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Sample records for major physics conference

  1. Effective Physics Major Recruiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Only the high school students that are in the top 2% in math of those that are college bound do well as physics majors. These students you recruit face to face in April by telling them your program is academically the toughest that they will find at your school. You promise that while crippling their social life and assuring that their lowest grades will be in their physics major, they will get to find out just how good they are. We will discuss:How to get face to face with that top 2% high school student.Why high school teachers and counselors will not help you.Why wait until April to recruit.What parents want to know about your physics program.Which activities are a waste of time when recuiting.By investing 20 hours spread over 2 weeks expect to get about 8 good physics majors.

  2. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  3. Major Conference about Astronomical Technology in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Press Conference on Monday, March 27, 2000 Which are the latest astronomical discoveries made with the new 8-10 metre class astronomical telescopes? Will it be possible to construct even more powerful instruments on the ground and in space to explore the near and distant Universe at all wavelengths from gamma-rays to radio waves? Which research areas in this dynamical science are likely to achieve break-throughs with emerging new technologies? These are some of the central themes that will be discussed by more than 600 specialists from all over the world at an international conference in Munich (Germany), "Astronomical Telescopes and Instruments 2000" , beginning on Monday, March 27, 2000. During five days, the modern architecture of the new International Congress Center in the Bavarian capital will be the scene of lively exchanges about recent progress at the world's top-class astronomical research facilities and the presentation of inspired new ideas about future technological opportunities. The conference will be accompanied by numerous on-site exhibition stands by the major industries and research organisations in this wide field. This meeting is the latest in a series, organised every second year, alternatively in the USA and Europe by the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) , this year with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) as co-sponsor and host institution. The conference will be opened in the morning of March 27 by the Bavarian Minister of Science, Research and Arts, Hans Zehetmair . His address will be followed by keynote speeches by Massimo Tarenghi (European Southern Observatory), James B. Breckenridge (National Science Foundation, USA), Harvey Butcher (Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy) and Albrecht Ruediger (Max Planck Institut fr Quantenoptik, Germany). The conference is subtitled "Power Telescopes and Instrumentation into the New Millennium" and will be attended by leading scientists and engineers from all continents. There will be plenary sessions and specialised working group meetings on virtually all subject areas related to modern astronomical technology, ranging from optical design, materials and fabrication to telescope structures, detectors and the associated discovery and research prospects. While the performance and results from the new, large ground-based facilities like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) will constitute one of the focal points, much attention will also be devoted to new projects in space astronomy, e.g., the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) , the planned successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Other space missions to be discussed are the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-Ray observatories. Radio Telescopes , herunder the projected Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA) , as well as Optical Interferometry are other hot subjects, as are the current plans for optical telescopes in the extremely large class , with surface diameters of 30 - 100 metres. Press Conference An international Press Conference will be held at the meeting site in the Munich International Conference Center on Monday, March 27, at 12:15 hrs local time (CET) . It will be attended by some of the key participants, with possibilities for individual interviews. More information about the Press Conference is available from

  4. The conferences for undergraduate women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessing, Susan K.

    2015-12-01

    The American Physical Society Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics are the continuation of a grassroots collaborative effort that began in 2006. The goals of the conferences are to increase retention and improve career outcomes of undergraduate women in physics. I describe the conferences, including organization and participant response, and encourage other countries to host similar programs for their undergraduate women.

  5. Second Microgravity Fluid Physics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference's purpose was to inform the fluid physics community of research opportunities in reduced-gravity fluid physics, present the status of the existing and planned reduced gravity fluid physics research programs, and inform participants of the upcoming NASA Research Announcement in this area. The plenary sessions provided an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program information on NASA's ground-based and space-based flight research facilities. An international forum offered participants an opportunity to hear from French, German, and Russian speakers about the microgravity research programs in their respective countries. Two keynote speakers provided broad technical overviews on multiphase flow and complex fluids research. Presenters briefed their peers on the scientific results of their ground-based and flight research. Fifty-eight of the sixty-two technical papers are included here.

  6. Third Microgravity Fluid Physics Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference's purpose was to inform the fluid physics community of research opportunities in reduced-gravity fluid physics, present the status of the existing and planned reduced gravity fluid physics research programs, and inform participants of the upcoming NASA Research Announcement in this area. The plenary sessions provided an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, present and future areas of emphasis, information on NASA's ground-based and space-based flight research facilities-especially use of the International Space Station, and the process by which future investigators enter the program. An international forum offered participants an opportunity to hear from Russian speakers about their microgravity research programs. Three keynote speakers provided broad technical overviews on the history and future development of the moon and on multiphase flow and complex fluids research. One keynote paper and an extended abstract are included in the proceedings. One hundred and thirty-two technical papers were presented in 28 sessions. Presenters briefed their peers on the scientific results of their ground-based and flight research. One hundred and twenty-two papers are included here.

  7. Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Fleming

    2009-04-01

    The Yale Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics was held on January 18th and 19th, 2008. The conference, targeted toward undergraduates in the Northeast, was a huge success. It was well attended by both a slate of impressive speakers including Janet Conrad, Mildred Dresselhaus, Elsa Garmire, Howard Georgi, Liz Rhodes, Meg Urry and Wendy Zhang, and many interested attendees. Talks were on current research, about issues for women in physics, and on the application process for graduate school. There was also a career panel, student talks, and a student poster session. The conference ran concurrently with the third annual conference at USC, as well as a first annual conference at the University of Michigan. Our purpose in creating this conference was to provide a supportive atmosphere for young physicists to connect with peers and with successful women in the field. We hope that from this conference, attendees have become confident and knowledgeable about applying to graduate school and be further inspired to pursue a career in physics. The following describes the conference program, participation and impact, logistics of running the conference and plans for the future.

  8. Teaching Physics for Biology Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barbara

    2000-04-01

    UCSD has a large population of students majoring in some form of biological science. These students are required to take a 3 quarter calculus level physics sequence which is offered each quarter. The students are willing to work hard to keep their GPA high but often have poor preparation for a physics class, and training that has rewarded memorization rather than logical deduction. The classes are large and many of the instructional staff give a higher priority to their research. To help students gain a better conceptual understanding we have started a ``tutorial" system where students meet in small groups to work cooperatively through prepared worksheets. The ``tutors" are primarily undergraduates from the biological sciences, the only requirements being enthusiasm, and that the tutor has passed the class with an A. The use of a standard set of worksheets (and their solutions) allows all instructors to offer tutorials with a minimum of extra effort. Students respond positively to these sessions.

  9. Highlights From the Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee

    2014-03-01

    The Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics was held in January 2013 with more than 100 participants from 74 different institutions. The participants comprised a diverse group faculty from large and small departments, staff from industry and national labs, and graduate students and postdocs. The conference was aimed at fostering innovation and creativity in our approach to graduate education in physics. Because the majority of physics PhDs ultimately find permanent employment outside academia, and because of the many competing demands on new faculty, many departments are reviewing their graduate programs. The presentations and discussions at the conference included the increasing attention being paid to broader and more flexible graduate curricula, forming industrial partnerships, strategies to increase diversity, professional skills training for graduate students and postdocs, and improving mentoring practices and instituting family-friendly policies for graduate students.

  10. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are essential, not only for fusion energy development, but also for astro- and space research. Plasmas in different situations often have important features in common. Results obtained under various conditions, in the laboratory or in space, should therefore be compared and interrelated. The Göteborg conference emphasized more than the previous one, which was held in Nagoya, Japan, the astro- and space aspects, but there were still more contributions from the fusion and laboratory research. The fundamental plasma theory part was, however, the most extensive one in the programme. At the conference there were seventy invited talks, including six comprehensive talks addressed to all participants. The remaining sixtyfour invited talks were topical talks. Besides, we had received about 450 contributed papers. About 300 of them were given as posters, and most of the remaining ones were presented as orals. The set of one page abstracts of these contributed papers as well as the titles of the invited talks were collected in two volumes, which were sent to all participants a month before the conference. Another set, the four page papers, which had been carefully prepared by the authors for photoreproduction to one page papers, were published in a volume of proceedings of some 460 pages available at the conference. When trying to classify the contributions, it turned out that they fell naturally into four main categories, namely: General Theory Space and Astro Plasmas Fusion Laboratory Plasmas For practical reasons we had to divide the Abstracts into two Volumes, the first one including categories (1) and (2), and the second one the two remaining categories (3) and (4). In publishing the invited talks from the conference we had to handle a great number of extensive papers. It turned out to be natural to have also the invited papers published in two parts, as two separate numbers of Physica Scripta, the first one devoted to (1) General Theory, and (2) Space and Astro Plasmas, whereas the second one to (3) Fusion and (4) Laboratory Plasmas. The 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics was organized by Chalmers University of Technology. It gathered about 500 participants from 40 countries. Large delegations came from the USA, France, West Germany, Japan, the USSR, and India, the number of participants from these countries ranging from 100 to 20. Sweden had about 50 participating scientists. There were a total of about 20 from the other Scandinavian countries. The principal sponsor of the conference was IUPAP, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The conference also had a number of co-sponsors like IAU, the International Astronomical Union, URSI, the International Union of Radio Science, EPS, the European Physical Society, and EURATOM-FUSION. The conference was supported by Swedish Industry and Swedish Research Boards. The previous ICPP, held in Nagoya two years ago, was the first attempt to combine two types of conferences: the Plasma Theory Conference, first held in Kiev in the Soviet Union in 1971, and the Waves and Instabilities Congress, held for the first time in Innsbruck, Austria in 1973. As a consequence of the success of the Nagoya conference it was decided by the International Organizing Committee of the ICPP that the 1982 conference should also be of the combined type. The 1982 ICPP in Göteborg was thus a Joint Conference of the Fifth Kiev International Conference in Plasma Theory and the Fifth International Congress on Waves and Instabilities in Plasmas. During the conference in Göteborg the International Organizing Committee had a meeting and it was decided that also the next International Conference on Plasma Physics will be of the combined type. It will be held in Lausanne, Switzerland in 1984. The International Organizing Committee on the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics comprised about 40 plasma physics scientists from all over the world, who represented various sections of plasma physics. I would like to thank the active members of the IOC for an efficient and friendly co-operation in deciding about the program of invited speakers and for discussions on the general structure of the conference. Our most cordial thanks are extended to the invited speakers for coming to the conference to deliver such excellent talks and to provide us in good time for printing with so beautifully prepared manuscripts. Symposium on Plasma Theory: Preface Several satellite meetings were arranged following the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics in Göteborg. Among them a Symposium on Plasma Theory was held at Aspenäsgården outside Göteborg during three days, June 16-18, 1982. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss problems of current interest in plasma theory with applications to space and astrophysical plasmas as well as to fusion plasmas. A total of fifteen talks were given during the three days, and some very lively discussions arose, notably in the area of plasma turbulence. There were around 30 invited scientists present, about one third from the United States, one third from the Soviet Union, and the rest from England, Japan, and various other countries. This volume of Physica Scripta (2B, 506-595) includes some of the talks which were given at Aspenäsgården. Several of the authors of contributed papers to the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics were encouraged to write extended versions of their contributions, and these are also included in this number, as are furthermore some papers, which were prepared during prolonged stays of visiting scientists at our institute in connection with the 1982 ICPP. It is expected that the collection of papers thus assembled will give a general picture of the activities accompanying the main conference and that it will elucidate some trends in the development of plasma theory.

  11. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    Just over one hundred years ago, Ernest Rutherford presented an interpretation of alpha-particle scattering experiments, performed a couple of years earlier by Geiger and Marsden, to the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society. The work was summarised shortly afterwards in a paper in the Philosophical Magazine. He postulated that a dense speck of matter must exist at the centre of an atom (later to become known as the nucleus) if the details of the experiments, particularly the yield of alpha particles scattered through large angles, were to be explained. The nuclear hypothesis, combined with the experimental work by Moseley on X-rays and Bohr's theoretical ideas, both also initiated at the Victoria University of Manchester, established our view of atomic structure and gave birth to the field of nuclear physics. The Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics was held at The University of Manchester in August 2011 to celebrate this anniversary by addressing the wide range of contemporary topics that characterise modern nuclear physics. This set of proceedings covers areas including nuclear structure and astrophysics, hadron structure and spectroscopy, fundamental interactions studied within the nucleus and results of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We would like to thank all those who presented their recent research results at the conference; the proceedings stand as a testament to the excitement and interest that still pervades the pursuit of this field of physics. We would also like to thank those who contributed in other ways to the conference. To colleagues at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry for putting together an exhibition to coincide with the conference that included the manuscript of the 1911 paper, letters, notebooks and equipment used by Rutherford. These items were kindly loaned by Cambridge and Manchester Universities. Winton Capital generously supported this exhibition. We would also like to thank Professor Mary Fowler, Rutherford's great-granddaughter, and Professor Stephen Watts, Head of the School of Physics and Astronomy at Manchester, for opening the exhibition as part of the welcome reception for the conference. The reception was only possible with support from Canberra Industries. We are grateful to His Excellency Mr Derek Leask, New Zealand High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, to Professor Rod Coombs, Deputy President of The University of Manchester, and to Professor David Phillips, the President of the Royal Society of Chemistry, for their contributions to the formal opening of the conference. Manchester City Council kindly supported a civic reception hosted by the Lord Mayor of the City of Manchester, Councillor Harry Lyons JP, at Manchester Town Hall. The Ogden Trust helped support the conference dinner and Professor George Dracoulis provided an entertaining after dinner speech. Thank you for these contributions to the social programme of the conference. In addition to the exhibition at the Museum, which was open to the public until October 2011, the conference programme also included a series of public evening lectures and we are grateful both to the speakers (David Jenkins, Alan Perkins and John Roberts) and to those providing support for the public engagement activities (the Institute of Physics Nuclear Physics Group, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine, the Nuclear Institute and the Science and Technology Facilities Council). We would also like to thank the European Physical Society for providing conference travel grants to a number of young scientists. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the other members of the UK Organising Committee for their help in making the conference a success and for their work in putting these proceedings together. In addition, the International Advisory Committee provided essential advice that contributed to the selection of the plenary speakers who were without exception engaging, interesting and entertaining, giving a really excellent set of presentations. Finally we are also pleased to express our thanks to the Conference Office of the Institute of Physics for their invaluable support in organising this event. We are especially grateful to Dawn Stewart for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, as well as to Claire Garland for her planning and management of this event. This conference is the second in a series of conferences that began with the Rutherford Jubilee Conference held in Manchester in 1961, which is described in one of the contributions to these proceedings. I do hope that at least some of the delegates from the Centennial Conference will be able to attend the next one, fifty years hence in 2061, just as we were honoured to have some of the Jubilee delegates with us for the Centennial. If I am still around, I doubt that I will have the energy then to be conference chair. I would also not like to attempt to predict the plenary programme, but I hope that it will be as vibrant and exciting as the 2011 conference. Professor Sean J Freeman Conference Chair On behalf of the UK Organising Committee Ernest Rutherford Ernest Rutherford (Photograph courtesy of The University of Manchester) Edited by: Sean Freeman (The University of Manchester) Andrei Andreyev (University of the West of Scotland/The University of York) Alison Bruce (University of Brighton) Alick Deacon (The University of Manchester) Dave Jenkins (University of York) Dave Joss (University of Liverpool) Douglas MacGregor (University of Glasgow) Paddy Regan (University of Surrey) John Simpson (University of Daresbury) Garry Tungate (University of Birmingham) Bob Wadsworth (University of York) Dan Watts (University of Edinburgh) International Advisory Panel: A Aprahamian (Notre Dame, USA) J Äystö (Jyväskylä, Finland) F Aziaez (Orsay, France) J-P Blaizot (Saclay, France/ECT, Italy) A Bracco (Milan, Italy) H Caines (Yale, USA) C W de Jaeger (JLAB, USA) J Dilling (TRIUMF, Canada) J Dobacewski (Warsaw, Poland) G Dracoulis (ANU, Australia) S J Freedman (LBL, USA) M Hass (Weizmann Institute, Israel) M Huyse (Leuven, Belgium) P Jones (Birmingham, UK) D Khao (Hanoi, Vietnam) R Krücken (Munich, Germany) K Langanke (Darmstadt, Germany) C Lister (Argonne, USA) G A Miller (University of Washington, USA) D Morrissey (MSU, USA) T Motobayashi (RIKEN, Japan) S Nagamiya (J-PARC, Japan) W Nazarewicz (ORNL, USA) S Mullins (iThemba, South Africa) T Nakamura (Tokyo, Japan) P Roussel Chomaz (GANIL, France) R Ribas (Sao Paolo, Brazil) M Vanderhaeghen (Mainz, Germany) U Wiedner (Uppsala, Sweden) F Xu (Peking University, China) Q Zhao (IHEP, Bejing) W Zajc (Columbia, USA)

  12. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of participants, and finally basic and astrophysical plasmas (BAP). New strategies are required to achieve a more balanced participation of these four areas of knowledge in future meetings, but the large number of participants and the overall high quality of the invited talks were particularly relevant this year. In the preparation of the Conference Programme we tried to present an updated view of plasma physics and to integrate suggestions coming from the scientific community, in particular through the use of the EPS PPD Open Forum. As mentioned, two evening sessions took place during the Conference. This year, the traditional evening on ITER was replaced by a session dedicated to inertial fusion, organized by D Batani, where the main installations and experiments on laser fusion around the world were presented and critically discussed. The other session, dedicated to plasma physics education, was organized by N Lopes-Cardoso, and discussed the specific educational issues of plasma physics and fusion, and presented the training programmes existing in Europe. As a concluding remark, we would like to thank our colleagues of the Programme Committee and, in particular, the coordinators of the subcommittees, Clarisse Bourdelle and Arthur Peters for MCF, Javier Honrubia for BPIF, Christoph Hollenstein for LTP, and Uli Stroth for BAP, for their generous help, suggestions and support. Due to the large number of participants, the smooth and efficient local organization, and the high overall quality of the plenary and invited presentations, the 37th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics can be considered an undeniable success. I hope you will find, in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, an interesting and useful account of this event. Outstanding scientists honoured at the 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics During the Conference the EPS Plasma Physics Division rewarded researchers who have achieved outstanding scientific or technological results. In this way the EPS PPD seeks to reinforce excellence in science. The Plasma Physics Hannes Alfvén Prize 2010 The Hannes Alfvén Prize is awarded to Allen Boozer (Professor, Columbia University) and Jürgen Nührenberg (Professor, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik and Greifswald University) for the formulation and practical application of criteria allowing stellarators to have good fast-particle and neoclassical energy confinement. Photo of Boozer and Nuhrenberg Jürgen Nührenberg (left) and Allen Boozer. The tokamak and the stellarator are two major candidate concepts for magnetically confining fusion plasmas. They were both conceived in the early 1950s, but the tokamak developed more rapidly because of its intrinsically favourable confinement properties. Indeed, the stellarator seemed fundamentally unable to confine energy and collisionless alpha-particle orbits well enough for a fusion reactor. In the 1980s, however, Allen Boozer and Jürgen Nührenberg developed methods for tailoring stellarator magnetic fields so as to guarantee confinement comparable to that in tokamaks. Allen Boozer introduced a set of magnetic coordinates, now named after him, in which the description of three-dimensionally shaped magnetic fields is particularly simple. He went on to show that if the magnetic field strength |B| is symmetric in these coordinates (so-called quasisymmetry) then the guiding-centre orbits and the neoclassical confinement properties are equivalent to those in a tokamak. In pioneering calculations a few years later, Jürgen Nührenberg showed that such magnetic fields can indeed be realized in practice, as can other configurations which have equally good confinement without being quasisymmetric. There is an unexpected vastness of configurational possibilities for toroidal plasma confinement, where the limit is likely to be set by turbulence rather than neoclassical losses. In addition, quasisymmetry should facilitate the development of strongly sheared rotation with direct impact in the control of turbulent transport. Moreover, Jügen Nührenberg showed that a number of other properties of the magnetic field can also be optimized simultaneously, allowing high equilibrium and stability limits to be achieved and thus opening up a route to an inherently steady-state fusion reactor. The ideas of Allen Boozer and Jürgen Nührenberg have revolutionized stellarator research. They have already partially been confirmed on the W7-AS and HSX stellarators, and provide the basis for the world's largest stellarator under construction, Wendelstein 7-X. The award of the 2010 Hannes Alfvén Prize to these two leading scientists underlines the development of understanding and transfer of knowledge in plasma physics. Invited papers by Allen Boozer and Jürgen Nührenberg are published as articles 124002 and 124003 in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The Plasma Physics Innovation Prize 2010 The 2010 Plasma Physics Innovation Prize of the European Physical Society is awarded to Uwe Czarnetzki (Professor, Ruhr-Universität Bochum) for his outstanding contributions in the discovery of the electrical asymmetry effect, its scientific characterization and for its development up to the level of successful industrial application. photo of Uwe Czarnetzki Uwe Czarnetzki. The energy of ions impacting surfaces during plasma processing is crucial in determining both the properties of materials being deposited by plasmas and for the control of the etching of thin films. The independent control of the ion energy and the plasma density has been the object of intense industrial research. Current technologies for modifying the ion energy rely on the geometry of the plasma processing chamber or on applying low and high frequency RF power that is not phase locked. These techniques are either not applicable to some situations or have only been partially successful. The electrical asymmetry effect allows the ion energy and plasma density to be decoupled. If the RF power applied to a plasma chamber is comprised of a phase locked fundamental and its second harmonic, the ion energy is a linear function of the phase angle between the two. This simple but previously overlooked technique has proved to be an enabling technology for future materials and plasma applications. The method has been patented and is currently used, for example, by leading manufacturers of large area solar cells and has resulted in unsurpassed quality and homogeneity of the devices. In addition to the elctrical asymmetry effect, Uwe Czarnetzki is internationally renowned for his many important contributions in the areas of laser-based plasma diagnostics and gas discharge physics. For all of these outstanding contributions to low temperature plasmas, the European Physical Society bestows its 2010 Plasma Physics Innovation Prize on Uwe Czarnetzki. The PhD Research Award 2010 The Plasma Physics Division 2010 PhD Research Award has been judged by a committee comprising Juergen Meyer-ter-Vehn, Emmanuel Marode and Michel Chatelier who examined all the candidatures in a process managed by Dimitri Batani. The EPS PhD prize is a key element of the EPS PPD activities to recognize exceptional quality of the work carried out by young physicists. photo of PhD Award winners The 2010 PhD Research Award winners. From left to right: Emeric Falize, Guilhem Dif-Pradalier, Bérénice Loupias, Peter Manz and Xavier Davoine. The jury nominated four award winners from a pool of impressively high quality candidates. The 2010 citations in alphabetical order are: Xavier Davoine for his research on an intense ultra short X source obtained by acceleration of a class of electrons in the wakefield of a laser pulse, improving the numerical procedure to model the electron dynamics. Guilhem Dif-Pradalier for a fundamental discussion of the formalism needed to describe turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas, including a collision operator in the Gysela gyrokinetic code that could modify the characteristics of the turbulence. Emeric Falize and Bérénice Loupias for their investigation of similarities between laser-induced plasmas and astrophysical systems and for the description of a set of diagnostics for laser plasmas aimed at demonstrating the possible astrophysics character of plasma jets in laser-induced plasma formation. Peter Manz for his comprehensive analysis of turbulence in magnetized plasmas, exploring the interplay between flows, electric fields and fluctuations. Itoh Project Prize in Plasma Turbulence 2010 Professor Sanae Itoh from Kyushu University continued to sponsor the Itoh Project Prize in Plasma Turbulence. The 2010 prize was awarded to G Birkenmeier (Stuttgart University). IOP Poster Prize winners in Dublin, 2010. The Institute of Physics (IOP) has once again provided encouragement for young physiscs with the IOP Poster Prize. Caroline Wilkinson presented the awards this year to three candidates: Mattia Albergante (EPFL, Lausanne), Clelia Pagano (Trinity College Dublin) and Marija Vranic (Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon). Proceedings of 37th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics As previously mentioned, this special issue contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, held in 2010. The complete proceedings are available online at http://ocs.ciemat.es/EPS2010PAP/html/ This site is also accessible from the conference website at http://www.eps2010.com/ (under `Contributions'). The Local Organizing Committee has also prepared a CD with a copy of the proceedings, identical to the online proceedings. This CD is stored at the offices of the European Physical Society as a backup, and as a master copy to make additional copies in case anyone should require one.

  13. 36th International Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Australian particle physics community was honoured to host the 36th ICHEP conference in 2012 in Melbourne. This conference has long been the reference event for our international community. The announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC was a major highlight, with huge international press coverage. ICHEP2012 was described by CERN Director-General, Professor Rolf Heuer, as a landmark conference for our field. In additional to the Higgs announcement, important results from neutrino physics, from flavour physics, and from physics beyond the standard model also provided great interest. There were also updates on key accelerator developments such as the new B-factories, plans for the LHC upgrade, neutrino facilities and associated detector developments. ICHEP2012 exceeded the promise expected of the key conference for our field, and really did provide a reference point for the future. Many thanks to the contribution reviewers: Andy Bakich, Csaba Balazs, Nicole Bell, Catherine Buchanan, Will Crump, Cameron Cuthbert, Ben Farmer, Sudhir Gupta, Elliot Hutchison, Paul Jackson, Geng-Yuan Jeng, Archil Kobakhidze, Doyoun Kim, Tong Li, Antonio Limosani (Head Editor), Kristian McDonald, Nikhul Patel, Aldo Saavedra, Mark Scarcella, Geoff Taylor, Ian Watson, Graham White, Tony Williams and Bruce Yabsley.

  14. Conference: Statistical Physics and Biological Information

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, David J.; Hwa, Terence

    2001-06-15

    OAK B188 In the spring of 2001, the Institute for Theoretical Physics ran a 6 month scientific program on Statistical Physics and Biological Information. This program was organized by Walter Fitch (UC Irvine), Terence Hwa (UC San Diego), Luca Peliti (University Federico II), Naples Gary Stormo (Washington University School of Medicine) and Chao Tang (NEC). Overall scientific supervision was provided by David Gross, Director, ITP. The ITP has an online conference/program proceeding which consists of audio and transparencies of almost all of the talks held during this program. Over 100 talks are available on the site at http://online.kitp.ucsb.edu/online/infobio01/.

  15. The 2005 National Conference of Black Physics Students

    SciTech Connect

    David D. Reid

    2006-09-26

    This proposal funded the 19th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students. This conference provided physics students with the opportunity to interact with world-class researchers and the facilities at which they work. The conference supports the well established need for the US to foster a larger and stronger scientific workforce through the recruitment and retention of science and engineering students.

  16. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhim

    2002-11-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This CP (conference proceeding) is a compilation of the abstracts, presentations, and posters presented at the conference.

  17. Physics for Occupational Therapy Majors Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Aurora, Tarlok

    1998-03-01

    In Spring 1996, a one semester course - "Survey of Physics" - was taught for students majoring in Occupational Therapy (O. T.), in contrast to the two semester physics sequence for all other health science majors. The course was designed to expose the students to the concept of physics, develop problem solving skills and to emphasize the importance of physics to O.T. In developing the course content, students' preparedness in mathematics and the perceived future applications of physics in O. T. was taken in to consideration, and steps were taken to remedy the deficiencies in students' background. The course was comprised of lecture, laboratory, and considerable self study due to the time constraints, and these will be described.

  18. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee chaired by Henry Hutchinson (RAL, Chilton), and to the Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion journal team (Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol), for their work on this conference. At the 2004 European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics, plenary invited speakers whose talks spanned the entire field were followed, each day, by multiple parallel sessions which also included invited talks. Invited speakers in both these categories were asked to contribute papers to this special issue (the contributed papers at this conference, and at all recent conferences in this series, are archived at http://epsppd.epfl.ch). The Programme Committee is very grateful to the many invited speakers who have responded positively to this request. Invited papers appear here in their order of presentation during the week beginning 28 June 2004; this ordering provides an echo of the character of the conference, as it was experienced by those who took part. Programme Committee 2004 Professor Richard Dendy UKAEA Culham Division, UK Chairman and guest editor Dr Jean-Luc Dorier Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne, Switzerland (Co-ordinator of dusty plasmas and guest editor) Professor Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching, Germany (Co-ordinator of laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics and guest editor) Dr Peter Norreys Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK (Scientific Secretary and guest editor) Dr Emilia R Solano CIEMAT Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Madrid, Spain ( Co-ordinator of magnetic confinement fusion and guest editor) Dr Shalom Eliezer Soreq Nuclear Research Centre, Israel Dr Wim Goedheer FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Rijnhuizen, Netherlands Professor Henry Hutchinson Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK Professor John Kirk Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg, Germany Dr Raymond Koch Ecole Royale Militaire/Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels, Belgium Professor Gerrit Kroesen Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Netherlands Dr Martin Lampe Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC, USA Dr Jo Lister Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne, Switzerland Dr Paola Mantica Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Milan, Italy Professor Tito Mendonca Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon, Portugal Dr Patrick Mora École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France Professor Lennart Stenflo Umeå Universitet, Sweden Professor Paul Thomas CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France Professor Friedrich Wagner Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany Professor Hannspeter Winter Technische Universität Wien, Austria

  19. Physics Careers, Employment and Education. AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 39.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perl, Martin L., Ed.

    This publication contains the proceedings of a Conference on Changing Career Opportunities for Physicists, held at the Pennsylvania State University, August 1-3, 1977. The purpose of the conference was to study present and future manpower problems in the physics profession. The breadth and depth of the conference is demonstrated by these…

  20. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary speakers to produce a schedule which was not only balanced but also stimulating and exciting. The speakers themelves, in both the plenary and parallel sessions, not only gave us a fine selection of interesting talks but also kept to their allotted times. Photos of many of the events can be found on the web page, http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/HEP2007 The biennial EPS HEPP conference has a long tradition as one of the major international conferences in particle physics. We were proud to be following in the succession of notable conferences, most recently at Aachen in 2003 and Lisbon in 2005: proud and also somewhat apprehensive as to whether we would come up to their high standard. With hindsight we can claim that we did just that, both in the standards of the scientific sessions and in the smooth running of an enjoyable conference. We achieved our goal of a conference that was memorable—for the right reasons. The next EPS HEPP conference is in Krakow in 2009, and is eagerly anticipated by all those who were at Manchester. We wish the organisers well. Roger Barlow Editor Conference logo

  1. XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013): Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    XXV IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2013) was held from 20-24 August 2013 at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) present an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas. The CCP series aims to draw computational scientists from around the world and to stimulate interdisciplinary discussion and collaboration by putting together researchers interested in various fields of computational science. It is organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and has been in existence since 1989. The CCP series alternates between Europe, America and Asia-Pacific. The conferences are traditionally supported by European Physical Society and American Physical Society. This year the Conference host was Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics. The Conference contained 142 presentations, and, in particular, 11 plenary talks with comprehensive reviews from airbursts to many-electron systems. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), European Physical Society (EPS), Division of Computational Physics of American Physical Society (DCOMP/APS), Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Department of Physical Sciences of Russian Academy of Sciences, RSC Group company. Further conference information and images from the conference are available in the pdf.

  2. Second IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel

    2005-11-01

    Seeking to build on the momentum generated by the groundbreaking 2002 conference, 145 delegates from 42 countries gathered for the Second IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics. During three days of energizing and inspirational discussions, posters, and networking, attendees assessed the progress that had been made in the intervening years in recruiting, retaining, and promoting women physicists worldwide. A special purpose of this second conference was to spotlight the physics research women are conducting around the world.

  3. Advancing Successful Physics Majors - The Physics First Year Seminar Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Jason; Petkie, Douglas

    In 2012, the Wright State University physics curriculum introduced a new year-long seminar course required for all new physics majors. The goal of this course is to improve student retention and success via building a community of physics majors and provide them with the skills, mindset, and advising necessary to successfully complete a degree and transition to the next part of their careers. This new course sequence assembles a new cohort of majors annually. To prepare each cohort, students engage in a variety of activities that span from student success skills to more specific physics content while building an entrepreneurial mindset. Students participate in activities including study skills, career night, course planning, campus services, and a department social function. More importantly, students gain exposure to programming, literature searches, data analysis, technical writing, elevator pitches, and experimental design via hands-on projects. This includes the students proposing, designing, and conducting their own experiments. Preliminary evidence indicates increased retention, student success, and an enhanced sense of community among physics undergraduate students, The overall number of majors and students eventually completing their physics degrees has nearly tripled. Associate Professor, Department of Physics.

  4. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This TM is a compilation of abstracts of the papers and the posters presented at the conference. Web-based proceedings, including the charts used by the presenters, will be posted on the web shortly after the conference.

  5. 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, G.; Golovin, A.

    2007-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 21 papers presented during 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held in Kyiv, at Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Faculty of Physics, from April, 23 to April 28, 2007. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: astrometry and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems, small bodies of the solar system, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, history of astronomy and related to the mentioned above.

  6. The Seventh Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Gerard M.

    1993-01-01

    The National Conference of Black Physics Students began in 1986 when several Black physics graduate students at MIT and Harvard decided to address the 'pipeline problem' of African Americans in physics by organizing a conference for Black physics undergraduates. The goals of the conference were: (1) to develop a network within the Black physics community, (2) to make Black students in physics, particularly at graduate level, aware of academic and professional opportunities and (3) to bring important issues and developments in the field to the attention of these students. We are pleased to announce the Seventh Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students held February 12 and 13, 1993 served the largest population of students so far. The largest conference previous to this one hosted 150 students. We registered and prepared for 240 students with 210 actually attenting. We received so many qualified abstracts for technical talks by students that instead of NCBPS's tradition of 3-4 student presentations, we ran 4 parallel sessions in different rooms with 4-5 presentations in each room. In response to comments from previous conferences, the program contained 3 workshop/discussion sessions. The topics for the interactive discussion workshops were: 'Getting Ready for Graduate School,' 'How to Succeed in Graduate School,' and 'Issues Facing Black Scientists.'

  7. The Second National Conference on Testing: Major Issues. Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossone, Richard M., Ed.

    The speeches presented at the second national conference on testing deal with models for program evaluation, reporting of test results, minimum competency programs, and the role of state and federal government in educational testing. Various approaches to program evaluation, and its relationship to testing are described by Michael Scriven, Lee J.…

  8. Major Issues of the World Administrative Radio Conference 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Ifram

    In preparation for the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC), this paper lists some of the issues on which WARC participants will focus. These issues include the expansion of the shortwave spectrum and the formulation of more equitable, more efficient procedures by which broadcasters are awarded high-frequency shortwave bands; ways to…

  9. A capstone research experience for physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David

    2013-03-01

    Dickinson College is a small liberal arts college with a thriving physics program. For years, one of the key features of our program has been a year-long senior research project that was required for each student. Unfortunately, as our number of majors increased, it became more and more difficult to supervise such a large number of senior research projects. To deal with this growing challenge, we developed a capstone research experience that involves a larger number of students working together on an independent group project. In this talk I will give a broad overview of our new senior research model and provide a few examples of projects that have been carried out over the past few years. I will also briefly describe the positive and negative aspects of this model from the perspective of faculty and students.

  10. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2015-01-06

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  11. Careers in Patent Law for Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    An important question that many undergraduate physics students ask is, "What can one do with a physics degree?" Of course there are many answers to this question. Often a general reference to becoming a lawyer is given as a possible answer. This paper is intended to explain the field of patent law and how a physics degree can lead to an

  12. Careers in Patent Law for Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    2010-01-01

    An important question that many undergraduate physics students ask is, "What can one do with a physics degree?" Of course there are many answers to this question. Often a general reference to becoming a lawyer is given as a possible answer. This paper is intended to explain the field of patent law and how a physics degree can lead to an…

  13. Careers in Patent Law for Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    2010-11-01

    An important question that many undergraduate physics students ask is, "What can one do with a physics degree?" Of course there are many answers to this question. Often a general reference to becoming a lawyer is given as a possible answer. This paper is intended to explain the field of patent law and how a physics degree can lead to an interesting and potentially lucrative career as a patent examiner, a patent agent, or a patent attorney. This information may be of interest to physics students as well as those who recruit or counsel physics students.

  14. PREFACE: International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Shashank N.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Gaur, Abhijeet

    2014-09-01

    The International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2014) was held at Indore, India, during 22-23 February 2014. The conference was hosted by the School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001. The objective of the conference was to provide a platform for interaction among scientists, teachers, researchers and students, and to share their ideas, thoughts and scientific findings in various areas of physics, including condensed matter and materials physics, laser and plasma physics. ICRTP 2014 attracted a total of 103 abstracts submitted by scientists from France, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy and Portugal. The conference included an inaugural talk and 17 invited talks. PhD students presented their work in the form of posters. Presented posters were judged by a panel of five experts. Two best posters were awarded prizes. It is our pleasure to thank the members of the Advisory Committee and Local Organizing Committee for their invaluable help, especially for their proposals for invited talks. A total of 80 papers were submitted to be considered for publication and 68 papers have been accepted for inclusion in the proceedings. All the papers were reviewed, and we wish to thank all the referees for their support and prompt reviewing of the papers. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for their financial support. Personally, we would like to thank all the volunteers without whom the conference would not have been functional. We express our sincere thanks to our university administration for their continuous support. Special thanks go to all the faculty members, administrative staff and students of the School of Physics for their tireless efforts in organizing ICRTP 2014. Finally, we deeply appreciate the assistance of Ms Sarah Toms, Conference Publishing Coordinator, Journal of Physics Conference Series (JPCS), IOP Publishing Ltd, UK, for all help in getting ICRTP 2014 published in JPCS. Indore, 28 July 2014 Shashank N Kane*, Ashutosh Mishra School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001, India Abhijeet Gaur School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain - 456010, India Guest Editors * E-mail address: kane_sn@yahoo.com Conference photograph Details of the organizing committees are available in the PDF

  15. PREFACE: XIV Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2014-07-01

    This volume contains the invited and contributed papers presented at the 14th Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy held in Cortona, Italy, from 29-31 October, 2013. The meeting was held at the Palazzone, an elegant Renaissance Villa, commissioned by the Cardinal Silvio Passerini (1469-1529), Bishop of Cortona, and presently owned by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The aim of this biennial Conference is to bring together Italian theorists working in various fields of nuclear physics to discuss their latest results and confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. This offers the opportunity to stimulate new ideas and promote collaborations between different research groups. The Conference was attended by 46 participants, coming from 13 Italian Universities and 11 Laboratories and Sezioni of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - INFN. The program of the conference, prepared by the Organizing Committee (Ignazio Bombaci, Aldo Covello, Laura Elisa Marcucci and Sergio Rosati) focused on the following main topics: Few-Nucleon Systems Nuclear Structure Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Quark-Gluon Plasma Nuclear Astrophysics Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes Structure of Hadrons and Hadronic Matter. In the last session of the Conference there were two invited review talks related to experimental activities of great current interest. Giacomo De Angelis from the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro spoke about the INFN SPES radioactive ion beam project. Sara Pirrone, INFN Sezione di Catania, gave a talk on the symmetry energy and isospin physics with the CHIMERA detector. Finally, Mauro Taiuti (Università di Genova), National Coordinator of the INFN-CSN3 (Nuclear Physics Experiments), reported on the present status and future challenges of experimental nuclear physics in Italy. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of INFN who helped make the conference possible. I Bombaci, A Covello, L E Marcucci, S Rosati

  16. Are Physical Education Majors Models for Fitness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamla, James; Snyder, Ben; Tanner, Lori; Wash, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) (2002) has taken a firm stance on the importance of adequate fitness levels of physical education teachers stating that they have the responsibility to model an active lifestyle and to promote fitness behaviors. Since the NASPE declaration, national initiatives like Let's Move…

  17. PREFACE: International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015) was held in Moscow, Russia, from October 5 to 10, 2015. The conference is organized by Center of Fundamental Research and Particle Physics of National Research Nuclear University ''MEPhI''. The aim of the Conference is to promote contacts between scientists and development of new ideas in fundamental research. We bring together experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical aspects of nuclear, particle, astroparticle physics and cosmology. The conference covers a wide range of topics such as accelerator physics, (astro) particle physics, cosmic rays, cosmology and methods of experimental physics - detectors and instruments. These directions are unified by development of the Standard Model (SM) which is evidently not complete. There are deviations from the Standard Model - neutrino oscillations, the dark matter existence. Together with strong interactions, they are main subjects of the Conference. New results from LHC collider as well as its future upgrade are discussed with the Higgs as the main point for discussion. Substantial development of experimental tools for astrophysical observations and new results from cosmic ray experiments is one of the main subjects of the conference. Various aspects of strong interaction are discussed. Among them: Charmonium and Bottomonium states, Flavor physics at Super B factories, Exotic Nuclei in Astrophysics. Another subject for discussion is the neutrino physics, promising and unique way to get new knowledge. In this content, several talks on BOREXINO experiment where new results in neutrino oscillations are presented. Special session is devoted to PAMELA experiment - 9 years in orbit and to the future GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with following main scientific goals: indirect dark matter origin study by the gamma-ray astronomy methods, discrete astrophysical sources observations, diffuse background γ-emission analysis, investigation of high energy γ-emission from GRBs and other astrophysical objects including Sun, explore of high energy e-e+ fluxes, research of high energy light nuclei fluxes. Several talks concern the cosmic ray physics with high energy muons in large volume detectors - IceCube, NEVOD are among them. Also γ-quanta and charged particles generation in astrophysical sources and planets magnetospheres were discussed in the frameworks of Cosmic Rays subsection. Cosmological problems such as an origin and features of the dark matter, space reionization, smallness of the cosmological constant and black hole origin are discussed at the theoretical section of the conference. Special workshops are devoted to NEVOD experiment, Pamela Experiment, SiPM and Electronics.

  18. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics (TROIA'11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2012-03-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'11 was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 22-25 August 2011. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. Its aim was to bring together the experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 60 participants from 12 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: Chiral Perturbation Theory QCD Sum Rules Effective Field Theory Exotic Hadrons Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD Experimental Results and Future Perspectives Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and the afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks and poster presentations. The speakers of the invited talks were: D Melikhov, M Nielsen, M Oka, E Oset, S Scherer, T T Takahashi and R Wanke. The conference venue was a resort hotel near Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient town of Troia and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Kadir Utku Can, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 13 February 2012 The Editors Güray Erkol Ayşe Küçükarslan Altuğ Özpineci Conference photograph

  19. PREFACE: Part II of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter; Jochemsen, Reyer

    2009-03-01

    This Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series forms Part II of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. Part II contains the papers of short oral and poster presentations. In addition, it provides general information about the LT25 conference, such as a Report from the Organizers, an Activity Report to the IUPAP of the C5 Chairs, an overview of Committees, Sponsors and Exhibitors, and some Conference Statistics. Part I of the Proceedings of LT25 is a special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. It contains the majority of the special invited lectures, such as the London Prize Lectures, the IUPAP Young Scientist Award Lectures, the Plenary and Half Plenary and Public Lectures, and the Historical Lectures presented at the conference excursion to Leiden. The JPCM LT25 special issue is available for free for a period of one year from publication (Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter). To ensure the high publication standard mandated by Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Journal of Physics: Conference Series, every paper was reviewed by at least one referee before it was accepted for publication. The Editors are indebted to many colleagues for invaluable assistance in the preparation and with the reviewing of the 900 papers appearing in Parts I and II of these Proceedings. In particular, we like to thank Carlo Beenakker, Jeroen van den Brink, Hans Brom, Jos de Jongh, Horst Rogalla, and Fons de Waele. Guest Editors Peter Kes and Reijer Jochemsen Leiden University, The Netherlands Conference logo

  20. PREFACE: NUBA Conference Series 1: Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boztosun, I.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kucuk, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The international conference series ''NUBA Conference Series 1: Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics'' was held on September 14-21 2014 in Antalya-Turkey. Akdeniz University hosted the conference and the Adrasan Training and Application Centre was chosen as a suitable venue to bring together scientists from all over the world as well as from different parts of Turkey. The conference was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBìTAK) and Akdeniz University Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center (NUBA). Based on the highly positive remarks received from the participants both during and after the conference, we believe that the event has proven to be a fulfilling experience for all those who took part. The conference provided an opportunity for the participants to share their ideas and experiences in addition to exploring possibilities for future collaborations. Participants of the conference focused on: • Nuclear Structure and Interactions • Nuclear Reactions, • Photonuclear Reactions and Spectroscopy • Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics • Nuclear Processes in Early Universe • Nuclear Applications • New Facilities and Instrumentation Participants included a number of distinguished invited speakers. There was significant interest from the international nuclear physics community and numerous abstracts and papers were submitted. The scientific committee conducted a careful and rigorous selection process, as a result of which 75 contributions were accepted. Of those, 65 of them were given as oral and 10 as poster presentations. The superb quality of the papers ensured fruitful discussion sessions. We thank all the participants for their efforts and also for promptly sending in their papers for publication. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series was peer-reviewed by expert referees and we also thank them for peer-reviewing the papers. The national and international advisory committee also deserve appreciation for their involvement in the shaping of the conference programme. The local organizing committee, Mesut Karakoç, Haris Djapo, Fatih Ozmen and Deniz Kaya worked diligently and ensured that the programme ran smoothly. We sincerely thank them all. Our final thanks go to IOP for publishing the proceedings in a most timely and meticulous manner. We hope to see the participants again in Turkey, in the second conference of this series.

  1. Planning Facilities for Physically Handicapped Children. Fifth Annual Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. School Planning Lab.

    The conference report on planning usable, accessible educational facilities for physically handicapped (orthopedically, visually, and aurally impaired) children features guidelines for eliminating indoor and outdoor architectural barriers. In developing and evaluating the guidelines, the Tennessee School Planning Laboratory analyzed plans of other…

  2. PREFACE: International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilling, Jens

    2011-09-01

    The International Nuclear Physics Conference 2010 (INPC 2010) was held from 4-9 July in Vancouver, Canada, hosted by TRIUMF, the Canadian National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics. The INPC is the main conference in the field of nuclear physics, endorsed and supported by IUPAP (International Union for Pure and Applied Physics) and held every three years. This year's conference was the 25th in the series and attracted over 750 delegates (150 graduate students) from 43 countries. The conference's hallmark is its breadth in nuclear physics; topics included structure, reactions, astrophysics, hadronic structure, hadrons in nuclei, hot and dense QCD, new accelerators and underground nuclear physics facilities, neutrinos and nuclei, and applications and interdisciplinary research. The conference started with a public lecture 'An Atom from Vancouver' by L Krauss (Arizona), who gave a broad perspective on how nuclear physics is key to a deeper understanding of how the Universe was formed and the birth, life, and death of stars. The conference opened its scientific plenary program with a talk by P Braun-Munzinger (GSI/EMMI Darmstadt) who highlighted the progress that has been made since the last conference in Tokyo 2007. The presentation showcased theoretical and experimental examples from around the world. All topics were well represented by plenary sessions and well attended afternoon parallel sessions where over 250 invited and contributed talks were presented, in addition to over 380 poster presentations. The poster sessions were among the liveliest, with high participation and animated discussions from graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. Many opportunities were found to connect to fellow nuclear physicists across the globe and, particularly for conferences like the INPC which span an entire field, many unexpected links exist, often leading to new discussions or collaborations. Among the scientific highlights were the presentations in the fields of Hot and Dense QCD reporting on experimental and theoretical progress at the RHIC facility. The Nuclear Reactions session provided highlights from the many new and exciting facilities including the RIKEN RIBF in Japan, and an outlook of what we can expect from FAIR (Germany) and FRIB (USA). The quest towards the 'Island of Stability' for the Superheavy Element community is still on, and new progress was reported with the identification of element 114. Impressive progress in the theoretical sector, in particular with ab-initio approaches, was presented as well. Applications of these methods and progress in the nucleon-nucleon interactions were presented in the Nuclear Structure session, where 3-body forces interactions are now considered state of the art. Predictions of such calculations can then be tested by experiments, as presented, for example, for ground state properties of exotic nuclei with laser experiments and ion trap measurements. In-beam or in-flight experiments pave the way to even more exotic isotopes where new magic numbers for the nuclear shell model are appearing. This will also prove relevant for Nuclear Astrophysics, where significant progress was achieved experimentally with new direct capture reaction measurements with rare beams and background suppressed facilities located in underground laboratories. Neutron star research and new modeling results of core-collapse supernovae were presented, which clearly indicated the need for neutrino interactions. Neutrinos also played a large role in other sessions such as the New Facilities and Instrumentation session where, among other new exciting projects, the deep underground facilities were presented. The first beam results from long-baseline oscillation experiments showed progress in this field, and double-beta decay experiments are nearing their first possible results, something that the community of nuclear physicists, but also others, are keenly waiting for. The Standard Model Tests and Fundamental Symmetries session is always one of the conference highlights. There, progress on Standard Model tests employing atomic nuclei or nuclear physics methods - which are used to probe complimentary sectors to large particle physics experiments, for example atomic and neutron EDM experiments - is reported. Recent progress was reported in the sector of nuclear beta decay as related to the testing of the CKM unitarity matrix, as well as the W-mass and the Weak Mixing Angle. The muon anomalous magnetic moment and its sensitivity for probing new physics and future experimental improvements are anticipated and showcase the activity in the field. The large oral and poster presentation program was extended to include special presentations by the IUPAP young scientist award winners. This prize is given out in the field of nuclear physics every three years during the INPC conference, and this year's winners were: Kenji Fukushima (Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University), Peter Mueller (Argonne National Laboratory), and Lijuan Ruan (Brookhaven National Laboratory). These three scientists represent future excellence in nuclear physics in the fields of theoretical QCD, experimental techniques related to quark gluon plasma, and precision experiments in low energy nuclear halo physics. One keenly anticipated presentation, 'The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen experiment', presented the results of the measurement of the proton rms charge radius. These results claimed a 5 sigma deviation from the established CODATA-value and in the future more tests will be needed to verify these findings. INPC 2010 made a special effort to attract many graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to the conference. This was achieved by a number of efforts, for example, TRIUMF combined its traditional summer school with the US National Science Foundation summer school for nuclear physics, and offered the school directly prior to the conference. This allowed the school to recruit some of the INPC delegates as lecturers, but also gave a broad overview of the field of nuclear physics before the conference. In addition INPC 2010 teamed up with the publishing house of Nuclear Physics A to provide awards to the best student oral presentation and the three top poster presentations at the conference. An international panel of judges together with members from the editorial board of Nuclear Physics A finally decided on the following award winners among a very strong field of applicants: P Finlay (Guelph, Canada), oral presentation; Y J Kim (Indiana, USA), E Rand (Guelph, Canada), and T Brunner (Munich, Germany) for posters. A treat of a different kind was in store for delegates at the conference banquet at the Museum of Anthropology. Olivia Fermi, the granddaughter of nuclear physics 'royalty' Enrico Fermi, was among the guests and shared in the after-dinner speech some anecdotes from her life growing up in the Fermi household. This, together with the unique setting of the museum of First Nations' artefacts and art pieces and overlooking the Pacific Ocean and the skyline of Vancouver, was a perfect fit for a very special conference. The field of nuclear physics clearly presented itself in a healthy and dynamic state, with many young people eagerly anticipating the advent of new experiments, theory, and facilities. At the end of the conference IUPAP announced the selection of the host of the next INPC conference: it will be held in 2013 in Florence, Italy. On behalf of the Local Organizing Committee we would like to acknowledge the great work of the Program Committee and the Session Chairs, who were responsible for the excellent selection and execution of the Parallel Session Program, the International Advisory Program and the work for the Plenary Session selections, and the judges for the Student Awards. Moreover, we would like to acknowledge the support of TRIUMF as the host and main organizer of the conference. Additional support was provided by the Canadian Institute for Nuclear Physics and the International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Very grateful acknowledgments go to the many volunteers and student helpers who ensured the frictionless and seamless execution of a very fruitful and exciting conference. We wish the organizers of the next INPC in Florence the best of luck and we hope to see you there. On behalf of the Local Organizing Committee Jens Dilling (Chair of INPC 2010)

  3. Third International Satellite Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The aim of the Conference is to present the latest advances in Mathematical Methods to researchers, post-docs and graduated students acting in the areas of Physics of Particles and Fields, Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics. Topics: Methods of Spectral and Group Theory, Differential and Algebraic Geometry and Topology in Field Theory, Quantum Gravity, String Theory and Cosmology. http://www.uel.br/eventos/isc/

  4. INTRODUCTION: Trends in Physics EPS-7: Proceedings of the Seventh General Conference of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åberg, T.; Stenholm, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Seventh General Conference of the European Physical Society "Trends in Physics" was held in Finland, August 10-14, 1987. The conference sites were the Finlandia Hall in Helsinki and the Helsinki University of Technology in Espoo. Seventy-five plenary and invited talks were presented together with about hundred and forty posters. In this special issue we have been able to include the majority of the plenary and invited talks. They cover a large area of contemporary physics from cosmology to biophysics. In addition a section has been devoted to the role of physics in our human society. In our compilation of the papers we have not attempted to follow the organisation of the conference, but the contributions are arranged so that the readers can find their way through the material in as easy a way as we have been able to achieve. We are very grateful to the authors for their contributions to these Proceedings, which in many ways reflect the exciting progress physics has made during recent years. It is, of course, impossible to cover all aspects of the development of physics in a five days conference. Nevertheless after having had access to all the manuscripts we feel that the international programme committee did an excellent job. This successful result was achieved largely through the efforts of the Program Committee Chairman, Professor Klaus Dransfeld. We think that it is a remarkable achievement of the European Physical Society to run these general physics conferences, where physicists representing widely diverse fields can meet and discover that they still share a common language.

  5. PREFACE: 4th International Hadron Physics Conference (TROIA'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağ, Hüseyin; Erkol, Güray; Küçükarslan, Ayşe; Özpineci, Altuğ

    2014-11-01

    The 4th International Conference on Hadron Physics, TROIA'14, was held at Canakkale, Turkey on 1-5 July 2014. Ozyegin University, Middle East Technical University, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and HadronPhysics2 Consortium sponsored the conference. It aimed at bringing together the experts and the young scientists working on experimental and theoretical hadron physics. About 50 participants from 10 countries attended the conference. The topics covered included: . Chiral Perturbation Theory . QCD Sum Rules . Effective Field Theory . Exotic Hadrons . Hadron Properties from Lattice QCD . Experimental Results and Future Perspectives . Hadronic Distribution Amplitudes The conference presentations were organized such that the morning sessions contained invited talks and afternoon sessions were devoted to contributed talks. The speakers of the invited talks were: C. Alexandrou, A. Gal, L. Tolos, J.R. Pelaez and M. Schindler. We had also guest speakers D. A. Demir and T. Senger. The conference venue was a resort hotel around Canakkale. As a social program, a guided full-day excursion to the excavation site of the ancient Troia town and Assos was organized. We believe that this conference provided a medium for young scientists and experts in the field to effectively communicate and share ideas. We would like to express our sincere thanks to supporting agencies and to all participants for their contributions and stimulating discussions. We are also grateful to the Scientific Secretary, Bora Işıldak, and all other members of the Organizing Committee for their patience and efforts. 30.10.2014 The Editors

  6. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they

  7. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they…

  8. PREFACE: 15th Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskii, Grigorii; Averkiev, Nikita

    2013-08-01

    The fifteenth Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy PhysicA.SPb was held 23-24 October 2012 in Saint-Petersburg, Russia. The Conference continues the tradition of Saint-Petersburg Seminars on Physics and Astronomy originating from the mid-90s. The main feature of PhysicA.SPb since then, remains the combination of both scientific and educational quality of the contributions delivered to the young audience. This feature makes it possible to combine the whole spectrum of modern Physics and Astronomy within one conference. PhysicA.SPb 2012 has brought together more than 150 students, young scientists and their professors from many universities and research institutes across Russia, as well as from Belarus, Ukraine, Finland, France and the United Kingdom. Oral and poster presentations were combined into a few well-defined sections among which one should name Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics of semiconductors, Physics of solid state, Physics and technology of the alternative energetics, Nanostructured and thin-film materials, THz and UHF materials and devices, and Physics of the quantum-sized structures. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series presents the extended contributions from participants of PhysicA.SPb 2012 that were peer-reviewed by expert referees through processes administered by the Presiders of the Organising and Programme Committees to the best professional and scientific standards. Grigorii S. Sokolovskii and Nikita S. Averkiev Editors

  9. PREFACE: 17th Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb/2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkiev, Nikita S.; Poniaev, Sergey A.; Sokolovskii, Grigorii S.

    2015-12-01

    The seventeenth Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb) was held from 28-30 October 2014 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The Conference continues the tradition of Saint Petersburg Seminars on Physics and Astronomy originating from the mid-1990s. Since then PhysicA.SPb maintains both the scientific and educational quality of contributions delivered to the young audience. This is the main feature of the Conference that makes it possible to combine the whole spectrum of modern Physics and Astronomy within one event. PhysicA.SPb/2014 has brought together more than 200 students, young scientists and their professor colleagues from many universities and research institutes across the whole of Russia as well as from Belarus, Ukraine, Finland, the Netherlands, France and Germany. Oral and poster presentations were combined into the well-defined sections of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Optics and spectroscopy, Physics of ferroics, Nanostructured and thin-film materials, Mathematical physics and numerical methods, Biophysics, Plasma physics, hydro- and aero-dynamics, and Physics of quantum structures. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series presents the extended contributions from participants of PhysicA.SPb/2014 that were peer-reviewed by expert referees through processes administered by the Presiders of the Organising and Programme Committees to the best professional and scientific standards.

  10. PREFACE: 16th Russian Youth Conference on Physics and Astronomy (PhysicA.SPb/2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-12-01

    The sixteenth Russian Conference on Physics and Astronomy PhysicA.SPb was held 23-24 October 2013 in Saint-Petersburg, Russia. The Conference continues the tradition of Saint-Petersburg Seminars on Physics and Astronomy originating from mid-90s. Since then PhysicA.SPb maintains both scientific and educational quality of contributions delivered to the young audience. This is the main feature of the Conference that makes it possible to combine the whole spectrum of modern Physics and Astronomy within one event. PhysicA.SPb/2013 has brought together about 200 students, young scientists and their colleague professors from many universities and research institutes across whole Russia as well as from Belarus, Ukraine, Switzerland, Turkey, Finland and France. Oral and poster presentations were combined into a few well-defined sections among which one should name Astronomy and Astrophysics, Plasma physics, hydro- and aero-dynamics, Physics of quantum-sized structures, Nanostructured and thin-film materials, Biophysics, THz and UHF materials and devices, Optoelectronic devices, Optics and spectroscopy, Atomic and elementary particles physics, Defects and impurities in solid state, Physics and technology of the alternative energetics. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series presents the extended contributions from participants of PhysicA.SPb/2013 that were peer-reviewed by expert referees through processes administered by the Presiders of the Organising and Programme Committees to the best professional and scientific standards. The Editors: Nikita S. Averkiev, Sergey A. Poniaev and Grigorii S. Sokolovskii

  11. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan C.

    2013-09-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they had begun the post-secondary career at a TYC. Nine percent of the physics undergraduate seniors in 2007 had started their college education at a TYC, and these students differ significantly from those who did not start at a TYC. The two graphs at right depict the high school physics experience for these two groups of students. More than one-fourth of those who started at a TYC did not take physics in high school, and only 18% took AP physics. The 6% of those who did not start at a TYC and did not take physics is consistent with the 5% of high school seniors who attend a school where physics is not offered. Their apparent difference of interest in physics in high school is also evident from their knowledge about AP physics offerings: 25% of those who started at a TYC did not know if AP physics was offered at their high school versus only 5% of those who did not start at a TYC. Since their high school physics experiences were so different, it is likely that something happened in their physics courses at the TYC that captured these students' interest in physics.

  12. PREFACE International Conference on Theoretical Physics Dubna-Nano 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury

    2010-11-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics 'Dubna-Nano2010' was held on 5-10 July 2010, at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The previous conference of this series was at Dubna in 2008. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (graphene, nanotubes, fullerenes), quantum dots, quantum transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, modelling, applications and perspectives. Approximately 120 scientists from 26 countries participated in the conference. The program included 63 oral talks and 70 posters. The 62 contributions are included in these proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference indeed successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about 'Dubna-Nano2010' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano10. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  13. PREFACE: IUPAP C20 Conference on Computational Physics (CCP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troparevsky, Claudia; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly, computational physics stands alongside experiment and theory as an integral part of the modern approach to solving the great scientific challenges of the day on all scales - from cosmology and astrophysics, through climate science, to materials physics, and the fundamental structure of matter. Computational physics touches aspects of science and technology with direct relevance to our everyday lives, such as communication technologies and securing a clean and efficient energy future. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains the proceedings of the scientific contributions presented at the 23rd Conference on Computational Physics held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, USA, in November 2011. The annual Conferences on Computational Physics (CCP) are dedicated to presenting an overview of the most recent developments and opportunities in computational physics across a broad range of topical areas and from around the world. The CCP series has been in existence for more than 20 years, serving as a lively forum for computational physicists. The topics covered by this conference were: Materials/Condensed Matter Theory and Nanoscience, Strongly Correlated Systems and Quantum Phase Transitions, Quantum Chemistry and Atomic Physics, Quantum Chromodynamics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics, Nuclear and High Energy Physics, Complex Systems: Chaos and Statistical Physics, Macroscopic Transport and Mesoscopic Methods, Biological Physics and Soft Materials, Supercomputing and Computational Physics Teaching, Computational Physics and Sustainable Energy. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), IUPAP Commission on Computational Physics (C20), American Physical Society Division of Computational Physics (APS-DCOMP), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Defect Physics (CDP), the University of Tennessee (UT)/ORNL Joint Institute for Computational Sciences (JICS) and Cray, Inc. We are grateful to the committees that helped put the conference together, especially the local organizing committee. Particular thanks are also due to a number of ORNL staff who spent long hours with the administrative details. We are pleased to express our thanks to the conference administrator Ann Strange (ORNL/CDP) for her responsive and efficient day-to-day handling of this event, Sherry Samples, Assistant Conference Administrator (ORNL), Angie Beach and the ORNL Conference Office, and Shirley Shugart (ORNL) and Fern Stooksbury (ORNL) who created and maintained the conference website. Editors: G Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) and M Claudia Troparevsky (UT) http://ccp2011.ornl.gov Chair: Dr Malcolm Stocks (ORNL) Vice Chairs: Adriana Moreo (ORNL/UT) James Guberrnatis (LANL) Local Program Committee: Don Batchelor (ORNL) Jack Dongarra (UTK/ORNL) James Hack (ORNL) Robert Harrison (ORNL) Paul Kent (ORNL) Anthony Mezzacappa (ORNL) Adriana Moreo (ORNL) Witold Nazarewicz (UT) Loukas Petridis (ORNL) David Schultz (ORNL) Bill Shelton (ORNL) Claudia Troparevsky (ORNL) Mina Yoon (ORNL) International Advisory Board Members: Joan Adler (Israel Institute of Technology, Israel) Constantia Alexandrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus) Claudia Ambrosch-Draxl (University of Leoben, Austria) Amanda Barnard (CSIRO, Australia) Peter Borcherds (University of Birmingham, UK) Klaus Cappelle (UFABC, Brazil) Giovanni Ciccotti (Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza', Italy) Nithaya Chetty (University of Pretoria, South Africa) Charlotte Froese-Fischer (NIST, US) Giulia A. Galli (University of California, Davis, US) Gillian Gehring (University of Sheffield, UK) Guang-Yu Guo (National Taiwan University, Taiwan) Sharon Hammes-Schiffer (Penn State, US) Alex Hansen (Norweigan UST) Duane D. Johnson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, US) David Landau (University of Georgia, US) Joaquin Marro (University of Granada, Spain) Richard Martin (UIUC, US) Todd Martinez (Stanford University, US) Bill McCurdy (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US) Ingrid Mertig (Martin Luther University, Germany) Alejandro Muramatsu (Universitat Stuttgart, Germany) Richard Needs (Cavendish Laboratory, UK) Giuseppina Orlandini (University of Trento, Italy) Martin Savage (University of Washington, US) Thomas Schulthess (ETH, Switzerland) Dzidka Szotek (Daresbury Laboratory, UK) Hideaki Takabe (Osaka University, Japan) William M. Tang (Princeton University, US) James Vary (Iowa State, US) Enge Wang (Chinese Academy of Science, China) Jian-Guo Wang (Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, China) Jian-Sheng Wang (National University, Singapore) Dan Wei (Tsinghua University, China) Tony Williams (University of Adelaide, Australia) Rudy Zeller (Julich, Germany) Conference Administrator: Ann Strange (ORNL)

  14. The 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics: Making progress in the number of women in physics around the world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Beth

    2015-04-01

    A short report on the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP) will be presented. In particular, a summary of the structure of the 5th ICWIP that occurred in Waterloo, Canada in August 2014 will be provided and placed into context of the previous four conferences. In addition, a synopsis of the recent efforts that are happening around the world to encourage girls and women to participate in physics will be given. Several US projects have been very successful in introducing girls to science and physics (e.g., ``Expanding Your Horizons'' intervention) and encouraging undergraduate women physics majors to continue into physics careers (e.g., Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics). Projects from other countries, such as the Juno Project in the UK that rates physics departments on their climate for women, might be implemented by US physics professional societies as well as colleges and universities. Several projects originating from the conference will be described: the new ``HERstories: Encouraging words from women in physics'' video based on interviews with delegates of the Conference, the My STEM Story project (http://mystemstory.wlu.ca), and the proceedings of the conference. Partial support provided by NSF #PHY-1419453.

  15. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntorad, Jan; Lokajicek, Milos

    2010-11-01

    The 17th International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held on 21-27 March 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing experience and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. Recent conferences were held in Victoria, Canada 2007, Mumbai, India in 2006, Interlaken, Switzerland in 2004, San Diego, USA in 2003, Beijing, China in 2001, Padua, Italy in 2000. The CHEP'09 conference had 600 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited oral presentations, a number of parallel sessions comprising 200 oral and 300 poster presentations, and an industrial exhibition. We thanks all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Components, Tools and Databases, Hardware and Computing Fabrics, Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies, Distributed Processing and Analysis and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to Prague and other Czech cities and castles and a banquet held at the Zofin palace in Prague. The next CHEP conference will be held in Taipei, Taiwan on 18-22 October 2010. We would like thank the Ministry of Education Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic and the EU ACEOLE project for the conference support, further to commercial sponsors, the International Advisory Committee, the Local Organizing Committee members representing the five collaborating Czech institutions Jan Gruntorad (co-chair), CESNET, z.s.p.o., Prague Andrej Kugler, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR v.v.i., Rez Rupert Leitner, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics Milos Lokajicek (co-chair), Institute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague Vojtech Petracek, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering and especially the Programme Committee for their careful choice of conference contributions and their enormous work with organization of 340 post conference proceedings paper review Ludek Matyska (chair), CESNET Online Computing Volker Gülzow, DESY Jiri Masik, University of Manchester/on leave from Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague Event Processing Elizabeth Sexton-Kennedy, FNAL Tomas Davidek, Charles University, Prague Software Components, Tools and Databases Paolo Calafiura, LBNL Julius Hrivnac, LAL Track 4 Hardware and Computing Fabrics Takashi Sasaki, KEK Jiri Chudoba, Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies Francesco Giacomini, CERN Ales Krenek, Masaryk University, Brno/CESNET Distributed Processing and Analysis Latchezar Betev, CERN Simon Lin, ASGC, Taipei Dagmar Adamova, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Prague Collaborative Tools Eva Hladka, Masaryk University, Brno/CESNET Thank you to all who made CHEP'09 a success. Jan Gruntorad and Milos Lokajicek CHEP'09 Conference Chairs Prague, March 2010 The PDF and HTML files contain a list of all CHEP'09 contributions.

  16. Optics and communication technology major of physics undergraduate degree at King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranasiri, Prathan

    2014-09-01

    A physics undergraduate degree major in optics and communication technology has been offered at King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang (KMITL), Bangkok, Thailand. There are nine required three credit hour courses including two laboratory courses plus a number of selections in optics and communication based technology courses. For independent thinking and industrial working skills, nine credit hours of research project, practical training or overseas studies are included for selection in the final semester. Students are encouraged to participate in international conferences and professional organizations. Recently the program, with support from SPIE and OSA, has organized its first international conference on photonic solutions 2013 (ICPS 2013).

  17. PREFACE: International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. N.; Mishra, A.; Dutta, A. K.; Sen, P.

    2012-05-01

    The International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP2012) took place in Indore, India, on 4-5 February 2012. The conference was hosted by the School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001. The objective of the conference was to provide a platform for interaction among scientists, teachers, researchers and students, and to share their ideas, thoughts and scientific findings in various areas of physics. ICRTP2012 attracted a total of 130 abstracts submitted by scientists from 7 different countries. The conference included an inaugural talk and 13 Invited talks. Aside from regular oral contributions, 118 posters were presented. A particular highlight of the conference was a special session for oral presentations by young PhD students. The aim of this session was to provide a platform for the budding scientists to present their recent findings in the presence of their community. The two best oral presentations, judged by a special three-member committee, were awarded prizes. Similarly the two best posters, judged by a committee of five experts, were also awarded prizes. It is our pleasure to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee and Local Organizing Committee for their invaluable help, especially for their proposals for invited talks. A total of 82 papers were submitted to be considered for publication and 59 papers were accepted for inclusion in the proceedings. All the papers were reviewed, and we wish to thank to all the referees for their support. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for their financial support of the organization of ICRTP2012. Support from Marketing Centre (India), Indore and Transolutions, Indore is also appreciated. Finally, we express our sincere thanks to our university administration for their continuous support. Special thanks go to all the faculty members, administrative staff and students of the School of Physics for their tireless efforts in organizing ICRTP2012. Indore, 30 April 2012 Shashank N. Kane Ashutosh Mishra Anup Kumar Dutta Pratima Sen Guest Editors School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001, India *e-mail address: kane_sn@yahoo.com

  18. PREFACE: The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhemery, Alain; Saffari, Nader; Aristegui, Christophe

    2009-11-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 8th annual meeting at Arcachon in France, between 8 to 10 December 2008. This series of meetings is a successful collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. First established in 2001, the aim of this annual conference is to provide a forum where the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France are reviewed. AFPAC alternates between venues in the UK and France and the format has been designed to be 'small and friendly'. The conference attracts the main research leaders in the two countries and likes to encourage research students in particular to have their debut presentations at this event. Every year the organisers also invite a number of keynote speakers who are leading international authorities in their fields. For the meeting in Arcachon, the invited speakers included Dame Anne Dowling of Cambridge University, Anthony Kent of Nottingham University, Michel Bruneau of Université du Maine, Richard Hazelwood, Jérôme Vasseur of Institut d'Electronique, de Micro électronique et de Nanotechnologie and Michel Castaings of Laboratoire de Mécanique Physique of Université Bordeaux 1. The scope of the conference is kept intentionally wide so as to encourage cross-fertilisation of ideas across different application areas in the field of Physical Acoustics. Presentations in the past have covered non-destructive evaluation and material characterisation, medical ultrasound, underwater acoustics and ultrasonic sensors. This is the first time the proceedings of AFPAC are being published in the event's history and the participants were invited to submit manuscripts for publication. As a result there are 9 peer reviewed papers from a total of 34 that were presented at the meeting. In view of the high standard of refereeing that the editors have applied to the received manuscripts, it is hoped that in future years the number of papers submitted for publication in the conference proceedings will grow. Alain Lhemery Nader Saffari Christophe Aristegui

  19. Experiences that influence a student's choice on majoring in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbin, Donya Rae

    Currently the production of college graduates with science and engineering degrees is insufficient to fill the increasing number of jobs requiring these skills. This study focuses on physics majors with an in-depth examination of student transitions from high school to college. Many different areas of influence could affect a student's decision to major in physics. The first phase of this study addresses all of the potential areas of influence identified from the literature. The goal was to identify common influences that might be used to increase students' interest in majoring in physics. Subjects (N=35) from the first phase were recruited from physics majors at diverse Michigan colleges and universities. The second phase of this study explored, in more depth, important areas of influence identified in the first phase of the study. Subjects (N=94) from the second phase were recruited from diverse colleges and universities in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. The interviews were also conducted via email. Approximately half of the students in the study decided to major in physics while still in high school. Their reasons relate to many of the areas of influence. For example, high school physics teachers were cited as a strong influence in many students' decisions to major in physics. Influential physics teachers were described as being helpful, encouraging and interesting. The teachers also need to be their students' number one cheerleader and not their number one critic. Some areas of influence were found to be different for males vs. females. A high percentage of all physics majors had influential adults with careers in physical or biological science fields. This percentage was even larger for female physics majors. Female students also showed a greater initial interest in astronomy than the male students. Thus, high school and college physics teachers should seek to expose students to science-related careers and adults with these careers. Astronomy is also an important and often over looked entry into physics.

  20. Proceedings. The National Conference on Testing: Major Issues. November 17 & 18, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossone, Richard M., Ed.; Weiner, Max, Ed.

    Educational testing and its uses have come under increasing criticism as they are used more and more for decision making--to determine student tracking assignments, college admission, personnel selection, and licensing policies. The papers from this conference, which discussed the major issues in testing, include: (1) Testing: A Parent's Point of

  1. 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Bytsenko, A. A.; Guimarães, M. E. X.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    The 7th International Conference on Mathematical Methods in Physics took place in the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), Rio de Janeiro - RJ, Brazil, from 16 to 20 April 2012, and was jointly organized by the following Institutions: Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas (CBPF/MCT), The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP, Italy), Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e Aplicada (IMPA, Brazil), The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS, Italy) and The Scuola Internazionale di Studi Avanzati (SISSA,Italy). The Organizing Committees were composed by: E. ABDALLA (USP, Brazil), L. BONORA (SISSA, Italy), H. BURSZTYN (IMPA, Brazil), A. A. BYTSENKO (UEL, Brazil), B. DUBROVIN (SISSA, Italy), M.E.X. GUIMARÃES (UFF, Brazil), J.A. HELAYËL-NETO (CBPF, Brazil). Advisory Committee: A. V. ASHTEKAR (Penn State University, U.S.A.), V. M. BUCHSTABER (Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), L. D. FADDEEV (St. Petersburg Dept. of Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russia), I. M. KRICHEVER (Columbia Univ., U.S.A./ Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), S. P. NOVIKOV (Univ. of Maryland, U.S.A./Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, Russia), J. PALIS (IMPA, Brazil), A. QADIR (National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan), F. QUEVEDO (ICTP, Italy), S. RANDJBAR-DAEMI (ICTP, Italy), G. THOMPSON (ICTP, Italy), C. VAFA (Harvard University, U.S.A.). The Main Goal: The aim of the Conference was to present the latest advances in Mathematical Methods of Physics to researchers, young scientists and students of Latin America in general, and Brazil in particular, in the areas of High Energy Physics, Cosmology, Mathematical Physics and Applied Mathematics. The main goal was to promote an updating of knowledge and to facilitate the interaction between mathematicians and theoretical physicists, through plenary sessions and seminars. This Conference can be considered as a part of a network activity in a special effort to encourage the formation of Regional and International scientific networks and professional societies. The ultimate ambition of the coordinated activity is to provide top level postgraduate (PhD) formation in an environment of high standard research in various fields of Physics, on the model of the School for Advanced Studies (SISSA). The Program: The Conference program was designed in order to provide an ample time for debates and discussions among the participants and included plenary talks (1 hour each) and a number of short seminars (30 minutes each) given by Brazilian and foreign researchers. There were also discussion sessions involving the participants, encouraging them to open debates on the themes of the Conference, as well as a “Round Table" (on prospectives in mathematics in South America) with discussions on a possible future investigations in theoretical and mathematical physics. Closing Sessions: Prof. R. C. SHELLARD (CBPF, Vice Director), Prof. G. MARTINELLI (SISSA, Italy), Prof. L. BONORA (SISSA, Italy), Prof. A. A. BYTSENKO (UEL, Local Chairman), R. COQUEREAUX (CPT, France). The organizers would like to thank the participants, who made this Conference a rare opportunity for the younger and experienced researchers present in this event to acquire new and precious knowledge. Thanks are also due to the contributors, who with their articles will surely make this Proceedings a living experience. Sponsors: This event has been co-sponsored by ICTP, TWAS, SISSA, CBPF, IMPA, FAPERJ and FAPESP. L. BONORA, A. A. BYTSENKO, M. E. X. GUIMARÃES, J. A. HELAYËL-NETO The Proceedings were Edited by: L. BONORA, A. A. BYTSENKO, M. E. X. GUIMARÃES and J. A. HELAYËL-NETO

  2. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2013-11-03

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  3. How to double the number of undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Sacha

    2015-03-01

    Many colleges and universities around the country have a solid physics program that prepares students bound for graduate physics study. For a variety of reasons, the number of students choosing to major in physics may be small, typically <1% of the student body. When compared to other majors, this population is experiencing negligible growth. I will describe a campaign launched while at the University of Texas at Austin aimed at recruiting and retention of majors. This campaign includes actual programmatic changes in the curriculum and instruction of majors. Additionally, it includes a direct marketing campaign that attempted to change student attitudes about physics and its relation to their current major. Finally, it includes a program to reach out to local high schools and engage students in a discussion about their career choices before they apply for college. I will share some numerical and attitudinal data that suggests positive changes in the student population.

  4. EDITORIAL: XXVI IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (CCP2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, A. W.; Campbell, D. K.; Coker, D. F.; Tang, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The 26th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics, CCP2014, was held in Boston, Massachusetts, during August 11-14, 2014. Almost 400 participants from 38 countries convened at the George Sherman Union at Boston University for four days of plenary and parallel sessions spanning a broad range of topics in computational physics and related areas. The first meeting in the series that developed into the annual Conference on Computational Physics (CCP) was held in 1989, also on the campus of Boston University and chaired by our colleague Claudio Rebbi. The express purpose of that meeting was to discuss the progress, opportunities and challenges of common interest to physicists engaged in computational research. The conference having returned to the site of its inception, it is interesting to recect on the development of the field during the intervening years. Though 25 years is a short time for mankind, computational physics has taken giant leaps during these years, not only because of the enormous increases in computer power but especially because of the development of new methods and algorithms, and the growing awareness of the opportunities the new technologies and methods can offer. Computational physics now represents a ''third leg'' of research alongside analytical theory and experiments in almost all subfields of physics, and because of this there is also increasing specialization within the community of computational physicists. It is therefore a challenge to organize a meeting such as CCP, which must have suffcient depth in different areas to hold the interest of experts while at the same time being broad and accessible. Still, at a time when computational research continues to gain in importance, the CCP series is critical in the way it fosters cross-fertilization among fields, with many participants specifically attending in order to get exposure to new methods in fields outside their own. As organizers and editors of these Proceedings, we are very pleased with the high quality of the papers provided by the participants. These articles represent a good cross-section of what was presented at the meeting, and it is our hope that they will not only be useful individually for their specific scientific content but will also represent a historical snapshot of the state of computational physics that they represent collectively. The remainder of this Preface contains lists detailing the organizational structure of CCP2014, endorsers and sponsors of the meeting, plenary and invited talks, and a presentation of the 2014 IUPAP C20 Young Scientist Prize. We would like to take the opportunity to again thank all those who contributed to the success of CCP214, as organizers, sponsors, presenters, exhibitors, and participants. Anders Sandvik, David Campbell, David Coker, Ying Tang

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Theoretical Physics: Dubna-Nano 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury M.

    2012-11-01

    The International Conference 'Dubna-Nano2012' was held on 9-14 July 2012 at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The conference was the third one in the series started in 2008. 'Dubna-Nano2012' provided an opportunity for presentations and discussions about theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: graphene and other carbon nanostructures, topological insulators, quantum transport, quantum dots, atomic clusters, Josephson junctions and applications of nanosystems. About 100 scientists from 22 countries participated in the conference. The program included 38 oral talks and 39 posters. This volume contains 35 contributions. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee Professors K S Novoselov, T Ando, T Chakraborty, J Fabian, V M Galitski, F Guinea, M Z Hasan, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, R Kleiner, T Koyama, Yu I Latyshev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G. Reinhard, J M Rost and A Ya Vul. Financial support from BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Further information about 'Dubna-Nano2012' is available on the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano12. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  6. The pre-pharmacy major: A survey of physics requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Richard P.

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of 81 colleges of pharmacy affiliated with the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy regarding physics requirements for the pre-pharmacy major. Responses include number of semesters required, credit hours, student majors in the course, and mathematical basis. Strengths and weaknesses as reported by the college representatives are also presented. Their comments are used to point to needed changes in the pre-professional physics course.

  7. Design Conference for the Evaluation of the Talent Search Program: Synthesis of Major Themes and Commissioned Papers Prepared for the Conference (Washington, D.C., September 30, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This report gathers papers prepared for a design conference for the evaluation of the Federal Talent Search Program, an early intervention program to identify gifted and talented financially needy students and connect them with discretionary grants for higher education. An introductory paper synthesizes major conference themes. These include: (1)…

  8. Why Do We Need 10,000 Physics Majors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2009-03-01

    The early 1960's saw a huge increase in the number of physics majors, reaching an all time peak of just over 6000 per year. While the number plummeted in the next four decades, it has finally experienced a resurgence to nearly this number. The American Physical Society along with the American Association of Physics Teachers recently endorsed a call to double the number of undergraduate physics majors over the next decade. The main focus of this effort is to increase both the number of high school physics teachers and the fraction of women and under-represented minorities studying physics. In addition, a physics degree prepares an undergraduate with excellent skills that will serve her or him for a variety of occupations both in the sciences and in other fields. This talk will explore some of the data on physics majors and the rationale for taking the bold step of suggesting we try and educate 10,000 majors each year. Sputnik helped catalyze the nation 50 years ago -- What is the Sputnik of today? Bring your thoughts and questions... we hope for a lively discussion.

  9. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference: Exposition Topical Areas 1-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhim

    2002-11-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This CP (conference proceeding) is a compilation of the abstracts, presentations, and posters presented at the conference.

  10. Recruiting and Retaining Physics Majors at Brigham Young University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, R. Steven

    2001-04-01

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Brigham Young University has had a steadily increasing number of graduates over the past ten years during a period of national decline in undergraduate physics majors. I will discuss what we do in our department to attract and retain majors. In particular I will highlight orientation activities, advisement, promoting student-student interactions, faculty mentoring, undergraduate research, teaching emphasis, and department culture. We have assessed the effectiveness of our recruiting and retention efforts by looking at profiles of our students and surveys of current and former students. The majors come to us well prepared, with high school GPA's (3.6) and natural science ACT scores (30) that have remained fairly constant over a recent five year period. Most say they chose physics because it was interesting or they thought it would fulfill a desire to understand the world or universe better. About half of the students decided to major in physics in primary or secondary school. One fifth selected physics as their major during their first year of college. The principle reasons current students gave for remaining in physics included a continuing interest in the subject, relationships with faculty, a satisfaction with meeting the challenge, and achieving personal goals. Alumni report positive or very positive experiences in the classroom (88%), in discussions and associations with faculty (81%), and in discussions and associations with other students (87%). About half the students plan to go into graduate physics programs after graduation. The rest are principally planning on graduate school in other disciplines, industrial or government employment, physics teaching, or professional schools.

  11. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin (Texas Tech University), Weidong Li (IHEP) 3) Readout techniques - Gerald Eigen (University of Bergen), Zheng Wang (IHEP) 4) Operating calorimeters and calibration - Marat Gataullin (CERN), Francesco Lanni (BNL) 5) Future calorimetry - Tohru Takeshita (Shinshu University), Lei Xia (Argonne National Laboratory) 6) Astrophysics and neutrino calorimetry - Giuliana Fiorillo (INFN), Hiro Tajima (SLAC) List of Participants AKCHURIN, NuralTexas Tech University AN, ZhenghuaIHEP AUFFRAY, EtiennetteCERN BANFI, DaniloUniversità degli Studi di Milano, INFN BASHARINA-FRESHVILLE, AnastasiaUniversity College London BEAUCHEMIN, Pierre-HuguesUniversity of Oxford BENAGLIA, Andrea DavideUniversity of Milano - Bicocca and INFN BIAN, JianminIHEP BIINO, CristinaINFN BILKI, BurakUniversity of Iowa BLAHA, JanLAPP BOUDRY, VincentLLR / CNRS-IN2P3 CAI, XiaoIHEP CAPONE, AntonioPhysics Department University "La Sapienza" and INFN CAVALLARI, FrancescaCERN and INFN Rome CECCHI, ClaudiaUniversity di Perugia e INFN CHANG, JinfanIHEP CHEN, HuchengBrookhaven National Laboratory CHILDERS, TaylorUniversität Heidelberg - Kirchhoff-Institut für Physik DAO, ValerioGeneva University - DPNC DE LA TAILLE, ChristopheIN2P3/OMEGA-LAL DIEMOZ, MarcellaINFN Roma DOTTI, AndreaCERN EIGEN, GeraldUniversity of Bergen EPIFANOV, DenisBudker Institute of Nuclear Physics FAIVRE, JulienLPSC Grenoble France FANG, JianIHEP FANG, ShuangshiIHEP FANTONI, AlessandraINFN - LNF FERRI, FedericoCEA/Saclay Irfu/SPP FERRONI, FernandoSapienza University & INFN Roma FISK, Henry EugeneFermilab GABALDON, CarolinaCERN GARUTTI, ErikaDESY GAUDIO, GabriellaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia GILLBERG, DagCarleton University GIOVANNINI, PaolaMax-Planck-Institut für Physik GLAZOV, AlexanderDESY GRACHOV, OlegUniversity of Kansas HAPPACHER, FabioINFN HE, MiaoIHEP HORI, YasutoUniversity of Tokyo, CNS HU, TaoIHEP HULTH, Per-OlofStockholm University JUN, Soon YungCarnegie Mellon University JURK, StefanISEG Spezialelektronik gmbH KAVATSYUK, MyroslavKVI, University of Groningen KHRAMOV, EvgenyJoint Institute for Nuclear Research KISTENEV, EdouardBrookhaven National Laboratory KUO, Chia MingNCU KWON, YoungilYonsei University LAKTINEH, ImadIPNL LECOQ, PaulCERN LI, ChengUniversity of Science and Technology of China LI, NingboNanJing Normal University & IHEP LI, WeidongIHEP LI, WeiguoIHEP LIU, ChunxiuIHEP LIU, LijiaoUniversity of Bergen, Norway LIVAN, MicheleDipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, University di Pavia , Italy LU, JunguangIHEP LUBRANO, PasqualeINFN Sezione di Perugia MACHIKHILIYAN, IrinaLAPP, Annecy, France MAVROMANOLAKIS, GeorgiosCERN MILLER, David WSLAC and Stanford University NECESAL, PetrInstitute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i. NEMECEK, StanislavFZU AVCR Praha NIESS, ValentinLPC, Clermont (CNRS/IN2P3) NOVOTNY, Rainer W2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen, Germany OBERLACK, HorstMPI für Physik, Munich PARA, AdamFermilab PARAMATTI, RiccardoINFN Rome & CERN PEPE, MonicaINFN Perugia POSPELOV, GennadyMax-Planck-Institut für Physik REPOND, JoseArgonne National Laboratory ROSSETTI, ValerioIFAE - Barcelona SCHACHT, PeterMPI/Munich SEFKOW, FelixDESY SFYRLA, AnnaCERN SGUAZZONI, GiacomoINFN Section of Florence SIMON, FrankMax-Planck-Institute for Physics SIMONYAN, MargarNiels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University SPADARO, TommasoLNF INFN SUN, XileiIHEP TAKESHITA, TohruShinshu University TANG, ZeboUniversity of Science and Technology of China TAPAN, IlhanUludag University THEOFILATOS, KonstantinosETH Zurich THOMSON, MarkUniversity of Cambridge TOKUNO, HisaoDepartment of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Engineering TRONCON, ClaraINFN UOZUMI SatoruKyungpook National University USAI, GiulioUniversity of Texas at Arlington VAZQUEZ GOMEZ, RicardoUniversitat de Barcelona VIDEAU, HenriLLR - Ecole polytechnique VOLOBOUEV, IgorTexas Tech University WAN, RenzhuoIOPP-CCNU, Wuhan, China & IPHC-CNRS, Strasbourg, France WANG, ZhengIHEP WANG, ZhigangIHEP WENZEL, HansFermilab WIGMANS, RichardTexas Tech University WILKENS, HenricCERN XIA, LeiArgonne National Laboratory XIE, YuguangIHEP YE, JingboSMU YETKIN, TaylanUniversity of Iowa YIN, ZhongbaoHuazhong Normal University YU, BoxiangIHEP ZHANG, AiwuIHEP ZHANG, HuaqiaoCentre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (CPPM) ZHANG, LiyuanCaltech ZHANG, QingminIHEP ZHANG, YunlongUniversity of Science and Technology of China ZHENG, YanghengGUCAS ZHU, RenyuanCaltech

  12. Summary of the Conference "The Physics of Evolved Stars"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, O.

    2015-12-01

    Olivier Chesneau was an astronomer of many talents. His expertise was on optical and infrared interferometry. Olivier*s tool of choice, the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), allowed him to see solutions to open questions in stellar astrophysics. These visions led to collaborations with experts in each of the fields where VLTI observations could be useful. As a result Olivier was a man in the middle of a phenomenal network of astronomers, collaborators and friends. I am fortunate to have been one of them. In this contribution I summarise the conference "Physics of Evolved Stars", held in Nice in June 2015 in memory of Olivier. The conference neatly showcased the science that Olivier had been involved with during his life and laid out the advancements that were made thanks in great part to him and to the collaborations he started. Without doubt his bubbly, happy personality, child-like in a way, made him the perfect connector bringing the technique, the questions and the experts in diverse fields together. Dear to all who worked with him, he was truly the little prince of Astronomy. We shall miss him every day.

  13. Qualitative Twitter analysis of participants, tweet strategies, and tweet content at a major urologic conference

    PubMed Central

    Borgmann, Hendrik; Woelm, Jan-Henning; Merseburger, Axel; Nestler, Tim; Salem, Johannes; Brandt, Maximilian P.; Haferkamp, Axel; Loeb, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The microblogging social media platform Twitter is increasingly being adopted in the urologic field. We aimed to analyze participants, tweet strategies, and tweet content of the Twitter discussion at a urologic conference. Methods: A comprehensive analysis of the Twitter activity at the European Association of Urology Congress 2013 (#eau2013) was performed, including characteristics of user profiles, engagement and popularity measurements, characteristics and timing of tweets, and content analysis. Results: Of 218 Twitter contributors, doctors (45%) were the most frequent, ahead of associations (15%), companies (10%), and journals (3%). However, journals had the highest tweet/participant rate (22 tweets/participant), profile activity (median: 1177, total tweets, 1805 followers, 979 following), and profile popularity (follower/following ratio: 2.1; retweet rank percentile: 96%). Links in a profile were associated with higher engagement (p<0.0001) and popularity (p<0.0001). Of 1572 tweets, 57% were original tweets, 71% contained mentions, 20% contained links, and 25% included pictures. The majority of tweets (88%) were during conference hours, with an average of 24.7 tweets/hour and a peak activity of 71 tweets/hour. Overall, 59% of tweets were informative, led by the topics uro-oncology (21%), urologic research (21%), and urotechnology (12%). Limitations include the analysis of a single conference analysis, assessment of global profile and not domain-specific activity, and the rapid evolution in Twitter-using habits. Conclusion: Results of this single conference qualitative analysis are promising for an enrichment of the scientific discussions at urologic conferences through the use of Twitter. PMID:26977205

  14. Co-publication with Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 277

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    This is a co-publication with Journal of Physics: Conference Series volume 277, The 9th International Conference on Photonics and Imaging in Biology and Medicine (PIBM 2010). These conferences were held together from November 2-5, 2010, at Wuhan Science & Technology Convention & Exhibition Center, Wuhan, PR China.

  15. The 2014 Gordon Research Conference: Physics Research & Education: The Complex Intersection of Biology and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Mel; Lang, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The field of biological physics and the physics education of biology and medically oriented students have experienced tremendous growth in recent years. New findings, applications, and technologies in biological and medical physics are having far reaching consequences that affect and influence the science community, the education of future scientists and health-care workers, and the general population. As a result leaders in Physics Education Research have begun to focus their attention on the specific needs of students in the biological sciences, the different ways physicists and biologists view the nature of science and the interactions of scientists in these disciplines. In this poster we highlight some of these findings and pose questions for discussion. The Complex Intersection of Biology and Physics will be the topic of the next Gordon Research Conference on Physics Research and Education to be held in June 2014. The exact date and location are still to be determined.

  16. Proceedings of the Fourth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This conference presents information to the scientific community on research results, future directions, and research opportunities in microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena within NASA's microgravity research program. The conference theme is "The International Space Station." The conference publication consists of the full Proceedings of the 4th Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference on CD-ROM, containing full papers presented at the conference. Ninety papers are presented in 21 technical sessions, and a special exposition session presents 32 posters describing the work of principal investigators new to NASA's program in this discipline. Eighty-eight papers and 25 posters are presented in their entirety on the CD-ROM.

  17. PREFACE: EPS Euroconference XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference: New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    It was with great pleasure that the Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics of the University of Pavia and the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) Structure of Pavia organised the XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the European Physical Society, which was held in the historical buildings of the University of Pavia from 5-9 September 2005. The Conference was devoted to the discussion of the most recent experimental and theoretical achievements in the field of Nuclear Physics applications, as well as of the latest developments in technological tools related to Nuclear Physics research. The University of Pavia has a long tradition in Physics and in Applied Physics, being the site where Alessandro Volta developed his "pila", the precursor of the modern battery. This is the place where the first experiments with electricity were conducted and where the term "capacitance" used for capacitors was invented. Today the University hosts a Triga Mark II nuclear reactor, which is used by the Departments of the University of Pavia and by other Universities and private companies as well. Moreover, Pavia is the site selected for the construction of the CNAO complex "Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica" (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy), planned for 2005-2008 which represents a unique facility in Italy and will be among the first complexes of this type in Europe. The Conference has gathered together experts in various fields from different countries and has been the occasion to review the present status and to discuss the new emerging trends in Nuclear Physics and its applications to multidisciplinary researches and the development of new technologies. The following topics were treated: Nuclear Techniques in Medicine and Life Sciences (Cancer Therapy, new Imaging and Diagnostics Tools, Radioisotope production, Radiation Protection and Dosimetry). Applications of Nuclear Techniques in Art, Archaeometry and other Interdisciplinary fields. Role of Nuclear Techniques in Environment Problems. Applications of Nuclear Techniques relevant for Civil Security (contraband and explosive detection, search for Weapons of Mass Destruction, Nuclear Safeguards). Nuclear Applications in Space Research. Material and Structure Testing in Research and Industry. New contributions of Nuclear Techniques to the solution of the Energy Production problems and Nuclear Waste Transmutation. Emerging experimental techniques, new detectors and new modeling tools. During the Monday morning Session of the Conference, the 2005 IBA-EUROPHYSICS PRIZE for Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine, sponsored by the Belgian company IBA, was awarded to the two laureates Werner Heil (Mainz) and Pierre Jean Nacher (Paris) for the development of spin polarized 3He targets by optical pumping and their applications in nuclear science and medicine. The meeting was a real success, with 18 invited talks, 66 contributed talks and 31 posters and an overall participation, during five full days, of around 150 scientists from different European and non-European countries. It also hosted a three day industrial exhibition of a selection of Companies that sponsored the event. The Organisers take thos opportunity to thank the University of Pavia, the Amministrazione Comunale di Pavia and the Provincia di Pavia, as well as all exhibitors (Ametek, Ansaldo Superconduttori, Caen, Else, Hamamatsu, IBA, Micos, Micron Semiconductor), for their support of the Conference. The Organisers finally wish to thank the Scientific Secretary of the Conference, Dr Andrea Fontana of INFN Pavia, for the huge amount of work done in preparing the Conference, Mr Claudio Casella of the Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics of the University of Pavia for technical support and the Conference staff, Dr Gaia Boghen and the graduate students Federica Devecchi and Silvia Franchino, for their invaluable help. The very effective and professional work of the staff of PRAGMA Congressi, who took charge of all the administrative and accommodation procedures, is also acknowledged. The Local Organizing Committee (Pavia, January 2006)

  18. 12th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 12th annual meeting in Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France, from 16th to 18th January 2013. This series of meetings is a collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. This year, attendees got the opportunity to see the French Riviera with its Mediterranean vegetation covered by a nice thick snow layer. The participants heard 34 excellent oral presentations and saw 3 posters covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects and of frequencies, from ultrasonic wave propagation in chocolate to metamaterials applied to seismic waves for protecting buildings. Among them, invited talks were given by Pr F A Duck ( Enhanced healing by ultrasound: clinical effects and mechanisms), Pr. J-C Valiére, who actually gave two invited talks ( 1. Measurement of audible acoustic particle velocity using laser: Principles, signal processing and applications, 2. Acoustic pots in ancient and medieval buildings: Literary analysis of ancient texts and comparison with recent observations in French churches), Dr P Huthwaite ( Ultrasonic imaging through the resolution of inverse problems), Dr X Lurton ( Underwater acoustic systems on oceanographic research vessels: principles and applications), Dr S Guenneau ( From platonics to seismic metamaterials). For the fifth consecutive year AFPAC is followed by the publication of its proceedings with 12 peer-reviewed papers which cover the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France. Alain Lhémery (CEA, France) and Nader Saffari (UCL, United Kingdom) French Riviera 12th AFPAC — Villa Clythia, Fréjus (French Riviera), the 17th of January 2013

  19. The Pre-Pharmacy Major: A Survey of Physics Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Richard P.

    2001-01-01

    Presents the results of a survey of (n=81) colleges of pharmacy affiliated with the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) regarding physics requirements for the pre-pharmacy major. Describes strengths and weaknesses as reported by the college representatives. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  20. MAJOR DETECOTRS IN ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS - May 1985 Suppl.

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1985-05-01

    This report is the second edition of a loose-leaf compendium of the properties and performance characteristics of the major detectors of elementary particle physics. This introduces the second edition of the LBL-91 Supplement 'Major Detectors in Elementary Particle Physics.' For some detectors the update merely documents minor modifications or provides additional references. Others have undergone major rebuilding or have been augmented with new subsystems. The new LEP, SLC, TRISTAN, BEPC, and FNAL detectors have had their designs fixed and are now under construction. Some detectors have completed their programs since the last edition and so are omitted. The use of colored loose-leaf paper should allow users to maintain a historical record of each detector. We again thank those physicists working with each detector who took the time to summarize its properties and supply us with the appropriate drawings.

  1. Proceedings of the conference on numerical methods in high temperature physics

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, R.E.; Holm, D.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1988-11-01

    These proceedings contain full papers presented at the Los Alamos Conference on High Temperature Physics. This conference discussed many aspects of high temperature physics including hydrodynamics, radiation and particle transport and some computational issues important for efficient calculations. The meetings was held between researchers from Los Alamos and the French Commissariat a L'Energy Atomique (CEA).

  2. 2012 CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS OF GRAPHITIC CARBON MATERIALS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 17-22, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Herbert

    2012-06-22

    This conference will highlight the urgency for research on graphitic carbon materials and gather scientists in physics, chemistry, and engineering to tackle the challenges in this field. The conference will focus on scalable synthesis, characterization, novel physical and electronic properties, structure-properties relationship studies, and new applications of the carbon materials. Contributors

  3. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    The 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics took place in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, on 7th--11th July 2003. It was jointly organized by the Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, the St Petersburg State Polytechnical University and Technical University Applied Physics Ltd, on behalf of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society (EPS). The members of the local organizing committee were drawn from these institutions: B Kuteev, Chair, Polytechnical University S Lebedev, Vice-Chair, Ioffe Institute A Lebedev, Scientific Secretary, Ioffe Institute V Bakharev, TUAP Ltd V Grigor'yants, Ioffe Institute V Sergeev, Polytechnical University N Zhubr, Ioffe Institute Over the years, the annual conference of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society has widened its scope. Contributions to the present conference covered widely diversified fields of plasma physics, ranging from magnetic and inertial fusion to low temperature plasmas. Plasma sizes under investigation ranged from tiny to astronomical. The topics covered during the conference were distributed over the following categories: tokamaks, stellarators, high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement, alternative magnetic confinement, plasma edge physics, plasma heating and current drive, diagnostics, basic plasma physics, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas and low temperature plasmas. The scientific programme and paper selection were the responsibility of the Programme Committee appointed by the Board of the EPS Plasma Physics Division. The committee was composed of: R Koch, Chairman, ERM/KMS Brussels, Belgium E Ascasibar, CIEMAT Madrid, Spain S Atzeni, Università di Roma, Italy G Bonhomme, LPMI Nancy, France C Chiuderi, Università di Firenze, Italy B Kuteev, St Petersburg State Polytechnical,University, Russian Federation M Mauel, Contact person APS-DPP, Columbia University New York, USA R A Pitts, EPFL/CRPP Lausanne, Switzerland R Salomaa, Helsinki University, Finland B Sharkov, ITEP Moscow, Russian Federation V Smirnov, Kurchatov Institute Moscow, Russian Federation W Suttrop, IPP Garching, Germany C Varandas, IST Lisbon, Portugal F Wagner, Chair EPS-PPD, IPP Greifswald, Germany H R Wilson, UKAEA Abingdon, UK This committee selected 30 invited talks, in which the speakers were asked to address the general audience of plasma physicists and to exert their didactic skills. Out of the contributed papers, in total, 92 oral presentations were selected and distributed over parallel topical sessions. The other contributed papers (743) were presented as posters. The conference was attended by more than 700 participants from 41 countries. A major event during the conference was the award of the Hannes Alfv\\'en Prize to Professor V E Fortov who gave a spectacular lecture on non-ideal plasmas. The associated paper is included in this special issue. Following the tradition of this conference series, four-page summaries of the contributed papers are published as the Europhysics Conference Abstracts series, volume 27A. The publication is in the form of a CD-ROM sent free of charge to all participants and is also accessible via the website: http://www.ioffe.ru/EPS2003/. This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion contains papers of the invited talks at this conference. These papers have been assessed according to the standards of the journal and examined by referees selected from or by the members of the International Programme Committee. We are proud to provide, in this special issue, an overview of the forefront research in all major fields of plasma physics, through a set of papers accessible to the general audience of plasma physicists. The selection of this set of papers has been the work of the Programme Committee, and we would like to express our gratitude to all of its members for this successful selection. We are grateful to all authors for their efforts in providing high quality papers combining didactic introductions and accurate reports on recent developments in their field, a combination not always easy to realize. We would also like to thank all authors and referees for doing their work in due time, despite occasional short notice. Finally, we would also like to thank Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion for the continuing support of this conference series.

  4. WELCOME SPEECH: EPS Euroconference XIX Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference: New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    2006-06-01

    Ladies and gentlemen, On behalf of the European Physical Society it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Conference: NEW TRENDS IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS APPLICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY This is the 19th International Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the Nuclear Physics Board of the EPS. It is a relatively new experience for the Board to support a Conference in an area so closely linked to applications and technology. I am therefore very pleased to see such a good response to the initiative of Professor Scannicchio and his local Organizing Committee under Professor Zenoni's Chairmanship. I would like to take this opportunity to say a few words about the EPS Nuclear Physics Board. The Board consists of 18 people (10 elected plus up to 10 co-opted) from across Europe, with me as Chair. Elections by members of the Division are held if there is competition for a vacancy, which is announced in Europhysics News. The Board exchanges observers with NuPECC. The Board has 3 major activities: 1. Divisional Scientific Meetings of which this is one. There are usually two per year, but this year there are three. Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics 2 (NPA2), Debrecen, Hungary, 16 20 May 2005. This conference, New Trends in Nuclear Physics Applications and Technology, Pavia, 5 9 September 2005. "Sandanski 3" Co-ordination Meeting in Nuclear Science organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, and the Institute for Nuclear Research and Energy, Sofia, which will be held in Albena, Bulgaria, 25 September to 2 October 2005. This grew out of two earlier meetings in 1995 and 2001 in Sandanski, Bulgaria. The aim of these meetings was to foster and support scientific collaborations in nuclear physics between eastern and western European countries. 2. The Board awards two prizes, usually in alternate years: The Lise Meitner Prize for outstanding contributions in the field of Nuclear Science. The 2004 recipients were Bent Herskind and Peter Twin for their pioneering work on rapidly spinning nuclei, in particular the discovery of super-deformed bands. The IBA-Europhysics Prize for Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine. The 2004 prize was awarded to Guy Demortier. The 2005 recipients are Werner Heil and Pierre Jean Nacher for the development of spin polarized 3He targets and their application to nuclear science and medicine. This prize will be presented later this morning by the Chair of the Awards Committee, Professor Christiane Leclerq-Willain. 3. Other Board activities include: To maintain a watching brief on Nuclear Energy developments through the preparation of a regularly up-dated position paper. Public Awareness of Nuclear Science (PANS) activities in collaboration with NuPECC. To encourage new initiatives for Nuclear Theory cooperation in Europe. To keep informed of major developments in Europe, e.g., the creation of a European Research Council. To foster the maintenance of nuclear physics expertise and education in Europe. More details of most of these activities can be found on our web site, which includes information about all the meetings we sponsor, our prizes and minutes of Board Meetings. If you are interested in contributing in any way to the Board's work, I urge you to join the European Physical Society as an Individual Member and give the Nuclear Physics Division as your special interest. The International Programme Committee under Professor Viesti's Chairmanship are to be congratulated for putting together what looks like a very wide ranging and exciting programme. I wish you all a scientifically rewarding and enjoyable five days!

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallet, Jean-Christophe

    2008-03-01

    The `International Conference on Noncommutative Geometry and Physics' was held on 23-27 April 2007 at the Laboratoire de Physique Théorique d'Orsay located at the Université Paris-Sud 11 campus. It brought together about 70 scientists, either mathematicians or physicists, actively working on the most recent aspects of noncommutative geometry, with a particular emphasis on some promising applications of noncommutative geometry in physics. The present volume involves most of the invited talks given by leading experts in the related areas of mathematics or physics and may therefore provide a view of the state of the art in this rapidly evolving domain. The talks covering the mathematical aspects either focused on recent new results or on reviews of some useful tools of noncommutative geometry, such as for instance deformation quantizations or derivation-based differential calculus. Other talks were centered on noncommutative field theories (NCFT). NCFT is now one of the main organized attempts to go beyond the present formulation of fundamental physics, aiming in particular at the elaboration of mathematical tools that may be used in the construction of a consistent theory of quantum gravity at the Planck scale. Two other such organized attempts are string theory and loop gravity. NCFT is now witnessing exciting developments, either on various classical aspects or in the recent construction of new renormalizable field theories, in particular those defined on the so-called noncommutative Moyal-Weyl space that seems to be related to some regime of string theory. The corresponding talks covered new developments related e.g. to solvable models, instantons or solitons, applications of spectral triples including a reformulation of the standard model, new results on renormalization group flow properties of interesting NCFT on Moyal spaces together with progress on renormalization of gauge theories on these spaces. The talks were completed by a poster session aiming at triggering further exchange between participants. It is a pleasure to thank M Dubois-Violette, H Grosse, O Lechtenfeld, J Magnen and V Rivasseau for their perfect organization creating a stimulating atmosphere and to gratefully acknowledge financial support from Agence Nationale pour la Recherche under grant ANR NT05-3-43374 `GENOPHY', Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire de Physique Théeorique d'Orsay and CNRS. Jean-Christophe Wallet

  6. Physical size associations to offensive performance among major league leaders.

    PubMed

    Crotin, Ryan L; Forsythe, Charles M; Karakolis, Thomas; Bhan, Shivam

    2014-09-01

    Minimal work has studied physical size effects on statistical performance among Major League players. In this study, longitudinal, bivariate, and regression analyses studied the impact of physical size on offensive baseball statistics within a homogeneous talent sample of Major League batting leaders. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from heights and weights that were publicly available to form a statistical database of 4,360 offense leaders from 1950 to 2010. Repeated-measures analysis of variances examined differences in anthropometrics and baseball statistics between each decade from 1950 to 2010. Bivariate correlation and linear regression analyses evaluated BMI as an independent variable of influence, where all tests applied an a priori significance level (p ≤ 0.05). After 1980, offensive performance increased (p ≤ 0.05) concurrent to body mass and BMI growth (p < 0.001). During the 1960s, only batting average and on-base plus slugging percentages were found statistically decreased (p ≤ 0.05). All baseball statistics were positively correlated and predicted by BMI (p < 0.001). Consideration to covariant factors is required in data interpretation, yet nonetheless, our results showed physical size (BMI) to positively influence Major League offensive statistics. Over the 60-year period, greater body weight-to-height proportions owed to improved competitive performance, which suggests greater emphasis on hypertrophic stimuli in training and nutrition, as well as selection of larger professional baseball prospects. PMID:24875425

  7. Conference report. Interview: Dr. Fred Sai. Programme expansion "a major advance".

    PubMed

    Hamand, J

    1994-01-01

    The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) scored quite a success in winning the inclusion of the improvement of women's status and the need for human resource development as part of the population dimension. It was also agreed in program terms that reproductive health is the main basis from which to proceed in family planning. The abortion debate was good in that it raised the conference profile through the world's media and forced people to consider and discuss the dangers of unsafe abortion. Overall, the program of action remains essentially unchanged from the document which came forth from New York. Abortion was not legalized everywhere, but the message was sent that something must be done to reduce the extent of unsafe abortions because they are damaging women's lives and health. Although there was not much talk about the environment, the ICPD scored big by getting its participants to agree that it is not only population pressure, but also consumption, lifestyle, and industrialization policies which are causing major environmental problems. The consumption patterns of both the North and the South must change. New approaches to development are also needed if environmental destruction is to be contained. When it came to the discussion of who would pay the program of action's bill, the US and Japan were exemplary in their failure to back down. Both countries are prepared to back their policies and the conference draft with funding and technical expertise. The Europeans were far less forthcoming. Finally, on the issue of migration, families must not be separated and documented migrants should be allowed to have their families join them in their country of employment. PMID:12319120

  8. Physics Majors in the US: Trends and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2015-03-01

    The number of undergraduate physics majors has doubled over the last 15 years, with more growth in sight. In that same time period the total number of PhDs awarded as well as those earned by domestic students has seen a similar rise. The picture is not so rosy when we look at underrepresented groups including women, and minority students. Nevertheless, we are now educating record numbers of physics students. This talk will explore some of the underlying issues, and present evidence for why some of these trends are present. Part of the discussion will include implications for physics programs. How big can programs become? What changes might be needed? What do we sacrifice, and what do we gain as a discipline? Will our new graduates get jobs? Bring your questions and thoughts to the discussion.

  9. Report from the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeland, Emily E.; Murphy, N.; Jang-Condell, H.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Third IUPAP (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics) International Conference on Women in Physics was held in Seoul, South Korea from October 8-10, 2008 with 283 participants from 57 countries. Topics discussed included personal and professional development, attracting girls to physics, site visits for assessing and improving the climate for women, fundraising and leadership, and organizing women in physics working groups. Resolutions unanimously passed by the conference assembly recommend (1) the formation of additional regional or national working groups for women in physics, (2) promotion of site visits as an effective tool for improving the climate of the physics workplace, (3) increased professional development opportunities and outreach activities associated with conferences, and (4) a global survey of physicists in 2009 to assess the status of women in physics. See http://www.icwip2008.org/ for the text of the resolutions and the conference program. In this poster, AAS members who participated will report on this conference as well as resolutions from the first (Paris, 2002) and second (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) conferences. The next IUPAP Conference on Women in Physics is expected to occur in South Africa in 2011.

  10. Biological Physics major as a means to stimulate an undergraduate physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Herbert; Eid, Khalid; Yarrison-Rice, Jan

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to stress the cross-disciplinary nature of modern physics we added a Biological Physics major. Drawing from coursework in physics, biology, chemistry, mathematics, and related disciplines, it combines a broad curriculum with physical and mathematical rigor in preparation for careers in biophysics, medical physics, and biomedical engineering. Biological Physics offers a new path of studies to a large pool of life science students. We hope to grow our physics majors from 70-80 to more than 100 students and boost our graduation rate from the mid-teens to the mid-twenties. The new major brought about a revision of our sophomore curriculum to make room for modern topics without sidelining fundamentals. As a result, we split our 1-semester long Contemporary Physics course (4 cr hrs) into a year-long sequence Contemporary Physics Foundations and Contemporary Physics Frontiers (both 3 cr hrs). Foundations starts with relativity, then focuses on 4 quantum mechanics topics: wells, spin 1/2, oscillators, and hydrogen. Throughout the course applications are woven in whenever the opportunity arises, e.g. magnetism and NMR with spin 1/2. The following semester Frontiers explores scientific principles and technological advances that make quantum science and resulting technologies different from the large scale. Frontiers covers enabling techniques from atomic, molecular, condensed matter, and particle physics, as well as advances in nanotechnology, quantum optics, and biophysics.

  11. Major detectors in elementary-particle physics. [Portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    With the 1983 issue of LBL-91 we introduce a supplement - a folio of descriptions of the world's major elementary particle physics detectors. Modern high energy physics usually involves the use of massive, costly, carefully engineered, large solid angle detectors. These detectors require a long lead time for construction, are often integrated with an accelerator, accumulate data over many years, and are in reality a combination of numerous subsystems. As was the case with bubble chambers, many experiments are performed with the same data, or with data taken after relatively minor changes or additions to the detector configuration. These experiments are often reported in journals whose space limitations make repeated full descriptions of the detector impossible. The detailed properties and performance of the detector are usually described in a fragmented series of papers in more specialized, technologically oriented journals. New additions are often not well documented. Several detectors often make similar measurements and physicists want to make quick comparisons of their respective capabilities. Designers of new large detectors and even of smaller experiments need to know what already exists and what performance has been achieved. To aid the physics community, the Particle Data Group has produced this brief folio of the world's major large detectors. This first edition has some notable omissions: in particular, the bubble chambers and any associated spectrometers, and the still somewhat tentative LEP, SLC, and TRISTAN detectors.

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at New York University on 21- 25 May 2012. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the High Energy and Nuclear Physics community and related scientific and technical fields. The CHEP conference provides a forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18-month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, the Americas and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Taipei, Taiwan (2010); Prague, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, United States (2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000). CHEP 2012 was organized by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and co-sponsored by New York University. The organizational structure for CHEP consists of an International Advisory Committee (IAC) which sets the overall themes of the conference, a Program Organizing Committee (POC) that oversees the program content, and a Local Organizing Committee (LOC) that is responsible for local arrangements (lodging, transportation and social events) and conference logistics (registration, program scheduling, conference site selection and conference proceedings). There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 125 oral and 425 poster presentations and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Distributed Processing and Analysis on Grids and Clouds, Computer Facilities, Production Grids and Networking, Software Engineering, Data Stores and Databases and Collaborative Tools. We would like to thank Brookhaven Science Associates, New York University, Blue Nest Events, the International Advisory Committee, the Program Committee and the Local Organizing Committee members for all their support and assistance. We also would like to acknowledge the support provided by the following sponsors: ACEOLE, Data Direct Networks, Dell, the European Middleware Initiative and Nexsan. Special thanks to the Program Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing the conference proceedings. The next CHEP conference will be held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands on 14-18 October 2013. Conference Chair Michael Ernst (BNL) Program Committee Daniele Bonacorsi, University of Bologna, Italy Simone Campana, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Canal, Fermilab, United States Sylvain Chapeland, CERN, Switzerland Dirk Düllmann, CERN, Switzerland Johannes Elmsheuser, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany Maria Girone, CERN, Switzerland Steven Goldfarb, University of Michigan, United States Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, United States Benedikt Hegner, CERN, Switzerland Andreas Heiss, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany Peter Hristov, CERN, Switzerland Tony Johnson, SLAC, United States David Lange, LLNL, United States Adam Lyon, Fermilab, United States Remigius Mommsen, Fermilab, United States Axel Naumann, CERN, Switzerland Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Rolf Seuster, TRIUMF, Canada Local Organizing Committee Maureen Anderson, John De Stefano, Mariette Faulkner, Ognian Novakov, Ofer Rind, Tony Wong (BNL) Kyle Cranmer (NYU) International Advisory Committee Mohammad Al-Turany, GSI, Germany Lothar Bauerdick, Fermilab, United States Ian Bird, CERN, Switzerland Dominique Boutigny, IN2P3, France Federico Carminati, CERN, Switzerland Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics, China Peter Clarke, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom Sridhara Dasu, University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States Günter Duckeck, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany Richard Dubois, SLAC, United States Michael Ernst, BNL, United States Ian Fisk, Fermilab, United States Gonzalo Merino, PIC, Spain John Gordon, STFC-RAL, United Kingdom Volker Gülzow, DESY, Germany Frederic Hemmer, CERN, Switzerland Viatcheslav Ilyin, Moscow State University, Russia Nobuhiko Katayama, KEK, Japan Alexei Klimentov, BNL, United States Simon C. Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Milos Lokajícek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic David Malon, ANL, United States Pere Mato Vila, CERN, Switzerland Mauro Morandin, INFN CNAF, Italy Harvey Newman, Caltech, United States Farid Ould-Saada, University of Oslo, Norway Ruth Pordes, Fermilab, United States Hiroshi Sakamoto, University of Tokyo, Japan Alberto Santoro, UERJ, Brazil Jim Shank, Boston University, United States Dongchul Son, Kyungpook National University, South Korea Reda Tafirout, TRIUMF, Canada Stephen Wolbers, Fermilab, United States Frank Wuerthwein, UCSD, United States

  13. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 18-22 October 2010. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18 month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, America and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Prauge, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, California(2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000) CHEP 2010 was organized by Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre. There was an International Advisory Committee (IAC) setting the overall themes of the conference, a Programme Committee (PC) responsible for the content, as well as Conference Secretariat responsible for the conference infrastructure. There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 260 oral and 200 poster presentations, and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases, Distributed Processing and Analysis, Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies, Grid and Cloud Middleware, and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to various attractions in Northern Taiwan, including Sanhsia Tsu Shih Temple, Yingko, Chiufen Village, the Northeast Coast National Scenic Area, Keelung, Yehliu Geopark, and Wulai Aboriginal Village, as well as two banquets held at the Grand Hotel and Grand Formosa Regent in Taipei. The next CHEP conference will be held in New York, the United States on 21-25 May 2012. We would like to thank the National Science Council of Taiwan, the EU ACEOLE project, commercial sponsors, and the International Advisory Committee and the Programme Committee members for all their support and help. Special thanks to the Programme Committee members for their careful choice of conference contributions and enormous effort in reviewing and editing about 340 post conference proceedings papers. Simon C Lin CHEP 2010 Conference Chair and Proceedings Editor Taipei, Taiwan November 2011 Track Editors/ Programme Committee Chair Simon C Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan Online Computing Track Y H Chang, National Central University, Taiwan Harry Cheung, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Event Processing Track Fabio Cossutti, INFN Trieste, Italy Oliver Gutsche, Fermilab, USA Ryosuke Itoh, KEK, Japan Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases Track Marco Cattaneo, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Stefan Roiser, CERN, Switzerland Distributed Processing and Analysis Track Kai-Feng Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan Ulrik Egede, Imperial College London, UK Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Fons Rademakers, CERN, Switzerland Torre Wenaus, BNL, USA Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies Track Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Bernd Panzer-Steindel, CERN, Switzerland Antonio Wong, BNL, USA Ian Fisk, Fermilab, USA Niko Neufeld, CERN, Switzerland Grid and Cloud Middleware Track Alberto Di Meglio, CERN, Switzerland Markus Schulz, CERN, Switzerland Collaborative Tools Track Joao Correia Fernandes, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Galvez, Caltech, USA Milos Lokajicek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic International Advisory Committee Chair: Simon C. Lin , Academia Sinica, Taiwan Members: Mohammad Al-Turany , FAIR, Germany Sunanda Banerjee, Fermilab, USA Dario Barberis, CERN & Genoa University/INFN, Switzerland Lothar Bauerdick, Fermilab, USA Ian Bird, CERN, Switzerland Amber Boehnlein, US Department of Energy, USA Kors Bos, CERN, Switzerland Federico Carminati, CERN, Switzerland Philippe Charpentier, CERN, Switzerland Gang Chen, Institute of High Energy Physics, China Peter Clarke, University of Edinburgh, UK Michael Ernst, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA David Foster, CERN, Switzerland Merino Gonzalo, CIEMAT, Spain John Gordon, STFC-RAL, UK Volker Guelzow, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg, Germany John Harvey, CERN, Switzerland Frederic Hemmer, CERN, Switzerland Hafeez Hoorani, NCP, Pakistan Viatcheslav Ilyin, Moscow State University, Russia Matthias Kasemann, DESY, Germany Nobuhiko Katayama, KEK, Japan Milos Lokajícek, FZU Prague, Czech Republic David Malon, ANL, USA Pere Mato Vila, CERN, Switzerland Mirco Mazzucato, INFN CNAF, Italy Richard Mount, SLAC, USA Harvey Newman, Caltech, USA Mitsuaki Nozaki, KEK, Japan Farid Ould-Saada, University of Oslo, Norway Ruth Pordes, Fermilab, USA Hiroshi Sakamoto, The University of Tokyo, Japan Alberto Santoro, UERJ, Brazil Jim Shank, Boston University, USA Alan Silverman, CERN, Switzerland Randy Sobie , University of Victoria, Canada Dongchul Son, Kyungpook National University, South Korea Reda Tafirout , TRIUMF, Canada Victoria White, Fermilab, USA Guy Wormser, LAL, France Frank Wuerthwein, UCSD, USA Charles Young, SLAC, USA

  14. PREFACE: 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Klein, R.; Schwoerer, M.

    1993-01-01

    The 13th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society was held in conjunction with the Frühjahrstagung des Arbeitskreises Festkörperphysik der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft from March 29 till April 2, 1993, in Regensburg. The programme comprised 3,134 contributions : 8 Plenary Talks, 171 Invited Talks, 1,480 Contributed Talks, 1,441 Poster Presentations, 1 Public Evening Talk and 33 Exhibitors Reports. The abstracts have been published as Europhysics Conference Abstracts, Volume 17A/Verhandlungen der Deutschen Physikalischen Gesellschaft 5/1993. The table (see PDF file) shows the distribution of the Plenary and Invited Speakers as well as of the participants according to countries within and outside of Europe. The conference was the largest meeting of physicists held in Germany to date. It was a manifestation of the enormous scientific activity in both basic and applied research in the fields of Condensed Matter Physics in Europe. Most of the research work, which was presented at the conference, was done by young physicists. They represent a large human capital in Europe. Most of the senior physicists and many of our young colleagues maintain scientific cooperations, and also personal friendships, which are and which have been almost independent of national barriers over the past three decades. The latter is to a large extent due to the European Physical Society which always cultivated these contacts, especially between the eastern and western parts of Europe. We would like to express our sincere thanks to the members of the Programme Committee. By their intensive work, which was free from national interests, a scientific programme was prepared, which covered the entire field of Condensed Matter Physics. About 70% of the Plenary and Invited Speakers came from 20 different foreign countries and about 30% from Germany. The meeting therefore has been a truly European Conference. For the young physicists, the number of which traditionally has been very large, the conference was an excellent opportunity to discuss their own research work and to get an impression of the broad research field in Condensed Matter Physics on an international level and also to cultivate scientific and personal friendships. We also would like to thank the city of Regensburg with their major, Mrs Maier, and the University of Regensburg with its Rektor, Professor Altner, for their overwhelming hospitality, Mr Ernst and his about 60 coworkers for their excellent local organization and Dr. Heinicke and his staff for the production of the abstract book. Finally we would like to thank the members of the Editorial Office of Physica Scripta for the smooth cooperation in the production of these proceedings, which comprise the papers of about 70% of the Plenary and Invited Speakers.

  15. Investigating elementary education and physical therapy majors' perceptions of an inquiry-based physics content course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, John Martin

    This study investigates why physical therapy assistant majors engage and perform better than elementary education majors in an inquiry-based conceptual physics course at Mid-Atlantic Community College. The students from each major are demographically similar, both courses are similar in depth and structure, and each course supports the students' program. However, there is an observed difference in the levels of engagement with the curriculum and performance on writing-based assessments between the two groups. To explore possible explanations for the difference, I examine students' affinity for science, their beliefs about the nature of science and scientific knowledge in the classroom, and their perception of the usefulness of science to their program. During semi-structured interviews, students from both majors displayed nearly identical weak affinities for science, epistemological beliefs, and uncertainty about the usefulness of the class. However, the physical therapy majors' ability to see the relevance of the physics course experience to their program enhanced their interest and motivation. In contrast, the elementary education students do not see connections between the course and their program, and do not see a purpose for their learning of physics content. To improve the program, I propose a two-pronged approach - designing a faded-scaffolded-inquiry approach for both classes, and developing a field-based/seminar class for the elementary education majors. The scaffolded inquiry will help both groups develop better orientations toward lab activities, and the structured observations and reflection will help the elementary group connect the material to their program.

  16. (The 25th international conference on high-energy physics at Singapore)

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1990-08-17

    The traveler attended the 25th International Conference on High-Energy Physics in Singapore, August 1--8, 1990. The conference was dominated by results from the new LEP accelerator at CERN. The precision of the data from LEP is impressive, and all results are consistent with the standard model. No new physics'' has emerged at LEP. The traveler presented a talk on CERN/SPS WA80 results and had several interesting, private discussions on both L* and WA80 topics.

  17. International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015) took place in the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece on June 18-20, 2015 and was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The scope of the conference was to provide a forum on the latest developments in Biomedical Instrumentation and related principles of Physical and Engineering sciences. Scientists and engineers from academic, industrial and health disciplines were invited to participate in the Conference and to contribute both in the promotion and dissemination of the scientific knowledge.

  18. News Competition: Physics Olympiad hits Thailand Report: Institute carries out survey into maths in physics at university Event: A day for everyone teaching physics Conference: Welsh conference celebrates birthday Schools: Researchers in Residence scheme set to close Teachers: A day for new physics teachers Social: Network combines fun and physics Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    Competition: Physics Olympiad hits Thailand Report: Institute carries out survey into maths in physics at university Event: A day for everyone teaching physics Conference: Welsh conference celebrates birthday Schools: Researchers in Residence scheme set to close Teachers: A day for new physics teachers Social: Network combines fun and physics Forthcoming events

  19. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  20. Characterizing the Evolution and Variation of Major Physics Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jennifer; Stewart, John

    2008-04-01

    The linguistic and structural properties of two major physics textbooks are compared. The structure of each textbook is measured and differences in the amount of space, words, and mathematics devoted to different parts of the text are reported. The linguistic richness of each text and each textual part is measured using LEXX. The readability of each textbook is characterized using standard readability formulas. A new readability formula that corrects for mathematics is proposed. The evolution of one of the textbooks over a fifteen year (four versions of the text) time span is also investigated. The reading difficulty of the textbook increased by approximately one-half a grade level over fifteen years. The lexical richness of the textbook also increased over the same period.

  1. 1991 Conference summary on computing in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.

    1991-03-01

    The papers presented at the Conference cover a wide range of important issues in software engineering and management. They indicate a trend toward more use of commercial systems and standards. This trend will likely have a significant influence on plans for future systems.

  2. PREFACE: The XXIII Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jenni; Halzen, Francis; Parke, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Conference logo After Jenni Adams and Stephen Parke organized a very successful Weak Interactions and Neutrino (WIN) meeting at the University of Canterbury near Christchurch, New Zealand in 2002, the idea emerged to organize Neutrino 08 in the same location. Christchurch also happens to be the gateway to Antarctica for the IceCube experiment. This idea was immediately supported by the late George Marx, the spiritual father of these conferences, and by Jack Schneps, whose advice made the organization of the meeting an easier task. We wish to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee and the International Neutrino Commission for their guidance and support. Neutrino 08 coincided with the 100th anniversary of Rutherford's Nobel, an occasion revisited in a talk by Cecilia Jarlskog that is reproduced in this volume. We thank the speakers for their long trip South to attend this a valuable meeting. With few exceptions, these proceedings report their contributions. The talks for which no written version has been submitted can be found at the SLAC e-conf website. We gratefully acknowledge the support of IUPAP and the New Zealand Government through the Ministry of Research, Science and Technology's International Conference fund, as well as the University of Canterbury, the University of Wisconsin (lead institution for the IceCube project), and Fermilab. The Los Alamos National Laboratory contributed to these proceedings. Most importantly, we thank Merrin McAuley and Claire McConchie and their team at the University of Canterbury Conference Office, Kim Kreiger from the University of Wisconsin, and Jo Robinson and her staff at the Christchurch Convention Centre for their dedication to making our meeting a success. Jenni Adams, Francis Halzen and Stephen Parke Conference photograph

  3. Small Research Balloons in a Physics Course for Education Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Verner, E.; Long, T.; Montanaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    At The Catholic Univ. of America, we teach an experimental physics course entitled Physics 240: The Sun-Earth Connection, which is designed for the undergraduate education major. The emphasis is on providing hands-on experience and giving the students an exciting experience in physics. As part of this course, in the Spring 2013 semester, we instituted a project to plan, build, launch, and retrieve a small (~1.3 kg) research balloon payload. The payload flown was a small GPS unit that sent its position to an Internet site, a small wide-angle high-resolution video camera, and an analog refrigerator thermometer placed in the field of view of the camera. All data were stored on the camera sim-card. Students faced the problems of flying a small research balloon in the congested, densely populated Northeast Corridor of the US. They used computer simulators available on the Web to predict the balloon path and flight duration given velocities for the Jet Stream and ground winds, as well as payload mass and amount of helium in the balloon. The first flight was extremely successful. The balloon was launched 140 km NW of Washington DC near Hagerstown, MD and touched down 10 miles (16 km) NW of York, PA, within 1.6 km of what was predicted. The balloon reached 73,000 ft (22,000 m) and the thermometer indicated temperatures as low as -70 degrees Fahrenheit (-57 C) during the flight. Further balloon flights are planned in conjunction with this course. Additional exercises and experiments will be developed centered around these flights. Besides learning that science can be exciting, students also learn that science is not always easily predictable, and that these balloon flights give an understanding of many of problems that go into real scientific space missions. This project is supported in part by an educational supplement to NASA grant NNX10AC56G

  4. Physics for the 1990s. AAPT Conference of Department Chairs in Physics. (February 19-20, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Mark N., Ed.; Wilson, Jack M., Ed.

    This book contains the proceedings of the Third Topical Conference of Department Chairs in Physics. Topics of the papers summarized include: (1) research centers sponsored by the National Science Foundation; (2) physics programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels; (3) the use of accelerators in education and research; (4) approaches to…

  5. PREFACE: Conference of Theoretical Physics and Nonlinear Phenomena (CTPNP) 2014: ''From Universe to String's Scale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical physics is the first step for the development of science and technology. For more than 100 years it has delivered new and sophisticated discoveries which have changed human views of their surroundings and universe. Theoretical physics has also revealed that the governing law in our universe is not deterministic, and it is undoubtedly the foundation of our modern civilization. Contrary to its importance, research in theoretical physics is not well advanced in some developing countries such as Indonesia. This workshop provides the formal meeting in Indonesia devoted to the field of theoretical physics and is organized to cover all subjects of theoretical physics as well as nonlinear phenomena in order to create a gathering place for the theorists in Indonesia and surrounding countries, to motivate young physicists to keep doing active researches in the field and to encourage constructive communication among the community members. Following the success of the tenth previous meetings in this conference series, the eleventh conference was held in Sebelas Maret University (UNS), Surakarta, Indonesia on 15 February 2014. In addition, the conference was proceeded by School of Advance Physics at Gadjah Mada University (UGM), Yogyakarta, on 16-17 February 2014. The conference is expected to provide distinguished experts and students from various research fields of theoretical physics and nonlinear phenomena in Indonesia as well as from other continents the opportunities to present their works and to enhance contacts among them. The introduction to the conference is continued in the pdf.

  6. Texas Children's Medication Algorithm Project: Update from Texas Consensus Conference Panel on Medication Treatment of Childhood Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Carroll W.; Emslie, Graham J.; Crismon, M. Lynn; Posner, Kelly; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Jensen, Peter; Curry, John; Vitiello, Benedetto; Lopez, Molly; Shon, Steve P.; Pliszka, Steven R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To revise and update consensus guidelines for medication treatment algorithms for childhood major depressive disorder based on new scientific evidence and expert clinical consensus when evidence is lacking. Method: A consensus conference was held January 13-14, 2005, that included academic clinicians and researchers, practicing…

  7. "Physics and Life" - Teachers Meet Scientists at Major EIROforum Event [

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    More than 400 selected delegates from 22 European countries will take part in "Physics on Stage 3" , organised by the EIROforum [1] research organisations (CERN, EFDA, EMBL, ESA, ESO, ESRF, ILL) at the ESA ESTEC site (Noordwijk, The Netherlands). It is the culmination of a year-long educational programme and is a central event during the EC-sponsored European Science and Technology Week (November 8-15, 2003). Following the vastly successful preceeding events in 2000 and 2002, the main theme this year is "Physics and Life", reflecting the decision to broaden the Physics on Stage activities to encompass more of the natural sciences within an interdisciplinary approach. As before, European teachers, scientists, curricula organisers and others connected to the national education systems in Europe will gather with the main goal of exploring solutions to stimulate the interest of young people in science, by means of exciting and innovative teaching methods and materials. The rich one-week programme has many components: spectacular and original performances by students and professional actors, intensive encounters at a central fair where each country will present the latest developments from its teaching community at their stands, workshops about a host of crucial themes related to the central mission of this programme, seminars where EIROforum scientists and experienced high school teachers get together to discuss new teaching opportunities based on the latest results from front-line research projects at Europe's leading science centres, as well as a publishers fair that will also serve as an international exchange for new educational materials. A mystery cultural event will surprise everyone with its originality. And last but not least, the annual European Science Teaching Awards - the highest distinction in this field - will be presented at the end of the meeting. "Physics on Stage" is a joint project organised by EIROforum, together with the European Physical Society (EPS) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) . The project is funded in part by the European Commission and takes place under the auspices of the European Science and Technology Week 2003. It is directed by the EIROforum Working Group on Outreach that brings together key members of the seven organisations' respective outreach departments. The "Physics on Stage 3" festival will be opened on Monday, November 10, by His Royal Highness, Prince Johan Friso of the Netherlands. Among the distinguished guests will also be Her Excellency, Mrs. Maria van der Hoeven, the Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science, as well as several Directors-General of the EIROforum organisations. This "Physics on Stage 3" festival is the most visible event within a year-long programme with the very active involvement of National Committees in two dozen European countries, each of which organised national events or competitions, during which the 400 delegates to the festival were selected for their outstanding projects to promote science teaching. Among the many entries, for example, two young physicists from Germany focus on the beauty of physical phenomena, producing fractals and demonstrating the "Theremin", the only musical instrument played without being touched. In another demonstration, a team from the UK explore the nature of sound and the theme of genetics through drama, music and physical theatre. In this third international festival of physics education, biological and biochemical themes will also play a major role. As usual, the colourful centrepiece of the week is the Fair. Every country has its own stand where delegates show their new, exciting and surprising projects, innovative software, elegant experiments, etc. In this highly inspiring atmosphere, the teachers exchange practical experience and insights, learning from each other and preparing themselves to bring back to their respective countries a rich harvest of new ideas and inspiration for better teaching of science. "Physics on Stage 3" is thus a unique international event, both in terms of international exchange, opportunities for collaboration, as well as encounters between the still all too separate worlds of school education and state-of-the-art science and technology. The organisers cordially invite journalists to take part in this spectacular event, an extraordinary opportunity in political as well as in cultural, scientific and visual terms.

  8. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, H.; Bonacorsi, D.; Ueda, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) is a major series of international conferences intended to attract physicists and computing professionals to discuss on recent developments and trends in software and computing for their research communities. Experts from the high energy and nuclear physics, computer science, and information technology communities attend CHEP events. This conference series provides an international forum to exchange experiences and the needs of a wide community, and to present and discuss recent, ongoing, and future activities. At the beginning of the successful series of CHEP conferences in 1985, the latest developments in embedded systems, networking, vector and parallel processing were presented in Amsterdam. The software and computing ecosystem massively evolved since then, and along this path each CHEP event has marked a step further. A vibrant community of experts on a wide range of different high-energy and nuclear physics experiments, as well as technology explorer and industry contacts, attend and discuss the present and future challenges, and shape the future of an entire community. In such a rapidly evolving area, aiming to capture the state-of-the-art on software and computing through a collection of proceedings papers on a journal is a big challenge. Due to the large attendance, the final papers appear on the journal a few months after the conference is over. Additionally, the contributions often report about studies at very heterogeneous statuses, namely studies that are completed, or are just started, or yet to be done. It is not uncommon that by the time a specific paper appears on the journal some of the work is over a year old, or the investigation actually happened in different directions and with different methodologies than originally presented at the conference just a few months before. And by the time the proceedings appear in journal form, new ideas and explorations have quickly formed, have already started, and presumably have also followed previously unpredictable directions. In this scenario, it is normal and healthy for the entire community to question itself as of whether it is a set of proceedings the best way to document and communicate to peers (present and future) the work that has been done at a precise time and the vivid and live ideas of a precise moment in the evolution of the discipline. Pointing the attention to a specific CHEP event alone does not give the right answer: in fact, the heritage value lies in the quality and continuity of the documentation work, despite the changes of times, trends and actors. The CHEP proceedings, in their variety and thanks to the condensed form of knowledge they offer, are what most likely will be more easily preserved for future generations, thanks to the outstanding efforts over digital libraries for all kinds of cultural heritage. Since 1985, this long-standing tradition continued with the 21st CHEP edition in Okinawa. The successful model that brings together high-energy and nuclear physicist and computer scientists was repeated in the Okinawa prefecture, an outstanding location consisting of a few dozen small islands in the southern half of the Nansei Shoto, the island chain which stretches over about one thousand kilometres from Kyushu to Taiwan. The OIST (Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology) centre hosted the event, and offered an outstanding location and efficient facilities for the event. As for the CHEP history, contributions from 'general purpose' physics experiments mixed together with highly specialized work on the frontier of precision and intensity. The year 2015 is marked by the LHC restart in Run 2. Experimental groups at the LHC reviewed and presented their Run 1 experiences in detail, and reported the work done in acquiring the latest computing and software technologies, as well as in evolving their computing models in preparation for Run 2 (and beyond). On the side of the intensity frontier, 2015 is also the start of Super-KEKB commissioning. Fixed-target experiments at CERN, Fermilab and J-PARC are growing bigger in size. In the field of nuclear physics, FAIR is under construction and RHIC well engaged into its Phase-II research program facing increased datasets and new challenges with precision physics. For the future, developments are progressing towards the construction of ILC. In all these projects, computing and software will be even more important than before. Beyond those examples, non-accelerator experiments reported on their search for novel computing models as their apparatus and operation become larger and more distributed. The CHEP edition in Okinawa explored the synergy of HEP experimental physicists and computer scientists with data engineers and data scientists even further. Many area of research are covered, and the techniques developed and adopted are presented in a richness and diversity never seen before. In numbers, CHEP 2015 attracted a very high number of oral and poster contribution, 535 in total, and hosted 450 participants from 28 countries. For the first time in the conference history, a system of 'keywords' at the abstracts submission time was set up and exploited to produce conference tracks depending on the topics covered in the proposed contributions. Authors were asked to select some 'application keywords' and/or 'technology keywords' to specify the content of their contribution. A bottom-up approach that was tried at CHEP 2015 in Okinawa for the first time in the history of this conference series, this encountered vast satisfaction both in the International Advisory Committee and among the conference attendees. This process created 8 topical tracks, well balanced in content, manageable in terms of number of contributions, and able to create the adequate discussion space for trend topics (e.g. cloud computing and virtualization). CHEP 2015 hosted contributions on online computing; offline software; data store and access; middleware, software development and tools, experiment frameworks, tools for distributed computing; computing activities and computing models; facilities, infrastructure, network; clouds and virtualization; performance increase and optimization exploiting hardware features. Throughout the entire process, we were blessed with a forward-looking group of competent colleagues in our International Advisory Committee, whom we warmly thank. All the individuals in the Program Committee team, who put together the technical tracks of the conference and reviewed all papers to prepare the sections of this proceedings journal, have to be credited for their outstanding work. And of course the gratitude goes to all people who submitted a contribution, presented it, and spent time to prepare a careful paper to document the work. These people, in the first place, are the main authors of the big success that CHEP continues to be. After almost 30 years, and 21 CHEP editions, this conference cycle continues to stay strong and to evolve in rapidly changing times towards a challenging future, covering new grounds and intercepting new trends as our field of research evolves. The next stop in this journey will be at the 22nd CHEP Conference on October 12th-14th, in San Francisco, hosted by SLAC and LBNL.

  9. The Washington Conference on Theoretical Physics: Bringing the Spirit of Copenhagen to Foggy Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Paul

    2010-02-01

    When George Gamow was offered a position at George Washington University in 1934, one of the conditions he set for acceptance was the establishment of an annual physics conference at that university, co-sponsored by the Carnegie Institution. Foggy Bottom, the Washington neighborhood where GWU is located, was not particularly known for physics. Gamow, however, wished to bring the ``spirit of Copenhagen'' to that locale and attract an international group of theorists. The Washington Conference on Theoretical Physics first convened in 1935 and assembled annually until 1947, except for a three year break during the war. Ironically, just like the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen itself, the conference was galvanized the most by Bohr's actual presence. In its fifth, and best known meeting, held in 1939, Bohr stunned the audience when he announced the successful completion of nuclear fission. After the tenth meeting in 1947, Gamow's focus had been turning from nuclear physics to cosmology, he had begun to work more closely with graduate students and local collaborators and, in light of diminished interest, the conference was no longer held. In this talk I will delineate the successes and limitations of the Washington Conference on Theoretical Physics. )

  10. A Mathematics Entrance Exam for General (Non-Majors) Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chediak, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a previous issue of "The Physics Teacher", John Hubisz explained how a mathematics background check has been used at three different colleges to determine the appropriate physics sequence for incoming students. Based on their performance, students are placed into either calculus-based physics (CBP), algebra-trig physics (ATP), or a year of

  11. A Mathematics Entrance Exam for General (Non-Majors) Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chediak, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a previous issue of "The Physics Teacher", John Hubisz explained how a mathematics background check has been used at three different colleges to determine the appropriate physics sequence for incoming students. Based on their performance, students are placed into either calculus-based physics (CBP), algebra-trig physics (ATP), or a year of…

  12. PREFACE 2nd International Conference on Materials Physics and Applications (JIPMA 2009/MATERIAUX 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2010-11-01

    The 'Tunisian Materials Research Society: Tu-MRS' organized the International Days on Materials Physics and Applications 'JIPMA 2009' and the National Conference on Materials 'MATERIAUX 2009' in Gafsa (Tunisia) During the period 20-24 December 2009. The first International Days on Materials Physics and Applications 'JIPMA 2007' were organized in Annaba (Algeria) in November 2007 while the first National Conference on Materials 'MATERIAUX 2006' was organized in Douz (Tunisia) in December 2006. The 'JIPMA' conference series together with the 'MATERIAUX' intend to provide an excellent opportunity for international, Maghreb and Tunisian researchers to make their own works on materials known to a wider audience and to have discussions with other participants. This conference will also be an opportunity to exchange experiences, create and consolidate cooperation between different research structures in the Maghreb countries. This conference will equally promote research development, contribute to collaboration between universities and the socio-economical milieu. More than 300 senior researchers, Professors, PhD and Master students attended this conference from Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, France, and Spain. Several researchers, engineers and managers from industrial firms also attended this scientific meeting. The conference consists of plenary and semi-plenary talks, oral contributions and poster presentations. The topics of the conference are: Nano-materials, nano-systems, thin films, surfaces and interfaces Multifonctional Materials, Magnetic Materials, Dielectric Materials, Superconducting Materials, Applications, ... Materials for Electronics, Informatics and Communications (Semi-conducting Materials, Electronic devices, Spintronic, ... Optoelectronic Materials, Sensors Ceramics, Glasses, Polymers, ... Natural Materials: Phosphates, Clay, ... Metallic Materials, alloys, ... Materials and Environment Materials and Energy Biomaterials Elaborating Methods and Characterization Techniques I want to thank the organizing committee and everyone else who participated in the organization of this meeting for their invaluable efforts to guarantee the full success of this conference. I want also to thank very warmly all the Scientific committee and all other reviewers for their hard work reviewing the submitted papers. Professor Abdelwaheb CHEIKHROUHOU Chairman of the Conference

  13. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, January 17-19, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference was devoted to over 30 workshops and demonstrations of games and sports that may be used by teachers to improve physical fitness and cardiovascular strength in young children. There were also seminars and workshops focusing on disruptive behavior, curriculum development,

  14. Engaging physics majors as partners in teaching: Learning Assistants in introductory physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Eleanor; Donnelly, David; Close, Hunter

    2012-03-01

    This semester we are running a pilot Learning Assistant (LA) program in one section of our introductory calculus-based mechanics course. The LA model of course transformation was developed at the University of Colorado (http://laprogram.colorado.edu/). In our current implementation, five undergraduate physics majors are assisting with tutorial instruction in the lecture section once a week (using primarily Tutorials in Introductory Physics); in addition, most weekly laboratory sections begin with a tutorial. Both LAs and laboratory TAs attend tutorial preparation sessions prior to instruction each week. In this talk we briefly describe the current program, including implementation issues; give preliminary notes on the experiences of the new LAs; and discuss future plans for an expanded LA program. Overall our plan is to improve the experience of being an undergraduate physics student in our department by improving student understanding of physics concepts and by including students as legitimate participants in the mission of the department.

  15. 2014 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    2014 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2014), was held at the Media Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 13-14 January 2014. The ScieTech 2014 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. ScieTech 2014 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 187 papers and after rigorous review, 50 papers were accepted. The participants come from 16 countries. There are 5 (Five) Paralell Sessions and Four Keynote Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of ScieTech 2014. The Editors of the Scietech 2014 Proceedings: Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Dr. Benfano Soewito Dr. P.N. Gajjar

  16. Asilomar conference on managing complexity in high energy physics: A summary and renaming of the conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1987-02-01

    The complex aspects of high energy physics work are briefly described, and approaches to managing them are discussed. Management of software and data are covered. For managing complexity in experimental physics, the choice of building or buying processor systems is addressed and the issues of compatibility and standardization are discussed. (LEW)

  17. FOREWORD: 7th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, F.; Grosso, G.; Pastori Parravicini, G.; Tosi, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    The annual General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society has grown into a leading forum for discussion and exchange of the latest scientific developments. The conference series started seven years ago at the initiative of J T Devreese with the Antwerp Conference; it continued with the conferences in Manchester (1982), Lausanne (1983), The Hague (1984), Berlin (1985) and Stockholm (1986). The 7th General Conference was held in Pisa from 7 to 10 April 1987; it was attended by about 900 participants, coming from more than 30 countries of Europe and overseas. The present volume, in two issues T19A and T19B, collects the papers orally presented at the Pisa Conference. The scientific programme contained 90 invited speakers, distributed in plenary lectures, symposia and individual invited talks. The presentation of the papers in this volume follows the pattern of the Conference as closely as possible. The recent explosion of interest in High Temperature Superconductivity motivated, besides the plenary lecture in the programme, the last minute inclusion of an open symposium on this subject. More than forty research groups contributed to this event. The titles of the contributions and the affiliation of the speakers have been included at the end of volume 19B for the benefit of interested readers. Numerous contributions (more than 500), ranging over the entire field of Condensed Matter Physics, were presented in poster sessions. Several poster contributions at the conference (as well as a number of the contributions to the Symposium on High Temperature Superconductivity) will appear as regular articles in Physica Scripta. These articles will later be collected in a Reprint Series of Physica Scripta. We wish to thank the Conference Committees and the individual people who helped in the choice of such stimulating material, and all the contributors to this volume for their cooperation in the timely preparation of manuscripts. A special acknowledgement is also due to the Sponsors, whose generous help has made this manifestation possible.

  18. Final/Technical Report on The National Conference of Black Physics Students

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Elvira

    2001-06-01

    The 14th Annual Conference of the Society of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held March 16-19, 2000 at North Carolina A&T State University. The conference was held jointly with the National Society of Black Physicists. The students had the opportunity to interact and network with each other and the members of the profesional organization (NSBP). There are two attachments: Findings from the survey of participants of the 14th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students, and XXVII Day of Scientific Lectures and 23rd Annual Meeting of The National Society of Black Physicists, March 15-18, 2000. The theme of the meeting was 'Physics: The science that shapes the future.'

  19. Proceedings of the Fourth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference presents information to the scientific community on research results, future directions, and research opportunities in microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena within NASA's microgravity research program. The conference theme is "The International Space Station." Plenary sessions provide an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, the International Space Station and the opportunities ISS presents to fluid physics and transport phenomena researchers, and the process by which researchers may become involved in NASA's program, including information about the NASA Research Announcement in this area. Two plenary lectures present promising areas of research in electrohydrodynamics/electrokinetics in the movement of particles and in micro- and meso-scale effects on macroscopic fluid dynamics. Featured speakers in plenary sessions present results of recent flight experiments not heretofore presented. The conference publication consists of this book of abstracts and the full Proceedings of the 4th Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference on CD-ROM, containing full papers presented at the conference (NASA/CP-1999-208526/SUPPL1).

  20. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics & 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38) and the 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics (IWTCP-1). Both the conference and the workshop were held from 29 July to 1 August 2013 in Pullman hotel, Da Nang, Vietnam. The IWTCP-1 was a new activity of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society (VTPS) organized in association with the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38), the most well-known annual scientific forum dedicated to the dissemination of the latest development in the field of theoretical physics within the country. The IWTCP-1 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). The overriding goal of the IWTCP is to provide an international forum for scientists and engineers from academia to share ideas, problems and solution relating to the recent advances in theoretical physics as well as in computational physics. The main IWTCP motivation is to foster scientific exchanges between the Vietnamese theoretical and computational physics community and world-wide scientists as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. About 110 participants coming from 10 countries participated in the conference and the workshop. 4 invited talks, 18 oral contributions and 46 posters were presented at the conference. In the workshop we had one keynote lecture and 9 invited talks presented by international experts in the fields of theoretical and computational physics, together with 14 oral and 33 poster contributions. The proceedings were edited by Nguyen Tri Lan, Trinh Xuan Hoang, and Nguyen Ai Viet. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the conference and the workshop successful. Nguyen Ai Viet Chair of NCTP-38 and IWTCP-1

  1. Proceedings of the Fifth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim S. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Fifth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provided the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program and research opportunities and plans for the near future. Consistent with the conference theme "Microgravity Research an Agency-Wide Asset" the conference focused not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. The conference included 14 invited plenary talks, 61 technical paper presentations, 61 poster presentations, exhibits and a forum on emerging research themes focusing on nanotechnology and biofluid mechanics. This web-based proceeding includes the presentation and poster charts provided by the presenters of technical papers and posters that were scanned at the conference site. Abstracts of all the papers and posters are included and linked to the presentations charts. The invited and plenary speakers were not required to provide their charts and are generally not available for scanning and hence not posted. The conference program is also included.

  2. Seventh National Conference on Physical Activity for the Exceptional Individual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles County Superintendent of Schools, CA. Div. of Special Education.

    A variety of physical activities and their applications to special education situations are presented and discussed in this collection of papers. Topics include--games for exceptional populations, mime and movement, behavioral management techniques, motor development programs for the handicapped, teacher and student motivation, yoga for the…

  3. PREFACE: 2013 International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford

    2013-03-01

    The 2013 International Conference on Science and Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics (ScieTech 2013), was held at the Aston Rasuna Hotel, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 24-25 January 2013. The ScieTech 2013 conference aims to bring together scholars, leading researchers and experts from diverse backgrounds and applications areas. Special emphasis is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics, all areas of sciences and applied mathematics. We would like to thank the invited and plenary speakers as well as all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program. This year, we received 197 papers and, after rigorous review, 67 papers were accepted. The participants come from 21 countries. There are 6 (six) Plenary and Invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series and we thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed ScieTech 2013 be be sucyh a success. The Editors of the ScieTech 2013 Proceedings Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Dr Hoga Saragih Tumpal Pandiangan Dr Mohamed Bououdina The PDF also contains the abstracts of the Invited and Plenary talks, and some photographs taken during the conference.

  4. Major and Minor Programs in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnell, Robert D.

    1981-01-01

    In order to ascertain whether the Bachelor of Science degree in physical education at a particular institution was comparable to those of other similar programs, a survey was conducted on several institutions. Responding institutions were distributed by geographic region. (JN)

  5. INTRODUCTION: The 8th International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Per Olof; Hedin, Lars

    1987-01-01

    The VUV conferences series The international conferences on vacuum ultraviolet radiation physics started in 1962, and are now being held every third year. VUV-8 took place at Lund University, August 4-8, 1986. VUV-9 will be arranged at the University of Hawaii, USA, August 14-18, 1989, with Prof. C S Fadley as conference chairman. Chairman of the international advisory board for the period 1986-89 is Prof. L Hedin. The theme of the series can be summarized as experimental and theoretical progress in research fields utilizing the interaction of VUV radiation with matter. The topics cover broad areas within atomic and molecular physics, solid state physics and VUV instrumentation. The conferences emphasize interdisciplinary aspects. To these belong common experimental techniques as, e.g., synchrotron radiation instrumentation, and common theoretical foundations for the description of photon interactions with matter. The VUV-8 conference The VUV-8 conference in Lund was attended by 300 participants from 26 countries. An address list of the participants is given at the end of this volume. There were 33 invited papers given as plenary or key-note talks. As many as 229 posters were presented; 49 of them were also given orally. These numbers are typical for the VUV conferences, except for the number of posters, which was unusually large. In the conference planning the poster sessions were stressed, and particular care was taken to provide a good atmosphere at these sessions. Thus the posters were kept up during the whole conference, coffee was served in the hail with the posters and there were convenient places to sit down close to the posters. Considering the wide scope of the conference it was necessary to emphasize a limited number of topics of high current interest and importance. Thus besides traditional topics, several rapidly expanding fields were discussed in special sessions. At VUV-8 there were the following sessions. Theory of atoms and molecules photoabsorption and -ionization of atoms and molecules and related phenomena multiphoton and other dynamical processes plasma physics VUV lasers time resolved spectroscopy instrumentation for VUV radiation synchrotron radiation centres solid state spectroscopy dynamical processes involving localized levels fundamental aspects of photoemission spin-polarized photoemission inverse photoemission semiconductors organic materials adsorbates Proceedings of VUV-8 The present volume contains most of the invited papers (28 out of 33). Regarding the contributed papers, over 50 are now being published in regular issues of PHYSICA SCRIPTA. These papers will also appear in a reprint volume, PHYSICA SCRIPTA RS4, which soon will be available. Abstracts of invited and contributed papers appeared in three conference volumes as follows: Volume I: Atomic and molecular physics. Instrumentation. Volume II: Solid state physics. Volume III: Post deadline papers. These books have been registered in an international data base and can thus be cited as published documents. Copies may be received from the conference secretary.* Acknowledgements We would like to thank our sponsors, which are listed on the following page, the members of the international program committee, and all others who helped in the planning of the program. Above all we like to thank those who worked with the local organization. Due to their dedicated efforts the conference ran very smoothly with a pleasant atmosphere.

  6. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  7. FOREWORD: 10th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhémery, Alain; Saffari, Nader

    2012-03-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 10th annual meeting in Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France, from 19-21 January 2011. This series of meetings is a collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. The conference has its loyal supporters whom we wish to thank. It is their loyalty that has made this conference a success. AFPAC alternates between the UK and France and its format has been designed to ensure that it remains a friendly meeting of very high scientific quality, offering a broad spectrum of subjects, welcoming young researchers and PhD students and giving them the opportunity to give their first presentations in an 'international' conference, but with limited pressure. For the third consecutive year AFPAC is followed by the publication of its proceedings in the form of 18 peer-reviewed papers, which cover the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France. Alain Lhémery CEA, France Nader Saffari UCL, United Kingdom

  8. News Workshop: Teachers explore electronics Conference: ASE conference hits Nottingham Teacher training: Videoconferencing discovers asteroids Lecture: Annual education talk gets interactive Award: Britton receives a New Year's honour Multimedia: Multimedia conference 2010 will be held in France Conference series: ICPE travels to Thailand in 2009 Filming: Sixth-formers take physics on location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-03-01

    Workshop: Teachers explore electronics Conference: ASE conference hits Nottingham Teacher training: Videoconferencing discovers asteroids Lecture: Annual education talk gets interactive Award: Britton receives a New Year's honour Multimedia: Multimedia conference 2010 will be held in France Conference series: ICPE travels to Thailand in 2009 Filming: Sixth-formers take physics on location

  9. PREFACE: 1st International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    We are delighted to come up with thirty two (32) contributed research papers in these proceedings, focusing on Materials Science and Applied Physics as an output of the 2013 International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science (ICAMS2013) held on October 22-24, 2013 at the Ateneo de Davao University, Davao City, Philippines. The conference was set to provide a high level of international forum and had brought together leading academic scientists, industry professionals, researchers and scholars from universities, industries and government agencies who have shared their experiences, research results and discussed the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted as well as the advances in the fields of Applied Physics and Materials Science. This conference has provided a wide opportunity to establish multidisciplinary collaborations with local and foreign experts. ICAMS2013, held concurrently with 15th Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (SPVM) National Physics Conference and 2013 International Meeting for Complex Systems, was organized by the Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (Physics Society of Visayas and Mindanao) based in MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, Iligan City, Philippines. The international flavor of converging budding researchers and experts on Materials Science and Applied Physics was the first to be organized in the 19 years of SPVM operation in the Philippines. We highlighted ICAMS2013 gathering by the motivating presence of Dr. Stuart Parkin, a British Physicist, as one of our conference's plenary speakers. Equal measures of gratitude were also due to all other plenary speakers, Dr. Elizabeth Taylor of Institute of Physics (IOP) in London, Dr. Surya Raghu of Advanced Fluidics in Maryland, USA and Prof. Hitoshi Miyata of Niigata University, Japan, Prof. Djulia Onggo of Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, and Dr. Hironori Katagiri of Nagaoka National College of Technology, Japan. The warm hospitality of the host university, Ateneo de Davao University, Davao City, Philippines blended with the overwhelming enthusiasm of the conference speakers, participants, and the unwavering support of the conference sponsors and donors and the administration of the MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, Iligan City, Philippines, all have brought realization to the production of these proceedings.

  10. Physics Computing '92: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Robert A.; Nadrchal, Jaroslav

    1993-04-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * INVITED PAPERS * Ab Initio Theoretical Approaches to the Structural, Electronic and Vibrational Properties of Small Clusters and Fullerenes: The State of the Art * Neural Multigrid Methods for Gauge Theories and Other Disordered Systems * Multicanonical Monte Carlo Simulations * On the Use of the Symbolic Language Maple in Physics and Chemistry: Several Examples * Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions in Catalysis and Population Models * Computer Algebra, Symmetry Analysis and Integrability of Nonlinear Evolution Equations * The Path-Integral Quantum Simulation of Hydrogen in Metals * Digital Optical Computing: A New Approach of Systolic Arrays Based on Coherence Modulation of Light and Integrated Optics Technology * Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Granular Materials * Numerical Implementation of a K.A.M. Algorithm * Quasi-Monte Carlo, Quasi-Random Numbers and Quasi-Error Estimates * What Can We Learn from QMC Simulations * Physics of Fluctuating Membranes * Plato, Apollonius, and Klein: Playing with Spheres * Steady States in Nonequilibrium Lattice Systems * CONVODE: A REDUCE Package for Differential Equations * Chaos in Coupled Rotators * Symplectic Numerical Methods for Hamiltonian Problems * Computer Simulations of Surfactant Self Assembly * High-dimensional and Very Large Cellular Automata for Immunological Shape Space * A Review of the Lattice Boltzmann Method * Electronic Structure of Solids in the Self-interaction Corrected Local-spin-density Approximation * Dedicated Computers for Lattice Gauge Theory Simulations * Physics Education: A Survey of Problems and Possible Solutions * Parallel Computing and Electronic-Structure Theory * High Precision Simulation Techniques for Lattice Field Theory * CONTRIBUTED PAPERS * Case Study of Microscale Hydrodynamics Using Molecular Dynamics and Lattice Gas Methods * Computer Modelling of the Structural and Electronic Properties of the Supported Metal Catalysis * Ordered Particle Simulations for Serial and MIMD Parallel Computers * "NOLP" -- Program Package for Laser Plasma Nonlinear Optics * Algorithms to Solve Nonlinear Least Square Problems * Distribution of Hydrogen Atoms in Pd-H Computed by Molecular Dynamics * A Ray Tracing of Optical System for Protein Crystallography Beamline at Storage Ring-SIBERIA-2 * Vibrational Properties of a Pseudobinary Linear Chain with Correlated Substitutional Disorder * Application of the Software Package Mathematica in Generalized Master Equation Method * Linelist: An Interactive Program for Analysing Beam-foil Spectra * GROMACS: A Parallel Computer for Molecular Dynamics Simulations * GROMACS Method of Virial Calculation Using a Single Sum * The Interactive Program for the Solution of the Laplace Equation with the Elimination of Singularities for Boundary Functions * Random-Number Generators: Testing Procedures and Comparison of RNG Algorithms * Micro-TOPIC: A Tokamak Plasma Impurities Code * Rotational Molecular Scattering Calculations * Orthonormal Polynomial Method for Calibrating of Cryogenic Temperature Sensors * Frame-based System Representing Basis of Physics * The Role of Massively Data-parallel Computers in Large Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations * Short-range Molecular Dynamics on a Network of Processors and Workstations * An Algorithm for Higher-order Perturbation Theory in Radiative Transfer Computations * Hydrostochastics: The Master Equation Formulation of Fluid Dynamics * HPP Lattice Gas on Transputers and Networked Workstations * Study on the Hysteresis Cycle Simulation Using Modeling with Different Functions on Intervals * Refined Pruning Techniques for Feed-forward Neural Networks * Random Walk Simulation of the Motion of Transient Charges in Photoconductors * The Optical Hysteresis in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon * Diffusion Monte Carlo Analysis of Modern Interatomic Potentials for He * A Parallel Strategy for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polar Liquids on Transputer Arrays * Distribution of Ions Reflected on Rough Surfaces * The Study of Step Density Distribution During Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth: Monte Carlo Computer Simulation * Towards a Formal Approach to the Construction of Large-scale Scientific Applications Software * Correlated Random Walk and Discrete Modelling of Propagation through Inhomogeneous Media * Teaching Plasma Physics Simulation * A Theoretical Determination of the Au-Ni Phase Diagram * Boson and Fermion Kinetics in One-dimensional Lattices * Computational Physics Course on the Technical University * Symbolic Computations in Simulation Code Development and Femtosecond-pulse Laser-plasma Interaction Studies * Computer Algebra and Integrated Computing Systems in Education of Physical Sciences * Coordinated System of Programs for Undergraduate Physics Instruction * Program Package MIRIAM and Atomic Physics of Extreme Systems * High Energy Physics Simulation on the T_Node * The Chapman-Kolmogorov Equation as Representation of Huygens' Principle and the Monolithic Self-consistent Numerical Modelling of Lasers * Authoring System for Simulation Developments * Molecular Dynamics Study of Ion Charge Effects in the Structure of Ionic Crystals * A Computational Physics Introductory Course * Computer Calculation of Substrate Temperature Field in MBE System * Multimagnetical Simulation of the Ising Model in Two and Three Dimensions * Failure of the CTRW Treatment of the Quasicoherent Excitation Transfer * Implementation of a Parallel Conjugate Gradient Method for Simulation of Elastic Light Scattering * Algorithms for Study of Thin Film Growth * Algorithms and Programs for Physics Teaching in Romanian Technical Universities * Multicanonical Simulation of 1st order Transitions: Interface Tension of the 2D 7-State Potts Model * Two Numerical Methods for the Calculation of Periodic Orbits in Hamiltonian Systems * Chaotic Behavior in a Probabilistic Cellular Automata? * Wave Optics Computing by a Networked-based Vector Wave Automaton * Tensor Manipulation Package in REDUCE * Propagation of Electromagnetic Pulses in Stratified Media * The Simple Molecular Dynamics Model for the Study of Thermalization of the Hot Nucleon Gas * Electron Spin Polarization in PdCo Alloys Calculated by KKR-CPA-LSD Method * Simulation Studies of Microscopic Droplet Spreading * A Vectorizable Algorithm for the Multicolor Successive Overrelaxation Method * Tetragonality of the CuAu I Lattice and Its Relation to Electronic Specific Heat and Spin Susceptibility * Computer Simulation of the Formation of Metallic Aggregates Produced by Chemical Reactions in Aqueous Solution * Scaling in Growth Models with Diffusion: A Monte Carlo Study * The Nucleus as the Mesoscopic System * Neural Network Computation as Dynamic System Simulation * First-principles Theory of Surface Segregation in Binary Alloys * Data Smooth Approximation Algorithm for Estimating the Temperature Dependence of the Ice Nucleation Rate * Genetic Algorithms in Optical Design * Application of 2D-FFT in the Study of Molecular Exchange Processes by NMR * Advanced Mobility Model for Electron Transport in P-Si Inversion Layers * Computer Simulation for Film Surfaces and its Fractal Dimension * Parallel Computation Techniques and the Structure of Catalyst Surfaces * Educational SW to Teach Digital Electronics and the Corresponding Text Book * Primitive Trinomials (Mod 2) Whose Degree is a Mersenne Exponent * Stochastic Modelisation and Parallel Computing * Remarks on the Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm for the ∫4 Model * An Experimental Computer Assisted Workbench for Physics Teaching * A Fully Implicit Code to Model Tokamak Plasma Edge Transport * EXPFIT: An Interactive Program for Automatic Beam-foil Decay Curve Analysis * Mapping Technique for Solving General, 1-D Hamiltonian Systems * Freeway Traffic, Cellular Automata, and Some (Self-Organizing) Criticality * Photonuclear Yield Analysis by Dynamic Programming * Incremental Representation of the Simply Connected Planar Curves * Self-convergence in Monte Carlo Methods * Adaptive Mesh Technique for Shock Wave Propagation * Simulation of Supersonic Coronal Streams and Their Interaction with the Solar Wind * The Nature of Chaos in Two Systems of Ordinary Nonlinear Differential Equations * Considerations of a Window-shopper * Interpretation of Data Obtained by RTP 4-Channel Pulsed Radar Reflectometer Using a Multi Layer Perceptron * Statistics of Lattice Bosons for Finite Systems * Fractal Based Image Compression with Affine Transformations * Algorithmic Studies on Simulation Codes for Heavy-ion Reactions * An Energy-Wise Computer Simulation of DNA-Ion-Water Interactions Explains the Abnormal Structure of Poly[d(A)]:Poly[d(T)] * Computer Simulation Study of Kosterlitz-Thouless-Like Transitions * Problem-oriented Software Package GUN-EBT for Computer Simulation of Beam Formation and Transport in Technological Electron-Optical Systems * Parallelization of a Boundary Value Solver and its Application in Nonlinear Dynamics * The Symbolic Classification of Real Four-dimensional Lie Algebras * Short, Singular Pulses Generation by a Dye Laser at Two Wavelengths Simultaneously * Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of the Apex-Oxygen-Model * Approximation Procedures for the Axial Symmetric Static Einstein-Maxwell-Higgs Theory * Crystallization on a Sphere: Parallel Simulation on a Transputer Network * FAMULUS: A Software Product (also) for Physics Education * MathCAD vs. FAMULUS -- A Brief Comparison * First-principles Dynamics Used to Study Dissociative Chemisorption * A Computer Controlled System for Crystal Growth from Melt * A Time Resolved Spectroscopic Method for Short Pulsed Particle Emission * Green's Function Computation in Radiative Transfer Theory * Random Search Optimization Technique for One-criteria and Multi-criteria Problems * Hartley Transform Applications to Thermal Drift Elimination in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy * Algorithms of Measuring, Processing and Interpretation of Experimental Data Obtained with Scanning Tunneling Microscope * Time-dependent Atom-surface Interactions * Local and Global Minima on Molecular Potential Energy Surfaces: An Example of N3 Radical * Computation of Bifurcation Surfaces * Symbolic Computations in Quantum Mechanics: Energies in Next-to-solvable Systems * A Tool for RTP Reactor and Lamp Field Design * Modelling of Particle Spectra for the Analysis of Solid State Surface * List of Participants

  11. Conference Experience for Undergraduates in the Division of Nuclear Physics - 10 Years Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Warren

    2008-04-01

    The Conference Experience for Undergraduates (CEU), held annually in the APS Division of Nuclear Physics since 1998, has become a valuable addition to the fall DNP meetings. Since its inception 10 years ago, approximately 730 undergraduate students from over 60 colleges and universities from around the country (and a few from abroad) have participated. The goal of the program is to provide students who have conducted undergraduate research in nuclear science a ``capstone'' conference experience, with the goal toward strengthening retention of talented students in the field. In addition to the main conference, the CEU includes extra activities for the students, including the main research poster session, two undergraduate nuclear physics seminars, and a graduate school information session. CEU application materials are considered by an independent review committee, and travel and lodging grants are awarded based on project merit. Financial support is provided by the NSF, DOE, and DNP. At the recent 10^th anniversary CEU, a mini-symposium was organized as part of the DNP conference, at which former CEU students (now graduate students, post-docs, and professors) had opportunity to talk about their research and the influence that undergraduate research and conference participation had on their career paths. Survey and anecdotal data indicating benefits of CEU participation, as well as initial results from career path tracking will be presented.

  12. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  13. Findings from the Survey of Participants of the 19th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollison, Julius; Neuschatz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    On the weekend of February 3-6, the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois hosted the 2005 National Conference of Black Physics Students, marking the 19th consecutive year that the Conference has provided African American physics students with the unique opportunity to meet and network with counterparts from all across…

  14. Findings from the Survey of Participants of the 18th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollison, Julius; Neuschatz, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The eighteenth annual National Conference of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held February 5-8, 2004 at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. The Conference brought together Black students interested in physics to meet and network with Black working physicists, corporate as well as graduate school recruiters, faculty members, administrators,…

  15. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference (9th, Atlanta, Georgia, January 22-24, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The conference reported in these proceedings focused on the sharing of recent innovations, successful programming and teaching concepts, and research in children's physical education. Materials are presented in three sections, one for each day of the conference. The first day's agenda included presentations by nationally known physical educators…

  16. MICE Online Data Quality Journal of Physics: Conference Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M.; Tunnell, Cd

    2012-12-01

    Within the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), the MICE Analysis User Software (MAUS) framework performs both online analysis of live data and detailed offline data analysis, simulation, and accelerator design. MAUS consists of four key components: inputters to handle input of live, archived or simulated data; transforms to analyse data; mergers to summarise transformed data in the form of histograms and tables; and outtputters to save this summarised data as images or tabular data. MAUS supports parallel data transformation in a map-reduce-inspired approach, however, the requirements of online reconstruction precluded adoption of a traditional map-reduce solution. A document-oriented database is used to cache transformed data, prior to merging, to support concurrent merging and visualisation of data. In MAUS, both offline and online analysis are implemented and executed in the same way, thereby removing the need for MICE to maintain and use two sets of analysis software, a common requirement elsewhere in experimental particle physics.

  17. News Festival: Science on stage deadline approaches Conference: Welsh conference attracts teachers Data: New phase of CERN openlab tackles exascale IT challenges for science Meeting: German Physical Society holds its physics education spring meeting Conference: Association offers golden opportunity in Norway Competition: So what's the right answer then?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    Festival: Science on stage deadline approaches Conference: Welsh conference attracts teachers Data: New phase of CERN openlab tackles exascale IT challenges for science Meeting: German Physical Society holds its physics education spring meeting Conference: Association offers golden opportunity in Norway Competition: So what's the right answer then?

  18. Concluding remarks. International Conference on Nuclear Physics, Berkeley, California, August 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Feshbach, H.

    1980-10-01

    Not a conference summary, these concluding remarks consider five major themes that were illuminated during the conference and the problems within them that need to be resolved in the future. The five topics considered and the following: new degrees of freedom (single-particle motion, giant resonances, nuclear molecular resonances, nuclear matter, kaon-produced hypernuclei, implications of the bag model and quantum chromodynamics), new forms of matter, new reaction mechanisms (direct vs compound-nucleus reactions, heavy-ion reactions), new aspects of the weak interactions in nuclei (weak neutral currents, P invariance), and new symmetries. 4 figures. (RWR)

  19. A Collaborative Astronomy Project Between Multimedia and Physics Undergraduate Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Walsh, L.; LaFratta, M.; Moffett, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    During the summer of 2004, faculty and undergraduate multimedia and physics interns from the University of North Carolina at Asheville and nearby Furman University joined together at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute to develop a new education and public outreach program of radio astronomy by utilizing the StarLab portable planetarium system. The program consists of three components: the StarLab cylinder for projection of the radio sky; display of a pulsar on the radio sky; and teaching and learning materials accessible through the Internet and CD-ROM. The multimedia and physics interns worked together to articulate and communicate aspects of their disciplines as they related to the development of the cylinder, the depiction of the pulsars and pulsar projector, and classroom activities for teachers and students. As a result, the cylinder shows both the radio sky and illustrates five distinct types of radio sources. The cylinder is augmented further through the use of an audio-visual pulsar projector, which emits pulses with sound for the audio-visually challenged. The activities present teachers with lesson plans related to radio astronomy topics. We discuss the unique development by this team needed to accomplish the program's first year goals. We acknowledge support from the NSF Internship in Public Science Education Program grant number 0324729.

  20. PREFACE: International conference on Computer Simulation in Physics and beyond (CSP2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International conference on Computer Simulations in Physics and beyond (CSP2015) was held from 6-10 September 2015 at the campus of the Moscow Institute for Electronics and Mathematics (MIEM), National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow. Computer simulations are in increasingly popular tool for scientific research, supplementing experimental and analytical research. The main goal of the conference is contributing to the development of methods and algorithms which take into account trends in hardware development, which may help with intensive research. The conference also allowed senior scientists and students to have the opportunity to speak each other and exchange ideas and views on the developments in the area of high-performance computing in science. We would like to take this opportunity to thank our sponsors: the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Federal Agency of Scientific Organizations, and Higher School of Economics.

  1. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008) Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter; Jochemsen, Reijer

    2009-04-01

    This issue forms part I of the Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 67-13 August 2008). The majority of the special invited lectures, such as the London prize lectures, the international union of pure and applied physics (IUPAP) young scientist award lectures, the plenary, half-plenary and public lectures, and the historical lectures presented at the LT25 conference, are included. The papers relating to the oral and poster presentations will appear in part II of the proceedings in a dedicated open access issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (2009 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 150). In addition to the organizer's report and a summary of the new developments in low temperature physics, which can also be found in this issue, part II provides useful information about LT25, such as an overview of committees, sponsors, exhibitors, and some conference statistics. To ensure the high publication standard mandated by Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Journal of Physics: Conference Series every paper was reviewed by at least one referee before it was accepted for publication. The editors are indebted to many colleagues for invaluable assistance in the preparation and review of 900 papers appearing in both parts I and II of these proceedings. In particular, we would like to thank Carlo Beenakker, Jeroen van den Brink, Hans Brom, Jos de Jongh, Horst Rogalla, Fons de Waele, and Jan Zaanen.

  2. Japan - UK Conference: Trends in Physics and Chemistry Education in Secondary Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    This conference, held in Tokyo between 3-5 April 1998, was the most recent product of a now longstanding involvement between British and Japanese physics teachers which has grown out of a personal friendship between Brenda Jennison (Cambridge University and Vice Chair of the Education Group) and Tae Ryu (Sophia University). For a number of years British teachers have hosted Japanese counterparts at the annual ASE meetings and in visits to schools following the conference. For this conference a team of four physicists, Brenda Jennison, lan Lawrence (King's School Worcester), Philip Britton (Leeds Grammar School) and Phil Scott (University of Leeds) travelled to Japan to contribute to a conference and visit schools and University Departments. Feelings on reading a conference report can too often resemble the experience of being shown a friend's holiday snaps. They are clearly very interesting but equally clearly your friend is enjoying it more than you are, because the snaps are rekindling memories and thoughts. This set of reflections is an attempt to report on just four of those memories and thoughts rather than describe the pictures. Why organize an international conference? The conference was an event that almost took more months of tireless organization than it lasted in hours. It was conceived and brought to fruition amongst a welter of e-mail communications between Brenda Jennison, Tae Ryu and Maurice Jenkins of the British Council, who sponsored the event. Given this immense organizational task, just why did we bother? What can be gained by holding such an international event? The significant benefit of discussing issues between two cultures is clarifying which are the issues that are intrinsically due to the nature of physics teaching rather than the extrinsic effects of educational systems and customs. Unsurprisingly pupil motivation, pupil numbers, relevance, `up-to-date-ness' and the role of mathematics emerged as concerns in both cultures. Also there are always benefits from gaining a wider view. Whether this is a need to see a classroom other than your own, a school other than your own or a country other than your own, the result is the same: setting challenges and discussions in context and helping to provide a sense of perspective. What we had to give to the conference During the conference the British contingent reviewed the present state of science education in Britain, particularly giving information on the Institute of Physics 16-19 Initiative and National Curriculum consultation, concentrating rather more on the principles than the detail, which by nature was not immediately relevant to the audience. To this was added a research perspective on Children's Learning in Science, focusing on the importance of discussion and conversation in reaching understanding. The central day was dominated by workshops attempting to argue why we undertake some experimental work in physics education. Four possible purposes of practical work were identified and then demonstrated by a hands-on practical circus. An investigative practical, necessarily open-ended and probably empirically messy, possibly not yielding clean results. A clearly illustrative practical intended to readily allow observation and discussion of a phenomenon with the ability to alter appropriate parameters and stimulating discussion. Practical work intended to produce clear, reproducible, reliable results if good care is taken: the `can-do' aspect of physics giving pride in obtaining a result. The demonstration intended to stimulate teacher-led class discussion. The abiding memory of this practical circus was of its role as the ultimate international ice-breaker. Previously formal conference discussion became animated and language difficulties became less important as teachers engaged in the truly international business of playing with and becoming fascinated with practical apparatus. What we gained from the conference On the Saturday evening we were treated to demonstrations by groups of physics and chemistry teachers of apparatus that they had made. This hugely enjoyable session has resulted in a great number of good ideas appearing ready for use in a certain British physics lab. Poaching ideas in teaching can be an international activity as well! One impression that this session left us with is that, making a gross generalization, the Japanese are physics teachers, the British physics teachers. How delightful if we in Britain could more often gather in this fashion to delight in exploring physics for ourselves. A substantial benefit of the conference was the challenge of presenting the substantive arguments behind the philosophy of curriculum change to teachers from a different culture, with thoughts being tempered in the furnace of translation. When each word requires lengthy translation, they become precious. An attempt to explain what was meant by the phrase `positive formative reinforcement' that had been carelessly written on one overhead transparency on the purpose of assessment has left permanent mental scars (and perhaps rightly so!). And what of the future? The conference, and perhaps more especially the surrounding visits, resulted in the start of new friendships and the renewal of old acquaintances. Other visits and conferences will doubtless be arranged. The two groups of physics teachers have much to share and discuss with each other. In the short term it is hoped that fruitful e-mail communication and cooperation can be continued both between participants and among a wider circle of physics teachers from both countries. Philip Britton and Ian Lawrence Head of Physics, Leeds Grammar School, and Secretary, IoP Education Group King's School Worcester, and Chairman, IoP Education Group

  3. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,…

  4. Using Environmental Science as a Motivational Tool to Teach Physics to Non-Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Hauke C.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional physical science course was transformed into an environmental physical science course to teach physics to non-science majors. The objective of the new course was to improve the learning of basic physics principles by applying them to current issues of interest. A new curriculum was developed with new labs, homework assignments,

  5. PREFACE: The 11th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The 11th General Conference of the Condensed Matter Division of the European Physical Society was held in Exeter from 8-11 April 1991. The annual Condensed Matter meeting of the UK Institute of Physics, which would have been held in December 1990, was not scheduled in order that there should not be two similar meetings too close together. The Exeter EPS conference followed the traditional pattern for Condensed Matter Division conference by covering a very broad range of topics and including several plenary lectures. In addition, there was a lecture from one of the joint Hewlett-Packard prizewinners, Professor D Jerome, and the annual Mott Lecture was presented by Professor R G Clark. The invited lectures were divided into 5 parallel sessions, in part because of lecture theatre sizes, in which the topics roughly divided into semiconductors (2 sessions), metals and magnetism, high Tc superconductivity and heavy fermions, and soft matter and polymers. A number of contributors of abstracts for poster presentation were offered the opportunity of oral presentation. The three, very full poster sessions, were of a high standard and generated much interest and discussion. One can conclude that condensed matter physics is strong and active in Europe. The papers of the invited talks contained in this volume will allow conference participants the opportunity for further study of the work presented and will also allow those unable to attent the meeting to learn of the interesting results presented. With such a broad subject coverage it is difficult to order the papers in a wholly rational way; according they have been brought together under five broad headings. It is a pleasure to thank all those involved in the Organising and Programme Committees (see PDF file for detail) for their contributions to the Conference. The generosity of the Sponsors (see PDF file for list of sponsors) is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics: Global Perspectives, Common Concerns, Worldwide Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastavker, Yevgeniya V.

    2009-03-01

    The 3^rd International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP), held in Seoul, Korea, in October 2008, brought together 300 participants from 57 countries, including a diverse 22-member U.S. Delegation, for a 3-day summit of stimulating discussions, thought-provoking presentations, inspirational posters, and networking. Held under the auspices of the Working Group on Women in Physics of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), this meeting built on the successes of the 1^st (Paris, 2002) and 2^nd (Rio de Janeiro, 2005) Conferences and further clarified the importance of diversifying the field of physics worldwide. Although considerable progress has been made since 2002, it was clear that the global scientific workforce is still under-utilizing a large percentage of the available female talent pool. If human society is to benefit to its fullest from various contributions that the field of physics can offer in addressing global issues of economic crisis, energy, environment, water, health, poverty, and hunger, women of all races and nationalities need to become fully included and engaged in the national and international physical community. To address these and many other issues, the ICWIP unanimously approved a five-part resolution to IUPAP recommending actions to promote the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in physics and related fields.

  7. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    The XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, CALOR2012, was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 4-8 June 2012. The series of conferences on calorimetry started in 1990 at Fermilab, and they have been the premier event for calorimeter aficionados, a trend that CALOR2012 upheld. This year, several presentations focused on the status of the major calorimeter systems, especially at the LHC. Discussions on new and developing techniques in calorimetry took a full day. Excellent updates on uses of calorimeters or about ideas that are deeply rooted in particle physics calorimetry in astrophysics and neutrino physics were followed by talks on algorithms and special triggers that rely on calorimeters. Finally, discussions of promising current developments and ongoing R&D work for future calorimeters capped the conference. The field of calorimetry is alive and well, as evidenced by the more than 100 attendees and the excellent quality of over 80 presentations. You will find the written contributions in this volume. The presentations can be found at calor2012.ttu.edu. The first day of the conference was dedicated to the LHC. In two invited talks, Guillaume Unal (CERN) and Tommaso Tabarelli de Fatis (Universita' & INFN Milano Bicocca) discussed the critical role electromagnetic calorimeters play in the hunt for the Standard Model Higgs boson in ATLAS and CMS, respectively. The enhanced sensitivity for light Higgs in the two-gamma decay channel renders electromagnetic calorimeters indispensible. Much of the higher mass region was already excluded for the SM Higgs by the time of this conference, and after less than a month, on 4 July, CERN announced the discovery of a new boson at 125 GeV, a particle that seems consistent with the Higgs particle so far. Once again, without the electromagnetic calorimeters, this would not have been possible. Professor Geoffrey West from the Santa Fe Institute gave the keynote address. His talk, 'Universal Scaling Laws from Cells to Cities - a Physicist's Search for Quantitative, Unified Theories of Biological and Social Structure and Dynamics,' inspired many interesting questions from the audience both after the talk and throughout the week during informal conversations. Calorimetry is extremely diverse: many different techniques may be employed in building the detector and also in extracting information from it. The topics of the Calorimeter Techniques sessions included high-rate liquid argon calorimeters, SiPM sensors, highly granular digital calorimeters, new crystals, and beam test and simulation results. In these pages, you will find exciting and sometimes contradicting points of view expressed, for example about fully sampling hadronic calorimeters. A rare astronomical event, the Venus transit, coincided with the second day of the conference. The participants enjoyed viewing Venus' trail across the sun with a solar telescope (H-alpha line at 656 nm). In Santa Fe, the interior ingress was at 16:23:04 and reached center at 19:27:04. The last transit occurred in 2004, and the next one will happen in 2117. In 1627, Johannes Kepler published data about the planetary orbits that predicted that Venus would pass directly between earth and the sun in 1631. Unfortunately Kepler died in 1630 and apparently nobody recorded the 1631 transit. The first recorded observation of a transit was in 1638, which Kepler had not predicted. Later, Jeremiah Horracks, an English astronomer, realized Kepler had made an error in his calculations. It was not until the Venus transit observations of 1769 that scientists measured the distance from the earth to the sun to be 95 million miles (actually 93 million miles or 149.7 million kilometers) based on the 1716 triangulation suggestion from Edmund Halley (of comet fame). It's interesting to remember that before the 18th century, one of the most vexing scientific puzzles, not unlike today's Higgs boson quest, was 'How far away is the Sun?' Although natural media such as Mediterranean water (ANTARES), Arctic ice (ARA, ARIANNA, ANITA, and others) or Utah air (TA) would hardly be choice absorbers in accelerator-based experiments, they are nevertheless successfully exploited in searches for new phenomena, as discussed by the members of these collaborations in several talks. Philippe Bruel (LLR, Ecole Polytechnique) gave an overview of the gamma-ray sky above 20 MeV using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the role of the hodoscopic array of CsI(Tl) calorimeter in an invited talk. In a second invited presentation, Sylvie Rosier-Lees (LAPP-Annecy) described the ECAL design (Pb/scintillating fiber sandwich) of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) that has been operating in the International Space Station since May 2011 and has collected over 15 billion events. The environs of Santa Fe have long been considered sacred by the first nation Americans and have been a source of inspiration for generations of artists, writers, and scientists. Robert Oppenheimer's love of this area played no small role in establishing what is now the nearby Los Alamos National Laboratory during the Second World War. On the third conference day, some participants visited the lab after an awe-inspiring trip to the Bandelier National Monument, where beautiful canyons and mesas show evidence of a human presence for over 11,000 years. Petroglyphs, dwellings carved into the soft rock cliffs, and standing masonry walls in the park mark the early days of a culture that still persists in surrounding communities. We are grateful to the International Advisory Committee for allowing us the opportunity to hold this Conference in these enchanted lands. In addition to making advances in calorimeter design, hardware, and front-end electronics, we in particle physics increasingly find ourselves inventing new algorithms to reconstruct physics objects that use the detector information to its maximum capacity. Several presentations provided details of the reconstruction and trigger of jets, missing transverse energy, electrons, photons, and taus. Pile-up, anomalous signals, and noise mitigation techniques were also discussed in the conference. On the last day, several future R&D initiatives were presented: highly granular CALICE with different technology options and plans for the dual-readout DREAM projects were the main topics. Although these approaches are quite different conceptually, future experiments will certainly benefit from their innovations. Concluding remarks by the chair of the organizing committee, Nural Akchurin (TTU), summarized the highlights of the conference and invited proposals to host the CALOR2014 conference in Europe, as the conference venue rotates between the Americas, Europe, and Asia every two years. We strived hard to keep the cost of this conference as low as possible without sacrificing the scientific mission. I am delighted to report that we were able to provide support for six junior colleagues to participate in this conference. I am also grateful to the institutions, industrial partners, and agencies that provided the support that made a lot possible: Texas Tech University, the University of New Mexico, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the US Department of Energy, CAEN, and the Wiener Plein & Baus, Corp. I also would like to thank the session conveners who organized sessions and reviewed the papers. The members of the local organizing committee were instrumental to the success of this conference: their experience and attention to detail were invaluable. Most of all, I extend my appreciation to the conference participants and to all my other colleagues who continue to enrich the field of calorimetry through their hard work and creativity. The future is bright. Nural Akchurin Chair of the Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee: Mikhail Danilov, ITEP Moscow Marcella Diemoz, INFN Roma I Antonio Ereditato, Univ. of Bern Franco L. Fabbri, INFN Frascati Tomio Kobayashi, ICEPP Tokyo Michele Livan, Pavia Univ. & INFN Pasquale Lubrano, INFN Perugia Steve Magill, ANL Amelia Maio, LIPP Lisbon Horst Oberlack, MPI Munich Adam Para, FNAL Klaus Pretzl, Univ. of Bern Yifang Wang, IHEP Beijing Richard Wigmans, TTU Ren-Yuan Zhu, Caltech Local Organizing Committee: Nural Akchurin, TTU Debra Boyce, TTU (Secretary) Xiadong Jiang, LANL Jon Kapustinsky, LANL Sung-Won Lee, TTU Sally Seidel, UNM Igor Volobouev, TTU Session Conveners: LHC I-III: David Barney (CERN) Ana Henriques (CERN) Sally Seidel (UNM) Calorimetry Techniques I-II: Francesca Tedaldi (ETH-Zurich) Tao Hu (IHEP-Beijing) Calorimetry Techniques III-IV: Craig Woody (BNL) Tohru Takeshita (Shinshu) Astrophysics and Neutrinos: Don Groom (LBNL) Steve Magill (ANL) Operating Calorimeters: Jordan Damgov (TTU) Gabriella Gaudio (INFN-Pavia) Frank Chlebana (FNAL) Algorithms and Simulations: Artur Apresyan (Caltech) Igor Volobouev (TTU) Front-end and Trigger: Chris Tully (Princeton) Kejun Zhu (IHEP-Beijing) Future Calorimetry: Michele Livan (Pavia Univ.) Frank Simon (MPI) Vishnu Zutshi (NICADD) List of Participants: ABOUZEID, Hass University of Toronto AKCHURIN, Nural Texas Tech University ANDEEN, Timothy Columbia University ANDERSON, Jake Fermilab APRESYAN, Artur California Institute of Technology AUFFRAY, Etiennette CERN BARILLARI, Teresa Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Physik BARNEY, David CERN BESSON, Dave University of Kansas BOYCE, Debra Texas Tech University BRUEL, Philippe LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3 BUCHANAN, Norm Colorado State University CARLOGANU, Cristina LPC Clermont Ferrand / IN2P3 / CNRS CHEFDEVILLE, Maximilien CNRS/IN2P3/LAPP CHLEBANA, Frank Fermilab CLARK, Jonathan Texas Tech University CONDE MUINO, Patricia LIP-Lisboa COWDEN, Christopher Texas Tech University DA SILVA, Cesar Luiz Los Alamos National Lab DAMGOV, Jordan Texas Tech University DAVYGORA, Yuriy University of Heidelberg DEMERS, Sarah Yale University EIGEN, Gerald University of Bergen EUSEBI, Ricardo Texas A&M University FERRI, Federico CEA/Saclay Irfu/SPP FRANCAVILLA, Paolo IFAE Barcelona GATAULLIN, Marat California Institute of Technology GATTO, Corrado INFN-Napoli GAUDIO, Gabriella INFN-Pavia GERMANI, Stefano INFN-Perugia Goldenzweig, Pablo University of Rochester GRAF, Norman SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory GROOM, Don Lawrence Berkeley Lab GUARDINCERRI, Elena Los Alamos National Laboratory HAUPTMAN, John Iowa State University HENRIQUES, Ana CERN HUANG, Jin Los Alamos National Laboratory HU, Tao IHEP-Beijing, CAS JIANG, Xiaodong Los Alamos National Laboratory JUI, Charles University of Utah KAPUSTINSKY, Jon Los Alamos National Laboratory KIBILKO, Mark SE Technical Sales, Inc. KIRSCHENMANN, Henning University of Hamburg KISTENEV, Edouard Brookhaven National Laboratory KLIMEK, Pawel Stockholm Universitet KROEGER, Robert University of Mississippi LECOQ, Paul CERN LEE, Sehwook Texas Tech University LEE, Sung-Won Texas Tech University LIVAN, Michele Pavia University LUTZ, Benjamin DESY MAGILL, Stephen Argonne National Laboratory MATHIS, Mark College of William and Mary MATTHEWS, John University of Utah MENKE, Sven Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik MOULSON, Matthew INFN-Frascati NAGEL, Martin Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik NAKAMURA, Isamu KEK NEMECEK, Stanislav FZU AVCR Praha NESSI-TEDALDI, Francesca ETH Zurich NOVOTNY, Rainer 2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen OREGLIA, Mark University of Chicago PERLOFF, Alexx Texas A&M University PETYT, David Rutherford Appleton Laboratory RAHMAT, Rahmat University of Mississippi RAMILLI, Marco Hamburg Universitaet ROSIER LEES, Sylvie LAPP- IN2P3-CNRS RUTHERFOORD, John University of Arizona SAKUMA, Tai Texas A&M University SANTIAGO CERQUEIRA, Augusto Federal University of Juiz de Fora SARRA, Ivano INFN-Frascati SEIDEL, Sally University of New Mexico SEIFERT, Frank TU Dresden, Germany SHAMIM, Mansoora University of Oregon SIMON, Frank Max-Planck-Institute for Physics STAFFAN, Paul Wiener Plein and Baus, Corp Dr. STAROVOITOV, Pavel DESY TABARELLI DE FATIS, Tommaso Universita' & INFN Milano-Bicocca TADEVOSYAN, Vardan AANL TAKESHITA, Tohru Shinshu University TALAGA, Richard Argonne National Laboratory TAPAN, Ilhan Uludag University TERWORT, Mark DESY TSAI, Oleg UCLA TULLY, Christopher Princeton University UNAL, Guillaume CERN VICHOU, Eirini University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign VILASIS-CARDONA, Xavier La Salle - Universitat Ramon Llull VOLOBOUEV, Igor Texas Tech University VOLPI, Matteo The University of Melbourne WANG, Zhigang IHEP-Beijing, CAS WENZEL, Hans Fermilab WHITE, Andy University of Texas at Arlington WIGMANS, Richard Texas Tech University WINN, David Fairfield University WOODY, Craig Brookhaven National Lab YANG, Fan California Institute of Technology ZABI, Alexandre LLR-Ecole Polytechnique ZHANG, Liyuan California Institute of Technoogy ZHAO, Zhiwen University of Virginia ZHU, Kejun IHEP-Beijing, CAS ZHU, Ren-Yuan California Institute of Technology ZUTSHI, Vishnu Northern Illinois University

  8. PREFACE: IC-MSQUARE 2012: International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, Theocharis; Vagenas, Elias; Vlachos, Dimitrios

    2013-02-01

    The first International Conference on Mathematical Modelling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Budapest, Hungary, from Monday 3 to Friday 7 September 2012. The conference was attended by more than 130 participants, and hosted about 290 oral, poster and virtual papers by more than 460 pre-registered authors. The first IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields in which mathematical modelling is used, such as theoretical/mathematical physics, neutrino physics, non-integrable systems, dynamical systems, computational nanoscience, biological physics, computational biomechanics, complex networks, stochastic modelling, fractional statistics, DNA dynamics, and macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, two parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The mounting question is whether this occurred accidentally, or whether IC-MSQUARE is a necessity in the field of physical and mathematical modelling. For all of us working in the field, the existing and established conferences in this particular field suffer from two distinguished and recognized drawbacks: the first is the increasing orientation, while the second refers to the extreme specialization of the meetings. Therefore, a conference which aims to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with applications of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology, environmental sciences etc., appears to be a necessity. This is the key role that IC-MSQUARE will play. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to IC-MSQUARE. We would also like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. Conference Chairmen Theocharis Kosmas Department of Physics, University of Ioannina Elias Vagenas RCAAM, Academy of Athens Dimitrios Vlachos Department of Computer Science and Technology, University of Peloponnese The PDF also contains a list of members of the International Scientific Committes and details of the Keynote and Invited Speakers.

  9. Proceedings of the International Conference on Physics Education. (Nanjing, The People's Republic of China, August 31-September 5, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Union of Pure and Applied Physics.

    This document contains 65 papers presented at the International Conference on Physics Education. Included are papers dealing with: (1) physics education in China; (2) the evaluation of physics courses in engineering colleges; (3) climate and weather; (4) the implications of physics education research for the classroom; (5) university physics…

  10. Report on the 4th International IUPAP Women in Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Cynthia

    2011-10-01

    Stellenbosch, South Africa was the site of the 4^th International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) International Conference on Women in Physics, which took place on April 5^th-8^th. This conference brought together the diverse contributions of 250 female physicist attendees from nearly 60 countries worldwide to dissect the challenges faced by female physicists worldwide and to propose strategies to attract and retain more girls and women to the field. Having served as a member of the U.S. Delegation, I will discuss the resolutions reached and highlight the most important results of Global Survey of Physicists, where nearly 15,000 physicists shine light on how gender affects their lives and careers.

  11. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, M.; Watanabe, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Takayasu, H.

    2010-04-01

    This volume contains contributed papers from the 7th international conference on 'Applications of Physics in Financial Analysis (APFA)' held at Tokyo on 1-5 March 2009. The conference was organized jointly by Tokyo Institute of Technology and Hitotsubashi University with support from the Research Institute of Economy, Trade, and Industry (RIETI), Physical Society of Japan, Japanese Economic Association, Information Processing Society of Japan, Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence, and Japan Association for Evolutionary Economics. The first APFA conference (APFA1) was held in 1999 at Dublin, followed by APFA2 at Liege in 2000, APFA3 at London in 2001, APFA4 at Warsaw in 2003, APFA5 at Torino in 2006, and APFA6 at Lisbon in 2007. The 7th APFA conference, which is the first meeting held outside Europe, was attended by 223 researchers in physics and economics from 23 countries world-wide. In keeping with past APFA conferences, we paid special attention to issues in financial markets, which turned out to be very timely. The conference was held in March 2009, in the middle of the global financial crisis that originally started in the US and spread quickly to every corner of the world. The topic of the conference is 'New Approaches to the Analysis of Large Scale Business and Economic data'. The rapid development of information and communication technology has enabled financial/non-financial firms to keep detailed records of their business activities in the form of, for example, tick-by-tick data in financial markets, point-of-sale (POS) data on individual household's purchasing activity, and interfirm network data describing relationships among firms in terms of suppliers/customers transactions and ownerships. This growth in the scope and amount of business data available to researchers has led to a far-reaching expansion in research possibilities. Researchers not only in social sciences but also in physics, mathematics, and information sciences have recently become interested in such datasets, conducting empirical investigations about various aspects of economic activities. Specifically, they have searched for regularities and 'laws' akin to the ones in natural science, successfully producing fascinating results, as shown in the papers contained in this volume. Each paper submitted for publication in this volume has gone through the refereeing process, and has been revised on the basis of comments and discussion at the conference as well as comments from the anonymous referees. Finally, 19 papers were accepted for publication. The editors are very grateful to the colleagues involved in the refereeing process for their rapid and careful reviewing of the papers. We thank Takayuki Mizuno, Koji Sakai, Hiwon Yoon and Hiroki Matsui for their support for the conference. We appreciate the administrative assistance provided by Yayoi Hatano of Hitotsubashi University, and Masahiko Ozaki, Masato Yamada and Tomoko Kase of RIETI. We are most grateful to the authors for their contributions, as well as to the participants, all of whom made this conference stimulating and enjoyable. Misako Takayasu Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan Tsutomu Watanabe Hitotsubashi University, Japan RIETI, Japan Yuichi Ikeda Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd, Japan Hideki Takayasu Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc, Japan

  12. 16th Russian Youth Conference on Physics of Semiconductors and Nanostructures, Opto- and Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suris, Robert A.; Vorobjev, Leonid E.; Firsov, Dmitry A.

    2015-01-01

    The 16th Russian Youth Conference on Physics of Semiconductors and Nanostructures, Opto- and Nanoelectronics was held on November 24 - 28 at St. Petersburg Polytechnic University. The program of the Conference included semiconductor technology, heterostructures with quantum wells and quantum dots, opto- and nanoelectronic devices, and new materials. A large number of participants with about 200 attendees from many regions of Russia provided a perfect platform for the valuable discussions between students and experienced scientists. The Conference included two invited talks given by a corresponding member of RAS P.S. Kopyev ("Nitrides: the 4th Nobel Prize on semiconductor heterostructures") and Dr. A.V. Ivanchik ("XXI century is the era of precision cosmology"). Students, graduate and postgraduate students presented their results on plenary and poster sessions. The total number of accepted papers published in Russian (the official conference language) was 92. Here we publish 18 of them in English. Like previous years, the participants were involved in the competition for the best report. Certificates and cash prizes were awarded to a number of participants for the presentations selected by the Program Committee. Two special E.F. Gross Prizes were given for the best presentations in semiconductor optics. Works with potential applications were recommended for participation in the following competition for support from the Russian Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises in Science and Technology. The Conference was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, the "Dynasty" foundation and the innovation company "ATC - Semiconductor Devices", St. Petersburg. The official Conference website is http://www.semicond.spbstu.ru/conf2014-eng.html

  13. CALOR2012 XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Akchurin, Nural .

    2015-05-04

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, or the CALOR series, have always been where the calorimeter experts come together to review the state of calorimetry and bring forth new ideas every two years. The #12;fteenth conference, CALOR2012, in Santa Fe was no exception. Although they were built roughly a decade ago, we are now witnessing the exceptional power of the LHC calorimeters and the crucial role they have been playing in the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs-like boson. As we ruminate on the coming generation of experiments at the next (linear) collider and on the upgrades at the LHC, we are heartened by the substantial advances we made in calorimetry in the last decade. These advances will certainly help uncover new physics in the years to come, not only at colliders but also in astroparticle experiments that take advantage of natural elements such as air, water, and ice. The proceedings were published by the IOP in Journal of Physics, Vol 404 2011. The conference web site is calor2012.ttu.edu.

  14. 16th international conference on the physics of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Stephan; Stöhlker, Thomas; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2013-09-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 16th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2012) held at the Ruprecht-Karls University in Heidelberg, Germany, 2-7 September 2012 (figure 1). This conference has been part of a biannual conference series that was started in Stockholm in 1982 and, since then, has been organized at various places around the world, with recent venues in Belfast (UK, 2006), Tokyo (Japan, 2008) and Shanghai (China, 2010). The physics of highly charged ions (HCI) is a rapidly developing and attractive field of research with impact upon many other research disciplines. Apart from fundamental studies on the structure and dynamics of matter in extreme fields, or the search for physics beyond the standard model, detailed knowledge about the properties and behavior of HCI is crucial for other areas, from astro- and solar physics to hot plasma and fusion research to extreme ultra-violet and ion lithography, or even to medical research, to name just a few. In fusion research, for example, of whether tokamak, stellarator or confinement fusion facilities, most models and diagnostics deeply rely on the understanding of HCI and the (theoretical) prediction of accurate atomic data for these systems. In life science, moreover, ion therapy or the laser acceleration of ions and electrons may help save and improve the quality of life in the future. Many of these and further topics are addressed in these proceedings. After 30 years, the HCI conference series, and especially the meeting in Heidelberg, is appreciated much as a key forum for bringing together senior experts with students, young researchers and scientists from related disciplines who make use and give back impact upon the research with HCI. More than 250 scientists from 23 countries participated in HCI 2012 and presented the current status of the field. About one third of them were post-graduate students, showing that the field attracts many young and talented physicists. The conference was held in the Physics Lecture Hall at the New Campus of Heidelberg University. On the evening of 2 September, the day before the opening of HCI 2012, all participants were welcomed warmly at the foyer of this lecture hall, whose decorative glass front provides a view upon artificial ponds and water lilies at this time of the year. For many colleagues and delegates, this evening offered a hearty re-encounter with each other, along with wine and other beverages. The conference then opened on the morning of 3 September, and an exciting program was organized by the local committee with the help of the International Advisory Board, including 5 invited talks, 10 progress reports as well as 26 selected talks. In addition, more than 230 posters were presented in two sessions, with beer and brezels aside. On Tuesday evening, an exciting public lecture on Heavy ions in therapy and space was given by Marco Durante from the GSI Helmholtz Center and Technical University in Darmstadt. Moreover, many of the participants joined the guided tour through the old city of Heidelberg with its famous (ruins of the) castle, and several the Solar Boat Trip. On Thursday night, we all enjoyed the conference dinner with home-brewed beer and regional specialties at the 'Kulturbrauerei' in the historic center of Heidelberg. Finally, scientific tours were also organized to GSI Darmstadt and the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg on the last day of the conference, and attracted much consideration. We here present the proceedings of this conference that contain a total of 104 contributions, including invited papers, progress reports and contributed papers. As previously, these papers are grouped into five categories. (1) Fundamental aspects, structure and spectroscopy. (2) Collisions with electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. (3) Interactions with clusters, surfaces and solids. (4) Interactions with photons, plasmas and strong field processes. (5) Production, experimental developments and applications. All papers were refereed by senior delegates to the conference, and we like to thank all of them for their work and rapid response. The next conference in this series will be held in Bariloche, Argentina, at the beginning of September 2014 for which we wish the organizers great success. Looking forward seeing you again in 2014. Acknowledgments Much of the success of the conference was due to the continuous support of the Advisory Board, the Local Organization Committee and the financial support by various academic and industrial sponsors. In particular, we wish to acknowledge the generous support by the Wilhelm-and-Else Heraeus Foundation, The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics. We thank all of them, and especially Stefanie Lüttges and Natali Jurina and her team from UniTT Conference Management. The assistance of Hans-Georg Siebig is very much appreciated. Finally, many thanks also to the post-graduate students from the Department of Physics and Astronomy in Heidelberg, who helped with customizing the conference site and running the audio-visual equipment.

  15. The NVL gene confers risk for both major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Chen, Jianhua; He, Kuanjun; Wang, Qingzhong; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Wen, Zujia; Song, Zhijian; Xu, Yifeng; Shi, Yongyong

    2015-10-01

    NVL (nuclear VCP (valosin containing protein)/p97-Like), a member of the AAA-ATPase (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) family, encodes a novel hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase)-interacting protein NVL2 which is a telomerase component essential for holoenzyme assembly. Previous researches have reported the impacts of telomerase activity on mental illness and the potential association between NVL and major depressive disorder. To validate the susceptibility of NVL to major depressive disorder, and to investigate the overlapping risk conferred by NVL for both major depressive disorder and schizophrenia, we analyzed 9 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag SNPs) using TaqMan® technology, in 1045 major depressive disorder patients, 1235 schizophrenia patients and 1235 normal controls of Han Chinese origin. We found that rs10916583 (P(allele) = 0.020, P(genotype) = 0.028, OR = 1.156) and rs16846649 (adjusted P(allele) = 0.014, P(genotype) = 0.007, OR = 0.718) were associated with major depressive disorder, while rs10916583 (adjusted P(allele) = 1.08E-02, OR = 1.213), rs16846649 (adjusted P(allele) = 7.40E-06, adjusted P(genotype) = 8.07E-05, OR = 0.598) and rs10799541 (adjusted P(allele) = 8.10E-03, adjusted P(genotype) = 0.049, OR= 0.826) showed statistically significant association with schizophrenia after Bonferroni correction. Furthermore, rs10916583 (adjusted P(allele) = 9.00E-03, adjusted P(genotype) = 3.15E-02, OR = 1.187) and rs16846649 (adjusted P(allele) = 8.92E-06, adjusted P(genotype) = 8.84E-05, OR = 0.653) remained strongly associated with the analysis of combined cases of major depressive disorder and schizophrenia after Bonferroni correction. Our results indicated that the NVL gene may contain overlapping common genetic risk factors for major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. The roles of NVL in telomerase biogenesis were also highlighted in psychiatric pathogenesis. The study on variants conferring overlapping risk for multiple psychiatric disorders could be tangible pathogenesis support and clinical or diagnostic references. PMID:25891250

  16. Emergency Evacuation of People with Physical Disabilities from Buildings: 2004 Conference Proceedings (Rockville, Maryland, October 13-14, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A two-day conference on Emergency Evacuation of People with Physical Disabilities from Buildings, sponsored by the Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR), Interagency Subcommittee on Technology (IST), was held on October 13-14, 2004, in Rockville, Maryland. This document is meant to summarize the conference's presentations and…

  17. 24th IUPAP Conference on Computational Physics (2012): Introduction, acknowledgements, program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Takabe, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    Welcome to CCP2012, held next to the K computer site in Kobe and in Japan's best season. The Conference on Computational Physics (CCP) is organized annually under the auspices of Commission 20 of the IUPAP (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics). This is the first time it has been held in Japan. I was asked to be the chairman about two and half years ago and when I accepted the request I decided to make the conference very unique and different from the traditional style of CCP. I was not satisfied when I attended big conferences where the parallel sessions are classified with the name of the research field. These days we have many opportunities to attend domestic and international conferences, where it is possible to listen to many talks on the same topics. If the topics are very new, then the conference is very useful for my research. However, I wanted to have a conference where I could listen to a variety of topics carried out with the same method. Computational science is very unique and it is easy to organize a new type of conference with the classification in the horizontal direction of the matrix made of the names of research fields and the name of numerical methods. You may be able to list the names of methods easily; finite difference, Monte Carlo, particle, molecular dynamics and so on. I was dissatisfied to find that most conferences focus solely on research fields and the method that brings to the scientific research is not highlighted as much. I wanted to listen to topics from fundamental physics to industrial science in a systematic way. In order to create such a conference, a small number of experts is not enough, so I asked for the help of more than 100 Japanese computer scientists, in a variety of fields. We called this group the Japan Advisory Board (JAB). I asked them to recommend a member of the International Advisory Board (IAB). Then, we could start making the list of plenary and invited speakers. This was almost the end of March last year. CCP2012 is organized also to celebrate the shared use of the K computer and we selected a venue next to it. Its use is of course open to the public and started on 28 September, one month earlier than had been scheduled. I hope you also enjoy the guided tour of the K computer. Throughout CCP2012, I hope new collaborations start among scientists in different fields. It would be also my great pleasure if such an inter-disciplinary conference encouraged young scientists (with their fresh energy and skills) to challenge new topics in different fields, particularly emerging ones like bio-computing, industrial applications, social sciences and so on. Finally, allow me to express my sincere thanks to all members of the local organizing committee (LOC). Twenty scientists from three universities and one institute voluntarily worked very hard to prepare CCP2012. Hideaki Takabe (Aki) The Chairman, CCP2012

  18. PREFACE: 13th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélat, Pierre; Pinfield, Valerie; Cegla, Frederic; Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The 13th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held at Selsdon Park Hotel, Croydon near London, United Kingdom, on 15-17 January 2014. The venue was an excellent location to exchange ideas, regardless whether this happened in the conference room, over lunch at the drinks reception in the conservatory, in the oak panelled bar after the conference dinner or in the local pub next door. Over 45 papers were presented at the conference. There were over 60 delegates from institutions covering four countries. The invited speakers from the French side shared their knowledge about the generation of sound from supersonic jets (Prof Christophe Bailly, École Centrale de Lyon) and the application of ultrasonic microscropy in the nuclear industry (Prof Gilles Despaux, Université de Montpellier). The UK invited speakers included Prof Malcolm Povey (University of Leeds), who talked about characterisation of the nucleation of crystals using ultrasound, and Prof Bruce Drinkwater (University of Bristol), who captured the audience by speaking about "ultrasonic lassos" and ultrasonic particle manipulation. There was a strong representation of laser ultrasonics at the meeting with scientific considerations of problems and applications that range from the macro to the nanoscale. There were also numerous papers on the interaction of elastic and acoustic waves with complex materials and scattering of these waves by materials such as foams or cavitating liquids. Presentations on biomedical applications are increasingly being featured at AFPAC meetings. Talks this year covered topics such as imaging and high-intensity focused ultrasound for therapeutic applications. Finally, there were also several contributions from the field of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) with talks ranging from the determination of the properties of in vivo wood to ultrasonic scattering techniques and tomographic reconstructions to recover the size and shape of defects in pipes and plates. The UK organising committee was particularly happy to welcome the many French contributors that travelled to Croydon and would like to thank Alain Lhémery and the Société Française d'Acoustique (SFA) for publicising the event in France. We are happy to announce that many of the presented papers will be published in the conference proceedings in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We would also like to draw the reader's attention to the upcoming 14th AFPAC conference that is scheduled to take place on 14-16 of January 2015 in Fréjus, France.

  19. Major initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada: the year in review.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    This commentary briefly reviews 10 significant initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada in 2007. These include: the Children's Fitness Tax Credit; CAN-PLAY research findings from the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute; resurrection of ParticipACTION; Healthy Weights for Healthy Kids report from the Standing Committee on Health; launch of the Canadian Health Measures Survey; publication of the Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Management and Prevention of Obesity in Adults and Children; Canada's food and beverage industry initiatives launch; hosting the International Conference on Physical Activity and Obesity in Children; release of the Active Healthy Kids Canada report card on physical activity for children and youth; and publication of the "advancing the future of Canada's physical activity measurement and guidelines" project. The diversity and intensity of activity addressing the childhood obesity and physical inactivity "epidemic" in Canada is encouraging and must be maintained. PMID:19039882

  20. Spiral-syllabus course in wave phenomena to introduce majors and nonmajors to physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touger, Jerold S.

    1981-09-01

    A single course to introduce physics to both nonscience and physics majors has been developed, dealing with light, sound, and signal, transmission and reception, and emphasizing wave aspects of these phenomena. Themes such as the observational basis of physics, the progression from qualitative observation to measurement, physical models, mathematical modeling, and the utility of models in developing technology are stressed. Modes of presentation, consistent with the notion of a spiral syllabus, are explained with reference to the cognitive and educational theories of Bruner and Piaget. Reasons are discussed for choosing this subject matter in preference to Newtonian mechanics as a starting point for physics majors.

  1. "The Confidence I Needed": Elementary Education Majors' Perceptions of Teaching Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte; Ashy, Madge

    2006-01-01

    Many US states do not require that elementary schools provide a physical education specialist, making the classroom teacher the only provider of physical education instruction. Their attitudes toward physical education and perceptions of their ability to teach it will affect their efforts to do so. Elementary education majors (n = 183) were…

  2. Wilderness Leadership for Physical Education Majors: The Current National Status of Wilderness Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Ping; Jewell, John; Davies, Nigel; Fletcher, Sue; McLaughlin, Erin; Workman, Gayle

    Outdoor/adventure education is a relatively new content area required by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for students majoring in physical education. Teacher preparation programs in physical education have yet to adopt a standardized curriculum. A survey was completed by 162 of the 536 physical education programs in…

  3. Physics Majors: Where do they come from? Where do they go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    Physics majors represent a small but important part of the physics education system in the United States. They also make up an equally small but important part of the workforce and supply post secondary institutions with students pursuing graduate level degrees in physics. This paper will give an over view of the backgrounds of undergraduate physics majors, the types of institutions and departments they attend, and their experiences as undergraduates. It will outline the types of employment new physics bachelors accept including employment sectors, work activities and the fields in which they are employed. Finally, it will give an overview of the physics majors (and others) who pursue graduate level physics education and their initial employment outcomes.

  4. News Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

  5. The neuronal transporter gene SLC6A15 confers risk to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Martin A.; Lucae, Susanne; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Demirkan, Ayse; Hek, Karin; Czamara, Darina; Alexander, Michael; Salyakina, Daria; Ripke, Stephan; Hoehn, David; Specht, Michael; Menke, Andreas; Hennings, Johannes; Heck, Angela; Wolf, Christiane; Ising, Marcus; Schreiber, Stefan; Czisch, Michael; Müller, Marianne B.; Uhr, Manfred; Bettecken, Thomas; Becker, Albert; Schramm, Johannes; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Cichon, Sven; Craig, Ian W.; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Binder, Elisabeth B.

    2011-01-01

    Major depression (MD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and a leading cause of loss in work productivity. A combination of genetic and environmental risk factors likely contributes to MD. We present data from a genome-wide association study revealing a neuron-specific neutral amino acid transporter (SLC6A15) as a novel susceptibility gene for MD. Risk allele carrier status in humans and chronic stress in mice were associated with a downregulation of the expression of this gene in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the pathophysiology of MD. The same polymorphisms also showed associations with alterations in hippocampal volume and neuronal integrity. Thus, decreased SLC6A15 expression, due to genetic or environmental factors might alter neuronal circuits related to the susceptibility for MD. Our convergent data from human genetics, expression studies, brain imaging and animal models suggest a novel pathophysiological mechanism for MD that may be accessible to drug targeting. PMID:21521612

  6. PREFACE: 16th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Rainer W.

    2015-02-01

    The XVIth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics - CALOR 2014 - was held in Giessen, Germany from 6-11 April 2014 at the Science Campus of the University. It was hosted by the Justus-Liebig-University and the HIC for FAIR Helmholtz International Center. The series of conferences on calorimetry were started in 1990 at Fermilab and are focusing primarily on operating and future calorimeter systems within the Hadron and High-Energy Physics community without neglecting the impact on other fields such as Astrophysics or Medical Imaging. Confirmed by the impressive list of over 70 oral presentations, 5 posters and over 100 attendees, the field of calorimetry appears alive and attractive. The present volume contains the written contributions of almost all presentations which can be found at http://calor2014.de. Time slots of 15 or 30 minutes including discussion were allocated. The conference was accompanied by a small exhibition of several industrial companies related to the field. The day before the opening of the scientific program, Richard Wigmans gave an excellent and vivid tutorial on basic aspects on calorimetry meant as an introduction for students and conference attendees new in the field. The opening ceremony was used to give an impression of the present and future status and the scientific program of the new FAIR facility nearby at Darmstadt presented by Klaus Peters from GSI. The conference program of the first day was dedicated to the performance and required future upgrade of the LHC experiments, dominated by ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The program of the next day contained specific aspects on electronics and readout as well as calorimetry in outer space. Several contributions discussed in detail new concepts for hadron calorimeters within the CALICE collaboration completed by a session on sampling calorimeters. The next sections were dedicated to operating and future calorimeters at various laboratories and covering a wide range of projectiles and beam energies, such as ELSA at Bonn, BELLE2, BESIII or future projects at JLab, FAIR or RHIC. The last group of contributions was focusing on new concepts including new detector materials or techniques taking into account the general demand on radiation hardness. Damage caused by a large fluence of hadrons appears to become the limiting factor for the detector performance in future collider experiments. The scientific program was completed by a single contribution on applications in medical imaging. Marcella Diemoz gave a personal conference summary underlining again the high quality of the presentations, lively discussions and the wide range of the physics program and the related detector systems. The significant support by the Justus-Liebig-University, HIC for FAIR and sponsoring industrial partners allowed to keep the overall costs low and to support the participation of students and young scientists. I personally would like to thank the session chairs, the local organizing committee, the secretaries, technicians and students of the institute for the smooth operation of the conference. Finally, I would like to express my appreciation to all participants who made the conference successful by their high level contributions and discussion distributing their ideas and experiences. Rainer W Novotny Chair of the Conference

  7. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences 2013 (IC-MSQUARE 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The second International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Prague, Czech Republic, from Sunday 1 September to Thursday 5 September 2013. The Conference was attended by more than 280 participants and hosted about 400 oral, poster, and virtual presentations while counted more than 600 pre-registered authors. The second IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel sessions were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee. Further information on the editors, speakers and committees is available in the attached pdf.

  8. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The third International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place at Madrid, Spain, from Thursday 28 to Sunday 31 August 2014. The Conference was attended by more than 200 participants and hosted about 350 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. More than 600 pre-registered authors were also counted. The third IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather heavy since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral sessions and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful, thus all attendees had a creative time. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  9. PREFACE: 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSquare2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Dimitrios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2015-09-01

    The 4th International Conference on Mathematical Modeling in Physical Sciences (IC-MSQUARE) took place in Mykonos, Greece, from Friday 5th June to Monday 8th June 2015. The Conference was attended by more than 150 participants and hosted about 200 oral, poster, and virtual presentations. There were more than 600 pre-registered authors. The 4th IC-MSQUARE consisted of different and diverging workshops and thus covered various research fields where Mathematical Modeling is used, such as Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Integrable Systems, Dynamical Systems, Computational Nanoscience, Biological Physics, Computational Biomechanics, Complex Networks, Stochastic Modeling, Fractional Statistics, DNA Dynamics, Macroeconomics etc. The scientific program was rather intense as after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, three parallel oral and one poster session were running every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high quality of talks creating an innovative and productive scientific environment for all attendees. We would like to thank the Keynote Speaker and the Invited Speakers for their significant contribution to IC-MSQUARE. We also would like to thank the Members of the International Advisory and Scientific Committees as well as the Members of the Organizing Committee.

  10. AINSE Plasma Science and Technology Conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White Workshop on Fundamental Problems in the Physics of Magnetically Confined Plasmas: Conference handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The handbook contains abstracts of papers and posters presented at the conference. The main topics relate to plasma physics and fusion, plasma processing and uses as well as specific fusion devices and experiments. Eighty-four out of ninety-two presentations were considered to be in the INIS subject scope and have been separately indexed.

  11. WHY TEACH PHYSICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BROWN, SANBORN C.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BOOK CONTAINS A SURVEY OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON PHYSICS IN GENERAL EDUCATION, HELD IN RIO DE JANEIRO IN JULY 1963. THIS WAS THE SECOND CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED PHYSICS. CONFERENCE ADDRESSES, CONSTITUTING THE MAJOR PORTION OF THE TEXT, CONSIDER THE TEACHING OF SECONDARY SCHOOL GENERAL EDUCATION…

  12. The Graduate Record Examination as an indicator of learning of the curriculum taught to physics majors in US institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halley, J. W.; Adjoudani, Azin; Heller, Patricia; Terwilliger, James S.

    1991-05-01

    A study is described to evaluate the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) as an indicator of learning by undergraduate physics majors. Measures were obtained of the overlap of the Graduate Record Examination in physics with the curriculum as it is taught to physics majors in US colleges and universities. The output of the project, for a given subfield f and set j of institutions, was two numbers Rj, f1 and Rj, f2. These two numbers estimated the extent to which (1) for Rj, f1, the curriculum prepares students at institutions j to take that part of the GRE which covers subfield f and (2) for Rj, f2, the GRE covers the materials in subfield f taught in the curriculum of institutions j. The subfields f were mechanics, electricity and magnetism, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, modern physics, and ``other'' (including experimental, mathematical, and solid-state physics). The institutions j were grouped into four categories: ``top graduate'' (those with the 20 best-ranked graduate programs); ``top undergraduate'' (those participating in the Oberlin Conference on College Science); ``random graduate'' (other institutions with graduate programs); and ``random undergraduate'' (other institutions without graduate programs). Generally the results show that the GRE does not cover the entire curriculum (low values of R2) for any institutional type. With regard to the coverage of the GRE by the curriculum (R1 values), there are significant differences between institutions of different types. Institutions with graduate programs have curricula that cover the modern physics and statistical mechanics aspects of the GRE significantly better than institutions without graduate programs.

  13. REPORT FROM THE ORGANIZERS: The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) was hosted by the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium of the Leiden Institute of Physics and held in the RAI Convention Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. It was the second time that the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory had the privilege of organizing an LT conference. In 1958, at LT6, 50 years of liquid helium temperatures were commemorated; in 2008 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the remarkable achievements of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators in Leiden. In 1958 there were 323 participants and 145 papers appeared in the proceedings; in 2008 these numbers had increased to 1390 participants and 900 papers, of which eventually 849 were accepted. This large participation required adequate conference and housing facilities. These could not be found in Leiden, but were conveniently available in Amsterdam. The triennial International Low Temperature Conferences are organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) through Commission C5 on Low Temperature Physics. It is the most important global meeting that brings together the international scientific community in the broad field of Low Temperature Physics. Because the meeting is held only every third year the 11 plenary and 22 half plenary talks (of 45 or 30 min.) generally provide an overview of important new discoveries over the last few years, whereas the 161 short oral presentations (20 min.) are mainly focused on very recent developments. Since the field is broad, embracing a large section of condensed matter physics, the program is divided into five parallel program lines: A. Quantum Gases, Fluids and Solids B. Superconductivity C. Quantum Phase Transitions and Magnetism D. Electronic Quantum Transport in Condensed Matter E. Cryogenic Techniques and Applications This distinction was used both to group the 1625 accepted abstracts, and the short-oral and poster presentations; the number of oral sessions per program line was made in proportion to the number of accepted abstracts per category (A: 323, B: 526, C: 404, D: 276, and E: 96, about the same distribution as at previous LT conferences, e.g. LT22 in Helsinki). Also the papers appearing in the on-line part of the proceedings are grouped according to this classification. From the 877 submitted papers 826 were accepted, 41 rejected, and 10 were withdrawn. In the 5 poster sessions altogether 1479 posters were presented (A: 311, B: 463, C: 370, D: 249 and E: 86). Two special evening sessions were organized to address (very) recent developments. In the first place there was a romp session about the surprising discovery of high temperature superconductivity in iron-based compounds with 7 rounds of about 5 short presentations concluded with 10 min. discussion each. In a parallel session the concern about the demand for and price of liquid helium was discussed in relation to future trends in cryocoolers which may considerably reduce the need for liquid helium. In an outreach evening session, open to the general public, we had two distinguished speakers: Dr Philppe Lebrun (CERN, Geneva), who talked about the cryotechnology of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and Professor Allan Griffin (University of Toronto) about the intriguing history of superfluidity. The centenary of liquid helium and the birth of low temperature physics were celebrated at the conference excursion to Leiden on Sunday 10 August 2008. Lack of space forced us to limit the number of participants to 643, but many others went on their own initiative. They could attend 3 historical lectures in the former Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, and visit several museums where special expositions related to '100 years of liquid helium' were arranged. The conference dinner in the center of Amsterdam on Monday evening was attended the by 555 people. Traditionally, at the opening session of the LT conferences time is reserved for prize ceremonies. The recipients of the most important prize in low temperature physics, the Fritz London Memorial Prize 2008, were Yuriy M Bunkov (Institute Neël, Grenoble), Vladimir V Dmitriev, and Igor A Fomin (both Kapitza Institute, Moscow). They got the prize for their discovery and understanding of the 'Phase Coherent Spin Precession and Spin Superfluidity of 3He-B'. The Simon Prize 2008 of The Physical Society went to Yasunobu Nakamura and Jaw-Shen Tsai (NEC Laboratories, Tsukuba) for their 'Pioneering demonstration of quantum coherent behaviour in a macroscopic object and for their subsequent explorations of quantum coherent physics in a series of novel superconducting devices'. The Nicholas Kurti European Science Prize (sponsored by Oxford Instruments) was awarded to Lieven Vandersypen (Delft University of Technology) for his 'Ground-breaking work on the coherent control of nuclear and electron spins, with possible application to quantum information processing'. Finally, the first IUPAP Young Scientist Prizes in Low Temperature Physics went to Kostya Novoselov (University of Manchester) for his 'Contribution in the discovery of graphene and for pioneering studies of its extraordinary properties', to Dai Aoki (Tohuko University, Sendai) for his 'Discovery of novel heavy fermion superconductivity in actinide compounds', and to Viktor Tsepelin (Lancaster University) for 'The development of new experimental techniques and key discoveries in the fields of 3He crystals and quantum turbulence'. All prize recipients got the opportunity to present their work in an invited oral contribution. As is common practice nowadays all announcements, registrations, paper submissions and communications regarding program and practical matters were done electronically, either by email or via internet. Nevertheless, the program book was still printed and handed out to all participants at registration and they received an electronic version on a USB stick as well. The stick also contained all the submitted (but not yet refereed) papers received before 15 July 2008. The final decisions about the scientific program were made in Leiden at a meeting of the program committee members in April 2008. This turned out to be a very efficient and pleasant procedure. The decision to split up the Proceedings in two parts had been taken much earlier in consultation with the Chair of C5 and the IUPAP. In order to optimize impact factors it has become common policy of publishing companies to publish proceedings of big conferences like the LT conference in special on-line journals (open access), such as Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We were pleased with the possibility to publish the most important contributions to the program of LT25 in a special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The latter will not only appear in print, but will also be available on-line for a period of 1 year from publication. Organizing a conference like LT25 could not have been accomplished without the help of many enthusiastic and dedicated colleagues. I would like to extend my sincere thanks to all of them, but above all, to my colleagues of the organizing committee. Peter Kes Chairman LT25

  14. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yaming; Hutton, Roger

    2011-07-01

    This issue contains papers presented at the 15th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions, HCI2010. The conference was held at Fudan University, Shanghai, 29 August-3 September 2010. HCI is a biannual conference series going back to the very first conference held in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982. Previous editions in this millennium were held in Berkeley, USA, 2000; Caen, France, 2002; Vilnius, Lithuania, 2004; Belfast, UK, 2006, and Tokyo, Japan, 2008. The physics of highly charged ions, HCIs, is of great interest due to their key role in testing quantum electrodynamics in strong fields, and possible testing of parity non-conservation. However, HCIs also play crucial roles in the physics of hot plasmas, for example those produced in tokamak fusion devices and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Much of the diagnostics of matter under such extreme environments relies very heavily on high quality atomic data of HCIs. The field of x-ray astronomy hinges almost entirely on the use of spectral lines from HCIs to provide information from distant astrophysical plasmas and objects. Given these fundamental interests and the current rapid developments in fusion and x-ray astronomy, it is clear that the physics of HCIs is a rich area of research with strong and important connections to many important subfields of physics. New application areas of HCI physics are also under development: two examples are (a) to provide 13.5 nm—and later half of this wavelength—radiation for lithography and (b) applications in medical research. The need for high quality atomic data of HCIs is as important now as it has ever been. HCI2010 was attended by over 200 scientists from around 20 countries; see the following table. Over 70 of the participants were students, which is very encouraging for the future of HCI related physics. The academic programme was organized based on the suggestions from the International Advisory Board, and consisted of six review lectures, nine progress reports, one local report and 21 selected talks. Country Tot. Reg. Stu. Country Tot. Reg. Stu. Argentina 1 1 0 Ireland 4 3 1 Austria 4 3 1 Japan 33 18 15 Brazil 1 1 0 Jordan 1 1 0 Canada 1 1 0 The Netherlands 1 1 0 China 63 26 37 Poland 4 3 1 Egypt 1 1 0 Portugal 1 1 0 France 12 11 1 Russia 4 2 2 Germany 30 19 11 Sweden 5 3 2 Greece 1 1 0 USA 7 7 0 India 8 5 3 Tot.=Total, Reg.=Regular and Stu.=Student. The proceedings could never have been published without the diligent work of the referees and we are very grateful for their help. The order of the 69 articles follows the five classic subfields of the HCI conference: Fundamental aspects, structure and spectroscopy Collisions with electrons, ions, atoms and molecules Interactions with clusters, surfaces and solids Interactions with photons, plasmas and strong field processes Production, experimental developments and applications. The day before the official opening of HCI2010, Sunday 29 August, we welcomed the conference delegates with a reception held at the Guanghua (Fudan twin towers) 15th floor 'sky bar' restaurant. Two poster sessions were arranged for the contributed papers on the afternoons of 30 and 31 August. After a visit to the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility on the afternoon of Wednesday 1 September we enjoyed a conference dinner at the Shanghai Sea Palace restaurant. Throughout the dinner we were entertained with traditional Chinese music by members of Fudan University's folk music group. A visit to the Shanghai 2010 World Expo, the largest World Expo in history (so far), was arranged for the Thursday afternoon. Finally the conference came to a close at lunchtime on Friday 3 September. It was a very successful conference due to the contributions of all the participants, the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organization Committee. We would like to thank them all. The next edition of the HCI conference series will be held at the University of Heidelberg, Germany in 2012, under the Chairmanship of Professors Thomas Stoehlker and Joachim Ullrich. We wish them all the best with their plans and look forward to meeting you all again in 2012. Committees, Exhibitors and Sponsors HCI2010 International Advisory Committee F Aumayr (Austria) T Azuma (Japan) P Beiersdorfer (USA) J Burgdoerfer (Austria) A Cassimi (France) H Cederquist (Sweden) J Costello (Ireland) F Currell (UK) R Hoekstra (Holland) X Ma (China) F Martín (Spain) A Mueller (German) N Nakamura (Japan) M Pajek (Poland) R Rivarola (Argentina) Z Rudzikas (Lithuania) V Shabaev (Russia) R Schuch (Sweden) T Stoehlker (Germany) J Tanis (USA) L Tribedi (India) K Tokési (Hungary) J Ullrich (Germany) D Vernhet (France) Y Zou (China) T Zouros (Greece) HCI2010 Local Organizing Committee Co-chairs: Yaming Zou and Roger Hutton (Fudan university) Secretaries: Baoren Wei and Yunqing Fu (Fudan University) Treasurers: Xiuqing Xu and Daoli Xu (Shanghai Nuclear Society) Members Chongyang Chen (Shanghai) Jianmin Yuan (Changsha) Jun Yan (Beijing) Chenzhong Dong (Lanzhou) Xiaohong Cai (Lanzhou) Xinwen Ma (Lanzhou) Xuru Duan (Sichuan) Baohan Zhang (Sichuan) Exhibitors Andor Technology andor.com Shanghai Kelin Technology Development Co. Ltd chnkelin.com Varian Inc. varianinc.com Sponsors Natural Science Foundation of China International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) Fudan University

  15. Strategic priorities for increasing physical activity among adults age 50 and older: the national blueprint consensus conference summary report.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Lisa; Senior, Jane; Park, Chae Hee; Mockenhaupt, Robin; Bazzarre, Terry; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek

    2003-12-01

    On May 1, 2001, a coalition of national organizations released a major planning document designed to develop a national strategy for the promotion of physically active lifestyles among the mid-life and older adult population. The National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older was developed with input from 46 organizations with expertise in health, medicine, social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, gerontology/geriatrics, clinical science, public policy, marketing, medical systems, community organization, and environmental issues. The Blueprint notes that, despite a wealth of evidence about the benefits of physical activity for mid-life and older persons, there has been little success in convincing age 50+ Americans to adopt physically active lifestyles. The Blueprint identifies barriers in the areas of research, home and community programs, medical systems, public policy and advocacy, and marketing and communications. In addition to identifying barriers, the Blueprint proposes a number of concrete strategies that could be employed in order to overcome the barriers to physical activity in society at large. This report summarizes the outcome of the National Blueprint Consensus Conference that was held in October 2002. In this conference, representatives of more than 50 national organizations convened in Washington, D.C. with the goal of identifying high priority and high feasibility strategies which would advance the National Blueprint and which could be initiated within the next 12 to 24 months. Participants in the consensus conference were assigned to one of five breakout groups: home and community, marketing, medical systems, public policy, and research. Each breakout group was charged with identifying the three highest priority strategies within their area for effectively increasing physical activity levels in the mid-life and older adult population. In addition to the 15 strategies identified by the breakout groups, three "cross-cutting" strategies were added which were considered to be broad-based in scope and which applied to more than one of the breakout themes. A national organization was identified to take the lead in planning and implementing each strategy. A summary of the 18 strategies and lead organizations is presented. The National Blueprint Consensus Conference has identified an ambitious agenda of strategies and tactics that will need to be implemented in order to overcome societal barriers to physical activity among the mid-life and older adult population. More than 50 national organizations have expressed a commitment to work towards the implementation of the Blueprint agenda. Eighteen priority strategies have been identified in the areas of home and community, marketing, medical systems, public policy, and research. The organizations charged with the task of implementing the high priority strategies will use professional networks and established delivery channels and communication systems to translate this plan into action. PMID:24688279

  16. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Particle Physics in memoriam Engin Arık and her Colleagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Serkant Ali; Jenni, Peter; Erkcan Özcan, Veysi; Nefer Şenoğuz, Vedat

    2012-02-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Particle Physics in memoriam Engin Arık and her Colleagues: Fatma Şenel Boydağ, İskender Hikmet, Mustafa Fidan, Berkol Doğan and Engin Abat was held at Doğuş University, İstanbul, Turkey on 20-25 June 2011. The conference was organized jointly by the Doğuş and Boğaziçi Universities, with support from CERN and the Turkish Academy of Sciences. This was the second International Conference on Particle Physics (ICPP) organized in memory of Engin Arık and her Colleagues who lost their lives in the tragic plane accident on November 30 2007, on their way to the workshop of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. The first of this conference series was held on 27-31 October 2008 at Boğaziçi University, İstanbul, Turkey. The conference is intended to be repeated every two years in Istanbul as a Conference Series under the name 'ICPP-Istanbul'. Professor Engin Arık had a pioneering role in experimental particle physics in Turkey, and was an inspiring teacher to many colleagues. She led the Turkish participation in experiments at CERN such as CHARMII, SMC, CHORUS, ATLAS and CAST. One of her latest involvements was in the national project to design the Turkish Accelerator Center with the collaboration of 10 Turkish universities including Doğuş and Boğaziçi. Our dear colleagues not only participated in the TAC project but also collaborated on the ATLAS (E Arık, E Abat and B Doğan) and CAST (E Arık, F Şenel Boydağ, İ Hikmet and B Doğan) experiments. We believe that the ICPP-Istanbul conference series has been, and will always be, a way to commemorate them in a most appropriate context. The topics covered in ICPP-Istanbul-II were 'LHC Physics and Tevatron Results', 'Neutrinos and Dark Matter', 'Particle Factories' and 'Accelerator Physics and Future TeV Scale Colliders'. The main emphasis was on the recent experimental results in high-energy physics with discussions on expectations from existing or future experiments. There were 20 plenary and 35 contributed talks at the conference, and a majority of these presentations are included in this proceedings. We are grateful to all speakers, the collaborations represented, and all members of the advisory and organizing committees for their invaluable contributions which enabled the conference to reach such a high scientific quality with many exciting results and discussions, making it a big success. Serkant Ali Çetin Chair of the Organizing Committee Peter Jenni Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee Scientific Advisory Committee Organizing Committee Ovsat AbdinovANAS, AzerbaijanKazem AziziDoğuş U. Metin ArıkBoğaziçi U., TurkeySerkant Ali Çetin*Doğuş U. Albert De RoeckCERN, SwitzerlandZuhal KaplanBoğaziçi U. Daniel DenegriCEA, FranceÖzgül KurtuluşDoğuş U. Samim ErhanUCLA, USAErkcan ÖzcanBoğaziçi U. Dan GreenFNAL, USANefer ŞenoğuzDoğuş U. Erhan GülmezBoğaziçi U., Turkeyİsmail UmanDoğuş U. Rolf HeuerCERN, Switzerland Peter Jenni*CERN, Switzerland*Committee Chairs Max KleinLiverpool U., UK Livio MapelliCERN, Switzerland Tatsuya NakadaEPFL, Switzerland Yaşar ÖnelIowa U., USA Gülsen ÖnengütÇukurova U., Turkey Ken PeachOxford U., UK Christoph RembserCERN, Switzerland Leonid RivkinPSI, Switzerland Yannis SemertzidisBNL, USA Saleh SultansoyTOBB ETU, Turkey Gökhan ÜnelUCI, USA Konstantin ZioutasPatras U., Greece Organizing InstitutionsSupporting Institutions DogusCERN Doğuş UniversityCERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research BogaziciTUBA Boğaziçi UniversityTÜBA - The Turkish Academy of Sciences

  17. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Chikashi

    2009-07-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI2008), held at the University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan from 1-5 September 2008. This series of conferences began in Stockholm, Sweden in 1982 and has since been held every other year; in Oxford, UK (1984), Groningen, the Netherlands (1986), Grenoble, France (1988), Giessen, Germany (1990), Manhattan, Kansas, USA (1992), Vienna, Austria (1994), Omiya, Japan (1996), Bensheim, Germany (1998), Berkeley, USA (2000), Caen, France (2002), Vilnius, Lithuania (2004) and Belfast, UK (2006). Highly charged ions (HCI), which are defined as highly ionized (i.e. positively charged atomic) ions here, mainly exist in hot plasmas such as the solar corona and fusion plasmas. It is true that its importance in plasma physics has driven researchers to the spectroscopic studies of HCIs, but the spectroscopy of few-electron ions is not only important for plasmas but also interesting for fundamental atomic physics. Electrons moving fast near a heavy nucleus give a suitable system to test the fundamental atomic theory involving relativistic and quantum electro-dynamic effects in a strong field. Also, the huge potential energy of a HCI induces drastic reaction in the interaction with matter. This unique property of HCIs, coupled with the recent development of efficient ion sources, is opening the possibility to utilize them in new technologies in the field such as nano-fabrication, surface analysis, medical physics, and so on. Hence, this conference is recognized as a valuable gathering place for established practitioners and also for newcomers; we exchange information, we are introduced to the subject itself, and to unexpected interfaces with other fields. On 31 August, the day before the opening of HCI2008, we welcomed the delegates at the university's restaurant—and we were greeted with an unusually heavy summer shower! The conference then opened on the morning of 1 September. In the evening we invited the foreign delegates to the Tokyo-EBIT laboratory and entertained them with sushi and YEBISU beer at the lab (YEBISU is a popular brand of beer in Japan and also the nickname of the Tokyo-EBIT project, Young Electron Beam Ion Source Unit). Cans of YEBISU beer also helped us to make the poster sessions lively, on the evenings of 2 and 4 September. The best poster of each session was selected by the vote of International Advisory Board, and two young scientists were awarded the prizes. On the afternoon of 3 September, we took an excursion to Lake Yamanaka near Mount Fuji for a conference outing. The conference dinner was then held at a hotel alongside Lake Yamanaka from where we really enjoyed the view of Mount Fuji. In the summer it is quite rare to have clear weather, but a teru-teru bozu (a Japanese paper doll with a wish for good weather) placed on the top page of the conference WEB site brought us clear skies for the dinner. About 200 scientists from 22 countries registered for the HCI2008. The number of invited talks was 18 and the contributed papers 206. These proceedings contain 9 invited talks and 107 contributed articles. Following the previous conference, they are grouped into the five categories of: (1) Fundamental aspects, structure and spectroscopy; (2) Collisions with electrons, ions, atoms and molecules; (3) Interactions with clusters, surfaces and solids; (4) Interactions with photons, plasmas and strong field processes, and (5) Production, experimental developments and applications. We are happy that the conference was completely successful, and this success owes much to the sponsors. We acknowledge the support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Matsuo Foundation, Iwatani Naoji Foundation, CASIO Science Promotion Foundation, and The Society for Atomic Collision Research. The next International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions will be held in Shanghai under the organization of Professor Y Zou of Fudan University and her colleagues. We wish the organizers of HCI2010 all possible success and are looking forward to meeting you all in Shanghai. Toshiyuki Azuma, Nobuyuki Nakamura and Chikashi Yamada Editors

  18. Telephone-Based Physical Activity Counseling for Major Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Wadhwani, Roini; Sullivan, Mark D.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Kraft, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity represents a promising treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We conducted a single-blind, two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-week physical activity counseling intervention delivered primarily by telephone (n = 44) to a wait-list control group (N = 48).…

  19. Mental Rolodexing: Senior Chemistry Majors' Understanding of Chemical and Physical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Bruce, Heather; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Using a constructivist framework, eight senior chemistry majors were interviewed twice to determine: (i) structural inferences they are able to make from chemical and physical properties; and (ii) their ability to apply their inferences and understandings of these chemical and physical properties to solve tasks on the reactivity of organic…

  20. Mental Rolodexing: Senior Chemistry Majors' Understanding of Chemical and Physical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Bruce, Heather; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Using a constructivist framework, eight senior chemistry majors were interviewed twice to determine: (i) structural inferences they are able to make from chemical and physical properties; and (ii) their ability to apply their inferences and understandings of these chemical and physical properties to solve tasks on the reactivity of organic

  1. Stories of Discovery Stimulate the Physics Major--A Polemic, with Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1980-01-01

    Provides historical examples of intuitive discovery applicable to the teaching of physics for majors. Cites details for the discovery of Coulomb's law, emphasizing the roles of Joseph Priestley and Henry Cavendish. Also discusses the career of Ivar Giaever, a Nobel Prize winner of 1973 in solid state physics. (CS)

  2. Induction of a Major Leaf Acid Phosphatase Does Not Confer Adaptation to Low Phosphorus Availability in Common Bean1

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaolong; Liao, Hong; Trull, Melanie C.; Beebe, Steve E.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2001-01-01

    Acid phosphatase is believed to be important for phosphorus scavenging and remobilization in plants, but its role in plant adaptation to low phosphorus availability has not been critically evaluated. To address this issue, we compared acid phosphatase activity (APA) in leaves of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a phosphorus-inefficient genotype (DOR364), a phosphorus-efficient genotype (G19833), and their F5.10 recombinant inbred lines (RILs). Phosphorus deficiency substantially increased leaf APA, but APA was much higher and more responsive to phosphorus availability in DOR364 than in G19833. Leaf APA segregated in the RILs, with two discrete groups having either high (mean = 1.71 ?mol/mg protein/min) or low (0.36 ?mol/mg protein/min) activity. A chi-square test indicated that the observed difference might be controlled by a single gene. Non-denaturing protein electrophoresis revealed that there are four visible isoforms responsible for total APA in common bean, and that the difference in APA between contrasting genotypes could be attributed to the existence of a single major isoform. Qualitative mapping of the APA trait and quantitative trait loci analysis with molecular markers indicated that a major gene contributing to APA is located on linkage group B03 of the unified common bean map. This locus was not associated with loci conferring phosphorus acquisition efficiency or phosphorus use efficiency. RILs contrasting for APA had similar phosphorus pools in old and young leaves under phosphorus stress, arguing against a role for APA in phosphorus remobilization. Our results do not support a major role for leaf APA induction in regulating plant adaptation to phosphorus deficiency. PMID:11299369

  3. Physical Education Majors' Judgments about Inclusion and Teaching Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Elliott, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the beliefs about inclusion and teaching students with disabilities of physical education (PE) majors from universities in North Carolina (NC). The participants were PE majors (n = 147) and other enrolled students (n = 30) at colleges and universities in NC. The research method was descriptive survey…

  4. Scientific Reasoning Abilities of Nonscience Majors in Physics-Based Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson's Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on…

  5. PREFACE: XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livan, Michele

    2009-07-01

    The XIII International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics was held in Pavia, Italy, 26-30 May 2008, picking up the baton from the 2006 Conference in Chicago. The Conference took place in the unique environment of the Theresian Room of the University Library. The attendees were surrounded by over 40 000 books of general interest and culture, and had the opportunity to see precious volumes written by such people as Galileo, Volta and Faraday. The Workshop brought together more than 120 participants, including senior scientists as well as young physicists, confirming the central and ever-growing role of calorimeters in modern particle physics. The development of these detectors, as stressed by Professor Klaus Pretzl in his lectio magistralis, has made it possible to explore new frontiers in physics, and the present scenario is no exception to this rule. With the LHC experiments almost completely installed and ready to take data, the Conference was an ideal chance to review the status of the different projects, whose development has been followed and discussed throughout the entire Calor series, and to show that they are capable of meeting the design specifications. Other highlights were the performance and physics results of calorimeters installed in currently operating experiments. In the session on astrophysics and neutrinos, the contributions confirmed the key role of calorimeters in this sector and demonstrated their growing application even beyond the field of accelerator physics. Considerable time was devoted to the state-of-the-art techniques in the design and operation of the detectors, while the session on simulation addressed the importance of a thorough understanding of the shower development to meet the demanding requirements of present experiments. Finally, on the R&D side, the particle flow and dual read-out concepts confronted the challenges issued by the next generation of experiments. This complex material was reviewed in 83 presentations, now reported in these proceedings, that were debated in stimulating and fruitful discussions. Outside of the Workshop, the participants were able to visit the historical Halls and Museum of the University, whose foundation dates back to the year 1361, and to enjoy a visit to the Certosa, a Carthusian monastery renowned for its exuberant architecture. Pavia welcomed the Conference participants by opening the doors of the Town Hall and offering a reception during which the Mayor's address underlined the importance of research and its applications in modern society. The successful organization and the smooth running of the Conference is due to many people and Institutions. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), the Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics and the University of Pavia, that made the Workshop possible, together with the contribution of our sponsors. The University also opened some rooms of the Chancellor's suite for the lunch and coffee breaks, and hosted the Conference Secretariat. We would like to express our deepest gratitude to the INFN and Department technical staff, who helped to prepare the Hall for the Conference and to provide computer services, and to the staff of the Theresian Library, who gave us access to the Room and organized a display of the many historical books from their vast and precious collections which are of interest to physicists. Above all, the success of the meeting is due to the participants who animated it, and in particular to the speakers for their dedicated work in preparing their excellent talks and in providing the write-ups, and to the conveners for their essential role in shaping an interesting and well balanced scientific program. Finally, we wish to thank the International Advisory Committee for their unfailing support and for offering us the opportunity to organize this Conference in Pavia. Michele Livan Chairman, Organizing Committee International Advisory Commitee M Danilov, ITEP Moscow M Diemoz, INFN Roma I A Ereditato, Bern F Fabbri, INFN Frascati T Kobayashi, ICEPP Tokyo P Lubrano, INFN Perugia S Magill, ANL Argonne A Maio, LIP Lisbon H Oberlack, MPI Munich A Para, Fermilab K Pretzl, Bern Y Wang, IHEP Beijing R Wigmans, TTU Lubbock R Yoshida, ANL Argonne R Zhu, Caltech Local Organizing Committee R Ferrari, INFN Pavia M Fraternali, Università di Pavia G Gaudio, INFN Pavia M Livan, Università di Pavia (Chair) P Pedroni, INFN Pavia D A Scannicchio, INFN Pavia V Vercesi, INFN Pavia Session Organizers Operating Calorimeters W Sakumoto (University of Rochester) D Schamberger (State University of NY at Stony Brook) Calorimetric Techniques C De La Taille (Université de Paris-Sud) Paul Lecoq (CERN) Frank Maas (GSI-Mainz University) Jan Stark (LPSC Grenoble) Astrophysics and neutrinos I Gil Botella (CIEMAT) A Vacchi (INFN Trieste) LHC P Bloch (CERN) L Serin (Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire/IN2P3/CNRS) New Techniques N Akchurin (Texas Tech University) F Salvatore (Royal Holloway University of London) Simulation T Carli (CERN) A Rimoldi (INFN e Università di Pavia) Organization Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica - Università degli Studi di Pavia Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Pavia Università degli Studi di Pavia Pragma Congressi, Corso Mazzini, 9 - Pavia Sponsored by CAEN HAMAMATSU Photonis Italia Iseg Spezialelektrinik GmbH Wiener

  6. FROM THE CURRENT LITERATURE: Review of experimental results in high-energy physics reported at recent conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostovtsev, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    The current status of experimental high-energy physics is reviewed based on recent conference sources and taking into account the forthcoming LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments when selecting the material. The latest experimental data discussed relate closely to the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb physics programs.

  7. Teaching Emergence and Collective Behavior in Physics and Biology to Non-majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Emergence and collective behavior form one of the most fertile intersections of physics and biology in current research. Unfortunately, modern and interdisciplinary concepts such as these are often neglected in physics courses for non-majors. A team of four graduate students and a faculty advisor recently redesigned our department's course for non-majors (Concepts of Physics for Humanities and Social Science Students) to focus on emergence and collective behavior along with three other major themes in modern physics. In the course we developed basic concepts of statistical physics and thermodynamics to understand a variety of emergent phenomena in physics and biology, including bird flocking, superconductivity, and protein folding. We discussed the notion of life itself as an inherently emergent phenomenon arising from the collective behavior of molecules. The students also wrote their own blog posts on emergent phenomena and interactively explored emergence through workshops on Foldit (the protein folding game) and Conway's Game of Life. We believe our course demonstrates some possibilities and challenges for teaching non-majors at the intersection of physics and biology. I gratefully acknowledge my collaboration with Aatish Bhatia, Deepak Iyer, Simon Knapen, and Saurabh Jha.

  8. Effect of satisfaction in major at university on academic achievement among physical therapy students

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate satisfaction in major among physical therapy students and to identify the sub-factors of satisfaction in major affecting academic achievement. [Subjects and Methods] We distributed a self-administered questionnaire, comprising items relating to satisfaction in major and academic achievement to 369 physical therapy students located in Seoul, Daejeon, Jinju, Pohang, and Gunsan. [Results] General satisfaction and academic achievement showed the greatest correlation (r = 0.235), followed by course satisfaction (r = 0.123). [Conclusion] Several sub-factors were found to affect academic achievement. The results of this study can be used as the basis for programs that aim at development of satisfaction in major and academic achievement among clinical physical therapists. PMID:25729179

  9. Development of pyramidal lines with two major QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight is an emerging threat in rice cultivation. It is animportant disease caused by the soil-borne necrotrophic pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. However, to date neither known major genes for quantitative resistance, nor any rice lines immune to this disease has been identified. The disease resistance is quantitative in nature. Numerous genes are involved in this resistance process. There are few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected conferring improved resistance against the disease. Teqing and Tetepshowimproved resistance having QTLs, qSB-9 and qSBR11-1, respectively. Since, these QTLs demonstrates additive effects, pyramiding of these QTLs might be an option to increase the sheath blight resistance in rice. Nine rice cultivars were screened at greenhouse conditions. Results showed that Tetep and Teqing had the lowest disease ratings. UKMRC2a new high yielding cultivar was as recipient parent. Crosses between UKMRC2 and Teqing, and UKMRC2 and Tetep were made and confirmed. Subsequently 4-way crosses between the two F1s were performed to develop pyramidal lines.

  10. FOREWORD: TAUP 2005: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Alessandro; Coccia, Eugenio; Morales, Julio; Puimedónv, Jorge

    2006-04-01

    The ninth meeting of the TAUP Workshop Series, TAUP 2005, was organized by the University of Zaragoza and Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc, jointly with the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN). It was dedicated to the memory of professor Angel Morales, co-founder of the TAUP Series and a central figure in the scientific shaping and organization of the TAUP conferences since their inception in 1989. He and his group of collaborators laid, twenty years ago, the foundations of underground physics in Spain. To have TAUP 2005 hosted by the University of Zaragoza was a tangible way of honouring his memory. The Conference was concluded by a visit to the new installations of the Canfranc Laboratory, where a memorial ceremony was held in honour of Angel Morales, the driving force for the creation of that Laboratory. In TAUP 2005 all the various aspects of Astroparticle Physics have been covered, from Cosmology and Dark Constituents, to Gravitational Waves, to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, to High Energy Astrophysics, to Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays Astronomy. New and important scientific results were presented and debated in the plenary review talks and in a very large number of contributions in topical parallel sessions. As editors of these proceedings, we hope that this volume, which contains most of the talks and contributions presented at TAUP 2005, will provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of Astroparticle Physics. We thank all the invited speakers and contributors who made this possible. Full coverage of the transparencies presented at the conference can be found on the website http://www.unizar.es/taup2005. At TAUP 2005 a memorial lecture was delivered by Art McDonald to commemorate John Bahcall, who passed away prematurely in August 2005. In this talk, his figure, as a pioneer and leader in the fields of Neutrino Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics and as a man of great personal qualities, was illustrated. The TAUP Steering Committee recalls with deep gratitude that John Bahcall served continuously as a member of the TAUP International Advisory Committee and that he gave an inspired and brilliant conclusive talk at TAUP 2003 in Seattle. Our astroparticle community will miss him greatly. The TAUP 2005 Organizing Committee thanks Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Gobierno de Aragón, Zaragoza University, INFN, IUPAP, PaNAGIC and Ibercaja for sponsoring the Conference, and the Rector and Vice-Rector of the Zaragoza University for their hospitality in the magnificent Paraninfo Palace, where the meeting was held. We wish to thank Venya Berezinsky, José Bernabéu and José Angel Villar for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. Very special thanks are due to Ms Mercedes Fatás and Ms Franca Masciulli, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Leopolda Benazzato for her invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Cristina Gil, Francisco Javier Mena and Alfonso Ortiz de Solórzano for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2007 will be held in Sendai, Japan, hosted by the Tohoku University with the chairs of Professors Atsuto Suzuki and Kunio Inoue. COMMITTEES TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F. T. Avignone, U. South Carolina B. Barish, CALTECH E. Bellotti, U. Milano/INFN J. Bernabéu, U. Valenciav A. Bottino (chair), U. Torino/INFN V. de Alfaro, U. Torino/INFN T. Kajita, ICRR Tokyo C. W. Kim, JHU Baltimore/KIAS Seoul E. Lorenz U. München V. Matveev, INR Moscow J. Morales, U. Zaragoza D. Sinclair, U. Carleton TAUP 2005 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J. J. Aubert, CNRS Marseille J. Bahcall, U. Princeton M. Baldo-Ceolin, U. Padova/INFN L. Bergström, U. Stockholm R. Bernabei, U. Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A. Bettini, U. Padova/INFN S. Bilenky, JINR Dubna/ICTP Trieste D. O. Caldwell, U.C. Santa Barbara J. Cronin, U. Chicago A. Dar, Technion Haifa G. Domogatsky, INR Moscow H. Ejiri, U. Osaka J. Ellis, CERN E. Fernández, IFAE Barcelona E. Fiorini, U. Milano/INFN G. Fogli, U. Bari/INFN M. Fukushima, ICCR Tokyo T. Gaisser, U. Delaware G. Gelmini, UCLA A. Giazotto, INFN, Pisa F. Halzen, U. Wisconsin W. Haxton, U. Washington E. Iarocci, U. Roma/INFN T. Kirsten, MPI Heidelberg L. Maiani, U. Roma/INFN A. McDonald, Queen's U. L. Mosca, Saclay/LSM Frejus E. Peterson, U. Minneapolis/Soudan R. Petronzio, INFN/U. Roma Tor Vergata G. Raffelt, MPI München R. Rebolo, IAC Tenerife L. Resvanis, U. Athens P. Salati, U. Savoie/LAPTH Annecy A. Smirnov, ICTP Trieste N. Spooner, U. Sheffield S. Ting, MIT/CERN M. S. Turner, FNAL/U. Chicago J.W.F. Valle, IFIC Valencia D. Vignaud, CdF Paris F. von Feilitzsch, T.U. München G. Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2005 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE V.S. Berezinsky, INFN/LNGS J. Bernabéu, U. Valencia A. Bottino, U. Torino/INFN E. Coccia (co-chair), INFN/LNGS/U. Roma Tor Vergata J. Morales (co-chair), U. Zaragoza J. Puimed¢n (scientific secretary), U. Zaragoza J. A. Villar, U. Zaragoza

  11. Physics and Industrial Development - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Physics and Industrial Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzinelli, R.; Moreira, R. L.; Rodrigues, W. N.

    1997-04-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Sponsors * Committees * Opening Lecture * Relations between Science and Industry in Brazil * Technological Change and Economic Development * Science and Economic Development * Recent Technological Change and Industrial Dynamics * Technology and Economic Development: Suitability of the Institutional System of Minais Gerais * Bridging the Gap * Transfer of Scientific Results into Industry: A Controversial Problem in Central and Eastern Europe * Bridging the Gap Between Basic Research and Industrial Development at the J. STEFAN Institute * Liquid Crystals: A Case Study of the Interaction Between Science and Application * Role of Physics in the Modern Industrialization Process of Korea * Research in Industry * A Theoretical Physicist's 21-Year Experience in the Argentine Industry * Four Characters in Search of a Profession * Status and Prospects for the Use of Renewable Sources of Energy in Minas Gerais State-Brazil * University-Industry Cooperation I * Development and Industrialization of Fiber Optics Metrology Equipment * Finnish Experiences on University-Industry Collaboration in Materials Science and Physical Metallurgy * A Conceptual Framework for Understanding the Interaction between Academic Research and Industry * Technological Modernization of the Alkaline Cooking Process for the Production of Masa and Tortilla * The Fapergs Program on University Versus Private Enterprise * Integral Development Centers: Tying Mexican Industry With the National Polytechnic Institute * Materials Characterization and Applied Physics * Imaging Manganese Sulfide Inclusions in Grain Oriented Silicon Steels * Electrical Resistivity Changes Associated to Static Strain Aging in High Carbon Steel * PVD Hard Coatings for Wear Applications * Scanning Acoustic Microscopy: Application to Porous Materials * Indentation Testing of Thennal Sprayed WC-Co * Applications of Capillary Electrophoresis with Laserinduced Fluorescence Detector in Biological Sciences and Chemistry * Quality Assessment of Solder Bonds of Printed Circuit Boards by Metallography * Observation of InAs Nanostructures on (100)-GaAs Substrate with Atomic Force Microscopy * In Situ Observations By Atomic Force Microscopy of Corrosion of An Aluminium Film in a Solution of HCl * Atomic Force Microscopy of Metallurgical Interactions in Integrated Circuit Contacts * Atomic Force Microscopy of Microcavity Semiconductor Devices * Characterization of the Emitted Air Particies By Steel Industries * A Comparative Study of the Anodic Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels - Din 1.4462-In Synthetic Sea-water * Study of the Corrosion Resistance of Duplex Stainless Steels in Solutions Containing Chlorides, Compared with other Stainless Steels * Development of New Materials and Devices * Development of the Electronic Signal in Proportional Detectors * Development of a Portable Ultrasound Equipment for Backfat Evaluation of Live Pigs * Thermal Barrier Coatings by Plasma Spraying * Scaling in Fragmentation Phenomena * A Study of Sn:In2O3 (ITO)/CuInSe2 Heterojunction for Solar Energy Applications * Organising a Ceramic Powder Shape Electronic Database * Feasibility of a Mixer Using the Negative Resistance of a SNS Junction * Characteristics of v-SiO2 Melted in Refractory Metal Furnace * Lasers for Industrial and Medical Applications * Portable Cat Scanner Applied to Collapsible Soil Studies * Experiments with Slip Casting of Fine Ceramics and v-SiO2 * R2Fe17 Halides: The Birth of a Material for Potential Hard Magnetic Applications * Computerized System for Embryos Freezing Protocols Development * Ferroelectric Parent Materials as Possible High-Tc Superconductors: High Temperature Magnetic and Electric Properties of Modified BNN and SBN * CVD Diamond: Emerging Technology for Many Applications * Development of New Techniques and Processes * Application of Mechanical Relaxation Spectroscopy to the Development of Low Carbon Steels * Measurement of Root Length by Digital Image Analysis * A Simple Model of a Glow Discharge Electron Beam for Materials Processing * Decorative Colored Oxide Coatings on Stainless Steel * Strengthening of Steel-Thermal-Sprayed -We-Co Interface * Protein Crystallography Station at LNLS * Fast Neural Systems for Experimental Physics and Industrial Applications: The Sennape Project * Automatic System for Measuring Myopia, Hyperopia and Astigmatism * The Feasibility of Pumping the He/Ne/H2, 585.3 nm Laser with the IPRl Steady State Triga Reactor * Optical and Mechanical Design of an Ophthalmic lnstrument: Slit Lamp * A Simple Model for Laser Ablation * University-Industry Cooperation II * From Basic Research in Plasma Physics to Applications in the Metal Mechanic Industry in Santa FE, Argentina * Role of the State in Bridging the Gap Between the Scientific and the Industrial Sectors. Experience in Province of Santa FE, Argentina * Physics in the BEM Program: Biomass-Energy-Materials * Production of Advanced Hard Materials - An Experience of Physical Research for Industry

  12. Physics of climate change, taught as a topics a course for undergraduate physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2012-10-01

    While anthropogenic (human-caused) climate change is generally accepted in the scientific community, there is considerable skepticism among the general population. Science students are often asked by their peers, family members, and others, whether they ``believe'' climate change is occurring and what should be done about it (if anything). While the pertinent material is covered in undergraduate physics courses, it helps to review the basics in order to develop an educated perspective on this topic that is very volatile (socially and politically). The basic topics are introductory quantum mechanics (discrete energy levels of atomic systems), molecular spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, and appreciation for the scientific method (particularly peer-reviewed research). These topics are usually covered in undergraduate modern physics and thermodynamics courses, but a separate course on climate change (taught in Spring 2012) helped ``put things together'' for both the students and their professor.

  13. Topical conference: Opportunities in biology for physicists. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-16

    The conference was aimed at early career physicists who were interested in exploring the possibilities of working at the interface between physics and biology, in particular, graduate students and postdocs considering applying the methods of physics to biological research. Areas of major importance were genomics and evolution, biological networks, biomolecular dynamics, high-resolution imaging of living cells, and technologies for biological investigation. A total of 205 persons attended the conference.

  14. PREFACE: 17th International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    The 17th edition of the International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions (HCI 2014) was held in San Carlos de Bariloche, in the southern region of Argentina known as Patagonia, from August 31 to September 5, 2014. This meeting corresponds to a series of HCI conferences, which has been held every other year since 1982 in cities in Europe, USA, Japan and China. This was the first time that the conference took place in Latin America. This edition was organized by a Local Committee made up of physicists mainly from the cities of Bariloche and Rosario and also from Buenos Aires and Bahía Blanca, all sites where research on Atomic Collisions is developed. The conference was attended by delegates coming from 18 countries, more that 23% of whom were women. The field of highly charged ions has seen in recent years a promising evolution originating from bold progress in theory and significant advances in experimental techniques. The HCI conferences aim at bringing together experimentalists and theoreticians from as wide a range of fields as, for instance, Fundamental Aspects, Structure and Spectroscopy, Collisions with Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules, Interaction with Clusters, Surfaces and Solids, Interactions with Photons and Plasmas, Strong Field Processes, and Production, Experimental Developments and Applications. The Scientific Programme, selected by an International Advisory Board, included 5 Review Lectures, 11 Progress Reports, 1 Local Report and 24 Special Reports. In addition, the results of 132 contributed works were presented as poster communications and a Public Lecture on 'The wonders of the Southern Skies' was delivered by an Argentinean expert. Thus, a wide range of subjects comprising a balanced mix of topics was covered throughout the course of the conference. The HCI 2014 was a resounding success for the international and local communities, from both the scientific and social aspects, considering that the attendees and accompanying persons had the opportunity to enjoy a comfortable and friendly ambiance as well as the beautiful landscapes of the region including big lakes and high mountains. During the conference vivid and interesting scientific discussions were maintained by the participants in a relaxed environment. The Local Organizing Committee would like to recognize the generous contributions made by various institutions: International Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Investigación Aplicada S. E. (INVAP), Patagonia Norte Division of CONICET, Instituto Balseiro and NEC Corporation. The Local Chairs would like to express their gratitude to all the other members of the Local Organizing Committee who collaborated with a great effort and in countless ways to the success of the conference. In particular, we thank Omar Fojón for the outstanding collaboration received, and Juan Manuel Monti, who worked hard for the production of the Book of Abstracts and other related activities. We also would like to thank Renata Della Picca, Juana Gervasoni and Silvina Seguí, for their generous work in printing the book of abstracts, bags, banners, etc. and for their continuous help at the Registration Desk. We extend our gratitude to the younger members of the Local Organizing Committee, Marcos Feole, Francisco Navarrete and Juan Martín Randazzo for their help with the poster logistics; and to Luis Rodríguez for ensuring that all the presentations were ready and on schedule. We thank María Silvia Gravielle, our colleague and liaison in Buenos Aires, for helping delegates to get their visas on time; Sebastián Otranto and Jocelyn Hanssen, for their early work collecting and sorting the talk's proposals and Carlos Stia, for helping with the revision of the style of the manuscripts. We also thank M. Galassi, P Focke and D. Fregenal. We recognize Sergio Suárez, for getting funding from private sources and Roberto Garibotti, for his help with the edition of the book of abstracts. We thank Lynn van Brook for her work as conference secretary, and Silvana Peralta and Natalia Mastrángelo, for the web development and graphic design. Finally, we express our acknowledgements to the scientists that participated during the refereeing process of the present Proceedings. Raúl Barrachina Flavio Colavecchia Roberto Rivarola Local Chairs, HCI 2014 December 2014

  15. PREFACE: International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberauer, Lothar; Raffelt, Georg; Wagner, Robert

    2012-07-01

    The 12th edition of the International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP 2011) was held 5-9 September 2011 in Munich (and for the first time in Germany). It was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP), the Technical University Munich (TUM) and the Cluster of Excellence 'Origin and Structure of the Universe'. The conference was held in the 'Künstlerhaus', a traditional downtown location for artistic festivities. The meeting attracted 317 participants (61 of which were women) from 29 countries, see figure below. The topics covered by the meeting were Cosmology and particle physics, Dark matter and its detection, Neutrino physics and astrophysics, Gravitational waves and High-energy astrophysics and cosmic rays, and the various interfaces between these areas. The scientific sessions consisted of five mornings of plenary talks, four afternoons of parallel sessions, and an evening poster session. The co-founder of the conference series, Alessandro Bottino, has decided to retire from the position of chairman of the TAUP Steering Committee after the completion of TAUP 2011. On behalf of all followers of this series, we thank him for having started these inspiring events and his many years of dedicated service. We thank all speakers, conveners and participants as well as the members of the organizing, steering and international advisory committee for making this a successful and memorable meeting. Lothar Oberauer, Georg Raffelt, Robert Wagner Proceedings editors Figure Committees International Advisory Committee G AntonUniversity of Erlangen E AprileColumbia University M Baldo-CeolinUniversity of Padova R BattistonUniversity of Perugia & INFN L BergströmUniversity Stockholm R BernabeiUniversity of Rome 'Tor Vergata' A BettiniLSC Canfranc P BinetruyAPC Paris J BlümerKarlsruhe Institute of Technology B CabreraStanford University A CaldwellMax Planck Institute for Physics M ChenQueens University E CocciaUniversity of Rome 'Tor Vergata' K DanzmannMax Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics S DodelsonFermilab G DomogatskyINR Moscow E FioriniUniversità di Milano Bicocca & INFN K FreeseUniversity of Michigan M FukugitaICRR Tokyo T GaisserUniversity of Delaware G GerbierCEA Saclay F HalzenUniversity of Wisconsin W HaxtonLNBL & UC Berkeley J HoughGlasgow University E KomatsuUniversity of Texas E KatsavounidisMassachusetts Institute of Technology M LindnerMax Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics K LeskoLBNL & UC Berkeley A McDonaldQueens University & SNO Laboratory H MurayamaIPMU Tokyo & UC Berkeley A OlintoUniversity of Chicago L ResvanisUniversity of Athens A RubbiaETH Zurich S SarkarUniversity of Oxford A SmirnovICTP Trieste N SmithSNO Laboratory C SpieringDESY Zeuthen N SpoonerUniversity of Sheffield Y SuzukiICRR Tokyo M TeshimaMax Planck Institute for Physics J W F ValleIFIC & University of Valencia L VotanoLNGS E WaxmanWeizmann Institute J WilkersonUniversity of North Carolina TAUP Steering Committee F T AvignoneUniversity of South Carolina B C BarishCaltech E BellottiUniversity of Milan Bicoccia & INFN J BernabeuUniversity of Valencia A BottinoUniversity of Turin & INFN (chair) N FornengoUniversity of Turin & INFN T KajitaICRR Tokyo C W KimJohns Hopkins University & KIAS V MatveevINR Moscow G RaffeltMax Planck Institute for Physics D SinclairUniversity of Carleton M SpiroCEA Saclay Parallel Session Conveners Dark Matter - Candidates and Searches J-C LanfranchiTechnische Universität München T Marrodán UndagoitiaUniversity of Zurich T BringmannUniversität Hamburg Cosmology J WellerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität München S HannestadUniversity of Aarhus Double Beta Decay, Neutrino Mass M HirschIFIC/CSIC - University of Valencia A GiulianiCNRS Orsay Neutrino Oscillations T LachenmaierUniversität Tübingen F SuekaneTohoku University Low-Energy Neutrinos (Geo, Solar, Supernova) A DigheTIFR Mumbai M ChenQueen's University M WurmUniversität Hamburg Gravitational Waves E CocciaUniversity of Rome Tor Vergata and INFN S MarkaColumbia University Astrophysical Messengers (Neutrinos, Gamma-Rays, Cosmic Rays) R M WagnerMax-Planck-Institut für Physik M KachelriessUniversity of Trondheim M KowalskiUniversity of Bonn Organizing Committee N FornengoTorino University and INFN B MajorovitsMax-Planck-Institut für Physik L OberauerTechnische Universität M ü nchen (co-chair) G RaffeltMax-Planck-Institut für Physik (co-chair) S RodríguezMax-Planck-Institut für Physik (conference secretary) S SchönertTechnische Universität München D SinclairSNO Laboratory & Carleton University R M WagnerMax-Planck-Institut für Physik (scientific secretary) B WankerlExcellence Cluster 'Origin and Structure of the Universe' M WurmTechnische Universität München S ZollingerMax-Planck-Institut für Physik Conference photograph

  16. The risk for major depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is multiplied by BDNF and SERT genetic vulnerability: a replication study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Blanca; Bellón, Juan Ángel; Rivera, Margarita; Molina, Esther; King, Michael; Marston, Louise; Torres-González, Francisco; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Motrico, Emma; Montón-Franco, Carmen; GildeGómez-Barragán, María Josefa; Sánchez-Celaya, Marta; Díaz-Barreiros, Miguel Ángel; Vicens, Catalina; de Dios Luna, Juan; Nazareth, Irwin; Cervilla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence for a moderating role of both serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genes on the risk for major depression (MD) developing after childhood maltreatment. However, research on this topic remains inconclusive, and there is a lack of data from longitudinal studies with large and representative population samples. Our study aimed to clarify whether, in the presence of previous childhood maltreatment, individuals carrying low functional alleles for both SERT 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms had a higher risk for MD. Methods We explored 2- and 3-way gene (SERT and BDNF) × environment (childhood maltreatment) interactions in a large sample of Spanish adults who were followed up over a 3-year period and assessed in person for both DSM-IV MD and exposure to childhood maltreatment. Results Our study included 2679 participants. Those with both the 5-HTTLPR s allele and the BDNF Met allele showed the highest risk of MD if they had previously experienced emotional (z = 2.08, p = 0.037), sexual (z = 2.19, p = 0.029) or any kind of childhood abuse (z = 2.37, p = 0.018). These 3-way interactions remained significant regardless of whether the 5-HTTLPR triallelic or the 5-HTTLPR biallelic polymorphisms were included in the analyses. Limitations Retrospective assessment of childhood maltreatment may have resulted in a moderate degree of recall bias. Conclusion Our results confirm that the risk of depression conferred by childhood maltreatment is modified by variation at both SERT and BDNF genes. PMID:25510949

  17. PREFACE: 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Nader; Lhémery, Alain; Lowe, Mike

    2013-08-01

    The 11th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) was held in Brighton, UK on 18-20 January 2012. This event, which is an annual collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique, successfully achieved its main aim of being a small, friendly meeting of high scientific quality, welcoming younger researchers and PhD students and covering a broad range of subjects in Acoustics. The participants heard 44 excellent presentations covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects, from audio acoustics to guided waves in composites and from phononic crystals to ultrasound surgery. As is the custom at these meetings, four prominent invited speakers set the pace for the event; these were Keith Attenborough (The Open University, UK), Claire Prada (Institut Langevin, France), David Moore (University of Nottingham, UK) and Philippe Roux (IS Terre, France). The submission of manuscripts for publication in the proceedings was, as in previous years, on a voluntary basis and in these proceedings we present 11 peer reviewed papers. Due to some unforeseen problems there has been a longer than planned delay in preparing these proceedings, for which the Editors sincerely apologise to the authors and the community. Nader Saffari, Mike Lowe and Alain Lhémery

  18. PREFACE: 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Ky, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2015-06-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39). Both the workshop and the conference were held from 28th - 31st July 2014 in Dakruco Hotel, Buon Ma Thuot, Dak Lak, Vietnam. The NCTP-39 and the IWTCP-2 were organized under the support of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society, with a motivation to foster scientific exchanges between the theoretical and computational physicists in Vietnam and worldwide, as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. The IWTCP-2 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). About 100 participants coming from nine countries participated in the workshop and the conference. At the IWTCP-2 workshop, we had 16 invited talks presented by international experts, together with eight oral and ten poster contributions. At the NCTP-39, three invited talks, 15 oral contributions and 39 posters were presented. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the workshop and the conference successful. Trinh Xuan Hoang, Nguyen Anh Ky, Nguyen Tri Lan and Nguyen Ai Viet

  19. PREFACE: Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Giulietti, D.; Torrisi, L.; Delle Side, D.

    2014-04-01

    The ''Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications'' Conference (PPLA 2013) is a biennial meeting in which the National teams involved in Laser-Plasma Interaction at high intensities communicate their late results comparing with the colleagues from the most important European Laser Facilities. The sixth appointment has been organized in Lecce, Italy, from 2 to 4 October 2013 at the Rector Palace of the University of Salento. Surprising results obtained by laser-matter interaction at high intensities, as well as, non-equilibrium plasma generation, laser-plasma acceleration and related secondary sources, diagnostic methodologies and applications based on lasers and plasma pulses have transferred to researchers the enthusiasm to perform experiments ad maiora. The plasma generated by powerful laser pulses produces high kinetic particles and energetic photons that may be employed in different fields, from medicine to microelectronics, from engineering to nuclear fusion, from chemistry to environment. A relevant interest concerns the understanding of the fundamental physical phenomena, the employed lasers, plasma diagnostics and their consequent applications. For this reason we need continuous updates, meetings and expertise exchanges in this field in order to follow the evolution and disclose information, that has been done this year in Lecce, discussing and comparing the experiences gained in various international laboratories. The conference duration, although limited to just 3 days, permitted to highlight important aspects of the research in the aforementioned fields, giving discussion opportunities about the activities of researchers of high international prestige. The program consisted of 10 invited talks, 17 oral talks and 17 poster contributions for a total of 44 communications. The presented themes covered different areas and, far from being exhaustive gave updates, stimulating useful scientific discussions. The Organizers belong to three Italian Universities, Professor V Nassisi of Salento University, Professor D Giulietti of Pisa University and Professor L Torrisi of Messina University. The Scientific Committee was constituted by colleagues coming from different European laboratories: Dr F Belloni from European Commission, Bruxell, Belgium; Professor M Borghesi from the Queens University of Belfast, United Kingdom; Professor L Calcagno from Catania University, Italy; Professor D Giulietti from Pisa University, Italy; Dr J Krása from Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague; Professor V Malka from Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, Palaiseau, France; Professor V Nassisi from Salento University, Italy; Professor L Palladino from L'Aquila University, Italy; Professor L Torrisi from Messina University, Italy; Professor Ullschmied from Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague; Professor J Wolowski from Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion of Warsaw, Poland and Dr J. Badziak from Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion of Warsaw, Poland. The Local Organizing team was composed by: Dr G Buccolieri, Dr D Delle Side, Dr F Paladini and Dr L Velardi from Salento University and Dr M Cutroneo from Messina University. The Scientific secretariat was coordinated by Dr D. Dell'Anna from Salento University. The Topics discussed in the conference were: ·Laser-Matter interactions; ·Laser ion sources; ·Electron beam generation; ·Physics of non-equilibrium plasmas; ·Theoretical models in plasmas; ·Photons and particles emission from pulsed plasmas; ·Ion acceleration from plasma; ·Fs laser pulses; ·Pulsed laser deposition; ·Applications of laser beams and pulsed plasmas; ·Techniques of characterization of plasmas. The colleagues attending the conference were about 80. The Chairmen and Presidents of the different Conference sessions were: Professor V Nassisi, Professor D Giulietti, Professor L Torrisi, Professor M Borghesi, Dr K Rohlena (ASCR of Prague, Czech Republic), Professor D Neely (RAL, Oxon, UK), Dr J Ullschmied (ASCR, Prague, Czech Republic), Professor S Ratynskaia (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden), Dr J. Krása, Dr J. Badziak. The award Leos Laska, a Czech colleague which gave in its country relevant contributions to development of the experimental activities in these research fields, has been proposed in memory to his work and to stimulate the interest of young researchers in this important sector. The Scientific Committee conferred the prize to Dr Mariapompea Cutroneo, PhD in Physics of Messina University, for her activity in the field of new methodologies related to the ion acceleration in laser-generated plasma. The widespread success of the event suggests we will meet again, next 2015, in another South Italy venue, as wonderful and welcoming as Lecce was. Vincenzo Nassisi, Danilo Giulietti, Lorenzo Torrisi and Domenico Delle Side

  20. PREFACE: The Joint 16th Europhysics Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases--5th International Conference on Reactive Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, N.

    2003-11-01

    The first joint meeting of the Europhysics Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG), the International Conference on Reactive Plasmas (ICRP) and the Symposium on Plasma Processing (SPP) was held in Grenoble, France between 14 and 18 July 2002. ESCAMPIG is an important biennial European event at which academics and industrialists working in low temperature plasma science meet. ICRP and SPP are Japanese triennial and annual meetings covering the entire field of reactive plasmas: generation, diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and their interaction with surfaces, and their applications. This ESCAMPIG 16th--ICRP 5th joint conference was organized under the sponsorship of the European Physical Society (EPS), the Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP), University Joseph Fourier (UJF) and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). The scientific scope of this joint conference was focused on both experimental and theoretical aspects of physics of ionized gases and on its industrial applications. It covered the following topics: bullet atomic and molecular processes in plasmas bullet particle energy distribution functions bullet discharge physics: sheathes, transport processes and modelling bullet plasma diagnostics bullet laser and particle beam assisted plasma processes bullet physical basis of plasma chemistry and plasma--surface interactions bullet production and control of reactive plasmas bullet etching, deposition and cleaning bullet environmental and other applications. The ESCAMPIG 16th--ICRP 5th joint conference was attended by 379 scientists from 26 countries. 22 invited papers were presented. Most of these papers are published in this special issue. In addition, 16 contributed papers were selected by the joint International Scientific Committee (ISC) for oral presentation as a `hot topic'. Beside this, two workshops were held on `Recent developments in plasma monitoring for microelectronics', organized by Professor H Sugai, and `High pressure non-equilibrium plasmas and their applications', organized by Professors J-P Boeuf and H Fujiyama, and a total of 10 invited talks were given. The 337 contributed papers were presented in four poster sessions. The abstracts of all oral and poster contributions were published in two volumes of the proceedings of the conference. I would like to thank the members of the ISC of ICRP and ESCAMPIG, and particularly their respective chairs, Professors Hideo Sugai and Gerrit Kroesen, as well as the members of the Local Organizing Committee for their indispensable contributions for the success of this joint meeting. Thanks are also due to the sponsors of the conference, particularly JSAP, UJF, CNRS and the City of Grenoble. We are particularly grateful to the Editor-in-Chief of {\\it Plasma Sources Science and Technology}, Professor Noah Hershkowitz, for the opportunity to publish the invited papers in this special issue, and so bring the joint ESCAMPIG 16th--ICRP 5th meeting to a wider audience.

  1. PREFACE: The 19th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases Preface: The 19th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, F. J.

    2009-07-01

    The 19th Europhysics Sectional Conference on the Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG-2008) took place in Granada (Spain) from 15 to 19 July 2008. The conference was mainly organized by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), with the collaboration and support of the University of Córdoba (UCO) and the Research Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT). It is already 35 years since the first ESCAMPIG in 1973. The first editions of ESCAMPIG were in consecutive years (1973 and 1974) but later on it became a biennial conference of the European Physical Society (EPS) initially focusing on the collisional and radiative atomic and molecular processes in low temperature plasmas. The successive ESCAMPIGs took place in Bratislava in 1976 (3rd), Essen in 1978 (4th), Dubrovnik in 1980 (5th) and so on until the last one organized in Granada in 2008 (19th), the first ESCAMPIG in Spain. A number of changes have taken place in the Granada edition of ESCAMPIG. First, the previous six topics that have remained unchanged for almost two decades (since 1990) have now been updated to become twelve new topics which, in the opinion of the International Scientific Committee (ISC), will enhance the opportunity for discussions and communication of new findings and developments in the field of low temperature plasmas. The new list of topics for ESCAMPIG is: • Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas • Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function • Physical basis of plasma chemistry • Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) • Plasma diagnostics • Plasma and dicharges theory and simulation • Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas • Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas • Low pressure plasma sources • High pressure plasma sources • Plasmas and gas flows • Laser produced plasmas Secondly, a new prize has been created, the `William Crookes' prize in Plasma Physics to be awarded biennially to a mid-career (10 to 20 years after PhD) researcher who has been judged to have made major contributions in one or more of the areas covered by ESCAMPIG. The prize was co-sponsored by the ESCAMPIG-2008 local committee, the European Physical Society (EPS) and Plasma Sources Science and Technology. The award was 1,000 Euros and a diploma along with hotel accommodation and waived fees to attend ESCAMPIG-2008 where the award was presented. The first `William Crookes' prize was awarded to Professor Dr Richard Van de Sanden from the Eindhoven University of Technology `for his major contributions to fundamental plasma-wall interaction studies and their use in plasma enhanced deposition and etching'. More than 290 scientists from 35 countries around the world attended ESCAMPIG-2008 in Granada. Also remarkable is the important number of registered students (87) that participated in the conference. The total number of abstracts submitted was over 330 with more than 300 poster presentations in the three scheduled poster sessions. The oral sessions involved 16 invited lectures and eight ISC selected hot topical presentations. In addition, two afternoon special sessions of ESCAMPIG-2008 were devoted to two workshops on: • Sprite chemistry and their impact in the upper atmosphere of the Earth, organized by Dr T Neubert and Dr F J Gordillo-Vazquez • Diagnostics of active species in plasma deposition of thin films, organized by Dr F L Tabarés Following a tradition started in previous ESCAMPIG editions, a special issue of {\\it Plasma Sources Science and Technology} (PSST) is published including peer-reviewed papers based on the invited lectures, hot topic presentations and workshop contributions. Many of the authors agreed to prepare and submit within deadline suitable articles with original results or in the form of reviews and critical overviews of their own published results. I would like to thank all the speakers for their co-operation and efforts in preparing interesting lectures and for preparing papers for the special issue of PSST devoted to ESCAMPIG XIX. These papers are an equilibrated representation of the topics treated during the conference. Their publication in PSST will significantly contribute to giving the contents of ESCAMPIG a wider audience. I would like to thank the International Scientific Committee, chaired by Professor W G Graham, for building up the Scientific Program of ESCAMPIG-2008. Finally, I want to thank the workshop organizers and all the sponsors (public institutions and companies) whose contribution was an essential part of the success of ESCAMPIG 2008 in Granada. F J Gordillo-Vazquez, CSIC, Granada, Spain Guest Editor

  2. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  3. A Physics Professor and a Science Librarian Challenge Non-Majors to Evaluate Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iber, Mary; Sherman, Derin

    2009-01-01

    Required science courses can have limited interest from some students. In this article, a physics professor and a science librarian describe methods used to engage non majors in learning about science in a non-threatening way. By evaluating the science on selected web sites, and classifying the sites according to six categories (valid,…

  4. Core Course for Science Majors Combining Material From Physics, Chemistry, and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickar, Arnold D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the course content of an interdisciplinary core course for science majors at Portland State University. This is a two-year sequence encompassing material from physics, chemistry, and biology, and is designed to prepare students to undertake an advanced undergraduate program in any of these fields. The syllabus and special features of the…

  5. A Study of Library Anxiety in History and Physical Education Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Joyce A.

    This study compared the factors of library anxiety in 23 upper level history and 24 physical education majors. The Library Anxiety Scale (LAS) was administered. This scale measures the five factors of library anxiety: barriers with staff, affective barriers, comfort with the library, knowledge of the library, and mechanical barriers. A t-test was…

  6. Who Becomes a Physics Major? A Long-term Longitudinal Study Examining the Roles of Pre-college Beliefs about Physics and Learning Physics, Interest, and Academic Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Katherine K.; Gratny, Mindy

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we examine the correlation between students' beliefs upon entering college and their likelihood of continuing on to become a physics major. Since 2004, we have collected CLASS survey and self-reported level-of-interest responses from students in the first-term, introductory calculus-based physics course (N>2500). Here, we conduct a retrospective analysis of students' incoming CLASS scores and level of interest, comparing those students who go on to become physics majors with those who do not. We find the incoming CLASS scores and reported interest of these future physics majors to be substantially higher than the class average, indicating that these students enter their first college course already having quite expert-like beliefs. The comparative differences are much smaller for grades, SAT score, and university predicted-GPA.

  7. PREFACE: 20th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics (HMF-20)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faugeras, Clément; Orlita, Milan; Piot, Benjamin; Potemski, Marek

    2013-08-01

    The 20th International Conference on 'High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics' (HMF-20) was held on 22-27 July 2012, in Chamonix Mont Blanc, France, as a satellite meeting to the 31st International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors. HMF-20 followed a series of biennial conferences, initiated by Gottfried Landwehr, in Wurzburg, Germany, in 1972. Primarily focused on 'semiconductors' and 'magnetic fields', the main topics of the conference have evolved with time and are now dominated by current themes related to the physics of low dimensional systems in conjunction with the application of magnetic fields. The list of HMF-20 topics included: quantum Hall effect phenomena, graphene and carbon nanotubes, quantum wells, dots and wires, bulk semiconductors, topological insulators and organic conductors, magneto-transport and magneto-spectroscopy, electron correlations and magnetic field driven phases, spin-dependent phenomena and non-equilibrium effects, as well as novel phenomena and new techniques in high magnetic fields. The HMF-20 conference gathered 200 participants from 23 different countries. It was organized by the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses, Grenoble, France, and greatly sponsored by the European High Magnetic Field Laboratory under the EC-FP7 framework. The 21st edition of the HMF conference series will take place during the summer of 2014 in Florida, USA. We thank the participants who, through their presentations, convivial discussions, and the papers presented here, contributed to the success of HMF-20 and advancements in the physics related to the applications of high magnetic fields. Clément Faugeras, Milan Orlita, Benjamin Piot and Marek Potemski Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses CNRS/UJF/UPS/INSA, Grenoble France

  8. PREFACE: Tenth International Conference on Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics (TAUP2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kunio; Suzuki, Atsuto; Mitsui, Tadao

    2008-07-01

    The tenth meeting of the TAUP Workshop Series, TAUP 2007, was organized by the Research Center for Neutrino Science, Tohoku University. In TAUP 2007 all the various aspects of Astroparticle Physics have been covered, from Cosmology and Dark Constituents, to Gravitational Waves, to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics, to High Energy Astrophysics, to Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Rays Astronomy. New and important scientific results were presented and debated in the plenary review talks and in a very large number of contributions in topical parallel sessions. As editors of these proceedings, we hope that this volume, which contains most of the talks and contributions presented at TAUP 2007, will provide a detailed state-of-the-art account of the various facets of Astroparticle Physics. We thank all the invited speakers, conveners, and contributors who made this possible. Full coverage of the transparencies presented at the conference can be found on the website http://www.awa.tohoku.ac.jp/taup2007. The TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee thanks IUPAP/PaNAGIC, Sendai Tourism and Convention Bureau, COE program: Exploring New Science by Bridging Particle-Matter Hierarchy, SEIKO EG&G, and REPIC corporation for sponsoring the Conference, and Sendai Civic Auditorium, where the meeting was held, for their hospitality. We wish to thank Alessandro Bottino, Junpei Shirai, Fumihiko Suekane, David Sinclair, Takaaki Kajita, Takeo Moroi, Masaki Mori, Masahiro Kawasaki, Yoshihito Gando, Sei Yoshida, Kyoko Tamae, Sanshiro Enomoto, Alexandre Kozlov, Yasuhiro Kishimoto, Itaru Shimizu, Kengo Nakamura, Haruo Ikeda, and Kyo Nakajima for their invaluable contribution in the scientific shaping of the conference and in the preparation of the present volume. The Organizing Committee is grateful to the members of the International Advisory Committee and of the TAUP Steering Committee for assistance and advice on the scientific program. Very special thanks are due to Ms Rika Bizen, Mr Fujio Miura, Ms Akemi Otsuka, and Ms Yuri Endo, our workshop secretaries, for their continuous and excellent work in the organization of the conference, and to Ms Chiyo Itoh, and Ms Machiko Mizutani, for their invaluable assistance during the conference. We also gratefully thank the technical staff: Tomoaki Takayama, Hiromitsu Hanada, Takashi Nakajima, for their invaluable help. As announced at the end of the conference, TAUP 2009 will be held in Gran Sasso, Italy, hosted by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) with the chair of Professor Eugenio Coccia. Kunio Inoue, Atsuto Suzuki and Tadao Mitsui COMMITTEES TAUP Steering Committee F T Avignone U South Carolina B C Barish CALTECH E Bellotti U Milano/INFN J Bernabéu U Valencia A Bottino (chair) U Torino/INFN V de Alfaro U Torino/INFN T Kajita ICRR U Tokyo C W Kim Johns Hopkins Univ /KIAS E Lorenz U München V Matveev INR Moskow J Morales U Zaragoza D Sinclair U Carleton M Spiro IN2P3 TAUP 2007 International Advisory Committee J J Aubert CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin U Padova/INFN V Berezinsky INFN-LNGS/INR L Bergström U Stockholm R Bernabei U Roma Tor Vergata/INFN A Bettini U Padova/INFN S Bilenky JINR Dubna D O Caldwell U C Santa Barbara E Coccia INFN-LNGS/U Roma Tor Vergata J Cronin U Chicago A Dar Technion Haifa G Domogatsky INR Moscow H Ejiri U Osaka J Ellis CERN E Fernández IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini U Milano/INFN G Fogli U Bari/INFN T Gaisser U Delaware G Gelmini UCLA G Gerbier CEA Saclay F Halzen U Wisconsin W Haxton U Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani U Roma/INFN A McDonald Queen's U K Nakamura KEK E Peterson U Minneapolis R Petronzio INFN/U Roma Tor Vergata G Raffelt MPI München R Rebolo IAC Tenerife L Resvanis U Athens P Salati U Savoie/LAPTH Annecy A Smirnov ICTP Trieste N Spooner U Sheffield S Ting MIT/CERN Y Totsuka U Tokyo M S Turner FNAL/U Chicago J W F Valle IFIC Valencia D Vignaud APC Paris F von Feilitzsch T U München G Zatsepin INR Moscow TAUP 2007 Organizing Committee A Bottino U Torino/INFN D Sinclair U Carleton T Kajita ICRR, U Tokyo A Suzuki (co-chair) KEK/Tohoku U K Inoue (co-chair) RCNS, Tohoku U J Shirai RCNS, Tohoku U F Suekane RCNS, Tohoku U T Mitsui (scientific secretary) RCNS, Tohoku U T Moroi Tohoku U M Mori ICRR, U Tokyo M Kawasaki ICRR, U Tokyo

  9. PREFACE: 19th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics and Nanotechnology (HMF-19)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraki, Koji; Takeyama, Shojiro

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains invited and contributed papers from the 19th International Conference on the Application of High Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Physics and Nanotechnology (HMF-19) held in Fukuoka, Japan, from 1-6 August 2010. This conference was mainly sponsored by the Tokyo University-'Horiba International fund', which was donated by Dr Masao Horiba, the founder of Horiba Ltd. The scientific program of HMF-19 consisted of 37 invited talks, 24 contributed talks, and 83 posters, which is available from the conference homepage http://www.hmf19.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index.html. Each manuscript submitted for publication in this volume has been independently reviewed. The Editor is very grateful to all the reviewers for their quick responses and helpful reports and to all the authors for their submissions and patience for the delay in the editorial process. Finally, the Editor would like to express his sincere gratitude to all the individuals involved in the conference organization and all the attendees, who made this conference so successful. Koji Muraki Conference photograph Committees Chair Conference chairS Takeyama(ISSP-UT) Conference secretary T Machida (IIS-UT) Program chair K Muraki (NTT) Local organizing chair K Oto (Chiba Univ.) Advisory Committee International Domestic L Brey (ES) T Ando (TIT) Z H Chen (CN) Y Hirayama (Tohoku Univ.) S Das Sarma (US) G Kido (NIMS) L Eaves (GB) N Miura (JP) J P Eisenstein (US) J Nitta (Tohoku Univ.) K Ensslin (CH) T Takamasu (NIMS) J Furdyna (US) G M Gusev (BR) I Kukushkin (RU) Z D Kvon (RU) G Landwehr (DE) J C Maan (NL) A H MacDonald (US) N F Oliveira Jr (BR) A Pinczuk (US) J C Portal (FR) A Sachrajda (CA) M K Sanyal(IN) R Stepniewski(PL) Program Committee Chair: K Muraki(NTT) International Domestic G Bauer (AU) H Ajiki (Osaka Univ.) G Boebinger (US) H Aoki (Hongo, UT) S Ivanov (RU) K Nomura (RIKEN) K von Klitzing (DE) T Okamoto (Hongo, UT) R Nicholas (GB) T Osada (ISSP-UT ) M Potemski (FR) N Studart (BR) U Zeitler (NL) Local Organizing Committee Chair: K Oto(Chiba Univ.) Y H Matsuda (ISSP-UT) H Yokoi (Kumamoto Univ.) M Itoh (IIS-UT) M Noda (ISSP-UT) H Sawabe (ISSP-UT) Sponsors Horiba International Conference (Dr Masao Horiba's Donation) The University of Tokyo Fukuoka City The Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo The Global Center of Excellence for Physical Sciences Frontier, The University of Tokyo

  10. Precisely mapping a major gene conferring resistance to Hessian fly in bread wheat using genotyping-by-sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background One of the reasons hard red winter wheat cultivar ‘Duster’ (PI 644016) is widely grown in the southern Great Plains is that it confers a consistently high level of resistance to biotype GP of Hessian fly (Hf). However, little is known about the genetic mechanism underlying Hf resistance i...

  11. Pedagogical changes in an astronomy course for non-physics majors: Student and professor perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Katarin; Razul, Mohamed Shajahan Gulam; Powell, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Pedagogical changes were made in the delivery of a three-credit, first-year astronomy course offered to non-physics majors by a department of physics at a small undergraduate university in Canada. The professor of the course initiated this change to better meet the needs of the students enrolled. A brief description of some of the activities and teaching strategies is given, along with student and professor perceptions. Results indicate that it is possible to develop and deliver a rigorous, conceptually based astronomy course and that the effort is worth the result.

  12. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  13. News Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

  14. An Integrated Earth Science, Astronomy, and Physics Course for Elementary Education Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnick, Roy E.; Varelas, Maria; Fan, Qian

    2009-03-01

    Physical World is a one-semester course designed for elementary education majors, that integrates earth science, astronomy, and physics. The course is part of a four-course set that explores science concepts, processes, and skills, along with the nature of scientific practice, that are included in state and national standards for elementary school science. Geo-science concepts, such as water and seismic waves, are used to illustrate general principles of physics, such as wave transmission, refraction, reflection, and interference. Laboratories are drawn from both introductory physics and earth science courses and have been redesigned to have a strong inquiry component. Pre-assessments were used to evaluate students' prior knowledge of key ideas. The use of pyramid tests measurably enhanced student performance. A major theme of the course is how science is represented (and misrepresented) in the media. Pedagogical challenges encountered in the course are due to various factors, two main ones being lack of previous experience with the natural world among a largely urban student body and the diversity of material that the course covers.

  15. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2015-06-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Science & Engineering in Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics 2015 (ScieTech 2015), was held at The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali on 31 January - 1 February 2015. The ScieTech 2015 conference is aimed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. ScieTech 2015 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within mathematics, chemistry and physics. As we already know that science and technology have brought tremendous benefits for human civilization. People are becoming healthier, wealthier, better educated, more peaceful, increasingly connected, and living longer. Of course, science and technology provide many answers to global challenges, but we will face more complex problems in the next decade due to increasing world population, limitation of energy, and climate change. Therefore, researchers should be more active in conducting research that enables collaboration between one and the others. Interdisciplinary cooperation is absolutely necessary in order to create a smart system for solving the global problems. We need a global and general long-term view of the future with long-range goals for solving complex problems in next decade. Therefore the conference was held to be a forum for researchers from different disciplines to start collaborating and conducting research that provides a solution to the global issues. The theme of ScieTech 2015 was ''The interdisciplinary Application between Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics to enhance the Quality of Life''. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting conference program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 197 papers and after rigorous review, 59 papers were accepted. The participants came from 19 countries, and there were six paralell sessions and four keynote speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of ScieTech 2015.

  16. Physical activity for the prevention and treatment of major chronic disease: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The evidence that higher levels of physical activity and/or lower levels of physical inactivity are associated with beneficial health-related outcomes stems mainly from observational studies. Findings from these studies often differ from randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews currently demonstrate mixed results, due partly to heterogeneity in physical activity interventions, methodologies used and populations studied. As a result, translation into clinical practice has been difficult. It is therefore essential that an overview is carried out to compare and contrast systematic reviews, and to identify those physical activity interventions that are the most effective in preventing and/or treating major chronic disease. This protocol has been registered on PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013003523. Methods We will carry out an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews. We will search the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials that have a primary focus on disease-related outcomes. We will restrict reviews to those in selected major chronic diseases. Two authors will independently screen search outputs, select studies, extract data and assess the quality of included reviews using the assessment of multiple systematic reviews tool; all discrepancies will be resolved by discussing and reaching a consensus, or by arbitration with a third author. The data extraction form will summarise key information from each review, including details of the population(s) (for example, disease condition), the context (for example, prevention, treatment or management), the participants, the intervention(s), the comparison(s) and the outcomes. The primary outcomes of interest are the prevention of chronic disease and/or improved outcomes, in the treatment or management of chronic disease. These outcomes will be summarised and presented for individual chronic diseases (for example, any change in blood pressure in hypertension or glucose control in diabetes). Secondary outcomes of interest are to describe the structure and delivery of physical activity interventions across chronic disease conditions and adverse events associated with physical activity. Discussion We anticipate that our results could inform researchers, guideline groups and policymakers of the most efficacious physical activity interventions in preventing and/or managing major chronic disease. PMID:23837523

  17. "Did You Say 50% of My Grade?"--Teaching Introductory Physics to Non-Science Majors through a Haunted Physics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Several years ago I attended an AAPT Haunted Physics Workshop taught by Dr. Tom Zepf from Creighton University. Dr. Zepf's highly successful Haunted Physics Lab at Creighton was put on every October by his physics majors. I found the concept of exhibiting physics projects in a "fun" way to students, faculty, and the public very exciting, so an

  18. Using Video Analysis and Biomechanics to Engage Life Science Majors in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jeff

    There is an interest in Introductory Physics for the Life Sciences (IPLS) as a way to better engage students in what may be their only physical science course. In this talk I will present some low cost and readily available technologies for video analysis and how they have been implemented in classes and in student research projects. The technologies include software like Tracker and LoggerPro for video analysis and low cost high speed cameras for capturing real world events. The focus of the talk will be on content created by students including two biomechanics research projects performed over the summer by pre-physical therapy majors. One project involved assessing medial knee displacement (MKD), a situation where the subject's knee becomes misaligned during a squatting motion and is a contributing factor in ACL and other knee injuries. The other project looks at the difference in landing forces experienced by gymnasts and cheer-leaders while performing on foam mats versus spring floors. The goal of this talk is to demonstrate how easy it can be to engage life science majors through the use of video analysis and topics like biomechanics and encourage others to try it for themselves.

  19. Scientific reasoning abilities of nonscience majors in physics-based courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. Christopher; Rubbo, Louis J.

    2012-06-01

    We have found that non-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors taking either a conceptual physics or astronomy course at two regional comprehensive institutions score significantly lower preinstruction on the Lawson’s Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning (LCTSR) in comparison to national average STEM majors. Based on LCTSR score, the majority of non-STEM students can be classified as either concrete operational or transitional reasoners in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, whereas in the STEM population formal operational reasoners are far more prevalent. In particular, non-STEM students demonstrate significant difficulty with proportional and hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Prescores on the LCTSR are correlated with normalized learning gains on various concept inventories. The correlation is strongest for content that can be categorized as mostly theoretical, meaning a lack of directly observable exemplars, and weakest for content categorized as mostly descriptive, where directly observable exemplars are abundant. Although the implementation of research-verified, interactive engagement pedagogy can lead to gains in content knowledge, significant gains in theoretical content (such as force and energy) are more difficult with non-STEM students. We also observe no significant gains on the LCTSR without explicit instruction in scientific reasoning patterns. These results further demonstrate that differences in student populations are important when comparing normalized gains on concept inventories, and the achievement of significant gains in scientific reasoning requires a reevaluation of the traditional approach to physics for non-STEM students.

  20. Self-report symptoms that predict major depression in patients with prominent physical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Abbey, S E; Toner, B B; Garfinkel, P E; Kennedy, S H; Kaplan, A S

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of depression in patients presenting with both depressive and physical symptoms is potentially confounded and problematic. The present study of 271 patients with four types of illness all with prominent physical symptoms--end-stage renal disease (n = 99), irritable bowel syndrome (n = 21), post-infectious neuromyasthenia (n = 25) and eating disorders (n = 126)--investigates if there are a group of symptoms on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) which predict the diagnosis of major depressive episode (MDE) made using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS). Discriminant function analysis of BDI responses yielded a four item function--self-hate, indecisiveness, loss of appetite and suicidal thoughts--which maximally discriminated between patients with and without a current MDE and correctly classified 75 percent of subjects. PMID:2265887

  1. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  2. Teaching Physics to Environmental Science Majors Using a Flipped Course Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, N. B.; Riha, S. J.; Wysocki, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coursework in physics provides a framework for quantitative reasoning and problem solving skill development in budding geoscientists. To make physical concepts more accessible and relevant to students majoring in environmental science, an environmental physics course was developed at Cornell University and offered for the first time during spring 2014. Principles of radiation, thermodynamics, and mechanics were introduced and applied to the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere to describe energy and mass transfers in natural and built environments. Environmental physics was designed as a flipped course where students viewed online material outside of class and worked in groups in class to solve sustainability problems. Experiential learning, just-in-time teaching, and peer collaboration strategies were also utilized. In-class problems were drawn from both local and global environmental sustainability concerns. Problems included an investigation of Cornell's lake source cooling system, calculations on the energy consumed in irrigation with groundwater in the southwestern United States, and power generated by wind turbines at various locations around the world. Class attendance was high, with at least 84% of students present at each meeting. Survey results suggest that students enjoyed working in groups and found the in-class problems helpful for assimilating the assigned material. However, some students reported that the workload was too heavy and they preferred traditional lectures to the flipped classroom. The instructors were able to actively engage with students and quickly identify knowledge and skill gaps that needed to be addressed. Overall, the integration of current environmental problems and group work into an introductory physics course could help to inspire and motivate students as they advance their ability to analyze problems quantitatively.

  3. TWO MAJOR RESISTANCE GENES CONFER RESISTANCE TO RACE SHIFT ISOLATES OVERCOMING BLAST RESISTANCE GENC PI-TA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the major challenges for blast disease management is that major resistance genes are often defeated by new virulent isolates. The goal of this project is to identify and characterize blast resistance genes to facilitate the development of blast resistant US cultivars by marker-assisted selec...

  4. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  5. Circadian Phenotype Composition is a Major Predictor of Diurnal Physical Performance in Teams

    PubMed Central

    Facer-Childs, Elise; Brandstaetter, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Team performance is a complex phenomenon involving numerous influencing factors including physiology, psychology, and management. Biological rhythms and the impact of circadian phenotype have not been studied for their contribution to this array of factors so far despite our knowledge of the circadian regulation of key physiological processes involved in physical and mental performance. This study involved 216 individuals from 12 different teams who were categorized into circadian phenotypes using the novel RBUB chronometric test. The composition of circadian phenotypes within each team was used to model predicted daily team performance profiles based on physical performance tests. Our results show that the composition of circadian phenotypes within teams is variable and unpredictable. Predicted physical peak performance ranged from 1:52 to 8:59 p.m. with performance levels fluctuating by up to 14.88% over the course of the day. The major predictor for peak performance time in the course of a day in a team is the occurrence of late circadian phenotypes. We conclude that circadian phenotype is a performance indicator in teams that allows new insight and a better understanding of team performance variation in the course of a day as often observed in different groupings of individuals. PMID:26483754

  6. Changes in physical size among major league baseball players and its attribution to elite offensive performance.

    PubMed

    Crotin, Ryan L; Forsythe, Charles M; Bhan, Shivam; Karakolis, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Major League Baseball (MLB) players have not been longitudinally examined for changes in physical size. Height, weight, and body mass indices (BMIs) were examined among offensive league leaders (OLL) and MLB reference cohorts at 1970, 1990, and 2010. Anthropometric values were expected to increase successively, where OLL were expected to be larger at each respective time point. A Mixed Model analysis of variance (p ? 0.05) examined anthropometric differences over time within and between groups. Mass and BMI increased over successive years with the largest effect seen between 1990 and 2010 (p < 0.001). A significant height reduction was shown for OLL from 1970 to 1990 (p ? 0.05), being the only significant decrease in physical size; yet, leaders were heavier and taller compared with the MLB reference population (p < 0.014). Results show that physical size has evolved in MLB, with the OLL being the largest players shown at each year in succession. Professional baseball scouts may have been influenced by greater offensive prowess shown by larger athletes; yet, increased secular anthropometrics must also be factored in greater heights, weights, BMIs shown over time in MLB. It is possible that greater participation in strength and conditioning programs at an earlier age, advances in sport nutrition, and potential abuse of anabolic drugs are factors perpetuating growth rates at present. PMID:24714544

  7. Circadian Phenotype Composition is a Major Predictor of Diurnal Physical Performance in Teams.

    PubMed

    Facer-Childs, Elise; Brandstaetter, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Team performance is a complex phenomenon involving numerous influencing factors including physiology, psychology, and management. Biological rhythms and the impact of circadian phenotype have not been studied for their contribution to this array of factors so far despite our knowledge of the circadian regulation of key physiological processes involved in physical and mental performance. This study involved 216 individuals from 12 different teams who were categorized into circadian phenotypes using the novel RBUB chronometric test. The composition of circadian phenotypes within each team was used to model predicted daily team performance profiles based on physical performance tests. Our results show that the composition of circadian phenotypes within teams is variable and unpredictable. Predicted physical peak performance ranged from 1:52 to 8:59 p.m. with performance levels fluctuating by up to 14.88% over the course of the day. The major predictor for peak performance time in the course of a day in a team is the occurrence of late circadian phenotypes. We conclude that circadian phenotype is a performance indicator in teams that allows new insight and a better understanding of team performance variation in the course of a day as often observed in different groupings of individuals. PMID:26483754

  8. Because physics majors have conceptual difficulties too: Development of a tutorial approach to teaching intermediate mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, Brad

    2009-04-01

    Ongoing research in physics education has demonstrated that physics majors often do not develop a working knowledge of basic concepts in mechanics, even after standard instruction in upper-level mechanics courses.1 A central goal of this work has been to explore the ways in which students make--- or do not make---appropriate connections between physics concepts and the more sophisticated mathematics (e.g., differential equations, vector calculus) that they are expected to use. Analysis of results from pretests (ungraded quizzes), written exams, and informal classroom observations will be presented to illustrate examples of specific conceptual and reasoning difficulties that students typically encounter. This work has motivated the need for alternative approaches to instruction in intermediate mechanics, and evidence of the effectiveness of a tutorial approach (using Intermediate Mechanics Tutorials2) will be presented. (These tutorial materials will also serve as the focus of a workshop to be offered later in the day.) 1. B.S. Ambrose, ``Investigating student understanding in intermediate mechanics: Identifying the need for a tutorial approach to instruction,'' Am. J. Phys. 72, 453- 459 (2004). 2. Supported by NSF grants DUE-0441426 and DUE-0442388.

  9. Physical Activity, Health, and Well-Being: An International Scientific Consensus Conference. Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Claude; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents eight papers: "Physical Activity and Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health: Cancer and Immune Function"; "Exercise and Psychosocial Health"; "Physical Activity, Health, and Wellbeing at Different Life Stages"; "Descriptive Epidemiology of Health-Related Physical Activity and Fitness"; "Dose-Response…

  10. Leishmania tarentolae secreting the sand fly salivary antigen PpSP15 confers protection against Leishmania major infection in a susceptible BALB/c mice model.

    PubMed

    Katebi, A; Gholami, E; Taheri, T; Zahedifard, F; Habibzadeh, S; Taslimi, Y; Shokri, F; Papadopoulou, B; Kamhawi, S; Valenzuela, J G; Rafati, S

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a zoonotic, vector-borne disease causing a major health problem in several countries. No vaccine is available and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens. Immune responses to sand fly saliva have been shown to protect against Leishmania infection. A cellular immune response to PpSP15, a protein from the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi, was sufficient to control Leishmania major infection in mice. This work presents data supporting the vaccine potency of recombinant live non-pathogenic Leishmania (L.) tarentolae secreting PpSP15 in mice and its potential as a new vaccine strategy against L. major. We generated a recombinant L. tarentolae-PpSP15 strain delivered in the presence of CpG ODN and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. major infection in BALB/c mice. In parallel, different vaccination modalities using PpSP15 as the target antigen were compared. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated before and at three and eight weeks after challenge. Footpad swelling and parasite load were assessed at eight and eleven weeks post-challenge. Our results show that vaccination with L. tarentolae-PpSP15 in combination with CpG as a prime-boost modality confers strong protection against L. major infection that was superior to other vaccination modalities used in this study. This approach represents a novel and promising vaccination strategy against Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:26298575

  11. Proceedings of the 1998 International Computational Accelerator Physics Conference (ICAP98)

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Kwok

    2002-01-14

    The eConf archive is a repository for full-text and eprint proceedings. It is designed to allow free, direct distribution of conference proceedings via a stable electronic archive that collects electronically-produced proceedings, indexes them, permanently archives them, and facilitates access to them over the Web.

  12. The Physics of Life: A Biophysics Course for Non-science Major Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-03-01

    Enhancing the scientific literacy of non-scientists is an important goal, both because of the ever-increasing impact of science and technology on people's lives, and because understanding contemporary science enables enriching insights into the workings of nature. One route to improving scientific literacy is via general education undergraduate courses - i.e. courses intended for students not majoring in the sciences or engineering - which in many cases provide these students' last formal exposure to science. I describe here a course on biophysics for non-science-major undergraduates recently developed at the University of Oregon. Biophysics, I claim, is a particularly useful vehicle for addressing scientific literacy. It involves important and general scientific concepts, demonstrates connections between basic science and tangible, familiar phenomena related to health and disease, and illustrates how scientific insights proceed not in predictable paths, but rather by applying tools and perspectives from disparate fields in creative ways. In addition, it highlights the far-reaching impact of physics research. I describe the general design of this course and the specific content of a few of its modules, as well as noting aspects of enrollment and evaluation. This work is affiliated with the University of Oregon's Science Literacy Program, supported by a grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  13. New and effective techniques in physics courses for non-science majors and the training of pre-college teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian B.

    1997-03-01

    Based on experience and research, two major educational programs are described, a physics course content and philosophy for non-science majors and a physics course for urban teachers and students based on the theme of sports and movement. Examples for each of these programs are given including a useful table for solving quantitative physics problems using the barest mathematics of subtraction and division by two. The thematic based program is entitled ACTION PHYSICS and was aimed at junior high school teachers and had the support of the National Science Foundation

  14. STEPS at CSUN: Increasing Retention of Engineering and Physical Science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, V. A.; Cadavid, A. C.; Horn, W.

    2012-12-01

    STEPS at CSUN seeks to increase the retention rate of first-time freshman in engineering, math, and physical science (STEM) majors from ~55% to 65%. About 40% of STEM first-time freshmen start in College Algebra because they do not take or do not pass the Mathematics Placement Test (MPT). This lengthens time to graduation, which contributes to dissatisfaction with major. STEPS at CSUN has made substantial changes to the administration of the MPT. Initial data show increases in the number of students who take the test and who place out of College Algebra, as well as increases in overall scores. STEPS at CSUN also funded the development of supplemental labs for Trigonometry and Calculus I and II, in partnership with similar labs created by the Math Department for College Algebra and Precalculus. These labs are open to all students, but are mandatory for at-risk students who have low scores on the MPT, low grades in the prerequisite course, or who failed the class the first time. Initial results are promising. Comparison of the grades of 46 Fall 2010 "at-risk" students without lab to those of 36 Fall 2011 students who enrolled in the supplementary lab show D-F grades decreased by 10% and A-B grades increased by 27%. A final retention strategy is aimed at students in the early stages of their majors. At CSUN the greatest loss of STEM majors occurs between sophomore-level and junior-level coursework because course difficulty increases and aspirations to potential careers weaken. The Summer Interdisciplinary Team Experience (SITE) is an intensive 3-week-long summer program that engages small teams of students from diverse STEM majors in faculty-mentored, team-based problem solving. This experience simulates professional work and creates strong bonds between students and between students and faculty mentors. The first two cohorts of students who have participated in SITE indicate that this experience has positively impacted their motivation to complete their STEM degree.

  15. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C. A. V.; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an appropriate molecular template for the construction of an efficient anti-infective agent. PMID:27058234

  16. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C A V; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an appropriate molecular template for the construction of an efficient anti-infective agent. PMID:27058234

  17. PREFACE: International Conference on Advancement in Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST): Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Hee, Pah Chin

    2013-04-01

    The 4th International Conference on the Advancement of Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST 2012), with theme 'Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications', took place in Kuantan, Malaysia, from Wednesday 7 to Friday 9 November 2012. The conference was attended by more than 100 participants, and hosted about 160 oral and poster papers by more than 140 pre-registered authors. The key topics of the 4th iCAST 2012 include Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Dynamical Systems, Statistics and Financial Mathematics. The scientific program was rather full since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, four parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The conference aimed to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with the application of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology and environmental sciences. We would like to thank the Keynote and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to 4th iCAST 2012. We would also like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. We cannot end without expressing our many thanks to International Islamic University Malaysia and our sponsors for their financial support . This volume presents selected papers which have been peer-reviewed. The editors hope that it may be useful and fruitful for scholars, researchers, and advanced technical members of the industrial laboratory facilities for developing new tools and products. Guest Editors Nasir Ganikhodjaev, Farrukh Mukhamedov and Pah Chin Hee The PDF contains the committee lists, board list and biographies of the plenary speakers.

  18. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes sensitized to the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii confers protection in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Theus, S A; Andrews, R P; Steele, P; Walzer, P D

    1995-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii is a major opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of morbidity in patients with AIDS. CD4+ cells have been shown to be important in host defenses against P. carinii, but the antigen(s) involved with this response have not been identified. We undertook the present study to determine whether the major surface glycoprotein (MSG) of P. carinii contains epitopes that can elicit a protective cellular immune response. Spleen cells and purified CD4+ cells isolated from Lewis rats, pulsed 1-4 d with MSG, and injected into corticosteroid-treated Lewis rats with pneumocystosis resulted in significant reduction in the P. carinii burden, as judged by organism quantitation and lung histology. The protective response demonstrated by the donor cells was dependent on previous exposure to P. carinii, cell concentration, and time of incubation with MSG. In addition, reconstitution with MSG-specific CD4+ cells resulted in an early hyperinflammatory response within the lungs of these animals with a high percentage of mortality. Thus, in this model, MSG can elicit an immune response mediated by CD4+ cells, which has a harmful as well as helpful effect on the host, and these responses occur despite the presence of corticosteroids. Images PMID:7769101

  19. Physics of space plasmas (1985-7); SPI Conference Proceedings and Reprint Series, No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.; Belcher, J.; Crew, G.B.; Jasperse, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The conference presents papers on the plasma universe, the magnetosphere of Uranus, magnetospheric convection at Uranus, and observations of electron precipitation induced by whistler mode waves. Other topics include lower hybrid ion conics, low-altitude tranverse ion acceleration, and ion acoustic double layers in the laboratory. Consideration is also given to the glow of spacecraft in LEO, measurements of bursts of intense broadband electrostatic noise in the source regions of auroral kilometric radiation, and bending waves and warps of current disks.

  20. DNA Physical Properties and Nucleosome Positions Are Major Determinants of HIV-1 Integrase Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Naughtin, Monica; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Xavier, Johan; Meyer, Sam; Silvain, Maud; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Levy, Nicolas; Miele, Vincent; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Ruff, Marc; Parissi, Vincent; Vaillant, Cédric; Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral integrases (INs) catalyse the integration of the reverse transcribed viral DNA into the host cell genome. This process is selective, and chromatin has been proposed to be a major factor regulating this step in the viral life cycle. However, the precise underlying mechanisms are still under investigation. We have developed a new in vitro integration assay using physiologically-relevant, reconstituted genomic acceptor chromatin and high-throughput determination of nucleosome positions and integration sites, in parallel. A quantitative analysis of the resulting data reveals a chromatin-dependent redistribution of the integration sites and establishes a link between integration sites and nucleosome positions. The co-activator LEDGF/p75 enhanced integration but did not modify the integration sites under these conditions. We also conducted an in cellulo genome-wide comparative study of nucleosome positions and human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integration sites identified experimentally in vivo. These studies confirm a preferential integration in nucleosome-covered regions. Using a DNA mechanical energy model, we show that the physical properties of DNA probed by IN binding are important in determining IN selectivity. These novel in vitro and in vivo approaches confirm that IN has a preference for integration into a nucleosome, and suggest the existence of two levels of IN selectivity. The first depends on the physical properties of the target DNA and notably, the energy required to fit DNA into the IN catalytic pocket. The second depends on the DNA deformation associated with DNA wrapping around a nucleosome. Taken together, these results indicate that HIV-1 IN is a shape-readout DNA binding protein. PMID:26075397

  1. Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Jaracz, Jan; Gattner, Karolina; Jaracz, Krystyna; Górna, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Patients with major depression often report pain. In this article, we review the current literature regarding the prevalence and consequences, as well as the pathophysiology, of unexplained painful physical symptoms (UPPS) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). UPPS are experienced by approximately two-thirds of depressed patients. The presence of UPPS makes a correct diagnosis of depression more difficult. Moreover, UPPS are a predictor of a poor response to treatment and a more chronic course of depression. Pain, in the course of depression, also has a negative impact on functioning and quality of life. Frequent comorbidity of depression and UPPS has inspired the formulation of an hypothesis regarding a shared neurobiological mechanism of both conditions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies has shown that frontal-limbic dysfunction in depression may explain abnormal pain processing, leading to the presence of UPPS. Increased levels of proinflamatory cytokines and substance P in patients with MDD may also clarify the pathophysiology of UPPS. Finally, dysfunction of the descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways that normally suppress ascending sensations has been proposed as a core mechanism of UPPS. Psychological factors such as catastrophizing also play a role in both depression and chronic pain. Therefore, pharmacological treatment and/or cognitive therapy are recommended in the treatment of depression with UPPS. Some data suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the alleviation of depression and UPPS. However, the pooled analysis of eight randomised clinical trials showed similar efficacy of duloxetine (an SNRI) and paroxetine (an SSRI) in reducing UPPS in depression. Further integrative studies examining genetic factors (e.g. polymorphisms of genes for interleukins, serotonin transporter and receptors), molecular factors (e.g. cytokines, substance P) and neuroimaging findings (e.g. functional studies during painful stimulation) might provide further explanation of the pathophysiology of UPPS in MDD and therefore facilitate the development of more effective methods of treatment. PMID:27048351

  2. Physical Education Professional Preparation: Insights and Foresights. Proceedings from the National Conference on Preparing the Physical Education Specialist for Children (2nd, Orlando, Florida October 20-23, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Hubert A., Ed.; Rink, Judith E., Ed.

    This volume contains the proceedings of a conference concerning the preparation of physical education teachers. Titles and authors of papers are: (1) "Action 2000: Preparing Physical Education Specialists for the Future" (M. Haberman); (2) "The Content of an Elementary School Physical Education Program and its Impact on Teacher Preparation" (K. R.…

  3. Development of the Physical Educators' Judgments about Inclusion Instrument for Japanese Physical Education Majors and an Analysis of Their Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Sato, Takahiro; Mukoyama, Takahito; Kozub, Francis M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Physical Educators' Judgments about Inclusion (PEJI) survey for analysing the judgments of Japanese (361 male, 170 female) physical education teacher education majors. A secondary purpose was to examine group differences in judgments as a function of gender and past

  4. Differences in Persistence Patterns between Life and Physical Science Majors: The Role of Grades, Peers, and Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ost, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Using longitudinal administrative data from a large elite research university, this paper separately analyzes the determinants of persistence for life and physical science majors. My results confirm much of the previous research on major persistence in the sciences, but I document that many findings are solely driven by persistence patterns in the…

  5. Prediction of body density using A-mode ultrasonoscope in Japanese physical education major college students.

    PubMed

    Oishi, K

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the distribution of subcutaneous fat and to derive several equations to predict body density (BD) using an amplitude modulation type of ultrasonoscope (A-mode ultrasonoscope, FUKUDA FT-100). Subjects were 188 male physical education major college students ranging in age from 18 to 24 years. Fifty subjects who were randomly selected out of the 188 subjects were measured for BD by the underwater weighing technique and were used to derive the equation for estimating the BD. Four points (scapular, triceps, suprailiac, and thigh) of subcutaneous fat which had been commonly selected, height, and weight were measured. The four measurements of fat for the 188 subjects indicated rather small means and small standard deviations respectively. Furthermore, histograms of those measurements tended to show a significant skewness for low values and deviated from the normal probability curve (p less than 0.01). Regarding the means, they were almost all the same except for suprailiac measurements. Suprailiac measurements showed more large values and were distributed rather more widely than the other measurements. Derivations of the multiple regression equations from anthropometric measurements were made using the Wherry-Doolittle test selection method (Clarke & Clarke, 1972). Four measurements (triceps, suprailiac, height, and weight) were selected by the Wherry-Doolittle method. PMID:2679581

  6. Proceedings of the 29th International Conference on High Energy Physics: Ichep '98 (in 2 Volumes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astbury, Alan; Axen, David; Robinson, Jacob

    1999-06-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * VOLUME I * Foreword * Conference Organization * PLENARY SESSIONS * Pl-01 Recent Results from the Super-Kamiokande * Recent Results from the Super-Kamiokande * Pl-02 Recent Results on Neutrino Oscillations * Recent Results on Neutrino Oscillations * Pl-03 Experimental Status of the Standard Model * Experimental Status of the Standard Model * Pl-04 Standard Model Theory * Standard Model Theory * Pl-05 Searches at Existing Machines * Searches at Existing Machines * Pl-06 Heavy Quark Production and Decay (t, b, and Onia) * Heavy Quark Production and Decay: (t, b, and Onia) * Pl-07 Heavy Quark Decay * Heavy Quark Decay * Pl-08 CP Violation, Rare Decays and Lepton Flavor Violation * CP Violation, Rare Decays and Lepton Flavor Violation * Pl-09 Light and Charmed Hadron Spectroscopy * Light and Charmed Hadron Spectroscopy * Pl-10 Progress in Lattice Gauge Theory * Progress in Lattice Gauge Theory * Pl-11 Structure Functions * Structure Functions * Pl-12 Diffraction and Low-Q2 Physics Including Two-Photon Physics * Diffraction and Low-Q2 Physics Including Two-Photon Physics * Pl-13 Heavy Ion Collisions at High Energy * Heavy Ion Collisions at High Energy * Pl-14 "Non-Perturbative Methods" in Field Theory * "Non-Perturbative Methods" in Field Theory * Pl-15 Experimental Aspects of QCD in e+e- Collisions * Experimental Aspects of QCD in e+e- Collisions * Pl-16 QCD at High Energy (Hadron-Hadron, Lepton-Hadron, and Gamma-Hadron) * QCD at High Energy (Hadron-Hadron, Lepton-Hadron, Gamma-Hadron) * Pl-17 Perturbative QCD Theory (Includes Our Knowledge of αs) * Perturbative QCD Theory (Includes our Knowledge of αs) * Pl-18 Experimental Particle Astrophysics * Experimental Particle Astrophysics * Pl-19 Particle Cosmology * Particle Cosmology * Pl-20 Guide to Physics Beyond the Standard Model * Guide to Physics Beyond the Standard Model * Pl-21 Developments in Superstring Theory * Developments in Superstring Theory * Pl-22 Future Accelerators * Future Accelerators * Pl-23 Summary and Outlook * Summary and Outlook * PARALLEL SESSIONS * Pa-01 Electroweak Interactions - Experiment and Theory W-boson Properties, Three Boson Couplings, LEPI/SLD Fits * Measurements of ALR and Alepton from SLD * Z Lineshape and Forward-Backward Asymmetries * New Results on the Theoretical Precision of the LEP/SLC Luminosity * Tau Polarisation Measurement at LEP * Z0 Decays to b, c-quarks * Heavy Quark Asymmetries at LEP * Fermion Pair Production at LEP2 * Two-fermion Heavy Flavour Production at LEP 2 * Single and Pair Production of Neutral Electroweak Gauge Bosons at LEP * Electroweak Radiative Corrections to W Boson Production at the Tevatron * New W and Z Results from CDF * W Boson Physics at the Tevatron * WW Cross Section and Branching Fraction Measurements at LEP * Measurement of |Vcs| in W Decays at LEP2 * Evaluation of the LEP Centre-of-mass Energy Above the W-pair Production Threshold * Measurement of the W Mass at LEP by Direct Reconstruction of W-pair Semileptonic Decays * Measurement of the W-boson Mass at LEP * W+W- Hadronic Decay Properties * Bose-Einstein Correlations in WW Events * W Boson Production at HERA * Single W Production at LEP2 * Vector Boson Pair Production and Trilinear Gauge Boson Couplings - Results from the Tevatron * Trilinear Gauge Couplings at LEP2 * Tests of Lepton Universality in τ Decays * Measurement of the Total Cross Section for the Hadronic Production by e+e- Annihilation at the Energies between 2-5 GeV * Evaluation of α(M2Z) and (g - 2)μ * E821, a New Measurement of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment at B.N.L. * Measurement of sin2 θW in νN Scattering at the Tevatron * The QED Process e+e- → γγ(γ) * Electroweak Measurements, QCD and Theory Uncertainties * Combined Analysis of Precision Electroweak Results * Pa-02 Neutrino and Non Accelerator Experiments Neutrino Oscillations; Solar Neutrinos; Double Beta-decay * Atmospheric Neutrino Studies in Soudan 2 * Measurements on Atmospheric Neutrinos with O * Solutions to the Atmospheric Neutrino Problem * Solar Neutrino Measurements from Super-Kamiokande * Final Results of the Gallex Solar Neutrino Experiment * Evidence for Neutrino Oscillations at LSND * Karmen 2: A New Precision in the Search for Neutrino Oscillations * Searches for Evidence of Neutrino Mass in the NuTeV Experiment at Fermilab * New results on the νμ → ντ Oscillation Search with the CHORUS Detector * Results from the NOMAD Experiment * Neutrino Trident Production from NuTeV * Neutrino Mass: Where Do We Stand, and Where Are We Going? * The Palo Verde Neutrino Experiment * The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory * The Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment * The HELLAZ Solar Neutrino Experiment - the Measurement of the Spectrum of νpp and νBe * Physics Opportunities with the KamLAND Experiment * Energy Spectra of Air Shower Muons as a Function of Atmospheric Depth * Radiative Four Neutrino Masses and Mixings * Pa-03 QCD, Jet Physics * Properties of Gluon and Quark Jets * QCD Tests Using bbar{b}g Events and a New Measurement of the B-Hadron Energy Distribution * Jet Structure in Deep-inelastic Scattering * Gluon Splitting Into cbar{c} and bbar{b} * Inclusive Production of Mesons and Baryons * Identified Particle Production in Quark and Gluon Jets * Multiplicity Fluctuations and Multiparticle Correlations * Fragmentation Functions and Two-Particle Correlations * Analytic QCD Flavour Thresholds Through Two Loops * NLO Calculations of the Three-jet Heavy Quark Production in e+e- - Annihilation: Status and Applications * Heavy Quark Effects and Improved Tests of the Flavour Independence of Strong Interactions * Progress in QCD Tests * Determination of Λ frac{{l( 5 right)}}{{MS}} from the Measured Energy Dependence of < 1 - Thrust > * QCD tests in Hadronic Final States * Measurements of αs from Hadronic Event Shapes in e+e- Annihilation * QCD Phase Shifts and Rising Total Cross Sections * A BFKL Monte Carlo Approach to Jet Production at Hadron-hadron and Lepton-hadron Colliders * Forward Jet and Particle Production at HERA * Jets and Prompt Photons in Photoproduction at Zeus * Inclusive Jet Production at 630 and 1800 GeV * Dijet Measurements at CDF and D0 * D*± and Inelastic J/ψ Productions at HERA * Measurement of R10 (σ(W + ≥ 1 jet)/σ(W)) at CDF * Isolated Photons without Fragmentation Contribution * Tests of Bjorken Sum Rule Using Perturbative QCD Analysis of g1(x, Q2) at Next-To-Leading Order * Pa-04 DIS, Low x; Structure Functions, Spin Structure Functions * Measurement of Neutral and Charged Current Cross Sections at High Q2 * Neutral and Charged Current DIS Cross Sections at High Q2 from ZEUS at HERA * Measurement and Phenomenology of the Proton Structure Function F2 from ZEUS at HERA * Precision Measurement of the Inclusive Deep Inelastic ep Scattering Cross Section at Low Q2 * Test of Structure Functions Using Lepton Pairs: W-Charge Asymmetry and Drell-Yan Production at CDF * Parton Distributions, d/u, and Higher Twists at High x * Determination of αs and Measurements of RL, κ, and |Vcs| from ν - N DIS at CCFR * Recent results from open charm production at H1 * Measurement of the Charm Structure Function of the Proton from D* Production and from Semileptonic Charm Decay * Comparison of Neutrino and Muon Structure Functions, Shadowing Corrections and Charge Symmetry Violation * Measurements of the Light Quark Flavor Asymmetry in the Nucleon Sea * Determination of the Flavor Asymmetry of the Light Quark Sea from Unpolarized Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERMES * Flavor Asymmetry of the Sea Quarks in the Baryon Octet * Influence of Parton kT on High pT Particle Production and Determination of the Gluon Distribution Function * Measurements of the Spin Structure of the Nucleon from SMC experiment * Polarized Quark Distributions from Deep Inelastic Scattering * Pa-05 Low Q2, Soft Phenomena, Two Photon Physics * Next To Leading Order Parton Distributions in the Photon from γ*γ and γ*p Scattering * Photon Structure Functions at LEP * NLO Prediction for the Photoproduction of the Isolated Photon at HERA * Photon Structure * Double Diffractive J/Ψ Production in High Energy γγ Collisions and the QCD Pomeron * Charm Production in γγ Collisions at LEP * Final States in γγ and γp Interactions * The Odderon in Theory and Experiment - A Mini-Review * Leading Baryon Production in ep Scattering at HERA * Fracture Functions for Diffractive and Leading Proton DIS * Final States, Jets and Charm Production in Diffraction at HERA * Are Two Gluons the QCD Pomeron? * New Results on Diffractive Light Vector Meson Production at HERA * Heavy Vector Meson Production at HERA * Diffreactive D*s Production by Neutrinos * Observation of Self-Affine Fractality in High Energy Hadron-Hadron Collisions * VOLUME II * PARALLEL SESSIONS * Pa-06 CP Violation and Rare Decays of K, mu, and tau * Results of the Sindrum II Experiment * τ Decays to Hadrons at LEP * Spectral Functions and the Strong Coupling Constant αs in Tau Decays from OPAL * Measurement of the Tau Dipole Moments at LEP * First Search for CP Violation in Tau Lepton Decay * On A New Class of Models for Soft CP Violation * Measurement of Direct CP-Violation with the NA48 Experiment at the CERN SPS * Status of the Direct CP Violation Measurement from KTeV and Other Results * Results on CP, T, CPT Symmetries with Tagged K0 and {bar{K}^0} by CPLEAR * Investigation of CP Violation in B0 → J/ψK0S Decays at LEP with the OPAL Detector * Measurement of {B^0}/{bar{B}^0} to J/ψ K_S^0 Decay Asymmetry Using Same-Side B-Flavour Tagging * Review of Future CP-Violation Experiments in B-Meson Decays * BNL E871 Rare Kaon Decay Searches: KL → μe, KL → ee, KL → μμ * Study of K+ → π+e+e- and K+ → π+μ+μ- Decays in E865 at the AGS * KTeV at Fermilab: New K0L and π0 Rare Decay Results from Phase II of Experiment 799 * Search for Time-Reversal Violation in K+ → π0μ+ν Decay * Study of the Rare K0S, K0L, K+, K- Decays at ∫ Resonance with the CMD-2 Detector * A New Search for Direct CP Violation in Hyperon Decays * Pa-07 Production and Decay of Heavy Quarks and Onia * Update on b → sγ and b → sl+l- from CLEO * Theoretical Status of B → Xsγ Decays * b - Quark Fragmentation Measurements * Leptoproduction of J/ψ * New Results on Heavy Qbar{Q} Pair Production Close to Threshold * Properties of b-Quark Production at the Tevatron * First Observation of Open b Production at HERA * Top Quark Mass from CDF * Direct Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at DØ * Gluon Radiation in Top Mass Reconstruction: Effect of Hadronic W Decays * DØ All-Hadronic Top Decay and Top Cross Section Summary * Top Quark Production and Decay Measurements from CDF * Charge Asymmetry of Heavy Quarks at Hadron Colliders * Pa-08 Heavy Hadrons: Lifetimes: Mixing, Rare Decays * B+, B0d and b-Baryon Lifetimes * Measurements of the Bs Lifetime and Search for a Lifetime Difference frac{{ΔΓ}}{Γ } * Status of D^0 - bar{D}^0 Mixing and Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed D0 Decay Rate Measurements * Nearby Resonances and D^0 - bar{D}^0 Mixing * Oscillations of the B0d Mesons * B0s Mixing, Limits on Δms * Semileptonic B Decays at the Z0 * Selected Results on b → cℓv from CLEO * Experimental Review on |Vub| * New Measurements of |Vub| and |Vcb| with DELPHI at LEP * A Constituent Quark-Meson Model for Heavy Meson Decays * Towards the Extraction of the CKM Angle γ * Observation of the Bc Meson at CDF * Rare Hadronic B Decays * Charmless and Double-Charm B Decays at SLD * Towards a Theory of Charmless Non-Leptonic Two-Body B Decays * Nonfactorizable Effects in Charmless B Decays and B Meson Lifetimes * B/bar{B} Flavour Tagging and Doubly Charmed B Decays in ALEPH * Production of Orbitally Excited B Mesons in Z Decays * Measurement of b-baryon Polarization in Z0 Decays * Pa-09 Light Hadron Spectroscopy (Glueballs, Exotics, States with c Quarks) * Study of D** and D*' Production in B and C Jets, with the DELPHI Detector * Recent Preliminary Results on D Meson Decays from the BES * OPAL Results on the Production of Excited Charm Mesons in Hadronic Z0 Decays * Leptonic Decays of the Ds Meson and Production of Orbitally Excited D and Ds Mesons * First Charm Hadroproduction Results from SELEX * Further Evidence on Gluonic States from the WA102 Experiment * Exotic Meson Produced in Antiproton-Neutron Annihilation: hat{p} to ηπ * Evidence for a JPC = 1-+ Exotic Mesons from BNL E852 * The 1.4 GeV JPC = 1-+ State as an Interference of a Non-Resonant Background and a Resonance at 1.6 GeV * Searches for Glueball Candidates in γγ Collisions at LEP and CESR * The Hadronic Structure in τ → 3πν Decays * Investigation of the Rare ∫ Radiative Decays with the CMD-2 Detector at VEPP-2M Collider * Radiative width of the α2 Meson * Pa-10 Searches for New Particles at Accelerators * Standard Model Higgs at LEP * Searches for Higgs Bosons Beyond the Standard Model at LEP * MSSM and Higgs Searches at the Tevatron * SUSY with Neutralino LSP at LEP * Searches for Supersymmetry at HERA * Closing the Light Gluino Window Using π+π- Pairs Produced in a Neutral Beam * Direct Search for Light Gluinos * Contact Interactions at LEP and Limits from SM Processes * Contact Interactions at HERA * Leptoquark Searches * Searches for Exotic Particles at the Tevatron * Searches for Heavy and Excited Fermions at √{s} = 183 - 189 {GeV} at LEP2 * Events with High Energy Isolated Leptons and Missing Transverse Momentum and Excited Fermion Searches at HERA * Search for Neutral Heavy Leptons in the NuTeV Experiment at Fermilab * SUSY Search with Photonic Events at LEP with tilde{G} as LSP and tilde{X}_1^0 as NLSP * Searches in Light Gravitino Scenarios with Sfermion NLSP at LEP * SUSY Searches at the Tevatron Using Photons * Search for SUSY with not{R}_p at LEP * Searches for R-Parity Violating SUSY at the Tevatron * Aspects of Higgs Physics and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at LHC and e+e- Linear Colliders * Pa-11 Particle Astrophysics (Dark Matter Searches, Extensive Air Shower, Space and Underground Experiments) * The Detection of Gravitational Waves LIGO * Status of the Gravitational Wave Detector VIRGO * Search for Rare Particles with the O Detector * A Search for Dark Matter Using Cryogenic Detectors (CDMS) * Search for P to K^{+}bar{v} with Super-Kamiokande * Status and Recent Results from the HEGRA Air Shower Experiment * TeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy at the Whipple Observatory * GLAST * Initial Results from the Amanda High Energy Neutrino Detector * ANTARES * Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS Report on the First Flight in Space June 2-12 * BESS Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum and Search for Antimatter * Pa-13 Heavy Ion Collisions at High Energies * Probing the Final and Initial State in Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions - Results from the WA98 Experiment * Intermediate Mass Dimuons in NA38/NA50 * Results on Charmonium States in Pb-Pb Interactions * High Energy Pb+Pb Collisions as Seen by the N44 Experiment * Overview of Hadronic Observables Measured by NA49 at the CERN/SPS in Central 208Pb+Pb Collisions at 158 GeV/Nucleon * Relativistic Multiparticle Processes in the Central Rapidity Region at Asymptotically High Energies in Nuclear Collisions * Pa-14 Experimental Techniques * The Compass Experiment * Status of the BaBar Detector * The HERA-B Experiment: Overview and Concepts * The Run II Upgrade to the Collider Detector at Fermilab * The DØ Detector Upgrade and Jet Energy Scale * The KLOE Calorimetric System for Neutral Particle Detection and Triggering * Precision Luminosity Measurement with the OPAL Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeters * The ATLAS Electromagnetic Calorimeter and the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger * Test of CsI(Tl) Crystals for the Dark Matter Search * The Drift Chamber and the Data Acquisition System of the KLOE Experiment * Progress Towards CLEO III: The Silicon Tracker and the LiF-TEA Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector * Status of HERA-B Sub-detectors & Operational Experience * Recent Results on the Development of Radiation-Hard Diamond Detectors * The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker and Recent Developments in P+N Silicon Strip Detectors for LHC * The RICH System and Vertex Detector of LHCb * Pa-15 Field Theory - Perturbative and Non Perturbative * Global Quantization of Yang-Mills Theory * Vilkovisky-DeWitt Effective Potential and the Higgs Mass Bound * Exact Results in Softly Broken SUSY Gauge Theories * Higgs Masses and s-Spectra in Finite and the Minimal SUSY Gauge-Yukawa GUT * Effective Chiral Theory of Mesons, Coefficients of ChPT, Axial Vector Symmetry Breaking * Analytic Perturbative Approach to QCD * The Perturbative QCD Potential and the tbar{t} Threshold * The Degree of Infrared Safety of Quark-Antiquark Annihilation at High Energy to All Orders * Perturbative QCD- and Power-corrected Hadron Spectra and Spectral Moments in the Decay B → Xsℓ+ℓ- * Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi Evolution and the Renormalization Group Improved Yennie-Frautschi-Suura Theory in QCD * Effect of Electromagnetism in Nonleptonic Kaon Decays * The Thermal Coupling Constant in the Vector λφ4D Model * Fixed Point Structure of Padé-Summation Approximations to the QCD β-Function * Problem of Divergent Energy-integrals in the Coulomb Gauge * Nonlocal Color Interactions in a Gauge-Invariant Formulation of QCD * On Scalar Field Theories with Polynomial Interactions * Pa-16 Beyond the Standard Model - Theory * The Fermion Mass Problem and the Anti-Grand Unification Model * Grand Unification from Gauge Theory in M4 × ZN * SU(N) SUSY GUTs with String Remnants: Minimal SU(5) and Beyond * The Dualized Standard Model and Its Applications * Predictions for SUSY Particle Masses from Electroweak Baryogenesis * Selected Low-Energy Supersymmetry Phenomenology Topics * Tau Leptons as the New Signal for Supersymmetry * Resonant Slepton Production at Hadron Colliders in R-Parity Violating Models * Extracting Chargino/Neutralino Mass Parameters from Physical Observables * Radiative Corrections in the MSSM Beyond One-Loop: Precision Observables and Neutral Higgs Masses * Bosonic Decays of tilde{t}_2 and tilde{b}_2 Including SUSY-QCD Corrections * Discovery Limits for Techni-Omega Production in eγ Collisions * Majorana Neutrino Transition Magnetic Moments in L-Right Symmetric Models * Light Rays of New Physics: CP Violation in B → Xsγ Decays * Lessons from bar{B} to X_{S}γ in Two Higgs Doublet Models * Scalar-Mediated Flavor-Changing Neutral Currents * Anomalous Higgs Couplings at Colliders * Pa-17 Superstrings * Stable Non-BPS States in String Theory * Duality in String Cosmology * Zero Temperature Phase Transitions in Gauge Theories * Newtonian Dynamics in an Infinite Momentum Frame * Non-perturbative Results in Global SUSY and Topological Field Theories * Supergravity Predictions for Dark Matter * Pa-18 Lattice Gauge Theory * Chirality on the Lattice * Gauge Invariant Properties of Abelian Monopoles * Theoretical Aspects of Topologically Unquenched QCD * Quantum Hall Dynamics on von Neumann Lattice * Toward the Chiral Limit of QCD: Quenched and Dynamical Domain Wall Fermions * Gauge Invariant Field Strength Correlators in QCD * Gauge Fixing on the Lattice and the Gibbs Phenomenon * Improved Lattice Actions and Charmed Hadrons * List of Participants * Conference Photos

  7. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  8. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference (Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, January 15-17, 1981). Proceedings, Friday, Activity and Position Paper Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The second session of the January conference on Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education was devoted to over 35 workshops and demonstrations of games and sports that could be used by teachers with their classes. Emphasis was placed on the development of individual skills, physical fitness through sports, and noncompetitive…

  9. Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference. Proceedings, Saturday, Activity and Position Paper Sessions (Atlanta, Georgia, January 13-15, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Margaret A., Ed.

    The second session of the Contemporary Elementary and Middle School Physical Education Conference was devoted to over 35 workshops and demonstrations of games and sports that may be used by teachers. Emphasis was placed on the development of individual skills, physical fitness through sports, and non-competitive games. Position papers were also…

  10. Involvement & Participation. National Conference on Physical Activity for the Exceptional Individual (11th, San Diego, California, November 19-20, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Edward R.; Richmond, Alan

    This publication contains papers, presented at a conference about physical activities for the exceptional individual, concerning: (1) student interest/motivation; (2) swimming; (3) games; (4) wheelchairs; (5) movement education; (6) physical stress and bone growth; (7) parent involvement; (8) meningomyelocele; (9) blind athletes; (10) Project…

  11. National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education Annual Conference Proceedings (San Diego, CA, January 8-10, 1982). Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedvilas, Leo L., Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 26 papers delivered at the National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (NAPEHE) Annual Conference (1982). Section 1, "NAPEHE's Image," contains two papers, one by Don Hellison, the other by Celeste Ulrich. "The Splintering of Physical Education" is the topic of the next section, and it contains papers by…

  12. Differential Posttranslational Processing Confers Intraspecies Variation of a Major Surface Lipoprotein and a Macrophage-Activating Lipopeptide of Mycoplasma fermentans

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Kim, Mary F.; Karpas, Arthur B.; Mühlradt, Peter F.; Wise, Kim S.

    1999-01-01

    The malp gene of Mycoplasma fermentans is shown to occur in single copy but to encode two discrete translated forms of lipid-modified surface protein that can be differentially expressed on isolates within this species: MALP-2, a 14-amino-acid (2-kDa) lipopeptide with potent macrophage-stimulatory activity (P. F. Mühlradt, M. Kiess, H. Meyer, R. Süssmuth, and G. Jung, J. Exp. Med. 185:1951–1958, 1997), and MALP-404, an abundant, full-length (404-amino-acid) surface lipoprotein of 41 kDa, previously designated P41 (K. S. Wise, M. F. Kim, P. M. Theiss, and S.-C. Lo, Infect. Immun. 61:3327–3333, 1993). The sequences, transcripts, and translation products of malp were compared between clonal isolates of strains PG18 (known to express P41) and II-29/1 (known to express high levels of MALP-2). Despite conserved malp DNA sequences containing full-length open reading frames and expression of full-length monocistronic transcripts in both isolates, Western blotting using a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to the N-terminal MALP-2 peptide revealed marked differences in the protein products expressed. Whereas PG18 expressed abundant MALP-404 with detectable MALP-2, II-29/1 revealed no MALP-404 even in samples containing a large comparative excess of MALP-2. Colony immunoblots with the MAb showed uniform surface expression of MALP-2 in II-29/1 populations. A second MAb to an epitope of MALP-404 outside the MALP-2 sequence predictably failed to stain II-29/1 colonies but uniformly stained PG18 populations. Collectively, these results provide evidence for novel posttranscriptional (probably posttranslational) processing pathways leading to differential intraspecies expression of a major lipoprotein, and a potent macrophage-activating lipopeptide, on the surface of M. fermentans. In the course of this study, a striking conserved motif (consensus, TD-G--DDKSFNQSAWE--), designated SLA, was identified in MALP-404; this motif is also distributed among selected lipoproteins and species from diverse bacterial genera, including Bacillus, Borrelia, Listeria, Mycoplasma, and Treponema. In addition, malp was shown to flank a chromosomal polymorphism. In eight isolates of M. fermentans examined, malp occurred upstream of an operon encoding the phase-variable P78 ABC transporter; but, in three of these isolates, a newly discovered insertion sequence, IS1630 (of the IS30 class), was located between these genes. PMID:9916088

  13. Education Majors' Expectations and Reported Experiences with Inquiry-Based Physics: Implications for Student Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.

    2013-01-01

    To address a perennial need to provide K-8 teachers with a solid foundation in science, there are many physics content courses throughout the United States. One such course is Physics and Astronomy for Teachers (PAT), which relies heavily on active-learning strategies. Although PAT is successful in teaching physics content, students sometimes…

  14. Physical health indicators in major mental illness: analysis of QOF data across UK general practice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julie Langan; Lowrie, Richard; McConnachie, Alex; McLean, Gary; Mair, Frances; Mercer, Stewart W; Smith, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Background The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) has specific targets for body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure recording in major mental illness (MMI), diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although aspects of MMI (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and related psychoses) are incentivised, barriers to care may occur. Aim To compare payment, population achievement, and exception rates for blood pressure and BMI recording in MMI relative to diabetes and CKD across the UK. Design and setting Analysis of 2012/2013 QOF data from 9731 UK general practices 2 years after the introduction of the mental health, BMI, and blood pressure QOF indicators. Method Payment, exception, and population achievement rates for the MMI and CKD blood pressure indicators and the MMI and diabetes BMI indicators were calculated and compared. Results UK payment and population achievement rates for BMI recording for MMI were significantly lower than for diabetes (payment: 92.7% versus 95.5% and population achievement: 84.0% versus 92.5%, P<0.001) and exception rates were higher (8.1% versus 2.0%, P<0.001). For blood pressure recording, UK payment and population achievement rates were significantly lower for MMI than for CKD (94.1% versus 97.8% and 87.0% versus 97.1%, P<0.001), while exception rate was higher (6.5% versus 0.0%, P<0.001). This was observed for all countries. Compared with England, Northern Ireland had higher population achievement rates for both mental health indicators, whereas Scotland and Wales had lower rates. There were no cross-jurisdiction differences for CKD and diabetes. Conclusion Differences in payment, exception, and population achievement rates for blood pressure and BMI recording for MMI relative to CKD and diabetes were observed across the UK. These findings suggest potential inequalities in the monitoring of physical health in MMI within the UK primary care system. PMID:25267051

  15. Instrumentation in Elementary Particle Physics: VIII ICFA School, AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 536 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    Kartal, S.

    2000-12-31

    In addition to lectures and ''hands-on'' laboratory courses on the state-of-the-art instrumentation techniques for high energy physics, there were a number of special talks on future experiments, collaboration with industry, and instrumentation for medical imaging and particle physics and particle astrophysics.

  16. Immunization with a single major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition epitope of herpes simplex virus type 2 confers protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Blaney, J E; Nobusawa, E; Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Mylin, L M; Fu, T M; Kawaoka, Y; Tevethia, S S

    1998-12-01

    We have evaluated the potential of conferring protective immunity to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) by selectively inducing an HSV-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response directed against a single major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CTL recognition epitope. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV-ES-gB498-505) which expresses the H-2Kb-restricted, HSV-1/2-cross-reactive CTL recognition epitope, HSV glycoprotein B residues 498 to 505 (SSIEFARL) (gB498-505), fused to the adenovirus type 5 E3/19K endoplasmic reticulum insertion sequence (ES). Mucosal immunization of C57BL/6 mice with this recombinant vaccinia virus induced both a primary CTL response in the draining lymph nodes and a splenic memory CTL response directed against HSV gB498-505. To determine the ability of the gB498-505-specific memory CTL response to provide protection from HSV infection, immunized mice were challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-2 strain 186 by the intranasal (i.n.) route. Development of the gB498-505-specific CTL response conferred resistance in 60 to 75% of mice challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-2 and significantly reduced the levels of infectious virus in the brains and trigeminal ganglia of challenged mice. Finally, i.n. immunization of C57BL/6 mice with either a recombinant influenza virus or a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HSV gB498-505 without the ES was also demonstrated to induce an HSV-specific CTL response and provide protection from HSV infection. This finding confirms that the induction of an HSV-specific CTL response directed against a single epitope is sufficient for conferring protective immunity to HSV. Our findings support the role of CD8(+) T cells in the control of HSV infection of the central nervous system and suggest the potential importance of eliciting HSV-specific mucosal CD8(+) CTL in HSV vaccine design. PMID:9811690

  17. Can Pre-Service Physical Education Majors Identify Learning Standards during Authentic Teaching Episodes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniffin, Mike; Foley, John; MacDonald, Lynn Couturier; Howarth, Kath

    2014-01-01

    Only a handful of research studies have been conducted to determine whether or not physical educators or pre-service physical education teachers are utilizing learning standards in their teaching. While pre-service teachers are typically required to align lesson objectives and content, their extent of their understanding of how learning standards…

  18. How We Learn: A Motor-Learning Project for Physical Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dail, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    One way to help physical education preservice students to think critically about the learning of physical skills is to provide hands-on experiences in which performance and learning can be seen and measured. Developing knowledge of these processes, however, requires creative and carefully planned exercises that can illustrate principles in a…

  19. Resources and approaches for teaching physics to pre-health and life science majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widenhorn, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    As science is advancing, the skill set for a physician or medical researcher today and in the future is very different than it has been in the past. As an example, the American Association of Medical Colleges revised the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) to reflect this dynamic environment. Because of these changes, the needs of students entering into these professions are often not met by a traditional physics course. Developing curriculum for an introductory physics course that helps to prepare life science and pre-health students can be challenging for many physics instructors who lack a strong foundation in biology or medicine. This presentation will address various approaches that physics instructors without a background in life sciences can use to successfully teach an introductory physics course for life science and pre-heath students. For these courses, an online resource may be a useful tool. Online resources already exist today, but their utility relies on active engagement and sharing of teaching material by physics instructors possessing a background in both physics and the life sciences. This talk will address ways for the biomedical physics community to contribute to this effort.

  20. Emerging New Physics with Major Implications for Energy Technology, Biology, and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2003-03-01

    In the past 15 years, reproducible experiments and prototype technological devices have emerged that may revolutionize much of physics and chemistry(despite the common perception that modern physics is on very solid ground and is nearing a "Theory of Everything"). This new physics has flourished despite very strong opposition by the entrenched foundational paradigms within physics and chemistry ( not to forget vested financial interests within academia). In fact, beginning with "cold fusion" (more generically low-energy nuclear reactions, LENR), one of the most important discoveries of the late 20th Century has been the irrefutable proof of the failure of the physics establishment to deal ethically and appropriately with potential and real paradigm shifts, when its "sacred writ" ( i.e. Its textbooks) -- are threatened with the need for massive revision.

  1. EDITORIAL: The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases The 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2011-03-01

    This special issue consists of papers that are associated with invited lectures, workshop papers and hot topic papers presented at the 20th European Sectional Conference on Atomic and Molecular Physics of Ionized Gases (ESCAMPIG XX). This conference was organized in Novi Sad (Serbia) from 13 to 17 July 2010 by the Institute of Physics of the University of Belgrade. It is important to note that this is not a conference 'proceedings'. Following the initial selection process by the International Scientific Committee, all papers were submitted to the journal by the authors and have been fully peer reviewed to the standard required for publication in Plasma Sources Science and Technology (PSST). The papers are based on presentations given at the conference but are intended to be specialized technical papers covering all or part of the topic presented by the author during the meeting. The ESCAMPIG conference is a regular biennial Europhysics Conference of the European Physical Society focusing on collisional and radiative aspects of atomic and molecular physics in partially ionized gases as well as on plasma-surface interaction. The conference focuses on low-temperature plasma sciences in general and includes the following topics: Atomic and molecular processes in plasmas Transport phenomena, particle velocity distribution function Physical basis of plasma chemistry Plasma surface interaction (boundary layers, sheath, surface processes) Plasma diagnostics Plasma and discharges theory and simulation Self-organization in plasmas, dusty plasmas Upper atmospheric plasmas and space plasmas Low-pressure plasma sources High-pressure plasma sources Plasmas and gas flows Laser-produced plasmas During ESCAMPIG XX special sessions were dedicated to workshops on: Atomic and molecular collision data for plasma modeling, organized by Professors Z Lj Petrovic and N Mason Plasmas in medicine, organized by Dr N Puac and Professor G Fridman. The conference topics were represented in the program by 16 invited lectures, 7 selected hot topics, and 191 poster presentations. The largest number of contributed papers was submitted in Topic 5: Plasma diagnostics (37). The workshop topics were addressed by 10 invited lectures, 5 oral presentations and 7 posters. A post-conference workshop with 5 invited lectures was organized, dealing with the data needs for modeling of plasma sources of light. ESCAMPIG XX was attended by 185 scientists from 31 countries. Of the participants, 30% were PhD students (55). The list includes scientists from the USA, Japan, Australia, Mexico and other non-European countries, which indicates the truly international status of the conference. We would like to thank the authors for their efforts in preparing stimulating lectures and interesting articles for the readers of PSST, and the scientific community dealing with ionized gases, plasma sources and atomic, molecular and chemical physics of low-temperature plasmas for continued interest in the field of ESCAMPIG. We would like to thank the organizers of all previous ESCAMPIG conferences for setting the standards for organization and, in particular, the organizers of ESCAMPIG XVIII and XIX for their direct help and insight. Finally the International Scientific Committee and its chairman in particular have worked hard to select the best possible program and to keep us in line with almost 40 years of tradition and standards of the conference. Most importantly this has been the 20th conference. The quality of new papers shows maturity and new vistas in the field that has produced so much fundamental understanding of complex, non-equilibrium, even nonlinear plasmas. At the same time the field has led to some of the key technologies of modern civilization and has shown that responsible science that pays attention to its societal benefits should have no fear for its future. All critical issues studied today were presented at the meeting and only a small part is represented here. For example, discharges in liquids or above liquids were covered by several lectures represented by two papers. Verreycken et al [1] studied optical emission spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering in discharges above water electrodes in order to measure gas temperature. At the same time Starikovsky et al [2] showed that it is possible to strike a breakdown directly in the liquid phase without gaseous evaporation or bubbles. Another key issue of present-day low-temperature plasma physics is atmospheric pressure discharges. Application of atmospheric pressure microwave plasma was considered by Belmonte et al [3] as a source for plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Strategies to produce nanosize structures and high deposition rates have also been proposed. Akishev et al [4] presented modeling results showing why spatial reproducibility of the origins of micro-discharges in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is very high while the stochastic nature of the breakdown leads to jitter. Associated with the application of plasmas in many systems is control plasma chemistry. Tanarro and Herrero [5] performed measurements and modeling of dominant species in a hollow cathode discharge with variation of pressure. Dramatic changes in composition were noticed in H2, H2/Ar, and air. For example, NO becomes the second most abundant neutral under some conditions while at high mean energies H2+ ions become more abundant than H3+. Loureiro et al [6] presented the most detailed self-consistent model of discharges in N2, both pure and in mixtures with H2 and CH4. The model includes coupling of different mechanisms in the gas phase and on surfaces. A further example of detailed plasma chemistry and modeling of possible industrial applications is the work of De Bie et al [7] who studied the conversion of methane to more complex hydrocarbons and other gases in a detailed model of kinetic and plasma chemistry of a DBD reactor. Associated with plasma chemistry models but with a completely different final goal is the work of Taccogna et al [8]. They provide a detailed model of negative ion production in an ITER source of fast neutrals for heating of fusion plasma. Low-temperature plasmas have made their most significant impact through application of etching and other plasma techniques in the production of integrated circuits. Associated with this there have been several papers dealing with control of plasmas relevant for plasma etching applications. Czarnetzki et al [9] presented the modeling of an electrical asymmetry effect which allows independent control of plasma symmetry, bias and consequently properties of ions reaching the surfaces. Separate control of the flux and energy of ions from capacitively coupled plasmas, while an interesting fundamental issue, is also one of the key issues in the manufacture of integrated circuits. Makabe and Yagisawa [10] gave a detailed presentation of the top-down model of plasma devices for etching and other plasma-related nanotechnologies. Their paper presents a complex model covering atomic and molecular collisions and transport, plasma kinetics in complex geometries, and plasma interaction with surfaces with the ability to calculate the development of etched profiles, and the damage-inducing potentials within the wafer. Finally, as the basis of all modeling of plasmas, atomic and molecular collision and transport data were a much more prominent part of ESCAMPIG conferences in the past. We tried to initiate the return of elementary processes to ESCAMPIG from numerous specialized conferences by organizing a workshop on the data for modeling. Bartschat and Zatsarinny [11] gave a presentation of the foundation of the B-spline R-matrix method and a number of cross section results that extend the databases for plasma modeling of atomic gases. State-of-the-art calculations presented here focus on threshold regions of electronic excitation cross sections where complex structures exist due to resonances. These threshold regions of the excitation cross sections, however, determine the distribution function in the region of the ionization, The interface between plasma modeling and atomic physics is swarm studies, and those are based on transport theory that has recently become quite complex and versatile. Dujko et al [12] considered a Boltzmann equation solution to the transport of charged particles, especially in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Apart from indicating the necessity to include transport properties in E × B fields in plasma modeling, these results show complexity and kinetic phenomena that require kinetic models to be properly included. Finally, Makabe and Tatsumi [13] presented the structure of a comprehensive model of plasma etching devices and focused on the requirements for the atomic and collision cross section data. The winner of the W Crookes Prize was Zoltán Donkó [14] who gave a review of particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulation methods and presented a review of a large number of systems where he and his co-workers have applied this technique. In particular the lecture gives examples of different kinetic phenomena that arise in modeling of different plasmas. This presentation covers both applications in the control of low-pressure capacitively coupled plasmas and DC breakdown and glow discharges as well as the issues of modeling of elementary processes in the gas phase and on surfaces. Finally, to reply to Harold Pinter and his famous quote, apart from the known and the unknown there is the joy of extending the border of the 'known' and sharing it with colleagues at conferences like ESCAMPIG. Every answer that is reached opens new horizons and new realms of the 'unknown' to explore, and conferences like ESCAMPIG have proven to be a continuous source of ideas and inspiration for all colleagues within the field of low-temperature plasmas and elementary processes. We can certainly hope that the 20th ESCAMPIG was no exception in this regard. References Verreycken T, van Gessel A F H, Pageau A and Bruggeman P 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024002 Starikovsky A, Yang Y, Cho Y I and Fridman A 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024003 Belmonte T, Gries T, Cardoso R P, Arnoult R, Kosior F and Henrion G 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024004 Akishev Y, Aponin G, Balakirev A, Grushin M, Karalnik V, Petryakov A and Trushkin N 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024005 Tanarro I and Herrero V J 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024006 Loureiro J, Guerra V, Sá P A, Pintassilgo C D and Lino da Silva M 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024007 De Bie C, Martens T, van Dijk, Paulussen S, Verheyde B and Bogaerts A 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024008 Taccogna F, Minelli P, Diomede P, Longo S, Capitelli M and Schneider R 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024009 Czarnetzki U, Schulze J, Schungel E and Donkó Z 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024010 Makabe T and Yagisawa T 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024011 Bartschat K and Zatsarinny O 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024012 Dujko S, White R D, Petrovic Z Lj and Robson R E 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024013 Makabe T and Tatsumi T 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024014 Donkó Z 2011 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20 024001

  2. Major initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada: the year in review.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript briefly reviews 15 significant initiatives related to childhood obesity and physical inactivity in Canada between September 2010 and September 2011. These include the: announcement of a Federal-Provincial-Territorial framework for action to promote healthy weights; implementation of the nutrition labeling initiative; launch of the CBC "Live Right Now" campaign; announcement of the Public Health Agency of Canada's innovation strategy funding related to obesity; publication of the Canadian Health Measures Survey physical activity findings; release of new Canadian physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines; launch of ParticipACTION's "Think Again" campaign; workshop on building trust to address the epidemic of obesity; start of the Canadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry; initiation of "Our Health Our Future: A National Dialogue on Healthy Weights"; release of the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth; National Obesity Summit; Nature Play Day and Sports Day in Canada; development of the Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy; and the creation of Active Canada 20/20--A National Physical Activity Plan. The diversity and intensity of activity addressing the childhood obesity and physical inactivity "epidemic" in Canada is encouraging and must be maintained and enhanced. PMID:22905632

  3. SPIN-UP and Preparing Undergraduate Physics Majors for Careers in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Seven years ago, the Strategic Programs for Innovations in Undergraduate Physics (SPIN-UP) Report produced by the National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics identified several key characteristics of thriving undergraduate physics departments including steps these departments had taken to prepare students better for careers in industry. Today statistical data from AIP shows that almost 40% of students graduating with a degree in physics seek employment as soon as they graduate. Successful undergraduate physics programs have taken steps to adapt their rigorous physics programs to ensure that graduating seniors have the skills they need to enter the industrial workplace as well as to go on to graduate school in physics. Typical strategies noted during a series of SPIN-UP workshops funded by a grant from NSF to APS, AAPT, and AIP include flexible curricula, early introduction of undergraduates to research techniques, revised laboratory experiences that provide students with skills they need to move directly into jobs, and increased emphasis on ``soft'' skills such as communication and team work. Despite significant success, undergraduate programs face continuing challenges in preparing students to work in industry, most significantly the fact that there is no job called ``physicist'' at the undergraduate level. supported by grant NSF DUE-0741560.

  4. The Shelter Island Conferences Revisited: ``Fundamental'' Physics in the Decade 1975–1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweber, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    The focus of this broad historical overview of "the steady evolution of theoretical ideas" from Shelter Island I in 1947 to Shelter Island II in 1983 is some of the developments in "fundamental" physics after the establishment of the standard model, in particular, the adoption of the view that all present day field theories are "effective field theories" based on the gauge concept; taking seriously big bang cosmology, grand unified field theories (GUTs), and inflation; and the emergence of a new symbiosis of physics and mathematics.

  5. The Shelter Island Conferences Revisited: "Fundamental" Physics in the Decade 1975-1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweber, S. S.

    2016-03-01

    The focus of this broad historical overview of "the steady evolution of theoretical ideas" from Shelter Island I in 1947 to Shelter Island II in 1983 is some of the developments in "fundamental" physics after the establishment of the standard model, in particular, the adoption of the view that all present day field theories are "effective field theories" based on the gauge concept; taking seriously big bang cosmology, grand unified field theories (GUTs), and inflation; and the emergence of a new symbiosis of physics and mathematics.

  6. Proceedings of the Geodesy/Solid Earth and Ocean Physics (GEOP) Research Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with interdisciplinary research in the fields of geodesy, solid earth and ocean physics. Topics discussed include: solid earth and ocean tides; the rotation of the earth and polar motion; vertical crustal motions; the geoid and ocean surface; earthquake mechanism; sea level changes; and lunar dynamics.

  7. A Listeria monocytogenes-based vaccine that secretes sand fly salivary protein LJM11 confers long-term protection against vector-transmitted Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Pavinski Bitar, Alan; Oliveira, Fabiano; Meneses, Claudio; Park, Justin J; Mendez, Susana; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Marquis, Hélène

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a sand fly-transmitted disease characterized by skin ulcers that carry significant scarring and social stigmatization. Over the past years, there has been cumulative evidence that immunity to specific sand fly salivary proteins confers a significant level of protection against leishmaniasis. In this study, we used an attenuated strain of Listeria monocytogenes as a vaccine expression system for LJM11, a sand fly salivary protein identified as a good vaccine candidate. We observed that mice were best protected against an intradermal needle challenge with Leishmania major and sand fly saliva when vaccinated intravenously. However, this protection was short-lived. Importantly, groups of vaccinated mice were protected long term when challenged with infected sand flies. Protection correlated with smaller lesion size, fewer scars, and better parasite control between 2 and 6 weeks postchallenge compared to the control group of mice vaccinated with the parent L. monocytogenes strain not expressing LJM11. Moreover, protection correlated with high numbers of CD4(+), gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ(+)), tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive/negative (TNF-α(+/-)), interleukin-10-negative (IL-10(-)) cells and low numbers of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+/-) TNF-α(-) IL-10(+) T cells at 2 weeks postchallenge. Overall, our data indicate that delivery of LJM11 by Listeria is a promising vaccination strategy against cutaneous leishmaniasis inducing long-term protection against ulcer formation following a natural challenge with infected sand flies. PMID:24733091

  8. A Listeria monocytogenes-Based Vaccine That Secretes Sand Fly Salivary Protein LJM11 Confers Long-Term Protection against Vector-Transmitted Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S.; Pavinski Bitar, Alan; Oliveira, Fabiano; Meneses, Claudio; Park, Justin J.; Mendez, Susana; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a sand fly-transmitted disease characterized by skin ulcers that carry significant scarring and social stigmatization. Over the past years, there has been cumulative evidence that immunity to specific sand fly salivary proteins confers a significant level of protection against leishmaniasis. In this study, we used an attenuated strain of Listeria monocytogenes as a vaccine expression system for LJM11, a sand fly salivary protein identified as a good vaccine candidate. We observed that mice were best protected against an intradermal needle challenge with Leishmania major and sand fly saliva when vaccinated intravenously. However, this protection was short-lived. Importantly, groups of vaccinated mice were protected long term when challenged with infected sand flies. Protection correlated with smaller lesion size, fewer scars, and better parasite control between 2 and 6 weeks postchallenge compared to the control group of mice vaccinated with the parent L. monocytogenes strain not expressing LJM11. Moreover, protection correlated with high numbers of CD4+, gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+), tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive/negative (TNF-α+/−), interleukin-10-negative (IL-10−) cells and low numbers of CD4+ IFN-γ+/− TNF-α− IL-10+ T cells at 2 weeks postchallenge. Overall, our data indicate that delivery of LJM11 by Listeria is a promising vaccination strategy against cutaneous leishmaniasis inducing long-term protection against ulcer formation following a natural challenge with infected sand flies. PMID:24733091

  9. Effect of structured physical activity on prevention of major mobility disability in older adults: the LIFE Study randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pahor, Marco; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Blair, Steven; Bonds, Denise E.; Church, Timothy S.; Espeland, Mark A.; Fielding, Roger A.; Gill, Thomas M.; Groessl, Erik J.; King, Abby C.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Manini, Todd M.; McDermott, Mary M.; Miller, Michael E.; Newman, Anne B.; Rejeski, W Jack; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Importance In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activity prevents or delays mobility disability. Objective To test the hypothesis that a long-term structured physical activity program is more effective than a health education program (also referred to as a successful aging program) in reducing the risk of major mobility disability. Design, Setting, and Participants The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicenter, randomized trial that enrolled participants between February 2010 and December 2011, who participated for an average of 2.6 years. Follow-up ended in December 2013. Outcome assessors were blinded to the intervention assignment. Participants were recruited from urban, suburban and rural communities at 8 field centers throughout the US. We randomized a volunteer sample of 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had physical limitations, defined as a score on the Short Physical Performance Battery of 9 or below, but were able to walk 400 m. Interventions Participants were randomized to a structured moderate intensity physical activity program (n=818) done in a center and at home that included including aerobic, resistance and flexibility training activities or to a health education program (n=817) consisting of workshops on topics relevant to older adults and upper extremity stretching exercises. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was major mobility disability objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m. Results Incident major mobility disability occurred in 30.1% (n=246/818) of physical activity and 35.5% (n=290/817) of health education participants (HR=0.82, 95%CI=0.69–0.98, p=0.03). Persistent mobility disability was experienced by 120/818 (14.7%) physical activity and 162/817 (19.8%) health education participants (HR=0.72; 95%CI=0.57–0.91; p=0.006). Serious adverse events were reported by 404/818 (49.4%) of the physical activity and 373/817 (45.7%) of the health education participants (Risk Ratio=1.08; 95%CI=0.98–1.20). Conclusions and Relevance A structured moderate intensity physical activity program, compared with a health education program, reduced major mobility disability over 2.6 years among older adults at risk of disability. These findings suggest mobility benefit from such a program in vulnerable older adults. Registration ClinicalsTrials.gov identifier NCT01072500. PMID:24866862

  10. A Novel Use of Wikipedia in the Instruction of Introduction Physics Labs for Non-majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Nathan

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 2 years, I have incorporated the use of Wikipedia entries into the conclusion sections of the students' lab reports for an introductory physics I laboratory course. The goal of this inclusion is to give students further motivation to learn the knowledge was well as allow the students to bring their knowledge of physics from a memorization schema to a deeper and more fundamental understanding. I will provide initial feedback from students which indicates that this simple cross-disciplinary addition has helped with motivation while exciting a more robust understanding of course material.

  11. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

  12. Essential Concepts and Underlying Theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics for "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry,

  13. Essential Concepts and Underlying Theories from Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics for "Biochemistry and Molecular Biology" Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Ann; Provost, Joseph; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer A.; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two years, through an NSF RCN UBE grant, the ASBMB has held regional workshops for faculty members from around the country. The workshops have focused on developing lists of Core Principles or Foundational Concepts in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, a list of foundational skills, and foundational concepts from Physics, Chemistry,…

  14. Literacy in the World and Its Major Regions. Ensuring Universal Rights to Literacy and Basic Education. A Series of 29 Booklets Documenting Workshops Held at the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (Hamburg, Germany, July 14-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. for Education.

    This booklet, which was produced as a follow-up to the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education, examines literacy in the world and its major regions. After a brief overview of the workshop from which the booklet emerged, the need to reconceptualize literacy as a tool for learning throughout life is emphasized. Discussed next are the…

  15. 1990 Conference on Cloud Physics, San Francisco, CA, July 23-27, 1990, Preprints

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on cloud physics are presented. Some of the individual topics addressed are: lake effect snow storm microphysics, origin of ice in strong convective cells, ice in New Mexican cumulus clouds, observed versus diagnosed ice production rates in warm-based midwestern cumuli, factors affecting the structure and stability of boundary-layer clouds, multifractal model of entrainment into a stratocumulus cloud top, Lagrangian development of a cloud-topped boundary layer in a turbulence closure model, entrainment and detrainment across a stratified interface, droplets in cloud edge downdrafts, water supersaturation in convective clouds, retention of ice crystal structure and habit during diffusional growth, crystallization of highly supersaturated solutions. Also discussed are: fractional cloudiness at the top of the marine boundary layer, mixing rate analysis of the stratocumulus-topped marine atmospheric boundary layer, 3D simulations of buoyancy reversal, experimental studies of two stage ice accretions, cloud structure and turbulent transport in the cloud-capped marine boundary layer, cloud-aerosol interactions in the marine atmosphere, physically based fractional cloudiness parameterization.

  16. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-02-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include nifH, nifD, nifK, nifT, nifY, nifE, nifN, nifX, nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, nifM, and nifF. Although there are significant spatial differences, the identified A. vinelandii nif-specific genes have the same sequential arrangement as the corresponding nif-specific genes from K. pneumoniae. Twelve other potential genes whose expression could be subject to nif-specific regulation were also found interspersed among the identified nif-specific genes. These potential genes do not encode products that are structurally related to the identified nif-specific gene products. Eleven potential nif-specific promoters were identified within the major nif cluster, and nine of these are preceded by an appropriate upstream activator sequence. A + T-rich regions were identified between 8 of the 11 proposed nif promoter sequences and their upstream activator sequences. Site-directed deletion-and-insertion mutagenesis was used to establish a genetic map of the major nif cluster. PMID:2644218

  17. Physical and genetic map of the major nif gene cluster from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, M R; Brigle, K E; Bennett, L T; Setterquist, R A; Wilson, M S; Cash, V L; Beynon, J; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1989-01-01

    Determination of a 28,793-base-pair DNA sequence of a region from the Azotobacter vinelandii genome that includes and flanks the nitrogenase structural gene region was completed. This information was used to revise the previously proposed organization of the major nif cluster. The major nif cluster from A. vinelandii encodes 15 nif-specific genes whose products bear significant structural identity to the corresponding nif-specific gene products from Klebsiella pneumoniae. These genes include nifH, nifD, nifK, nifT, nifY, nifE, nifN, nifX, nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, nifM, and nifF. Although there are significant spatial differences, the identified A. vinelandii nif-specific genes have the same sequential arrangement as the corresponding nif-specific genes from K. pneumoniae. Twelve other potential genes whose expression could be subject to nif-specific regulation were also found interspersed among the identified nif-specific genes. These potential genes do not encode products that are structurally related to the identified nif-specific gene products. Eleven potential nif-specific promoters were identified within the major nif cluster, and nine of these are preceded by an appropriate upstream activator sequence. A + T-rich regions were identified between 8 of the 11 proposed nif promoter sequences and their upstream activator sequences. Site-directed deletion-and-insertion mutagenesis was used to establish a genetic map of the major nif cluster. PMID:2644218

  18. News Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

  19. Education majors' expectations and reported experiences with inquiry-based physics: Implications for student affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.

    2013-06-01

    To address a perennial need to provide K-8 teachers with a solid foundation in science, there are many physics content courses throughout the United States. One such course is Physics and Astronomy for Teachers (PAT), which relies heavily on active-learning strategies. Although PAT is successful in teaching physics content, students sometimes report dissatisfaction with the course. Such instances of poor affect are worrisome because they may influence how teachers present science in their own classrooms. Therefore, this study investigates students’ affect in terms of their pedagogical expectations and potential personal learning outcomes with respect to PAT. Two sections of PAT, each containing approximately 40 students, were observed. Students in those sections were surveyed, and a sample were interviewed (N=10). An analysis of the data in terms of an expectancy violation framework shows that while students’ expectations regarding the hands-on and interactive components of PAT were met, they received substantially fewer lectures, class discussions, and opportunities to make class presentations than they had expected, even after they had been presented with the course syllabus and informed about the specific nature of the course. Additionally, students expected PAT to be more directly linked with their future teaching careers and therefore expected more opportunities to practice teaching science than they reported receiving. This investigation serves as a case study to provide insight into why students are sometimes frustrated and confused when first encountering active-learning classes, and it implies that instructors should be cognizant of those feelings and devote resources toward explicit orientation that emphasizes the purpose of the course and reasons behind their pedagogical choices.

  20. [Association between the risk of major depression and low physical activity in peruvian workers studying in universities].

    PubMed

    Murillo-Pérez, Luis; Rojas-Adrianzén, Carolay; Ramos-Torres, Gabriela; Cárdenas-Vicente, Bryan; Hernández-Fernández, Wendy; Larco-Castilla, Piero; Haro-García, Luis; Mezones-Holguín, Edward

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess if an association exists between the risk of major depression (RMD) and physical activity (PA), controlling for demographic and academic variables in workers enrolled in undergraduate studies at a private university in Lima, Peru, we carried out a cross-sectional study of 1,111 people. We used the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) to measure RMD and PA, respectively. RMD prevalence was 4.2%. In the multiple regression model adjusted for age, gender, unemployment and hours of sleep, low levels of PA were associated with increased odds of RDM (OR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.16 to 4.00). We conclude that there is an association between RMD and PA in the study population, independent of demographic and academics factors. Strategies to improve screening and development of longitudinal studies to assess causality are suggested. PMID:25418652

  1. Proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Calorimetry in Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, Claudia

    The Pamela silicon tungsten calorimeter / G. Zampa -- Design and development of a dense, fine grained silicon tungsten calorimeter with integrated electronics / D. Strom -- High resolution silicon detector for 1.2-3.1 eV (400-1000 nm) photons / D. Groom -- The KLEM high energy cosmic rays collector for the NUCLEON satellite mission / M. Merkin (contribution not received) -- The electromagnetic calorimeter of the Hera-b experiment / I. Matchikhilian -- The status of the ATLAS tile calorimeter / J. Mendes Saraiva -- Design and mass production of Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) / Preshower (PS) detector for LHC-b experiment / E. Gushchin -- Study of new FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator as active media of large EMCal of ALICE at LHC / O. Grachov -- The CMS hadron calorimeter / D. Karmgard (contribution not received) -- Test beam study of the KOPIO Shashlyk calorimeter prototype / A. Poblaguev -- The Shashlik electro-magnetic calorimeter for the LHCb experiment / S. Barsuk -- Quality of mass produced lead-tungstate crystals / R. Zhu -- Status of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter / J. Fay -- Scintillation detectors for radiation-hard electromagnetic calorimeters / H. Loehner -- Energy, timing and two-photon invariant mass resolution of a 256-channel PBWO[symbol] calorimeter / M. Ippolitov -- A high performance hybrid electromagnetic calorimeter at Jefferson Lab / A. Gasparian -- CsI(Tl) calorimetry on BESHI / T. Hu (contribution not received) -- The crystal ball and TAPS detectors at the MAMI electron beam facility / D. Watts -- Front-end electronics of the ATLAS tile calorimeter / R. Teuscher -- The ATLAS tilecal detector control system / A. Gomes -- Performance of the liquid argon final calibration board / C. de la Taille -- Overview of the LHCb calorimeter electronics / F. Machefert -- LHCb preshower photodetector and electronics / S. Monteil -- The CMS ECAL readout architecture and the clock and control system / K. Kloukinas -- Test of the CMS-ECAL trigger primitive generation / N. Regnault -- Optical data links for the CMS ECAL / J. Grahl (contribution not received) -- CMS ECAL off-detector electronics / R. Alemany Fernandez -- Performance of a low noise readout ASIC for the W-Si calorimeter physics prototype for the future linear collider / C. de la Taille -- Properties of a sampling calorimeter with warm-liquid ionization chambers / S. Plewnia -- Calorimetry and the DO experiment / R. Zitoun (contribution not received) -- Data quality monitoring for the DØ calorimeter / V. Shary -- Status of the construction of the ATLAS electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter, overview of beam test performance studies / L. Serin -- Uniformity of response of ATLAS liquid argon EM calorimeter / O. Gaunter -- Status of the ATLAS liquid argon hadronic endcap calorimeter construction / M. Vincter -- Results from particle beam tests of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap calorimeters / M. Lefebvre -- First results of the DREAM project / R. Wigmans -- Electron and muon detection with a dual-readout (DREAM) calorimeter / N. Akchurin -- The neutron zero degree calorimeter for the ALICE experiment / M. Gallio -- The liquid xenon scintillation calorimeter of the MEG experiment: operation of a large prototype / G. Signorelli -- Detection of high energy particles using radio frequency signals / C. Hebert -- Hadronic shower simulation / J.-P. Wellisch -- E.M. and hadronic shower simulation with FLUKA / G. Battistoni -- Simulation of the LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter response with GEANT4 / P. Robbe -- Comparison of beam test results of the combined ATLAS liquid argon endcap calorimeters with GEANT3 and GEANT4 simulations / D. Salihagić -- GEANT4 hadronic physics validation with LHC test-beam data / C. Alexa -- The full simulation of the GLAST LAT high energy gamma ray telescope / F. Longo -- Response of the KLOE electromagnetic calorimeter to low-energy particles / T. Spadaro -- Calorimeter algorithms for DØ; / S. Trincaz-Duvoid -- Identification of low P[symbol] muon with the ATLAS tile calorimeter / G. Usai -- Electron and photon reconstruction with fully simulated events in the CMS experiment / G. Daskalakis -- Expected performance of Jet, [symbol] and [symbol] reconstruction in ATLAS / I. Vivarelli -- LHCb calorimeter from trigger to physics / O. Deschamps -- The calibration strategy of CMS electromagnetic calorimeter / P. Meridiani -- Energy and impact point reconstruction in the CMS ECAL (testbeam results from 2003) / I. B. van Vulpen -- The jet energy scale and resolution in the DO calorimeter / A. Kupco (contribution not received) -- Precision linearity studies of the ATLAS liquid argon EM calorimeter / G. Graziani -- Calibration of the ATLAS tile calorimeter / F. Sarri -- Performance of the CMS ECAL laser monitoring source in the test beam / A. Bornheim -- Energy reconstruction algorithms and their influence on the ATLAS tile calorimeter / E. Fullana -- Study of the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations for a more realistic evaluation of the radiation quality in hadrontherapy / R. Cherubini (contribution not received) -- New dosimetry technologies for IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radio Therapy) / A. Piermattei -- Photon neutron radiotherapy / G. Giannini (contribution not received) -- Recent developments in molecular imaging / G. Zavattini (contribution not received) -- Performance goals and design considerations for a linear collider calorimeter / F. Sefkow -- Improving the jet reconstruction with the particle flow method; an introduction / J.-C. Brient -- Fine grained SiW ECAL for a linear collider detector / D. Strom (in the silicon session) -- Silicon-tungsten sampling electromagnetic calorimeter for the TeV electron-positron linear collider / J.-C. Brient -- LCCAL: a calorimeter prototype for future linear colliders / S. Miscetti -- Analog vs digital hadron calorimetry at a future electron-positron linear collider / S. Magill -- Toward a scintillator based heal and tail catcher for the LC calorimeter / M. Martin (contribution not received) -- Minical options, description in MC, calibration, plans for test beam prototype / G. Eigen (contribution not received) -- Photodetector options for a scintillator heal / E. Popova (contribution not received) -- Very low background scintillators in DAMA project: results and perspectives / R. Bernabei -- EDELWEISS Ge cryogenics detectors: main performance and physics results / X. Navick (contribution not received) -- Review of massive underground detectors / A. Rubbia -- Review of neutrino telescopes underwater and under ice / A. Capone (contribution not received) -- The fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory / R. Caruso -- The EUSO mission for the observation of ultra high energy cosmic rays from space / A. Petrolini -- Performance of a 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter for the AMSO2 space experiment / C. Adloff -- Beam test calibration of the balloon borne imaging calorimeter for the CREAM experiment / P. Maestro.

  2. Physical properties of type I collagen extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas.

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Tanaka, Junzo; Walsh, Dominic; Mann, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    Type I collagens were extracted from fish scales of Pagrus major and Oreochromis niloticas as a possible underutilized resource for medical materials. The fish scales were demineralized with EDTA and digested by pepsin. The resultant type I collagens contained more than 33.6% of glycine as the most abundant amino acid. The denaturation temperatures of the collagens from P. major and O. niloticas were 303 and 308K, respectively, both of which were relatively lower than that of porcine dermis collagen (314K). CD spectra indicated that the denaturation temperatures were dependent on the amount of hydroxyproline, rather than proline residues. Raman spectra also indicated that the relative intensities of Raman lines at 879 and 855cm(-1) assigned to Hyp and Pro rings were changed due to the contents of the imino acids. Significantly, the content of sulphur-containing methionine was higher in the fish scales than in porcine dermis. The enthalpy and entropy estimated from thermal analyses could be correlated to amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) of type I collagens and the number of methionine amino acid residues. PMID:12957317

  3. A BAC-based physical map of the major autosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, R A; Nelson, C R; Berman, B P; Laverty, T R; George, R A; Ciesiolka, L; Naeemuddin, M; Arenson, A D; Durbin, J; David, R G; Tabor, P E; Bailey, M R; DeShazo, D R; Catanese, J; Mammoser, A; Osoegawa, K; de Jong, P J; Celniker, S E; Gibbs, R A; Rubin, G M; Scherer, S E

    2000-03-24

    We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based physical map of chromosomes 2 and 3 of Drosophila melanogaster, which constitute 81% of the genome. Sequence tagged site (STS) content, restriction fingerprinting, and polytene chromosome in situ hybridization approaches were integrated to produce a map spanning the euchromatin. Three of five remaining gaps are in repeat-rich regions near the centromeres. A tiling path of clones spanning this map and STS maps of chromosomes X and 4 was sequenced to low coverage; the maps and tiling path sequence were used to support and verify the whole-genome sequence assembly, and tiling path BACs were used as templates in sequence finishing. PMID:10731150

  4. MAJOR RIVER PLUMES IN THE TROPICAL OCEAN: PHYSICAL AND BIOGEOCHEMICAL EXPRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, J M; Lopez,, J E; Brocco, J M,; Fuentes, B; Antoun, D; Lopez, H; Cabrera, R; Mendez, A

    2008-03-02

    The Caribbean and Western Tropical Atlantic receive massive inputs of Orinoco and Amazon River water carrying a load of organic and inorganic materials into waters characteristically devoid of these. The magnitude of riverine impact became evident as remote sensing became an ocean color monitoring tool. These observations depict riverine plumes, containing dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton well above background concentrations, being advected into the oligotrophic ocean. Subsequent research revealed that riverine intrusions radically modulate trophic balance and activity through changes in plankton abundance, composition and size distribution and last but not least: availability of solar irradiance. Moreover, riverine influence responds to climate processes and oceanic mesoscale processes bringing about significant spatial and temporal variability at annual and interannual scales. We discuss observations of physical and biogeochemical gradients in the Orinoco River Plume in the above context.

  5. News Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    Teaching Support: New schools network launched Competition: Observatory throws open doors to a select few Festival: Granada to host 10th Ciencia en Acción Centenary: Science Museum celebrates 100 years Award: Queen's birthday honour for science communicator Teacher Training: Training goes where it's needed Conference: Physics gets creative in Christchurch Conference: Conference is packed with ideas Poster Campaign: Bus passengers learn about universe Forthcoming events

  6. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  7. News The fabulousness of physics in 2013 Crossing boundaries, national and disciplinary Five days of Eureka! in Ethiopia Warm and welcoming in Iceland New Zealand Physics Conference moves to the home of Rutherford Jupiter on high: UK Astronomy Week 2014 Physics World Cup 2013 Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-01-01

    The fabulousness of physics in 2013 Crossing boundaries, national and disciplinary Five days of Eureka! in Ethiopia Warm and welcoming in Iceland New Zealand Physics Conference moves to the home of Rutherford Jupiter on high: UK Astronomy Week 2014 Physics World Cup 2013 Forthcoming Events

  8. Longitudinal effects of college type and selectivity on degrees conferred upon undergraduate females in physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Stacy Mckimm

    There has been much research to suggest that a single-sex college experience for female undergraduate students can increase self-confidence and leadership ability during the college years and beyond. The results of previous studies also suggest that these students achieve in the workforce and enter graduate school at higher rates than their female peers graduating from coeducational institutions. However, some researchers have questioned these findings, suggesting that it is the selectivity level of the colleges rather than the comprised gender of the students that causes these differences. The purpose of this study was to justify the continuation of single-sex educational opportunities for females at the post-secondary level by examining the effects that college selectivity, college type, and time have on the rate of undergraduate females pursuing majors in non-traditional fields. The study examined the percentage of physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science degrees conferred upon females graduating from women's colleges from 1985-2001, as compared to those at comparable coeducational colleges. Sampling for this study consisted of 42 liberal arts women's (n = 21) and coeducational (n = 21) colleges. Variables included the type of college, the selectivity level of the college, and the effect of time on the percentage of female graduates. Doubly multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance testing revealed significant main effects for college selectivity on social science graduates, and time on both life science and math and computer science graduates. Significant interaction was also found between the college type and time on social science graduates, as well as the college type, selectivity level, and time on math and computer science graduates. Implications of the results and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  9. News Expedition: Teachers go on extreme journey Summer School: Summer school inspires student Conference: Bristol plans science teaching festival Teacher Support: Make the most of your SPN support Conference: Schools can use latest physics Web Resource: Datamouse online project goes live Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    Expedition: Teachers go on extreme journey Summer School: Summer school inspires student Conference: Bristol plans science teaching festival Teacher Support: Make the most of your SPN support Conference: Schools can use latest physics Web Resource: Datamouse online project goes live Forthcoming Events

  10. ICOM2012: 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (Belgrade, Serbia, 2-6 September 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramićanin, Miroslav D.; Antić, Željka; Viana, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    The 3rd International Conference on the Physics of Optical Materials and Devices (ICOM2012) was held in Belgrade (Serbia) from 2 to 6 September 2012 (figure 1). The conference was organized by the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade (Serbia) and the Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (France), and supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia and Optical Society of America. ICOM2012 was a follow-up to the two previous, successful ICOM conferences held in Herceg Novi in 2006 and 2009. The conference aimed at providing a forum for scientists in optical materials to debate on: • Luminescent materials and nanomaterials • Hybrid optical materials (organic/inorganic) • Characterization techniques of optical materials • Luminescence mechanisms and energy transfers • Theory and modeling of optical processes • Ultrafast-laser processing of materials • Optical sensors • Medical imaging • Advanced optical materials in photovoltaics and biophotonics • Photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy and phenomena The conference stressed the value of a fundamental scientific understanding of optical materials. A particular accent was put on wide band-gap materials in crystalline, glass and nanocrystalline forms. The applications mainly involved lasers, scintillators and phosphors. Rare earth and transition metal ions introduced as dopants in various hosts were considered, and their impact on the optical properties were detailed in several presentations. This volume contains selected contributions of speakers and participants of the ICOM2012 conference. The conference provided a unique opportunity for about 200 scientists from 32 countries to discuss recent progress in the field of optical materials. During the three and half days, 21 invited talks and 52 contributed lectures were given, with a special event in memory of our dear colleague Professor Dr Tsoltan Basiev (Russia). In addition, 183 posters were presented and the two Young Scientist Awards were announced at the closing ceremony. Acknowledgments We thank all the authors for their valuable research contribution presented in this volume. We express our acknowledgements to all reviewers with a special thanks to Dr G Watt, then Publisher of the journal, for accepting the publication of these papers in a special issue of Physica Scripta . We wish to express our gratitude to the members of the ICOM scientific advisory committee and organizing committee for their excellent work and commitment for the success of ICOM2012.

  11. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Nuclear physics, lasers, and medicine(Scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 14 December 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    The scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the Conference Hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 14 December 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Kotov Yu D (National Research Nuclear University 'Moscow Engineering Physics Institute' (MEPhI), Institute of Astrophysics, Moscow) "High-energy solar flare processes and their investigation onboard Russian satellite missions CORONAS"; (2) Pakhlov P N (Russian Federation State Scientific Center 'Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,' Moscow) "Exotic charmonium"; (3) Shcherbakov I A (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Laser and plasma technologies in medicine"; (4) Balakin V E (Center for Physics and Technology, Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Protvino, Moscow region) "New-generation equipment and technologies for the ray therapy of oncological diseases using a proton beam"; (5) Kravchuk L V (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Development of nuclear physics medicine at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS." Papers based on reports 1, 3, and 5 are published below. The expanded content of the report by Pakhlov is presented in review form in Physics-Uspekhi 53 219 (2010). High-energy solar flare processes and their investigation onboard Russian satellite missions CORONAS, Yu D Kotov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 619-631 Laser physics in medicine, I A Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 631-635 Development of nuclear physics medicine at the Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, L V Kravchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 6, Pages 635-639

  12. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  13. News Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Education: Physics Education Networks meeting has global scale Competition: Competition seeks the next Brian Cox Experiment: New measurement of neutrino time-of-flight consistent with the speed of light Event: A day for all those who teach physics Conference: Students attend first Anglo-Japanese international science conference Celebration: Will 2015 be the 'Year of Light'? Teachers: Challenging our intuition in spectacular fashion: the fascinating world of quantum physics awaits Research: Science sharpens up sport Learning: Kittinger and Baumgartner: on a mission to the edge of space International: London International Youth Science Forum calls for leading young scientists Competition: Physics paralympian challenge needs inquisitive, analytical, artistic and eloquent pupils Forthcoming events

  14. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  15. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an

  16. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  17. Physical Education and Recreation for Handicapped Children; Proceedings of a Study Conference on Research and Demonstration Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Recreation and Park Association, Arlington, VA.

    Included are articles on the status of physical education for the retarded, the visually handicapped, the hearing impaired, and the emotionally disturbed. Concepts in research and demonstration needs in physical education and recreation for the physically handicapped are presented. Papers consider the status of recreation for the handicapped as…

  18. Conference Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC.

    This manual has been developed to serve two primary purposes: as a text in the original training of company personnel in conference leadership and a guide for the use of trained conference leaders. The conference leader is responsible for creating a situation which makes for complete freedom of discussion. Using the conference, the leader aims to:

  19. Proceedings of the 34th International Conference in High Energy Physics (ICHEP08), Philadelphia, PA, 2008, eConf C080730, [hep-ph/0809.xxx

    SciTech Connect

    Lockyer, Nigel S.; Smith, AJ Stewart,; et. al.

    2008-09-01

    In 2004 a team from the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and the Institute for Advanced Study proposed to host the 2008 International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP) on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The proposal was approved later that year by the C-11 committee of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The Co-Chairs were Nigel S. Lockyer (U. Penn/TRIUMF) and A.J. Stewart Smith (Princeton); Joe Kroll of U. Penn served as Deputy Chair from 2007 on. Highlights of the proposal included 1. greatly increased participation of young scientists, women scientists, and graduate students 2. new emphasis on formal theory 3. increased focus on astrophysics and cosmology 4. large informal poster session (170 posters) in prime time 5. convenient, contiguous venues for all sessions and lodging 6. landmark locations for the reception and banquet. The conference program consisted of three days of parallel sessions and three days of plenary talks.

  20. International Conference on Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics, 8th, Lunds Universitet, Sweden, Aug. 4-8, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, Per-Olof (Editor); Nordgren, Joseph (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The interactions of VUV radiation with solids are explored in reviews and reports of recent theoretical and experimental investigations from the fields of atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics, and VUV instrumentation. Topics examined include photoabsorption and photoionization, multiphoton processes, plasma physics, VUV lasers, time-resolved spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation centers, solid-state spectroscopy, and dynamical processes involving localized levels. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles of photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission, inverse photoemission, semiconductors, organic materials, and adsorbates.

  1. PLANNING AREAS AND FACILITIES FOR HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION BY PARTICIPANTS IN NATIONAL FACILITIES CONFERENCE. REVISED 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    SPECIFIC INFORMATION IS PROVIDED IN THIS GUIDE TO PLANNERS OF AREAS AND FACILITIES FOR ATHLETICS, RECREATION, OUTDOOR EDUCATION, AND PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION. PART ONE CONCERNS BASIC CONCEPTS PERTINENT TO THE AREA OF CONSIDERATION. THE AIMS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION, AND RECREATION ARE LISTED. PLANNING PRINCIPLES,…

  2. Attracting Girls to Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandow, Barbara; Marks, Ann; Borg, Anne

    2009-04-01

    In most countries the number of girls studying physics, as well female physicists in academic positions, is still low. Active recruitment at all levels is essential to change this situation. In some countries a large proportion of students are female, but career progression is difficult. Highlighting the broad spectrum of career opportunities for those with physics qualifications is a major approach in attracting girls to physics. This paper presents findings, examples of best practices, and recommendations resulting from the workshop, Attracting Girls to Physics, organized as part of the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, Seoul, 2008.

  3. Synthetic fusion-protein containing domains of Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum lectin (ASAL) conferred enhanced insecticidal activity against major lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Tajne, Sunita; Boddupally, Dayakar; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-02-10

    Different transgenic crop plants, developed with δ-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and mannose-specific plant lectins, exhibited significant protection against chewing and sucking insects. In the present study, a synthetic gene (cry-asal) encoding the fusion-protein having 488 amino acids, comprising DI and DII domains from Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Ligand blot analysis disclosed that the fusion-protein could bind to more number of receptors of brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins of Helicoverpa armigera. Artificial diet bioassays revealed that 0.025 μg/g and 0.50 μg/g of fusion-protein were sufficient to cause 100% mortality in Pectinophora gossypiella and H. armigera insects, respectively. As compared to Cry1Ac, the fusion-protein showed enhanced (8-fold and 30-fold) insecticidal activity against two major lepidopteran pests. Binding of fusion-protein to the additional receptors in the midgut cells of insects is attributable to its enhanced entomotoxic effect. The synthetic gene, first of its kind, appears promising and might serve as a potential candidate for engineering crop plants against major insect pests. PMID:24355805

  4. Inheritance and Identification of a Major Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) that Confers Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita and a Novel QTL for Plant Height in Sweet Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Harris-Shultz, Karen R; Davis, Richard F; Knoll, Joseph E; Anderson, William; Wang, Hongliang

    2015-12-01

    Southern root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) are a pest on many economically important row crop and vegetable species and management relies on chemicals, plant resistance, and cultural practices such as crop rotation. Little is known about the inheritance of resistance to M. incognita or the genomic regions associated with resistance in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). In this study, an F2 population (n = 130) was developed between the resistant sweet sorghum cultivar 'Honey Drip' and the susceptible sweet cultivar 'Collier'. Each F2 plant was phenotyped for stalk weight, height, juice Brix, root weight, total eggs, and eggs per gram of root. Strong correlations were observed between eggs per gram of root and total eggs, height and stalk weight, and between two measurements of Brix. Genotyping-by-sequencing was used to generate single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The G-Model, single marker analysis, interval mapping, and composite interval mapping were used to identify a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 3 for total eggs and eggs per gram of root. Furthermore, a new QTL for plant height was also discovered on chromosome 3. Simple sequence repeat markers were developed in the total eggs and eggs per gram of root QTL region and the markers flanking the resistance gene are 4.7 and 2.4 cM away. These markers can be utilized to move the southern root-knot nematode resistance gene from Honey Drip to any sorghum line. PMID:26574655

  5. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  6. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-08-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  7. Major latex protein-like protein 43 (MLP43) functions as a positive regulator during abscisic acid responses and confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanping; Yang, Li; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Ruijie; Wu, Yan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the disadvantageous environmental conditions for plant growth and reproduction. Given the importance of abscisic acid (ABA) to plant growth and abiotic stress responses, identification of novel components involved in ABA signalling transduction is critical. In this study, we screened numerous Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by seed germination assay and identified a mutant mlp43 (major latex protein-like 43) with decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination. The mlp43 mutant was sensitive to drought stress while the MLP43-overexpressed transgenic plants were drought tolerant. The tissue-specific expression pattern analysis showed that MLP43 was predominantly expressed in cotyledons, primary roots and apical meristems, and a subcellular localization study indicated that MLP43 was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Physiological and biochemical analyses indicated that MLP43 functioned as a positive regulator in ABA- and drought-stress responses in Arabidopsis through regulating water loss efficiency, electrolyte leakage, ROS levels, and as well as ABA-responsive gene expression. Moreover, metabolite profiling analysis indicated that MLP43 could modulate the production of primary metabolites under drought stress conditions. Reconstitution of ABA signalling components in Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that MLP43 was involved in ABA signalling transduction and acted upstream of SnRK2s by directly interacting with SnRK2.6 and ABF1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, ABA and drought stress down-regulated MLP43 expression as a negative feedback loop regulation to the performance of MLP43 in ABA and drought stress responses. Therefore, this study provided new insights for interpretation of physiological and molecular mechanisms of Arabidopsis MLP43 mediating ABA signalling transduction and drought stress responses. PMID:26512059

  8. Major latex protein-like protein 43 (MLP43) functions as a positive regulator during abscisic acid responses and confers drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Yang, Li; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Ruijie; Wu, Yan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the disadvantageous environmental conditions for plant growth and reproduction. Given the importance of abscisic acid (ABA) to plant growth and abiotic stress responses, identification of novel components involved in ABA signalling transduction is critical. In this study, we screened numerous Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by seed germination assay and identified a mutant mlp43 (major latex protein-like 43) with decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination. The mlp43 mutant was sensitive to drought stress while the MLP43-overexpressed transgenic plants were drought tolerant. The tissue-specific expression pattern analysis showed that MLP43 was predominantly expressed in cotyledons, primary roots and apical meristems, and a subcellular localization study indicated that MLP43 was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Physiological and biochemical analyses indicated that MLP43 functioned as a positive regulator in ABA- and drought-stress responses in Arabidopsis through regulating water loss efficiency, electrolyte leakage, ROS levels, and as well as ABA-responsive gene expression. Moreover, metabolite profiling analysis indicated that MLP43 could modulate the production of primary metabolites under drought stress conditions. Reconstitution of ABA signalling components in Arabidopsis protoplasts indicated that MLP43 was involved in ABA signalling transduction and acted upstream of SnRK2s by directly interacting with SnRK2.6 and ABF1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Moreover, ABA and drought stress down-regulated MLP43 expression as a negative feedback loop regulation to the performance of MLP43 in ABA and drought stress responses. Therefore, this study provided new insights for interpretation of physiological and molecular mechanisms of Arabidopsis MLP43 mediating ABA signalling transduction and drought stress responses. PMID:26512059

  9. The Majority of the Migrant Factory Workers of the Light Industry in Shenzhen, China May Be Physically Inactive

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joseph T. F.; Wu, Anise M. S.; Tse, Vincent W. S.; Zhou, Shenglai

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a strong risk factor of non-communicable diseases (NCD). In China, there are 250 million migrant factory workers, who are susceptible to physical inactivity and hence NCD because of work nature and setting. With random stratified sampling, 807 such workers of the light industry were recruited in Shenzhen, China and completed a self-administered questionnaire with informed consent. The prevalence of inadequate physical activity (defined according to the World Health Organization’s recommendation on level of moderate/vigorous physical activity) was 95.4%. Of all participants, 69.1% showed “a very low level of physical activity” (VLLPA), defined as ≤30 minutes of weekly moderate/vigorous physical activity, which was significantly associated with female sex (Odds ratio [OR]=1.65), lower education level (OR=0.10 to 0.33, primary education as the reference group) and married status (OR=0.63, single status as the reference group). Adjusted for these factors, perceived social support (Adjusted OR=0.87) was negatively associated with VLLPA, while job stress due to workload, which was significant in the univariate analysis (OR=0.98), became non-significant (p=0.184). Significant interaction between perceived social support and perceived job stress onto VLLPA was found (p=0.044), implying that the negative association between job stress and VLLPA, which might reflect a potential response to cope with stress by performing exercises, was stronger among those with weaker social support. The extremely low level of physical activity rings an alarm, as it implies high risk of NCD, and as there are no existing programs promoting physical activity in this group. Interventions need to take into account social support, potential coping to job stress, and structural factors of the factory setting, while involving factories’ management. PMID:26244514

  10. Development of a Core-Course for College Science Majors Combining Material from Introductory Courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics-Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickar, Arnold D.

    Reported is the second phase of the development of a two-year college core science course for science majors. Materials were combined from introductory college courses in biology, chemistry, and physics. A revised lecture and laboratory syllabus was prepared incorporating improvements suggested after a pilot study of the first year course.…

  11. A Science Summer Camp as an Effective Way to Recruit High School Students to Major in the Physical Sciences and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischoff, Paul J.; Castendyk, Devin; Gallagher, Hugh; Schaumloffel, John; Labroo, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Now in its fifth year, PR[superscript 2]EPS is a National Science Foundation funded initiative designed to recruit high school students to attend college majoring in the physical sciences, including engineering and secondary science education, and to help ensure their retention within these programs until graduation. A central feature of the…

  12. CONFERENCE REPORT: Report on the 11th European Fusion Physics Workshop (Heraklion, Crete, 8 10 December 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Bécoulet, A.; Counsell, G.; Federici, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Kirschner, A.; Krieger, K.; Ortolani, S.; Pitts, R.; Philipps, V.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2005-08-01

    The 11th EFPW took place in December 2003 at Heraklion in Crete, hosted by the Association EURATOM-Greece and the FORTH Institute, Heraklion and sponsored by the European Commission. Within the overall theme of 'plasma-wall interactions (PWI) and their implications for impurity generation and transport', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. Key PWI issues for ITER were also reviewed, the programmes of the two European physics task forces, on PWI and on integrated tokamak modelling, were discussed, and several topical reviews on key physics R&D issues for ITER were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  13. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Extragalactic astronomy (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 28 October 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), "Extragalactic astronomy", was held in the Conference Hall of the Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems, RAS, on 28 October 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Varshalovich D A, Ivanchik A V, Balashev S A (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS) "Big Bang nucleosynthesis of deuterium and HD/H2 molecular abundances in interstellar clouds of 12 Gyr ago"; (2) Aptekar R L, Golenetskii S V, Mazets E P (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS). "Studies of cosmic gamma-ray bursts and gamma repeaters with the Ioffe Institute Konus experiments"; (3) Beskin G M, Karpov S V (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS), Bondar S V (Scientific Research Institute of Precision Instrument Making) "Discovery of the fast optical variability of the GRB 080319B gamma burst and the prospects for wide-angle high time resolution optical monitoring"; (4) Starobinskii A A (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS) "Experimental and theoretical investigation of dark matter in the Universe"; (5) Zasov A V, Sil'chenko O K (Shternberg State Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University) "Galactic disks and their evolution"; (6) Burdyuzha V V (Astro-Space Center of the Lebedev Physics Institute) "Dark components of the Universe". Papers based of reports 1-3, 5, and 6 are published below. A A Starobinskii's extended report will be presented in the form of a review, which is planned for publication in one of the forthcoming issues of Physics-Uspekhi. • Big Bang nucleosynthesis of deuterium and HD/H2 molecular abundances in interstellar clouds of 12 Gyr ago, D A Varshalovich, A V Ivanchik, S A Balashev, P Petitjean Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 4, Pages 397-401 • Cosmic gamma-ray bursts and gamma repeaters studies with Ioffe Institute Konus experiments, R L Aptekar, S V Golenetskii, E P Mazets, V D Pal'shin, D D Frederiks Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 4, Pages 401-406 • Discovery of the fast optical variability of GRB 080319B and the prospects for wide-field optical monitoring with high time resolution, G M Beskin, S V Karpov, S F Bondar, V L Plokhotnichenko, A Guarnieri, C Bartolini, G Greco, A Piccioni Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 4, Pages 406-414 • Galactic disks and their evolution, A V Zasov, O K Sil'chenko Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 4, Pages 415-419 • Dark components of the Universe, V V Burdyuzha Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 4, Pages 419-424

  14. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Ongoing International conference on phase transitions and related critical and nonlinear phenomena in condensed media: special event held on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the RAS Daghestan Science Center's Institute of Physics (12 - 15 September 2007, Makhachkala, Daghestan, RF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilov, I. K.; Murtazaev, A. K.

    2008-02-01

    A brief review is given of the results presented at the International conference "Phase transitions, critical and nonlinear phenomena in condensed media" that was held on 12 - 15 September 2007 at the RAS Daghestan Science Center's Institute of Physics and in the framework of which the VIII International seminar Magnetic phase transitions was conducted.

  15. Approaches to Problems of Public School Administration in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Proceedings of the National Conference of City and County Directors, (6 th, Washington, D.C., December 8-10, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This report contains a collection of papers selected from those presented at the conference. Topics covered include: human relations in the interactions of ethnic groups, crowd control at athletic events, trends in health education on drugs, sex education and family life, administrative structure, year-round schools, physical education programs,…

  16. An Examination of Variables Which Influence High School Students to Enroll in an Undergraduate Engineering or Physical Science Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the variables which influence a high school student to enroll in an engineering discipline versus a physical science discipline. Data was collected utilizing the High School Activities, Characteristics, and Influences Survey, which was administered to students who were freshmen in an engineering or physical…

  17. FOREWORD: HELAS II International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Roth, Markus

    2008-07-01

    Volume 118 (2008) of Journal of Physics: Conference Series provides a written record of the talks and posters presented at the HELAS II International Conference `Helioseismology, Asteroseismology and MHD Connections'. The conference was held during the week 20-24 August 2007 in Göttingen, Germany, jointly hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research and the Faculty of Physics of the University of Göttingen. A total of 140 scientists from all over the world attended. The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of Conny Aerts, Annie Baglin, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Thierry Corbard, Jadwiga Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, Stefan Dreizler, Yvonne Elsworth, Laurent Gizon (Chairman), Wolfgang Glatzel, Frank Hill, Donald Kurtz, Oskar von der Lühe, Maria Pia Di Mauro, Mário Monteiro, Pere Pallé, Markus Roth, Philip Scherrer, Manfred Schüssler, and Michael Thompson. HELAS stands for the European Helio- and Asteroseismology Network, a Coordination Action supported by the sixth Framework Programme of the European Union. It aims to bring together researchers in the fields of solar and stellar oscillations. This volume consists of 91 articles organized into sections that reflect the scientific programme of the conference: 012001-07 Wave diagnostics in physics, geophysics and astrophysics 012008-09 Perspectives on helio- and asteroseismology 012010-17 Asteroseismology: Observations 012018-25 Asteroseismology: Theory 012026-32 Global helioseismology and solar models 012033-38 Local helioseismology and magnetic activity 012039-44 Future observational projects in helio- and asteroseismology 012045-91 Poster papers. The overwhelming majority of papers discuss the seismology of the Sun and stars. Papers in the first section provide a broader perspective on wave phenomena and techniques for probing other physical systems, from living beings to the universe as a whole. We were extremely fortunate to have particularly distinguished experts to cover these topics. Also available in the online edition are (i) an interactive conference picture, (ii) the abstract book, and (iii) material on the special session `Waves, Waves and Waves'. Additional articles related to both the HELAS II and the SOHO 19/GONG 2007 conferences can be found in a topical issue of Solar Physics, volume 251, nos 1-2. Financial support was provided by the HELAS Network, the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (through Ulrich Christensen and Sami Solanki) and the University of Göttingen (through Stefan Dreizler). We thank the local organizers, and in particular Sabine Deutsch, for their outstanding efforts in making the conference a success. We are also grateful to Graham Douglas and Jacky Mucklow of IoP Publishing for their help in the production of this volume. Laurent Gizon and Markus Roth Editors Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany

  18. May the Circle Be Unbroken: A New Decade. Final Report on the National Indian Conference on Aging (3rd, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 8-10, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    Focusing on six major topics to be addressed at the 1981 White House Conference (economic security, physical and mental health, social well being, older Americans as a national resource, creating an age-integrated society, and research), the National Indian Conference attracted 1,165 persons from more than 140 tribes (592 being Indian elders over…

  19. Using Vee and Concept Maps in Collaborative Settings: Elementary Education Majors Construct Meaning in Physical Science Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Roychoudhury, Anita

    1993-01-01

    Discusses Vee mapping, a technique to assist students in categorizing the relationship between the conceptual and procedural aspects of science. Presents a study to investigate elementary education majors' (n=27) use of the Vee heuristic and concept mapping for the construction of knowledge; attitudes toward learning science in collaborative

  20. Is oxidative status influenced by dietary carotenoid and physical activity after moult in the great tit (Parus major)?

    PubMed

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Decencière, Beatriz; Perret, Samuel; Karadas, Filiz; Meylan, Sandrine; Biard, Clotilde

    2015-07-01

    In the context of sexual and natural selection, an allocation trade-off for carotenoid pigments may exist because of their obligate dietary origin and their role both in the antioxidant and immune systems and in the production of coloured signals in various taxa, particularly birds. When birds have expended large amounts of carotenoids to feather growth such as after autumn moult, bird health and oxidative status might be more constrained. We tested this hypothesis in a bird species with carotenoid-based plumage colour, by manipulating dietary carotenoids and physical activity, which can decrease antioxidant capacity and increase reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) concentration. Great tits were captured after moult and kept in aviaries, under three treatments: physical handicap and dietary supplementation with carotenoids, physical handicap and control diet, and no handicap and control diet. We measured plasma composition (antioxidant capacity, ROM concentration, and vitamin A, vitamin E and total carotenoid concentrations), immune system activation (blood sedimentation) and stress response (heterophil/lymphocyte ratio) and predicted that handicap treatment should influence these negatively and carotenoid supplementation positively. Coloration of yellow feathers was also measured. Carotenoid supplementation increased total plasma carotenoid concentration, decreased feather carotenoid chroma and marginally increased ROM concentration. Handicap increased blood sedimentation only in males but had no clear influence on oxidative stress, which contradicted previous studies. Further studies are needed to investigate how physical activity and carotenoid availability might interact and influence oxidative stress outside the moult period, and their combined potential influence on attractiveness and reproductive investment later during the breeding season. PMID:25964421

  1. Italian Conference on General Relativity and Gravitational Physics, 8th, Cavalese, Italy, Aug. 30-Sept. 3, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdonio, Massimo; Toller, Marco; Cianci, Roberto; Francaviglia, Mauro

    Papers are presented on general relativity and gravitational physics, covering topics such as nonperturbative quantum gravity, black hole evaporation, QSOs, relativistic effects on earth satellites, algebraic computing in general relativity, cohomology of supermanifolds, accretion disks, Riemannian structures, gravitational plane waves, and Fermionic superstrings and modular invariance. Additional topics include neutrinos from SNs, gravitational wave detection, torsion, relativistic kinetic theory, recent developments in cosmology, normal coordinates in canonical form, and the iterative approach to gravitation. Other topics include interactive solitonic waves, the Cauchy problem in general relativity, quadratic Lagrangians and Legendre transformation, charge and pole motion, the spinor structure of space-time, viscous Bianchi universes, the cosmological quark-hadron transition, gravitational wave spectra of binary star systems, a superfluid He-4 SQUID as a gyroscope, VLBI Doppler measurements, inverse scattering for resonator alignment, the detection of gravitational waves, super line bundles, the quantum bosonic string in the anholonomic formalism, stochastic quantization in curved space-time, and loop representation in quantum gravity.

  2. MC 93 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Monte Carlo Simulation in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragovitsch, Peter; Linn, Stephan L.; Burbank, Mimi

    1994-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Heavy Fragment Production for Hadronic Cascade Codes * Monte Carlo Simulations of Space Radiation Environments * Merging Parton Showers with Higher Order QCD Monte Carlos * An Order-αs Two-Photon Background Study for the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson * GEANT Simulation of Hall C Detector at CEBAF * Monte Carlo Simulations in Radioecology: Chernobyl Experience * UNIMOD2: Monte Carlo Code for Simulation of High Energy Physics Experiments; Some Special Features * Geometrical Efficiency Analysis for the Gamma-Neutron and Gamma-Proton Reactions * GISMO: An Object-Oriented Approach to Particle Transport and Detector Modeling * Role of MPP Granularity in Optimizing Monte Carlo Programming * Status and Future Trends of the GEANT System * The Binary Sectioning Geometry for Monte Carlo Detector Simulation * A Combined HETC-FLUKA Intranuclear Cascade Event Generator * The HARP Nucleon Polarimeter * Simulation and Data Analysis Software for CLAS * TRAP -- An Optical Ray Tracing Program * Solutions of Inverse and Optimization Problems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics Using Inverse Monte Carlo * FLUKA: Hadronic Benchmarks and Applications * Electron-Photon Transport: Always so Good as We Think? Experience with FLUKA * Simulation of Nuclear Effects in High Energy Hadron-Nucleus Collisions * Monte Carlo Simulations of Medium Energy Detectors at COSY Jülich * Complex-Valued Monte Carlo Method and Path Integrals in the Quantum Theory of Localization in Disordered Systems of Scatterers * Radiation Levels at the SSCL Experimental Halls as Obtained Using the CLOR89 Code System * Overview of Matrix Element Methods in Event Generation * Fast Electromagnetic Showers * GEANT Simulation of the RMC Detector at TRIUMF and Neutrino Beams for KAON * Event Display for the CLAS Detector * Monte Carlo Simulation of High Energy Electrons in Toroidal Geometry * GEANT 3.14 vs. EGS4: A Comparison Using the DØ Uranium/Liquid Argon Calorimeter Geometry * Simulations with EGS4/PRESTA for Thin Si Sampling Calorimeter * SIBERIA -- Monte Carlo Code for Simulation of Hadron-Nuclei Interactions * CALOR89 Predictions for the Hanging File Test Configurations * Estimation of the Multiple Coulomb Scattering Error for Various Numbers of Radiation Lengths * Monte Carlo Generator for Nuclear Fragmentation Induced by Pion Capture * Calculation and Randomization of Hadron-Nucleus Reaction Cross Section * Developments in GEANT Physics * Status of the MC++ Event Generator Toolkit * Theoretical Overview of QCD Event Generators * Random Numbers? * Simulation of the GEM LKr Barrel Calorimeter Using CALOR89 * Recent Improvement of the EGS4 Code, Implementation of Linearly Polarized Photon Scattering * Interior-Flux Simulation in Enclosures with Electron-Emitting Walls * Some Recent Developments in Global Determinations of Parton Distributions * Summary of the Workshop on Simulating Accelerator Radiation Environments * Simulating the SDC Radiation Background and Activation * Applications of Cluster Monte Carlo Method to Lattice Spin Models * PDFLIB: A Library of All Available Parton Density Functions of the Nucleon, the Pion and the Photon and the Corresponding αs Calculations * DTUJET92: Sampling Hadron Production at Supercolliders * A New Model for Hadronic Interactions at Intermediate Energies for the FLUKA Code * Matrix Generator of Pseudo-Random Numbers * The OPAL Monte Carlo Production System * Monte Carlo Simulation of the Microstrip Gas Counter * Inner Detector Simulations in ATLAS * Simulation and Reconstruction in H1 Liquid Argon Calorimetry * Polarization Decomposition of Fluxes and Kinematics in ep Reactions * Towards Object-Oriented GEANT -- ProdiG Project * Parallel Processing of AMY Detector Simulation on Fujitsu AP1000 * Enigma: An Event Generator for Electron-Photon- or Pion-Induced Events in the ~1 GeV Region * SSCSIM: Development and Use by the Fermilab SDC Group * The GEANT-CALOR Interface

  3. The NB-LRR proteins RGA4 and RGA5 interact functionally and physically to confer disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Césari, Stella; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Bernoux, Maud; Chalvon, Véronique; Kawano, Yoji; Shimamoto, Ko; Dodds, Peter; Terauchi, Ryohei; Kroj, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plant resistance proteins of the class of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain proteins (NB-LRRs) are immune sensors which recognize pathogen-derived molecules termed avirulence (AVR) proteins. We show that RGA4 and RGA5, two NB-LRRs from rice, interact functionally and physically to mediate resistance to the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and accomplish different functions in AVR recognition. RGA4 triggers an AVR-independent cell death that is repressed in the presence of RGA5 in both rice protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana. Upon recognition of the pathogen effector AVR-Pia by direct binding to RGA5, repression is relieved and cell death occurs. RGA4 and RGA5 form homo- and hetero-complexes and interact through their coiled-coil domains. Localization studies in rice protoplast suggest that RGA4 and RGA5 localize to the cytosol. Upon recognition of AVR-Pia, neither RGA4 nor RGA5 is re-localized to the nucleus. These results establish a model for the interaction of hetero-pairs of NB-LRRs in plants: RGA4 mediates cell death activation, while RGA5 acts as a repressor of RGA4 and as an AVR receptor. PMID:25024433

  4. Role of magnetic fields in physics and astrophysics; Proceedings of the Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 5-7, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1975-01-01

    The papers deal with the role of magnetism in astrophysics and the properties of matter in the presence of unusually large magnetic fields. Topics include a quantum-mechanical treatment of high-energy charged particles radiating in a homogeneous magnetic field, the solution and properties of the Dirac equation for magnetic fields of any strength up to 10 to the 13th power gauss, experimental difficulties encountered and overcome in generating megagauss fields, the effect of strong radiation damping for an ultrarelativistic charge in an external electromagnetic field, magnetic susceptibilities of nuclei and elementary particles, and Compton scattering in strong external electromagnetic fields. Other papers examine static uniform electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the vacuum in arbitrarily strong magnetic fields, quantum-mechanical processes in neutron stars, basic ideas of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, helical MHD turbulence, relations between cosmic and laboratory plasma physics, and insights into the nature of magnetism provided by relativity and cosmology. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  5. Designing the objective structured clinical examination to cover all major areas of physical medicine and rehabilitation over 3 yrs.

    PubMed

    Garstang, Susan; Altschuler, Eric L; Jain, Sheela; Delisa, Joel A

    2012-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that training programs comprehensively evaluate residents in the six core Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. One of the ways we do this in our residency is by administering a nine-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) at the end of each year, which evaluates tasks such as history taking, focused physical examination, communication, professionalism, procedural skills, management, prescription writing, and understanding systems-based practice. We have classified our OSCE stations into what we consider key areas in our field and assessed these on a rotating basis over 3 yrs. This results in the assessment of 27 areas over the 3 yrs of residency. Structuring the OSCE as a series of stations over 3 yrs is an efficient method to evaluate residents' competencies that are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and certifying boards. An analysis of OSCE scores when compared with American Board of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation parts 1 and 2 scores and final summative resident evaluation scores reveals that OSCE results correlate with part 1 scores and final evaluation scores but do not show the same strong correlations with part 2 scores. We discuss the way the OSCE can complete other assessment techniques and ways to improve cases in the future. PMID:22469878

  6. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  7. Trends in physics EPS-7; Proceedings of the Seventh General Conference of the European Physical Society, Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland, Aug. 10-14, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenholm, Stig; Aberg, Teijo

    Various papers on trends in physics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: big bang and little bang cosmology in the laboratory; the icosahedral quasi-periodic phase; optical properties of quantum wells and superlattices; scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on Si(111); theoretical models for high-Tc superconductors; remarks on the theory of heavy-fermion superconductivity; experiment and theory in the collisions of highly excited atoms; rotational excitations and resonant behavior in electron-molecule collisions; instabilities and chaos in optics; and the single atom maser and quantum electrodynamics in a cavity. Also discussed are: femtosecond pulse generation through soliton-Raman processes; propagation of subpicosecond pulses and soliton formation in an optical fiber; quadratic coherence in parametric emission; unipolar hot electron transistors; hot electrons in double barrier GaAs transistors; modification of surfaces and surface layers by nonequilibrium processes; molecular engineering and the all-optical computer; laser spectroscopy applied to energy, environmental, and medical research; and the use of multiSQUID systems for noninvasive brain research.

  8. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  9. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  10. Educational Telecommunications. Cable Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    The Michigan Department of Education sponsored a conference which brought educational administrators and cable television (CATV) entrepreneurs together for a common exploration of their respective concerns in order that they might develop a working relationship leading to the effective utilization of CATV by educators. Major topics dealt with: 1)…

  11. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1) was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking) and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination) status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64–107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979) associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p < 0.022). In addition, we found two SNPs borderline influencing longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505) in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging. PMID:26064428

  12. Antioxidants and Quality of Aging: Further Evidences for a Major Role of TXNRD1 Gene Variability on Physical Performance at Old Age.

    PubMed

    Dato, Serena; De Rango, Francesco; Crocco, Paolina; Passarino, Giuseppe; Rose, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major determinant of human aging and common hallmark of age-related diseases. A protective role against free radicals accumulation was shown for thioredoxin reductase TrxR1, a key antioxidant selenoprotein. The variability of encoding gene (TXNRD1) was previously found associated with physical status at old age and extreme survival in a Danish cohort. To further investigate the influence of the gene variability on age-related physiological decline, we analyzed 9 tagging SNPs in relation to markers of physical (Activity of Daily Living, Hand Grip, Chair stand, and Walking) and cognitive (Mini Mental State Examination) status, in a Southern-Italian cohort of 64-107 aged individuals. We replicated the association of TXNRD1 variability with physical performance, with three variants (rs4445711, rs1128446, and rs11111979) associated with physical functioning after 85 years of age (p < 0.022). In addition, we found two SNPs borderline influencing longevity (rs4964728 and rs7310505) in our cohort, the last associated with health status and survival in Northern Europeans too. Overall, the evidences of association in a different population here reported extend the proposed role of TXNRD1 gene in modulating physical decline at extreme ages, further supporting the investigation of thioredoxin pathway in relation to the quality of human aging. PMID:26064428

  13. Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness as major markers of cardiovascular risk: their independent and interwoven importance to health status.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; McAuley, Paul; Lavie, Carl J; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Arena, Ross; Kokkinos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The evolution from hunting and gathering to agriculture, followed by industrialization, has had a profound effect on human physical activity (PA) patterns. Current PA patterns are undoubtedly the lowest they have been in human history, with particularly marked declines in recent generations, and future projections indicate further declines around the globe. Non-communicable health problems that afflict current societies are fundamentally attributable to the fact that PA patterns are markedly different than those for which humans were genetically adapted. The advent of modern statistics and epidemiological methods has made it possible to quantify the independent effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and PA on health outcomes. Based on more than five decades of epidemiological studies, it is now widely accepted that higher PA patterns and levels of CRF are associated with better health outcomes. This review will discuss the evidence supporting the premise that PA and CRF are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as the interplay between both PA and CRF and other CVD risk factors. A particular focus will be given to the interplay between CRF, metabolic risk and obesity. PMID:25269064

  14. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Gnther Schmahl University Gttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  15. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion, cooperation and collaboration to devise strategies to address the research needs identified. PMID:21142913

  16. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  17. EPRI electric vehicle conference

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleeger, D.

    1999-10-01

    Lower operating and maintenance costs, quiet and clean operation appear the main factors in choosing electric over the typical internal combustion powered equipment. The Conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI is a cooperative effort by major electric companies across the USA, founded in 1973 and headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. Featured at the Conference were presentations on regulatory issues, lift truck technologies, automotive advances and other industrial applications to include automated guided vehicles, personnel carriers and electric bicycles. Approximately 25 exhibitors displayed components, subassemblies and complete vehicles.

  18. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The scientific program of the conference began with an overview of high energy nuclear physics in China by Professor Wenqing Shen, vice president of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Professor Shen highlighted many contributions made by the Chinese scientists in both theory and experiment. Dr Nick Samios, former director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), gave a vivid account of the early years of RHIC and recent accomplishments. Highlights of the conference include new results from RHIC at BNL and SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Many experimental results reported at the conference support the notion that the quark-gluon matter at RHIC behaves like a perfect liquid with minimum viscosity to entropy ratio. There were 15 plenary sessions which covered 54 plenary talks, 12 parallel sessions and 1 poster session. A total of 320 abstracts were submitted to the conference out of which 124 were selected for oral presentation and the rest were assigned to the poster session. Talks and posters in the conference covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical progress in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, which includes new evidence of sQGP, jet quenching and heavy quark energy loss, heavy-ion collision phenomenology, quantum field theory at finite temperature and/or density, and relevant areas of astrophysics and plasma physics. The Quark Matter 2006 conference coincided with the 80th birthday of Professor T D Lee. A special reception was held in the banquet hall of the Shanghai Grand Theatre to celebrate Professor Lee's birthday and to honor his great contributions to physics, in particular, to the development of high energy nuclear physics research in China. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee for providing valuable advice on a variety of matters, from the general structure of the conference to the selection of the plenary speakers and selection of abstracts for oral presentations. Professors T Hemmick, H Satz, D T Son and N Xu gave excellent pedagogical lectures in the pre-conference student symposium and their efforts were greatly appreciated. The Shanghai Association of Science and Technology (SAST) and the staff of the Shanghai science hall provided valuable assistance and services during the conference. The conference would not have run so smoothly without their professional dedication. We also thank Professor Wenqing Shen, Chairman of the SAST, for his many valuable suggestions to the conference organizers and for providing close cooperation with SAST staff. We thank members of the Local Organizing Committee for many useful suggestions and help. We would like to express our special appreciation for the tireless efforts by many local staff who worked very hard to make this conference a success. Dr Xiang-Zhou Cai, Mrs Wei Zhou and Mrs Yang Shen undertook many duties to coordinate and organize the local services. Dr Kun Wang took responsibility of the conference web page. Dr Wei Guo, Dr Wendong Tian, Mr Chunwang Ma and Mrs Wanyan Qian organized student volunteers for the conference. Without their help and dedication this conference could not have been such a success. The Quark Matter 2006 conference has received substantial financial support from many organizations, including the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), the Ministry of Education of China (MOE), Shanghai Science and Technology Committee (SSTC), Chinese Nuclear Physics Society (CNPS), Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Central China Normal University (CCNU), China Center of Advanced Science and Technology (CCAST), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), and Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics (IOP Publishing).

  19. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded beyond ICF-related laser-plasma interactions to encompass closely related technical areas including laser particle acceleration, high-intensity laser effects, short­ pulse laser interactions, PIC and Vlasov/rad-hydro modeling, inertial and magnetic fusion plasmas, advanced plasma diagnostics, alternate ignition schemes, EOS/transport/opacity, and this year, x­ ray free-electron lasers and their applications. The conference continues to be a showcase for the presentation and discussion of the latest developments in these areas. II. Meeting Report The conference was extremely successful with more than one hundred participants. There were ninety-nine (99) abstracts submitted. There were forty-four (44) presentations including eleven (11) invited talks. The following topics were covered: a) Radiation Hydrodynamics b) Implosion Plasma Kinetic Effects c) Alternate Ignition Schemes d) Astrophysical Phenomena e) Opacity/Transport/EOS f) High Power Lasers and Facilities g) High-Intensity Laser-Matter Interactions h) Hydrodynamics and Hydro-instabilities i) Hot Dense Plasma Atomic Processes j) High Energy Density Physics k) Laser Particle Acceleration Physics l) Advanced Plasma Diagnostics m) Advanced light sources and applications Despite significant advertising, there were two students who applied for the travel grants: Charlie Jarrott and Joohwan Kim. The total funds expended were $3,216.14.

  20. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  1. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  2. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  3. Conference on Non-linear Phenomena in Mathematical Physics: Dedicated to Cathleen Synge Morawetz on her 85th Birthday. The Fields Institute, Toronto, Canada September 18-20, 2008. Sponsors: Association for Women in Mathematics, Inc. and The Fields Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jennifer

    2012-10-15

    This scientific meeting focused on the legacy of Cathleen S. Morawetz and the impact that her scientific work on transonic flow and the non-linear wave equation has had in recent progress on different aspects of analysis for non-linear wave, kinetic and quantum transport problems associated to mathematical physics. These are areas where the elements of continuum, statistical and stochastic mechanics, and their interplay, have counterparts in the theory of existence, uniqueness and stability of the associated systems of equations and geometric constraints. It was a central event for the applied and computational analysis community focusing on Partial Differential Equations. The goal of the proposal was to honor Cathleen Morawetz, a highly successful woman in mathematics, while encouraging beginning researchers. The conference was successful in show casing the work of successful women, enhancing the visibility of women in the profession and providing role models for those just beginning their careers. The two-day conference included seven 45-minute lectures and one day of six 45-minute lectures, and a poster session for junior participants. The conference program included 19 distinguished speakers, 10 poster presentations, about 70 junior and senior participants and, of course, the participation of Cathleen Synge Morawetz. The conference celebrated Morawetz’s paramount contributions to the theory of non-linear equations in gas dynamics and their impact in the current trends of nonlinear phenomena in mathematical physics, but also served as an awareness session of current women’s contribution to mathematics.

  4. Confronting the Core Curriculum: Considering Change in the Undergraduate Mathematics Major. Proceedings of the West Point Core Curriculum Conference in Mathematics (West Point, New York, April 23-24, 1994). Notes 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossey, John A., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of a conference held at the U.S. Military Academy to consider the question of core requirements for the courses often employed by partner disciplines, what concepts and procedural skills are really central, and how these questions might lead to the creation of a new undergraduate set of requirements that meet…

  5. Proceedings of the ninth cellulose conference. I. Symposia on biosynthesis of cellulose, structure and physics of cellulose, and chemistry and utilization of lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Sarko, A.

    1983-01-01

    Volume I of this conference contains 37 papers covering research programs in the biosynthesis of cellulose and its precursors and the structure and chemical composition of cellulose and lignin. All 37 papers have been abstracted separately. 1028 references, 344 figures, 63 tables.

  6. Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münzenberg, G.

    2003-05-01

    The fourteenth International Conference on Electromagnetic Isotope Separators and Techniques related to their Applications, EMIS-14, held in Victoria, Canada, was attended by more than 130 participants. As compared to earlier EMIS conferences, EMIS-14 reflected the increasing importance of experimental developments applicable to unstable nuclei. Reports on efficient isotope separation, beam manipulation such as cooling, trapping and acceleration were presented. The theoretical basis for research with exotic beams was put by W. Nazarewicz. He clearly underlined the importance of neutron rich nuclei which cover a large and unexplored region of the nuclear chart. New phenomena such as the separation of proton and neutron matter in nuclei or disappearance and formation of new nuclear shells are expected. The investigation of the rich field of nuclei far-off stability will shed light on the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction and finally help to understand the structure of elementary matter.

  7. PREFACE: International Conference on Fundamentals and Applications of HIPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Bandorf, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    Thin film technology and surface engineering are nowadays key components for numerous innovative products like efficient windows, flat screens, sensors or hard coatings used in tool coating and automotive applications, as well as products for everyday life. In line with the demands of surface technology, coating technology is also evolving and improving. The latest major technology jump was the introduction of pulse technology in physical vapor deposition. High power impulse magnetron sputtering is the most recent development of pulse sputtering. After approximately a decade of intense academic investigation and development we observe today a transfer of this new technology towards industrial processes. As well as several international activities the international conference on fundamentals and applications of HIPIMS continues the success story of the HIPIMS days, initiated in 2004 at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. Becoming the only international conference especially dedicated to HIPIMS the HIPIMS conference is a venue for industrial and academic exchange on the latest developments in this fast evolving new technology. As a joint undertaking of Sheffield Hallam University SHU, Network of Competence for Industrial Plasma Surface Technology INPLAS and Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST the HIPIMS conference was launched in 2010 in Sheffield, UK. With 120 delegates the impact of the new conference was underlined. The growing importance of HIPIMS technology was connected with a growth by nearly 35% to 160 participants in 2011 at the second HIPIMS conference in Braunschweig, DE. The participants were made up of equal numbers from research and development (university and research institutes) and industry. Being a global conference representatives from 25 different countries from all continents attended. The HIPIMS conference is also in joint collaboration with the COST Action MP0804 Highly Ionized Pulse Plasma Processes (www.hipp-cost.eu). COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) is one of the longest-running European frameworks supporting cooperation among scientists and researchers across Europe (www.cost.eu). The COST Action MP0804 HIPP processes focuses on the fundamentals and the industrial implementation of highly ionized pulse plasmas, where HIPIMS is the most prominent and most mature technology, today. Over 50 high level contributions, divided in 37 oral and 14 poster presentations were highly appreciated by the professional audience. The message from 2011 was that HIPIMS technology has now reached industry. In the opening session of the conference representatives from different companies reported on the latest developments in industrialization. Using HIPIMS technology, the lifetime of mills using a state of the art coating can be extended by 50%. Comparable deposition rates for coating cutting inserts on the different faces are reported. The ice-free window for automotive application is one solution just becoming available by HIPIMS technology. The talks from international experts covered a range from fundamental physics, experimental investigations, theoretically modeling to several applications and made the international conference on fundamentals and applications a success story to be continued in the following years. Arutiun Ehiasarian and Ralf Bandorf (Conference Chairmen of HIPIMS 2010 and 2011, respectively) Organising Committee (2010 and 2011) - Affiliations Professor Dr Papken Hovsepian (Sheffield Hallam University, Nanotechnology Center for PVD Research, UK) Professor Dr Günter Bräuer (Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST/ Network of Competence INPLAS, Braunschweig, DE) Professor Dr Arutiun P. Ehiasarian (Sheffield Hallam University, Materials Research Institute, UK) Dr Ralf Bandorf (Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films IST, Braunschweig, DE) Main Sponsor Society of Vacuum Coaters SVC Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA Sponsors Ionbond Netherlands BV Venlo, NL Hauzer Techno Coating BV Venlo, NL Hüttinger Elektronik GmbH + Co. KG Freiburg, DE Conference Photos Conference photograph Attendees HIPIMS Conference 2010, Sheffield, UK Conference photograph Attendees HIPIMS Conference 2011, Braunschweig, Germany

  8. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  9. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA Commemoration of the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii(Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 May 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), was held on 26 May 2010 at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The session was devoted to the 85th birthday of S I Syrovatskii. The program announced on the web page of the RAS Physical Sciences Division (www.gpad.ac.ru) contained the following reports: (1) Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Current sheets and reconnection in the geomagnetic tail"; (2) Frank A G (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Dynamics of current sheets as the cause of flare events in magnetized plasmas"; (3) Kuznetsov V D (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space research on the Sun"; (4) Somov B V (Shternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Strong shock waves and extreme plasma states"; (5) Zybin K P (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Structure functions for developed turbulence"; (6) Ptuskin V S (Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow region) "The origin of cosmic rays." Papers based on reports 1-4 and 6 are published in what follows. • Metastability of current sheets, L M Zelenyi, A V Artemyev, Kh V Malova, A A Petrukovich, R Nakamura Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 933-941 • Dynamics of current sheets underlying flare-type events in magnetized plasmas, A G Frank Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 941-947 • Space research of the Sun, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 947-954 • Magnetic reconnection in solar flares, B V Somov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 954-958 • The origin of cosmic rays, V S Ptuskin Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 9, Pages 958-961

  10. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  11. PREFACE: Second International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcoumanis, C.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2006-08-01

    The area of optical and laser diagnostics continues to expand and develop, and is now an essential part of many fields in engineering. Indeed it is one of the most interdisciplinary of the topics of today's research, impacting upon areas from fundamental physics to IT and encompassing a wide number of specific fields in engineering today. The proceedings of this, the second International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics (ICOLAD 2005), follows upon the very successful first conference held in 2002, and reflects in its content many of the developments in this area since that time. The aim of a Conference which is an international forum for new ideas and developments in this exciting branch of optical engineering continues, building upon the foundation of research in optical diagnostics and optical sensing for a number of industrial and biomedical application areas at the City University, London. The Conference was structured into a number of sessions, held over three days in London, with the contributed talks led by invited papers from many internationally known and respected experts in their field from the UK, mainland Europe, the United States and Japan. The material covered includes such major themes as laser diagnostics, reciprocating engine-related applications and flow velocity measurement, extending to encompass, for example, biomedical and structural monitoring using advanced optical techniques. The papers draw their authority from the reputations of the authors and the groups and companies internationally that they represent and this volume brings together a valuable cross-section of such world-leading research. The local Organizing Committee would like to acknowledge and thank the industrial sponsors of the Conference and the members of the local and the International Steering Committee for their contribution to the success of this Conference. In particular thanks are due to Ms Claire Pantlin and the Institute of Physics for their work to make ICOLAD 2005 a very successful event.

  12. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  13. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. S.

    2008-10-01

    This first Subaru international conference has highlighted the remarkably diverse and significant contributions made using the 8.2m Subaru telescope by both Japanese astronomers and the international community. As such, it serves as a satisfying tribute to the pioneering efforts of Professors Keiichi Kodaira and Sadanori Okamura whose insight and dedication is richly rewarded. Here I try to summarize the recent impact of wide field science in extragalactic astronomy and cosmology and take a look forward to the key questions we will address in the near future.

  14. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  15. Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Norman Robert

    2013-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. The Propositions of Science: 1. The subject matter of science; 2. The nature of laws; 3. The nature of laws (contd); 4. The discovery and proof of laws; 5. The explanation of laws; 6. Theories; 7. Chance and probability; 8. The meaning of science; 9. Science and philosophy; Part II. Measurement: 10. Fundamental measurement; 11. Physical number; 12. Fractional and negative magnitudes; 13. Numerical laws and derived magnitudes; 14. Units and dimensions; 15. The uses of dimensions; 16. Errors of measurement; methodical errors; 17. Errors of measurement; errors of consistency and the adjustment of observations; 18. Mathematical physics; Appendix; Index.

  16. The 2009 National Environmental Public Health Conference: One Model for Planning Green and Healthy Conferences

    PubMed Central

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Moore, Cory; Burgin, Deborah; Byrne, Maggie Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry committed to making their 2009 National Environmental Public Health Conference a model for green and healthy conferences. The conference included increased opportunities for physical activity, both as part of conference events and for transportation to the conference. In addition, conference meals were healthy and sustainably sourced. The conference also implemented intuitive, accessible recycling; online scheduling and evaluation to minimize hard-copy materials; and the purchase of carbon offsets to reduce the unwanted environmental impact of the conference. Public health professionals have an opportunity and obligation to support healthy behaviors at their events and to serve as leaders in this area. Facilitating healthy and sustainable choices is in alignment with goals for both public health and broader social issues—such as environmental quality—that have a direct bearing on public health. PMID:21563713

  17. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry. Irago Conference 2013 is scheduled to be held in October 2013 as a platform for participants from a wide range of backgrounds and specialities to interact and discuss solutions to increasingly important environmental, social, and technological challenges people of the 21st century. Conference photograph

  18. Sports Safety II, Proceedings of the National Sports Safety Conference (2nd, Chicago, Illinois, October 15-17, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehouse, Chauncey A., Ed.

    In this conference on safety and sports, conducted by the American School and Community Safety Association, five major topics were discussed. The first item concerned injuries in physical activities, the prevention of injuries in sports and a report on a survey of athletic injuries and deaths. The second item covered was the subject of injury…

  19. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  20. Proceedings of the international conference on nuclear physics, August 24-30, 1980, Berkeley, California. Volume 1. Abstracts. [Berkeley, California, August 24-30, 1980 (abstracts only)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains all abstracts (931) received by the conference organizers before June 20, 1980. The abstracts are grouped according to the following topics: nucleon-nucleon interactions, free and in nuclei; distribution of matter, charge, and magnetism; exotic nuclei and exotic probes; giant resonances and other high-lying excitations; applications of nuclear science; nuclei with large angular momentum and deformation; heavy-ion reactions and relaxation phenomena; new techniques and instruments; pion absorption and scattering by nuclei; and miscellaneous. Some of these one-page abstracts contain data. A complete author index is provided. (RWR)

  1. A BACTERIAL ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOME CONTIG SPANNING THE MAJOR DOMESTICATION LOCUS Q IN WHEAT AND IDENTIFICATION OF A CANDIDATE GENE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Q locus played a major role in the domestication of wheat because it confers the free-threshing character and influences many other agronomically important traits. We constructed a physical contig spanning the Q locus using a Triticum monococcum BAC library. Four chromosome walking steps were ...

  2. Cairo conference.

    PubMed

    McMichael, A J

    1994-09-01

    The United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in September, 1994, will evoke criticism of the inability of governments to act quickly enough to avert demographic and environmental crises. Rapid population growth has clear implications for public health. Globally there now occur anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition, the degradation of fertile lands and ocean fisheries, an accelerating loss of biodiversity, and the social and ecological problems of massive urbanization. In the future, per capita consumption levels will increase in burgeoning populations of developing countries, thus adding to the environmental impacts of overconsuming rich countries. By the end of the decade there will be over six billion people, of whom one half will live in cities. These demographic and environmental trends, if translated into climatic change, regional food shortages, and weakened ecosystems, would adversely affect human health. The World Health Organization is likely to concentrate only on accessible family planning and promotion of health for women and families. Continuing asymmetric child-saving aid, unaccompanied by substantial aid to help mobilize the social and economic resources needed to reduce fertility, may delay the demographic transition in poor countries and potentiate future public health disasters. As a result of recent reductions in fertility, even in Sub-Saharan Africa, average family sizes have been halved. Yet the demographic momentum will double population by 2050. The biosphere is a complex of ecosystems and, if unsustained, it could not fulfill the productive, cleansing, and protective functions on which life depends. The Cairo conference must therefore recognize that sustaining human health is a prime reason for concern about population growth and models of economic development. PMID:8086939

  3. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68 papers were accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The total number of submitted and accepted papers for this year's conference represents a significant increase over previous Fluid Mechanics Conferences, and has expanded its initial national character and borders which speaks to the great vitality of fluid mechanics. We hope that these proceedings will be used not only as a document of the event but also to assess achievements and new paths to be taken in fluid mechanics research. Finally, we would like to congratulate the winners of the 2014 Professor Janusz W Elsner Competition Ruri Hidema from Japan, Fernando Tejero from Spain and Lukasz Laniewski-Wollk from Poland. Acknowledgements We would like to express grateful appreciation to our colleagues from the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics, as well as to the International Scientific Committee i.e. Members and the Advisory Board. Their advice and efforts have helped us to overcome the problems normally associated with organising international meetings. Special thanks goes to the reviewers for their work in encouraging the submission of papers and the subsequent review of all papers. Their contribution cannot be overestimated. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference was organised by AGH University of Science and Technology, the Polish Academy of Sciences the Committee of Mechanics and the AGH-UST Foundation. Proceedings was published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The demanding work involved could not have been done without the contribution of so many individuals from all institutions as well as numerous external co-workers. Without their extremely valuable help such a meeting would have been impossible. Thank you all so much! Details of the committees are available in the PDF

  4. Genetic dissection of a TIR-NB-LRR locus from the wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia identifies paralogous genes conferring resistance to major fungal and oomycete pathogens in cultivated grapevine.

    PubMed

    Feechan, Angela; Anderson, Claire; Torregrosa, Laurent; Jermakow, Angelica; Mestre, Pere; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Walker, Amanda R; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Reisch, Bruce; Aubourg, Sebastien; Bentahar, Nadia; Shrestha, Bipna; Bouquet, Alain; Adam-Blondon, Anne-Françoise; Thomas, Mark R; Dry, Ian B

    2013-11-01

    The most economically important diseases of grapevine cultivation worldwide are caused by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator syn. Uncinula necator) and the oomycete pathogen downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola). Currently, grapegrowers rely heavily on the use of agrochemicals to minimize the potentially devastating impact of these pathogens on grape yield and quality. The wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia was recognized as early as 1889 to be resistant to both powdery and downy mildew. We have now mapped resistance to these two mildew pathogens in M. rotundifolia to a single locus on chromosome 12 that contains a family of seven TIR-NB-LRR genes. We further demonstrate that two highly homologous (86% amino acid identity) members of this gene family confer strong resistance to these unrelated pathogens following genetic transformation into susceptible Vitis vinifera winegrape cultivars. These two genes, designated resistance to Uncinula necator (MrRUN1) and resistance to Plasmopara viticola (MrRPV1) are the first resistance genes to be cloned from a grapevine species. Both MrRUN1 and MrRPV1 were found to confer resistance to multiple powdery and downy mildew isolates from France, North America and Australia; however, a single powdery mildew isolate collected from the south-eastern region of North America, to which M. rotundifolia is native, was capable of breaking MrRUN1-mediated resistance. Comparisons of gene organization and coding sequences between M. rotundifolia and the cultivated grapevine V. vinifera at the MrRUN1/MrRPV1 locus revealed a high level of synteny, suggesting that the TIR-NB-LRR genes at this locus share a common ancestor. PMID:24033846

  5. Physics.

    PubMed

    Bromley, D A

    1980-07-01

    From massive quarks deep in the hearts of atomic nuclei to the catastrophic collapse of giant stars in the farthest reaches of the universe, from the partial realization of Einstein's dream of a unified theory of the forces of nature to the most practical applications in technology, medicine, and throughout contemporary society, physics continues to have a profound impact on man's view of the universe and on the quality of life. The author argues that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, new insight-and the new questions-have been among the most productive in the history of the field and puts into context his selection of some of the most important new developments in this fundamental science. PMID:17836565

  6. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Scientific session of the Division of General Physics and Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (January 29, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimberg, D.; Ipatova, Iya P.; Kop'ev, P. S.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Malyshkin, V. G.; Shchukin, V. A.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Gippius, Nikolai A.; Kulakovskii, Vladimir D.; Tikhodeev, Sergei G.; Kapaev, V. V.; Kopaev, Yurii V.; Tokatly, I. V.; Lysenko, V. G.; Krupenin, V. A.; Lotkhov, S. V.; Pashkin, Yurii A.; Presnov, D. E.

    1997-05-01

    A scientific session of the Division of General Physics and Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held at the P L Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems, RAS on 29 January 1997. Six reports were presented at this session: (1) D Bimberg, I P Ipatova, P S Kop'ev, N N Ledentsov, V G Malyshkin, V A Shchukin (Technische Universitat Berlin, Berlin; A F Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute, RAS, St.-Petersburg) 'Spontaneous ordering of semiconductor nanostructures'; (2) I V Kukushkin (Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) 'Experimental verification of the skyrmion concept'; 3) N A Gippius, V D Kulakovskii, S G Tikhodeev (Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow; Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) 'Effect of electric field redistribution on the electronic and optical properties of nanostructures'; (4) V V Kapaev, Yu V Kopaev, I V Tokatly (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Momentum dependence of electron state dimensionality in heterostructures'; (5) V G Lysenko (Institute of Technology Problems for Microelectronics and Highly Purified Materials, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow region) 'Bloch oscillations in superlattices'; (6) V A Krupenin, S V Lotkhov, Yu A Pashkin, D E Presnov (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow; P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'An experimental study of charge effects in ultrasmall tunnel junctions'. An abridge version of the five of above reports is given below.

  7. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Scientific session of the Division of General Physics and Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (April 23, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, V. I.; Balaev, A. D.; Val'kov, V. V.; Gavrichkov, V. A.; Ivanova, N. B.; Ovchinnikov, Sergei G.; Chernov, V. K.; Brazhkin, Vadim V.; Lyapin, A. G.; Popova, Svetlana V.; Voloshin, Roman N.; Lyapin, S. G.; Klyuev, Yu A.; Naletov, A. M.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Ragul'skii, Valerii V.; Komberg, Boris V.; Lukash, Vladimir N.

    1997-09-01

    A scientific session of the Division of General Physics and Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences was held on April 23, 1997 at the P L Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Simonov V I (Institute of Crystallography, RAS, Moscow) 'Structural investigation of single crystals and the structure—properties correlation'; (2) Fridman A M (Institute for Astronomy, RAS, Moscow) 'Giant curls in galaxies'; (3) Balaev A D, Val'kov V V, Gavrichkov V A, Ivanova N B, Ovchinnikov S G, Chernov V K (Kirenskii Institute of Physics, RAS, Krasnoyarsk) 'Quantum oscillations of resistance and magnetization in magnetic semiconductors and semimetals; (4) Brazhkin V V, Lyapin A G, Popova S V, Voloshin R N (Institute of High Pressure Physics, RAS, Troitsk, Moscow Region), Lyapin S G (Institute of High Pressure Physics and University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford), Klyuev Yu A, Naletov A M (All-Russia Scientific-Research Institute of Diamonds), Mel'nik N N (P N Lebedev Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'New crystalline and amorphous carbon modifications produced from fullerite at high pressure'; (5) Ragul'skii V V (Institute for Mechanical Problems, RAS, Moscow) 'An experimental study of the optical isotropy of space'; (6) Kravtsov A V, Komberg B V, Lukash V N (Astro-Space Centre of the P N Lebedev Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Large-scale structure of the Universe and quasars'. Summaries of the four (1, 3, 4, 5) reports are given below.

  8. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed at scientists and PhD students working in the field of wake dynamics. The conference covers the following subject areas: Wake and vortex dynamics, instabilities in trailing vortices and wakes, simulation and measurements of wakes, analytical approaches for modeling wakes, wake interaction and other wind farm investigations. Many people have been involved in producing the 2015 Wake Conference proceedings. The work by the more than 60 reviewers ensuring the quality of the papers is greatly appreciated. The timely evaluation and coordination of the reviews would not have been possible without the work of the section editors: Christian Masson, ÉTS, Fernando Porté-Agel, EPFL, Gerard Schepers, ECN Wind Energy, Gijs Van Kuik, Delft University, Gunner Larsen, DTU Wind Energy, Jakob Mann, DTU Wind Energy, Javier Sanz Rodrigo, CENER, Johan Meyers, KU Leuven, Rebecca Barthelmie, Cornell University, Sandrine Aubrun-Sanches, Université d'Orléans and Thomas Leweke, IRPHE-CNRS. We are also immensely indebted to the very responsive support from the editorial team at IOP Publishing, especially Sarah Toms, during the review process of these proceedings. Visby, Sweden, June 2015 Andrew Barney, Jens Nørkær Sørensen and Stefan Ivanell Uppsala University - Campus Gotland

  9. 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For a long time it was a wish of European plasma diagnosticians to have a biennial conference that brings together scientist working on diagnostics for magnetic confinement fusion, beam plasmas and inertial fusion, low-temperature and industrial plasmas, and basic and astrophysical plasmas. Although it is relatively straightforward to set up a new conference in a field, that doesn't hold for obtaining the endorsement from the European Physical Society (EPS). After a successful 1.5 day pilot, which was organized as satellite to the main EPS Conference on Plasma Physics in Helsinki in 2013, the EPS gave the green light for organizing the First EPS Conference on Plasma Diagnostics, that was held from 14 to 17 April, 2015 in Frascati (Rome), Italy. The International Scientific Committee of the First EPS Conference on Plasma Diagnostics (ECPD1) was formed by Dimitri Batani, Bob Bingham, Rejean Boivin, Hong Young Chang, Tony DonnÃ

  10. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas, Institute for Fusion Studies, RLM 11.314, Austin, TX 78712. Tel +1-512-471-1322, E-mail stewart@hagar.ph.utexas.edu. 17 - 18 February 1997 Plasma '97: 21st Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering Plasma Science and Technology Conference Sydney, Australia Contact: Margaret Lanigan, Conference Manager, PMB 1, MENAI NSW 2234, Australia. Fax +61-(0)2-439-6561, E-mail ainse@ansto.gov.au. 6 - 11 April 1997 10th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating Ameland, The Netherlands Contact: J Hamers-Smit, FOM - Instituut voor Plasmafysica 'Rijnhuizen', Postbus 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein. Tel +31-30-6096999, Fax +31-30-6031204, E-mail ec10@rijnh.nl. Application and abstract deadline: 17 January 1997. 8 - 12 September 1997 12th International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications Greifswald, Germany Contact: Dr G Babucke, Inst. f. Niedertemperatur-Plasmaphysik, Robert-Blum-Str. 8 - 10, 17489 Greifswald, Germany. Tel +49-3834-554411, Fax +49-3834-554301, E-mail gd97@public.inp.uni-greifswald.de.

  11. The Association Between Physical Activity, Mental Status, and Social and Family Support with Five Major Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases Among Elderly People: A Cross-Sectional Study of a Rural Population in Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiang; Yang, Huajie; Wang, Harry H.X.; Qiu, Yongjun; Lai, Xiujuan; Zhou, Zhiheng; Li, Fangjian; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Jiaji; Lei, Jimin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) have become the top threat in China. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of major NCDs among the elderly population in rural areas in southern China and explore its associated social determinants. Methods: A multistage cluster random sampling methodology was adopted to select a total of 9245 rural elderly people from 3860 rural households in Guangdong Province. Interviews and physical examinations were performed to collect patient information. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with the presence of major NCDs. Results: Over one-third (38.5%) of the study population suffered from five major NCDs. The grade of activities of daily living (ADL), mental status, and social relationship of elderly people without NCDs were better than those with NCDs. The major factors associated with the presence of NCDs among the elderly people included age (70–79 years group and 80–89 years group), education level (senior high/technical secondary school and junior college and above), mental status (concentration, enrichment and happy life and memory), relationship with neighbours, activities of daily living (ADL) (being able to climb three floors and bend over), physical activity, marital status (bereft), and living conditions (with offspring and family members). Conclusions: The study identified several social determinants associated with the presence of major NCDs. A higher level of family support and physical exercise might contribute to improved physical condition, mental status, and ADL among the elderly people in rural areas in southern China. PMID:26506364

  12. SIAM conference on applications of dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A conference (Oct.15--19, 1992, Snowbird, Utah; sponsored by SIAM (Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) Activity Group on Dynamical Systems) was held that highlighted recent developments in applied dynamical systems. The main lectures and minisymposia covered theory about chaotic motion, applications in high energy physics and heart fibrillations, turbulent motion, Henon map and attractor, integrable problems in classical physics, pattern formation in chemical reactions, etc. The conference fostered an exchange between mathematicians working on theoretical issues of modern dynamical systems and applied scientists. This two-part document contains abstracts, conference program, and an author index.

  13. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  14. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Scientific session of the Division of General Physics and Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (May 14, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineev, V. P.; Vavilov, M. G.; Volkov, V. A.; Takhtamirov, E. E.; Sukhorukov, Anatolii P.; Bogatov, Alexandr P.; Korovin, S. D.; Ardelyan, N. V.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennadiĭ S.; Moiseenko, S. G.; Slysh, V. I.

    1997-10-01

    A scientific session of the Division of General Physics and Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences was held on May 14, 1997 at the P L Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Mineev V P, Vavilov M G (Landau Institute of Theoretical Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow Region) ''De Haas—van Alphen effect in superconductors''; (2) Volkov V A, Takhtamirov E E (Institute of Radio-Engineering and Electronics, RAS, Moscow) ''Dynamics of an electron with space-dependent mass and the effective-mass method for semiconductor heterostructures''; (3) Sukhorukov A P (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) ''New avenue of investigation in the physics of solitons: parametrically-coupled solitons in a quadratically-nonlinear medium''; (4) Bogatov A P (P N Lebedev Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) ''Optics of semiconductor lasers''; (5) Korovin S D (Institute of High-Power Electronics, Tomsk) ''Generation of high-power microwave radiation on the base of high-current nanosecond electron beams''; (6) Ardelyan N V, Bisnovatyi-Kogan G S, Moiseenko S G (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow; Institute of Space Research, Moscow) ''Explosion mechanisms of supernovae: the magnetorotational model''; (7) Slysh V I (Astrocosmic Centre of the P N Lebedev Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) ''Stars, planets, and cosmic masers''. Summaries of four (1, 2, 6, 7) of the reports are given below.

  15. PREFACE: International Conference on Modern Perspectives of Cosmology and Gravitation (COSGRAV 12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Supratik; Basu, Banasri

    2012-12-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the International Conference on Modern Perspectives of Cosmology and Gravitation (COSGRAV 12) organized by Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata, held on 7-11 February 2012. The conference, which focused exclusively on recent trends of research in Cosmology and Gravitation, was the first in the series held in this institute of great repute. The ultimate plan is to make it a regular event every two or three years based on the very positive response we received which was beyond our expectation. The immediate purpose of this conference was to bring together experienced as well as young scientists who are interested in working actively on various aspects of Cosmology and Gravitation. The lectures addressed major theoretical issues, current and forthcoming observational data as well as upcoming ideas in both theoretical and observational sectors. Keeping in mind the 'academic exchange first' approach the lectures were arranged in such a way that the young researchers had ample scope to interact with the stalwarts who are internationally leading experts in their respective fields of research. The major topics covered in the conference are: Early Universe: Inflation, Alternatives and Links to Fundamental Physics Present Universe: Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Alternatives Observational Cosmology: CMB, Supernovae, Lensing, Galaxies and Clusters Quantum Aspects of Gravity Black Hole Physics Interface of Gravitation with Information Theory and Condensed Matter Physics. Besides the invited talks a good proportion of the participants also presented their work through contributory talks and posters on this big platform. This was particularly encouraging and of benefit to the young participants, given that there were a number of scientists of international repute among the participants, the feedback from whom could guide them in the right direction. All the contributions were refereed by experts. This set a standard of its own. We are indebted to the Indian Statistical Institute for providing us with generous funding that covered all the expenses required to organize such a huge conference, and for providing us with the support staff facilities. We gratefully acknowledge encouragement from Professor Bimal K Roy, Director, Indian Statistical Institute, and his constant support in all aspects of the conference which made the program function so well. We thank the Scientific Advisory Committee for their valuable suggestions on technical aspects of the conference. We thank all the members of Local Organizing Committee as well as the volunteering students who contributed their hard labour to make the conference a great success. Special thanks to Sudipta Das, Barun Kumar Pal and Sayantan Choudhury for their help during every stage of the conference. We sincerely thank IOP Publishing and the staff of Journal of Physics: Conference Series for the publication of this issue. Last but not least, we thank all the speakers and participants without whom the program would not have been such as success. We hope we will your active participation in future versions of the conference as well. Supratik Pal and Banasri Basu (Editors) Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit Indian Statistical Institute 203 B.T.Road Kolkata 700108 INDIA Conference photograph

  16. (Physics and chemistry of van der Waals particles)

    SciTech Connect

    Klots, C.E.

    1990-10-08

    Accounts are given of the two major international conferences on the physics and chemistry of small particles, commonly referred to as van der Waals particles. Details of special interest to Oak Ridge National Laboratory personnel are cited. Information exchanges at Freiburg and Paris are described.

  17. Physical Trauma as an Etiological Agent in Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angle, Carol R., Ed.; Bering, Edgar A., Jr., Ed.

    The conference on Physical Trauma as a Cause of Mental Retardation dealt with two major areas of etiological concern - postnatal and perinatal trauma. Following two introductory statements on the problem of and issues related to mental retardation (MR) after early trauma to the brain, five papers on the epidemiology of head trauma cover…

  18. The 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference: Accomplishments and next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamruz-Smith, Susan; Harrison, Patti L.; Cummings, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    The major national and international school psychology organizations hosted the 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference during the fall of 2012. The conference was designed to provide an opportunity for school psychologists to plan their future roles in better supporting children, families, and schools. The 2012 conference, titled "School…

  19. The 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference: Accomplishments and next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamruz-Smith, Susan; Harrison, Patti L.; Cummings, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    The major national and international school psychology organizations hosted the 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference during the fall of 2012. The conference was designed to provide an opportunity for school psychologists to plan their future roles in better supporting children, families, and schools. The 2012 conference, titled "School

  20. Screening for resistance against Pseudomonas syringae in rice-FOX Arabidopsis lines identified a putative receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase gene that confers resistance to major bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    Dubouzet, Joseph G; Maeda, Satoru; Sugano, Shoji; Ohtake, Miki; Hayashi, Nagao; Ichikawa, Takanari; Kondou, Youichi; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Horii, Yoko; Matsui, Minami; Oda, Kenji; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Mori, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 000 of the rice-FOX Arabidopsis transgenic lines, which overexpress 13 000 rice full-length cDNAs at random in Arabidopsis, were screened for bacterial disease resistance by dip inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). The identities of the overexpressed genes were determined in 72 lines that showed consistent resistance after three independent screens. Pst DC3000 resistance was verified for 19 genes by characterizing other independent Arabidopsis lines for the same genes in the original rice-FOX hunting population or obtained by reintroducing the genes into ecotype Columbia by floral dip transformation. Thirteen lines of these 72 selections were also resistant to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. Eight genes that conferred resistance to Pst DC3000 in Arabidopsis have been introduced into rice for overexpression, and transformants were evaluated for resistance to the rice bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. One of the transgenic rice lines was highly resistant to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Interestingly, this line also showed remarkably high resistance to Magnaporthe grisea, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, which is the most devastating rice disease in many countries. The causal rice gene, encoding a putative receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase, was therefore designated as BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1. Our results demonstrate the utility of the rice-FOX Arabidopsis lines as a tool for the identification of genes involved in plant defence and suggest the presence of a defence mechanism common between monocots and dicots. PMID:20955180

  1. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.

    2004-07-01

    The competition between CDM and MOND to account for the `missing mass' phenomenon is asymmetric. MOND has clearly demonstrated that a characteristic acceleration a_0 underlies the data and understanding what gives rise to a_0 is an important task. The reason for MOND's success may lie in either the details of galaxy formation, or an advance in fundamental physics that reduces to MOND in a suitable limit. CDM has enjoyed great success on large scales. The theory cannot be definitively tested on small scales until galaxy formation has been understood because baryons either are, or possibly have been, dominant in all small-scale objects. MOND's predictive power is seriously undermined by its isolation from the rest of physics. In view of this isolation, the way forward is probably to treat CDM as an established theory to be used alongside relativity and electromagnetism in efforts to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  2. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  3. EDITORIAL: International MEMS Conference 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Francis E. H.; Jianmin, Miao; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    The International MEMS conference (iMEMS2006) organized by the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Nanyang Technological University aims to provide a platform for academicians, professionals and industrialists in various related fields from all over the world to share and learn from each other. Of great interest is the incorporation of the theme of life sciences application using MEMS. It is the desire of this conference to initiate collaboration and form network of cooperation. This has continued to be the objective of iMEMS since its inception in 1997. The technological advance of MEMS over the past few decades has been truly exciting in terms of development and applications. In order to participate in this rapid development, a conference involving delegates from within the MEMS community and outside the community is very meaningful and timely. With the receipt of over 200 articles, delegates related to MEMS field from all over the world will share their perspectives on topics such as MEMS/MST Design, MEMS Teaching and Education, MEMS/MST Packaging, MEMS/MST Fabrication, Microsystems Applications, System Integration, Wearable Devices, MEMSWear and BioMEMS. Invited speakers and delegates from outside the field have also been involved to provide challenges, especially in the life sciences field, for the MEMS community to potentially address. The proceedings of the conference will be published as an issue in the online Journal of Physics: Conference Series and this can reach a wider audience and will facilitate the reference and citation of the work presented in the conference. We wish to express our deep gratitude to the International Scientific Committee members and the organizing committee members for contributing to the success of this conference. We would like to thank all the delegates, speakers and sponsors from all over the world for presenting and sharing their perspectives on topics related to MEMS and the challenges that MEMS can potentially address.

  4. Minnesota Junior College Faculty 1969 Conferences. Reports and Papers from Three Conferences on Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Norman W., Ed.; Shaner, James P., Ed.

    Three conferences on educational innovation raised basic questions concerning goals and values for junior college students. Speakers addressed each of the conferences on problems encountered in their respective areas of humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences. The addresses are presented, along with recommendations made by the…

  5. Proceedings of High Energy Physics Workshop ''Scalar Mesons: An Interesting Puzzle for QCD'' held at SUNY Institute of Technology, May 16-18, 2003 Published by the American Institute of Physics AIP Conference Proceedings 688 Editor: Amir H. Fariborz

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, Amir H.

    2003-11-01

    The proceedings of the workshop: ''Scalar Mesons: An Interesting Puzzle for QCD'' contains papers that were presented at the workshop by a number of experts from around the world. It includes three main categories of Theoretical, Computational and Experimental works. The topics that are presented in this proceedings are of interest to senior and junior investigators in high energy physics, nuclear physics and computational physics, and provide most recent ideas, techniques, and directions for future research in these fields.

  6. The ZbYME2 gene from the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii confers not only YME2 functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but also the capacity for catabolism of sorbate and benzoate, two major weak organic acid preservatives.

    PubMed

    Mollapour, M; Piper, P W

    2001-11-01

    A factor influencing resistances of food spoilage microbes to sorbate and benzoate is whether these organisms are able to catalyse the degradation of these preservative compounds. Several fungi metabolize benzoic acid by the beta-ketoadipate pathway, involving the hydroxylation of benzoate to 4-hydroxybenzoate. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to use benzoate as a sole carbon source, apparently through the lack of benzoate-4-hydroxylase activity. However a single gene from the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii, heterologously expressed in S. cerevisiae cells, can enable growth of the latter on benzoate, sorbate and phenylalanine. Although this ZbYME2 gene is essential for benzoate utilization by Z. bailii, its ZbYme2p product has little homology to other fungal benzoate-4-hydroxylases studied to date, all of which appear to be microsomal cytochrome P450s. Instead, ZbYme2p has strong similarity to the matrix domain of the S. cerevisiae mitochondrial protein Yme2p/Rna12p/Prp12p and, when expressed as a functional fusion to green fluorescent protein in S. cerevisiae growing on benzoate, is largely localized to mitochondria. The phenotypes associated with loss of the native Yme2p from S. cerevisiae, mostly apparent in yme1,yme2 cells, may relate to increased detrimental effects of endogenous oxidative stress. Heterologous expression of ZbYME2 complements these phenotypes, yet it also confers a potential for weak acid preservative catabolism that the native S. cerevisiae Yme2p is unable to provide. Benzoate utilization by S. cerevisiae expressing ZbYME2 requires a functional mitochondrial respiratory chain, but not the native Yme1p and Yme2p of the mitochondrion. PMID:11737636

  7. Magnetotail physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of magnetotails (MTs) are examined in reviews and reports based on papers presented at the Chapman Conference on Magnetotail Physics, held at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in October 1985. Topics addressed include the MT configuration, fluid and kinetic aspects of MT dynamics, active diagnosis of the earth MT, and the MTs of celestial objects. Also provided are an overview of the conference findings and summaries of panel discussions on injection-layer and Alfven-layer models, reconnection and viscous-interaction models of solar-wind/magnetosphere energy transfer, and phenomenological models of MT substorms.

  8. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcoumanis, C.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2007-09-01

    The International Conference on Optical and Laser Diagnostics (ICOLAD 2007), held at City University in May 2007, was the third meeting in this well established series, following upon the first in 2002 and the second in 2005. During that time the area of optical and laser diagnostics has continued to develop and to expand with both the changes seen in the technology and the availability of new optical components and laser systems. The field remains one of the most interdisciplinary of the topics of today's research, impacting upon areas from fundamental physics to IT and encompassing a number of different areas in engineering today. These proceedings are a record of current practice in this area from a Conference which remains an international forum for new ideas and developments in this exciting branch of optical engineering. It builds upon the foundation of research in the broad field of optical diagnostics in a number of industrial and biomedical application areas at the City University, London. The Conference was structured into a number of sessions reflecting topical developments in engine research, optical sensing and measurement and biomedical engineering held over three days in London, with the contributed talks led by invited papers from many internationally known and respected experts in their field from mainland Europe, the United States and Japan and the UK. The material covered encompasses such major themes as laser diagnostics, reciprocating engine-related applications and flow velocity measurement, extending to include biomedical and structural monitoring using advanced optical techniques. The papers at this Conference continue to draw their authority from the reputations of the authors and the groups and companies internationally that they represent. This volume brings together a valuable cross-section of world-leading research at the time. The local Organizing Committee would like to acknowledge and thank the industrial sponsors of the Conference and the members of the local and the International Steering Committee for their contribution to the success of this Conference. In particular thanks are due to Ms Dawn Stewart and Mrs Claire Garland of the Institute of Physics for their work to have made the latest Conference in the ICOLAD series a very successful event. C Arcoumanis and K T V Grattan Editors

  9. Pre-Student Teaching Laboratory Experiences for Students Majoring in Physical Education and in Elementary Education. The Children's Motor Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Stevens Point. Dept. of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

    This report of the 1972 Distinguished Achievement Award Entry from the University of Wisconsin describes the Children's Motor Development Program which is designed to give student teachers experience in elementary physical education methods through volunteer laboratory training. After a review of the development of the program, the following…

  10. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Seventy years of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Troitsk, Moscow region) was held in the conference hall of IZMIRAN on 25 November 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Moscow) "The role of cosmic rays and runaway electron breakdown in atmospheric lightning discharges"; (2) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research"; (3) Dorman L I (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region, CR & SWC, Israel) "Cosmic ray variations and space weather"; (4) Mareev E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects"; (5) Tereshchenko E D, Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Research Center, RAS, Murmansk) "Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects"; (6) Gulyaev Yu V, Armand N A, Efimov A I, Matyugov S S, Pavelyev A G, Savich N A, Samoznaev L N, Smirnov V V, Yakovlev O I (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region) "Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods"; (7) Kunitsyn V E (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Satellite radio probing and the radio tomography of the ionosphere"; (8) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space Research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences." Papers based on reports 2-8 are published below. The main contents of report 1 are reproduced in A V Gurevich's review, "Nonlinear effects in the ionosphere" [Phys. Usp. 50 1091 (2007)] and in the paper by A V Gurevich et al., "Nonlinear phenomena in the ionospheric plasma. Effects of cosmic rays and runaway breakdown on thunderstorm discharges" [Phys. Usp. 52 735 (2009)]. • Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research , E B Aleksandrov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 487-496 • Cosmic ray variations and space weather, L I Dorman Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 496-503 • Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects, E A Mareev Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 504-511 • Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects, V V Safargaleev, E D Tereshchenko Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 511-517 • Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods, N A Armand, Yu V Gulyaev, A L Gavrik, A I Efimov, S S Matyugov, A G Pavelyev, N A Savich, L N Samoznaev, V M Smirnov, O I Yakovlev Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 517-523 • Satellite radio probing and radio tomography of the ionosphere, V E Kunitsyn, E D Tereshchenko, E S Andreeva, I A Nesterov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 523-528 • Space research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences , V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 5, Pages 528-534

  11. Preface: Special issue featuring papers from the International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, L.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.

    2004-02-01

    The International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors (HCIS-13) celebrates 30 years since it first took place in Modena. Nonequilibrium dynamics of charge carriers, pioneered by the hot-electron concept, is an important issue for understanding electro-optic transport properties in semiconductor materials and structures. In these 30 years several topics have matured, and new ones have emerged thus fertilizing the field with a variety of physical problems and new ideas. The history of the conference is summarized in the opening paper `30 years of HCIS'. The future of the conference seems secure considering the continued lively interest of the participants. The conference addressed eleven major topics which constitute the backbone of the proceedings and are summarized as follows: carrier transport in low dimensional and nanostructure systems, nonequilibrium carriers in superlattices and devices, small devices and related phenomena, carrier dynamics and fluctuations, carrier quantum dynamics, coherent/incoherent carrier dynamics of optical excitations and ultra-fast optical phenomena, nonlinear optical effects, transport in organic matter, semiconductor-based spintronics, coherent dynamics in solid state systems for quantum processing and communication, novel materials and devices. Nanometric space scale and femtosecond time scale represent the ultimate domains of theoretical, experimental and practical interest. Traditional fields such as bulk properties, quantum transport, fluctuations and chaotic phenomena, etc, have received thorough and continuous attention. Emerging fields from previous conferences, such as quantum processing and communication, have been better assessed. New fields, such as spintronics and electron transport in organic matter, have appeared for the first time. One plenary talk, 11 invited talks, 230 submitted abstracts covering all these topics constituted a single-session conference. Following scientific selection through the Advisory and Program Committees and peer review, 162 papers were selected for publication by the Institute of Physics Publishing in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The financial support that allowed conference organization and helped researchers with budget difficulties to attend came from the following institutions which are gratefully acknowledged: Office of Naval Research (ONR), Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), Office of Naval Research International Field Office (ONRIFO), International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), Italian Ministry of Education University and Research (MIUR), National Institute for the Physics of Matter (INFM), University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’ Innovazione of the Lecce University. Finally, sincere thanks are addressed to the technical staff who provided assistance during the conference: G Angelone, M Benassi, F Grossi, M Leuzzi, A Magnani, S Montanto, L Zagni and D Zanfi. The staff of the University Press Office together with F Goggi and N Minto are acknowledged for their excellent job in printing the conference documents.

  12. Conference summary: Experimnetal

    SciTech Connect

    Thommpson, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    The conference is the 1995 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems. The summary highlights research on the ``extended`` Doniach model, Kondo insulators, borocarbide superconductors, oxides (including cuprates), other phase transitions, and new materials.

  13. Usage of Social Media and Smartphone Application in Assessment of Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Individuals in Times of a Major Air Pollution Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cyrus SH; Fang, Pan; Lu, Yanxia; Ho, Roger CM

    2014-01-01

    Background Crisis situations bring about many challenges to researchers, public institutions, and governments in collecting data and conducting research in affected individuals. Recent developments in Web-based and smartphone technologies have offered government and nongovernment organizations a new system to disseminate and acquire information. However, research into this area is still lacking. The current study focuses largely on how new social networking websites and, in particular, smartphone technologies could have helped in the acquisition of crucial research data from the general population during the recent 2013 Southeast Asian Haze. This crisis lasted only for 1 week, and is unlike other crisis where there are large-scale consequential after-effects. Objective To determine whether respondents will make use of Internet, social media, and smartphone technologies to provide feedback regarding their physical and psychological wellbeing during a crisis, and if so, will these new mechanisms be as effective as conventional, technological, Internet-based website technologies. Methods A Web-based database and a smartphone application were developed. Participants were recruited by snowball sampling. The participants were recruited either via a self-sponsored Facebook post featuring a direct link to the questionnaire on physical and psychological wellbeing and also a smartphone Web-based application; or via dissemination of the questionnaire link by emails, directed to the same group of participants. Information pertaining to physical and psychological wellbeing was collated. Results A total of 298 respondents took part in the survey. Most of them were between the ages of 20 to 29 years and had a university education. More individuals preferred the option of accessing and providing feedback to a survey on physical and psychological wellbeing via direct access to a Web-based questionnaire. Statistical analysis showed that demographic variables like age, gender, and educational levels did not influence the mechanism of access. In addition, the participants reported a mean number of 4.03 physical symptoms (SD 2.6). The total Impact of Event Scale–Revised (IES-R) score was 18.47 (SD 11.69), which indicated that the study population did experience psychological stress but not post-traumatic stress disorder. The perceived dangerous Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) level and the number of physical symptoms were associated with higher IES-R Score (P<.05). Conclusions This is one of the first few studies demonstrating the use of Internet in data collection during an air-pollution crisis. Our results demonstrated that the newer technological modalities have the potential to acquire data, similar to that of conventional technologies. Demographic variables did not influence the mechanism of usage. In addition, our findings also suggested that there are acute physical and psychological impacts on the population from an air-pollution crisis. PMID:25098255

  14. 1980 Is Now: A Conference on the Future of Deaf-Blind Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrick, Carl E., Ed.

    Presented are a conference summary and 15 papers on the present and future service needs of deaf-blind (rubella) children and their parents. The conference summary contains recommendations for future activities; major points of agreement among conference members; synopsis of the papers presented; a review of discussion by conference participants;…

  15. Youth Conference Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    This handbook is designed to provide practical aid to those who have charge of the planning and organization of a youth conference, Defined as a conference to provide practical information as well as information about possible responsibilities, risks, and consequences of actions, related to the chosen conference topic. Suggestions are given for…

  16. Ninth Conference on Space Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The papers presented in this conference provided an international dialogue and a meaningful exchange in the simulation of space environments as well as the evolution of these technological advances into other fields. The papers represent a significant contribution to the understanding of space simulation problems and the utilization of this knowledge. The topics of the papers include; spacecraft testing; facilities and test equipment; system and subsystem test; life sciences, medicine and space; physical environmental factors; chemical environmental factors; contamination; space physics; and thermal protection.

  17. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Conferences; conference... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference memorandum . (a) Conferences. The Board may convene the parties in conference, either by telephone or in...

  18. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  19. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  20. Proceedings of the Next Generation Exploration Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schingler, Robbie (Editor); Lynch, Kennda

    2006-01-01

    The Next Generation Exploration Conference (NGEC) brought together the emerging next generation of space leaders over three intensive days of collaboration and planning. The participants extended the ongoing work of national space agencies to draft a common strategic framework for lunar exploration, to include other destinations in the solar system. NGEC is the first conference to bring together emerging leaders to comment on and contribute to these activities. The majority of the three-day conference looked beyond the moon and focused on the "next destination": Asteroids, Cis-Lunar, Earth 3.0, Mars Science and Exploration, Mars Settlement and Society, and Virtual Worlds and Virtual Exploration.

  1. Second NASA Advanced Composites Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr. (Compiler); Bohon, Herman L. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The conference papers are presented. The Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) Program is a major multi-year research initiative to achieve a national goal of technology readiness before the end of the decade. Conference papers recorded results of research in the ACT Program in the specific areas of automated fiber placement, resin transfer molding, textile preforms, and stitching as these processes influence design, performance, and cost of composites in aircraft structures. These papers will also be included in the Ninth Conference Proceedings to be published by the Federal Aviation Administration as a separate document.

  2. Conference on Real-Time Computer Applications in Nuclear, Particle and Plasma Physics, 6th, Williamsburg, VA, May 15-19, 1989, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pordes, Ruth (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers on real-time computer applications in nuclear, particle, and plasma physics are presented, covering topics such as expert systems tactics in testing FASTBUS segment interconnect modules, trigger control in a high energy physcis experiment, the FASTBUS read-out system for the Aleph time projection chamber, a multiprocessor data acquisition systems, DAQ software architecture for Aleph, a VME multiprocessor system for plasma control at the JT-60 upgrade, and a multiasking, multisinked, multiprocessor data acquisition front end. Other topics include real-time data reduction using a microVAX processor, a transputer based coprocessor for VEDAS, simulation of a macropipelined multi-CPU event processor for use in FASTBUS, a distributed VME control system for the LISA superconducting Linac, a distributed system for laboratory process automation, and a distributed system for laboratory process automation. Additional topics include a structure macro assembler for the event handler, a data acquisition and control system for Thomson scattering on ATF, remote procedure execution software for distributed systems, and a PC-based graphic display real-time particle beam uniformity.

  3. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history, scientists were fascinated with Syrtis Major because this dark region varied so much through the seasons and years. Some people thought it might be a changing sea, and others thought it might be vegetation. Early spacecraft like Mariner and Viking revealed for the first time that the changes were caused by the wind blowing dust and sand across the surface. What we can see in this image is exactly that: evidence of a lot of wind action. Bright dust patches streak across this image, formed through wind interference from craters and other landforms. These wispy, bright streaks are spread on the surface by a vigorous, east-west wind that kicked up huge dust storms, scattering the fine particles of sand and dust in an almost etherial pattern. The bright streaks in the top part of the image might have formed in a slightly different way, because there is no landform standing in the wind's way. Beneath the bright surface dust are raised ridges that mark the edges of earlier lava flows from Nili Patera, a Martian 'caldera.' A caldera is a collapsed, bowl-shaped depression at the top of a volcano cone. Can you imagine how Christian Huygens would feel if he lived today and could see all of this knowledge unfold? Or how it would feel to be the first person to stand in this dark volcanic and cratered region, knowing how many discovers had paved the way to that moment? Yes, exploration lives!

  4. Perspective on IUPAP-ICWIP conferences and USA Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Herman

    2015-04-01

    Starting in 1999, the (International Union of Pure and Applied Physics) IUPAP, General Assembly, passed a resolution to form an IUPAP Working Group on Women in Physics. This lead to a number of international conferences that focused on analyzing the then current status of and progress in promoting women in physics for each country and world wide as well as sharing physics research progress and participation. I was twice a member of the USA delegation and participated in two of the last three of these conferences. I will present a perspective on the USA participation and contribution to the efforts of the conferences.

  5. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS — 75 years(Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation, 6 April 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Bolotovskii, Boris M.; Kopaev, Yurii V.; Kardashev, Nikolai S.; Zatsepin, Georgii T.; Roganova, Tat'yana M.; Masalov, Anatolii V.; Gubin, Mikhail A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.

    2009-11-01

    A Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council of the Academy of Sciences and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation was convened on 6 April 2009 to mark the 75th anniversary of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN). The following papers were read to the session: (1) Mesyats G A (P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "75 years of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS which traces back its origin to the Physics Room of Peter the Great's Kunstkamera created 225 years ago"; (2) Bolotovskii B M (Division of Theoretical Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation"; (3) Kopaev Yu V (Division of Solid State Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Toroidal states in crystals"; (4) Kardashev N S (Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Science program of the Radioastron mission"; (5) Zatsepin G T (Nuclear Research Institute RAS), Roganova T M (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, D V Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute) "Cosmic ray studies"; (6) Masalov A V (Optics Division, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Spectroscopy: from atoms to cosmic objects"; (7) Gubin M A, Velichansky V L (Division of Quantum Radiophysics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Small-size optical frequency standards"; (8) Dagkesamanskii R D (Radioastronomical Observatory in Pushchino of the Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Prospects for radioastronomical research in Pushchino". Articles written on the basis of these talks are printed in this special issue of Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 179 (11) 1145 - 1256 (2009) [English version: Phys. Usp. 52 (11) (2009] journal. • P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS: past, present, and future, G A Mesyats Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1084-1097 • Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation: its discovery and application, B M Bolotovskii Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1099-1110 • Toroidal ordering in crystals, Yu V Kopaev Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1111-1125 • Radioastron: a radio telescope many times the size of Earth. Research program, N S Kardashev Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1127-1137 • Cosmic ray investigations, G T Zatsepin, T M Roganova Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1139-1146 • Spectroscopy: from atoms to cosmic objects, A V Masalov Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1147-1152 • Laser frequency standards at the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, V L Velichansky, M A Gubin Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1153-1158 • The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow, R D Dagkesamanskii Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1159-1167

  6. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt has been traced back to an ancient Ethiopian word 'basal,' which means 'a rock from which you can obtain iron.' That must have made it a very desired material with ancient Earth civilizations long ago. Basalt is actually one of the most abundant types of rock found on Earth. Most of the volcanic islands in the ocean are made of basalt, including the large shield volcano of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which is often compared to Martian shield volcanoes. Shield volcanoes don't have high, steep, mountain-like sides, but are instead low and broad humps upon the surface. They're created when highly fluid, molten-basalt flows spread out over wide areas. Over several millennia of basaltic layering upon layering, these volcanoes can reach massive sizes like the ones seen on Mars. You can see the wrinkly texture of dark lava flows (now hard and cool) in the above image beneath the brighter dust.

  7. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    The 2013 Strangeness in Quark Matter conference took place at the University of Birmingham in July 2013, in a period of remarkably good weather that gave a very welcome boost to the event. 158 physicists from 25 countries gathered for a week of discussions on the production of strangeness and heavy flavour in heavy ion collisions. The dates for the meeting had been set two years earlier in Cracow, so as to allow it to offer the first major examination of proton-lead collisions from the Large Hadron Collider. It had originally been thought that these collisions would be recorded by the end of 2012, but in the event it turned out that the running period was postponed until January and February of 2013, giving the LHC collaborations - all four major collaborations since LHCb also took part in pPb data taking - very little time to prepare their results. Nevertheless, new results were provided, and their presentation and interpretation formed one of the highlights of the conference. In addition, there was a more detailed assessment of the RHIC beam energy scan, many new heavy flavour results from the RHIC and LHC heavy ion runs and detailed discussions of the future FAIR and NICA programmes. The conference also hosted a good cross-section of current topics in theoretical talks. In the last few years there has been much interest in thermalization and in the use of hydrodynamics to describe the fluctuations visible in higher-order flow coefficients. Discussions of both of these features were well represented, indicating the maturing of this field. We gratefully acknowledge support from The University of Birmingham, CERN, The Extreme Matter Institute (EMMI), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP), Institute of Physics Publishing and from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). This assistance allowed us to support over twenty young physicists, and allowed us to ensure that we had the breadth of programme needed for a successful conference. We thank the International Organizing Committee for their help and advice in planning the conference, and we are grateful to the University of Birmingham Conference Service and to the Birmingham Botanical Gardens for the excellent way in which the catering and room provision was provided. David Evans School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Simon Hands Department of Physics, Swansea University Roman Lietava School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Rosa Romita Oliver Lodge Laboratory, The University of Liverpool Orlando Villalobos Baillie School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Birmingham Editors

  8. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals (APERIODIC'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Uwe; McGrath, Rónán; Degtyareva, Olga; Sharma, Hem Raj

    2010-04-01

    Aperiodic Logo Aperiodic'09, the sixth International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals, took place in Liverpool 13-18 September 2009. It was the first major conference in this interdisciplinary research field held in the UK. The conference, which was organised under the auspices of the Commission on Aperiodic Crystals of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr), followed on from Aperiodic'94 (Les Diablerets, Switzerland), Aperiodic'97 (Alpe d'Huez, France), Aperiodic'2000 (Nijmegen, The Netherlands), Aperiodic'03 (Belo Horizonte, Brazil) and Aperiodic'06 (Zao, Japan). The next conference in the series will take place in Australia in 2012. The Aperiodic conference series is itself the successor to a series of Conferences on Modulated Structures, Polytypes and Quasicrystals (MOSPOQ), which were held in Marseilles (France) in 1984, Wroclaw (Poland) in 1986, Varanasi (India) in 1988 and Balatonszeplak (Hungary) in 1991. The remit of the conference covers two broad areas of research on aperiodic crystals, incommensurately modulated and composite crystals on the one hand, and quasicrystals on the other hand, sharing the property that they are aperiodically ordered solids. In addition, the conference also featured recent research on complex metal alloys, which are in fact periodically ordered solids. However, the term complex refers to their large unit cells, which may contain thousands of atoms, and as a consequence complex metal alloys share some of the properties of quasicrystalline solids. Aperiodic'09 attracted about 110 participants from across the world, including 20 UK-based scientists (the second largest group after Japan who sent 21 delegates). A particular feature of the conference series is its interdisciplinary character, and once again the range of disciplines of participants included mathematics, physics, crystallography and materials science. The programme started with three tutorial lectures on Sunday afternoon, presenting introductory overviews on quasicrystals (Eiji Abe), complex metal alloys (Alessandra Beni) and incommensurately modulated structures (Gervais Chapuis). While these were mainly aimed at younger researchers in the field, the lectures were very well attended and appreciated by the participants. The main programme ran from Monday morning until Friday lunchtime. It comprised 13 invited and 40 contributed plenary talks, and more than 40 posters, which were presented at two afternoon/evening poster sessions. The topics covered in the programme range from mathematical foundations, mathematical models, new materials, sample preparation, structure determination, physical properties and surface properties to industrial applications. Every presenter was invited to submit an article for this proceedings volume, and the 36 peer-reviewed papers in this volume present a cross-section of the range of presentations at the conference. They have been arranged into four categories, (i) quasicrystals, (ii) modulated structures, (iii) mathematical and theoretical aspects of aperiodic order, and (iv) approximants and complex phases. Prizes for best student presentations were awarded to Heinrich Orsini-Rosenberg (ETH Zurich) for his poster Tailor-made sevenfold approximants: ab-initio investigations on formation and stability and to Holger Euchner (Universität Stuttgart) for his contributed talk on Lattice dynamics in complex metallic alloys - vibrational properties of Zn11Mg2. In addition to a cash prize, Heinrich Orsini-Rosenberg received an icosahedral teapot, which was manufactured and donated by David Warrington, and Holger Euchner received a book prize. The meeting started with a welcome reception in the University's recently refurbished Victoria Gallery and Museum. A public lecture Simple sets of shapes that tile the plane but cannot ever repeat by Professor Sir Roger Penrose FRS attracted a wide audience and gave a fascinating insight into the discovery of the Penrose tiling, which is still the paradigm of aperiodic order in two dimensions and used in modelling quasicrystalline materials, some ten years before quasicrystals were first seen in experiment. The conference excursion and dinner centred on the historic waterfront area of this 800-year old city that was designated European Capital of Culture in 2008. The enjoyment of the ferry trip on the Mersey and subsequent walk to the Albert dock museums was greatly enhanced by the fine weather, which lasted throughout the entire conference week. The guests of honour at the conference dinner were Professor Sir Roger Penrose FRS and Professor Alan L Mackay FRS, bringing together two distinguished UK scientists who made seminal contributions to the subject. Besides the scientific programme, the conference also offered a presentation by the author Ann Lingard, whose latest novel The Embalmer's Book of Recipes features a mathematician working on quasicrystals at the University of Liverpool as its main character. A related EPSRC-supported workshop on Mathematical Aspects of Aperiodic Order, organised by Alex Clark, John Hunton and Uwe Grimm, was held in Leicester in the week preceding the conference, and attracted about 40 participants. It is not possible to organise a conference without the help and support of a large number of people, and we would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the support of everyone who was involved in organising and running this conference. We would like to thank the IUCr Aperiodic Commission, and in particular its chair Professor Marc de Boissieu, who not only entrusted us with hosting the event, but acted as the International Advisory Committee and provided valuable advice and guidance. We are indebted to the members of the International Programme Committee, who helped to put together an exciting programme by suggesting invited speakers and selecting presentations for contributed plenary talks. We are immensely grateful to all members of the National Organising Committee, who provided essential support during the organising stage and during the conference itself, and we would particularly like to thank the conference secretary, Mrs Angie Reid, for her excellent administrative support before, during and after the conference, and for her help in the production of this volume. We are very much indebted to out co-editors, Dr Olga Degtyareva (Edinburgh) and Dr Hem Raj Sharma (Liverpool), for their contributions to the editing of this volume. Finally, and most of all, we would like to thank all participants of the conference for coming to Liverpool, for contributing by presenting their recent work and taking part in discussions, and for creating such an enjoyable and fruitful collegiate atmosphere throughout the week. Last but not least we would like to express our gratitude for the generous financial support we received from the Open University, the University of Liverpool and the Institute of Physics (Mathematical and Theoretical Physics Group and Thin Films and Surfaces Group). The International Union of Crystallography provided financial sponsorship which was allocated to support the participation of 15 young scientists. The European Network of Excellence on Complex Metallic Alloys provided travel and subsistence support to members of participating organisations. Rónán McGrath Uwe Grimm Conference photograph

  9. Lack of Exercise of "Moderate to Vigorous" Intensity in People with Low Levels of Physical Activity Is a Major Discriminant for Sociodemographic Factors and Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Sánchez, José A.; Bello-Luján, Luis M.; Auyanet-Batista, Juan M.; Fernández-Rodríguez, María J.; González-Henríquez, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim is to examine the differences between participation at low and zero moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in relation to their t