide. In keeping with past APFA conferences, we paid special attention to issues in financial markets, which turned out to be very timely. The conference was held in March 2009, in the middle of the global financial crisis that originally started in the US and spread quickly to every corner of the world. The topic of the conference is 'New Approaches to the Analysis of Large Scale Business and Economic data'. The rapid development of information and communication technology has enabled financial/non-financial firms to keep detailed records of their business activities in the form of, for example, tick-by-tick data in financial markets, point-of-sale (POS) data on individual household's purchasing activity, and interfirm network data describing relationships among firms in terms of suppliers/customers transactions and ownerships. This growth in the scope and amount of business data available to researchers has led to a far-reaching expansion in research possibilities. Researchers not only in social sciences but also in physics, mathematics, and information sciences have recently

  5. 16th Russian Youth Conference on Physics of Semiconductors and Nanostructures, Opto- and Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suris, Robert A.; Vorobjev, Leonid E.; Firsov, Dmitry A.

    2015-01-01

    The 16th Russian Youth Conference on Physics of Semiconductors and Nanostructures, Opto- and Nanoelectronics was held on November 24 - 28 at St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The program of the Conference included semiconductor technology, heterostructures with quantum wells and quantum dots, opto- and nanoelectronic devices, and new materials. A large number of participants with about 200 attendees from many regions of Russia provided a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between students and experienced scientists. The Conference included two invited talks given by a corresponding member of RAS P.S. Kopyev ("Nitrides: the 4th Nobel Prize on semiconductor heterostructures") and Dr. A.V. Ivanchik ("XXI century is the era of precision cosmology"). Students, graduate and postgraduate students presented their results on plenary and poster sessions. The total number of accepted papers published in Russian (the official conference language) was 92. Here we publish 18 of them in English. Like previous years, the participants were involved in the competition for the best report. Certificates and cash prizes were awarded to a number of participants for the presentations selected by the Program Committee. Two special E.F. Gross Prizes were given for the best presentations in semiconductor optics. Works with potential applications were recommended for participation in the following competition for support from the Russian Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises in Science and Technology. The Conference was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the "Dynasty" foundation and the innovation company "ATC - Semiconductor Devices", St. Petersburg. The official Conference website is http://www.semicond.spbstu.ru/conf2014-eng.html

  6. CALOR2012 XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Akchurin, Nural .

    2015-05-04

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, or the CALOR series, have always been where the calorimeter experts come together to review the state of calorimetry and bring forth new ideas every two years. The fteenth conference, CALOR2012, in Santa Fe was no exception. Although they were built roughly a decade ago, we are now witnessing the exceptional power of the LHC calorimeters and the crucial role they have been playing in the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs-like boson. As we ruminate on the coming generation of experiments at the next (linear) collider and on the upgrades at the LHC, we are heartened by the substantial advances we made in calorimetry in the last decade. These advances will certainly help uncover new physics in the years to come, not only at colliders but also in astroparticle experiments that take advantage of natural elements such as air, water, and ice. The proceedings were published by the IOP in Journal of Physics, Vol 404 2011. The conference web site is calor2012.ttu.edu.

  7. FOREWORD: 27th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT27)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2014-12-01

    The Low Temperature Physics Conference is an international event held every three years, under the auspices of the IUPAP through its Commission C5 on Low Temperature Physics. These conferences aim at the exchange of information and views among the members of the international scientific community in the general field of Low Temperature Physics, promoting the excellence of invited and contributed presentations. It is a tradition that LT offers updates on the various topics, provided by the highest representatives of the field, as well as oral and poster contributions in the different areas. LT27 was the first conference of the series that took place in South America. It was therefore a particular challenge for us and it is a source of pride to present these Proceedings as proof of the wonderful scientific atmosphere at the meeting. We wish to acknowledge our host institutions, sponsors, and the many people whose work made this meeting possible. Our appreciation goes to all of them, as well as to speakers and attendants.

  8. 24th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (2012): Introduction, acknowledgements, program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Takabe, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    Welcome to CCP2012, held next to the K computer site in Kobe and in Japan's best season. The Conference on Computational Physics (CCP) is organized annually under the auspices of Commission 20 of the IUPAP (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics). This is the first time it has been held in Japan. I was asked to be the chairman about two and half years ago and when I accepted the request I decided to make the conference very unique and different from the traditional style of CCP. I was not satisfied when I attended big conferences where the parallel sessions are classified with the name of the research field. These days we have many opportunities to attend domestic and international conferences, where it is possible to listen to many talks on the same topics. If the topics are very new, then the conference is very useful for my research. However, I wanted to have a conference where I could listen to a variety of topics carried out with the same method. Computational science is very unique and it is easy to organize a new type of conference with the classification in the horizontal direction of the matrix made of the names of research fields and the name of numerical methods. You may be able to list the names of methods easily; finite difference, Monte Carlo, particle, molecular dynamics and so on. I was dissatisfied to find that most conferences focus solely on research fields and the method that brings to the scientific research is not highlighted as much. I wanted to listen to topics from fundamental physics to industrial science in a systematic way. In order to create such a conference, a small number of experts is not enough, so I asked for the help of more than 100 Japanese computer scientists, in a variety of fields. We called this group the Japan Advisory Board (JAB). I asked them to recommend a member of the International Advisory Board (IAB). Then, we could start making the list of plenary and invited speakers. This was almost the end of March last

  9. PREFACE: 13th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, Pierre; Pinfield, Valerie; Cegla, Frederic; Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The 13th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held at Selsdon Park Hotel, Croydon near London, United Kingdom, on 15-17 January 2014. The venue was an excellent location to exchange ideas, regardless whether this happened in the conference room, over lunch at the drinks reception in the conservatory, in the oak panelled bar after the conference dinner or in the local pub next door. Over 45 papers were presented at the conference. There were over 60 delegates from institutions covering four countries. The invited speakers from the French side shared their knowledge about the generation of sound from supersonic jets (Prof Christophe Bailly, École Centrale de Lyon) and the application of ultrasonic microscropy in the nuclear industry (Prof Gilles Despaux, Université de Montpellier). The UK invited speakers included Prof Malcolm Povey (University of Leeds), who talked about characterisation of the nucleation of crystals using ultrasound, and Prof Bruce Drinkwater (University of Bristol), who captured the audience by speaking about "ultrasonic lassos" and ultrasonic particle manipulation. There was a strong representation of laser ultrasonics at the meeting with scientific considerations of problems and applications that range from the macro to the nanoscale. There were also numerous papers on the interaction of elastic and acoustic waves with complex materials and scattering of these waves by materials such as foams or cavitating liquids. Presentations on biomedical applications are increasingly being featured at AFPAC meetings. Talks this year covered topics such as imaging and high-intensity focused ultrasound for therapeutic applications. Finally, there were also several contributions from the field of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) with talks ranging from the determination of the properties of in vivo wood to ultrasonic scattering techniques and tomographic reconstructions to recover the size and shape of

  10. ITIH family genes confer risk to schizophrenia and major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    He, Kuanjun; Wang, Qingzhong; Chen, Jianhua; Li, Tao; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Wenjin; Wen, Zujia; Qiang, Yu; Wang, Meng; Shen, Jiawei; Song, Zhijian; Ji, Jue; Feng, Guoyin; Qi, Shuguang; Lin, He; Shi, Yongyong; Cheng, Zaohuo

    2014-06-01

    As a major extracellular matrix component, ITIHs played an important role in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Several genome-wide association studies have reported that some positive signals which were derived from the tight linkage disequilibrium region on chromosome 3p21 were associated with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in the Caucasian population. To further investigate whether this genomic region is also a susceptibility locus of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population, we conducted this study by recruiting 1235 schizophrenia patients, 1045 major depressive disorder patients and 1235 healthy control subjects in the Han Chinese samples for a case-control study. We genotyped seven SNPs within this region using TaqMan® technology. We found that rs2710322 was significantly associated with schizophrenia (adjusted P(allele) = 0.0018, adjusted P(genotype) = 0.006, OR [95% CI] = 1.278 [1.117-1.462]) while rs1042779 was weakly associated with schizophrenia (adjusted P(allele) = 0.048, OR [95% CI] = 1.164 [1.040-1.303]) and major depressive disorder (adjusted P(allele) = 0.042, OR [95% CI] = 1.178 [1.047-1.326]); it was also our finding that rs3821831 was positively associated with major depressive disorder (adjusted P(allele) = 0.003, adjusted P(genotype) = 0.006, OR [95% CI] = 1.426 [1.156-1.760]). Furthermore, no haplotype was found to be associated with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. Via the association analysis which combines the schizophrenia and major depressive disorder cases, we also notice that rs1042779 and rs3821831 were significantly associated with combined cases (rs1042779: adjusted P(allele) = 0.012, adjusted P(genotype) = 0.018, OR [95% CI] = 1.171 [1.060-1.292]; rs3821831:adjusted P(genotype) = 0.012, OR [95% CI] = 1.193 [1.010-1.410]). Our results revealed that the shared genetic risk factors of both schizophrenia and major depressive disorder exist in ITIH family genes in the Han Chinese

  11. News Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

  12. Seventh annual National Conference of Black Physics students. Summary report, February 12--13, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 conference hosted a wide variety of presentations and activities. Continuing the NCBPS tradition, we offered technical physics presentations, tours of physics research facilities, a career and educational fair, technical presentations by students, dinner speakers and a dance. New this, year were the interactive workshops (described in the section entitled ``New Features``). We included a ``celebrity`` speaker -- Col. Fred Gregory, an African-American NASA astronaut This presentation was featured on the local TV news. There were two last minute changes to the program They included: the replacement of Howard Adams and Tim Childs with Sylvia Wilson and Warren Buck, respectively. Howard Adams was ill and canceled a couple of days in advance. He recommended Sylvia Wilson, also of the GEM Program, as a replacement speaker. The substitution worked quite well, especially since our program was lacking in female speakers. Tim Childs missed his flight so Warren Buck, who attended the conference as an observer, generously filled in at the last minute. We ran a brief survey of the corporate, governmental and educational recruiters who were part of our Career/Educational Fair. Of 15 recruiters, 9 responded to the survey. All who responded said they were pleased with the conference arrangements. See Appendix C for the complete results of the Survey for Recruiters.

  13. The NVL gene confers risk for both major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Chen, Jianhua; He, Kuanjun; Wang, Qingzhong; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Wen, Zujia; Song, Zhijian; Xu, Yifeng; Shi, Yongyong

    2015-10-01

    NVL (nuclear VCP (valosin containing protein)/p97-Like), a member of the AAA-ATPase (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) family, encodes a novel hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase)-interacting protein NVL2 which is a telomerase component essential for holoenzyme assembly. Previous researches have reported the impacts of telomerase activity on mental illness and the potential association between NVL and major depressive disorder. To validate the susceptibility of NVL to major depressive disorder, and to investigate the overlapping risk conferred by NVL for both major depressive disorder and schizophrenia, we analyzed 9 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag SNPs) using TaqMan® technology, in 1045 major depressive disorder patients, 1235 schizophrenia patients and 1235 normal controls of Han Chinese origin. We found that rs10916583 (P(allele) = 0.020, P(genotype) = 0.028, OR = 1.156) and rs16846649 (adjusted P(allele) = 0.014, P(genotype) = 0.007, OR = 0.718) were associated with major depressive disorder, while rs10916583 (adjusted P(allele) = 1.08E-02, OR = 1.213), rs16846649 (adjusted P(allele) = 7.40E-06, adjusted P(genotype) = 8.07E-05, OR = 0.598) and rs10799541 (adjusted P(allele) = 8.10E-03, adjusted P(genotype) = 0.049, OR= 0.826) showed statistically significant association with schizophrenia after Bonferroni correction. Furthermore, rs10916583 (adjusted P(allele) = 9.00E-03, adjusted P(genotype) = 3.15E-02, OR = 1.187) and rs16846649 (adjusted P(allele) = 8.92E-06, adjusted P(genotype) = 8.84E-05, OR = 0.653) remained strongly associated with the analysis of combined cases of major depressive disorder and schizophrenia after Bonferroni correction. Our results indicated that the NVL gene may contain overlapping common genetic risk factors for major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. The roles of NVL in telomerase biogenesis were also highlighted in psychiatric pathogenesis. The study on

  14. Wilderness Leadership for Physical Education Majors: The Current National Status of Wilderness Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Ping; Jewell, John; Davies, Nigel; Fletcher, Sue; McLaughlin, Erin; Workman, Gayle

    Outdoor/adventure education is a relatively new content area required by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for students majoring in physical education. Teacher preparation programs in physical education have yet to adopt a standardized curriculum. A survey was completed by 162 of the 536 physical education programs in…

  15. Physics Majors: Where do they come from? Where do they go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    Physics majors represent a small but important part of the physics education system in the United States. They also make up an equally small but important part of the workforce and supply post secondary institutions with students pursuing graduate level degrees in physics. This paper will give an over view of the backgrounds of undergraduate physics majors, the types of institutions and departments they attend, and their experiences as undergraduates. It will outline the types of employment new physics bachelors accept including employment sectors, work activities and the fields in which they are employed. Finally, it will give an overview of the physics majors (and others) who pursue graduate level physics education and their initial employment outcomes.

  16. PREFACE: 16th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Rainer W.

    2015-02-01

    The XVIth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics - CALOR 2014 - was held in Giessen, Germany from 6-11 April 2014 at the Science Campus of the University. It was hosted by the Justus-Liebig-University and the HIC for FAIR Helmholtz International Center. The series of conferences on calorimetry were started in 1990 at Fermilab and are focusing primarily on operating and future calorimeter systems within the Hadron and High-Energy Physics community without neglecting the impact on other fields such as Astrophysics or Medical Imaging. Confirmed by the impressive list of over 70 oral presentations, 5 posters and over 100 attendees, the field of calorimetry appears alive and attractive. The present volume contains the written contributions of almost all presentations which can be found at http://calor2014.de. Time slots of 15 or 30 minutes including discussion were allocated. The conference was accompanied by a small exhibition of several industrial companies related to the field. The day before the opening of the scientific program, Richard Wigmans gave an excellent and vivid tutorial on basic aspects on calorimetry meant as an introduction for students and conference attendees new in the field. The opening ceremony was used to give an impression of the present and future status and the scientific program of the new FAIR facility nearby at Darmstadt presented by Klaus Peters from GSI. The conference program of the first day was dedicated to the performance and required future upgrade of the LHC experiments, dominated by ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The program of the next day contained specific aspects on electronics and readout as well as calorimetry in outer space. Several contributions discussed in detail new concepts for hadron calorimeters within the CALICE collaboration completed by a session on sampling calorimeters. The next sections were dedicated to operating and future calorimeters at various laboratories and covering a wide range of

  17. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSquare2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Dimitrios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    The 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Mykonos, Greece, from Friday 5th June to Monday 8th June 2015. The Conference was attended by more than 150 participants and hosted about 200 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. There were more than 600 pre-registered authors. The 4th IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather intense as after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high quality of talks creating an innovative and productive scientific environment for all attendees. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  18. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The third International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Madrid, Spain, from Thursday 28 to Sunday 31 August 2014. The Conference was attended by more than 200 participants and hosted about 350 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. More than 600 pre-registered authors were also counted. The third IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral sessions and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  19. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences 2013 (IC-MSQUARE 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The second International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Prague, Czech Republic, from Sunday 1 September to Thursday 5 September 2013. The Conference was attended by more than 280 participants and hosted about 400 oral, poster, and virtual presentations while counted more than 600 pre-registered authors. The second IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel sessions were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee. Further information on the editors, speakers and committees is available in the attached pdf.

  20. Multiple Loci within the Major Histocompatibility Complex Confer Risk of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Soltani-Arabshahi, Razieh; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nair, Rajan P.; Stuart, Philip; Elder, James T.; Schrodi, Steven J.; Begovich, Ann B.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Callis-Duffin, Kristina P.; Krueger, Gerald G.; Goldgar, David E.

    2009-01-01

    that there are at least two additional loci within the MHC conferring risk of psoriasis. PMID:19680446

  1. WHY TEACH PHYSICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BROWN, SANBORN C.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BOOK CONTAINS A SURVEY OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON PHYSICS IN GENERAL EDUCATION, HELD IN RIO DE JANEIRO IN JULY 1963. THIS WAS THE SECOND CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED PHYSICS. CONFERENCE ADDRESSES, CONSTITUTING THE MAJOR PORTION OF THE TEXT, CONSIDER THE TEACHING OF SECONDARY SCHOOL GENERAL EDUCATION…

  2. Differences in Personality, Attitude, and Cognitive Abilities Found Among Biological, Physical Science and Non Science Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale

    Historically, few women pursue studies or careers in science. In an effort to determine factors that relate to a scientific career choice, this research examines differences between sexes and among majors in 180 males and females in biological, physical science, and nonscience college majors. Nonscience majors mostly included female language…

  3. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI-96)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaya, Yohko; Kambara, Tadashi

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at the Eighth International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI-96) which was held on September 23-26, 1996 in Omiya, Saitama, Japan, hosted by the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN). The first conference of this series was held in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982. The subject was the "Production and Physics of Highly Charged Ions". The conference has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992) and Vienna, Austria (1994). When the first conference of this series was held, various highly charged ions were available from many heavy ion accelerators, which had been constructed since the 1960's, and ion sources such as EBIS and ECRIS, which were then new facilities. Subsequently, many other experimental techniques have been developed to study or to control highly charged ions, such as ion traps, EBIT's, storage rings, high-brilliance synchrotron radiation, and so forth. Now the properties of highly charged ions themselves and their interactions with various kinds of materials can be studied systematically using ions of any element at various collision energies. These studies will result in a deeper insight into their nature as well as giving us important basic data for use in the fields closely related to atomic physics. About 190 scientists from 18 countries registered at the HCI-96. The number of invited talks was 21 and that of contrib- uted papers 215. In these proceedings, 20 papers of invited talks and 116 papers on contributions are included. They are classified into categories of "Structure and Spectroscopy of Highly Charged Ions and Fundamental Aspects", "Highly Charged Ions in Plasmas and Strong Fields", "Interactions of Highly Charged Ions with Atoms and Ions", "Dynamic Processes Related to Molecules and Clusters", "Interactions of Highly Charged Ions with

  4. AINSE Plasma Science and Technology Conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White Workshop on Fundamental Problems in the Physics of Magnetically Confined Plasmas: Conference handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The handbook contains abstracts of papers and posters presented at the conference. The main topics relate to plasma physics and fusion, plasma processing and uses as well as specific fusion devices and experiments. Eighty-four out of ninety-two presentations were considered to be in the INIS subject scope and have been separately indexed.

  5. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, Gennadii A.

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews the history of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FIAN in Russ. abbr.). Major achievements of FIAN scientists are discussed, current activities are described, and future prospects are outlined.

  6. Between the poles: Locating physics majors in the expert-novice continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth Ellen

    2007-12-01

    Expert-novice comparisons have been a productive research tool for investigating many aspect of physics education, including physics conceptions, views about physics, and problem solving activities. These comparisons have typically focused on differences between introductory physics students and physics professor. This thesis examines undergraduate physics majors, who have an intermediate amount of experience studying physics. Known expert-novice distinctions are used to characterize physics majors' views about science and problem solving activities. Views about science are measured with the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey. Follow-up interviews allowed students to elaborate on their responses to the survey and informed the interpretation of the survey data. During the interviews, students were asked to solve two physics problems. The students' approaches to these problems and their problem solving heuristics are characterized using a scheme developed from known expert-novice differences. It was found that undergraduate physics majors' have many views and problem solving abilities that are similar to those of experts. The implications for teaching physics and physics education research are discussed.

  7. The neuronal transporter gene SLC6A15 confers risk to major depression.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Martin A; Lucae, Susanne; Saemann, Philipp G; Schmidt, Mathias V; Demirkan, Ayse; Hek, Karin; Czamara, Darina; Alexander, Michael; Salyakina, Daria; Ripke, Stephan; Hoehn, David; Specht, Michael; Menke, Andreas; Hennings, Johannes; Heck, Angela; Wolf, Christiane; Ising, Marcus; Schreiber, Stefan; Czisch, Michael; Müller, Marianne B; Uhr, Manfred; Bettecken, Thomas; Becker, Albert; Schramm, Johannes; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Nöthen, Markus M; Cichon, Sven; Craig, Ian W; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn M; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2011-04-28

    Major depression (MD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and a leading cause of loss in work productivity. A combination of genetic and environmental risk factors probably contributes to MD. We present data from a genome-wide association study revealing a neuron-specific neutral amino acid transporter (SLC6A15) as a susceptibility gene for MD. Risk allele carrier status in humans and chronic stress in mice were associated with a downregulation of the expression of this gene in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the pathophysiology of MD. The same polymorphisms also showed associations with alterations in hippocampal volume and neuronal integrity. Thus, decreased SLC6A15 expression, due to genetic or environmental factors, might alter neuronal circuits related to the susceptibility for MD. Our convergent data from human genetics, expression studies, brain imaging, and animal models suggest a pathophysiological mechanism for MD that may be accessible to drug targeting. PMID:21521612

  8. The neuronal transporter gene SLC6A15 confers risk to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Martin A.; Lucae, Susanne; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Demirkan, Ayse; Hek, Karin; Czamara, Darina; Alexander, Michael; Salyakina, Daria; Ripke, Stephan; Hoehn, David; Specht, Michael; Menke, Andreas; Hennings, Johannes; Heck, Angela; Wolf, Christiane; Ising, Marcus; Schreiber, Stefan; Czisch, Michael; Müller, Marianne B.; Uhr, Manfred; Bettecken, Thomas; Becker, Albert; Schramm, Johannes; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Cichon, Sven; Craig, Ian W.; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Binder, Elisabeth B.

    2011-01-01

    Major depression (MD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and a leading cause of loss in work productivity. A combination of genetic and environmental risk factors likely contributes to MD. We present data from a genome-wide association study revealing a neuron-specific neutral amino acid transporter (SLC6A15) as a novel susceptibility gene for MD. Risk allele carrier status in humans and chronic stress in mice were associated with a downregulation of the expression of this gene in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the pathophysiology of MD. The same polymorphisms also showed associations with alterations in hippocampal volume and neuronal integrity. Thus, decreased SLC6A15 expression, due to genetic or environmental factors might alter neuronal circuits related to the susceptibility for MD. Our convergent data from human genetics, expression studies, brain imaging and animal models suggest a novel pathophysiological mechanism for MD that may be accessible to drug targeting. PMID:21521612

  9. REPORT FROM THE ORGANIZERS: The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) was hosted by the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium of the Leiden Institute of Physics and held in the RAI Convention Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. It was the second time that the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory had the privilege of organizing an LT conference. In 1958, at LT6, 50 years of liquid helium temperatures were commemorated; in 2008 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the remarkable achievements of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators in Leiden. In 1958 there were 323 participants and 145 papers appeared in the proceedings; in 2008 these numbers had increased to 1390 participants and 900 papers, of which eventually 849 were accepted. This large participation required adequate conference and housing facilities. These could not be found in Leiden, but were conveniently available in Amsterdam. The triennial International Low Temperature Conferences are organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) through Commission C5 on Low Temperature Physics. It is the most important global meeting that brings together the international scientific community in the broad field of Low Temperature Physics. Because the meeting is held only every third year the 11 plenary and 22 half plenary talks (of 45 or 30 min.) generally provide an overview of important new discoveries over the last few years, whereas the 161 short oral presentations (20 min.) are mainly focused on very recent developments. Since the field is broad, embracing a large section of condensed matter physics, the program is divided into five parallel program lines: A. Quantum Gases, Fluids and Solids B. Superconductivity C. Quantum Phase Transitions and Magnetism D. Electronic Quantum Transport in Condensed Matter E. Cryogenic Techniques and Applications This distinction was used both to group the 1625 accepted abstracts, and the short-oral and poster presentations; the

  10. The Graduate Record Examination as an indicator of learning of the curriculum taught to physics majors in US institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halley, J. W.; Adjoudani, Azin; Heller, Patricia; Terwilliger, James S.

    1991-05-01

    A study is described to evaluate the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as an indicator of learning by undergraduate physics majors. Measures were obtained of the overlap of the Graduate Record Examination in physics with the curriculum as it is taught to physics majors in US colleges and universities. The output of the project, for a given subfield f and set j of institutions, was two numbers Rj, f1 and Rj, f2. These two numbers estimated the extent to which (1) for Rj, f1, the curriculum prepares students at institutions j to take that part of the GRE which covers subfield f and (2) for Rj, f2, the GRE covers the materials in subfield f taught in the curriculum of institutions j. The subfields f were mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, modern physics, and ``other'' (including experimental, mathematical, and solid-state physics). The institutions j were grouped into four categories: ``top graduate'' (those with the 20 best-ranked graduate programs); ``top undergraduate'' (those participating in the Oberlin Conference on College Science); ``random graduate'' (other institutions with graduate programs); and ``random undergraduate'' (other institutions without graduate programs). Generally the results show that the GRE does not cover the entire curriculum (low values of R2) for any institutional type. With regard to the coverage of the GRE by the curriculum (R1 values), there are significant differences between institutions of different types. Institutions with graduate programs have curricula that cover the modern physics and statistical mechanics aspects of the GRE significantly better than institutions without graduate programs.

  11. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yaming; Hutton, Roger

    2011-07-01

    This issue contains papers presented at the 15th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions, HCI2010. The conference was held at Fudan University, Shanghai, 29 August-3 September 2010. HCI is a biannual conference series going back to the very first conference held in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982. Previous editions in this millennium were held in Berkeley, USA, 2000; Caen, France, 2002; Vilnius, Lithuania, 2004; Belfast, UK, 2006, and Tokyo, Japan, 2008. The physics of highly charged ions, HCIs, is of great interest due to their key role in testing quantum electrodynamics in strong fields, and possible testing of parity non-conservation. However, HCIs also play crucial roles in the physics of hot plasmas, for example those produced in tokamak fusion devices and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Much of the diagnostics of matter under such extreme environments relies very heavily on high quality atomic data of HCIs. The field of x-ray astronomy hinges almost entirely on the use of spectral lines from HCIs to provide information from distant astrophysical plasmas and objects. Given these fundamental interests and the current rapid developments in fusion and x-ray astronomy, it is clear that the physics of HCIs is a rich area of research with strong and important connections to many important subfields of physics. New application areas of HCI physics are also under development: two examples are (a) to provide 13.5 nm—and later half of this wavelength—radiation for lithography and (b) applications in medical research. The need for high quality atomic data of HCIs is as important now as it has ever been. HCI2010 was attended by over 200 scientists from around 20 countries; see the following table. Over 70 of the participants were students, which is very encouraging for the future of HCI related physics. The academic programme was organized based on the suggestions from the International Advisory Board, and consisted of six review lectures

  12. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yaming; Hutton, Roger

    2011-07-01

    This issue contains papers presented at the 15th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions, HCI2010. The conference was held at Fudan University, Shanghai, 29 August-3 September 2010. HCI is a biannual conference series going back to the very first conference held in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982. Previous editions in this millennium were held in Berkeley, USA, 2000; Caen, France, 2002; Vilnius, Lithuania, 2004; Belfast, UK, 2006, and Tokyo, Japan, 2008. The physics of highly charged ions, HCIs, is of great interest due to their key role in testing quantum electrodynamics in strong fields, and possible testing of parity non-conservation. However, HCIs also play crucial roles in the physics of hot plasmas, for example those produced in tokamak fusion devices and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Much of the diagnostics of matter under such extreme environments relies very heavily on high quality atomic data of HCIs. The field of x-ray astronomy hinges almost entirely on the use of spectral lines from HCIs to provide information from distant astrophysical plasmas and objects. Given these fundamental interests and the current rapid developments in fusion and x-ray astronomy, it is clear that the physics of HCIs is a rich area of research with strong and important connections to many important subfields of physics. New application areas of HCI physics are also under development: two examples are (a) to provide 13.5 nm—and later half of this wavelength—radiation for lithography and (b) applications in medical research. The need for high quality atomic data of HCIs is as important now as it has ever been. HCI2010 was attended by over 200 scientists from around 20 countries; see the following table. Over 70 of the participants were students, which is very encouraging for the future of HCI related physics. The academic programme was organized based on the suggestions from the International Advisory Board, and consisted of six review lectures

  13. Strategic priorities for increasing physical activity among adults age 50 and older: the national blueprint consensus conference summary report.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Lisa; Senior, Jane; Park, Chae Hee; Mockenhaupt, Robin; Bazzarre, Terry; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2003-12-01

    On May 1, 2001, a coalition of national organizations released a major planning document designed to develop a national strategy for the promotion of physically active lifestyles among the mid-life and older adult population. The National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older was developed with input from 46 organizations with expertise in health, medicine, social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, gerontology/geriatrics, clinical science, public policy, marketing, medical systems, community organization, and environmental issues. The Blueprint notes that, despite a wealth of evidence about the benefits of physical activity for mid-life and older persons, there has been little success in convincing age 50+ Americans to adopt physically active lifestyles. The Blueprint identifies barriers in the areas of research, home and community programs, medical systems, public policy and advocacy, and marketing and communications. In addition to identifying barriers, the Blueprint proposes a number of concrete strategies that could be employed in order to overcome the barriers to physical activity in society at large. This report summarizes the outcome of the National Blueprint Consensus Conference that was held in October 2002. In this conference, representatives of more than 50 national organizations convened in Washington, D.C. with the goal of identifying high priority and high feasibility strategies which would advance the National Blueprint and which could be initiated within the next 12 to 24 months. Participants in the consensus conference were assigned to one of five breakout groups: home and community, marketing, medical systems, public policy, and research. Each breakout group was charged with identifying the three highest priority strategies within their area for effectively increasing physical activity levels in the mid-life and older adult population. In addition to the 15 strategies identified by the breakout groups, three

  14. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Particle Physics in memoriam Engin Arık and her Colleagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Serkant Ali; Jenni, Peter; Erkcan Özcan, Veysi; Nefer Şenoğuz, Vedat

    2012-02-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Particle Physics in memoriam Engin Arık and her Colleagues: Fatma Şenel Boydağ, İskender Hikmet, Mustafa Fidan, Berkol Doğan and Engin Abat was held at Doğuş University, İstanbul, Turkey on 20-25 June 2011. The conference was organized jointly by the Doğuş and Boğaziçi Universities, with support from CERN and the Turkish Academy of Sciences. This was the second International Conference on Particle Physics (ICPP) organized in memory of Engin Arık and her Colleagues who lost their lives in the tragic plane accident on November 30 2007, on their way to the workshop of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. The first of this conference series was held on 27-31 October 2008 at Boğaziçi University, İstanbul, Turkey. The conference is intended to be repeated every two years in Istanbul as a Conference Series under the name 'ICPP-Istanbul'. Professor Engin Arık had a pioneering role in experimental particle physics in Turkey, and was an inspiring teacher to many colleagues. She led the Turkish participation in experiments at CERN such as CHARMII, SMC, CHORUS, ATLAS and CAST. One of her latest involvements was in the national project to design the Turkish Accelerator Center with the collaboration of 10 Turkish universities including Doğuş and Boğaziçi. Our dear colleagues not only participated in the TAC project but also collaborated on the ATLAS (E Arık, E Abat and B Doğan) and CAST (E Arık, F Şenel Boydağ, İ Hikmet and B Doğan) experiments. We believe that the ICPP-Istanbul conference series has been, and will always be, a way to commemorate them in a most appropriate context. The topics covered in ICPP-Istanbul-II were 'LHC Physics and Tevatron Results', 'Neutrinos and Dark Matter', 'Particle Factories' and 'Accelerator Physics and Future TeV Scale Colliders'. The main emphasis was on the recent experimental results in high-energy physics with discussions on expectations from existing or future

  15. News CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

  16. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI2008), held at the University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan from 1-5 September 2008. This series of conferences began in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982 and has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992), Vienna, Austria (1994), Omiya, Japan (1996), Bensheim, Germany (1998), Berkeley, USA (2000), Caen, France (2002), Vilnius, Lithuania (2004) and Belfast, UK (2006). Highly charged ions (HCI), which are defined as highly ionized (i.e. positively charged atomic) ions here, mainly exist in hot plasmas such as the solar corona and fusion plasmas. It is true that its importance in plasma physics has driven researchers to the spectroscopic studies of HCIs, but the spectroscopy of few-electron ions is not only important for plasmas but also interesting for fundamental atomic physics. Electrons moving fast near a heavy nucleus give a suitable system to test the fundamental atomic theory involving relativistic and quantum electro-dynamic effects in a strong field. Also, the huge potential energy of a HCI induces drastic reaction in the interaction with matter. This unique property of HCIs, coupled with the recent development of efficient ion sources, is opening the possibility to utilize them in new technologies in the field such as nano-fabrication, surface analysis, medical physics, and so on. Hence, this conference is recognized as a valuable gathering place for established practitioners and also for newcomers; we exchange information, we are introduced to the subject itself, and to unexpected interfaces with other fields. On 31 August, the day before the opening of HCI2008, we welcomed the delegates at the university's restaurant—and we were greeted with an unusually heavy summer shower! The conference then opened on

  17. Courses in Modern Physics for Non-science Majors, Future Science Teachers, and Biology Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollman, Dean

    2001-03-01

    For the past 15 years Kansas State University has offered a course in modern physics for students who are not majoring in physics. This course carries a prerequisite of one physics course so that the students have a basic introduction in classical topics. The majors of students range from liberal arts to engineering. Future secondary science teachers whose first area of teaching is not physics can use the course as part of their study of science. The course has evolved from a lecture format to one which is highly interactive and uses a combination of hands-on activities, tutorials and visualizations, particularly the Visual Quantum Mechanics materials. Another course encourages biology students to continue their physics learning beyond the introductory course. Modern Miracle Medical Machines introduces the basic physics which underlie diagnosis techniques such as MRI and PET and laser surgical techniques. Additional information is available at http://www.phys.ksu.edu/perg/

  18. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies.

    PubMed

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A; Beverley, Stephen M; Turco, Salvatore J; Sacks, David

    2010-07-01

    Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO(4)] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2(-) or lpg5A(-)/5B(-)) or LPG alone (lpg1(-)) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36-72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2(-) and lpg5A(-)/5B(-) mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2(-) in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2(-) promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  19. REPORT FROM THE ORGANIZERS: The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) was hosted by the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium of the Leiden Institute of Physics and held in the RAI Convention Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. It was the second time that the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory had the privilege of organizing an LT conference. In 1958, at LT6, 50 years of liquid helium temperatures were commemorated; in 2008 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the remarkable achievements of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators in Leiden. In 1958 there were 323 participants and 145 papers appeared in the proceedings; in 2008 these numbers had increased to 1390 participants and 900 papers, of which eventually 849 were accepted. This large participation required adequate conference and housing facilities. These could not be found in Leiden, but were conveniently available in Amsterdam. The triennial International Low Temperature Conferences are organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) through Commission C5 on Low Temperature Physics. It is the most important global meeting that brings together the international scientific community in the broad field of Low Temperature Physics. Because the meeting is held only every third year the 11 plenary and 22 half plenary talks (of 45 or 30 min.) generally provide an overview of important new discoveries over the last few years, whereas the 161 short oral presentations (20 min.) are mainly focused on very recent developments. Since the field is broad, embracing a large section of condensed matter physics, the program is divided into five parallel program lines: A. Quantum Gases, Fluids and Solids B. Superconductivity C. Quantum Phase Transitions and Magnetism D. Electronic Quantum Transport in Condensed Matter E. Cryogenic Techniques and Applications This distinction was used both to group the 1625 accepted abstracts, and the short-oral and poster presentations; the

  20. New Computer Package Provides a Flexible Tool for Teaching Physics Concepts to Non-Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The Comprehensive Unified Physics Learning Environment is a computer system using computer programs, interactive videodisks, and electronic sensors being developed at the University of Maryland. The method has been found more effective than traditional ones for teaching physics majors and is being used to modify the conventional course for…

  1. Telephone-Based Physical Activity Counseling for Major Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Wadhwani, Roini; Sullivan, Mark D.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Kraft, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity represents a promising treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We conducted a single-blind, two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-week physical activity counseling intervention delivered primarily by telephone (n = 44) to a wait-list control group (N = 48).…

  2. Stories of Discovery Stimulate the Physics Major--A Polemic, with Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1980-01-01

    Provides historical examples of intuitive discovery applicable to the teaching of physics for majors. Cites details for the discovery of Coulomb's law, emphasizing the roles of Joseph Priestley and Henry Cavendish. Also discusses the career of Ivar Giaever, a Nobel Prize winner of 1973 in solid state physics. (CS)

  3. Spiral-Syllabus Course in Wave Phenomena to Introduce Majors and Nonmajors to Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touger, Jerold S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a single introductory course for both nonscience and physics majors, emphasizing wave aspects of selected physics phenomena rather than traditional Newtonian mechanics. Modes of presentation, consistent with the notion of a spiral syllabus, are explained with reference to the cognitive and educational theories of Bruner and Piaget.…

  4. Mental Rolodexing: Senior Chemistry Majors' Understanding of Chemical and Physical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Bruce, Heather; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Using a constructivist framework, eight senior chemistry majors were interviewed twice to determine: (i) structural inferences they are able to make from chemical and physical properties; and (ii) their ability to apply their inferences and understandings of these chemical and physical properties to solve tasks on the reactivity of organic…

  5. PREFACE: XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livan, Michele

    2009-07-01

    The XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics was held in Pavia, Italy, 26-30 May 2008, picking up the baton from the 2006 Conference in Chicago. The Conference took place in the unique environment of the Theresian Room of the University Library. The attendees were surrounded by over 40 000 books of general interest and culture, and had the opportunity to see precious volumes written by such people as Galileo, Volta and Faraday. The Workshop brought together more than 120 participants, including senior scientists as well as young physicists, confirming the central and ever-growing role of calorimeters in modern particle physics. The development of these detectors, as stressed by Professor Klaus Pretzl in his lectio magistralis, has made it possible to explore new frontiers in physics, and the present scenario is no exception to this rule. With the LHC experiments almost completely installed and ready to take data, the Conference was an ideal chance to review the status of the different projects, whose development has been followed and discussed throughout the entire Calor series, and to show that they are capable of meeting the design specifications. Other highlights were the performance and physics results of calorimeters installed in currently operating experiments. In the session on astrophysics and neutrinos, the contributions confirmed the key role of calorimeters in this sector and demonstrated their growing application even beyond the field of accelerator physics. Considerable time was devoted to the state-of-the-art techniques in the design and operation of the detectors, while the session on simulation addressed the importance of a thorough understanding of the shower development to meet the demanding requirements of present experiments. Finally, on the R&D side, the particle flow and dual read-out concepts confronted the challenges issued by the next generation of experiments. This complex material was reviewed in 83

  6. 16th international conference on the physics of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Stephan; Stöhlker, Thomas; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2013-09-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 16th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2012) held at the Ruprecht-Karls University in Heidelberg, Germany, 2-7 September 2012 (figure 1). This conference has been part of a biannual conference series that was started in Stockholm in 1982 and, since then, has been organized at various places around the world, with recent venues in Belfast (UK, 2006), Tokyo (Japan, 2008) and Shanghai (China, 2010). The physics of highly charged ions (HCI) is a rapidly developing and attractive field of research with impact upon many other research disciplines. Apart from fundamental studies on the structure and dynamics of matter in extreme fields, or the search for physics beyond the standard model, detailed knowledge about the properties and behavior of HCI is crucial for other areas, from astro- and solar physics to hot plasma and fusion research to extreme ultra-violet and ion lithography, or even to medical research, to name just a few. In fusion research, for example, of whether tokamak, stellarator or confinement fusion facilities, most models and diagnostics deeply rely on the understanding of HCI and the (theoretical) prediction of accurate atomic data for these systems. In life science, moreover, ion therapy or the laser acceleration of ions and electrons may help save and improve the quality of life in the future. Many of these and further topics are addressed in these proceedings. After 30 years, the HCI conference series, and especially the meeting in Heidelberg, is appreciated much as a key forum for bringing together senior experts with students, young researchers and scientists from related disciplines who make use and give back impact upon the research with HCI. More than 250 scientists from 23 countries participated in HCI 2012 and presented the current status of the field. About one third of them were post-graduate students, showing that the field attracts many young and talented

  7. Physical Education Majors' Judgments about Inclusion and Teaching Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Elliott, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the beliefs about inclusion and teaching students with disabilities of physical education (PE) majors from universities in North Carolina (NC). The participants were PE majors (n = 147) and other enrolled students (n = 30) at colleges and universities in NC. The research method was descriptive survey…

  8. Scientific Reasoning Abilities of Nonscience Majors in Physics-Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on…

  9. The bipolar disorder risk allele at CACNA1C also confers risk of recurrent major depression and of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Green, E K; Grozeva, D; Jones, I; Jones, L; Kirov, G; Caesar, S; Gordon-Smith, K; Fraser, C; Forty, L; Russell, E; Hamshere, M L; Moskvina, V; Nikolov, I; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Holmans, P A; Owen, M J; O'Donovan, M C; Craddock, N

    2010-01-01

    Molecular genetic analysis offers opportunities to advance our understanding of the nosological relationship between psychiatric diagnostic categories in general, and the mood and psychotic disorders in particular. Strong evidence (P=7.0 × 10−7) of association at the polymorphism rs1006737 (within CACNA1C, the gene encoding the α-1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel) with the risk of bipolar disorder (BD) has recently been reported in a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies of BD, including our BD sample (N=1868) studied within the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Here, we have used our UK case samples of recurrent major depression (N=1196) and schizophrenia (N=479) and UK non-psychiatric comparison groups (N=15316) to examine the spectrum of phenotypic effect of the bipolar risk allele at rs1006737. We found that the risk allele conferred increased risk for schizophrenia (P=0.034) and recurrent major depression (P=0.013) with similar effect sizes to those previously observed in BD (allelic odds ratio ∼1.15). Our findings are evidence of some degree of overlap in the biological underpinnings of susceptibility to mental illness across the clinical spectrum of mood and psychotic disorders, and show that at least some loci can have a relatively general effect on susceptibility to diagnostic categories, as currently defined. Our findings will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of major psychiatric illness, and such knowledge should be useful in providing an etiological rationale for shaping psychiatric nosology, which is currently reliant entirely on descriptive clinical data. PMID:19621016

  10. Teaching Emergence and Collective Behavior in Physics and Biology to Non-majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Emergence and collective behavior form one of the most fertile intersections of physics and biology in current research. Unfortunately, modern and interdisciplinary concepts such as these are often neglected in physics courses for non-majors. A team of four graduate students and a faculty advisor recently redesigned our department's course for non-majors (Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science Students) to focus on emergence and collective behavior along with three other major themes in modern physics. In the course we developed basic concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics to understand a variety of emergent phenomena in physics and biology, including bird flocking, superconductivity, and protein folding. We discussed the notion of life itself as an inherently emergent phenomenon arising from the collective behavior of molecules. The students also wrote their own blog posts on emergent phenomena and interactively explored emergence through workshops on Foldit (the protein folding game) and Conway's Game of Life. We believe our course demonstrates some possibilities and challenges for teaching non-majors at the intersection of physics and biology. I gratefully acknowledge my collaboration with Aatish Bhatia, Deepak Iyer, Simon Knapen, and Saurabh Jha.

  11. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    The ninth meeting of the TAUP Workshop Series, TAUP 2005, was organized by the University of Zaragoza and Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc, jointly with the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN). It was dedicated to the memory of professor Angel Morales, co-founder of the TAUP Series and a central figure in the scientific shaping and organization of the TAUP conferences since their inception in 1989. He and his group of collaborators laid, twenty years ago, the foundations of underground physics in Spain. To have TAUP 2005 hosted by the University of Zaragoza was a tangible way of honouring his memory. The Conference was concluded by a visit to the new installations of the Canfranc Laboratory, where a memorial ceremony was held in honour of Angel Morales, the driving force for the creation of that Laboratory. In TAUP 2005 all the various aspects of Astroparticle Physics have been covered, from Cosmology and Dark Constituents, to Gravitational Waves, to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, to High Energy Astrophysics, to Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays Astronomy. New and important scientific results were presented and debated in the plenary review talks and in a very large number of contributions in topical parallel sessions. As editors of these proceedings, we hope that this volume, which contains most of the talks and contributions presented at TAUP 2005, will provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of Astroparticle Physics. We thank all the invited speakers and contributors who made this possible. Full coverage of the transparencies presented at the conference can be found on the website http://www.unizar.es/taup2005. At TAUP 2005 a memorial lecture was delivered by Art McDonald to commemorate John Bahcall, who passed away prematurely in August 2005. In this talk, his figure, as a pioneer and leader in the fields of Neutrino Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics and as a man of great personal

  12. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    The ninth meeting of the TAUP Workshop Series, TAUP 2005, was organized by the University of Zaragoza and Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc, jointly with the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN). It was dedicated to the memory of professor Angel Morales, co-founder of the TAUP Series and a central figure in the scientific shaping and organization of the TAUP conferences since their inception in 1989. He and his group of collaborators laid, twenty years ago, the foundations of underground physics in Spain. To have TAUP 2005 hosted by the University of Zaragoza was a tangible way of honouring his memory. The Conference was concluded by a visit to the new installations of the Canfranc Laboratory, where a memorial ceremony was held in honour of Angel Morales, the driving force for the creation of that Laboratory. In TAUP 2005 all the various aspects of Astroparticle Physics have been covered, from Cosmology and Dark Constituents, to Gravitational Waves, to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, to High Energy Astrophysics, to Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays Astronomy. New and important scientific results were presented and debated in the plenary review talks and in a very large number of contributions in topical parallel sessions. As editors of these proceedings, we hope that this volume, which contains most of the talks and contributions presented at TAUP 2005, will provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of Astroparticle Physics. We thank all the invited speakers and contributors who made this possible. Full coverage of the transparencies presented at the conference can be found on the website http://www.unizar.es/taup2005. At TAUP 2005 a memorial lecture was delivered by Art McDonald to commemorate John Bahcall, who passed away prematurely in August 2005. In this talk, his figure, as a pioneer and leader in the fields of Neutrino Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics and as a man of great personal

  13. Effect of satisfaction in major at university on academic achievement among physical therapy students

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate satisfaction in major among physical therapy students and to identify the sub-factors of satisfaction in major affecting academic achievement. [Subjects and Methods] We distributed a self-administered questionnaire, comprising items relating to satisfaction in major and academic achievement to 369 physical therapy students located in Seoul, Daejeon, Jinju, Pohang, and Gunsan. [Results] General satisfaction and academic achievement showed the greatest correlation (r = 0.235), followed by course satisfaction (r = 0.123). [Conclusion] Several sub-factors were found to affect academic achievement. The results of this study can be used as the basis for programs that aim at development of satisfaction in major and academic achievement among clinical physical therapists. PMID:25729179

  14. Physics and Industrial Development - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Physics and Industrial Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzinelli, R.; Moreira, R. L.; Rodrigues, W. N.

    1997-04-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Sponsors * Committees * Opening Lecture * Relations between Science and Industry in Brazil * Technological Change and Economic Development * Science and Economic Development * Recent Technological Change and Industrial Dynamics * Technology and Economic Development: Suitability of the Institutional System of Minais Gerais * Bridging the Gap * Transfer of Scientific Results into Industry: A Controversial Problem in Central and Eastern Europe * Bridging the Gap Between Basic Research and Industrial Development at the J. STEFAN Institute * Liquid Crystals: A Case Study of the Interaction Between Science and Application * Role of Physics in the Modern Industrialization Process of Korea * Research in Industry * A Theoretical Physicist's 21-Year Experience in the Argentine Industry * Four Characters in Search of a Profession * Status and Prospects for the Use of Renewable Sources of Energy in Minas Gerais State-Brazil * University-Industry Cooperation I * Development and Industrialization of Fiber Optics Metrology Equipment * Finnish Experiences on University-Industry Collaboration in Materials Science and Physical Metallurgy * A Conceptual Framework for Understanding the Interaction between Academic Research and Industry * Technological Modernization of the Alkaline Cooking Process for the Production of Masa and Tortilla * The Fapergs Program on University Versus Private Enterprise * Integral Development Centers: Tying Mexican Industry With the National Polytechnic Institute * Materials Characterization and Applied Physics * Imaging Manganese Sulfide Inclusions in Grain Oriented Silicon Steels * Electrical Resistivity Changes Associated to Static Strain Aging in High Carbon Steel * PVD Hard Coatings for Wear Applications * Scanning Acoustic Microscopy: Application to Porous Materials * Indentation Testing of Thennal Sprayed WC-Co * Applications of Capillary Electrophoresis with Laserinduced

  15. Atomic Physics 15: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Walraven, J. T. M.; Reynolds, M. W.

    1997-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Generation of a "Schrödinger cat" of radiation and observation of its decoherence * Synthesis of entangled states and quantum computing * Entangled states of atomic ions for quantum metrology and computation * Entanglement and indistinguishability: Coherence experiments with photon pairs and triplets * Atom optics as a testing ground for quantum chaos * Coherent ultra-bright XUV lasers and harmonics * Hollow atoms * Interdisciplinary experiments with polarized noble gases * The creation and study of Bose-Einstein condensation in a cold alkali vapor * oscopic quantum phenomena in trapped Bose-condensed gases * Doppler-free spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen * QED and the ground state of helium * Towards coherent atomic samples using laser cooling * Bose-Einstein condensation of a weakly-interacting gas * Zeeman and his contemporaries: Dutch physics around 1900 * Zeeman's great discovery * The Zeeman effect: A tool for atom manipulation * The Zeeman effect a century later: New insights into classical physics * QED effects in few-electron high-Z systems * Lamb shift experiments on high-Z one- and two-electron systems * Fundamental constants of nature * Response of atoms in photonic lattices * Hydrogen-like systems and quantum electrodynamics * New experiments with atomic lattices bound by light * Bloch oscillations of atoms in an optical potential * Quantum decoherence and inertial sensing with atom interferometers * Quantum effects in He clusters * Atoms in super-intense radiation fields * Wave packet dynamics of excited atomic electrons in intense laser fields * Nonlinear laser-electron scattering * Comparing the antiproton and proton and progress toward cold antihydrogen * Author Index

  16. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-12-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments, worksheets, and interactive classroom learning techniques such as Peer Instruction (PI) and SCALE-UP.2 It was found that the new course showed an increase in students' class participation, attendance, and overall interest, with most rating their science experience as very positive.

  17. Physics of climate change, taught as a topics a course for undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2012-10-01

    While anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population. Science students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). While the pertinent material is covered in undergraduate physics courses, it helps to review the basics in order to develop an educated perspective on this topic that is very volatile (socially and politically). The basic topics are introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, and appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research). These topics are usually covered in undergraduate modern physics and thermodynamics courses, but a separate course on climate change (taught in Spring 2012) helped ``put things together'' for both the students and their professor.

  18. Physics and Industrial Development - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Physics and Industrial Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzinelli, R.; Moreira, R. L.; Rodrigues, W. N.

    1997-04-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Sponsors * Committees * Opening Lecture * Relations between Science and Industry in Brazil * Technological Change and Economic Development * Science and Economic Development * Recent Technological Change and Industrial Dynamics * Technology and Economic Development: Suitability of the Institutional System of Minais Gerais * Bridging the Gap * Transfer of Scientific Results into Industry: A Controversial Problem in Central and Eastern Europe * Bridging the Gap Between Basic Research and Industrial Development at the J. STEFAN Institute * Liquid Crystals: A Case Study of the Interaction Between Science and Application * Role of Physics in the Modern Industrialization Process of Korea * Research in Industry * A Theoretical Physicist's 21-Year Experience in the Argentine Industry * Four Characters in Search of a Profession * Status and Prospects for the Use of Renewable Sources of Energy in Minas Gerais State-Brazil * University-Industry Cooperation I * Development and Industrialization of Fiber Optics Metrology Equipment * Finnish Experiences on University-Industry Collaboration in Materials Science and Physical Metallurgy * A Conceptual Framework for Understanding the Interaction between Academic Research and Industry * Technological Modernization of the Alkaline Cooking Process for the Production of Masa and Tortilla * The Fapergs Program on University Versus Private Enterprise * Integral Development Centers: Tying Mexican Industry With the National Polytechnic Institute * Materials Characterization and Applied Physics * Imaging Manganese Sulfide Inclusions in Grain Oriented Silicon Steels * Electrical Resistivity Changes Associated to Static Strain Aging in High Carbon Steel * PVD Hard Coatings for Wear Applications * Scanning Acoustic Microscopy: Application to Porous Materials * Indentation Testing of Thennal Sprayed WC-Co * Applications of Capillary Electrophoresis with Laserinduced

  19. Development of pyramidal lines with two major QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight is an emerging threat in rice cultivation. It is animportant disease caused by the soil-borne necrotrophic pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. However, to date neither known major genes for quantitative resistance, nor any rice lines immune to this disease has been identified. The disease resistance is quantitative in nature. Numerous genes are involved in this resistance process. There are few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected conferring improved resistance against the disease. Teqing and Tetepshowimproved resistance having QTLs, qSB-9 and qSBR11-1, respectively. Since, these QTLs demonstrates additive effects, pyramiding of these QTLs might be an option to increase the sheath blight resistance in rice. Nine rice cultivars were screened at greenhouse conditions. Results showed that Tetep and Teqing had the lowest disease ratings. UKMRC2a new high yielding cultivar was as recipient parent. Crosses between UKMRC2 and Teqing, and UKMRC2 and Tetep were made and confirmed. Subsequently 4-way crosses between the two F1s were performed to develop pyramidal lines.

  20. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C.; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Turco, Salvatore J.; Sacks, David

    2010-01-01

    Summary Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO4] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2− or lpg5A−/5B−) or LPG alone (lpg1−) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36–72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2− and lpg5A−/5B− mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2− in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2− promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  1. Topical conference: Opportunities in biology for physicists. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-16

    The conference was aimed at early career physicists who were interested in exploring the possibilities of working at the interface between physics and biology, in particular, graduate students and postdocs considering applying the methods of physics to biological research. Areas of major importance were genomics and evolution, biological networks, biomolecular dynamics, high-resolution imaging of living cells, and technologies for biological investigation. A total of 205 persons attended the conference.

  2. PREFACE: 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Ky, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2015-06-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39). Both the workshop and the conference were held from 28th - 31st July 2014 in Dakruco Hotel, Buon Ma Thuot, Dak Lak, Vietnam. The NCTP-39 and the IWTCP-2 were organized under the support of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society, with a motivation to foster scientific exchanges between the theoretical and computational physicists in Vietnam and worldwide, as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. The IWTCP-2 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). About 100 participants coming from nine countries participated in the workshop and the conference. At the IWTCP-2 workshop, we had 16 invited talks presented by international experts, together with eight oral and ten poster contributions. At the NCTP-39, three invited talks, 15 oral contributions and 39 posters were presented. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the workshop and the conference successful. Trinh Xuan Hoang, Nguyen Anh Ky, Nguyen Tri Lan and Nguyen Ai Viet

  3. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The 17th edition of the International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2014) was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, in the southern region of Argentina known as Patagonia, from August 31 to September 5, 2014. This meeting corresponds to a series of HCI conferences, which has been held every other year since 1982 in cities in Europe, USA, Japan and China. This was the first time that the conference took place in Latin America. This edition was organized by a Local Committee made up of physicists mainly from the cities of Bariloche and Rosario and also from Buenos Aires and Bahía Blanca, all sites where research on Atomic Collisions is developed. The conference was attended by delegates coming from 18 countries, more that 23% of whom were women. The field of highly charged ions has seen in recent years a promising evolution originating from bold progress in theory and significant advances in experimental techniques. The HCI conferences aim at bringing together experimentalists and theoreticians from as wide a range of fields as, for instance, Fundamental Aspects, Structure and Spectroscopy, Collisions with Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules, Interaction with Clusters, Surfaces and Solids, Interactions with Photons and Plasmas, Strong Field Processes, and Production, Experimental Developments and Applications. The Scientific Programme, selected by an International Advisory Board, included 5 Review Lectures, 11 Progress Reports, 1 Local Report and 24 Special Reports. In addition, the results of 132 contributed works were presented as poster communications and a Public Lecture on 'The wonders of the Southern Skies' was delivered by an Argentinean expert. Thus, a wide range of subjects comprising a balanced mix of topics was covered throughout the course of the conference. The HCI 2014 was a resounding success for the international and local communities, from both the scientific and social aspects, considering that the attendees and accompanying

  4. PREFACE: 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain; Lowe, Mike

    2013-08-01

    The 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held in Brighton, UK on 18-20 January 2012. This event, which is an annual collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique, successfully achieved its main aim of being a small, friendly meeting of high scientific quality, welcoming younger researchers and PhD students and covering a broad range of subjects in Acoustics. The participants heard 44 excellent presentations covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects, from audio acoustics to guided waves in composites and from phononic crystals to ultrasound surgery. As is the custom at these meetings, four prominent invited speakers set the pace for the event; these were Keith Attenborough (The Open University, UK), Claire Prada (Institut Langevin, France), David Moore (University of Nottingham, UK) and Philippe Roux (IS Terre, France). The submission of manuscripts for publication in the proceedings was, as in previous years, on a voluntary basis and in these proceedings we present 11 peer reviewed papers. Due to some unforeseen problems there has been a longer than planned delay in preparing these proceedings, for which the Editors sincerely apologise to the authors and the community. Nader Saffari, Mike Lowe and Alain Lhémery

  5. PREFACE: Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Giulietti, D.; Torrisi, L.; Delle Side, D.

    2014-04-01

    The ''Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications'' Conference (PPLA 2013) is a biennial meeting in which the National teams involved in Laser-Plasma Interaction at high intensities communicate their late results comparing with the colleagues from the most important European Laser Facilities. The sixth appointment has been organized in Lecce, Italy, from 2 to 4 October 2013 at the Rector Palace of the University of Salento. Surprising results obtained by laser-matter interaction at high intensities, as well as, non-equilibrium plasma generation, laser-plasma acceleration and related secondary sources, diagnostic methodologies and applications based on lasers and plasma pulses have transferred to researchers the enthusiasm to perform experiments ad maiora. The plasma generated by powerful laser pulses produces high kinetic particles and energetic photons that may be employed in different fields, from medicine to microelectronics, from engineering to nuclear fusion, from chemistry to environment. A relevant interest concerns the understanding of the fundamental physical phenomena, the employed lasers, plasma diagnostics and their consequent applications. For this reason we need continuous updates, meetings and expertise exchanges in this field in order to follow the evolution and disclose information, that has been done this year in Lecce, discussing and comparing the experiences gained in various international laboratories. The conference duration, although limited to just 3 days, permitted to highlight important aspects of the research in the aforementioned fields, giving discussion opportunities about the activities of researchers of high international prestige. The program consisted of 10 invited talks, 17 oral talks and 17 poster contributions for a total of 44 communications. The presented themes covered different areas and, far from being exhaustive gave updates, stimulating useful scientific discussions. The Organizers belong to three Italian Universities

  6. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the

  7. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The 17th edition of the International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2014) was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, in the southern region of Argentina known as Patagonia, from August 31 to September 5, 2014. This meeting corresponds to a series of HCI conferences, which has been held every other year since 1982 in cities in Europe, USA, Japan and China. This was the first time that the conference took place in Latin America. This edition was organized by a Local Committee made up of physicists mainly from the cities of Bariloche and Rosario and also from Buenos Aires and Bahía Blanca, all sites where research on Atomic Collisions is developed. The conference was attended by delegates coming from 18 countries, more that 23% of whom were women. The field of highly charged ions has seen in recent years a promising evolution originating from bold progress in theory and significant advances in experimental techniques. The HCI conferences aim at bringing together experimentalists and theoreticians from as wide a range of fields as, for instance, Fundamental Aspects, Structure and Spectroscopy, Collisions with Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules, Interaction with Clusters, Surfaces and Solids, Interactions with Photons and Plasmas, Strong Field Processes, and Production, Experimental Developments and Applications. The Scientific Programme, selected by an International Advisory Board, included 5 Review Lectures, 11 Progress Reports, 1 Local Report and 24 Special Reports. In addition, the results of 132 contributed works were presented as poster communications and a Public Lecture on 'The wonders of the Southern Skies' was delivered by an Argentinean expert. Thus, a wide range of subjects comprising a balanced mix of topics was covered throughout the course of the conference. The HCI 2014 was a resounding success for the international and local communities, from both the scientific and social aspects, considering that the attendees and accompanying

  8. Using computer simulation classes to raise interest for physics majors in their freshman and sophomore years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    2004-03-01

    Most courses at the undergraduate level present physics which was developed more than 70 years ago. This situation can demotivate students, who feel that there is nothing new left to discover in physics. To overcome this impression, we have created a new course ``Introduction to computer simulation in physics'' which is a requirement for all physics majors in the first or second year at the university. This course replaces a programming class and plays two roles : (1) introduce the students to scientific programming, using Python, a very powerful objet-oriented script language and (2) present modern concepts of physics to students early in their program to help motivate them. In order to sustain the rapid pace of the course, we use weekly lectures, group work and individual laboratories. The student response has been extremely positive and we are currently working to integrate the use of Python in the experimental laboratories, in order to increase the impact of this class.

  9. The risk for major depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is multiplied by BDNF and SERT genetic vulnerability: a replication study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Blanca; Bellón, Juan Ángel; Rivera, Margarita; Molina, Esther; King, Michael; Marston, Louise; Torres-González, Francisco; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Motrico, Emma; Montón-Franco, Carmen; GildeGómez-Barragán, María Josefa; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Díaz-Barreiros, Miguel Ángel; Vicens, Catalina; de Dios Luna, Juan; Nazareth, Irwin; Cervilla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence for a moderating role of both serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes on the risk for major depression (MD) developing after childhood maltreatment. However, research on this topic remains inconclusive, and there is a lack of data from longitudinal studies with large and representative population samples. Our study aimed to clarify whether, in the presence of previous childhood maltreatment, individuals carrying low functional alleles for both SERT 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms had a higher risk for MD. Methods We explored 2- and 3-way gene (SERT and BDNF) × environment (childhood maltreatment) interactions in a large sample of Spanish adults who were followed up over a 3-year period and assessed in person for both DSM-IV MD and exposure to childhood maltreatment. Results Our study included 2679 participants. Those with both the 5-HTTLPR s allele and the BDNF Met allele showed the highest risk of MD if they had previously experienced emotional (z = 2.08, p = 0.037), sexual (z = 2.19, p = 0.029) or any kind of childhood abuse (z = 2.37, p = 0.018). These 3-way interactions remained significant regardless of whether the 5-HTTLPR triallelic or the 5-HTTLPR biallelic polymorphisms were included in the analyses. Limitations Retrospective assessment of childhood maltreatment may have resulted in a moderate degree of recall bias. Conclusion Our results confirm that the risk of depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is modified by variation at both SERT and BDNF genes. PMID:25510949

  10. Who Becomes a Physics Major? A Long-term Longitudinal Study Examining the Roles of Pre-college Beliefs about Physics and Learning Physics, Interest, and Academic Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Katherine K.; Gratny, Mindy

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we examine the correlation between students' beliefs upon entering college and their likelihood of continuing on to become a physics major. Since 2004, we have collected CLASS survey and self-reported level-of-interest responses from students in the first-term, introductory calculus-based physics course (N>2500). Here, we conduct a retrospective analysis of students' incoming CLASS scores and level of interest, comparing those students who go on to become physics majors with those who do not. We find the incoming CLASS scores and reported interest of these future physics majors to be substantially higher than the class average, indicating that these students enter their first college course already having quite expert-like beliefs. The comparative differences are much smaller for grades, SAT score, and university predicted-GPA.

  11. An Investigation of Elementary School Physical Education Experiences of Selected Entering Education Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbogast, Gary W.

    The elementary school experiences of 418 entering education majors at the University of New Mexico were investigated to determine the extent to which early experience may or may not have influenced the students' choice of physical education as a career. Data was collected concerning the following variables: 1) number of students whose shools had…

  12. A Teaching Intervention to Increase Achievement of Hispanic Nonscience Majors Taking Physical Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poelzer, G. Herold; Zeng, Liang

    2008-01-01

    This quasi-experimental pilot study of nonscience majors taking a physical science course at a university in South Texas was conducted on Hispanic undergraduate students, and is theory based--an application of attribution theory. That the treatment group outperformed the comparison group provides evidence of the positive effect of having students…

  13. A Physics Professor and a Science Librarian Challenge Non-Majors to Evaluate Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iber, Mary; Sherman, Derin

    2009-01-01

    Required science courses can have limited interest from some students. In this article, a physics professor and a science librarian describe methods used to engage non majors in learning about science in a non-threatening way. By evaluating the science on selected web sites, and classifying the sites according to six categories (valid,…

  14. Research Report on College Level Physical Science for Non-Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, John P.

    This research report focuses on an experimental study comparing two laboratory approaches to a college level physical science course for non-majors. An approach using contemporary topics was compared to an approach using standard topics. The three dependent variables were achievement of subject content, scientific attitude, and understanding the…

  15. Cooperative Networks in Physics Education. Proceedings of the Inter-American Conference on Physics Education (Oaxtepec, Mexico, July 20-24, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barojas, Jorge, Ed.

    This conference on physics education was held to improve cooperative efforts in connection with 12 topics previously identified by a survey. A working group was organized in association with each of these topics with the hope of creating or reinforcing a network. Working groups included: network development procedures; graduate education and…

  16. PREFACE: Tenth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio; Suzuki, Atsuto; Mitsui, Tadao

    2008-07-01

    The tenth meeting of the TAUP Workshop Series, TAUP 2007, was organized by the Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University. In TAUP 2007 all the various aspects of Astroparticle Physics have been covered, from Cosmology and Dark Constituents, to Gravitational Waves, to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, to High Energy Astrophysics, to Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays Astronomy. New and important scientific results were presented and debated in the plenary review talks and in a very large number of contributions in topical parallel sessions. As editors of these proceedings, we hope that this volume, which contains most of the talks and contributions presented at TAUP 2007, will provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of Astroparticle Physics. We thank all the invited speakers, conveners, and contributors who made this possible. Full coverage of the transparencies presented at the conference can be found on the website http://www.awa.tohoku.ac.jp/taup2007. The TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee thanks IUPAP/PaNAGIC, Sendai Tourism and Convention Bureau, COE program: Exploring New Science by Bridging Particle-Matter Hierarchy, SEIKO EG&G, and REPIC corporation for sponsoring the Conference, and Sendai Civic Auditorium, where the meeting was held, for their hospitality. We wish to thank Alessandro Bottino, Junpei Shirai, Fumihiko Suekane, David Sinclair, Takaaki Kajita, Takeo Moroi, Masaki Mori, Masahiro Kawasaki, Yoshihito Gando, Sei Yoshida, Kyoko Tamae, Sanshiro Enomoto, Alexandre Kozlov, Yasuhiro Kishimoto, Itaru Shimizu, Kengo Nakamura, Haruo Ikeda, and Kyo Nakajima for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. The Organizing Committee is grateful to the members of the International Advisory Committee and of the TAUP Steering Committee for assistance and advice on the scientific program. Very special thanks are due to Ms Rika Bizen, Mr Fujio Miura, Ms Akemi

  17. PREFACE: 19th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics and Nanotechnology (HMF-19)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraki, Koji; Takeyama, Shojiro

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains invited and contributed papers from the 19th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics and Nanotechnology (HMF-19) held in Fukuoka, Japan, from 1-6 August 2010. This conference was mainly sponsored by the Tokyo University-'Horiba International fund', which was donated by Dr Masao Horiba, the founder of Horiba Ltd. The scientific program of HMF-19 consisted of 37 invited talks, 24 contributed talks, and 83 posters, which is available from the conference homepage http://www.hmf19.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index.html. Each manuscript submitted for publication in this volume has been independently reviewed. The Editor is very grateful to all the reviewers for their quick responses and helpful reports and to all the authors for their submissions and patience for the delay in the editorial process. Finally, the Editor would like to express his sincere gratitude to all the individuals involved in the conference organization and all the attendees, who made this conference so successful. Koji Muraki Conference photograph Committees Chair Conference chairS Takeyama(ISSP-UT) Conference secretary T Machida (IIS-UT) Program chair K Muraki (NTT) Local organizing chair K Oto (Chiba Univ.) Advisory Committee International Domestic L Brey (ES) T Ando (TIT) Z H Chen (CN) Y Hirayama (Tohoku Univ.) S Das Sarma (US) G Kido (NIMS) L Eaves (GB) N Miura (JP) J P Eisenstein (US) J Nitta (Tohoku Univ.) K Ensslin (CH) T Takamasu (NIMS) J Furdyna (US) G M Gusev (BR) I Kukushkin (RU) Z D Kvon (RU) G Landwehr (DE) J C Maan (NL) A H MacDonald (US) N F Oliveira Jr (BR) A Pinczuk (US) J C Portal (FR) A Sachrajda (CA) M K Sanyal(IN) R Stepniewski(PL) Program Committee Chair: K Muraki(NTT) International Domestic G Bauer (AU) H Ajiki (Osaka Univ.) G Boebinger (US) H Aoki (Hongo, UT) S Ivanov (RU) K Nomura (RIKEN) K von Klitzing (DE) T Okamoto (Hongo, UT) R Nicholas (GB) T Osada (ISSP-UT ) M Potemski (FR) N Studart (BR) U Zeitler (NL

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberauer, Lothar; Raffelt, Georg; Wagner, Robert

    2012-07-01

    The 12th edition of the International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP 2011) was held 5-9 September 2011 in Munich (and for the first time in Germany). It was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP), the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Cluster of Excellence 'Origin and Structure of the Universe'. The conference was held in the 'Künstlerhaus', a traditional downtown location for artistic festivities. The meeting attracted 317 participants (61 of which were women) from 29 countries, see figure below. The topics covered by the meeting were Cosmology and particle physics, Dark matter and its detection, Neutrino physics and astrophysics, Gravitational waves and High-energy astrophysics and cosmic rays, and the various interfaces between these areas. The scientific sessions consisted of five mornings of plenary talks, four afternoons of parallel sessions, and an evening poster session. The co-founder of the conference series, Alessandro Bottino, has decided to retire from the position of chairman of the TAUP Steering Committee after the completion of TAUP 2011. On behalf of all followers of this series, we thank him for having started these inspiring events and his many years of dedicated service. We thank all speakers, conveners and participants as well as the members of the organizing, steering and international advisory committee for making this a successful and memorable meeting. Lothar Oberauer, Georg Raffelt, Robert Wagner Proceedings editors Figure Committees International Advisory Committee G AntonUniversity of Erlangen E AprileColumbia University M Baldo-CeolinUniversity of Padova R BattistonUniversity of Perugia & INFN L BergströmUniversity Stockholm R BernabeiUniversity of Rome 'Tor Vergata' A BettiniLSC Canfranc P BinetruyAPC Paris J BlümerKarlsruhe Institute of Technology B CabreraStanford University A CaldwellMax Planck Institute for Physics M ChenQueens University E CocciaUniversity of Rome

  19. Walk on the Bright Side: Physical Activity and Affect in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Jutta; Thompson, Renee J.; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Jonides, John; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    Although prescribed exercise has been found to improve affect and reduce levels of depression, we do not know how self-initiated everyday physical activity influences levels of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) in depressed persons. Fifty-three individuals diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and 53 never-depressed controls participated in a seven-day experience sampling study. Participants were prompted randomly eight times per day and answered questions about their physical activity and affective state. Over the week, the two groups of participants did not differ in average level of physical activity. As expected, participants with MDD reported lower average PA and higher average NA than did never-depressed controls. Both participants with MDD and controls reported higher levels of PA at prompts after physical activity than at prompts after inactive periods; moreover, for both groups of participants, PA increased from a prompt after an inactive period to a subsequent prompt at which activity was reported. Depressed participants in particular showed a dose-response effect of physical activity on affect: longer duration and/or higher intensity of physical activity increased their PA significantly more than did short duration and/or lower intensity physical activity. Physical activity did not influence NA in either group. In contrast to previous treatment studies that examined the effects of prescribed structured exercise, this investigation showed that self-initiated physical activity influences PA. These findings also underscore the importance of distinguishing between PA and NA to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of physical activity on affect in MDD. PMID:21553939

  20. Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (J-TUPP): Overview and Major Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Paula

    2016-03-01

    The Joint Task Force on Undergraduate Physics Programs (JTUPP) was formed in response to growing awareness in the physics community that physics majors pursue a wide range of careers after graduation, with very few ending up in academia. The task force is charged with identifying the skills and knowledge that undergraduate physics degree holders should possess to be well prepared for a diverse set of careers, and providing guidance for physicists considering revising the undergraduate curriculum to improve the education of a diverse student population. Task force members represent large and small universities, professional societies, and industry, and have expertise in a broad range of areas including entrepreneurship, physics education research and systemic change in education. We reviewed employment data, surveys of employers, and reports generated by other disciplines. We also met with physicists in selected industries to get their views on the strengths and weaknesses of physics graduates, commissioned a series of interviews with recent physics graduates employed in the private sector, and identified exemplary programs that ensure that all of their students are well prepared to pursue a wide range of career paths. The findings and recommendations will be summarized.

  1. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  2. News Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

  3. Realizing a Framework for Enhancing the Laboratory Experiences of Non-Physics Majors: From Pilot to Large-Scale Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Les; Pizzica, Jenny; Waite, Katrina; Srinivasan, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Physics experiments for students not majoring in physics may have little meaning for those students and appear to them unconnected in any way to their majors. This affects student engagement and influences the extent to which they regard their experiences in the physics laboratory as positive. We apply a framework for the development and…

  4. Precisely mapping a major gene conferring resistance to Hessian fly in bread wheat using genotyping-by-sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background One of the reasons hard red winter wheat cultivar ‘Duster’ (PI 644016) is widely grown in the southern Great Plains is that it confers a consistently high level of resistance to biotype GP of Hessian fly (Hf). However, little is known about the genetic mechanism underlying Hf resistance i...

  5. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2015-06-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015), was held at The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali on 31 January - 1 February 2015. The ScieTech 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. ScieTech 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics. As we already know that science and technology have brought tremendous benefits for human civilization. People are becoming healthier, wealthier, better educated, more peaceful, increasingly connected, and living longer. Of course, science and technology provide many answers to global challenges, but we will face more complex problems in the next decade due to increasing world population, limitation of energy, and climate change. Therefore, researchers should be more active in conducting research that enables collaboration between one and the others. Interdisciplinary cooperation is absolutely necessary in order to create a smart system for solving the global problems. We need a global and general long-term view of the future with long-range goals for solving complex problems in next decade. Therefore the conference was held to be a forum for researchers from different disciplines to start collaborating and conducting research that provides a solution to the global issues. The theme of ScieTech 2015 was ''The interdisciplinary Application between Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics to enhance the Quality of Life''. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting conference program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 197 papers and after rigorous review, 59 papers were accepted. The participants came from 19

  6. Using Video Analysis and Biomechanics to Engage Life Science Majors in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jeff

    There is an interest in Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences (IPLS) as a way to better engage students in what may be their only physical science course. In this talk I will present some low cost and readily available technologies for video analysis and how they have been implemented in classes and in student research projects. The technologies include software like Tracker and LoggerPro for video analysis and low cost high speed cameras for capturing real world events. The focus of the talk will be on content created by students including two biomechanics research projects performed over the summer by pre-physical therapy majors. One project involved assessing medial knee displacement (MKD), a situation where the subject's knee becomes misaligned during a squatting motion and is a contributing factor in ACL and other knee injuries. The other project looks at the difference in landing forces experienced by gymnasts and cheer-leaders while performing on foam mats versus spring floors. The goal of this talk is to demonstrate how easy it can be to engage life science majors through the use of video analysis and topics like biomechanics and encourage others to try it for themselves.

  7. Report of the HEPAP Subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-05-01

    The subpanel on Major Detectors in Non-Accelerator Particle Physics was formed in February 1989 as the result of a letter from Robert Hunter, Director, Office of Energy Research, to Francis Low, Chairman of HEPAP. A copy of the letter is included in the Appendix to this report. The letter referred to the previous report of HEPAP Subpanel on High Energy Gamma Ray and Neutrino Astronomy which had found that several groups of scientists were working on promising new ideas and proposals in non-accelerator high energy physics and astrophysics; this report recommended that panel be formed to evaluate large projects in these areas of science when specific proposals were received by the funding agencies. In concurring with the recommendation, the request to establish this new Subpanel included the following specific charge: Within the context of changing world wide high energy physics activities and opportunities, review as necessary and evaluate the following major research proposals which have been submitted to the Department of Energy and/or to the National Science foundation: DUMAND II, GRANDE, and the Fly's Eye Upgrade.

  8. Scientific reasoning abilities of nonscience majors in physics-based courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-06-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on LCTSR score, the majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Prescores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of research-verified, interactive engagement pedagogy can lead to gains in content knowledge, significant gains in theoretical content (such as force and energy) are more difficult with non-STEM students. We also observe no significant gains on the LCTSR without explicit instruction in scientific reasoning patterns. These results further demonstrate that differences in student populations are important when comparing normalized gains on concept inventories, and the achievement of significant gains in scientific reasoning requires a reevaluation of the traditional approach to physics for non-STEM students.

  9. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  10. Self-report symptoms that predict major depression in patients with prominent physical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Abbey, S E; Toner, B B; Garfinkel, P E; Kennedy, S H; Kaplan, A S

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of depression in patients presenting with both depressive and physical symptoms is potentially confounded and problematic. The present study of 271 patients with four types of illness all with prominent physical symptoms--end-stage renal disease (n = 99), irritable bowel syndrome (n = 21), post-infectious neuromyasthenia (n = 25) and eating disorders (n = 126)--investigates if there are a group of symptoms on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) which predict the diagnosis of major depressive episode (MDE) made using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS). Discriminant function analysis of BDI responses yielded a four item function--self-hate, indecisiveness, loss of appetite and suicidal thoughts--which maximally discriminated between patients with and without a current MDE and correctly classified 75 percent of subjects. PMID:2265887

  11. Brief history of ‘Neutrino’, the International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Schneps, Jacob

    2015-07-15

    We briefly review the history of the NEUTRINO conferences that began in 1972, with preludes taking place starting in 1965. We touch upon highlights, some un-highlights, various individuals, and the topics of interest.

  12. News Outreach: Polish physics club reaches out with practical demonstrations Networking: Online workspace helps teachers to share ideas Mauritius: Telescope inspires science specification Fusion: EFDA sparks resources Olympiad: British team enjoys success at the International Physics Olympiad 2009 Nanoscience: 'Quietest' building in the world opens in Bristol, UK Conference: University of Leicester hosts the GIREP EPEC 2009 international conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Outreach: Polish physics club reaches out with practical demonstrations Networking: Online workspace helps teachers to share ideas Mauritius: Telescope inspires science specification Fusion: EFDA sparks resources Olympiad: British team enjoys success at the International Physics Olympiad 2009 Nanoscience: 'Quietest' building in the world opens in Bristol, UK Conference: University of Leicester hosts the GIREP EPEC 2009 international conference

  13. Teaching Physics to Environmental Science Majors Using a Flipped Course Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, N. B.; Riha, S. J.; Wysocki, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coursework in physics provides a framework for quantitative reasoning and problem solving skill development in budding geoscientists. To make physical concepts more accessible and relevant to students majoring in environmental science, an environmental physics course was developed at Cornell University and offered for the first time during spring 2014. Principles of radiation, thermodynamics, and mechanics were introduced and applied to the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere to describe energy and mass transfers in natural and built environments. Environmental physics was designed as a flipped course where students viewed online material outside of class and worked in groups in class to solve sustainability problems. Experiential learning, just-in-time teaching, and peer collaboration strategies were also utilized. In-class problems were drawn from both local and global environmental sustainability concerns. Problems included an investigation of Cornell's lake source cooling system, calculations on the energy consumed in irrigation with groundwater in the southwestern United States, and power generated by wind turbines at various locations around the world. Class attendance was high, with at least 84% of students present at each meeting. Survey results suggest that students enjoyed working in groups and found the in-class problems helpful for assimilating the assigned material. However, some students reported that the workload was too heavy and they preferred traditional lectures to the flipped classroom. The instructors were able to actively engage with students and quickly identify knowledge and skill gaps that needed to be addressed. Overall, the integration of current environmental problems and group work into an introductory physics course could help to inspire and motivate students as they advance their ability to analyze problems quantitatively.

  14. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  15. Circadian Phenotype Composition is a Major Predictor of Diurnal Physical Performance in Teams

    PubMed Central

    Facer-Childs, Elise; Brandstaetter, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Team performance is a complex phenomenon involving numerous influencing factors including physiology, psychology, and management. Biological rhythms and the impact of circadian phenotype have not been studied for their contribution to this array of factors so far despite our knowledge of the circadian regulation of key physiological processes involved in physical and mental performance. This study involved 216 individuals from 12 different teams who were categorized into circadian phenotypes using the novel RBUB chronometric test. The composition of circadian phenotypes within each team was used to model predicted daily team performance profiles based on physical performance tests. Our results show that the composition of circadian phenotypes within teams is variable and unpredictable. Predicted physical peak performance ranged from 1:52 to 8:59 p.m. with performance levels fluctuating by up to 14.88% over the course of the day. The major predictor for peak performance time in the course of a day in a team is the occurrence of late circadian phenotypes. We conclude that circadian phenotype is a performance indicator in teams that allows new insight and a better understanding of team performance variation in the course of a day as often observed in different groupings of individuals. PMID:26483754

  16. Changes in physical size among major league baseball players and its attribution to elite offensive performance.

    PubMed

    Crotin, Ryan L; Forsythe, Charles M; Bhan, Shivam; Karakolis, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Major League Baseball (MLB) players have not been longitudinally examined for changes in physical size. Height, weight, and body mass indices (BMIs) were examined among offensive league leaders (OLL) and MLB reference cohorts at 1970, 1990, and 2010. Anthropometric values were expected to increase successively, where OLL were expected to be larger at each respective time point. A Mixed Model analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) examined anthropometric differences over time within and between groups. Mass and BMI increased over successive years with the largest effect seen between 1990 and 2010 (p < 0.001). A significant height reduction was shown for OLL from 1970 to 1990 (p ≤ 0.05), being the only significant decrease in physical size; yet, leaders were heavier and taller compared with the MLB reference population (p < 0.014). Results show that physical size has evolved in MLB, with the OLL being the largest players shown at each year in succession. Professional baseball scouts may have been influenced by greater offensive prowess shown by larger athletes; yet, increased secular anthropometrics must also be factored in greater heights, weights, BMIs shown over time in MLB. It is possible that greater participation in strength and conditioning programs at an earlier age, advances in sport nutrition, and potential abuse of anabolic drugs are factors perpetuating growth rates at present. PMID:24714544

  17. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference. Proceedings, Friday, Activity and Position Paper Sessions (Atlanta, Georgia, January 13-15, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    Precis are presented of the meetings, workshops, and seminars at the 1983 Conference on Elementary and Middle School Physical Education. Papers were presented on teacher burnout, physical fitness testing, teaching methods and learning processes, and curriculum development. Presentations included suggestions for adapting physical education for…

  18. TWO MAJOR RESISTANCE GENES CONFER RESISTANCE TO RACE SHIFT ISOLATES OVERCOMING BLAST RESISTANCE GENC PI-TA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the major challenges for blast disease management is that major resistance genes are often defeated by new virulent isolates. The goal of this project is to identify and characterize blast resistance genes to facilitate the development of blast resistant US cultivars by marker-assisted selec...

  19. Physical Activity, Health, and Well-Being: An International Scientific Consensus Conference. Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Claude; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents eight papers: "Physical Activity and Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health: Cancer and Immune Function"; "Exercise and Psychosocial Health"; "Physical Activity, Health, and Wellbeing at Different Life Stages"; "Descriptive Epidemiology of Health-Related Physical Activity and Fitness"; "Dose-Response…

  20. PREFACE: 20th International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groep, D. L.; Bonacorsi, D.

    2014-06-01

    In this age and time, capturing 'state of the art' of computing in a conference proceedings gets to be increasingly hard. It is quite common too for the submitted abstracts to refer to studies yet to be done - and the time span between abstract submission and the actual conference is often less than six months. By the time the proceedings appear in journal form, a similar period after its closing session, some of the work is over a year old, by which time new ideas will have been formed and the deployment of current ones progressed - at times beyond recognition. The preface is continued in the pdf.

  1. Influence of painful physical symptoms in the treatment of Japanese patients with melancholic major depressive disorder: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Atsushi; Hozumi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2016-08-30

    The aim of this study was to clarify how painful physical symptoms affect treatment outcomes in patients with melancholic major depressive disorder. The subjects comprised 100 consecutive Japanese outpatients with melancholic major depressive disorder who visited our clinic from October 2011 to October 2014. All subjects were interviewed for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Axis 2, 3, and 4 and family history of major depressive disorder, and then grouped according to the presence of painful physical symptoms. We evaluated painful physical symptoms at baseline and after 12, 24, and 36 weeks of treatment and scores on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, compared major depressive disorder remission between groups, and assessed responsiveness to antidepressants. The group with painful physical symptoms had a significantly more positive family history of major depressive disorder. The major depressive disorder remission rate was high in both groups, and no significant differences were observed. However, a significant relationship between major depressive disorder and painful physical symptoms remission was observed in the group with painful physical symptoms. A significantly higher number of remitted patients with painful physical symptoms (N=61) were administered serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, with significantly more receiving duloxetine than milnacipran. PMID:27294798

  2. Proceedings of the 1998 International Computational Accelerator Physics Conference (ICAP98)

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Kwok

    2002-01-14

    The eConf archive is a repository for full-text and eprint proceedings. It is designed to allow free, direct distribution of conference proceedings via a stable electronic archive that collects electronically-produced proceedings, indexes them, permanently archives them, and facilitates access to them over the Web.

  3. New and effective techniques in physics courses for non-science majors and the training of pre-college teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian B.

    1997-03-01

    Based on experience and research, two major educational programs are described, a physics course content and philosophy for non-science majors and a physics course for urban teachers and students based on the theme of sports and movement. Examples for each of these programs are given including a useful table for solving quantitative physics problems using the barest mathematics of subtraction and division by two. The thematic based program is entitled ACTION PHYSICS and was aimed at junior high school teachers and had the support of the National Science Foundation

  4. PREFACE: International Conference on Advancement in Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST): Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Hee, Pah Chin

    2013-04-01

    The 4th International Conference on the Advancement of Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST 2012), with theme 'Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications', took place in Kuantan, Malaysia, from Wednesday 7 to Friday 9 November 2012. The conference was attended by more than 100 participants, and hosted about 160 oral and poster papers by more than 140 pre-registered authors. The key topics of the 4th iCAST 2012 include Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Dynamical Systems, Statistics and Financial Mathematics. The scientific program was rather full since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, four parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The conference aimed to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with the application of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology and environmental sciences. We would like to thank the Keynote and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to 4th iCAST 2012. We would also like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. We cannot end without expressing our many thanks to International Islamic University Malaysia and our sponsors for their financial support . This volume presents selected papers which have been peer-reviewed. The editors hope that it may be useful and fruitful for scholars, researchers, and advanced technical members of the industrial laboratory facilities for developing new tools and products. Guest Editors Nasir Ganikhodjaev, Farrukh Mukhamedov and Pah Chin Hee The PDF contains the committee lists, board list and biographies of the plenary speakers.

  5. The Physics of Life: A Biophysics Course for Non-science Major Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Enhancing the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important goal, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science and technology on people's lives, and because understanding contemporary science enables enriching insights into the workings of nature. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses - i.e. courses intended for students not majoring in the sciences or engineering - which in many cases provide these students' last formal exposure to science. I describe here a course on biophysics for non-science-major undergraduates recently developed at the University of Oregon. Biophysics, I claim, is a particularly useful vehicle for addressing scientific literacy. It involves important and general scientific concepts, demonstrates connections between basic science and tangible, familiar phenomena related to health and disease, and illustrates how scientific insights proceed not in predictable paths, but rather by applying tools and perspectives from disparate fields in creative ways. In addition, it highlights the far-reaching impact of physics research. I describe the general design of this course and the specific content of a few of its modules, as well as noting aspects of enrollment and evaluation. This work is affiliated with the University of Oregon's Science Literacy Program, supported by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  6. STEPS at CSUN: Increasing Retention of Engineering and Physical Science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, V. A.; Cadavid, A. C.; Horn, W.

    2012-12-01

    STEPS at CSUN seeks to increase the retention rate of first-time freshman in engineering, math, and physical science (STEM) majors from ~55% to 65%. About 40% of STEM first-time freshmen start in College Algebra because they do not take or do not pass the Mathematics Placement Test (MPT). This lengthens time to graduation, which contributes to dissatisfaction with major. STEPS at CSUN has made substantial changes to the administration of the MPT. Initial data show increases in the number of students who take the test and who place out of College Algebra, as well as increases in overall scores. STEPS at CSUN also funded the development of supplemental labs for Trigonometry and Calculus I and II, in partnership with similar labs created by the Math Department for College Algebra and Precalculus. These labs are open to all students, but are mandatory for at-risk students who have low scores on the MPT, low grades in the prerequisite course, or who failed the class the first time. Initial results are promising. Comparison of the grades of 46 Fall 2010 "at-risk" students without lab to those of 36 Fall 2011 students who enrolled in the supplementary lab show D-F grades decreased by 10% and A-B grades increased by 27%. A final retention strategy is aimed at students in the early stages of their majors. At CSUN the greatest loss of STEM majors occurs between sophomore-level and junior-level coursework because course difficulty increases and aspirations to potential careers weaken. The Summer Interdisciplinary Team Experience (SITE) is an intensive 3-week-long summer program that engages small teams of students from diverse STEM majors in faculty-mentored, team-based problem solving. This experience simulates professional work and creates strong bonds between students and between students and faculty mentors. The first two cohorts of students who have participated in SITE indicate that this experience has positively impacted their motivation to complete their STEM degree.

  7. Leishmania tarentolae secreting the sand fly salivary antigen PpSP15 confers protection against Leishmania major infection in a susceptible BALB/c mice model.

    PubMed

    Katebi, A; Gholami, E; Taheri, T; Zahedifard, F; Habibzadeh, S; Taslimi, Y; Shokri, F; Papadopoulou, B; Kamhawi, S; Valenzuela, J G; Rafati, S

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a zoonotic, vector-borne disease causing a major health problem in several countries. No vaccine is available and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens. Immune responses to sand fly saliva have been shown to protect against Leishmania infection. A cellular immune response to PpSP15, a protein from the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi, was sufficient to control Leishmania major infection in mice. This work presents data supporting the vaccine potency of recombinant live non-pathogenic Leishmania (L.) tarentolae secreting PpSP15 in mice and its potential as a new vaccine strategy against L. major. We generated a recombinant L. tarentolae-PpSP15 strain delivered in the presence of CpG ODN and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. major infection in BALB/c mice. In parallel, different vaccination modalities using PpSP15 as the target antigen were compared. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated before and at three and eight weeks after challenge. Footpad swelling and parasite load were assessed at eight and eleven weeks post-challenge. Our results show that vaccination with L. tarentolae-PpSP15 in combination with CpG as a prime-boost modality confers strong protection against L. major infection that was superior to other vaccination modalities used in this study. This approach represents a novel and promising vaccination strategy against Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:26298575

  8. Physics of space plasmas (1985-7); SPI Conference Proceedings and Reprint Series, No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.; Belcher, J.; Crew, G.B.; Jasperse, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The conference presents papers on the plasma universe, the magnetosphere of Uranus, magnetospheric convection at Uranus, and observations of electron precipitation induced by whistler mode waves. Other topics include lower hybrid ion conics, low-altitude tranverse ion acceleration, and ion acoustic double layers in the laboratory. Consideration is also given to the glow of spacecraft in LEO, measurements of bursts of intense broadband electrostatic noise in the source regions of auroral kilometric radiation, and bending waves and warps of current disks.

  9. Physical Education Professional Preparation: Insights and Foresights. Proceedings from the National Conference on Preparing the Physical Education Specialist for Children (2nd, Orlando, Florida October 20-23, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Hubert A., Ed.; Rink, Judith E., Ed.

    This volume contains the proceedings of a conference concerning the preparation of physical education teachers. Titles and authors of papers are: (1) "Action 2000: Preparing Physical Education Specialists for the Future" (M. Haberman); (2) "The Content of an Elementary School Physical Education Program and its Impact on Teacher Preparation" (K. R.…

  10. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C. A. V.; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  11. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C A V; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  12. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen. PMID:27436950

  13. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen. PMID:27436950

  14. DNA Physical Properties and Nucleosome Positions Are Major Determinants of HIV-1 Integrase Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Naughtin, Monica; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Xavier, Johan; Meyer, Sam; Silvain, Maud; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Levy, Nicolas; Miele, Vincent; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Ruff, Marc; Parissi, Vincent; Vaillant, Cédric; Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integrases (INs) catalyse the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the host cell genome. This process is selective, and chromatin has been proposed to be a major factor regulating this step in the viral life cycle. However, the precise underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. We have developed a new in vitro integration assay using physiologically-relevant, reconstituted genomic acceptor chromatin and high-throughput determination of nucleosome positions and integration sites, in parallel. A quantitative analysis of the resulting data reveals a chromatin-dependent redistribution of the integration sites and establishes a link between integration sites and nucleosome positions. The co-activator LEDGF/p75 enhanced integration but did not modify the integration sites under these conditions. We also conducted an in cellulo genome-wide comparative study of nucleosome positions and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integration sites identified experimentally in vivo. These studies confirm a preferential integration in nucleosome-covered regions. Using a DNA mechanical energy model, we show that the physical properties of DNA probed by IN binding are important in determining IN selectivity. These novel in vitro and in vivo approaches confirm that IN has a preference for integration into a nucleosome, and suggest the existence of two levels of IN selectivity. The first depends on the physical properties of the target DNA and notably, the energy required to fit DNA into the IN catalytic pocket. The second depends on the DNA deformation associated with DNA wrapping around a nucleosome. Taken together, these results indicate that HIV-1 IN is a shape-readout DNA binding protein. PMID:26075397

  15. Development of the Physical Educators' Judgments about Inclusion Instrument for Japanese Physical Education Majors and an Analysis of Their Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Sato, Takahiro; Mukoyama, Takahito; Kozub, Francis M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Physical Educators' Judgments about Inclusion (PEJI) survey for analysing the judgments of Japanese (361 male, 170 female) physical education teacher education majors. A secondary purpose was to examine group differences in judgments as a function of gender and past…

  16. Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Jaracz, Jan; Gattner, Karolina; Jaracz, Krystyna; Górna, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Patients with major depression often report pain. In this article, we review the current literature regarding the prevalence and consequences, as well as the pathophysiology, of unexplained painful physical symptoms (UPPS) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). UPPS are experienced by approximately two-thirds of depressed patients. The presence of UPPS makes a correct diagnosis of depression more difficult. Moreover, UPPS are a predictor of a poor response to treatment and a more chronic course of depression. Pain, in the course of depression, also has a negative impact on functioning and quality of life. Frequent comorbidity of depression and UPPS has inspired the formulation of an hypothesis regarding a shared neurobiological mechanism of both conditions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies has shown that frontal-limbic dysfunction in depression may explain abnormal pain processing, leading to the presence of UPPS. Increased levels of proinflamatory cytokines and substance P in patients with MDD may also clarify the pathophysiology of UPPS. Finally, dysfunction of the descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways that normally suppress ascending sensations has been proposed as a core mechanism of UPPS. Psychological factors such as catastrophizing also play a role in both depression and chronic pain. Therefore, pharmacological treatment and/or cognitive therapy are recommended in the treatment of depression with UPPS. Some data suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the alleviation of depression and UPPS. However, the pooled analysis of eight randomised clinical trials showed similar efficacy of duloxetine (an SNRI) and paroxetine (an SSRI) in reducing UPPS in depression. Further integrative studies examining genetic factors (e.g. polymorphisms of genes for interleukins, serotonin transporter and receptors), molecular factors (e.g. cytokines

  17. Differences in Persistence Patterns between Life and Physical Science Majors: The Role of Grades, Peers, and Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ost, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Using longitudinal administrative data from a large elite research university, this paper separately analyzes the determinants of persistence for life and physical science majors. My results confirm much of the previous research on major persistence in the sciences, but I document that many findings are solely driven by persistence patterns in the…

  18. Involvement & Participation. National Conference on Physical Activity for the Exceptional Individual (11th, San Diego, California, November 19-20, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Edward R.; Richmond, Alan

    This publication contains papers, presented at a conference about physical activities for the exceptional individual, concerning: (1) student interest/motivation; (2) swimming; (3) games; (4) wheelchairs; (5) movement education; (6) physical stress and bone growth; (7) parent involvement; (8) meningomyelocele; (9) blind athletes; (10) Project…

  19. National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education Annual Conference Proceedings (San Diego, CA, January 8-10, 1982). Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedvilas, Leo L., Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 26 papers delivered at the National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (NAPEHE) Annual Conference (1982). Section 1, "NAPEHE's Image," contains two papers, one by Don Hellison, the other by Celeste Ulrich. "The Splintering of Physical Education" is the topic of the next section, and it contains papers by…

  20. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference (Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, January 15-17, 1981). Proceedings, Saturday, Activity and Position Paper Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    At the final session of the January conference on Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education, 40 discussions and workshops centered on physical fitness, health, safety, and adapting athletics for the disabled child. Other topics covered were creative dance, water activities, lifetime sports, and teacher resource materials and…

  1. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  2. Localization by restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping in potato of a major dominant gene conferring resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis.

    PubMed

    Barone, A; Ritter, E; Schachtschabel, U; Debener, T; Salamini, F; Gebhardt, C

    1990-11-01

    A major dominant locus conferring resistance against several pathotypes of the root cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis was mapped on the linkage map of potato using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers. The assessment of resistance versus susceptibility of the plants in the experimental population considered was based on an in vivo (pot) and an in vitro (petri dish) test. By linkage to nine RFLP markers the resistance locus Gro1 was assigned to the potato linkage group IX which is homologous to the tomato linkage group 7. Deviations from the additivity of recombination frequencies between Gro1 and its neighbouring markers in the pot test led to the detection of a few phenotypic misclassifications of small plants with poor root systems that limited the observation of cysts on susceptible roots. Pooled data from both tests provided better estimates of recombination frequencies in the linkage interval defined by the markers flanking the resistance locus. PMID:1980523

  3. Education Majors' Expectations and Reported Experiences with Inquiry-Based Physics: Implications for Student Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.

    2013-01-01

    To address a perennial need to provide K-8 teachers with a solid foundation in science, there are many physics content courses throughout the United States. One such course is Physics and Astronomy for Teachers (PAT), which relies heavily on active-learning strategies. Although PAT is successful in teaching physics content, students sometimes…

  4. Semiconductor heterojunctions at the Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces: A device physicist`s perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kroemer, H.

    1993-07-01

    After a very slow start, heterojunctions have emerged as one of the central topics of the Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Semiconductor Interfaces. The presentation describes this emergence, starting from such items as the electron affinity rule of conduction band offsets, Dingle`s first determination of the GaAs-(Al,Ga)As band lineups, and the first lineup theories. Some of the blind alleys in this development (85:15 Rule, Common-Anion Rule, and others) are retold by one of the participants. The treatment then turns to a few of the most recent developments, such as the emerging role of ab initio computations as a quasiexperimental tool, plus a few developments this writer finds worth speculating about. The treatment is from the perspective of a device physicist, rather than a surface scientist, and some thoughts are offered on why there is not more commonality between heterojunctions and Schottky barriers. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Immunization with a single major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition epitope of herpes simplex virus type 2 confers protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Blaney, J E; Nobusawa, E; Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Mylin, L M; Fu, T M; Kawaoka, Y; Tevethia, S S

    1998-12-01

    We have evaluated the potential of conferring protective immunity to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) by selectively inducing an HSV-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response directed against a single major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CTL recognition epitope. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV-ES-gB498-505) which expresses the H-2Kb-restricted, HSV-1/2-cross-reactive CTL recognition epitope, HSV glycoprotein B residues 498 to 505 (SSIEFARL) (gB498-505), fused to the adenovirus type 5 E3/19K endoplasmic reticulum insertion sequence (ES). Mucosal immunization of C57BL/6 mice with this recombinant vaccinia virus induced both a primary CTL response in the draining lymph nodes and a splenic memory CTL response directed against HSV gB498-505. To determine the ability of the gB498-505-specific memory CTL response to provide protection from HSV infection, immunized mice were challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-2 strain 186 by the intranasal (i.n.) route. Development of the gB498-505-specific CTL response conferred resistance in 60 to 75% of mice challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-2 and significantly reduced the levels of infectious virus in the brains and trigeminal ganglia of challenged mice. Finally, i.n. immunization of C57BL/6 mice with either a recombinant influenza virus or a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HSV gB498-505 without the ES was also demonstrated to induce an HSV-specific CTL response and provide protection from HSV infection. This finding confirms that the induction of an HSV-specific CTL response directed against a single epitope is sufficient for conferring protective immunity to HSV. Our findings support the role of CD8(+) T cells in the control of HSV infection of the central nervous system and suggest the potential importance of eliciting HSV-specific mucosal CD8(+) CTL in HSV vaccine design. PMID:9811690

  6. How We Learn: A Motor-Learning Project for Physical Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dail, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    One way to help physical education preservice students to think critically about the learning of physical skills is to provide hands-on experiences in which performance and learning can be seen and measured. Developing knowledge of these processes, however, requires creative and carefully planned exercises that can illustrate principles in a…

  7. Physical Activity Patterns of PETE Majors: Do They Walk the Talk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVine, Mary E.; Ray, Cortney

    2006-01-01

    It is well established and supported by research that regular physical activity has positive benefits to health. Currently, there is much concern about the decreasing amount of physical activity in adults and children with a corresponding increase in obesity and morbidity/ mortality rates. This study was designed to investigate the activity…

  8. Can Pre-Service Physical Education Majors Identify Learning Standards during Authentic Teaching Episodes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniffin, Mike; Foley, John; MacDonald, Lynn Couturier; Howarth, Kath

    2014-01-01

    Only a handful of research studies have been conducted to determine whether or not physical educators or pre-service physical education teachers are utilizing learning standards in their teaching. While pre-service teachers are typically required to align lesson objectives and content, their extent of their understanding of how learning standards…

  9. Resources and approaches for teaching physics to pre-health and life science majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widenhorn, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    As science is advancing, the skill set for a physician or medical researcher today and in the future is very different than it has been in the past. As an example, the American Association of Medical Colleges revised the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) to reflect this dynamic environment. Because of these changes, the needs of students entering into these professions are often not met by a traditional physics course. Developing curriculum for an introductory physics course that helps to prepare life science and pre-health students can be challenging for many physics instructors who lack a strong foundation in biology or medicine. This presentation will address various approaches that physics instructors without a background in life sciences can use to successfully teach an introductory physics course for life science and pre-heath students. For these courses, an online resource may be a useful tool. Online resources already exist today, but their utility relies on active engagement and sharing of teaching material by physics instructors possessing a background in both physics and the life sciences. This talk will address ways for the biomedical physics community to contribute to this effort.

  10. Emerging New Physics with Major Implications for Energy Technology, Biology, and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2003-03-01

    In the past 15 years, reproducible experiments and prototype technological devices have emerged that may revolutionize much of physics and chemistry(despite the common perception that modern physics is on very solid ground and is nearing a "Theory of Everything"). This new physics has flourished despite very strong opposition by the entrenched foundational paradigms within physics and chemistry ( not to forget vested financial interests within academia). In fact, beginning with "cold fusion" (more generically low-energy nuclear reactions, LENR), one of the most important discoveries of the late 20th Century has been the irrefutable proof of the failure of the physics establishment to deal ethically and appropriately with potential and real paradigm shifts, when its "sacred writ" ( i.e. Its textbooks) -- are threatened with the need for massive revision.

  11. Trends in Collider Spin Physics - Proceedings of the Adriatico Research Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onel, Y.; Paver, N.; Penzo, A.

    1997-03-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * The Context of High Energy QCD Spin Physics * SPIN Collaboration and Polarized Proton Beams * Spin Physics at RHIC: A New Twist on the Heavy Ion Experiments * The Problem of the Spin of the Proton and Elastic Neutroni-Proton Scattering * Handedness: Status and Puzzles * Hard Exclusive Processes within Instanton Vacuum Model Approach * Single Spin Asymmetries in Inclusive High Energy Hadron-Hadron Collision Processes * SLD Physics with Polarized Beams * Identification of Theoretical Models at NLC with Polarized Beams * Model-independent Determination of Trilinear Gauge Boson Couplings from Polarized e+e- → W+W- * Anomalous Boson Couplings for a Strongly Interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector at NLC * Longitudinal Electron Polarization at HERA and Prospects for Proton Polarization at Very High Energy * Spin Generation and Transport, and Polarimetry at SLC/SLD * Acceleration and Storage of Polarized Proton Beams * Collider Spin Physics at RHIC and STAR * Spin Structure of the Nucleon and Further Perspectives of Spin Physics from PHENIX * Possible Measurements of Single and Double Spin Asymmetries with HERA-ěc {N} * Gottfried and Bjorken Integrals and Gluon Polarization in the Proton * Spin Asymmetries in Diffractive High-Energy Reactions * Single Spin Asymmetries in Inclusive Hadron Production * Evolution of the Spin-splitter Concept * Production of an Atomic Hydrogen Beam by Means of a Supersonic-jet Microwave Dissociator * Background and Intrabeam Scattering for Molecular Beams at the HELP Test Bench * Inclusive overlineΛ^0 Polarization in pp Collisions at 27.5 GeV * Spin Tracking in RHIC (Code Spink) * Numerical Optimization of Siberian Snakes and Spin Rotators for RHIC * Transverse Spin Effects in Inclusive Hadron-Hadron Interactions * Summary of Experimental Data on High Energy Spin Physics * List of Participants * Final Programme

  12. The Shelter Island Conferences Revisited: "Fundamental" Physics in the Decade 1975-1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweber, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this broad historical overview of "the steady evolution of theoretical ideas" from Shelter Island I in 1947 to Shelter Island II in 1983 is some of the developments in "fundamental" physics after the establishment of the standard model, in particular, the adoption of the view that all present day field theories are "effective field theories" based on the gauge concept; taking seriously big bang cosmology, grand unified field theories (GUTs), and inflation; and the emergence of a new symbiosis of physics and mathematics.

  13. The Shelter Island Conferences Revisited: "Fundamental" Physics in the Decade 1975-1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweber, S. S.

    2016-03-01

    The focus of this broad historical overview of "the steady evolution of theoretical ideas" from Shelter Island I in 1947 to Shelter Island II in 1983 is some of the developments in "fundamental" physics after the establishment of the standard model, in particular, the adoption of the view that all present day field theories are "effective field theories" based on the gauge concept; taking seriously big bang cosmology, grand unified field theories (GUTs), and inflation; and the emergence of a new symbiosis of physics and mathematics.

  14. The Shelter Island Conferences Revisited: ``Fundamental'' Physics in the Decade 1975–1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweber, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this broad historical overview of "the steady evolution of theoretical ideas" from Shelter Island I in 1947 to Shelter Island II in 1983 is some of the developments in "fundamental" physics after the establishment of the standard model, in particular, the adoption of the view that all present day field theories are "effective field theories" based on the gauge concept; taking seriously big bang cosmology, grand unified field theories (GUTs), and inflation; and the emergence of a new symbiosis of physics and mathematics.

  15. Major initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada: the year in review.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews 15 significant initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada between September 2010 and September 2011. These include the: announcement of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial framework for action to promote healthy weights; implementation of the nutrition labeling initiative; launch of the CBC "Live Right Now" campaign; announcement of the Public Health Agency of Canada's innovation strategy funding related to obesity; publication of the Canadian Health Measures Survey physical activity findings; release of new Canadian physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines; launch of ParticipACTION's "Think Again" campaign; workshop on building trust to address the epidemic of obesity; start of the Canadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry; initiation of "Our Health Our Future: A National Dialogue on Healthy Weights"; release of the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth; National Obesity Summit; Nature Play Day and Sports Day in Canada; development of the Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy; and the creation of Active Canada 20/20--A National Physical Activity Plan. The diversity and intensity of activity addressing the childhood obesity and physical inactivity "epidemic" in Canada is encouraging and must be maintained and enhanced. PMID:22905632

  16. SPIN-UP and Preparing Undergraduate Physics Majors for Careers in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Seven years ago, the Strategic Programs for Innovations in Undergraduate Physics (SPIN-UP) Report produced by the National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics identified several key characteristics of thriving undergraduate physics departments including steps these departments had taken to prepare students better for careers in industry. Today statistical data from AIP shows that almost 40% of students graduating with a degree in physics seek employment as soon as they graduate. Successful undergraduate physics programs have taken steps to adapt their rigorous physics programs to ensure that graduating seniors have the skills they need to enter the industrial workplace as well as to go on to graduate school in physics. Typical strategies noted during a series of SPIN-UP workshops funded by a grant from NSF to APS, AAPT, and AIP include flexible curricula, early introduction of undergraduates to research techniques, revised laboratory experiences that provide students with skills they need to move directly into jobs, and increased emphasis on ``soft'' skills such as communication and team work. Despite significant success, undergraduate programs face continuing challenges in preparing students to work in industry, most significantly the fact that there is no job called ``physicist'' at the undergraduate level. supported by grant NSF DUE-0741560.

  17. In the foot steps of Madame Curie: A cross-case study of female undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaladanki, Vani Savithri

    Females are disproportionately underrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors. Further, the number of females who take physics in college has declined. While female students make up 61% of graduates in biological sciences and 50% in chemistry, the proportion of women completing physics degrees is only 21% (Sawtelle, 2011). In order to improve women's access to science and engineering education, research must focus on personal and environmental factors that motivate them to select these fields (AAUW, 2010). The purpose of this study was to explore how the educational experiences of three female undergraduate physics majors contribute to their current dispositions toward, interest in, and pursuit of physics as a major at a large southern research university. This qualitative study employs symbolic interactionism (Blumer, 1969) as its methodological framework and social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 2002) as its theoretical framework. Case study methods (Yin, 2006) were implemented to investigate the experiences of three participants. The primary sources of data included critical incident interviews (Flanagan, 1954), photographs, documents, object elicitations, and the researcher's reflections. Narrative and arts-based techniques were employed to analyze and represent data. Findings are presented as co-constructed narratives of the participants' journeys to becoming undergraduate physics majors. Three major themes emerged from the cross case analysis: carving new spaces, authoring an empowered self, and show me you care and so will I. The direct experiences of engaging with science at a young age and social persuasions of family members, teachers, and peers strongly influenced the participants' interest in and pursuit of physics. Their current dispositions to physics result from vicarious experiences with professors and peers in combination with the social persuasions of the latter. This study informs science

  18. Proceedings of the Geodesy/Solid Earth and Ocean Physics (GEOP) Research Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with interdisciplinary research in the fields of geodesy, solid earth and ocean physics. Topics discussed include: solid earth and ocean tides; the rotation of the earth and polar motion; vertical crustal motions; the geoid and ocean surface; earthquake mechanism; sea level changes; and lunar dynamics.

  19. Muscular development and physical activity as major determinants of femoral bone mass acquisition during growth

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Rodriguez, G; Ara, I; Perez-Gomez, J; Dorado, C; Calbet, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate to what extent bone mass accrual is determined by physical activity and changes in lean, fat, and total body mass during growth. Methods: Twenty six physically active and 16 age matched control boys were followed up for three years. All subjects were prepubertal at the start of the survey (mean (SEM) age 9.4 (0.3) years). The weekly physical activity of the active boys included compulsory physical education sessions (80–90 minutes a week), three hours a week of extracurricular sports participation, and occasional sports competitions at weekends. The physical activity of the control group was limited to the compulsory physical education curriculum. Bone mineral content (BMC) and areal density (BMD), lean mass, and fat mass were measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. Results: The effect of sports participation on femoral bone mass accrual was remarkable. Femoral BMC and BMD increased twice as much in the active group as in the controls over the three year period (p<0.05). The greatest correlation was found between the increment in femoral bone mass and the increment in lean mass (BMC r = 0.67 and BMD r = 0.69, both p<0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed enhancement in lean mass as the best predictor of the increment in femoral bone BMC (R = 0.65) and BMD (R = 0.69). Conclusions: Long term sports participation during early adolescence results in greater accrual of bone mass. Enhancement of lean mass seems to be the best predictor of this bone mass accumulation. However, for a given muscle mass, a greater level of physical activity is associated with greater bone mass and density in peripubertal boys. PMID:16118297

  20. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

  1. A Listeria monocytogenes-Based Vaccine That Secretes Sand Fly Salivary Protein LJM11 Confers Long-Term Protection against Vector-Transmitted Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S.; Pavinski Bitar, Alan; Oliveira, Fabiano; Meneses, Claudio; Park, Justin J.; Mendez, Susana; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a sand fly-transmitted disease characterized by skin ulcers that carry significant scarring and social stigmatization. Over the past years, there has been cumulative evidence that immunity to specific sand fly salivary proteins confers a significant level of protection against leishmaniasis. In this study, we used an attenuated strain of Listeria monocytogenes as a vaccine expression system for LJM11, a sand fly salivary protein identified as a good vaccine candidate. We observed that mice were best protected against an intradermal needle challenge with Leishmania major and sand fly saliva when vaccinated intravenously. However, this protection was short-lived. Importantly, groups of vaccinated mice were protected long term when challenged with infected sand flies. Protection correlated with smaller lesion size, fewer scars, and better parasite control between 2 and 6 weeks postchallenge compared to the control group of mice vaccinated with the parent L. monocytogenes strain not expressing LJM11. Moreover, protection correlated with high numbers of CD4+, gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+), tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive/negative (TNF-α+/−), interleukin-10-negative (IL-10−) cells and low numbers of CD4+ IFN-γ+/− TNF-α− IL-10+ T cells at 2 weeks postchallenge. Overall, our data indicate that delivery of LJM11 by Listeria is a promising vaccination strategy against cutaneous leishmaniasis inducing long-term protection against ulcer formation following a natural challenge with infected sand flies. PMID:24733091

  2. A Novel Use of Wikipedia in the Instruction of Introduction Physics Labs for Non-majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Nathan

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 2 years, I have incorporated the use of Wikipedia entries into the conclusion sections of the students' lab reports for an introductory physics I laboratory course. The goal of this inclusion is to give students further motivation to learn the knowledge was well as allow the students to bring their knowledge of physics from a memorization schema to a deeper and more fundamental understanding. I will provide initial feedback from students which indicates that this simple cross-disciplinary addition has helped with motivation while exciting a more robust understanding of course material.

  3. 1990 Conference on Cloud Physics, San Francisco, CA, July 23-27, 1990, Preprints

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on cloud physics are presented. Some of the individual topics addressed are: lake effect snow storm microphysics, origin of ice in strong convective cells, ice in New Mexican cumulus clouds, observed versus diagnosed ice production rates in warm-based midwestern cumuli, factors affecting the structure and stability of boundary-layer clouds, multifractal model of entrainment into a stratocumulus cloud top, Lagrangian development of a cloud-topped boundary layer in a turbulence closure model, entrainment and detrainment across a stratified interface, droplets in cloud edge downdrafts, water supersaturation in convective clouds, retention of ice crystal structure and habit during diffusional growth, crystallization of highly supersaturated solutions. Also discussed are: fractional cloudiness at the top of the marine boundary layer, mixing rate analysis of the stratocumulus-topped marine atmospheric boundary layer, 3D simulations of buoyancy reversal, experimental studies of two stage ice accretions, cloud structure and turbulent transport in the cloud-capped marine boundary layer, cloud-aerosol interactions in the marine atmosphere, physically based fractional cloudiness parameterization.

  4. Essential Concepts and Underlying Theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics for "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry,…

  5. Literacy in the World and Its Major Regions. Ensuring Universal Rights to Literacy and Basic Education. A Series of 29 Booklets Documenting Workshops Held at the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (Hamburg, Germany, July 14-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. for Education.

    This booklet, which was produced as a follow-up to the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education, examines literacy in the world and its major regions. After a brief overview of the workshop from which the booklet emerged, the need to reconceptualize literacy as a tool for learning throughout life is emphasized. Discussed next are the…

  6. News Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

  7. The place of information technology in the teaching of physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Ian

    1997-03-01

    Recent changes in teaching conditions in many universities as well as concurrent advances in information technology (IT), have raised questions about the place of IT in improving the efficiency of university teaching. It is helpful to ascertain what use physics departments currently make of computers in their teaching. This will be explored by focussing on the Australian experience, where there was recently set up a clearinghouse for educational software in science, UniServe•Science, at the University of Sydney, to cater for all sciences taught at introductory level: biochemistry, biology, chemistry, geography, geology, physics and psychology. It is argued that conclusions drawn from surveys of Australian universities should be not too different from the rest of the world. The use to which IT is being put can be classified into three broad categories: pedagogical mode, in which the student uses the computer to learn material in a preprogrammed manner; expository mode, in which the teacher uses the computer to enhance traditional modes of teaching; and apprentice mode, in which teacher and student explore the use of the computer as a professional tool. Surveys are beginning to elucidate the pattern of use of IT in teaching, not only in physics, but in the other sciences as well.

  8. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-02-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include nifH, nifD, nifK, nifT, nifY, nifE, nifN, nifX, nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, nifM, and nifF. Although there are significant spatial differences, the identified A. vinelandii nif-specific genes have the same sequential arrangement as the corresponding nif-specific genes from K. pneumoniae. Twelve other potential genes whose expression could be subject to nif-specific regulation were also found interspersed among the identified nif-specific genes. These potential genes do not encode products that are structurally related to the identified nif-specific gene products. Eleven potential nif-specific promoters were identified within the major nif cluster, and nine of these are preceded by an appropriate upstream activator sequence. A + T-rich regions were identified between 8 of the 11 proposed nif promoter sequences and their upstream activator sequences. Site-directed deletion-and-insertion mutagenesis was used to establish a genetic map of the major nif cluster. PMID:2644218

  9. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-01-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include nifH, nifD, nifK, nifT, nifY, nifE, nifN, nifX, nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, nifM, and nifF. Although there are significant spatial differences, the identified A. vinelandii nif-specific genes have the same sequential arrangement as the corresponding nif-specific genes from K. pneumoniae. Twelve other potential genes whose expression could be subject to nif-specific regulation were also found interspersed among the identified nif-specific genes. These potential genes do not encode products that are structurally related to the identified nif-specific gene products. Eleven potential nif-specific promoters were identified within the major nif cluster, and nine of these are preceded by an appropriate upstream activator sequence. A + T-rich regions were identified between 8 of the 11 proposed nif promoter sequences and their upstream activator sequences. Site-directed deletion-and-insertion mutagenesis was used to establish a genetic map of the major nif cluster. PMID:2644218

  10. Education majors' expectations and reported experiences with inquiry-based physics: Implications for student affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.

    2013-06-01

    To address a perennial need to provide K-8 teachers with a solid foundation in science, there are many physics content courses throughout the United States. One such course is Physics and Astronomy for Teachers (PAT), which relies heavily on active-learning strategies. Although PAT is successful in teaching physics content, students sometimes report dissatisfaction with the course. Such instances of poor affect are worrisome because they may influence how teachers present science in their own classrooms. Therefore, this study investigates students’ affect in terms of their pedagogical expectations and potential personal learning outcomes with respect to PAT. Two sections of PAT, each containing approximately 40 students, were observed. Students in those sections were surveyed, and a sample were interviewed (N=10). An analysis of the data in terms of an expectancy violation framework shows that while students’ expectations regarding the hands-on and interactive components of PAT were met, they received substantially fewer lectures, class discussions, and opportunities to make class presentations than they had expected, even after they had been presented with the course syllabus and informed about the specific nature of the course. Additionally, students expected PAT to be more directly linked with their future teaching careers and therefore expected more opportunities to practice teaching science than they reported receiving. This investigation serves as a case study to provide insight into why students are sometimes frustrated and confused when first encountering active-learning classes, and it implies that instructors should be cognizant of those feelings and devote resources toward explicit orientation that emphasizes the purpose of the course and reasons behind their pedagogical choices.

  11. Chipscale optical frequency combs: from soliton physics to coherent communication (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasch, Victor; Geiselmann, Michael; Herr, Tobias; Lihachev, Grigoriy; Pfeiffer, Martin H. P.; Gorodetsky, Michael L.; Kippenberg, Tobias J.

    2016-04-01

    In our experiment we use silicon nitride waveguides embedded in silicon dioxide on a silicon chip. The cross section of the waveguide is approximately 1.8µm width by 0.8µm height and the ring resonator has a radius of 120µm. This resonator is coupled to a bus waveguide that is used to couple the continuous wave pump light into the resonator and the light from the resonator out again. The pump laser is an amplified diode laser which provides around 2W of pump power in the bus waveguide on the photonic chip. If the pump light is in resonance with one of the resonances of the resonator we can generate a frequency comb from the pump light via the Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The spacing in between the lines of the frequency comb is close to the free spectral range of the resonator, which is 190 GHz for the resonator used. By tuning the pump laser through the resonance and modulating the power of the pump light we can achieve a stable state with a pulsed-shape waveform circulating inside the microresonator. These states are known as dissipative Kerr soliton states and they are solutions to the Lugiato-Lefever equation, which describes the nonlinear physics of the system. So far they had been experimentally demonstrated in fiber-ring cavities as well as crystalline microresonators. The main benefits of these states for Kerr frequency combs is that they allow for low-noise but broadband frequency combs with low modulation in the spectrum. In our case we report a 3-dB bandwidth of 10THz which is equivalent to sub-30fs pulses inside the resonator. Because of the chosen geometry of the waveguide cross section we also observe an effect which is caused by higher-order dispersion. Higher-order dispersion are terms that describe the dispersion beyond the quadratic group velocity dispersion. In order for dissipative Kerr solitons to form, anomalous group velocity dispersion is required. If higher-order terms are present as well, the soliton can still exist but additional

  12. Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Calorimetry in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, Claudia

    primitive generation / N. Regnault -- Optical data links for the CMS ECAL / J. Grahl (contribution not received) -- CMS ECAL off-detector electronics / R. Alemany Fernandez -- Performance of a low noise readout ASIC for the W-Si calorimeter physics prototype for the future linear collider / C. de la Taille -- Properties of a sampling calorimeter with warm-liquid ionization chambers / S. Plewnia -- Calorimetry and the DO experiment / R. Zitoun (contribution not received) -- Data quality monitoring for the DØ calorimeter / V. Shary -- Status of the construction of the ATLAS electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter, overview of beam test performance studies / L. Serin -- Uniformity of response of ATLAS liquid argon EM calorimeter / O. Gaunter -- Status of the ATLAS liquid argon hadronic endcap calorimeter construction / M. Vincter -- Results from particle beam tests of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap calorimeters / M. Lefebvre -- First results of the DREAM project / R. Wigmans -- Electron and muon detection with a dual-readout (DREAM) calorimeter / N. Akchurin -- The neutron zero degree calorimeter for the ALICE experiment / M. Gallio -- The liquid xenon scintillation calorimeter of the MEG experiment: operation of a large prototype / G. Signorelli -- Detection of high energy particles using radio frequency signals / C. Hebert -- Hadronic shower simulation / J.-P. Wellisch -- E.M. and hadronic shower simulation with FLUKA / G. Battistoni -- Simulation of the LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter response with GEANT4 / P. Robbe -- Comparison of beam test results of the combined ATLAS liquid argon endcap calorimeters with GEANT3 and GEANT4 simulations / D. Salihagić -- GEANT4 hadronic physics validation with LHC test-beam data / C. Alexa -- The full simulation of the GLAST LAT high energy gamma ray telescope / F. Longo -- Response of the KLOE electromagnetic calorimeter to low-energy particles / T. Spadaro -- Calorimeter algorithms for DØ; / S. Trincaz-Duvoid -- Identification of

  13. An examination of variables which influence high school students to enroll in an undergraduate engineering or physical science major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Christopher H.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the variables which influence a high school student to enroll in an engineering discipline versus a physical science discipline. Data was collected utilizing the High School Activities, Characteristics, and Influences Survey, which was administered to students who were freshmen in an engineering or physical science major at an institution in the Southeastern United States. A total of 413 students participated in the survey. Collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon tests, and binomial logistic regression techniques. A total of 29 variables were deemed significant between the general engineering and physical science students. The 29 significant variables were further analyzed to see which have an independent impact on a student to enroll in an undergraduate engineering program, as opposed to an undergraduate physical science program. Four statistically significant variables were found to have an impact on a student's decision to enroll in a engineering undergraduate program versus a physical science program: father's influence, participation in Project Lead the Way, and the subjects of mathematics and physics. Recommendations for theory, policy, and practice were discussed based on the results of the study. This study presented suggestions for developing ways to attract, educate, and move future engineers into the workforce.

  14. Science on the Table: Motivating Non-Science Majors to Learn Physical Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Martha; Iriarte-Gross, Judith

    2006-03-01

    Most undergraduates in non-scientific fields view personal science knowledge as both irrelevant and unnecessary for their future well-being. Attempts by universities to address the problem of an increasingly scientifically illiterate citizenry through the incorporation of science requirements in the general education curriculum are viewed by students as one more obstacle in their quest for an undergraduate degree, not as an opportunity to develop the skills needed for personal and civic decision making related to scientific and technologic issues. We have modified the laboratory portion of our existing Physical Science course (previously a catch-all course intended to cover concepts in physics, chemistry, earth science, and astronomy in one semester) to incorporate activities that draw attention to the impact of science on society and individuals. These activities include classroom debates on current issues with scientific content as well as experiments that draw attention to the science of everyday materials and phenomena. We will discuss these activities and the skills students are expected to develop from them.

  15. Physical properties of type I collagen extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Junzo; Walsh, Dominic; Mann, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    Type I collagens were extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas as a possible underutilized resource for medical materials. The fish scales were demineralized with EDTA and digested by pepsin. The resultant type I collagens contained more than 33.6% of glycine as the most abundant amino acid. The denaturation temperatures of the collagens from P. major and O. niloticas were 303 and 308K, respectively, both of which were relatively lower than that of porcine dermis collagen (314K). CD spectra indicated that the denaturation temperatures were dependent on the amount of hydroxyproline, rather than proline residues. Raman spectra also indicated that the relative intensities of Raman lines at 879 and 855cm(-1) assigned to Hyp and Pro rings were changed due to the contents of the imino acids. Significantly, the content of sulphur-containing methionine was higher in the fish scales than in porcine dermis. The enthalpy and entropy estimated from thermal analyses could be correlated to amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) of type I collagens and the number of methionine amino acid residues. PMID:12957317

  16. MAJOR RIVER PLUMES IN THE TROPICAL OCEAN: PHYSICAL AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL EXPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, J M; Lopez,, J E; Brocco, J M,; Fuentes, B; Antoun, D; Lopez, H; Cabrera, R; Mendez, A

    2008-03-02

    The Caribbean and Western Tropical Atlantic receive massive inputs of Orinoco and Amazon River water carrying a load of organic and inorganic materials into waters characteristically devoid of these. The magnitude of riverine impact became evident as remote sensing became an ocean color monitoring tool. These observations depict riverine plumes, containing dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton well above background concentrations, being advected into the oligotrophic ocean. Subsequent research revealed that riverine intrusions radically modulate trophic balance and activity through changes in plankton abundance, composition and size distribution and last but not least: availability of solar irradiance. Moreover, riverine influence responds to climate processes and oceanic mesoscale processes bringing about significant spatial and temporal variability at annual and interannual scales. We discuss observations of physical and biogeochemical gradients in the Orinoco River Plume in the above context.

  17. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Spintronics(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 3 February 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 3 February 2010 at the Conference Hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Ustinov V V (Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch, RAS, Ekaterinburg) "Metallic nanospintronics"; (2) Kusrayev Yu G (Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Spin-related phenomena in semiconductors; physics and applications"; (3) Tarasenko S A (Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Spin photocurrents in semiconductors"; (4) Averkiev N S, Golub L E (Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Spin relaxation in quantum semiconductor heterostructures". Papers written on the basis of reports 2-4 are given below. • Spin phenomena in semiconductors: physics and applications, Yu G Kusrayev Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 7, Pages 725-738 • Spin photocurrents in semiconductors, S A Tarasenko Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 7, Pages 739-742 • Spin relaxation anisotropy in two-dimensional semiconductors, N S Averkiev Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 7, Pages 742-745

  18. News Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

  19. Functional disability as an explanation of the associations between chronic physical conditions and 12-month major depressive episode

    PubMed Central

    Stegmann, Mariken E.; Ormel, Johan; de Graaf, Ron; Haro, Josep-Maria; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Demyttenaere, Koen; Kovess, Vivianne; Matschinger, Herbert; Vilagut, Gemma; Alonso, Jordi; Burger, Huibert

    2013-01-01

    Background The link between physical conditions and mental health is poorly understood. Functional disability could explain the association of physical conditions with major depressive episode (MDE) as an intermediary factor. Methods Data was analyzed from a subsample (N=8,796) of the European Study of the Epidemiology of Mental Disorders (ESEMeD), a cross-sectional general population survey. MDE during the last 12 months was assessed using a revision of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0). Lifetime chronic physical conditions were assessed by self-report. Functional disability was measured using a version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS). The associations of physical conditions with MDE and explanation by functional disability were quantified using logistic regression. Results All physical conditions were significantly associated with MDE. The increases in risk of MDE ranged from 30% for allergy to amply 100% for arthritis and heart disease. When adjusted for physical comorbidity, associations decreased and were no longer statistically significant for allergy and diabetes. Functional disability explained between 17 and 64% of these associations, most substantially for stomach or duodenum ulcer, arthritis and heart disease. Limitations Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study the temporal relationship of the variables could not be assessed and the amount of explanation can not simply be interpreted as the amount of mediation. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the association of chronic physical conditions with MDE is partly explained by functional disability. Such explanation is more pronounced for pain causing conditions and heart disease. Health professionals should be particularly aware of the increased risk of depressive disorder when patients experience disability from these conditions. PMID:19939461

  20. News Competition: School team launches a rocket Conference: Norway focuses on physics teaching Science on Stage: Canadian science acts take to the stage Particle Physics: Teachers get a surprise at CERN Teaching: Exploring how students learn physics University: Oxford opens doors to science teachers Lasers: Lasers shine light on meeting Science Fair: Malawi promotes science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    Competition: School team launches a rocket Conference: Norway focuses on physics teaching Science on Stage: Canadian science acts take to the stage Particle Physics: Teachers get a surprise at CERN Teaching: Exploring how students learn physics University: Oxford opens doors to science teachers Lasers: Lasers shine light on meeting Science Fair: Malawi promotes science education

  1. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  2. Longitudinal effects of college type and selectivity on degrees conferred upon undergraduate females in physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Stacy Mckimm

    There has been much research to suggest that a single-sex college experience for female undergraduate students can increase self-confidence and leadership ability during the college years and beyond. The results of previous studies also suggest that these students achieve in the workforce and enter graduate school at higher rates than their female peers graduating from coeducational institutions. However, some researchers have questioned these findings, suggesting that it is the selectivity level of the colleges rather than the comprised gender of the students that causes these differences. The purpose of this study was to justify the continuation of single-sex educational opportunities for females at the post-secondary level by examining the effects that college selectivity, college type, and time have on the rate of undergraduate females pursuing majors in non-traditional fields. The study examined the percentage of physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science degrees conferred upon females graduating from women's colleges from 1985-2001, as compared to those at comparable coeducational colleges. Sampling for this study consisted of 42 liberal arts women's (n = 21) and coeducational (n = 21) colleges. Variables included the type of college, the selectivity level of the college, and the effect of time on the percentage of female graduates. Doubly multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance testing revealed significant main effects for college selectivity on social science graduates, and time on both life science and math and computer science graduates. Significant interaction was also found between the college type and time on social science graduates, as well as the college type, selectivity level, and time on math and computer science graduates. Implications of the results and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  3. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Plasma phenomena in nanostructures and neutron stars Scientific Session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (26 March 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, V. V.; Istomin, Ya N.; Kosevich, Yu A.

    2008-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 26 March 2008 at the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Klimov V V (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Nanoplasmonics"; (2) Istomin Ya N (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Electron-positron plasma generation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars"; (3) Kosevich Yu A (N N Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, RAS, Moscow) "Multichannel propagation and scattering of phonons and photons in low-dimension nanostructures". An abridged version of these reports is given below. • Nanoplasmonics, V V Klimov Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 8, Pages 839-844 • Electron-positron plasma generation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars, Ya N Istomin Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 8, Pages 844-848 • Multichannel propagation and scattering of phonons and photons in low-dimension nanostructures, Yu A Kosevich Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 8, Pages 848-859

  4. ICOM2012: 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (Belgrade, Serbia, 2-6 September 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Antić, Željka; Viana, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    The 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (ICOM2012) was held in Belgrade (Serbia) from 2 to 6 September 2012 (figure 1). The conference was organized by the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade (Serbia) and the Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (France), and supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia and Optical Society of America. ICOM2012 was a follow-up to the two previous, successful ICOM conferences held in Herceg Novi in 2006 and 2009. The conference aimed at providing a forum for scientists in optical materials to debate on: • Luminescent materials and nanomaterials • Hybrid optical materials (organic/inorganic) • Characterization techniques of optical materials • Luminescence mechanisms and energy transfers • Theory and modeling of optical processes • Ultrafast-laser processing of materials • Optical sensors • Medical imaging • Advanced optical materials in photovoltaics and biophotonics • Photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy and phenomena The conference stressed the value of a fundamental scientific understanding of optical materials. A particular accent was put on wide band-gap materials in crystalline, glass and nanocrystalline forms. The applications mainly involved lasers, scintillators and phosphors. Rare earth and transition metal ions introduced as dopants in various hosts were considered, and their impact on the optical properties were detailed in several presentations. This volume contains selected contributions of speakers and participants of the ICOM2012 conference. The conference provided a unique opportunity for about 200 scientists from 32 countries to discuss recent progress in the field of optical materials. During the three and half days, 21 invited talks and 52 contributed lectures were given, with a special event in memory of our dear colleague Professor Dr Tsoltan

  5. Evaluation of lifetime trauma exposure and physical health in women with posttraumatic stress disorder or major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Michelle F; Flood, Amanda M; Reynolds, Victoria; Araujo, Gustavo; Clancy, Carolina P; Barefoot, John C; Beckham, Jean C

    2009-05-01

    The current study examines lifetime trauma exposure rates in 148 women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), or neither diagnosis and whether this is related to measures of PTSD, depression, hostility, health symptoms, and health care utilization. Findings indicate that multiple trauma exposures were prevalent in this sample, with 96% of those with PTSD and 79% of those with MDD reporting three or more trauma exposures compared to 46% in the comparison group. Controlling for diagnostic status, regression analysis for PTSD symptom severity reveals that the trauma exposure adult physical assault category was significantly associated with more severe PTSD and depressive symptoms, whereas the childhood violence category was most associated with increased hostility. PTSD and MDD groups reported greater past year health conditions and health care utilization. PMID:19329771

  6. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  7. News Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

  8. PRACTICAL GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORGAN, JOHN S.

    THIS GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP BEGINS WITH A CHAPTER ON LEADERSHIP PSYCHOLOGY AND GOES ON TO PRESENT OUTLINES FOR RUNNING CONFERENCES. THE LEADER PREPARES FOR THE MEETING BY COLLECTING FACTS ON THE SUBJECT, PREPARING AN OUTLINE, KNOWING THE PARTICIPANTS, MAKING PHYSICAL ARRANGEMENTS, AND WRITING THE TENTATIVE SUMMARY. IN THE CONFERENCE HE…

  9. The Major Trends of Research on Physical Activity in Japan Viewed From the Reports Presented at the JSPE Annual Conventions During Past 25 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meshizuka, Tetsuo

    1978-01-01

    The major research trends over the past 25 years in Japanese physical education are analyzed using oral reports of the Japanese Society of Physical Education. Topics for analysis include: philosophy, sociology, history, administration, psychology, growth and development, health education, teaching methodology, biomechanics, measurement and…

  10. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  11. Physical Education and Recreation for Handicapped Children; Proceedings of a Study Conference on Research and Demonstration Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Recreation and Park Association, Arlington, VA.

    Included are articles on the status of physical education for the retarded, the visually handicapped, the hearing impaired, and the emotionally disturbed. Concepts in research and demonstration needs in physical education and recreation for the physically handicapped are presented. Papers consider the status of recreation for the handicapped as…

  12. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  13. Proceedings of the 34th International Conference in High Energy Physics (ICHEP08), Philadelphia, PA, 2008, eConf C080730, [hep-ph/0809.xxx

    SciTech Connect

    Lockyer, Nigel S.; Smith, AJ Stewart,; et. al.

    2008-09-01

    In 2004 a team from the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and the Institute for Advanced Study proposed to host the 2008 International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP) on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The proposal was approved later that year by the C-11 committee of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The Co-Chairs were Nigel S. Lockyer (U. Penn/TRIUMF) and A.J. Stewart Smith (Princeton); Joe Kroll of U. Penn served as Deputy Chair from 2007 on. Highlights of the proposal included 1. greatly increased participation of young scientists, women scientists, and graduate students 2. new emphasis on formal theory 3. increased focus on astrophysics and cosmology 4. large informal poster session (170 posters) in prime time 5. convenient, contiguous venues for all sessions and lodging 6. landmark locations for the reception and banquet. The conference program consisted of three days of parallel sessions and three days of plenary talks.

  14. Attracting Girls to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandow, Barbara; Marks, Ann; Borg, Anne

    2009-04-01

    In most countries the number of girls studying physics, as well female physicists in academic positions, is still low. Active recruitment at all levels is essential to change this situation. In some countries a large proportion of students are female, but career progression is difficult. Highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications is a major approach in attracting girls to physics. This paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from the workshop, Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, Seoul, 2008.

  15. International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics, 8th, Lunds Universitet, Sweden, Aug. 4-8, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, Per-Olof (Editor); Nordgren, Joseph (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The interactions of VUV radiation with solids are explored in reviews and reports of recent theoretical and experimental investigations from the fields of atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, and VUV instrumentation. Topics examined include photoabsorption and photoionization, multiphoton processes, plasma physics, VUV lasers, time-resolved spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation centers, solid-state spectroscopy, and dynamical processes involving localized levels. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles of photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission, inverse photoemission, semiconductors, organic materials, and adsorbates.

  16. PLANNING AREAS AND FACILITIES FOR HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION BY PARTICIPANTS IN NATIONAL FACILITIES CONFERENCE. REVISED 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    SPECIFIC INFORMATION IS PROVIDED IN THIS GUIDE TO PLANNERS OF AREAS AND FACILITIES FOR ATHLETICS, RECREATION, OUTDOOR EDUCATION, AND PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION. PART ONE CONCERNS BASIC CONCEPTS PERTINENT TO THE AREA OF CONSIDERATION. THE AIMS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION, AND RECREATION ARE LISTED. PLANNING PRINCIPLES,…

  17. The Age of Majority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of State Governments, Lexington, KY.

    During the past 2 years state laws lowering the age of majority to 18 and other statutes that confer some majority rights on minors have considerably altered the status of young people in our society. In 7 states, the age of majority has been lowered in an effort to relieve young people of the minority disabilities originally intended to protect…

  18. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Nanoplasmonics and metamaterials(Scientific session of the Division of Physical Sciences, Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 April 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhodeev, Sergei G.; Shubina, Tat'yana V.; Ivanov, Sergei V.; Toropov, Aleksei A.; Kop'ev, Petr S.; Kurin, Vladislav V.; Lagarkov, Andrei N.; Sarychev, Andrei K.; Gippius, Nikolai A.

    2009-09-01

    On 27 April 2009, in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, a scientific session of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences devoted to the problem of nanoplasmonics and metamaterials took place. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Tikhodeev S G, Gippius N A (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Plasmon-polariton effects in nanostructured metal-dielectric photonic crystals and metamaterials"; (2) Shubina T V, Ivanov S V, Toropov A A, Kop'ev P S (Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg) "Plasmon effects in In(Ga)N-based nanostructures"; (3) Kurin V V (Institute of Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Resonance scattering of light in nanostructured metallic and ferromagnetic films"; (4) Lagarkov A N , Sarychev A K (Institute of Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Active optical metamaterials"; (5) Gippius N A, Tikhodeev S G (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Application of the scattering matrix method for calculating the optical properties of metamaterials." Summaries of reports 1-3 and 5 and of an article written on the basis of report 4 are given below. • Plasmon-polariton effects in nanostructured metal-dielectric photonic crystals and metamaterials, S G Tikhodeev, N A Gippius Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 9, Pages 945-949 • Plasmon effects in In(Ga)N-based nanostructures, T V Shubina, S V Ivanov, A A Toropov, P S Kop'ev Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 9, Pages 949-953 • Resonance scattering of light in nanostructured metallic and ferromagnetic films, V V Kurin Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 9, Pages 953-959 • Superresolution and enhancement in metamaterials, A N Lagarkov, A K Sarychev, V N

  19. National Society of Black Physicists XXV Annual Day of Scientific Lectures and 21st Annual Meeting - NSBP '98: The Next Generation/12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students - NCPBS '98: Physics/Life in Motion

    SciTech Connect

    MacKellar, Alan

    1999-02-28

    The 12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held jointly with the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) March 4-8, 1998 in Lexington, Ky. The Proceedings consists of scientific talks and abstracts given by NSBP members and students attending the NCBPS meeting. One joint session of general scientific interest was held, with NCBPS students, NSBP members, and about 75 high school students from the state of Kentucky present. NCBPS session included ''How to get into Graduate School'', ''How to Survive in Graduate School'', and a Panel on ''Opportunities for Physics Graduates.'' The report by AIP: ''Survey of Participants of the 12th Annual NCBPS'' is included in the Proceedings.

  20. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  1. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-08-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED CARBONS' PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO THEIR MERCURY ADSORPTION: SYMPOSIUM/CONFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SYMPOS/CONF NRMRL-RTP-P-597 Li*, Y.H., Lee*, C.W., and Gullett*, B.K. Characterization of Activated Carbons' Physical and Chemical Properties in Relation to their Mercury Adsorption. Carbon '01, Lexington, KY, 7/14-19/01. 2001. EPA/600/A-01/075 (NTIS PB2002- 100291). 04/05/200...

  3. European Conference on Health Economics.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own. PMID:21155696

  4. The Majority of the Migrant Factory Workers of the Light Industry in Shenzhen, China May Be Physically Inactive

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joseph T. F.; Wu, Anise M. S.; Tse, Vincent W. S.; Zhou, Shenglai

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a strong risk factor of non-communicable diseases (NCD). In China, there are 250 million migrant factory workers, who are susceptible to physical inactivity and hence NCD because of work nature and setting. With random stratified sampling, 807 such workers of the light industry were recruited in Shenzhen, China and completed a self-administered questionnaire with informed consent. The prevalence of inadequate physical activity (defined according to the World Health Organization’s recommendation on level of moderate/vigorous physical activity) was 95.4%. Of all participants, 69.1% showed “a very low level of physical activity” (VLLPA), defined as ≤30 minutes of weekly moderate/vigorous physical activity, which was significantly associated with female sex (Odds ratio [OR]=1.65), lower education level (OR=0.10 to 0.33, primary education as the reference group) and married status (OR=0.63, single status as the reference group). Adjusted for these factors, perceived social support (Adjusted OR=0.87) was negatively associated with VLLPA, while job stress due to workload, which was significant in the univariate analysis (OR=0.98), became non-significant (p=0.184). Significant interaction between perceived social support and perceived job stress onto VLLPA was found (p=0.044), implying that the negative association between job stress and VLLPA, which might reflect a potential response to cope with stress by performing exercises, was stronger among those with weaker social support. The extremely low level of physical activity rings an alarm, as it implies high risk of NCD, and as there are no existing programs promoting physical activity in this group. Interventions need to take into account social support, potential coping to job stress, and structural factors of the factory setting, while involving factories’ management. PMID:26244514

  5. A Science Summer Camp as an Effective Way to Recruit High School Students to Major in the Physical Sciences and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischoff, Paul J.; Castendyk, Devin; Gallagher, Hugh; Schaumloffel, John; Labroo, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Now in its fifth year, PR[superscript 2]EPS is a National Science Foundation funded initiative designed to recruit high school students to attend college majoring in the physical sciences, including engineering and secondary science education, and to help ensure their retention within these programs until graduation. A central feature of the…

  6. Development of a More Flexible Physical Science Laboratory Program for Non-Science Majors with Superior High School Science Backgrounds. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stekel, Frank D.

    The effects of two different approaches for teaching the physical science laboratory for non-science majors were compared. The control group had a traditional laboratory with assigned, structured laboratory exercises; the experimental group was subjected to a situation where there was more student involvement in choice of experiment, experimental…

  7. Antihypertensive use and the effect of a physical activity intervention in the prevention of major mobility disability among older adults: The LIFE study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: This subgroup analysis of the Lifestyle Intervention and Independence for Elders trial evaluates the impact of a long-term physical activity (PA) intervention on rates of major mobility disability (MMD) among older adults according to their antihypertensive medication use. METHODS: Lifes...

  8. Inheritance and Identification of a Major Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) that Confers Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and a Novel QTL for Plant Height in Sweet Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Harris-Shultz, Karen R; Davis, Richard F; Knoll, Joseph E; Anderson, William; Wang, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    Southern root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) are a pest on many economically important row crop and vegetable species and management relies on chemicals, plant resistance, and cultural practices such as crop rotation. Little is known about the inheritance of resistance to M. incognita or the genomic regions associated with resistance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). In this study, an F2 population (n = 130) was developed between the resistant sweet sorghum cultivar 'Honey Drip' and the susceptible sweet cultivar 'Collier'. Each F2 plant was phenotyped for stalk weight, height, juice Brix, root weight, total eggs, and eggs per gram of root. Strong correlations were observed between eggs per gram of root and total eggs, height and stalk weight, and between two measurements of Brix. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to generate single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The G-Model, single marker analysis, interval mapping, and composite interval mapping were used to identify a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 3 for total eggs and eggs per gram of root. Furthermore, a new QTL for plant height was also discovered on chromosome 3. Simple sequence repeat markers were developed in the total eggs and eggs per gram of root QTL region and the markers flanking the resistance gene are 4.7 and 2.4 cM away. These markers can be utilized to move the southern root-knot nematode resistance gene from Honey Drip to any sorghum line. PMID:26574655

  9. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Extragalactic astronomy (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 28 October 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), "Extragalactic astronomy", was held in the Conference Hall of the Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems, RAS, on 28 October 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Varshalovich D A, Ivanchik A V, Balashev S A (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS) "Big Bang nucleosynthesis of deuterium and HD/H2 molecular abundances in interstellar clouds of 12 Gyr ago"; (2) Aptekar R L, Golenetskii S V, Mazets E P (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS). "Studies of cosmic gamma-ray bursts and gamma repeaters with the Ioffe Institute Konus experiments"; (3) Beskin G M, Karpov S V (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS), Bondar S V (Scientific Research Institute of Precision Instrument Making) "Discovery of the fast optical variability of the GRB 080319B gamma burst and the prospects for wide-angle high time resolution optical monitoring"; (4) Starobinskii A A (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS) "Experimental and theoretical investigation of dark matter in the Universe"; (5) Zasov A V, Sil'chenko O K (Shternberg State Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University) "Galactic disks and their evolution"; (6) Burdyuzha V V (Astro-Space Center of the Lebedev Physics Institute) "Dark components of the Universe". Papers based of reports 1-3, 5, and 6 are published below. A A Starobinskii's extended report will be presented in the form of a review, which is planned for publication in one of the forthcoming issues of Physics-Uspekhi. • Big Bang nucleosynthesis of deuterium and HD/H2 molecular abundances in interstellar clouds of 12 Gyr ago, D A Varshalovich, A V Ivanchik, S A Balashev, P Petitjean Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 4, Pages 397-401 • Cosmic gamma-ray bursts and gamma repeaters studies with Ioffe Institute Konus experiments, R L Aptekar, S

  10. Major latex protein-like protein 43 (MLP43) functions as a positive regulator during abscisic acid responses and confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanping; Yang, Li; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Ruijie; Wu, Yan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the disadvantageous environmental conditions for plant growth and reproduction. Given the importance of abscisic acid (ABA) to plant growth and abiotic stress responses, identification of novel components involved in ABA signalling transduction is critical. In this study, we screened numerous Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by seed germination assay and identified a mutant mlp43 (major latex protein-like 43) with decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination. The mlp43 mutant was sensitive to drought stress while the MLP43-overexpressed transgenic plants were drought tolerant. The tissue-specific expression pattern analysis showed that MLP43 was predominantly expressed in cotyledons, primary roots and apical meristems, and a subcellular localization study indicated that MLP43 was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Physiological and biochemical analyses indicated that MLP43 functioned as a positive regulator in ABA- and drought-stress responses in Arabidopsis through regulating water loss efficiency, electrolyte leakage, ROS levels, and as well as ABA-responsive gene expression. Moreover, metabolite profiling analysis indicated that MLP43 could modulate the production of primary metabolites under drought stress conditions. Reconstitution of ABA signalling components in Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that MLP43 was involved in ABA signalling transduction and acted upstream of SnRK2s by directly interacting with SnRK2.6 and ABF1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, ABA and drought stress down-regulated MLP43 expression as a negative feedback loop regulation to the performance of MLP43 in ABA and drought stress responses. Therefore, this study provided new insights for interpretation of physiological and molecular mechanisms of Arabidopsis MLP43 mediating ABA signalling transduction and drought stress responses. PMID:26512059

  11. Several regions in the major histocompatibility complex confer risk for anti-CCP-antibody positive rheumatoid arthritis, independent of the DRB1 locus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Annette T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I; Carulli, John P; Navarrete, Cristina; Remmers, Elaine F; Kastner, Daniel L; Plenge, Robert M; Li, Wentian; Gregersen, Peter K

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that additional risk loci for RA are present in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), independent of the class II HLA-DRB1 locus. We have now tested a total of 1,769 SNPs across 7.5Mb of the MHC located from 6p22.2 (26.03 Mb) to 6p21.32 (33.59 Mb) derived from the Illumina 550K Beadchip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). For an initial analysis in the whole dataset (869 RA CCP + cases, 1,193 controls), the strongest association signal was observed in markers near the HLA-DRB1 locus, with additional evidence for association extending out into the Class I HLA region. To avoid confounding that may arise due to linkage disequilibrium with DRB1 alleles, we analyzed a subset of the data by matching cases and controls by DRB1 genotype (both alleles matched 1:1), yielding a set of 372 cases with 372 controls. This analysis revealed the presence of at least two regions of association with RA in the Class I region, independent of DRB1 genotype. SNP alleles found on the conserved A1-B8-DR3 (8.1) haplotype show the strongest evidence of positive association (P ~ 0.00005) clustered in the region around the HLA-C locus. In addition, we identified risk alleles that are not present on the 8.1 haplotype, with maximal association signals (P ~ 0.001-0.0027) located near the ZNF311 locus. This latter association is enriched in DRB1*0404 individuals. Finally, several additional association signals were found in the extreme centromeric portion of the MHC, in regions containing the DOB1, TAP2, DPB1, and COL11A2 genes. These data emphasize that further analysis of the MHC is likely to reveal genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis that are independent of the DRB1 shared epitope alleles. PMID:18309376

  12. Major latex protein-like protein 43 (MLP43) functions as a positive regulator during abscisic acid responses and confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Yang, Li; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Ruijie; Wu, Yan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the disadvantageous environmental conditions for plant growth and reproduction. Given the importance of abscisic acid (ABA) to plant growth and abiotic stress responses, identification of novel components involved in ABA signalling transduction is critical. In this study, we screened numerous Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by seed germination assay and identified a mutant mlp43 (major latex protein-like 43) with decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination. The mlp43 mutant was sensitive to drought stress while the MLP43-overexpressed transgenic plants were drought tolerant. The tissue-specific expression pattern analysis showed that MLP43 was predominantly expressed in cotyledons, primary roots and apical meristems, and a subcellular localization study indicated that MLP43 was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Physiological and biochemical analyses indicated that MLP43 functioned as a positive regulator in ABA- and drought-stress responses in Arabidopsis through regulating water loss efficiency, electrolyte leakage, ROS levels, and as well as ABA-responsive gene expression. Moreover, metabolite profiling analysis indicated that MLP43 could modulate the production of primary metabolites under drought stress conditions. Reconstitution of ABA signalling components in Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that MLP43 was involved in ABA signalling transduction and acted upstream of SnRK2s by directly interacting with SnRK2.6 and ABF1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, ABA and drought stress down-regulated MLP43 expression as a negative feedback loop regulation to the performance of MLP43 in ABA and drought stress responses. Therefore, this study provided new insights for interpretation of physiological and molecular mechanisms of Arabidopsis MLP43 mediating ABA signalling transduction and drought stress responses. PMID:26512059

  13. May the Circle Be Unbroken: A New Decade. Final Report on the National Indian Conference on Aging (3rd, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 8-10, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    Focusing on six major topics to be addressed at the 1981 White House Conference (economic security, physical and mental health, social well being, older Americans as a national resource, creating an age-integrated society, and research), the National Indian Conference attracted 1,165 persons from more than 140 tribes (592 being Indian elders over…

  14. FOREWORD: HELAS II International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Roth, Markus

    2008-07-01

    Volume 118 (2008) of Journal of Physics: Conference Series provides a written record of the talks and posters presented at the HELAS II International Conference `Helioseismology, Asteroseismology and MHD Connections'. The conference was held during the week 20-24 August 2007 in Göttingen, Germany, jointly hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research and the Faculty of Physics of the University of Göttingen. A total of 140 scientists from all over the world attended. The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of Conny Aerts, Annie Baglin, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Thierry Corbard, Jadwiga Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, Stefan Dreizler, Yvonne Elsworth, Laurent Gizon (Chairman), Wolfgang Glatzel, Frank Hill, Donald Kurtz, Oskar von der Lühe, Maria Pia Di Mauro, Mário Monteiro, Pere Pallé, Markus Roth, Philip Scherrer, Manfred Schüssler, and Michael Thompson. HELAS stands for the European Helio- and Asteroseismology Network, a Coordination Action supported by the sixth Framework Programme of the European Union. It aims to bring together researchers in the fields of solar and stellar oscillations. This volume consists of 91 articles organized into sections that reflect the scientific programme of the conference: 012001-07 Wave diagnostics in physics, geophysics and astrophysics 012008-09 Perspectives on helio- and asteroseismology 012010-17 Asteroseismology: Observations 012018-25 Asteroseismology: Theory 012026-32 Global helioseismology and solar models 012033-38 Local helioseismology and magnetic activity 012039-44 Future observational projects in helio- and asteroseismology 012045-91 Poster papers. The overwhelming majority of papers discuss the seismology of the Sun and stars. Papers in the first section provide a broader perspective on wave phenomena and techniques for probing other physical systems, from living beings to the universe as a whole. We were extremely fortunate to have particularly distinguished experts to cover these topics

  15. An Examination of Variables Which Influence High School Students to Enroll in an Undergraduate Engineering or Physical Science Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the variables which influence a high school student to enroll in an engineering discipline versus a physical science discipline. Data was collected utilizing the High School Activities, Characteristics, and Influences Survey, which was administered to students who were freshmen in an engineering or physical…

  16. Use of a Classwide Peer Recording Program To Enhance the Quality and Accuracy of Responses of Physical Education Majors in a Physical Activity Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocansey, Reginald T-A.

    This study employed a classwide peer recording (CWPR) program to demonstrate the efficacy of peers as behavior change agents in a physical activity setting. The study sought to determine whether or not the frequency of stimuli conditions presented by a game changes when a CWPR procedure is in effect, and whether or not the frequency of actual…

  17. Is oxidative status influenced by dietary carotenoid and physical activity after moult in the great tit (Parus major)?

    PubMed

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Decencière, Beatriz; Perret, Samuel; Karadas, Filiz; Meylan, Sandrine; Biard, Clotilde

    2015-07-01

    In the context of sexual and natural selection, an allocation trade-off for carotenoid pigments may exist because of their obligate dietary origin and their role both in the antioxidant and immune systems and in the production of coloured signals in various taxa, particularly birds. When birds have expended large amounts of carotenoids to feather growth such as after autumn moult, bird health and oxidative status might be more constrained. We tested this hypothesis in a bird species with carotenoid-based plumage colour, by manipulating dietary carotenoids and physical activity, which can decrease antioxidant capacity and increase reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) concentration. Great tits were captured after moult and kept in aviaries, under three treatments: physical handicap and dietary supplementation with carotenoids, physical handicap and control diet, and no handicap and control diet. We measured plasma composition (antioxidant capacity, ROM concentration, and vitamin A, vitamin E and total carotenoid concentrations), immune system activation (blood sedimentation) and stress response (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) and predicted that handicap treatment should influence these negatively and carotenoid supplementation positively. Coloration of yellow feathers was also measured. Carotenoid supplementation increased total plasma carotenoid concentration, decreased feather carotenoid chroma and marginally increased ROM concentration. Handicap increased blood sedimentation only in males but had no clear influence on oxidative stress, which contradicted previous studies. Further studies are needed to investigate how physical activity and carotenoid availability might interact and influence oxidative stress outside the moult period, and their combined potential influence on attractiveness and reproductive investment later during the breeding season. PMID:25964421

  18. MC 93 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Monte Carlo Simulation in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragovitsch, Peter; Linn, Stephan L.; Burbank, Mimi

    1994-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Heavy Fragment Production for Hadronic Cascade Codes * Monte Carlo Simulations of Space Radiation Environments * Merging Parton Showers with Higher Order QCD Monte Carlos * An Order-αs Two-Photon Background Study for the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson * GEANT Simulation of Hall C Detector at CEBAF * Monte Carlo Simulations in Radioecology: Chernobyl Experience * UNIMOD2: Monte Carlo Code for Simulation of High Energy Physics Experiments; Some Special Features * Geometrical Efficiency Analysis for the Gamma-Neutron and Gamma-Proton Reactions * GISMO: An Object-Oriented Approach to Particle Transport and Detector Modeling * Role of MPP Granularity in Optimizing Monte Carlo Programming * Status and Future Trends of the GEANT System * The Binary Sectioning Geometry for Monte Carlo Detector Simulation * A Combined HETC-FLUKA Intranuclear Cascade Event Generator * The HARP Nucleon Polarimeter * Simulation and Data Analysis Software for CLAS * TRAP -- An Optical Ray Tracing Program * Solutions of Inverse and Optimization Problems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics Using Inverse Monte Carlo * FLUKA: Hadronic Benchmarks and Applications * Electron-Photon Transport: Always so Good as We Think? Experience with FLUKA * Simulation of Nuclear Effects in High Energy Hadron-Nucleus Collisions * Monte Carlo Simulations of Medium Energy Detectors at COSY Jülich * Complex-Valued Monte Carlo Method and Path Integrals in the Quantum Theory of Localization in Disordered Systems of Scatterers * Radiation Levels at the SSCL Experimental Halls as Obtained Using the CLOR89 Code System * Overview of Matrix Element Methods in Event Generation * Fast Electromagnetic Showers * GEANT Simulation of the RMC Detector at TRIUMF and Neutrino Beams for KAON * Event Display for the CLAS Detector * Monte Carlo Simulation of High Energy Electrons in Toroidal Geometry * GEANT 3.14 vs. EGS4: A Comparison Using the DØ Uranium/Liquid Argon

  19. The NB-LRR proteins RGA4 and RGA5 interact functionally and physically to confer disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Césari, Stella; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Bernoux, Maud; Chalvon, Véronique; Kawano, Yoji; Shimamoto, Ko; Dodds, Peter; Terauchi, Ryohei; Kroj, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins of the class of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain proteins (NB-LRRs) are immune sensors which recognize pathogen-derived molecules termed avirulence (AVR) proteins. We show that RGA4 and RGA5, two NB-LRRs from rice, interact functionally and physically to mediate resistance to the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and accomplish different functions in AVR recognition. RGA4 triggers an AVR-independent cell death that is repressed in the presence of RGA5 in both rice protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana. Upon recognition of the pathogen effector AVR-Pia by direct binding to RGA5, repression is relieved and cell death occurs. RGA4 and RGA5 form homo- and hetero-complexes and interact through their coiled-coil domains. Localization studies in rice protoplast suggest that RGA4 and RGA5 localize to the cytosol. Upon recognition of AVR-Pia, neither RGA4 nor RGA5 is re-localized to the nucleus. These results establish a model for the interaction of hetero-pairs of NB-LRRs in plants: RGA4 mediates cell death activation, while RGA5 acts as a repressor of RGA4 and as an AVR receptor. PMID:25024433

  20. Role of magnetic fields in physics and astrophysics; Proceedings of the Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 5-7, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1975-01-01

    The papers deal with the role of magnetism in astrophysics and the properties of matter in the presence of unusually large magnetic fields. Topics include a quantum-mechanical treatment of high-energy charged particles radiating in a homogeneous magnetic field, the solution and properties of the Dirac equation for magnetic fields of any strength up to 10 to the 13th power gauss, experimental difficulties encountered and overcome in generating megagauss fields, the effect of strong radiation damping for an ultrarelativistic charge in an external electromagnetic field, magnetic susceptibilities of nuclei and elementary particles, and Compton scattering in strong external electromagnetic fields. Other papers examine static uniform electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the vacuum in arbitrarily strong magnetic fields, quantum-mechanical processes in neutron stars, basic ideas of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, helical MHD turbulence, relations between cosmic and laboratory plasma physics, and insights into the nature of magnetism provided by relativity and cosmology. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  1. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2014-07-01

    This conference on ``Multi-wavelength AGN Surveys and Studies'' has provided a detailed look at the explosive growth over the past decade, of available astronomical data from a growing list of large scale sky surveys, from radio-to-gamma rays. We are entering an era were multi-epoch (months to weeks) surveys of the entire sky, and near-instantaneous follow-up observations of variable sources, are elevating time-domain astronomy to where it is becoming a major contributor to our understanding of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). While we can marvel at the range of extragalactic phenomena dispayed by sources discovered in the original ``Markarian Survey'' - the first large-scale objective prism survey of the Northern Sky carried out at the Byurakan Astronomical Observtory almost a half-century ago - it is clear from the talks and posters presented at this meeting that the data to be be obtained over the next decade will be needed if we are to finally understand which phase of galaxy evolution each Markarian Galaxy represents.

  2. Designing the objective structured clinical examination to cover all major areas of physical medicine and rehabilitation over 3 yrs.

    PubMed

    Garstang, Susan; Altschuler, Eric L; Jain, Sheela; Delisa, Joel A

    2012-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that training programs comprehensively evaluate residents in the six core Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. One of the ways we do this in our residency is by administering a nine-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) at the end of each year, which evaluates tasks such as history taking, focused physical examination, communication, professionalism, procedural skills, management, prescription writing, and understanding systems-based practice. We have classified our OSCE stations into what we consider key areas in our field and assessed these on a rotating basis over 3 yrs. This results in the assessment of 27 areas over the 3 yrs of residency. Structuring the OSCE as a series of stations over 3 yrs is an efficient method to evaluate residents' competencies that are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and certifying boards. An analysis of OSCE scores when compared with American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation parts 1 and 2 scores and final summative resident evaluation scores reveals that OSCE results correlate with part 1 scores and final evaluation scores but do not show the same strong correlations with part 2 scores. We discuss the way the OSCE can complete other assessment techniques and ways to improve cases in the future. PMID:22469878

  3. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  4. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age.

    PubMed

    Dato, Serena; De Rango, Francesco; Crocco, Paolina; Passarino, Giuseppe; Rose, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1) was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking) and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination) status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64-107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979) associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p < 0.022). In addition, we found two SNPs borderline influencing longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505) in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging. PMID:26064428

  5. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  6. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  7. Conference on Non-linear Phenomena in Mathematical Physics: Dedicated to Cathleen Synge Morawetz on her 85th Birthday. The Fields Institute, Toronto, Canada September 18-20, 2008. Sponsors: Association for Women in Mathematics, Inc. and The Fields Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jennifer

    2012-10-15

    This scientific meeting focused on the legacy of Cathleen S. Morawetz and the impact that her scientific work on transonic flow and the non-linear wave equation has had in recent progress on different aspects of analysis for non-linear wave, kinetic and quantum transport problems associated to mathematical physics. These are areas where the elements of continuum, statistical and stochastic mechanics, and their interplay, have counterparts in the theory of existence, uniqueness and stability of the associated systems of equations and geometric constraints. It was a central event for the applied and computational analysis community focusing on Partial Differential Equations. The goal of the proposal was to honor Cathleen Morawetz, a highly successful woman in mathematics, while encouraging beginning researchers. The conference was successful in show casing the work of successful women, enhancing the visibility of women in the profession and providing role models for those just beginning their careers. The two-day conference included seven 45-minute lectures and one day of six 45-minute lectures, and a poster session for junior participants. The conference program included 19 distinguished speakers, 10 poster presentations, about 70 junior and senior participants and, of course, the participation of Cathleen Synge Morawetz. The conference celebrated Morawetz's paramount contributions to the theory of non-linear equations in gas dynamics and their impact in the current trends of nonlinear phenomena in mathematical physics, but also served as an awareness session of current women's contribution to mathematics.

  8. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  9. Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness as major markers of cardiovascular risk: their independent and interwoven importance to health status.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; McAuley, Paul; Lavie, Carl J; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Arena, Ross; Kokkinos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The evolution from hunting and gathering to agriculture, followed by industrialization, has had a profound effect on human physical activity (PA) patterns. Current PA patterns are undoubtedly the lowest they have been in human history, with particularly marked declines in recent generations, and future projections indicate further declines around the globe. Non-communicable health problems that afflict current societies are fundamentally attributable to the fact that PA patterns are markedly different than those for which humans were genetically adapted. The advent of modern statistics and epidemiological methods has made it possible to quantify the independent effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and PA on health outcomes. Based on more than five decades of epidemiological studies, it is now widely accepted that higher PA patterns and levels of CRF are associated with better health outcomes. This review will discuss the evidence supporting the premise that PA and CRF are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as the interplay between both PA and CRF and other CVD risk factors. A particular focus will be given to the interplay between CRF, metabolic risk and obesity. PMID:25269064

  10. The Isthmus of Panama: a major physical barrier to gene flow in a highly mobile pantropical seabird.

    PubMed

    Steeves, T E; Anderson, D J; Friesen, V L

    2005-07-01

    To further test the hypothesis that the Isthmus of Panama is a major barrier to gene flow in pantropical seabirds, we applied phylogeographic methods to mitochondrial control sequence variation in masked booby (Sula dactylatra) populations on either side of the Isthmus of Panama and the southern tip of Africa. In accord with Steeves et al. (2003), we found that all Caribbean masked boobies with the 'secondary contact' cytochrome b haplotype (m-B) shared a control region haplotype (Sd_100), which grouped with Indian-Pacific haplotypes and not Caribbean-Atlantic haplotypes. In addition, Sd_100 was more closely related to control region haplotypes in the Indian Ocean than in the Pacific. We also found that the 'secondary contact' birds diverged more recently from extant populations in the Indian Ocean than in the Pacific. Thus, it appears that these masked boobies did not breach the Isthmus of Panama. Rather, birds likely dispersed around the southern tip of Africa during favourable oceanographic conditions in the Pleistocene. PMID:16033573

  11. Identification and physical localization of useful genes and markers to a major gene-rich region on wheat group 1S chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, D; Champoux, J A; Bondareva, S N; Gill, K S

    2001-01-01

    The short arm of Triticeae homeologous group 1 chromosomes is known to contain many agronomically important genes. The objectives of this study were to physically localize gene-containing regions of the group 1 short arm, enrich these regions with markers, and study the distribution of genes and recombination. We focused on the major gene-rich region ("1S0.8 region") and identified 75 useful genes along with 93 RFLP markers by comparing 35 different maps of Poaceae species. The RFLP markers were tested by gel blot DNA analysis of wheat group 1 nullisomic-tetrasomic lines, ditelosomic lines, and four single-break deletion lines for chromosome arm 1BS. Seventy-three of the 93 markers mapped to group 1 and detected 91 loci on chromosome 1B. Fifty-one of these markers mapped to two major gene-rich regions physically encompassing 14% of the short arm. Forty-one marker loci mapped to the 1S0.8 region and 10 to 1S0.5 region. Two cDNA markers mapped in the centromeric region and the remaining 24 loci were on the long arm. About 82% of short arm recombination was observed in the 1S0.8 region and 17% in the 1S0.5 region. Less than 1% recombination was observed for the remaining 85% of the physical arm length. PMID:11290727

  12. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  13. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  14. EPRI electric vehicle conference

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleeger, D.

    1999-10-01

    Lower operating and maintenance costs, quiet and clean operation appear the main factors in choosing electric over the typical internal combustion powered equipment. The Conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI is a cooperative effort by major electric companies across the USA, founded in 1973 and headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. Featured at the Conference were presentations on regulatory issues, lift truck technologies, automotive advances and other industrial applications to include automated guided vehicles, personnel carriers and electric bicycles. Approximately 25 exhibitors displayed components, subassemblies and complete vehicles.

  15. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  16. LEAP 96 Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanet, Lucien

    1997-06-01

    The following pages represent a short summary of the many new results in low energy antiproton (p¯) physics presented and discussed at the LEAP 96 Conference. They cover a broad field of physics, from atomic physics to nuclear physics, from hadronic physics to parton physics. The impact of these results on "soft QCD", the part of strong interactions which we do not yet understand, and on the limits that we can establish to the "fundamental symmetries" which govern Nature are original and important. Within these twelve pages, I cannot do justice to all contributions. I present my apologizes for the omissions, hoping however that the serious reader will find the missing information in these proceedings.

  17. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  18. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  19. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  20. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  1. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  2. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  3. Conference -- summary and comment.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, D

    1974-01-01

    500 delegates met at the IPPF twenty-first Anniversary Conference which was held in Brighton on October 22-27, 1973. The theme of the conference was Planning for the Future. In his welcoming speech Dr. Fernando Tamayo, IPPF President, noted that the quality of life is everybody's business. Mr. Rafael Salas, UNFPA Executive Director, gave the keynote speech pointing out the need for a comprehensive approach to the problem of rapid population growth. The motto of the World Population Year 1974, "1 world for all," should be the goal. "A Survey of Unmet Needs in Family Planning," which was the result of family planning studies in 209 countries, was the background document of the conference. Other important papers of the conference were Dr. Thorsten Sjovall's paper "Human Rights and Welfare Aspects," Dr. Bernard Berelson's paper "Contribution of Family Planning to Demographic, Economic and Social Goals"; Rodney Shearman's "New Possibilities for Fertility Control"; Dr. Alexander Kessler's report "Barriers between Contraceptive Services and the Consumer"; papers on social and economic change and planned parenthood; a discussion by Professor Francis Okediji on "Social and Cultural Values affecting Fertility and the Adoption of Family Planning in Africa," following a speech by Mrs. Nani Soewondo on the influence of legislation and policy in improving the status of women; and the final paper by Mrs. Wendy Marson entitled "A View for the Future." At the final session of the conference Professor Brian Abel-Smith presented a summary of the proceedings. The writer believes that energy was generated by the exchange of views at the conference and that energy must be harnessed and driven forward by the IPPF Governing Body and Management Planning Committee. A major degree of flexibility in outlook and action must be maintained. PMID:12178347

  4. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  5. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  6. MESON2000 Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.

    2001-04-26

    This short contribution is a lite MESON2000 conference summary. As appropriate for the 600th anniversary of the Jagellonian University, it begins with a brief summary of the last 600 years of European history and its place in hadron physics. Next a ''physicist chirality'' order parameter PC is introduced. When applied to MESON2000 plenary speakers this order parameter illustrates the separation of hadron physicists into disjoint communities. The individual plenary talks in MESON2000 are next sorted according to the subconference associated with each of the 36 plenary speakers. Finally, I conclude with a previously unreported Feynman story regarding the use of models in hadron physics.

  7. Construction of a BAC library and a physical map of a major QTL for CBB resistance of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, S Y; Yu, K; Huffner, M; Park, S J; Banik, M; Pauls, K P; Crosby, W

    2010-07-01

    A major quantitative trait loci (QTL) conditioning common bacterial blight (CBB) resistance in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines HR45 and HR67 was derived from XAN159, a resistant line obtained from an interspecific cross between common bean lines and the tepary bean (P. acutifolius L.) line PI319443. This source of CBB resistance is widely used in bean breeding. Several other CBB resistance QTL have been identified but none of them have been physically mapped. Four molecular markers tightly linked to this QTL have been identified suitable for marker assisted selection and physical mapping of the resistance gene. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library was constructed from high molecular weight DNA of HR45 and is composed of 33,024 clones. The size of individual BAC clone inserts ranges from 30 kb to 280 kb with an average size of 107 kb. The library is estimated to represent approximately sixfold genome coverage. The BAC library was screened as BAC pools using four PCR-based molecular markers. Two to seven BAC clones were identified by each marker. Two clones were found to have both markers PV-tttc001 and STS183. One preliminary contig was assembled based on DNA finger printing of those positive BAC clones. The minimum tiling path of the contig contains 6 BAC clones spanning an estimated size of 750 kb covering the QTL region. PMID:20419470

  8. Proceedings of the ninth cellulose conference. I. Symposia on biosynthesis of cellulose, structure and physics of cellulose, and chemistry and utilization of lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Sarko, A.

    1983-01-01

    Volume I of this conference contains 37 papers covering research programs in the biosynthesis of cellulose and its precursors and the structure and chemical composition of cellulose and lignin. All 37 papers have been abstracted separately. 1028 references, 344 figures, 63 tables.

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Fundamentals and Applications of HIPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Bandorf, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    Thin film technology and surface engineering are nowadays key components for numerous innovative products like efficient windows, flat screens, sensors or hard coatings used in tool coating and automotive applications, as well as products for everyday life. In line with the demands of surface technology, coating technology is also evolving and improving. The latest major technology jump was the introduction of pulse technology in physical vapor deposition. High power impulse magnetron sputtering is the most recent development of pulse sputtering. After approximately a decade of intense academic investigation and development we observe today a transfer of this new technology towards industrial processes. As well as several international activities the international conference on fundamentals and applications of HIPIMS continues the success story of the HIPIMS days, initiated in 2004 at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. Becoming the only international conference especially dedicated to HIPIMS the HIPIMS conference is a venue for industrial and academic exchange on the latest developments in this fast evolving new technology. As a joint undertaking of Sheffield Hallam University SHU, Network of Competence for Industrial Plasma Surface Technology INPLAS and Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST the HIPIMS conference was launched in 2010 in Sheffield, UK. With 120 delegates the impact of the new conference was underlined. The growing importance of HIPIMS technology was connected with a growth by nearly 35% to 160 participants in 2011 at the second HIPIMS conference in Braunschweig, DE. The participants were made up of equal numbers from research and development (university and research institutes) and industry. Being a global conference representatives from 25 different countries from all continents attended. The HIPIMS conference is also in joint collaboration with the COST Action MP0804 Highly Ionized Pulse Plasma Processes (www

  10. Confronting the Core Curriculum: Considering Change in the Undergraduate Mathematics Major. Proceedings of the West Point Core Curriculum Conference in Mathematics (West Point, New York, April 23-24, 1994). Notes 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossey, John A., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of a conference held at the U.S. Military Academy to consider the question of core requirements for the courses often employed by partner disciplines, what concepts and procedural skills are really central, and how these questions might lead to the creation of a new undergraduate set of requirements that meet…

  11. Find a Physical Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy. Other Popular Resources: - Member Directory - Annual Reports Careers & Education Find Jobs Courses & Conferences About PT/PTA Careers Career Management ...

  12. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  13. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Commemoration of the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 May 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), was held on 26 May 2010 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The session was devoted to the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii. The program announced on the web page of the RAS Physical Sciences Division (www.gpad.ac.ru) contained the following reports: (1) Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Current sheets and reconnection in the geomagnetic tail"; (2) Frank A G (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Dynamics of current sheets as the cause of flare events in magnetized plasmas"; (3) Kuznetsov V D (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space research on the Sun"; (4) Somov B V (Shternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Strong shock waves and extreme plasma states"; (5) Zybin K P (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Structure functions for developed turbulence"; (6) Ptuskin V S (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The origin of cosmic rays." Papers based on reports 1-4 and 6 are published in what follows. • Metastability of current sheets, L M Zelenyi, A V Artemyev, Kh V Malova, A A Petrukovich, R Nakamura Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 933-941 • Dynamics of current sheets underlying flare-type events in magnetized plasmas, A G Frank Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 941-947 • Space research of the Sun, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 947-954 • Magnetic reconnection in solar flares, B V Somov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 954-958 • The origin of cosmic rays, V S Ptuskin Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 958-961

  14. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference.

  15. Identification of domains within the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early 86-kilodalton protein and the retinoblastoma protein required for physical and functional interaction with each other.

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, E A; Sommer, M H; Yoder, K; Spector, D H

    1997-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early 86-kDa protein (IE2 86) plays an important role in the trans activation and regulation of HCMV gene expression. Previously, we demonstrated that IE2 86 contains three regions (amino acids [aa] 86 to 135, 136 to 290, and 291 to 364) that can independently bind to in vitro-translated Rb when IE2 86 is produced as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (M. H. Sommer, A. L. Scully, and D. H. Spector, J. Virol. 68:6223-6231, 1994). In this report, we have elucidated the regions of Rb involved in binding to IE2 86 and have further analyzed the functional nature of the interaction between these two proteins. We find that two domains on Rb, the A/B pocket and the carboxy terminus, can each independently form a complex with IE2 86. In functional assays, we demonstrate that IE2 86 and another IE protein, IE1 72, can counter the enlarged flat cell phenotype, but not the G1/S block, which results from expression of wild-type Rb in the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2. Mutational analysis reveals that there are two domains on IE2 86 that can independently affect Rb function. One region (aa 241 to 369) includes the major Rb-binding domain, while the second maps to the amino-terminal region (aa 1 to 85) common to both IE2 86 and IE1 72. These data show that Rb and IE2 86 physically and functionally interact with each other via at least two separate domains and provide further support for the hypothesis that IE2 86 may exert its pleiotropic effects through the formation of multimeric protein complexes. PMID:9343168

  16. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  17. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  18. The 2009 National Environmental Public Health Conference: one model for planning green and healthy conferences.

    PubMed

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Moore, Cory; Burgin, Deborah; Byrne, Maggie Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry committed to making their 2009 National Environmental Public Health Conference a model for green and healthy conferences. The conference included increased opportunities for physical activity, both as part of conference events and for transportation to the conference. In addition, conference meals were healthy and sustainably sourced. The conference also implemented intuitive, accessible recycling; online scheduling and evaluation to minimize hard-copy materials; and the purchase of carbon offsets to reduce the unwanted environmental impact of the conference. Public health professionals have an opportunity and obligation to support healthy behaviors at their events and to serve as leaders in this area. Facilitating healthy and sustainable choices is in alignment with goals for both public health and broader social issues-such as environmental quality-that have a direct bearing on public health. PMID:21563713

  19. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  20. Conference Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.; Thomas, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    The MU-SPIN conference focused on showcasing successful experiences with information technology to enhance faculty and student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. And it provided a forum for discussing increased participation of MU-SPIN schools in NASA Flight Missions and NASA Educational and Public Outreach activities. Opportunities for Involvement sessions focused on Space Science, Earth Science, Education, and Aeronautics. These sessions provided insight into the missions of NASA's enterprises and NASA's Education program. Presentations by NASA scientists, university Principal Investigators, and other affiliates addressed key issues for increased minority involvement.

  1. Physical Map of Human 6p21.2–6p21.3: Region Flanking the Centromeric End of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Tripodis, Nicos; Mason, Ruth; Humphray, Sean J.; Davies, Angela F.; Herberg, Jethro A.; Trowsdale, John; Nizetic, Dean; Senger, Gabriele; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    1998-01-01

    We have physically mapped and cloned a 2.5-Mb chromosomal segment flanking the centromeric end of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We characterized in detail 27 YACs, 144 cosmids, 51 PACs, and 5 BACs, which will facilitate the complete genomic sequencing of this region of chromosome 6. The contig contains the genes encoding CSBP, p21, HSU09564 serine kinase, ZNF76, TCP-11, RPS10, HMGI(Y), BAK, and the human homolog of Tctex-7 (HSET). The GLO1 gene was mapped further centromeric in the 6p21.2–6p21.1 region toward TCTE-1. The gene order of the GLO1–HMGI(Y) segment in respect to the centromere is similar to the gene order in the mouse t-chromosome distal inversion, indicating that there is conservation in gene content but not gene order between humans and mice in this region. The close linkage of the BAK and CSBP genes to the MHC is of interest because of their possible involvement in autoimmune disease. PMID:9647638

  2. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  3. UN conference reaffirms reproductive rights.

    PubMed

    1996-07-26

    The United Nations Conference on Human Settlements, also known as the Habitat II conference, met in Istanbul from June 3 to 14. It was the last major UN gathering of this millennium and the first major UN meeting since 1995's Fourth World Conference on Women (the "Beijing Conference")--and thus an important opportunity for a wider international community to weigh in on agreements reached in Beijing and at the International Conference on Population and Development, held in Cairo in 1994. The final document that emerged from Habitat II, the "Global Plan of Action," affirmed crucial elements of those earlier accords. The Habitat documents calls for action to "[d]evelop and implement programmes to ensure universal access for women throughout their life-span to a full range of affordable health care services, including those related to reproductive health care, which includes family planning and sexual health, consistent with the Report of the International Conference on Population and Development." Language adopted at the Cairo meeting is also affirmed in Habitat's call for "universal access to the widest range of primary health care services." Perhaps most significantly, the Istanbul document reiterated an important declaration from the Beijing conference: "While the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical, cultural, and religious backgrounds must be borne in mind, it is the duty of all States to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms." Most of the 189 UN members and observer states that attended the conference upheld all three of these provisions. Only a small group of states--Argentina, Guatemala, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, and the Holy See--filed reservations on the health care sections. PMID:12347289

  4. Proceedings of the international conference on nuclear physics, August 24-30, 1980, Berkeley, California. Volume 1. Abstracts. [Berkeley, California, August 24-30, 1980 (abstracts only)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains all abstracts (931) received by the conference organizers before June 20, 1980. The abstracts are grouped according to the following topics: nucleon-nucleon interactions, free and in nuclei; distribution of matter, charge, and magnetism; exotic nuclei and exotic probes; giant resonances and other high-lying excitations; applications of nuclear science; nuclei with large angular momentum and deformation; heavy-ion reactions and relaxation phenomena; new techniques and instruments; pion absorption and scattering by nuclei; and miscellaneous. Some of these one-page abstracts contain data. A complete author index is provided. (RWR)

  5. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  6. The Conference Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolls, Blanche; Hartman, Linda; Corey, Linda; Marcoux, Betty; Jay, M. Ellen; England, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles on conference experiences: preplanning for a library conference; top ten reasons to attend an AASL (American Association of School Librarians) national conference; why should you bother to fill out a conference evaluation form; a case for conferences; and AASL tours. (LRW)

  7. SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    2003-01-01

    The Second SIAM Conference on Computational Science and Engineering was held in San Diego from February 10-12, 2003. Total conference attendance was 553. This is a 23% increase in attendance over the first conference. The focus of this conference was to draw attention to the tremendous range of major computational efforts on large problems in science and engineering, to promote the interdisciplinary culture required to meet these large-scale challenges, and to encourage the training of the next generation of computational scientists. Computational Science & Engineering (CS&E) is now widely accepted, along with theory and experiment, as a crucial third mode of scientific investigation and engineering design. Aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, semiconductor, and other industrial sectors now rely on simulation for technical decision support. For federal agencies also, CS&E has become an essential support for decisions on resources, transportation, and defense. CS&E is, by nature, interdisciplinary. It grows out of physical applications and it depends on computer architecture, but at its heart are powerful numerical algorithms and sophisticated computer science techniques. From an applied mathematics perspective, much of CS&E has involved analysis, but the future surely includes optimization and design, especially in the presence of uncertainty. Another mathematical frontier is the assimilation of very large data sets through such techniques as adaptive multi-resolution, automated feature search, and low-dimensional parameterization. The themes of the 2003 conference included, but were not limited to: Advanced Discretization Methods; Computational Biology and Bioinformatics; Computational Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Computational Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Computational Electromagnetics; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Computational Medicine and Bioengineering; Computational Physics and Astrophysics; Computational Solid Mechanics and Materials; CS

  8. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68

  9. SAARC Conference on Children.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In September 1992, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, ministry representatives attended the 2nd South Asian Ministerial Conference on Children to discuss child survival and safe motherhood, maternal and child nutrition, basic education, safe water, sanitation, the environment, child rights, and sociopolitical strategy to reach goals and to reduce poverty. To achieve the 7 major goals and essential supportive goals for the region, each country must define tasks in manageable terms based on country-specific and community-specific needs and importance while at the same time countries should cooperate to strengthen prospects of achieving goals emerging as priorities. The Conference called for countries to reinforce their National Plans of Action with a regional perspective and to consider representative goals in primary education, diarrhea control, iodine deficiency disorders, reducing gender disparity, family size, child labor, drinking water, guinea worm disease, immunization, maternal mortality, and nutrition. The Conference emphasized that the strategy for reaching child-centered goals should be integrated with the total development strategy and be a holistic approach. For example, governments need to expand social safety programs for children and women because of structural adjustments in the economy. The resolution also called on governments to allow community-led local planning. A working group at the conference made recommendations for supporting/sectoral goals on water supply, sanitation, and environment. For example, it called for universal access to potable water and sanitary means of excreta disposal by 2000 and for adequate shelter and services to improve the living environment of children in South Asia. Some recommended strategies to achieve these goals were community participation; decentralization; promotion of self-reliance, cost-sharing, and sustainability; and special training for women. Other areas they addressed were home gardens for vegetables and fruits

  10. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    PubMed

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues. PMID:12222268

  11. IEEE International conference on plasma science: Conference record--Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The conference covered the following topics: basic plasma physics; vacuum electronics; gaseous and electrical gas discharges; laser-produced plasma; space plasmas; computational plasma science; plasma diagnostics; electron, ion and plasma sources; intense electron and ion beams; intense beam microwaves; fast wave M/W devices; microwave-plasma interactions; magnetic fusion; MHD; plasma focus; ultrafast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; plasma processing; fast-opening switches; EM and ETH launchers; solid-state plasmas and switches; plasmas for lighting; ball lightning and spherical plasma configurations; and environmental/energy issues. Separate abstracts were prepared for 379 items in this conference.

  12. SLA's Conference Wrap-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Susan J., Comp.

    1987-01-01

    Encapsulates a wrap-up session on technical programs presented at the Special Libraries Association's June 1987 conference, including presentations in the areas of information technology, management, education, and international issues. Ethics, value, leadership, international issues, image, and risk are identified as major themes of the…

  13. Physical Trauma as an Etiological Agent in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angle, Carol R., Ed.; Bering, Edgar A., Jr., Ed.

    The conference on Physical Trauma as a Cause of Mental Retardation dealt with two major areas of etiological concern - postnatal and perinatal trauma. Following two introductory statements on the problem of and issues related to mental retardation (MR) after early trauma to the brain, five papers on the epidemiology of head trauma cover…

  14. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  15. Genetic dissection of a TIR-NB-LRR locus from the wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia identifies paralogous genes conferring resistance to major fungal and oomycete pathogens in cultivated grapevine.

    PubMed

    Feechan, Angela; Anderson, Claire; Torregrosa, Laurent; Jermakow, Angelica; Mestre, Pere; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Walker, Amanda R; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Reisch, Bruce; Aubourg, Sebastien; Bentahar, Nadia; Shrestha, Bipna; Bouquet, Alain; Adam-Blondon, Anne-Françoise; Thomas, Mark R; Dry, Ian B

    2013-11-01

    The most economically important diseases of grapevine cultivation worldwide are caused by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator syn. Uncinula necator) and the oomycete pathogen downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola). Currently, grapegrowers rely heavily on the use of agrochemicals to minimize the potentially devastating impact of these pathogens on grape yield and quality. The wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia was recognized as early as 1889 to be resistant to both powdery and downy mildew. We have now mapped resistance to these two mildew pathogens in M. rotundifolia to a single locus on chromosome 12 that contains a family of seven TIR-NB-LRR genes. We further demonstrate that two highly homologous (86% amino acid identity) members of this gene family confer strong resistance to these unrelated pathogens following genetic transformation into susceptible Vitis vinifera winegrape cultivars. These two genes, designated resistance to Uncinula necator (MrRUN1) and resistance to Plasmopara viticola (MrRPV1) are the first resistance genes to be cloned from a grapevine species. Both MrRUN1 and MrRPV1 were found to confer resistance to multiple powdery and downy mildew isolates from France, North America and Australia; however, a single powdery mildew isolate collected from the south-eastern region of North America, to which M. rotundifolia is native, was capable of breaking MrRUN1-mediated resistance. Comparisons of gene organization and coding sequences between M. rotundifolia and the cultivated grapevine V. vinifera at the MrRUN1/MrRPV1 locus revealed a high level of synteny, suggesting that the TIR-NB-LRR genes at this locus share a common ancestor. PMID:24033846

  16. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  17. Residual symptoms in patients with partial versus complete remission of a major depressive disorder episode: patterns of painful physical symptoms in depression

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Eiji; Satoi, Yoichi; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Alev, Levent; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Objective The patterns of residual painful physical symptoms (PPS) and emotional symptoms among patients with partial remission (PR) or complete remission (CR) of a major depressive disorder (MDD) episode were compared. Methods This is a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study. Patients who had originally been diagnosed with MDD, were treated with an antidepressant for 12 weeks for that episode, and achieved either PR or CR at study entry were enrolled in the study. Using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17), PR was defined as a score of ≥8 and ≤18 and CR as a score of ≤7. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) and the HAM-D17. Results A total of 323 patients (CR =158, PR =165) were included in the study. Patients in the PR group had a higher mean (standard deviation) score in the HAM-D17 than those in the CR group (11.8 [3.1] and 4.4 [2.0], respectively). BPI-SF results showed that “at least moderate PPS” (score ≥3 on BPI-SF question 5) was significantly more prevalent among patients with PR than those with CR (37.0% vs 16.5%, respectively; odds ratio =3.04; P<0.001). Presence of pain (any severity) was also more prevalent among patients with PR than those with CR (54.5% vs 35.4%, respectively). The HAM-D17 results for individual items indicated that impaired work and activities, depressed mood, psychological and somatic anxiety, and general somatic symptoms were observed in at least 75% of patients with PR. Conclusion PR was associated with a higher prevalence of at least moderate PPS. Other residual symptoms commonly observed in patients with PR included typical core emotional symptoms (eg, loss of interest, depressed mood, and psychological anxiety). These results underline the importance of PPS, because PPS is clinically relevant for the patients but difficult to assess with the commonly used depression evaluation scale. PMID:27418827

  18. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  19. The Association Between Physical Activity, Mental Status, and Social and Family Support with Five Major Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases Among Elderly People: A Cross-Sectional Study of a Rural Population in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiang; Yang, Huajie; Wang, Harry H.X.; Qiu, Yongjun; Lai, Xiujuan; Zhou, Zhiheng; Li, Fangjian; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Jiaji; Lei, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) have become the top threat in China. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of major NCDs among the elderly population in rural areas in southern China and explore its associated social determinants. Methods: A multistage cluster random sampling methodology was adopted to select a total of 9245 rural elderly people from 3860 rural households in Guangdong Province. Interviews and physical examinations were performed to collect patient information. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with the presence of major NCDs. Results: Over one-third (38.5%) of the study population suffered from five major NCDs. The grade of activities of daily living (ADL), mental status, and social relationship of elderly people without NCDs were better than those with NCDs. The major factors associated with the presence of NCDs among the elderly people included age (70–79 years group and 80–89 years group), education level (senior high/technical secondary school and junior college and above), mental status (concentration, enrichment and happy life and memory), relationship with neighbours, activities of daily living (ADL) (being able to climb three floors and bend over), physical activity, marital status (bereft), and living conditions (with offspring and family members). Conclusions: The study identified several social determinants associated with the presence of major NCDs. A higher level of family support and physical exercise might contribute to improved physical condition, mental status, and ADL among the elderly people in rural areas in southern China. PMID:26506364

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Modern Perspectives of Cosmology and Gravitation (COSGRAV 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Supratik; Basu, Banasri

    2012-12-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the International Conference on Modern Perspectives of Cosmology and Gravitation (COSGRAV 12) organized by Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, held on 7-11 February 2012. The conference, which focused exclusively on recent trends of research in Cosmology and Gravitation, was the first in the series held in this institute of great repute. The ultimate plan is to make it a regular event every two or three years based on the very positive response we received which was beyond our expectation. The immediate purpose of this conference was to bring together experienced as well as young scientists who are interested in working actively on various aspects of Cosmology and Gravitation. The lectures addressed major theoretical issues, current and forthcoming observational data as well as upcoming ideas in both theoretical and observational sectors. Keeping in mind the 'academic exchange first' approach the lectures were arranged in such a way that the young researchers had ample scope to interact with the stalwarts who are internationally leading experts in their respective fields of research. The major topics covered in the conference are: Early Universe: Inflation, Alternatives and Links to Fundamental Physics Present Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Alternatives Observational Cosmology: CMB, Supernovae, Lensing, Galaxies and Clusters Quantum Aspects of Gravity Black Hole Physics Interface of Gravitation with Information Theory and Condensed Matter Physics. Besides the invited talks a good proportion of the participants also presented their work through contributory talks and posters on this big platform. This was particularly encouraging and of benefit to the young participants, given that there were a number of scientists of international repute among the participants, the feedback from whom could guide them in the right direction. All the contributions were

  1. Gender Differences in Learning Constructs, Shifts in Learning Constructs, and Their Relationship to Course Achievement in a Structured Inquiry, Yearlong College Physics Course for Life Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavallo, Ann M. L.; Rozman, Michelle; Potter, Wendell H.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated differences and shifts in learning and motivation constructs among male and female students in a nonmajors, yearlong structured inquiry college physics course and examined how these variables were related to physics understanding and course achievement. Tests and questionnaires measured students' learning approaches,…

  2. The Logical and Psychological Structure of Physical Chemistry and Its Relevance to Graduate Students' Opinions about the Difficulties of the Major Areas of the Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In a previous publication, Jensen's scheme for the logical structure of chemistry was employed to identify a logical structure for physical chemistry, which was further used as a tool for analyzing the organization of twenty physical chemistry textbooks. In addition, science education research was considered for the study of the psychological…

  3. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  4. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  5. Writing about Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    Described are the proceedings from the 1980 annual conference of the Institute of Physics Education Group. The topic of discussion, "writing skills in physics," included teaching writing skills, writing requirements in industry, and writing practice makes perfect. (DS)

  6. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Commemoration of the centenary of the birth of S.M. Rytov (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 November 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, Yurii V.; Barabanenkov, Yurii N.; Kaplan, Alexander E.; Volkov, S. N.; Klyatskin, Valery I.; Dolin, Lev S.

    2009-05-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the Conference Hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on November 26, 2008. The session was dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the birth of Sergei Mikhailovich Rytov. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Gulyaev Yu V (V A Kotel'nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow) "Sergei Mikhailovich Rytov (Opening address)"; (2) Barabanenkov Yu N (V A Kotel'nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow) "Asymptotic limit of the radiative transfer theory in problems of multiple wave scattering in randomly inhomogeneous media"; (3) Kaplan A E, Volkov S N (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA) "Local fields in nanolattices of strongly interacting atoms: nanostrata, giant resonances, 'magic numbers', and optical bistability"; (4) Klyatskin V I (A M Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS, Moscow) "Modern methods for the statistical description of dynamical stochastic systems"; (5) Dolin L S (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "Development of the radiative transfer theory as applied to instrumental imaging in turbid media". An abridge version of the reports is given below. • Sergei Mikhailovich Rytov (Opening address), Yu V Gulyaev Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 5, Pages 499-502 • Asymptotic limit of the radiative transfer theory in problems of multiple wave scattering in randomly inhomogeneous media, Yu N Barabanenkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 5, Pages 502-506 • Local fields in the nanolattices of strongly interacting atoms: nanostrata, giant resonances, 'magic numbers', and optical bistability, A E Kaplan, S N Volkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 5, Pages 506-514 • Modern methods for the statistical description of dynamical stochastic systems, V I Klyatskin Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 5, Pages 514-519

  7. The 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference: Accomplishments and next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamruz-Smith, Susan; Harrison, Patti L.; Cummings, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    The major national and international school psychology organizations hosted the 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference during the fall of 2012. The conference was designed to provide an opportunity for school psychologists to plan their future roles in better supporting children, families, and schools. The 2012 conference, titled "School…

  8. Magnetotail physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of magnetotails (MTs) are examined in reviews and reports based on papers presented at the Chapman Conference on Magnetotail Physics, held at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in October 1985. Topics addressed include the MT configuration, fluid and kinetic aspects of MT dynamics, active diagnosis of the earth MT, and the MTs of celestial objects. Also provided are an overview of the conference findings and summaries of panel discussions on injection-layer and Alfven-layer models, reconnection and viscous-interaction models of solar-wind/magnetosphere energy transfer, and phenomenological models of MT substorms.

  9. Message from the Conference Chairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Perera, Unil

    2015-05-01

    We were very excited to host the 8th International Workshop on Quantum Structure Infrared Photodetectors (QSIP 2014), in picturesque Santa Fe, New Mexico from June 29th-July 3rd, 2014. This followed successful QSIP conferences at Dana Point (2000), Torino (2002), Kananaskis (2004), Kandy (2006), Yosimite (2009), Istanbul (2010) and Corsica (2012). The QSIP workshop is a high level scientific conference that aims to bring together scientists, engineers, industrial organizations, students and users in order to discuss recent advances, and to share the "State of the Art" in this field. QSIP conferences provide an international forum for attendees to present and discuss progress in infrared device physics and modeling, materials growth and processing issues, focal plane array development and characterization.

  10. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.

    2004-07-01

    The competition between CDM and MOND to account for the `missing mass' phenomenon is asymmetric. MOND has clearly demonstrated that a characteristic acceleration a_0 underlies the data and understanding what gives rise to a_0 is an important task. The reason for MOND's success may lie in either the details of galaxy formation, or an advance in fundamental physics that reduces to MOND in a suitable limit. CDM has enjoyed great success on large scales. The theory cannot be definitively tested on small scales until galaxy formation has been understood because baryons either are, or possibly have been, dominant in all small-scale objects. MOND's predictive power is seriously undermined by its isolation from the rest of physics. In view of this isolation, the way forward is probably to treat CDM as an established theory to be used alongside relativity and electromagnetism in efforts to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  11. GIREP Conference in Israel: Oscillations and Waves and Current Problems in Physics Teaching (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel, 19-24 August 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikelskis, Helmut

    1980-01-01

    Discusses oscillations and waves as a new topic for primary and secondary science curricula because of the many developments in the fields of optics and electronics. Outlines current problems in physics instruction under the headings of social aspects, disadvantaged pupils, and developing countries. (GS)

  12. [White House Conference on Aging, 1981. Physical & Social Environment and Quality of Life. Report and Executive Summary of the Technical Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacks, Margaret H.; And Others

    This Technical Committee Report begins by citing function as the key factor in the committee's view of quality of life and by examining four elements upon which function depends, i.e., satisfaction of basic physical needs, choice, freedom from undue stress, and the lack of a direct correlation between affluence and quality of life. Key issues and…

  13. EDITORIAL: International MEMS Conference 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Francis E. H.; Jianmin, Miao; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    The International MEMS conference (iMEMS2006) organized by the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Nanyang Technological University aims to provide a platform for academicians, professionals and industrialists in various related fields from all over the world to share and learn from each other. Of great interest is the incorporation of the theme of life sciences application using MEMS. It is the desire of this conference to initiate collaboration and form network of cooperation. This has continued to be the objective of iMEMS since its inception in 1997. The technological advance of MEMS over the past few decades has been truly exciting in terms of development and applications. In order to participate in this rapid development, a conference involving delegates from within the MEMS community and outside the community is very meaningful and timely. With the receipt of over 200 articles, delegates related to MEMS field from all over the world will share their perspectives on topics such as MEMS/MST Design, MEMS Teaching and Education, MEMS/MST Packaging, MEMS/MST Fabrication, Microsystems Applications, System Integration, Wearable Devices, MEMSWear and BioMEMS. Invited speakers and delegates from outside the field have also been involved to provide challenges, especially in the life sciences field, for the MEMS community to potentially address. The proceedings of the conference will be published as an issue in the online Journal of Physics: Conference Series and this can reach a wider audience and will facilitate the reference and citation of the work presented in the conference. We wish to express our deep gratitude to the International Scientific Committee members and the organizing committee members for contributing to the success of this conference. We would like to thank all the delegates, speakers and sponsors from all over the world for presenting and sharing their perspectives on topics related to MEMS and the challenges that MEMS can

  14. News Conference: ASE '09 invigorates participants 34th Stirling Physics Meeting: IOP in Scotland meets to debate curriculum and celebrate success From the News to the Classroom: A positive outlook for science as Obama takes up US presidency Workshop: Nanoschool educates Finnish teachers CERN: Act fast: High School Teacher Programme calls for applicants London Physics Teachers' Network: Teachers' Network Day has an international flavour CERN: LHC timetabled to restart in the summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    Conference: ASE '09 invigorates participants 34th Stirling Physics Meeting: IOP in Scotland meets to debate curriculum and celebrate success From the News to the Classroom: A positive outlook for science as Obama takes up US presidency Workshop: Nanoschool educates Finnish teachers CERN: Act fast: High School Teacher Programme calls for applicants London Physics Teachers' Network: Teachers' Network Day has an international flavour CERN: LHC timetabled to restart in the summer

  15. Screening for resistance against Pseudomonas syringae in rice-FOX Arabidopsis lines identified a putative receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase gene that confers resistance to major bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    Dubouzet, Joseph G; Maeda, Satoru; Sugano, Shoji; Ohtake, Miki; Hayashi, Nagao; Ichikawa, Takanari; Kondou, Youichi; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Horii, Yoko; Matsui, Minami; Oda, Kenji; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 000 of the rice-FOX Arabidopsis transgenic lines, which overexpress 13 000 rice full-length cDNAs at random in Arabidopsis, were screened for bacterial disease resistance by dip inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The identities of the overexpressed genes were determined in 72 lines that showed consistent resistance after three independent screens. Pst DC3000 resistance was verified for 19 genes by characterizing other independent Arabidopsis lines for the same genes in the original rice-FOX hunting population or obtained by reintroducing the genes into ecotype Columbia by floral dip transformation. Thirteen lines of these 72 selections were also resistant to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. Eight genes that conferred resistance to Pst DC3000 in Arabidopsis have been introduced into rice for overexpression, and transformants were evaluated for resistance to the rice bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. One of the transgenic rice lines was highly resistant to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Interestingly, this line also showed remarkably high resistance to Magnaporthe grisea, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, which is the most devastating rice disease in many countries. The causal rice gene, encoding a putative receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, was therefore designated as BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1. Our results demonstrate the utility of the rice-FOX Arabidopsis lines as a tool for the identification of genes involved in plant defence and suggest the presence of a defence mechanism common between monocots and dicots. PMID:20955180

  16. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  17. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: On the 50th anniversary of the L F Vereshchagin Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS (Scientific outreach session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 23 April 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stishov, S. M.; Khvostantsev, L. G.; Slesarev, V. N.; Popova, S. V.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Dzhavadov, L. N.; Gromnitskaya, E. L.; Stepanov, G. N.; Timofeev, Yu A.; Dizhur, E. M.; Venttsel, V. A.; Voronovskii, A. N.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Barabanov, A. F.; Magnitskaya, M. V.; Tareeva, E. E.

    2008-10-01

    A scientific outreach session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 23 April 2008 at the Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region. The session was devoted to the 50th anniversary of the Institute. The following reports were presented: (1) Stishov S M (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The Institute for High Pressure Physics is now 50 (opening address)"; (2) Khvostantsev L G and Slesarev V N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Large-volume high-pressure devices for physical investigations"; (3) Popova S V, Brazhkin V V and Dyuzheva T I (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Structural phase transitions in highly compressed substances and the synthesis of high-pressure phases"; (4) Dzhavadov L N, Gromnitskaya E L, Stepanov G N and Timofeev Yu A (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Studies of the thermodynamic, elastic, superconducting, and magnetic properties of substances at high pressures"; (5) Dizhur E M, Venttsel V A and Voronovskii A N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region), "Quantum transport at high pressures"; (6) Ryzhov V N, Barabanov A F, Magnitskaya M V and Tareyeva E E (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Theoretical studies of condensed matter"; (7) Bugakov V I, Antanovich A A, Konyaev Yu S and Slesarev V N (Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Designing new construction and superhard materials and related tools." An abridged version of reports 1 -6 is presented below. • The Institute for High Pressure Physics is now 50 (opening address), Stishov S M Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 10, Pages 1055-1059 • Large-volume high-pressure devices for physical investigations, Khvostantsev L G and Slesarev V N Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 10, Pages 1059

  18. Conference Proceedings: Research Dissemination and Training Conference (June 26-27, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY. ERIC Clearinghouse for Urban Disadvantaged.

    This conference was conducted to communicate the deliberations of prior conferences to those who are responsible for planning research and allocating funds in the area of the education of the disadvantaged and/or segregated. Major purposes were: (1) to improve communication between investigators working in this field; (2) to stimulate interest in…

  19. News Workshop: Getting the measure of space Conference: Respecting the evidence receives a great response Event: Communities meet to stimulate science in Wales Teachers: A day to polish up on A-level practicals Development: Exhilarating physics CPD day is a hit in London Lecture: The universe as a classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-07-01

    Workshop: Getting the measure of space Conference: Respecting the evidence receives a great response Event: Communities meet to stimulate science in Wales Teachers: A day to polish up on A-level practicals Development: Exhilarating physics CPD day is a hit in London Lecture: The universe as a classroom

  20. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues.

  1. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Seventy years of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Troitsk, Moscow region) was held in the conference hall of IZMIRAN on 25 November 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Moscow) "The role of cosmic rays and runaway electron breakdown in atmospheric lightning discharges"; (2) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research"; (3) Dorman L I (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region, CR & SWC, Israel) "Cosmic ray variations and space weather"; (4) Mareev E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects"; (5) Tereshchenko E D, Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Research Center, RAS, Murmansk) "Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects"; (6) Gulyaev Yu V, Armand N A, Efimov A I, Matyugov S S, Pavelyev A G, Savich N A, Samoznaev L N, Smirnov V V, Yakovlev O I (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region) "Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods"; (7) Kunitsyn V E (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Satellite radio probing and the radio tomography of the ionosphere"; (8) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space Research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences." Papers based on reports 2-8 are published below. The main contents of report 1 are reproduced in A V Gurevich's review, "Nonlinear effects in the ionosphere" [Phys. Usp. 50

  2. Preface: Special issue featuring papers from the International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, L.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.

    2004-02-01

    The International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors (HCIS-13) celebrates 30 years since it first took place in Modena. Nonequilibrium dynamics of charge carriers, pioneered by the hot-electron concept, is an important issue for understanding electro-optic transport properties in semiconductor materials and structures. In these 30 years several topics have matured, and new ones have emerged thus fertilizing the field with a variety of physical problems and new ideas. The history of the conference is summarized in the opening paper `30 years of HCIS'. The future of the conference seems secure considering the continued lively interest of the participants. The conference addressed eleven major topics which constitute the backbone of the proceedings and are summarized as follows: carrier transport in low dimensional and nanostructure systems, nonequilibrium carriers in superlattices and devices, small devices and related phenomena, carrier dynamics and fluctuations, carrier quantum dynamics, coherent/incoherent carrier dynamics of optical excitations and ultra-fast optical phenomena, nonlinear optical effects, transport in organic matter, semiconductor-based spintronics, coherent dynamics in solid state systems for quantum processing and communication, novel materials and devices. Nanometric space scale and femtosecond time scale represent the ultimate domains of theoretical, experimental and practical interest. Traditional fields such as bulk properties, quantum transport, fluctuations and chaotic phenomena, etc, have received thorough and continuous attention. Emerging fields from previous conferences, such as quantum processing and communication, have been better assessed. New fields, such as spintronics and electron transport in organic matter, have appeared for the first time. One plenary talk, 11 invited talks, 230 submitted abstracts covering all these topics constituted a single-session conference. Following scientific selection

  3. The Major Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Packaging Signal Is Present on All HIV-2 RNA Species: Cotranslational RNA Encapsidation and Limitation of Gag Protein Confer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Stephen D. C.; Allen, Jane F.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Deletion of a region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) 5′ leader RNA reduces genomic RNA encapsidation to about 5% that of wild-type virus with no defect in viral protein production but severely limits virus spread in Jurkat T cells, indicating that this region contains a major cis-acting encapsidation signal, or psi (Ψ). Being upstream of the major splice donor, it is present on all viral transcripts. We have shown that HIV-2 selects its genomic RNA for encapsidation cotranslationally, rendering wild-type HIV-2 unable to encapsidate vector RNAs in trans . Virus with Ψ deleted, however, encapsidates an HIV-2 vector, demonstrating competition for Gag protein. HIV-2 overcomes the lack of packaging signal location specificity by two novel mechanisms, cotranslational packaging and competition for limiting Gag polyprotein. PMID:11711596

  4. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered. PMID:25134869

  5. Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    To do justice to so many interesting contributions, both in the form of papers presented as talks and posters represented only by titles in these proceedings, will be difficult. Rather than attempting to list contributions from the individual areas in a representative fashion, I will attempt to see how a few of the striking contributions fit into, or alter, our views on major questions we have been trying to answer during the past few decades — questions dealing with the structure and evolution of the universe, the formation of galaxies and stars, and the origins of the solar system, in short everything from Comets to Cosmology — though I will reverse the order, starting here with cosmological questions and ending up with comets, or rather with zodiacal dust.

  6. Zombie physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornes, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    What makes for a fun student project that provides useful results, a journal publication and a high-profile conference talk? Stephen Ornes describes how Alex Alemi and Matt Bierbaum spiced up their learning by mixing statistical physics with their love of zombie tales.

  7. National Council of Organizations for Children and Youth Bicentennial Conference on Children (Washington, D. C., February 1-4, 1976). Conference Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Organizations for Children and Youth, Washington, DC.

    This summary of the National Council of Organizations for Children and Youth (NCOCY) Bicentennial Conference on Children contains the text of the major addresses presented at the conference and summary reports of the conference discussion groups. The major topics discussed were family income support, child health, child care, and legislation…

  8. Major Andre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henisch, B. A.; Henisch, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    If most Revolutionary era people seem two-dimensional their lives simpler to understand than ours, it may be only that history, with the benefit of hindsight, clarifies. Examines a profile of Major John Andre, the British liaison officer in Benedict Arnold's plan to surrender West Point, as both hero and villain to show the complexity of early…

  9. 1980 Is Now: A Conference on the Future of Deaf-Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrick, Carl E., Ed.

    Presented are a conference summary and 15 papers on the present and future service needs of deaf-blind (rubella) children and their parents. The conference summary contains recommendations for future activities; major points of agreement among conference members; synopsis of the papers presented; a review of discussion by conference participants;…

  10. Usage of Social Media and Smartphone Application in Assessment of Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Individuals in Times of a Major Air Pollution Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cyrus SH; Fang, Pan; Lu, Yanxia; Ho, Roger CM

    2014-01-01

    Background Crisis situations bring about many challenges to researchers, public institutions, and governments in collecting data and conducting research in affected individuals. Recent developments in Web-based and smartphone technologies have offered government and nongovernment organizations a new system to disseminate and acquire information. However, research into this area is still lacking. The current study focuses largely on how new social networking websites and, in particular, smartphone technologies could have helped in the acquisition of crucial research data from the general population during the recent 2013 Southeast Asian Haze. This crisis lasted only for 1 week, and is unlike other crisis where there are large-scale consequential after-effects. Objective To determine whether respondents will make use of Internet, social media, and smartphone technologies to provide feedback regarding their physical and psychological wellbeing during a crisis, and if so, will these new mechanisms be as effective as conventional, technological, Internet-based website technologies. Methods A Web-based database and a smartphone application were developed. Participants were recruited by snowball sampling. The participants were recruited either via a self-sponsored Facebook post featuring a direct link to the questionnaire on physical and psychological wellbeing and also a smartphone Web-based application; or via dissemination of the questionnaire link by emails, directed to the same group of participants. Information pertaining to physical and psychological wellbeing was collated. Results A total of 298 respondents took part in the survey. Most of them were between the ages of 20 to 29 years and had a university education. More individuals preferred the option of accessing and providing feedback to a survey on physical and psychological wellbeing via direct access to a Web-based questionnaire. Statistical analysis showed that demographic variables like age, gender, and

  11. Ninth Conference on Space Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The papers presented in this conference provided an international dialogue and a meaningful exchange in the simulation of space environments as well as the evolution of these technological advances into other fields. The papers represent a significant contribution to the understanding of space simulation problems and the utilization of this knowledge. The topics of the papers include; spacecraft testing; facilities and test equipment; system and subsystem test; life sciences, medicine and space; physical environmental factors; chemical environmental factors; contamination; space physics; and thermal protection.

  12. Socioeconomic differences in the benefits of structured physical activity compared with health education on the prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiying; Bonell, Chris; Glynn, Nancy W; Fielding, Roger A; Manini, Todd; King, Abby C; Pahor, Marco; Mihalko, Shannon L; Gill, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is lacking on whether health-benefiting community-based interventions differ in their effectiveness according to socioeconomic characteristics. We evaluated whether the benefit of a structured physical activity intervention on reducing mobility disability in older adults differs by education or income. Methods The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicentre, randomised trial that compared a structured physical activity programme with a health education programme on the incidence of mobility disability among at-risk community-living older adults (aged 70–89 years; average follow-up of 2.6 years). Education (≤ high school (0–12 years), college (13–17 years) or postgraduate) and annual household income were self-reported (<$24 999, $25 000 to $49 999 and ≥$50 000). The risk of disability (objectively defined as loss of ability to walk 400 m) was compared between the 2 treatment groups using Cox regression, separately by socioeconomic group. Socioeconomic group×intervention interaction terms were tested. Results The effect of reducing the incidence of mobility disability was larger for those with postgraduate education (0.72, 0.51 to 1.03; N=411) compared with lower education (high school or less (0.93, 0.70 to 1.24; N=536). However, the education group×intervention interaction term was not statistically significant (p=0.54). Findings were in the same direction yet less pronounced when household income was used as the socioeconomic indicator. Conclusions In the largest and longest running trial of physical activity amongst at-risk older adults, intervention effect sizes were largest among those with higher education or income, yet tests of statistical interactions were non-significant, likely due to inadequate power. Trial registration number NCT01072500. PMID:27060177

  13. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  14. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS — 75 years(Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation, 6 April 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Bolotovskii, Boris M.; Kopaev, Yurii V.; Kardashev, Nikolai S.; Zatsepin, Georgii T.; Roganova, Tat'yana M.; Masalov, Anatolii V.; Gubin, Mikhail A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.

    2009-11-01

    A Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council of the Academy of Sciences and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation was convened on 6 April 2009 to mark the 75th anniversary of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN). The following papers were read to the session: (1) Mesyats G A (P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "75 years of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS which traces back its origin to the Physics Room of Peter the Great's Kunstkamera created 225 years ago"; (2) Bolotovskii B M (Division of Theoretical Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation"; (3) Kopaev Yu V (Division of Solid State Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Toroidal states in crystals"; (4) Kardashev N S (Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Science program of the Radioastron mission"; (5) Zatsepin G T (Nuclear Research Institute RAS), Roganova T M (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, D V Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute) "Cosmic ray studies"; (6) Masalov A V (Optics Division, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Spectroscopy: from atoms to cosmic objects"; (7) Gubin M A, Velichansky V L (Division of Quantum Radiophysics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Small-size optical frequency standards"; (8) Dagkesamanskii R D (Radioastronomical Observatory in Pushchino of the Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Prospects for radioastronomical research in Pushchino". Articles written on the basis of these talks are printed in this special issue of Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 179 (11) 1145 - 1256 (2009) [English version: Phys. Usp. 52 (11) (2009] journal. • P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS: past, present, and future, G A Mesyats Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1084-1097 • Vavilov

  15. Conference on Real-Time Computer Applications in Nuclear, Particle and Plasma Physics, 6th, Williamsburg, VA, May 15-19, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pordes, Ruth (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers on real-time computer applications in nuclear, particle, and plasma physics are presented, covering topics such as expert systems tactics in testing FASTBUS segment interconnect modules, trigger control in a high energy physcis experiment, the FASTBUS read-out system for the Aleph time projection chamber, a multiprocessor data acquisition systems, DAQ software architecture for Aleph, a VME multiprocessor system for plasma control at the JT-60 upgrade, and a multiasking, multisinked, multiprocessor data acquisition front end. Other topics include real-time data reduction using a microVAX processor, a transputer based coprocessor for VEDAS, simulation of a macropipelined multi-CPU event processor for use in FASTBUS, a distributed VME control system for the LISA superconducting Linac, a distributed system for laboratory process automation, and a distributed system for laboratory process automation. Additional topics include a structure macro assembler for the event handler, a data acquisition and control system for Thomson scattering on ATF, remote procedure execution software for distributed systems, and a PC-based graphic display real-time particle beam uniformity.

  16. Proceedings of the Next Generation Exploration Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schingler, Robbie (Editor); Lynch, Kennda

    2006-01-01

    The Next Generation Exploration Conference (NGEC) brought together the emerging next generation of space leaders over three intensive days of collaboration and planning. The participants extended the ongoing work of national space agencies to draft a common strategic framework for lunar exploration, to include other destinations in the solar system. NGEC is the first conference to bring together emerging leaders to comment on and contribute to these activities. The majority of the three-day conference looked beyond the moon and focused on the "next destination": Asteroids, Cis-Lunar, Earth 3.0, Mars Science and Exploration, Mars Settlement and Society, and Virtual Worlds and Virtual Exploration.

  17. Second NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The conference papers are presented. The Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. These papers will also be included in the Ninth Conference Proceedings to be published by the Federal Aviation Administration as a separate document.

  18. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals (APERIODIC'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Uwe; McGrath, Rónán; Degtyareva, Olga; Sharma, Hem Raj

    2010-04-01

    Aperiodic Logo Aperiodic'09, the sixth International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals, took place in Liverpool 13-18 September 2009. It was the first major conference in this interdisciplinary research field held in the UK. The conference, which was organised under the auspices of the Commission on Aperiodic Crystals of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr), followed on from Aperiodic'94 (Les Diablerets, Switzerland), Aperiodic'97 (Alpe d'Huez, France), Aperiodic'2000 (Nijmegen, The Netherlands), Aperiodic'03 (Belo Horizonte, Brazil) and Aperiodic'06 (Zao, Japan). The next conference in the series will take place in Australia in 2012. The Aperiodic conference series is itself the successor to a series of Conferences on Modulated Structures, Polytypes and Quasicrystals (MOSPOQ), which were held in Marseilles (France) in 1984, Wroclaw (Poland) in 1986, Varanasi (India) in 1988 and Balatonszeplak (Hungary) in 1991. The remit of the conference covers two broad areas of research on aperiodic crystals, incommensurately modulated and composite crystals on the one hand, and quasicrystals on the other hand, sharing the property that they are aperiodically ordered solids. In addition, the conference also featured recent research on complex metal alloys, which are in fact periodically ordered solids. However, the term complex refers to their large unit cells, which may contain thousands of atoms, and as a consequence complex metal alloys share some of the properties of quasicrystalline solids. Aperiodic'09 attracted about 110 participants from across the world, including 20 UK-based scientists (the second largest group after Japan who sent 21 delegates). A particular feature of the conference series is its interdisciplinary character, and once again the range of disciplines of participants included mathematics, physics, crystallography and materials science. The programme started with three tutorial lectures on Sunday afternoon, presenting introductory overviews

  19. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    The 2013 Strangeness in Quark Matter conference took place at the University of Birmingham in July 2013, in a period of remarkably good weather that gave a very welcome boost to the event. 158 physicists from 25 countries gathered for a week of discussions on the production of strangeness and heavy flavour in heavy ion collisions. The dates for the meeting had been set two years earlier in Cracow, so as to allow it to offer the first major examination of proton-lead collisions from the Large Hadron Collider. It had originally been thought that these collisions would be recorded by the end of 2012, but in the event it turned out that the running period was postponed until January and February of 2013, giving the LHC collaborations - all four major collaborations since LHCb also took part in pPb data taking - very little time to prepare their results. Nevertheless, new results were provided, and their presentation and interpretation formed one of the highlights of the conference. In addition, there was a more detailed assessment of the RHIC beam energy scan, many new heavy flavour results from the RHIC and LHC heavy ion runs and detailed discussions of the future FAIR and NICA programmes. The conference also hosted a good cross-section of current topics in theoretical talks. In the last few years there has been much interest in thermalization and in the use of hydrodynamics to describe the fluctuations visible in higher-order flow coefficients. Discussions of both of these features were well represented, indicating the maturing of this field. We gratefully acknowledge support from The University of Birmingham, CERN, The Extreme Matter Institute (EMMI), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP), Institute of Physics Publishing and from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). This assistance allowed us to support over twenty young physicists, and allowed us to ensure that we had the breadth of programme needed for a successful conference

  20. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  1. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  2. The P450 CYP6Z1 confers carbamate/pyrethroid cross-resistance in a major African malaria vector beside a novel carbamate-insensitive N485I acetylcholinesterase-1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Ndula, Miranda; Riveron, Jacob M; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Carbamates are increasingly used for vector control notably in areas with pyrethroid resistance. However, a cross-resistance between these insecticides in major malaria vectors such as Anopheles funestus could severely limit available resistance management options. Unfortunately, the molecular basis of such cross-resistance remains uncharacterized in An. funestus, preventing effective resistance management. Here, using a genomewide transcription profiling, we revealed that metabolic resistance through upregulation of cytochrome P450 genes is driving carbamate resistance. The P450s CYP6P9a, CYP6P9b and CYP6Z1 were the most upregulated detoxification genes in the multiple resistant mosquitoes. However, in silico docking simulations predicted CYP6Z1 to metabolize both pyrethroids and carbamates, whereas CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b were predicted to metabolize only the pyrethroids. Using recombinant enzyme metabolism and inhibition assays, we demonstrated that CYP6Z1 metabolizes bendiocarb and pyrethroids, whereas CYP6P9a and CYP6P9b metabolize only the pyrethroids. Other upregulated gene families in resistant mosquitoes included several cuticular protein genes suggesting a possible reduced penetration resistance mechanism. Investigation of the target-site resistance in acetylcholinesterase 1 (ace-1) gene detected and established the association between the new N485I mutation and bendiocarb resistance (odds ratio 7.3; P < 0.0001). The detection of multiple haplotypes in single mosquitoes after cloning suggested the duplication of ace-1. A TaqMan genotyping of the N485I in nine countries revealed that the mutation is located only in southern Africa with frequency of 10-15% suggesting its recent occurrence. These findings will help in monitoring the spread and evolution of carbamate resistance and improve the design of effective resistance management strategies to control this malaria vector. PMID:27135886

  3. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  4. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  5. 20th International Conference for Students and Young Scientists: Modern Techniques and Technologies (MTT'2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    The active involvement of young researchers in scientific processes and the acquisition of scientific experience by gifted youth currently have a great value for the development of science. One of the research activities of National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, aimed at the preparing and formation of the next generation of scientists, is the International Conference of Students and Young Scientists ''Modern Techniques and Technologies'', which was held in 2014 for the twentieth time. Great experience in the organization of scientific events has been acquired through years of carrying the conference. There are all the necessary resources for this: a team of organizers - employees of Tomsk Polytechnic University, premises provided with modern office equipment and equipment for demonstration, and leading scientists - professors of TPU, as well as the status of the university as a leading research university in Russia. This way the conference is able to attract world leading scientists for the collaboration. For the previous years the conference proved itself as a major scientific event at international level, which attracts more than 600 students and young scientists from Russia, CIS and other countries. The conference provides oral plenary and section reports. The conference is organized around lectures, where leading Russian and foreign scientists deliver plenary presentations to young audiences. An important indicator of this scientific event is the magnitude of the coverage of scientific fields: energy, heat and power, instrument making, engineering, systems and devices for medical purposes, electromechanics, material science, computer science and control in technical systems, nanotechnologies and nanomaterials, physical methods in science and technology, control and quality management, design and technology of artistic materials processing. The main issues considered by young researchers at the conference were related to the analysis of contemporary

  6. Physical property and Textural transition across the Unconformity and Major Seismic Reflectors in the Upper plate of the Costa Rica Subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamahashi, M.; Screaton, E.; Tanikawa, W.; Hashimoto, Y.; Martin, K. M.; Saito, S.; Kimura, G.

    2014-12-01

    At the Costa Rica subduction zone offshore Osa Peninsula, the Cocos plate and Cocos Ridge subduct under the Caribbean plate along the Middle America Trench, creating active seismicity. In this region, the Caribbean plate is characterized by a well-consolidated, high velocity framework material beneath the slope sediments, but the nature of the upper plate material is yet unknown. During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 334 and 344, the unconformity between the slope sediments (Unit 1) and upper plate material (Units 2 and 3) consisting of lithic sedimentary units was penetrated at mid-slope Site 1380. In the current study, to characterize the compaction behavior of the upper plate material, we investigate the physical properties, texture and composition of the sediments at Site 1380 by conducting microstructural observations, resistivity measurements, particle size analyses, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses. The microstructures of sediments observed through the microscope tend to develop dense and cohesive textures in low porosity sediments, and particle size changes across several unconformities. In particular, the small particle-sized lithic fragments compose larger bodies and form cohesive structures. The cross correlation between measured particle size and shipboard porosity show negative correlation especially at Unit 2, indicating that larger sized particles form smaller or fewer pores. From the results of XRF and XRD analyses, we found that Al, K, Ti tend to concentrate in the higher porosity sediments of Unit 1, whereas Si, Ca, P, Mg, Na, and Mn concentrate in the lower porosity sediments of Unit 2 and 3. The higher concentration in Mg, Na, Mn, Si may be due to minerals such as chlorite, serpentine, amphibole, and sodium manganese. The crossplots between porosity and element concentration show negative correlations in Mg, Na, and Mn with porosity, suggesting that the minerals rich in these elements may relate with the

  7. Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing.

    PubMed

    Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R; Hlavacek, William S; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E; Zilman, Anton

    2011-10-01

    This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very

  8. EDITORIAL: Physics competitions Physics competitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    2009-11-01

    less are invited to present their research and results as a paper, in the style typically published by scientific journals. The student is allowed to choose a topic within the broad scope of physics, including cross-over fields such as astro- or biophysics. In 2008 over 2000 papers were submitted and 25 awards were given. In line with 'First Step' is the International Conference for Young Scientists (ICYS) [7]. The conference started in 1994 in Viségrad, Hungary. Here too, the participants present the results of their research, not by submitting a research paper but by giving a presentation to an audience of peers and a jury of specialists. The subjects of the presentations are in physics, mathematics, computer science, environmental sciences, engineering or life sciences. The jury awards the presentations according to the level of the content and the presentation. The last three competitions presented here are younger and did not start within Eastern European countries. The International Olympics of Astrophysics and Astronomy (IOAA) was organized for the second time in Bandung, Indonesia in 2008 and 24 countries participated [8]. As the title of the competition indicates, problems are directed towards theoretical and experimental aspects of astronomy. A little bit older is the European Union Science Olympiad (EUSO) [9]. This started in 2001, but the first competition took place in Dublin, Ireland, in 2003. The last competition was organized in March-April 2009 in Murcia, Spain. This competition addresses younger students, aged 17 years or less. It tries to combine biology, chemistry and physics. Although the problems are formulated in an interdisciplinary way, the students remain specialists, one in physics and the others in biology and chemistry. For even younger students, there is the International Junior Science Olympiad (IJSO) [10]. This competition started in December 2004 on the initiative of Professor Masno Ginting from Indonesia. The last competition took

  9. Chemical Physics Summer School

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-28

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Chemical Physics Summer School was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  10. Eighth International Conference on Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grousset, Francis; Peterson, Larry; Delaney, Peggie; Elderfield, Harry; Emeis, Kay; Haug, Gerald; Stocker, Thomas; Wang, Pinxian

    Every three years since 1983, the paleoceanographic community has come together at a different venue to share new data and discoveries at the International Conference on Paleoceanography (ICP). For the recent ICP-8, France was the host country for a conference focused on the theme of “An Ocean View of Global Change.” The Environnements et Paleoenvironnement Oceanique (EPOC) paleoceanography group of the University Bordeaux I acted as the local organizing committee.Scientific presentations at ICP-8 addressed the latest discoveries in paleoceanography and highlighted both emerging and as-yet-unsolved questions on global climate change. Thirty-five speakers, invited by the ICP-8 Science Committee, gave overview talks during morning sessions organized around five major scientific themes. These themes were Cenozoic-Mesozoic Oceans; Carbonate and Silica Systems of the Pleistocene Ocean; Biogeochemical Cycles of the Past; High-Frequency Climate Variability; and Interhemispheric Ocean-Continent-Climate Linkages.

  11. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 May 2004 This image of Syrtis Major was acquired August 20, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.8, Longitude 79.5 East (280.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  12. Topical Conference on Oportunities in Biology for Physicists II

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Judy R.

    2004-02-01

    In 2002, the American Physical Society (APS) organized and held the first topical conference in Boston, MA, as a way of informing physicists, particularly those just entering the field, of opportunities emerging at the interface of physics and biology. Because of the tremendous success of the first conference, it was decided to organize a second conference, similar in nature and focus, but with different presentation topic areas. Again the intended audience would be graduate students and postdocs considering applying methods of physics to biological research, and those who advise others on such opportunities.

  13. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  14. 21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V.; Wang, Yongqiang; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Rout, Bibhudutta

    2014-08-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B contains the proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA – 2013). This conference was held in Marriott Waterfront in Seattle, Washington, USA during June 23–28, 2013.

  15. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  16. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  17. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  18. Conference Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Library Association, Burlington.

    Intended as a useful aid for organizing its annual spring meeting, this general conference planning manual developed by the Vermont Library Association provides a blueprint for planners on the responsibilities of the planning committee, the conference chair, and others; site selection and local arrangements; program and sessions planning;…

  19. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  20. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  1. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas and tried…

  2. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  3. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  4. Conference on Newborn Hearing Screening; Proceedings Summary and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Presented in the conference proceedings are schedule and list of participants, seven major papers, and the newborn hearing screening recommendations of the interdisciplinary conference on newborn hearing and early identification of hearing impairment. Neonatal auditory testing is reviewed by Sanford E. Gerber, and Sheldon B. Korones gives a…

  5. PREFACE: 6th Liquid Matter Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; Vroege, Gert Jan; Lekkerkerker, Henk; Frenkel, Daan

    2005-11-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains the Proceedings of the 6th Liquid Matter Conference held in Utrecht, The Netherlands, 2-6 July 2005. The three-yearly Liquid Matter Conference is organized by the Liquids Section of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society. This series of meetings began in Lyon in 1990. The most recent meeting was held in 2003 in Konstanz. The aim of the Liquid Matter Conferences is to bring together scientists working on the liquid state of matter. This rapidly growing field includes the physics, chemistry, biology and chemical engineering of liquid matter as well as various applied research areas. In fact, the Utrecht meeting had, for the first time, a special session devoted to Fundamental Challenges in Applied Liquid Physics and Microfluidics. The Utrecht meeting had 760 registered participants from four continents. An important event at this meeting was the award of the First Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society to Professor Jean-Pierre Hansen FRS, of Cambridge University. In addition to a plenary speech by the recipient of the Liquid Matter Prize, the scientific programme consisted of 10 plenary lectures, 117 symposia talks, 25 of which were keynote lectures and some 650 poster contributions. The meeting also hosted a one-day symposium of the Division of Liquids and Interfaces of the Chemical Sciences division of NWO. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter contains 61 of the oral communications. Liquid state physics is at the interface of many fields of research. As a consequence, many of the attendants come from adjacent fields and find in the Liquid Matter Conference a forum to meet experts from other areas of research. This aspect of the Liquid Matter Conference makes it an exciting meeting as it not only offers the participants an up-to-date picture of the status of research into the liquid state of matter, but it also allows them to establish new

  6. Lunar Science Conference, 4th, Houston, Tex., March 5-8, 1973, Proceedings. Volume 1 - Mineralogy and petrology. Volume 2 - Chemical and isotope analyses. Organic chemistry. Volume 3 - Physical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gose, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The mineralogy, petrology, chemistry, isotopic composition, and physical properties of lunar materials are described in papers detailing methods, results, and implications of research on samples returned from eight lunar landing sites: Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, and Luna 16 and 20. The results of experiments conducted or set up on the lunar surface by the astronauts are also described along with observations taken from Command Modules and subsatellites. Major topics include general geology, soil and breccia studies, petrologic studies, mineralogic analyses, elemental compositions, radiometric age determinations, rare gas chemistry, radionuclides, organogenic compounds, particle track records, thermal properties, seismic studies, resonance studies, orbital mapping, lunar atmosphere, magnetic studies, electrical studies, optical properties, and microcratering. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  7. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    The next Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM), will be held from 9 to 12 June 1992 at the Centre des Nouvelles Industries et Technologies (CNIT), La Défense, Paris, France. This conference, which is held every two years and whose importance and high level, confirmed by thirty years' experience, are recognized throughout the world, can be considered as a forum in which scientists, metrologists and professionals will have the opportunity to present and compare their research results on fundamental constants, standards and new techniques of precision measurement in the electromagnetic domain. Topics The following topics are regarded as the most appropriate for this conference: realization of units and fundamental constants d.c. a.c. and high voltage time and frequency radio-frequency and microwaves dielectrics, antennas, fields lasers, fibre optics advanced instrumentation, cryoelectronics. There will also be a session on international cooperation. Conference Language The conference language will be English. No translation will be provided. Organizers Société des Electriciens et des Electroniciens (SEE). Bureau National de Métrologie (BNM) Sponsors Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Instrumentation & Measurement Society Union Radio Scientifique Internationale United States National Institute of Standards and Technology Centre National d'Etudes des Télécommunications Mouvement Français pour la Qualité, Section Métrologie Comité National Français de Radioélectricité Scientifique Contact Jean Zara, CPEM 92 publicity, Bureau National de Métrologie, 22, rue Monge, 75005 Paris Tel.: (33) 1 46 34 48 16, Fax: (33) 1 46 34 48 63

  8. [Health conferences in Germany: an overview].

    PubMed

    Hollederer, A

    2015-03-01

    Health conferences are a special management instrument of health policy. Less is known about the distribution. There is a lack of systematic evaluation methods.This overview is based on comprehensive literature, data base and internet searches about health conferences in Germany.The establishment of structured conferences is derived from funding projects of the federal states or local initiatives which began in different phases and with various emphases. The strategies varied from individual actions to an implementation in the whole state. Currently there are altogether 130 health conferences in Germany for approximately one third of the county and city districts in 13 federal states. The federal states assist health conferences by providing financial support, health policy, support by health authorities and regulations in the law. In the majority of the cases the office is located within the public health service. There is a great diversity in the composition of the stakeholders and in the contents. A systematic monitoring and outcome evaluation was conducted only in a few cases. Those studies predominantly report positive results but also promoting and inhibiting factors. They referred to restrictions.Health conferences are broadly disseminated, especially in west Germany. They offer opportunities for a community health management. There is a need for more intensive exchange and evaluation to improve their development. PMID:24420647

  9. The 1973 Boston Conference on Grading Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Values Associates, Amherst, MA.

    This conference was held to help educators (1) obtain a clearer understanding of the major controversy over current grading practices, (2) share ideas on grading, (3) obtain information on grading alternatives, and (4) learn how to bring about changes in grading procedures. Topics discussed include the relationship of the evaluation of student…

  10. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  11. Twenty-first DOE/NRC nuclear air-cleaning conference

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, R.R.; Moeller, D.W.; First, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Twenty-First Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Air-Cleaning Conference was held August 12-16, 1990, in San Diego, California. A total of 232 air-cleaning specialists attended the conference. The United States and 14 foreign countries were represented, and the specialists were affiliated with government agencies, educational institutions, and the nuclear industry. Several major topics were discussed during the conference, including development and use of industry codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; particulate filter developments, including filter testing and filter response to physical stress; development of adsorbents, including laboratory testing and in-place testing; incineration and vitrification; containment venting; reactor operations, including design and modeling; and measurement systems capable of verifying safe operation. The conference continued to provide a forum for direct and efficient interchange of technical and philosophical information among the participants. The high level of foreign participation and interest continues, as evidenced by over one half of the papers being sponsored by foreign interests, and one quarter of the attendees being from outside the United States. Further evidence of international interest was seen in a plenary session devoted to nuclear air-cleaning programs in nine different countries. A common concern throughout many of the sessions was the development of meaningful standards, their implementation for existing air-cleaning system, and the use of these standards by regulatory agencies. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Young Women's Conference in STEM: Our starting point for getting women into STEM fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Deedee; Zwicker, Andrew; Greco, Shannon; Dominguez, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    The number of women in STEM careers is staggeringly low; just one in seven engineers are female and only 27% of all computer science jobs are held by women. A recent US Dept. of Commerce report found that between 2000-2011 women experienced no employment growth in STEM jobs. According to the AIP, the percentage of women in physics overall is 26% and women make up less than 7% of the fusion energy workforce. To address this problem we have, since 2001, run a conference to introduce young women to the wide range of careers in STEM fields in a way that is not part of their typical education. By introducing students in a meaningful way to successful women in STEM, from graduate students to senior researchers, the intent of the conference is to foster interest, develop mentoring relationships, and to provide role models that will have a positive influence on future educational and career choices. Data from surveys indicate that this is indeed the impact. For example, 86% of 2015 attendees indicated they are more likely to major in a scientific field after attending the conference then they were before. We are now in the process of expanding and improving the conference in order to reach more students and increase the overall impact.

  13. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CONFERENCE (NELAC): CONSTITUTION, BYLAWS, AND STANDARDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The principles and operating procedures for the National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC) are contained in the NELAC Constitution and Bylaws. The major portion of this document (standards) contains detailed requirements for accrediting environmental labo...

  14. International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The papers that were accepted for the International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution, 31 Aug. - 2 Sep. 1992, are presented. One of the major paper topics was the Sudbury project.

  15. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR...

  16. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a)...

  17. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... reliability of the Bulk-Power System. The conference will explore the progress made on the priorities for addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences....

  18. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a proceeding... proceeding. Conferences held after the commencement of an administrative proceeding before OFE shall...

  19. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  20. The 50th Anniversary of the Thayer Conference: Historical Perspectives and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Information from several historical sources provides a clearer understanding of the Thayer Conference, including little-known background information. Changes in school psychology since the conference are described through comparisons of the field at the time of the conference and at present. Major recommendations and expectations emanating from…

  1. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  2. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  3. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  4. Chemistry of electronic ceramic materials. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Chemistry of Electronic Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, P. K.; Roth, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The conference was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming from August 17 to 22, 1990, and in an attempt to maximize the development of this rapidly moving, multidisciplinary field, this conference brought together major national and international researchers to bridge the gap between those primarily interested in the pure chemistry of inorganic solids and those interested in the physical and electronic properties of ceramics. With the many major discoveries that have occurred over the last decade, one of the goals of this meeting was to evaluate the current understanding of the chemistry of electronic ceramic materials, and to assess the state of a field that has become one of the most important areas of advanced materials research. The topics covered include: crystal chemistry; dielectric ceramics; low temperature synthesis and characterization; solid state synthesis and characterization; surface chemistry; superconductors; theory and modeling.

  5. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  6. Second National Space Grant Conference report, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimsoth, Jeffrey T. (Editor); Dasch, E. Julius (Editor); Devon, Richard F. (Editor); Keffer, Lynne (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The conference goals were: (1) to provide a setting for Space Grant College/Consortia leaders to meet and discuss program plans; (2) to provide participants with updates on major NASA science and engineering programs and educational affairs activities; and (3) to hold workshops on themes of critical importance to the program. The conference agenda focused primarily on a series of 15 workshops in which program directors or their designees discussed components of the Space Grant Program. These components - outreach, pre-college education, publicity, and organization - were earlier incorporated in very specific ways within individual program plans. The conference, thus, afforded those attending an opportunity to exchange information and concerns regarding program elements while exploring ways to structure, enhance and perhaps broaden their program plans. Space Grant representatives also discussed with headquarters officials ways in which the Space Grant Program itself should be evaluated.

  7. PREFACE: XXII International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    The 22nd International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes (ICSLS) was convened at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA, during June 1 to 6, 2014. A variety of topics of interest to the line shape community were addressed during invited and contributed oral and poster presentations. General categories of the ICSLS 2014 scientific contents included Astrophysics, Biomedical Physics, High and Low Temperature Plasma Physics, Magnetic Fusion Physics, Neutrals Atomic-Molecular-Optical (AMO) Physics, and Applied Physics. Research interests at UTSI and at the Center for Laser Applications (CLA) focus on Applied Physics and Plasma Physics areas such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, spectroscopy with ultra-short light pulses, combustion diagnostics, to name a few. Consequently, the presentations during the conference addressed a variety of these topics. Attendance at the conference included researchers from North America, Africa, Asia and Europe, with an international representation showing 250 authors and co-authors with over 25 different citizenships, and 100 participants at the Conference. Figure 1 shows a photo of Conference attendees. The schedule included 82 contributions, 41 oral and 41 poster presentations. The 29 invited, 12 contributed oral and 41 contributed poster presentations were selected following communication with the international organizing committee members. A smart phone ''app'' was also utilized, thanks to Elsevier, to communicate electronic versions of the posters during the conference. Special thanks go to the members of the international and local committees for their work in organizing the 22nd ICSLS. In addition, thank you notes also go to the peer reviewers for the proceedings. Following the success of the IOP: Journal of Physics Conference Series selected for the 21st ICSLS publication, the proceedings papers report ongoing research activities. Papers submitted amount to 68 in number, or 83% of

  8. PREFACE: The International Conference on Science of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kouji; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    The first international conference on the science of friction in Japan was held at Irago, Aichi on 9-13 September 2007. The conference focused on the elementary process of friction phenomena from the atomic and molecular scale view. Topics covered in the conference are shown below.:

  9. Superlubricity and friction
  10. Electronic and phononic contributions to friction
  11. Friction on the atomic and molecular scales
  12. van der Waals friction and Casimir force
  13. Molecular motor and friction
  14. Friction and adhesion in soft matter systems
  15. Wear and crack on the nanoscale
  16. Theoretical studies on the atomic scale friction and energy dissipation
  17. Friction and chaos
  18. Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts
  19. Friction of powder
  20. The number of participants in the conference was approximately 100, registered from 11 countries. 48 oral and 29 poster talks were presented at the conference. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 23 papers devoted to the above topics of friction. The successful organization of the conference was made possible by the contribution of the members of the Organizing Committee and International Advisory Committee. The conference was made possible thanks to the financial support from Aichi University of Education and the Taihokogyo Tribology Research Foundation (TTRF), and moreover thanks to the approval societies of The Physical Society of Japan, The Surface Science Society of Japan, The Japanese Society of Tribologists and Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. The details of the conference are available at http://www.science-of-friction.com . Finally we want to thank the speakers for the high quality of their talks and all participants for coming to Irago, Japan and actively contributing to the conference. Kouji Miura and Hiroshi Matsukawa Editors

  21. PREFACE: SQM2004 The 8th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleymans, Jean; Steinberg, Peter; Vilakazi, Zeblon

    2005-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2004) was held at at the Breakwater Lodge, which is part of the Graduate School of Business of the University of Cape Town. The architecture of the Breakwater Lodge is a stark reminder of the fact that its original purpose was to serve as a municipal jail. It appears that the spectacular background of Table Mountain and the V&A Waterfront and an excellent set of speakers were sufficient to keep the lecture rooms full to capacity, despite the numerous temptations of Cape Town. This is the first time a major heavy ion conference has been held in South Africa, and the timing is fortuitous, with a long-delayed MoU between South Africa and CERN at last being signed and finalized. At last, funding is being made available for South African scientists to play a meaningful role and make contributions to the international effort in heavy ion physics. Despite the substantial distance from the major cities in the northern hemisphere, the conference was very well attended and the number of participants was about 50% larger than originally anticipated. Participants came from China, India, Japan, the United States, Brazil and many European countries. We would like to thank all of the SQM2004 participants for their efforts and, in particlular, all of the plenary and parallel speakers for their hard work in making this conference such a success. Of course, even more thanks go to all the chairpersons of the various sessions who struggled to keep the conference program on the (admittedly tight) schedule. For future conferences, we recommend keeping a bell handy! Photograph Participants gather on the UCT campus with Table Mountain in the backgound. We would like to thank Professor Tony Fairall for a most entertaining after-dinner talk about all that is unusual and fascinating about the southern hemisphere. It could not be emphasized enough that the daily working of the meeting would have ground to a halt without the

  22. PREFACE: XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Hart, H. W.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2012-11-01

    The XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, 27 July - 2 August 2011. Members of the Local Organising Committee were drawn from the School of Mathematics and Physics of Queen's University Belfast, the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University, the School of Physics at University College Dublin and the Department of Experimental Physics at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The Conference was attended by 566 participants with contributions from 54 countries. The meeting attracted 786 contributed papers for presentation in the poster sessions. The conference included 20 Special Reports selected from the contributed papers, and these are included in part 1 of this volume. During the meeting a total of 65 Progress Reports were also presented, and the authors invited to submit written versions of their talks (see Part 1). Of the total number of contributed papers, 663 are included as refereed abstracts in parts 2 to 15 of this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Part 1 of this volume includes detailed write-ups of the majority of plenary lectures, progress reports and special reports, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting, and is additionally published in hard-copy as the Conference Proceedings. There were 5 plenary lectures given by Margaret Murnane on Ultrafast processes in atomic dynamics; Chris Greene on Few-body highly-correlated dynamics; Michael Allan on Electron-molecule collisions; Yasunori Yamazaki on Antiproton and positron collisions and Thomas Stöhlker on Relativistic ion collisions. Ian Spielman, winner of the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize for 2011, gave a special lecture entitled Modifying interatomic interactions using Raman coupling: a tale of slowly colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition an evening public lecture by Mike Baillie on How precise tree-ring dating raises issues concerning the

  23. Ramadan Major Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Results: We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). Conclusions: This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest. PMID:25593728

  24. Sports and Recreational Programs for the Child and Young Adult with Physical Disability. Proceedings of the Winter Park Seminar (Winter Park, Colorado, April 11-13, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Kay, Ed.

    The proceedings from a 1983 conference on sports and recreation for students with physical disabilities are presented. The major part of the proceedings consists of state of the art analyses on five topics (sample subtopics in parentheses): (1) ability assessment (fitness norms, energy cost of walking, wheelchair kinesiology, psychology of…

  25. Cairo conference follow-up.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The declaration of the International Conference on Population and Development, which was held in Cairo, met with criticism and acclaim. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) approved of the focus on women, but other organizations thought too much emphasis was placed on population rather than development. The conference moved away from demographic targets and won spending commitments for activities such as women's reproductive health. Specific goals were set for maternal, infant, and child mortality, as well as for education, particularly of women (educated women have been shown to have fewer children). Unmet needs for contraception and reproductive health services were addressed (the biggest breakthrough according to IPPF), and the issue of unsafe abortion was discussed (Catholics and Muslims succeeded in amending the draft declaration, but IPPF considers the main ideas to be intact.). Governments were called upon to commit to women's health, to deal with the impact of unsafe abortion as a major public health issue, and to reduce recourse to abortion by expanding and improving family planning services. The importance of sex education for teenagers was retained in the draft. ENDA, which is based in Dakar, complained that development issues "sank into oblivion"; that migratory peoples received inadequate attention; and that more time should have been spent on how to implement the declaration. PMID:12346094

  26. Bellagio conference and book. Symbiosis as Source of Evolutionary Innovation: Speciation and Morphogenesis. Conference--June 25-30, 1989, Bellagio Conference Center, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Fester, R.

    1991-01-01

    This conference at the Bellagio Conference Center, Italy, from June 25-30, 1989, provided a unique opportunity for evolutionary theorists and symbiosis biologists to cross the boundaries of their respective disciplines and share ideas. A major task was to address the adequacy of the prevailing neodarwinian concept of evolution with respect to the relative importance of symbiosis in the origin of morphological and evolutionary novelty.

  27. Policy Conference on Young Children: Conference Summary (Anchorage, AK, November 18-20, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Legislature, Juneau.

    The conference described addressed a wide range of key issues affecting young children and families; namely, child abuse, quality in pre-elementary programs, and responsibility for delivery of services. The document summarizes the policy issues identified by attendees of the 16 workshops and the addresses of the three major speakers (Dr. Donald C.…

  28. EDITORIAL: The 28th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simek, Milan; Sunka, Pavel

    2008-05-01

    The 28th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (ICPIG) was held in Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, on 15--20 July 2007, under the sponsorship of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). The ICPIG, a traditional international conference with a remarkably long history, is held every two years and covers the fundamental physical aspects of ionized gases. It emphasizes interdisciplinary research and fosters exchange between the different communities. The 28th ICPIG was organized by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy Sciences of the Czech Republic with the participation of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University, and the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of Charles University, all in Prague. The conference was attended by 619 scientists from 50 countries (537 participants from outside the host country) and, compared with preceding meetings, ICPIG in Prague came with several changes. The pocket program and CD proceedings have been replaced by the book of abstracts, pocket program and CD containing full-length contributions. The International Scientific Committee also decided to update substantially the list of ICPIG topics. These topics have been grouped into four major sections: A. Fundamentals; B. Modelling, Simulation and Diagnostics; C. Plasma Sources and Discharge Regimes; D. Applications, with each major section structured into several sub-topics. Last but not least, on the occasion of ICPIG 2007, the IUPAP Early Career Award in Plasma Physics was bestowed for the first time. Complete 28th ICPIG conference records include the von Engel Prize Lecture, 10 general and 26 topical invited lectures, 18 workshop lectures and the contributed papers (http://icpig2007.ipp.cas.cz/). All 718 submitted full-length contributed papers were reviewed and 608 contributions were accepted for poster presentation. It is worth noting that 98 of the total of 608 poster contributions belong to the topic 'Non

  29. EDITORIAL: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    Dear Readers, The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'14, took place in the City of Sofia, Bulgaria. 361 participants from 35 countries attended the conference. It was hosted by the Institute of Electronics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. This year's Workshop was dedicated to paying tribute to two major events: • 50th anniversary of 1964 Nobel Prize in physics, • 145th anniversary of the establishment of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS'14 has been taken under the High Patronage of Rosen Plevneliev, President of the Republic of Bulgaria. The LPHYS'14 Steering Committee and the Advisory & Program Committee would like to extend their sincere gratitude to Professor Sanka Gateva (Co-Chair) and Professor Ekaterina Borisova (Head of the Local Organizing Committee) and to their team for the outstanding job performed in organizing, arranging, managing and putting in order the conference. Their combined efforts lead to a successful result. In this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series you will find selected proceedings of the Workshop in Sofia. Please make a note that the 24th annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'15) will take place from August 21 to August 25, 2015 in the city of Shanghai, China hosted by Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. With kind regards, Steering and Advisory & Program committees LPHYS'14

  30. Physics of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  31. Proceedings: 2002 Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Baltimore, MD, October 2002

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-01

    In response to program pressures resulting from shorter outages, combined with a diminishing group of contract health physics (HP) technicians, HP professionals must continuously upgrade their programs. Demanding emergent work also requires HP technicians in the nuclear industry to use new methods and technologies. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference was directed at highlighting a number of key health physics issues and developments.

  32. PREFACE: 18th Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials Conference (MSM XVIII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, T.; Hutchison, John L.

    2013-11-01

    YRM logo This volume contains invited and contributed papers from the 18th international conference on 'Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials' held at St Catherine's College, University of Oxford, on 7-11 April 2013. The meeting was organised under the auspices of the Royal Microscopical Society and supported by the Institute of Physics as well as the Materials Research Society of the USA. This conference series deals with recent advances in semiconductor studies carried out by all forms of microscopy, with an emphasis on electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy with high spatial resolution. This time the meeting was attended by 109 delegates from 17 countries world-wide. We were welcomed by Professor Sir Peter Hirsch, who noted that this was the first of these conferences where Professor Tony Cullis was unable to attend, owing to ill-health. During the meeting a card containing greetings from many of Tony's friends and colleagues was signed, and duly sent to Tony afterwards. As semiconductor devices shrink further new routes for device processing and characterisation need to be developed, and, for the latter, methods that offer sub-nanometre spatial resolution are particularly valuable. The various forms of imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy available in modern microscopes are powerful tools for studying the microstructure, electronic structure, chemistry and also electric fields in semiconducting materials. Recent advances in instrumentation, from lens aberration correction in both TEM and STEM instruments, to the development of a wide range of scanning probe techniques, as well as new methods of signal quantification have been presented at this conference. Two topics that have at this meeting again highlighted the interesting contributions of aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy were: contrast quantification of annular dark-field STEM images in terms of chemical composition (Z-contrast), sample thickness and strain, and the study of